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Sample records for adult mouse spinal

  1. Retinoic acid receptor beta2 and neurite outgrowth in the adult mouse spinal cord in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Jonathan; So, Po-Lin; Barber, Robert D; Vincent, Karen J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Maden, Malcolm

    2002-10-01

    Retinoic acid, acting through the nuclear retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2), stimulates neurite outgrowth from peripheral nervous system tissue that has the capacity to regenerate neurites, namely, embryonic and adult dorsal root ganglia. Similarly, in central nervous system tissue that can regenerate, namely, embryonic mouse spinal cord, retinoic acid also stimulates neurite outgrowth and RARbeta2 is upregulated. By contrast, in the adult mouse spinal cord, which cannot regenerate, no such upregulation of RARbeta2 by retinoic acid is observed and no neurites are extended in vitro. To test our hypothesis that the upregulation of RARbeta2 is crucial to neurite regeneration, we have transduced adult mouse or rat spinal cord in vitro with a minimal equine infectious anaemia virus vector expressing RARbeta2. After transduction, prolific neurite outgrowth occurs. Outgrowth does not occur when the cord is transduced with a different isoform of RARbeta nor does it occur following treatment with nerve growth factor. These data demonstrate that RARbeta2 is involved in neurite outgrowth, at least in vitro, and that this gene may in the future be of some therapeutic use. PMID:12235288

  2. Ex vivo infection of human embryonic spinal cord neurons prior to transplantation into adult mouse cord

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    Dénes Ádám

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically modified pseudorabies virus (Prv proved suitable for the delivery of foreign genes to rodent embryonic neurons ex vivo and maintaining foreign gene expression after transplantation into spinal cord in our earlier study. The question arose of whether human embryonic neurons, which are known to be more resistant to Prv, could also be infected with a mutant Prv. Specifically, we investigated whether a mutant Prv with deleted ribonucleotide reductase and early protein 0 genes has the potential to deliver marker genes (gfp and β-gal into human embryonic spinal cord neurons and whether the infected neurons maintain expression after transplantation into adult mouse cord. Results The results revealed that the mutant Prv effectively infected human embryonic spinal cord neurons ex vivo and the grafted cells exhibited reporter gene expression for several weeks. Grafting of infected human embryonic cells into the spinal cord of immunodeficient (rnu-/rnu- mice resulted in the infection of some of the host neurons. Discussion These results suggest that Prv is suitable for the delivery of foreign genes into transplantable human cells. This delivery method may offer a new approach to use genetically modified cells for grafting in animal models where spinal cord neuronal loss or axon degeneration occurs.

  3. Fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate and spinal mouse in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Grøndahl, Lillian; Nielsen, Jens Bo;

    2012-01-01

    that it is possible to evoke fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate mouse in vivo using L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-DOPA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5HTP) following injection of the monoaminoxiadase inhibitor Nialamide. We investigate the effects of afferent stimulation...

  4. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What are adult brain ...

  5. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life(1), this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques(1). Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections(1). PMID:27078037

  6. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells are chemoattractive and accelerate motor recovery in a mouse model of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Neirinckx, Virginie; Agirman, Gulistan; Coste, Cécile; Marquet, Alice; Dion, Valérie; Rogister, Bernard; Franzen, Rachelle; Wislet, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stem cells from adult tissues were considered for a long time as promising tools for regenerative therapy of neurological diseases, including spinal cord injuries (SCI). Indeed, mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) together constitute the bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) that were used as therapeutic options in various models of experimental SCI. However, as clinical approaches remained disappointing, we thought that reducing BMSC heterogeneity should be a...

  7. A Fab fragment directed against the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 enhances functional recovery after injury of the adult mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loers, Gabriele; Cui, Yi-Fang; Neumaier, Irmgard; Schachner, Melitta; Skerra, Arne

    2014-06-15

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery, which leads to severe disabilities in motor functions or pain. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration. In the present study, we describe the cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli cells and purification of a recombinant αL1 Fab fragment that binds to L1 with comparable activity as the function-triggering monoclonal antibody 557.B6 and induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cultured neurons, despite its monovalent function. Infusion of αL1 Fab into the lesioned spinal cord of mice enhanced functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord compression injury. αL1 Fab treatment resulted in reduced scar volume, enhanced number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons and increased linear density of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1) on motoneurons. Furthermore, the number and soma size of ChAT (choline acetyltransferase)-positive motoneurons and the linear density of ChAT-positive boutons on motoneurons as well as parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord were elevated. Stimulation of endogenous L1 by application of the αL1 Fab opens new avenues for recombinant antibody technology, offering prospects for therapeutic applications after traumatic nervous system lesions.

  8. Inhibitory zinc-enriched terminals in mouse spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, G; Jo, S M; Varea, E;

    2001-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of zinc transporter-3, glutamate decarboxylase and zinc ions in zinc-enriched terminals in the mouse spinal cord was studied by zinc transporter-3 and glutamate decarboxylase immunohistochemistry and zinc selenium autometallography, respectively.The distribution...

  9. Blood supply to the thoracolumbar spinal cord in the laboratory mouse using corrosion and dissection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesarova, Slavka; Mazensky, David; Teleky, Jana; Almasiova, Viera; Holovska, Katarina; Supuka, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mice are used frequently as experimental models in the study of ischemic spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to describe the arterial blood supply to the thoracolumbar spinal cord in the mouse. The study was carried out on 20 adult mice using the corrosion and dissection technique. Dorsal intercostal arteries were found as branches of the thoracic aorta: as 7 pairs in 80% of cases, as 8 pairs in 15% of cases and as 9 pairs in 5% of cases. The paired lumbar arteries arising from the abdominal aorta were present as 5 pairs in all cases. Along the entire thoracic and lumbar spinal regions, we observed left-sided branches entering the ventral spinal artery in 64.2% and right-sided branches in 35.8% of cases. Along the entire thoracic and lumbar spinal regions, the branches entering the dorsal spinal arteries were left-sided in 60.8% of cases and right-sided in 39.2% of cases. We found some variations in the site of origin of the artery of Adamkiewicz and in the number of dorsal spinal arteries. Documenting the anatomical variations in spinal cord blood supply in the laboratory mouse will aid the planning of future experimental studies and in determining the clinical relevance of such studies.

  10. The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal, degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse%The calcium-binding protein Mtsl/S100A4 in normal,degenerating and demyelinated spinal cord of the adult mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhengyu; XIONG Liang; HUANG Xiaolin; ZHOU Ning; Kozlova-Aldskogius Elena

    2008-01-01

    目的:研究止常、退行性病变以及脱髓鞘小鼠脊髓内Mtsl/S100A4蛋白的表达模式,及其对胶质细胞反应的影响.方法:以野生型和Mtsl/S100A4基因敲除型小鼠为试验动物,采用背根损伤、坐骨神经损伤、溴乙啶局部微量注射的方法复制退行性病变及脱髓鞘脊髓动物模型,应用免疫荧光技术,检测S100A4、GFAP、NG2、Mac1的表达情况.结果:野生型小鼠脊髓内,仅白质星型胶质细胞表达S100A4蛋白,且主要分布于Lissauer束:背根或坐骨神经损伤后,白质星形胶质细胞内的S100A4及GFAP表达上调.野生型与S100A4基因敲除小鼠GFAP表达量无显著差异;溴乙啶注射7d后,野生型小鼠脊髓脱髓鞘区域内她S100A4呈云雾状分布,胶质细胞反应局限于注射侧,并且形成清晰的胶质瘢痕,而S100A4基凶敲除小鼠则未见上述病理变化.结论:S100A4蛋白在小鼠脊髓内的表达模式与大鼠相似;退行性变的脊髓内,细胞内上调的S100A4蛋白并不影响胶质细胞的反应;脱髓鞘脊髓内,细胞外的S100A4蛋白明显影响胶质细胞反应,包括胶质瘢痕的形成.%Objective:To investigate the expression pattern of Mtsl/S100A4 in mouse spinal cord;to investigate the effects of Mtsl/S100A4 on glial cell responses.Method:The study was carried out on Mtsl/S100A4 wild type and knock-out mice.The degenerative spinal cord model was established by dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury.The de-myelinated spinal cord model was established by ethidium bromide injections.Then the expressions of S100A4,GFA P,NG2 and Mael were measured.Result:The expressions of Mtsl/S100A4 in mice spinal cord were similar to that in rats.In WT mice this protein expressed in a thin layer of fiber bundles in the tract of Lissauer,and in white matter astrocytes.There was intracellular up-regulation of Mtsl/S100A4 in white matter astrocytes of WT mice after dorsal root or sciatic nerve injury,with no difference in glial cell response

  11. Glycoconjugates Distribution during Developing Mouse Spinal Cord Motor Organizers

    OpenAIRE

    Vojoudi, Elham; Ebrahimi, Vahid; Ebrahimzadeh-Bideskan, Alireza; Fazel, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to study the distribution and changes of glycoconjugates particularly their terminal sugars by using lectin histochemistry during mouse spinal cord development. Methods: Formalin-fixed sections of mouse embryo (10-16 fetal days) were processed for lectin histochemical method. In this study, two groups of horseradish peroxidase -labeled specific lectins were used: N-acetylgalactosamine, including Dolichos biflorus, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA), ...

  12. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  13. A Neural Model of Demyelination of the Mouse Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Petreska, Biljana; Yovel, Yossi

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network model of demyelination of the mouse motor pathways, coupled to a central pattern generation (CPG) model for quadruped walking. Demyelination is the degradation of the myelin layer covering the axons which can be caused by several neurodegenerative autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We use this model - to our knowledge first of its kind - to investigate the locomotion deficits that appear following demyelination of axons in the spinal cord. Our...

  14. Decision Making Algorithm for Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongjung J; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Cheh, Gene; Cho, Samuel K; Rhim, Seung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    Adult spinal deformity (ASD) is one of the most challenging spinal disorders associated with broad range of clinical and radiological presentation. Correct selection of fusion levels in surgical planning for the management of adult spinal deformity is a complex task. Several classification systems and algorithms exist to assist surgeons in determining the appropriate levels to be instrumented. In this study, we describe our new simple decision making algorithm and selection of fusion level for ASD surgery in terms of adult idiopathic idiopathic scoliosis vs. degenerative scoliosis. PMID:27446511

  15. Complications after spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jie; Guan, Zheng; Gao, Zhen; Xiang, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Sheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Since little has been reported about complications of spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome (TCS), we sought to delineate the characteristics of the condition.A total of 4 cases of adult TCS after spinal anesthesia were reviewed. The medical charts of the patients were obtained. Anesthesia, which was combined spinal and epidural anesthesia or spinal anesthesia was performed, and follow-up were carried out in all patients.The most common neurological symptom of adult TCS before surgery was occasional severe pain in back, perineal region, or legs. Frequent micturition, diminished knee and ankle reflexes, and difficulty in bending were exhibited in partial patients. Paraesthesia of perineal region or/and lower extremities existed 2 to 3 days after spinal anesthesia in all the cases. Weakness of lower extremities existed in 1 case. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the low location of conus medullaris. At follow-up, 3 cases recovered completely within 3 weeks, and 1 case underwent permanent disability.These cases suggest anesthesiologists and surgeons alert to the association of adult TCS and spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia should be prohibited in patients with adult TCS to prevent neurological damages. PMID:27442670

  16. Characterisation of the primary afferent spinal innervation of mouse uterus

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    Geraldine eHerweijer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary afferent innervation of the uterus is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the location and characteristics of primary afferent neurons that innervate the uterine horn of mice and correlate the different morphological types of putative primary afferent nerve endings, immunoreactive to the sensory marker, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP. Using retrograde tracing, injection of 5-10µL of 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI into discrete single sites in each uterine horn revealed a biomodal distribution of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG with peak labelling occurring between T13-L3 and a second smaller peak between L6-S1. The mean cross sectional area of labelled cells was 463 µm2 +/- SEM. A significantly greater proportion of labelled neurons consisted of small cell bodies (<300 µm2 in the sacral spinal cord (S2 compared with peak labelling at the lumbar (L2 region. In both sections and whole mount preparations, immunohistochemical staining for CGRP revealed substantial innervation of the uterus by CGRP-positive nerve fibres located primarily at the border between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers (N=4. The nerve endings were classified into three distinct types: single, branching or complex, that often aligned preferentially in either the circular or longitudinal axis of the smooth muscles. Complex endings were often associated with mesenteric vessels. We have identified that the cell bodies of primary afferent neurons innervating the mouse uterus lie primarily in DRG at L2 and S1 spinal levels. Also, the greatest density of CGRP immunoreactivity lies within the myometrium, with at least three different morphological types of nerve endings identified. These findings will facilitate further investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory transduction in mouse uterus.

  17. A Surgery Protocol for Adult Zebrafish Spinal Cord Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Fang; Jin-Fei Lin; Hong-Chao Pan; Yan-Qin Shen; Melitta Schachner

    2012-01-01

    Adult zebrafish has a remarkable capability to recover from spinal cord injury,providing an excellent model for studying neuroregeneration.Here we list equipment and reagents,and give a detailed protocol for complete transection of the adult zebrafish spinal cord.In this protocol,potential problems and their solutions are described so that the zebrafish spinal cord injury model can be more easily and reproducibly performed.In addition,two assessments are introduced to monitor the success of the surgery and functional recovery:one test to assess free swimming capability and the other test to assess extent of neuroregeneration by in vivo anterograde axonal tracing.In the swimming behavior test,successful complete spinal cord transection is monitored by the inability of zebrafish to swim freely for 1 week after spinal cord injury,followed by the gradual reacquisition of full locomotor ability within 6 weeks after injury.As a morphometric correlate,anterograde axonal tracing allows the investigator to monitor the ability of regenerated axons to cross the lesion site and increasingly extend into the gray and white matter with time after injury,confirming functional recovery.This zebrafish model provides a paradigm for recovery from spinal cord injury,enabling the identification of pathways and components of neuroregeneration.

  18. Silencing neuronal mutant androgen receptor in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

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    Sahashi, Kentaro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Hung, Gene; Adachi, Hiroaki; Kondo, Naohide; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Tohnai, Genki; Iida, Madoka; Bennett, C Frank; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that affects males, results from a CAG triplet repeat/polyglutamine expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Patients develop progressive muscular weakness and atrophy, and no effective therapy is currently available. The tissue-specific pathogenesis, especially relative pathological contributions between degenerative motor neurons and muscles, remains inconclusive. Though peripheral pathology in skeletal muscle caused by toxic AR protein has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SBMA using mouse models, the role of motor neuron degeneration in SBMA has not been rigorously investigated. Here, we exploited synthetic antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit the RNA levels of mutant AR in the central nervous system (CNS) and explore its therapeutic effects in our SBMA mouse model that harbors a mutant AR gene with 97 CAG expansions and characteristic SBMA-like neurogenic phenotypes. A single intracerebroventricular administration of the antisense oligonucleotides in the presymptomatic phase efficiently suppressed the mutant gene expression in the CNS, and delayed the onset and progression of motor dysfunction, improved body weight gain and survival with the amelioration of neuronal histopathology in motor units such as spinal motor neurons, neuromuscular junctions and skeletal muscle. These findings highlight the importance of the neurotoxicity of mutant AR protein in motor neurons as a therapeutic target.

  19. Functional effect of mouse embryonic stem cell implantation after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    We transplanted mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to improve functional loss in a rat model of clip-compression spinal cord injury (SCI). The mouse embryonic stem cells were transplanted to injured cord 7 days after injury. We include minimizing the progression of secondary injury, manipulating the neuroinhibitory environment of the spinal cord, replacing lost tissue with transplanted cells and substantial improvement of motor. A number of potential approaches optimize functional recovery af...

  20. Primary monolayer culture of adult mouse hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary monolayer cultures of adult mouse hepatocytes isolated by collagenase perfusion of the liver in situ were exposed to 2 hepatotropic viruses, an avian influenza A virus adapted to grow in mouse liver in vivo and a herpes simplex type I virus. Influenza virus infection led to lysis of individual hepatocytes and total monolayer destruction within 18 to 120 hours after infection according to the virus dose used. Virus replication was evidenced by assaying hepatocyte supernates for hemagglutinin and infectivity, immunofluorescent staining and by electron microscopy. Herpes virus infection resulted in polykaryocyte formation followed by nuclear pycnosis and cell lysis. Virus replication was assayed by titration of supernate infectivity. (auth.)

  1. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk

    OpenAIRE

    Pull ter Gunne, Albert F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than typical spinal procedures. Previous research has identified risk factors for SSI in spinal surgery, but few studies have looked at adult deformity surgeries. We retrospectively performed a large case...

  2. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    OpenAIRE

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facili...

  3. A neonatal mouse spinal cord injury model for assessing post-injury adaptive plasticity and human stem cell integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Boulland

    Full Text Available Despite limited regeneration capacity, partial injuries to the adult mammalian spinal cord can elicit variable degrees of functional recovery, mediated at least in part by reorganization of neuronal circuitry. Underlying mechanisms are believed to include synaptic plasticity and collateral sprouting of spared axons. Because plasticity is higher in young animals, we developed a spinal cord compression (SCC injury model in the neonatal mouse to gain insight into the potential for reorganization during early life. The model provides a platform for high-throughput assessment of functional synaptic connectivity that is also suitable for testing the functional integration of human stem and progenitor cell-derived neurons being considered for clinical cell replacement strategies. SCC was generated at T9-T11 and functional recovery was assessed using an integrated approach including video kinematics, histology, tract tracing, electrophysiology, and high-throughput optical recording of descending inputs to identified spinal neurons. Dramatic degeneration of axons and synaptic contacts was evident within 24 hours of SCC, and loss of neurons in the injured segment was evident for at least a month thereafter. Initial hindlimb paralysis was paralleled by a loss of descending inputs to lumbar motoneurons. Within 4 days of SCC and progressively thereafter, hindlimb motility began to be restored and descending inputs reappeared, but with examples of atypical synaptic connections indicating a reorganization of circuitry. One to two weeks after SCC, hindlimb motility approached sham control levels, and weight-bearing locomotion was virtually indistinguishable in SCC and sham control mice. Genetically labeled human fetal neural progenitor cells injected into the injured spinal cord survived for at least a month, integrated into the host tissue and began to differentiate morphologically. This integrative neonatal mouse model provides opportunities to explore early

  4. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

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    Karen K Y Ling

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  5. Akhirin regulates the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in intact and injured mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhaleem, Felemban Athary M; Song, Xiaohong; Kawano, Rie; Uezono, Naohiro; Ito, Ayako; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Hossain, Mahmud; Nakashima, Kinichi; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-05-01

    Although the central nervous system is considered a comparatively static tissue with limited cell turnover, cells with stem cell properties have been isolated from most neural tissues. The spinal cord ependymal cells show neural stem cell potential in vitro and in vivo in injured spinal cord. However, very little is known regarding the ependymal niche in the mouse spinal cord. We previously reported that a secreted factor, chick Akhirin, is expressed in the ciliary marginal zone of the eye, where it works as a heterophilic cell-adhesion molecule. Here, we describe a new crucial function for mouse Akhirin (M-AKH) in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors in the mouse spinal cord. During embryonic spinal cord development, M-AKH is transiently expressed in the central canal ependymal cells, which possess latent neural stem cell properties. Targeted inactivation of the AKH gene in mice causes a reduction in the size of the spinal cord and decreases BrdU incorporation in the spinal cord. Remarkably, the expression patterns of ependymal niche molecules in AKH knockout (AKH-/-) mice are different from those of AKH+/+, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we provide evidence that AKH expression in the central canal is rapidly upregulated in the injured spinal cord. Taken together, these results indicate that M-AKH plays a crucial role in mouse spinal cord formation by regulating the ependymal niche in the central canal.

  6. MicroRNA expression in the adult mouse central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Mads; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Møller, Morten;

    2008-01-01

    distinct areas of the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS). Microarray profiling in combination with real-time RT-PCR and LNA (locked nucleic acid)-based in situ hybridization uncovered 44 miRNAs displaying more than threefold enrichment in the spinal cord, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, pons......, hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, olfactory bulb, eye, and pituitary gland. These findings suggest that a large number of mouse CNS-expressed miRNAs may be associated with specific functions within these regions. Notably, more than 50% of the identified mouse CNS-enriched miRNAs showed different expression......RNA-related gene regulatory networks in the mammalian central nervous system. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  7. Spinal metastasis of medulloblastoma in adults: A case report

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    Živković Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medulloblastoma is a primitive neuro-ectodermal malignant tumor most commonly seen in childhood and rarely and uncommonly in adult age. Treatment consists of surgery followed by radiotherapy. In the case of a relapse there is no overall accepted treatment. Tumor metastasis can be seen along the neural axis, lymph nodes, soft tissues, bones and distant organs. Case Outline. In this paper we present a 45-year-old female patient with a thoraco-spinal extramedullary metastatic medulloblastoma and progressive neurological deterioration seen 11 months after the first operation and description of magnetic resonance and intraoperative finding. Conclusion. Although rare, the presence of metastasis is a poor prognostic factor. The treatment options for patients with metastases are limited and their prognosis continues to remain poor.

  8. Isolation of a Mouse Motoneuron-Enriched Fraction from Mouse Spinal Cord on a Density Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    John Graham

    2002-01-01

    After a combined enzymic and mechanical disruption of the spinal cord tissue, the low-density motoneurons band at the interface of a 1.06-g/ml barrier through which other contaminating cells sediment.

  9. Positron emission tomography for serial imaging of the contused adult rat spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe, R.D.S.; Yu, J.; Seidel, J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Tsui, B.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Pomper, M.G.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) could be used in combination with computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques for longitudinal monitoring of the injured spinal cord. In adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6), the ninth thoracic (T9) spinal cord segment was e

  10. Aberrant LncRNA Expression Profile in a Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Ding

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs play a crucial role in cell growth, development, and various diseases related to the central nervous system. However, LncRNA differential expression profiles in spinal cord injury are yet to be reported. In this study, we profiled the expression pattern of LncRNAs using a microarray method in a contusion spinal cord injury (SCI mouse model. Compared with a spinal cord without injury, few changes in LncRNA expression levels were noted 1 day after injury. The differential changes in LncRNA expression peaked 1 week after SCI and subsequently declined until 3 weeks after injury. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was used to validate the reliability of the microarray, demonstrating that the results were reliable. Gene ontology (GO analysis indicated that differentially expressed mRNAs were involved in transport, cell adhesion, ion transport, and metabolic processes, among others. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG enrichment analysis showed that the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and focal adhesions were potentially implicated in SCI pathology. We constructed a dynamic LncRNA-mRNA network containing 264 LncRNAs and 949 mRNAs to elucidate the interactions between the LncRNAs and mRNAs. Overall, the results from this study indicate for the first time that LncRNAs are differentially expressed in a contusion SCI mouse model.

  11. Lumbar spinal mobility changes among adults with advancing age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Adamu Saidu

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : Using these data, we developed normative values of spinal mobility for each sex and age group. This study helps the clinicians to understand and correlate the restrictions of lumbar spinal mobility due to age and differentiate the limitations due to disease.

  12. Spinal mechanism of standard analgesics: evaluation using mouse models of allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Mina; Kiso, Tetsuo; Shimoshige, Yukinori; Aoki, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2010-05-25

    Spinal neurotransmission plays an important role in the perception of pain signaling. In the present study, we investigated the spinal anti-nociceptive mechanism of current standard analgesics in mouse models of tactile allodynia induced by intrathecal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and bicuculline. NMDA-induced allodynia is induced by postsynaptic NMDA receptor activation, while PGE2-induced allodynia is triggered by the enhancement of presynaptic glutamate release via EP1 receptor activation. In contrast, bicuculline induces allodynia by the blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated inhibitory system. As the clinically available analgesics, pregabalin (alpha2delta-subunit calcium channel ligand), ziconotide (N-type calcium channel blocker), mexiletine (sodium channel blocker), and duloxetine (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) were evaluated in these neurochemically-induced allodynia models. Pregabalin almost completely alleviated NMDA-, PGE2-, and bicuculline-induced allodynia. Despite being classified as an agent with a similar molecular target mechanism, ziconotide could only alleviate PGE2-induced allodynia, but not NMDA- or bicuculline-induced allodynia, as did mexiletine and duloxetine. These results taken together suggest that ziconotide, mexiletine, and duloxetine suppress spinal hyperactivity via the presynaptic site mechanism. In contrast, pregabalin could suppress via the downstream step during spinal hyperactivation such as postsynaptic NMDA activation or dysfunction of GABAergic control in addition to presynaptic mechanism. In conclusion, present findings provide implication that the spinal anti-nociceptive mechanistic site of pregabalin is different from that of ziconotide, mexiletine, and duloxetine, and pregabalin could have a broader anti-nociceptive mechanism other than N-type calcium channel blockade. PMID:20188724

  13. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

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    Olivia L Bordiuk

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ, and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain.

  14. Pulmonary function before and after anterior spinal surgery in adult idiopathic scoliosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, C. A.; Cole, A. A.; L. Watson; Webb, J K; Johnston, I. D.; Kinnear, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long term effects of anterior spinal surgery on pulmonary function in adult patients with idiopathic scoliosis. A study was therefore undertaken of pulmonary function before and after anterior spinal surgery in this group of patients. METHODS: Fourteen patients (12 women) of mean age 26.5 years (range 17-50, 10 > or = 20 years) were studied. All 14 patients underwent thoracotomy and anterior arthrodesis, and five also underwent posterior arthrodesis. Scol...

  15. Dopamine exerts activation-dependent modulation of spinal locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Jennifer M; Whelan, Patrick J

    2012-12-01

    Monoamines can modulate the output of a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate networks, including the spinal cord networks that control walking. Here we examined the multiple changes in the output of locomotor networks induced by dopamine (DA). We found that DA can depress the activation of locomotor networks in the neonatal mouse spinal cord following ventral root stimulation. By examining disinhibited rhythms, where the Renshaw cell pathway was blocked, we found that DA depresses a putative recurrent excitatory pathway that projects onto rhythm-generating circuitry of the spinal cord. This depression was D(2) but not D(1) receptor dependent and was not due exclusively to depression of excitatory drive to motoneurons. Furthermore, the depression in excitation was not dependent on network activity. We next compared the modulatory effects of DA on network function by focusing on a serotonin and a N-methyl-dl-aspartate-evoked rhythm. In contrast to the depressive effects on a ventral root-evoked rhythm, we found that DA stabilized a drug-evoked rhythm, reduced the frequency of bursting, and increased amplitude. Overall, these data demonstrate that DA can potentiate network activity while at the same time reducing the gain of recurrent excitatory feedback loops from motoneurons onto the network.

  16. Repair of acutely injured spinal cord through constructing tissue-engineered neural complex in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Yu; GUO Qing-shan; WANG Ai-min; WU Si-yu; XING Shu-xing; ZHANG Zhong-rong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To construct tissue-engineered neural complex in vitro and study its effect in repairing acutely injured spinal cord in adult rats. Methods: Neural stem cells were harvested from the spinal cord of embryo rats and propagated in vitro. Then the neural stem cells were seeded into polyglycolic acid scaffolds and co-cultured with extract of embryonic spinal cord in vitro. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and scanning electron microscope were used to observe the microstructure of this complex. Animal model of spine semi-transection was made and tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted by surgical intervention. Six weeks after transplantation, functional evaluation and histochemistry were applied to evaluate the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction. Results: The tissue-engineered neural complex had a distinct structure, which contained neonatal neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. After tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted into the injured spinal cord, the cell components such as neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, could survive and keep on developing. The adult rats suffering from spinal cord injury got an obvious neurological recovery in motor skills. Conclusions: The tissue-engineered neural complex appears to have therapeutic effects on the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction of the adult rats with spinal cord injury.

  17. The late and dual origin of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracca, Yanina L; Sartoretti, Maria Micaela; Di Bella, Daniela J; Marin-Burgin, Antonia; Carcagno, Abel L; Schinder, Alejandro F; Lanuza, Guillermo M

    2016-03-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that control the production of specialized neuronal types. However, how the timing of differentiation contributes to neuronal diversity in the developing spinal cord is still a pending question. In this study, we show that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs), an anatomically discrete cell type of the ependymal area, originate from surprisingly late neurogenic events in the ventral spinal cord. CSF-cNs are identified by the expression of the transcription factors Gata2 and Gata3, and the ionic channels Pkd2l1 and Pkd1l2. Contrasting with Gata2/3(+) V2b interneurons, differentiation of CSF-cNs is independent of Foxn4 and takes place during advanced developmental stages previously assumed to be exclusively gliogenic. CSF-cNs are produced from two distinct dorsoventral regions of the mouse spinal cord. Most CSF-cNs derive from progenitors circumscribed to the late-p2 and the oligodendrogenic (pOL) domains, whereas a second subset of CSF-cNs arises from cells bordering the floor plate. The development of these two subgroups of CSF-cNs is differentially controlled by Pax6, they adopt separate locations around the postnatal central canal and they display electrophysiological differences. Our results highlight that spatiotemporal mechanisms are instrumental in creating neural cell diversity in the ventral spinal cord to produce distinct classes of interneurons, motoneurons, CSF-cNs, glial cells and ependymal cells. PMID:26839365

  18. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  19. Functional expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in spinal motoneurons of the adult turtle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Canto-Bustos

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV channels are transmembrane proteins comprising three subfamilies named CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3. The CaV3 channel subfamily groups the low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels (LVA or T-type a significant role in regulating neuronal excitability. CaV3 channel activity may lead to the generation of complex patterns of action potential firing such as the postinhibitory rebound (PIR. In the adult spinal cord, these channels have been found in dorsal horn interneurons where they control physiological events near the resting potential and participate in determining excitability. In motoneurons, CaV3 channels have been found during development, but their functional expression has not yet been reported in adult animals. Here, we show evidence for the presence of CaV3 channel-mediated PIR in motoneurons of the adult turtle spinal cord. Our results indicate that Ni2+ and NNC55-0396, two antagonists of CaV3 channel activity, inhibited PIR in the adult turtle spinal cord. Molecular biology and biochemical assays revealed the expression of the CaV3.1 channel isotype and its localization in motoneurons. Together, these results provide evidence for the expression of CaV3.1 channels in the spinal cord of adult animals and show also that these channels may contribute to determine the excitability of motoneurons.

  20. Clinical features of adult spinal muscular atrophy:46 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun He; Ping Zhang; Guanghui Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a kind of degenerative disease of nervous system. There are 4 types in clinic, especially types Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ are common, and the researches on those 3 types are relative mature. Type Ⅳ is a kind of adult spinal muscular atrophy (ASMA), which has low incidence rate and is often misdiagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, cervical syndrome, or others.OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical features of 46 ASMA patients and analyze the relationship between course and activity of daily living.DESIGN: Case analysis.SETTING: Departments of Neurology of the 81 Hospital of Chinese PLA, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical College and General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 46 ASMA patients were selected from the Departments of Neurology of the 81Hospital of Chinese PLA, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical College and General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between April 1998 and January 2002. All patients were consentient. Among 46 cases, there were 37 males and 9 females with the mean age of 42 years. The patients' courses in all ranged from 6 months to 23 years, concretely, courses of 37 cases were less than or equal to 5 years, and those of 9 cases were more than or equal to 6 years.METHODS : ① All the 46 ASMA patients were asked to check blood sedimentation, anti O, serum creatinine,creatine, blood creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and muscular biopsy as early as possible. ② X-ray was used to measure plain film of cervical vertebra borderline film of cranium and neck at proximal end of upper limb of 25 cases and plain film of abdominal vertebra at proximal end of lower limb of 17 cases.③ Cerebrospinal fluid of lumbar puncture was checked on 42 cases, for routine examination, biochemical examination, and immunoglobulin examination. Electromyogram (EMG) was also examined to 42 cases. ④ Barthel index

  1. Shenfu injection attenuates neurotoxicity of bupivacaine in cultured mouse spinal cord neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Li-ze; WANG Qiang; LIU Mu-yun; PENG Ye; LI Qing-bo; LU Zhi-hong; LEI Chong

    2007-01-01

    Background Our previous in vivo study in the rat demonstrates that Shenfu injection, a clinically used extract preparation from Chinese herbs, attenuates neural and cardiac toxicity induced by intravenous infusion of bupivacaine, a local anesthetic. This study was designed to investigate whether bupivacaine could induce a toxic effect in primary cultured mouse spinal cord neuron and if so, whether the Shenfu injection had a similar neuroprotective effect in the cell model. Methods The spinal cords from 11- to 14-day-old fetal mice were minced and incubated. Cytarabine was added into the medium to inhibit the proliferation of non-neuronal cells. The immunocytochemical staining of β-tubulin was used to determine the identity of cultured cells. The cultured neurons were randomly assigned into three sets treated with various doses of bupivacaine, Shenfu and bupivacaine+Shenfu, for 48 hours respectively. Cell viability in each group was analyzed by methyl thiazoleterazolium (MTT) assay. Results The viability of the cultured neurons treated with bupivacaine at concentrations of 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.04% and 0.08% was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Although the Shenfu injection at concentrations ranging from 1/50 to 1/12.5 (V/V) had no significant influence on the viability of cultured neurons (P<0.05 vs control), the injection significantly increased the cellular viability of cultured neurons pretreated with 0.03% bupivacaine (P<0.05). Conclusion Although Shenfu injection itself has no effect on spinal neurons, it was able to reduce the bupivacaine induced neurotoxicity in vitro.

  2. A Comprehensive Atlas of the Adult Mouse Penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany R; Wright, David K; Gradie, Paul E; Johnston, Leigh A; Pask, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Mice are routinely used to study the development of the external genitalia and, in particular, the process of male urethral closure. This is because misplacement of the male penile urethra, or hypospadias, is amongst the most common birth defects reported in humans. While mice present a tractable model to study penile development, several structures differ between mice and humans, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on their annotation and developmental origins. Defining the ontology of the mouse prepuce is especially important for the relevance and interpretation of mouse models of hypospadias to human conditions. We have developed a detailed annotation of the adult mouse penis that addresses these differences and enables an accurate comparison of murine and human hypospadias phenotypes. Through MRI data, gross morphology and section histology, we define the origin of the mouse external and internal prepuces, their relationship to the single human foreskin as well as provide a comprehensive view of the various structures of the mouse penis and their associated muscle attachments within the body. These data are combined to annotate structures in a novel 3D adult penis atlas that can be downloaded, viewed at any angle, and manipulated to examine the relationship of various structures.

  3. EXCITATORY CONNECTIONS BETWEEN SPINAL MOTONEURONS IN THE ADULT RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. Dendro-dendritic and dendro-somatic projections are common between spinal motoneurons. We attempted to clarify whether there are functional connections through these projections.Methods. Motoneurons were antidromically stimulated by the muscle nerve and recorded intracellularly to examine the direct interaction between them, after the related dorsal roots had been cut.Results. Excitatory connections, demonstrated by depolarizing potentials in response to muscle nerve stimulation, were found between motoneurons innervating the same muscle or synergistic muscles, but never between motoneurons innervating antagonistic muscles. These potentials were finely graded in response to a series of increasing stimuli and resistant to high frequency (50Hz) stimulation.Conclusions.These results indicate that excitatory connections, with certain specificity of spatial and temporal distribution, occur in the spinal motoneurons. It is also suggested that electrical coupling should be involved in these connections and this mechanism should improve the excitability of the motoneurons in the same column.

  4. Reduced inflammation accompanies diminished myelin damage and repair in the NG2 null mouse spinal cord

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    Kucharova Karolina

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a demyelinating disease in which blood-derived immune cells and activated microglia damage myelin in the central nervous system. While oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs are essential for generating oligodendrocytes for myelin repair, other cell types also participate in the damage and repair processes. The NG2 proteoglycan is expressed by OPCs, pericytes, and macrophages/microglia. In this report we investigate the effects of NG2 on these cell types during spinal cord demyelination/remyelination. Methods Demyelinated lesions were created by microinjecting 1% lysolecithin into the lumbar spinal cord. Following demyelination, NG2 expression patterns in wild type mice were studied via immunostaining. Immunolabeling was also used in wild type and NG2 null mice to compare the extent of myelin damage, the kinetics of myelin repair, and the respective responses of OPCs, pericytes, and macrophages/microglia. Cell proliferation was quantified by studies of BrdU incorporation, and cytokine expression levels were evaluated using qRT-PCR. Results The initial volume of spinal cord demyelination in wild type mice is twice as large as in NG2 null mice. However, over the ensuing 5 weeks there is a 6-fold improvement in myelination in wild type mice, versus only a 2-fold improvement in NG2 null mice. NG2 ablation also results in reduced numbers of each of the three affected cell types. BrdU incorporation studies reveal that reduced cell proliferation is an important factor underlying NG2-dependent decreases in each of the three key cell populations. In addition, NG2 ablation reduces macrophage/microglial cell migration and shifts cytokine expression from a pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conclusions Loss of NG2 expression leads to decreased proliferation of OPCs, pericytes, and macrophages/microglia, reducing the abundance of all three cell types in demyelinated spinal cord lesions. As a result

  5. Extensive neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cell grafts in adult rat spinal cord.

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    Jun Yan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective treatments for degenerative and traumatic diseases of the nervous system are not currently available. The support or replacement of injured neurons with neural grafts, already an established approach in experimental therapeutics, has been recently invigorated with the addition of neural and embryonic stem-derived precursors as inexhaustible, self-propagating alternatives to fetal tissues. The adult spinal cord, i.e., the site of common devastating injuries and motor neuron disease, has been an especially challenging target for stem cell therapies. In most cases, neural stem cell (NSC transplants have shown either poor differentiation or a preferential choice of glial lineages. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present investigation, we grafted NSCs from human fetal spinal cord grown in monolayer into the lumbar cord of normal or injured adult nude rats and observed large-scale differentiation of these cells into neurons that formed axons and synapses and established extensive contacts with host motor neurons. Spinal cord microenvironment appeared to influence fate choice, with centrally located cells taking on a predominant neuronal path, and cells located under the pia membrane persisting as NSCs or presenting with astrocytic phenotypes. Slightly fewer than one-tenth of grafted neurons differentiated into oligodendrocytes. The presence of lesions increased the frequency of astrocytic phenotypes in the white matter. CONCLUSIONS: NSC grafts can show substantial neuronal differentiation in the normal and injured adult spinal cord with good potential of integration into host neural circuits. In view of recent similar findings from other laboratories, the extent of neuronal differentiation observed here disputes the notion of a spinal cord that is constitutively unfavorable to neuronal repair. Restoration of spinal cord circuitry in traumatic and degenerative diseases may be more realistic than previously thought, although major

  6. Novel mouse model of spinal cord injury-induced heterotopic ossification

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    Heejae Kang, BA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic ossification (HO develops in about 20% to 30% of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI and significantly impairs their rehabilitation. There is no effective prevention or treatment for this condition at this time. Our current understanding of its etiology and pathophysiology is limited partially due to the lack of clinically relevant animal models. In this study, we report a novel mouse model of SCI-induced HO by administering a subthreshold dose of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2 to muscles in mice after SCI. Microcomputed tomography scanning showed that an intramuscular injection of 0.25 micrograms of BMP-2 causes significant HO in mice with SCI but not in control (sham surgery mice. Our analysis of gene expression showed significantly increased BMP signaling in quadriceps following SCI, suggesting that BMP signaling may play a role in SCI-induced HO. Administering 0.25 micrograms of BMP-2 to the front arms of the mice with SCI also results in the development of significant HO but not in control mice. This suggests that SCI causes a systematic osteogenic effect, which is not limited to paralyzed limbs. This novel mouse model will serve as a powerful tool in exploring the molecular mechanisms of SCI-induced HO, which may lead to novel treatment for this disease.

  7. Role of minimally invasive surgery for adult spinal deformity in preventing complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chun-Po; Mosley, Yusef I; Uribe, Juan S

    2016-09-01

    With the aging population, there is a rising prevalence of degenerative spinal deformity and need of surgical care for these patients. Surgical treatment for adult spinal deformity (ASD) is often fraught with a high rate of complications. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has for the past decade been adopted by spine surgeons to treat ASD in the hopes of reducing access-related morbidity and perioperative complications. The benefits of MIS approach in general and recent development of MIS techniques to avoid long-term complications such as pseudoarthrosis or proximal junctional kyphosis are reviewed. PMID:27411527

  8. Differentiation of endogenous neural precursors following spinal cord injury in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Zhao; Hua Han; Shuanke Wang; Bingren Gao; Zhengyi Sun

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Studies have shown that cell death can activate proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and promote newly generated cells to migrate to a lesion site.OBJECTIVE:To observe regeneration and differentiation of neural cells following spinal cord injury in adult rats and to quantitatively analyze the newly differentiated cells.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A cell biology experiment was performed at the Institute of Orthopedics and Medical Experimental Center,Lanzhou University.between August 2005 and October 2007.MATERIALS:Fifty adult,Wistar rats of both sexes;5-bromodeoxyuridine(BrdU,Sigma,USA);antibodies against neuron-specific enolase,glial fibrillary acidic protein,and myelin basic protein(Chemicon,USA).METHODS:Twenty-five rats were assigned to the spinal cord injury group and received a spinal cord contusion injury.Materials were obtained at day 1,3,7,15,and 29 after injury,with 5 rats for each time point.Twenty-five rats were sham-treated by removing the lamina of the vertebral arch without performing a contusion.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The phenotype of BrdU-labeled cells,i.e.,expression and distribution of surface markers for neurons(neuron-specific enolase),astrocytes(glial fibrillary acidic protein),and oligodendrocytes(myelin basic protein),were identified with immunofluorescence double-labeling.Confocal microscopy was used to detect double-labeled cells by immunofluorescence.Quantitative analysis of newly generated cells was performed with stereological counting methods.RESULTS:There was significant cell production and differentiation after adult rat spinal cord injury.The quantity of newly-generated BrdU-labeled cells in the spinal cord lesion was 75-fold greater than in the corresponding area of control animals.Endogenous neural precursor cells differentiated into astrocytes and oligodendrocytes,however spontaneous neuronal difierentiation was not detected.Between 7 and 29 d after spinal cord injury,newly generated cells expressed increasingly more

  9. The change of T-wave on electrocardiogram after epinephrine test dose in spinal anesthetized adults

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Deokyu; Choi, Hyun Ho; Kim, Dong Chan

    2010-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the efficacy of a T-wave change after the IV administration of low dose epinephrine containing the test dose during spinal anesthesia. Methods Eighty healthy adults undergoing spinal anesthesia were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided randomly into the following 4 groups: Group S (n = 20) received 3 ml of normal saline, group L (n = 20) received 3 ml of 1.0% lidocaine, group E5 received 3 ml of 1.0% lidocaine with epinephrine 5 µg, and group E10 r...

  10. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C.; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M.; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W.; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P.; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of gene...

  11. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord

    CERN Document Server

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spadon, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Defaults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal systems is a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with neither contrast agent nor a destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is a crucial tool for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries. In particular, it s...

  12. Differential expression of Wnts after spinal cord contusion injury in adult rats.

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    Carmen María Fernández-Martos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability that has no clinically accepted treatment. Functional decline following spinal cord injury is caused by mechanical damage, secondary cell death, reactive gliosis and a poor regenerative capacity of damaged axons. Wnt proteins are a family of secreted glycoproteins that play key roles in different developmental processes although little is known of the expression patterns and functions of Wnts in the adult central nervous system in normal or diseased states. FINDINGS: Using qRT-PCR analysis, we demonstrate that mRNA encoding most Wnt ligands and soluble inhibitors are constitutively expressed in the healthy adult spinal cord. Strikingly, contusion spinal cord injury induced a time-dependent increase in Wnt mRNA expression from 6 hours until 28 days post-injury, and a narrow peak in the expression of soluble Wnt inhibitors between 1 and 3 days post-injury. These results are consistent with the increase in the migration shift, from day 1 to 7, of the intracellular Wnt signalling component, Dishevelled-3. Moreover, after an initial decrease by 1 day, we also found an increase in phosphorylation of the Wnt co-receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, and an increase in active β-catenin protein, both of which suffer a dramatic change, from a homogeneous expression pattern in the grey matter to a disorganized injury-induced pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a role for Wnts in spinal cord homeostasis and injury. We demonstrate that after injury Wnt signalling is activated via the Wnt/β-catenin and possibly other pathways. These findings provide an important foundation to further address the function of individual Wnt proteins in vivo and the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury.

  13. Vascularized peripheral nerve trunk autografted in the spinal cord: a new experimental model in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of vascularized peripheral nerve trunk autografted in spinal cord. Methods: With modern microsurgical technique,vascularized peripheral median and ulnar nerve trunk autografted in the upper thoracic region of the spinal cord were established in 20 female adult rats. The origin and the termination of axons in the graft were studied by retrograde neuronal labeling with horseradish peroxidase (HRP).Cord, nerve grafts and some normal median and ulnar nerves in the right upper limb were removed and sectioned for Bielschowsky's silver stain and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. Light and electron microscopic examination and electrophysiological examination were applied.Results: The grafts were innervated by many new fibers. Studies with HRP indicated that new axons in graft were originated from intrinsic central nervous system (CNS) neurons with their cell bodies from brain stem to sacral segments of spinal cord. Other axons arose from dorsal root ganglia at the level of graft and at least 19 distal segments to them. Together with electron microscopy, electrophysiological examination, silver and H&E stain, the results demonstrated that vascularized peripheral nerve trunk grafted in spinal cord attracted many neurons to grow into the nerve grafts.Conclusions: The findings implicate that CNS is able to regenerate much better in vascularized nerve autografted in spinal cord.

  14. Characterization of Proliferating Neural Progenitors after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Zebrafish.

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    Subhra Prakash Hui

    Full Text Available Zebrafish can repair their injured brain and spinal cord after injury unlike adult mammalian central nervous system. Any injury to zebrafish spinal cord would lead to increased proliferation and neurogenesis. There are presences of proliferating progenitors from which both neuronal and glial loss can be reversed by appropriately generating new neurons and glia. We have demonstrated the presence of multiple progenitors, which are different types of proliferating populations like Sox2+ neural progenitor, A2B5+ astrocyte/ glial progenitor, NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor, radial glia and Schwann cell like progenitor. We analyzed the expression levels of two common markers of dedifferentiation like msx-b and vimentin during regeneration along with some of the pluripotency associated factors to explore the possible role of these two processes. Among the several key factors related to pluripotency, pou5f1 and sox2 are upregulated during regeneration and associated with activation of neural progenitor cells. Uncovering the molecular mechanism for endogenous regeneration of adult zebrafish spinal cord would give us more clues on important targets for future therapeutic approach in mammalian spinal cord repair and regeneration.

  15. Abundance of gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in adult Mosquitofish spinal cord neurons

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    Jose L Serrano-Velez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dye-coupling, whole-mount immunohistochemistry for gap junction channel protein connexin 35 (Cx35, and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL reveal an abundance of electrical synapses/gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in the 14th spinal segment that innervates the adult male gonopodium of Western Mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis (Mosquitofish.To study gap junctions’ role in fast motor behavior, we used a minimally-invasive neural-tract-tracing technique to introduce gap junction-permeant or -impermeant dyes into deep muscles controlling the gonopodium of the adult male Mosquitofish, a teleost fish that rapidly transfers (complete in 50 of the 62 gap junctions at mixed synapses are in the 14th spinal segment.Our results support and extend studies showing gap junctions at mixed synapses in spinal cord segments involved in control of genital reflexes in rodents, and they suggest a link between mixed synapses and fast motor behavior. The findings provide a basis for studies of specific roles of spinal neurons in the generation/regulation of sex-specific behavior and for studies of gap junctions’ role in regulating fast motor behavior. Finally, the CoPA IN provides a novel candidate neuron for future studies of gap junctions and neural control of fast motor behaviors.

  16. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis of the SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification and Confounding Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallager, Dennis Winge; Hansen, Lars Valentin; Dragsted, Casper Rokkjær;

    2016-01-01

    confounding variables. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification includes sagittal modifiers considered important for HRQOL and the clinical impact of the classification has been validated in patients from the International Spine Study Group database; however, equivocal...... results were reported for the Pelvic Tilt modifier and potential confounding variables were not evaluated. METHODS: Between March 2013 and May 2014, all adult spinal deformity patients from our outpatient clinic with sufficient radiographs were prospectively enrolled. Analyses of HRQOL variance and post...... with multivariate proportional odds regressions. P values were adjusted for multiple testing. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-two of 460 eligible patients were included for analyses. The SRS-Schwab Classification significantly discriminated HRQOL scores between normal and abnormal sagittal modifier classifications...

  18. Characterisation of Transcriptional Changes in the Spinal Cord of the Progressive Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Biozzi ABH Mouse Model by RNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David; Selwood, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating immune-mediated neurological disorder affecting young adults. MS is primarily relapsing-remitting, but neurodegeneration and disability accumulate from disease onset. The most commonly used mouse MS models exhibit a monophasic immune response with fast accumulation of neurological damage that does not allow the study of progressive neurodegeneration. The chronic relapsing and secondary progressive EAE (pEAE) Biozzi ABH mouse model of MS exhibits a reproducible relapsing-remitting disease course that slowly accumulates permanent neurological deficit and develops a post-relapsing progressive disease that permits the study of demyelination and neurodegeneration. RNA sequencing (RNAseq) was used to explore global gene expression in the pEAE Biozzi ABH mouse. Spinal cord tissue RNA from pEAE Biozzi ABH mice and healthy age-matched controls was sequenced. 2,072 genes were differentially expressed (q<0.05) from which 1,397 were significantly upregulated and 675 were significantly downregulated. This hypothesis-free investigation characterised the genomic changes that describe the pEAE mouse model. The differentially expressed genes revealed a persistent immunoreactant phenotype, combined with downregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis superpathway and the LXR/RXR activation pathway. Genes differentially expressed include the myelination genes Slc17a7, Ugt8A and Opalin, the neuroprotective genes Sprr1A, Osm and Wisp2, as well as genes identified as MS risk factors, including RGs14 and Scap2. Novel genes with unestablished roles in EAE or MS were also identified. The identification of differentially expressed novel genes and genes involved in MS pathology, opens the door to their functional study in the pEAE mouse model which recapitulates some of the important clinical features of progressive MS. PMID:27355629

  19. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  20. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  1. Severe neuromuscular denervation of clinically relevant muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Karen K Y; Gibbs, Rebecca M; Feng, Zhihua; Ko, Chien-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a motoneuron disease caused by a deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, is characterized by motoneuron loss and muscle weakness. It remains unclear whether widespread loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) is involved in SMA pathogenesis. We undertook a systematic examination of NMJ innervation patterns in >20 muscles in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. We found that severe denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) occurs selectively in many vulnerable axial muscles and several appendicular muscles at the disease end stage. Since these vulnerable muscles were located throughout the body and were comprised of varying muscle fiber types, it is unlikely that muscle location or fiber type determines susceptibility to denervation. Furthermore, we found a similar extent of neurofilament accumulation at NMJs in both vulnerable and resistant muscles before the onset of denervation, suggesting that neurofilament accumulation does not predict subsequent NMJ denervation. Since vulnerable muscles were initially innervated, but later denervated, loss of innervation in SMA may be attributed to defects in synapse maintenance. Finally, we found that denervation was amendable by trichostatin A (TSA) treatment, which increased innervation in clinically relevant muscles in TSA-treated SMNΔ7 mice. Our findings suggest that neuromuscular denervation in vulnerable muscles is a widespread pathology in SMA, and can serve as a preparation for elucidating the biological basis of synapse loss, and for evaluating therapeutic efficacy.

  2. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  3. Posterior spinal decompression, stabilization and arthrodesis in Nigerian adults: Profile and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O E Idowu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The availability of intraoperative fluoroscopy and improved access to varieties of spinal titanium implants has revived posterior spinal stabilization techniques with their distinct advantages. Our aim is to describe the profile of various spine pathologies requiring subaxial posterior spinal decompression, stabilization (using titanium implants, and arthrodesis, and to determine the rate of postoperative complications and factors affecting outcome. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective single institution study of consecutive adult patients seen during the study period. Data collected included the patients′ demographics, radiological findings, indication for surgery, surgical procedure, operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative complications. Results: There were 26 patients (15 males and 11 females. Their ages ranged between 24 and 78 years (median = 42 years. The most common indications for surgery were spinal trauma and degenerative spine disease (24 patients. The region that was most commonly stabilized was the lumbar- 12 cases (46.2%. No patients experienced neural or vascular injury as a result of screw position; likewise no patient had screw loosening. There was a case each of superficial surgical site infection and transient cerebrospinal fluid leak but no case of implant failure was encountered. The outcome was significantly associated with the etiology (0.030 of the indication for surgery and preoperative power grade (0.000. Conclusion: Spinal trauma and degenerative spine disease are the two most common indications for posterior spinal decompression, stabilization and fusion in our center. It is associated with acceptable postoperative complication rate when done under fluoroscopic guidance. Outcome is related more to the preoperative neurological deficit and etiology of the indication for surgical stabilization.

  4. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic appendectomy in adults: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh S Mane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is one of the most common surgical procedures and is the procedure of choice for most of the elective abdominal surgeries performed preferably under endotracheal general anesthesia. Technical advances in the field of laparoscopy have helped to reduce surgical trauma and discomfort, reduce anesthetic requirement resulting in shortened hospital stay. Recently, regional anaesthetic techniques have been found beneficial, especially in patients at a high risk to receive general anesthesia. Herewith we present a case series of laparoscopic appendectomy in eight American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA I and II patients performed under spinal-epidural anaesthesia. Methods: Eight ASA Grade I and II adult patients undergoing elective Laparoscopic appendectomy received Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia. Spinal Anaesthesia was performed at L 2 -L 3 interspace using 2 ml of 0.5% (10 mg hyperbaric Bupivacaine mixed with 0.5ml (25 micrograms of Fentanyl. Epidural catheter was inserted at T 10 -T 11 interspace for inadequate spinal anaesthesia and postoperative pain relief. Perioperative events and operative difficulty were studied. Systemic drugs were administered if patients complained of shoulder pain, abdominal discomfort, nausea or hypotension. Results: Spinal anaesthesia was adequate for surgery with no operative difficulty in all the patients. Intraoperatively, two patients experienced right shoulder pain and received Fentanyl, one patient was given Midazolam for anxiety and two were given Ephedrine for hypotension. The postoperative period was uneventful. Conclusion: Spinal anaesthesia with Hyperbaric Bupivacaine and Fentanyl is adequate and safe for elective laparoscopic appendectomy in healthy patients but careful evaluation of the method is needed particularly in compromised cardio respiratory conditions.

  5. Motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry may involve in modulation of nociception: a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study in spinally transected transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Ye

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that motor cortex stimulation provided pain relief by motor cortex plasticity and activating descending inhibitory pain control systems. Recent evidence indicated that the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R in the periaqueductal gray played an important role in neuropathic pain. This study was designed to assess whether MC4R signaling existed in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry modulated the activity of sympathetic pathway by a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study. Pseudorabies virus (PRV-614 was injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle in adult male MC4R-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice (n = 15. After a survival time of 4-6 days, the mice (n = 5 were randomly assigned to humanely sacrifice, and spinal cords and brains were removed and sectioned, and processed for PRV-614 visualization. Neurons involved in the efferent control of the left gastrocnemius muscle were identified following visualization of PRV-614 retrograde tracing. The neurochemical phenotype of MC4R-GFP-positive neurons was identified using fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling. PRV-614/MC4R-GFP dual labeled neurons were detected in spinal IML, periaqueductal gray and motor cortex. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may participate in the modulation of the melanocortin-sympathetic signaling and contribute to the descending modulation of nociceptive transmission, suggesting that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may modulate the activity of sympathetic outflow sensitive to nociceptive signals.

  6. Dissection of complex adult traits in a mouse synthetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, David T; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Chen, Shu; West, Joshua L; Wilkowski, Jodi M; Goldstein, Steven A; Miller, Richard A; Galecki, Andrzej T

    2012-08-01

    Finding the causative genetic variations that underlie complex adult traits is a significant experimental challenge. The unbiased search strategy of genome-wide association (GWAS) has been used extensively in recent human population studies. These efforts, however, typically find only a minor fraction of the genetic loci that are predicted to affect variation. As an experimental model for the analysis of adult polygenic traits, we measured a mouse population for multiple phenotypes and conducted a genome-wide search for effector loci. Complex adult phenotypes, related to body size and bone structure, were measured as component phenotypes, and each subphenotype was associated with a genomic spectrum of candidate effector loci. The strategy successfully detected several loci for the phenotypes, at genome-wide significance, using a single, modest-sized population (N = 505). The effector loci each explain 2%-10% of the measured trait variation and, taken together, the loci can account for over 25% of a trait's total population variation. A replicate population (N = 378) was used to confirm initially observed loci for one trait (femur length), and, when the two groups were merged, the combined population demonstrated increased power to detect loci. In contrast to human population studies, our mouse genome-wide searches find loci that individually explain a larger fraction of the observed variation. Also, the additive effects of our detected mouse loci more closely match the predicted genetic component of variation. The genetic loci discovered are logical candidates for components of the genetic networks having evolutionary conservation with human biology. PMID:22588897

  7. Spinal metastasis of medulloblastoma in adults: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Živković Nenad; Berisavac Iva; Marković Marko; Milenković Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medulloblastoma is a primitive neuro-ectodermal malignant tumor most commonly seen in childhood and rarely and uncommonly in adult age. Treatment consists of surgery followed by radiotherapy. In the case of a relapse there is no overall accepted treatment. Tumor metastasis can be seen along the neural axis, lymph nodes, soft tissues, bones and distant organs. Case Outline. In this paper we present a 45-year-old female patient with a thoraco-sp...

  8. Cervical Spinal Cord Atrophy Profile in Adult SMN1-Linked SMA.

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    Mohamed-Mounir El Mendili

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the topography of motor deficits in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA remain unknown. We investigated the profile of spinal cord atrophy (SCA in SMN1-linked SMA, and its correlation with the topography of muscle weakness.Eighteen SMN1-linked SMA patients type III/V and 18 age/gender-matched healthy volunteers were included. Patients were scored on manual muscle testing and functional scales. Spinal cord was imaged using 3T MRI system. Radial distance (RD and cord cross-sectional area (CSA measurements in SMA patients were compared to those in controls and correlated with strength and disability scores.CSA measurements revealed a significant cord atrophy gradient mainly located between C3 and C6 vertebral levels with a SCA rate ranging from 5.4% to 23% in SMA patients compared to controls. RD was significantly lower in SMA patients compared to controls in the anterior-posterior direction with a maximum along C4 and C5 vertebral levels (p-values < 10-5. There were no correlations between atrophy measurements, strength and disability scores.Spinal cord atrophy in adult SMN1-linked SMA predominates in the segments innervating the proximal muscles. Additional factors such as neuromuscular junction or intrinsic skeletal muscle defects may play a role in more complex mechanisms underlying weakness in these patients.

  9. Expression and role of PAK6 after spinal cord injury in adult rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Xiang-dong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To observe p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6 expression and its possible role after spinal cord injury (SCI in adult rat. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to spinal cord injury. To explore the pathological and physiological significance of PAK6, the expression patterns and distribution of PAK6 were observed by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results: Western blot analysis showed PAK6 protein level was significantly up-regulated on day 2 and day 4, then reduced and had no up-regulation till day 14. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the expression of PAK6 was significantly increased on day 4 compared with the control group. Besides, double immunofluorescence staining showed PAK6 was primarily expressed in the neurons and astrocytes in the control group. While after injury, the expression of PAK6 was increased significantly in the astrocytes and neurons, and the astrocytes were largely proliferated. We also examined the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and found its change was correlated with the expression of PAK6. Importantly, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cell proliferation evaluated by PCNA appeared in many PAK6-expressing cells on day 4 after injury. Conclusion: The up-regulation of PAK6 in the injured spinal cord may be associated with glial proliferation. Key words: PAK6 protein, human; p21-activated kinases; Spinal cord injury; Astrocytes

  10. Influence of cryopreserved olfactory ensheathing cells transplantation on axonal regeneration in spinal cord of adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈慧勇; 殷德振; 唐勇; 吴燕峰; 程志安; 杨睿; 黄霖

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of cryopreserved olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) transplantation on axonal regeneration and functional recovery following spinal cord injury in adult rats.Methods: Twenty-four rats were divided into experimental and control groups, each group having 12 rats. The spinal cord injury was established by transecting the spinal cord at T10 level with microsurgery scissors.OECs were purified from SD rat olfactory bulb and cultured in DMEM ( Dulbecco's minimum essential medium) and cryopreserved (-120℃) for two weeks.OECs suspension[(1-1.4)×105/ul] was transplanted into transected spinal cord, while the DMEM solution was injected instead in the control group. At 6 and 12 weeks after transplantation, the rats were evaluated with climbing test and MEP ( moter evoked potentials) monitoring. The samples of spinal cord were procured and studied with histological and immunohisto chemical stainings.Results: At 6 weeks after transplantation, all of the rats in both transplanted and control groups were paraplegic, and MEPs could not be recorded. Morphology of transplanted OECs was normal, and OECs were interfused with host well. Axons could regrow into gap tissue between the spinal cords. Both OECs and regrown axons were immunoreactive for MBP. No regrown axons were found in the control group. At 12 weeks after transplantation, 2 rats (2/7) had lower extremities muscle contraction, 2 rats (2/7) had hip and/or knee active movement, and MEP of 5 rats (5/7) could be recorded in the calf in the transplantation group. None of the rats (7/ 7) in the control group had functional improvement, and none had MEPs recorded. In the transplanted group,histological and immunohistochemical methods showed the number of transplanted OECs reduced and some regrown axons had reached the end of transected spinal cord.However, no regrown axons could be seen except scar formation in the control group.Conclusions: Cryopreserved OECs could integrated with the host and

  11. Influences of olfactory ensheathing cells transplantation on axonal regeneration in spinal cord of adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈慧勇; 唐勇; 吴燕峰; 陈燕涛; 程志安

    2002-01-01

    To observe whether olfactory ensheathing cells could be used to promote axonal regeneration in a spontaneously nonregenerating system. Methods: After laminectomy at the lower thoracic level, the spinal cords of adult rats were exposed and completely transected at T10. A suspension of ensheathing cells was injected into the lesion site in 12 adult rats, and control D/F-12 (1∶1 mixture of DMEM and Hams F-12) was injected in 12 adult rats. Six weeks and ten weeks after cell transplantation, the rats were evaluated by climbing test and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) monitoring. The samples were procured and studied with histologicl and immunohistochemical methods. Results: At the 6th week after cell transplantation, all the rats in both the transplanted and control groups were paraplegic and the MEPs could not be recorded. At the 10th week after cell transplantation, of 7 rats in the control group, 2 rats had muscles contraction of the lower extremities, 2 rats had hips and/or knees active movement; and 5 rats MEPs could be recorded in the hind limbs in the transplanted group (n=7). None of the rats in the control group had functional improvement and no MEPs recorded (n=7). Numerous regenerating axons were observed through the transplantation and continued to regenerate into the denervated host tract. Cell labelling using anti-Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) and anti-Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (anti-NGFR) indicated that the regenerated axons were derived from the appropriate neuronal source and that donor cells migrated into the denervated host tract. But axonal degeneration existed and regenerating axons were not observed within the spinal cords of the adult rats with only D/F-12 injection. Conclusions: The axonal regeneration in the transected adult rat spinal cord is possible after ensheathing cells transplantation.

  12. Delayed post-traumatic spinal cord infarction in an adult after minor head and neck trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartanusz Viktor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Delayed post-traumatic spinal cord infarction is a devastating complication described in children. In adults, spinal cord ischemia after cardiovascular interventions, scoliosis correction, or profound hypotension has been reported in the literature. However, delayed spinal cord infarction after minor head trauma has not been described yet. Case presentation We report the case of a 45-year-old Hispanic man who had a minor head trauma. He was admitted to our hospital because of paresthesias in his hands and neck pain. A radiological workup showed cervical spinal canal stenosis and chronic cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Twelve hours after admission, our patient became unresponsive and, despite full resuscitation efforts, died. The autopsy revealed spinal cord necrosis involving the entire cervical spinal cord and upper thoracic region. Conclusions This case illustrates the extreme fragility of spinal cord hemodynamics in patients with chronic cervical spinal canal stenosis, in which any further perturbations, such as cervical hyperflexion related to a minor head injury, can have catastrophic consequences. Furthermore, the delayed onset of spinal cord infarction in this case shows that meticulous maintenance of blood pressure in the acute post-traumatic period is of paramount importance, even in patients with minimal post-traumatic symptoms.

  13. Differential Apoptosis Radiosensitivity of Neural Progenitors in Adult Mouse Hippocampus

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    Yu-Qing Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian tissue-specific stem cells and progenitors demonstrate differential DNA damage response. Neural progenitors in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are known to undergo apoptosis after irradiation. Using a mouse model of hippocampal neuronal development, we characterized the apoptosis sensitivity of the different neural progenitor subpopulations in adult mouse dentate gyrus after irradiation. Two different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms were used for cell fate mapping. We identified two apoptosis sensitive neural progenitor subpopulations after irradiation. The first represented non-proliferative and non-newborn neuroblasts and immature neurons that expressed doublecortin, calretinin or both. The second consisted of proliferative intermediate neural progenitors. The putative radial glia-like neural stem cells or type-1 cells, regardless of proliferation status, were apoptosis resistant after irradiation. There was no evidence of radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of the Trp53 (p53 gene but absence of Cdkn1a (p21 did not alter the apoptotic response. Upregulation of nuclear p53 was observed in neuroblasts after irradiation. We conclude that adult hippocampal neural progenitors may demonstrate differential p53-dependent apoptosis sensitivity after irradiation.

  14. Impact of spine surgery complications on costs associated with management of adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeramaneni, Samrat; Robinson, Chessie; Hostin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of the consequences of spine surgery complications is warranted to optimize patient-reported outcomes and contain the rising health care costs associated with the management of adult spinal deformity (ASD). We systematically searched PubMed and Scopus databases using keywords "adult spinal deformity surgery," "complications," and "cost" for published studies on costs of complications associated with spinal surgery, with a particular emphasis on ASD and scoliosis. In the 17 articles reviewed, we identified 355,354 patients with 11,148 reported complications. Infection was the most commonly reported complication, with an average treatment cost ranging from $15,817 to $38,701. Hospital costs for patients with deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, and surgical site infection were 2.3 to 3.1 times greater than for patients without those complications. An effort to collect and characterize data on cost of complications is encouraged, which may help health care providers to identify potential resources to limit complications and overall costs. PMID:27278531

  15. Changes in Synapses and Axons Demonstrated by Synaptophysin Immunohistochemistry Following Spinal Cord Compression Trauma in the Rat and Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI-LIN LI; MOHAMMAD FAROOQUE; JONAS ISAKSSON; YNGVE OLSSON

    2004-01-01

    and methods To evaluate synaptic changes using synaptophysin immunohistochemstry in rat and mouse, which spinal cords were subjected to graded compression trauma at the level of Th8-9. Results Normal animals showed numerous fine dots of synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the gray matter. An increase in synaptophysin immunoreactivity was observed in the neuropil and synapses at the surface of motor neurons of the anterior horns in the Th8-9 segments lost immunoreactivity at 4-hour point after trauma. The immunoreactive synapses reappeared around motor neurons at 9-day point. Unexpected accumulation of synaptophysin immunoreactivity occurred in injured axons of the white matter of the compressed spinal cord. Conclusion Synaptic changes were important components of secondary injuries in spinal cord trauma. Loss of synapses on motor neurons may be one of the factors causing motor dysfunction of hind limbs and formation of new synapses may play an important role in recovery of motor function. Synaptophysin immunohistochemistry is also a good tool for studies of axonal swellings in spinal cord injuries.

  16. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development

  17. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Carol F., E-mail: carol-webb@omrf.org [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ratliff, Michelle L., E-mail: michelle-ratliff@omrf.org [Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Powell, Rebecca, E-mail: rebeccapowell@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R., E-mail: celeste-wirsig@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Lakiza, Olga, E-mail: olga-lakiza@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Obara, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoko-obara@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Experts \\ Spinal Cord Injury 101 Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... in countries outside the US ? A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed to ...

  19. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  20. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  1. Insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 administration ameliorates disease manifestations in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-12-06

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1-treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease.

  2. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangansewinkel, Tim; Geurts, Nathalie; Quanten, Kirsten; Nelissen, Sofie; Lemmens, Stefanie; Geboes, Lies; Dooley, Dearbhaile; Vidal, Pia M; Pejler, Gunnar; Hendrix, Sven

    2016-05-01

    An important barrier for axon regeneration and recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is attributed to the scar that is formed at the lesion site. Here, we investigated the effect of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP) 6, a mast cell (MC)-specific tryptase, on scarring and functional recovery after a spinal cord hemisection injury. Functional recovery was significantly impaired in both MC-deficient and mMCP6-knockout (mMCP6(-/-)) mice after SCI compared with wild-type control mice. This decrease in locomotor performance was associated with an increased lesion size and excessive scarring at the injury site. Axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and the extracellular matrix components fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV were significantly up-regulated in MC-deficient and mMCP6(-/-) mice, with an increase in scar volume between 23 and 32%. A degradation assay revealed that mMCP6 directly cleaves fibronectin and collagen IV in vitro In addition, gene expression levels of the scar components fibronectin, aggrecan, and collagen IV were increased up to 6.8-fold in mMCP6(-/-) mice in the subacute phase after injury. These data indicate that endogenous mMCP6 has scar-suppressing properties after SCI via indirect cleavage of axon growth-inhibitory scar components and alteration of the gene expression profile of these factors.-Vangansewinkel, T., Geurts, N., Quanten, K., Nelissen, S., Lemmens, S., Geboes, L., Dooley, D., Vidal, P. M., Pejler, G., Hendrix, S. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

  3. Abnormal growth of the corticospinal axons into the lumbar spinal cord of the hyt/hyt mouse with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jung-Yu C; Stein, Stuart A; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2008-11-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency may cause severe neurological disorders resulting from developmental deficits of the central nervous system. The mutant hyt/hyt mouse, characterized by fetal-onset, life-long hypothyroidism resulting from a point mutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor of the thyroid gland, displays a variety of abnormalities in motor behavior that are likely associated with dysfunctions of specific brain regions and a defective corticospinal tract (CST). To test the hypothesis that fetal and neonatal hypothyroidism cause abnormal CST development, the growth of the CST was investigated in hypothyroid hyt/hyt mice and their euthyroid progenitors, the BALB/cByJ mice. Anterograde labeling with biotinylated dextran amine demonstrated a decrease in the number of CST axons in the hyt/hyt mouse at the first lumbar level at postnatal day (P) 10. After retrograde tracing with fast blue (FB), fewer FB-labeled neurons were found in the motor cortex, the red nucleus, and the lateral vestibular nucleus of the hyt/hyt mouse. At the fourth lumbar level, the hyt/hyt mouse also showed smaller CST cross-sectional areas and significantly lower numbers of unmyelinated axons, myelinated axons, and growth cones within the CST during postnatal development. At P10, the hyt/hyt mouse demonstrated significantly lower immunoreactivity of embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule in the CST at the seventh cervical level, whereas the expression of growth-associated protein 43 remained unchanged. Our study demonstrated an abnormal development of the CST in the hyt/hyt mouse, manifested by reduced axon quantity and retarded growth pattern at the lumbar spinal cord. PMID:18543337

  4. Distribution and densitometry mapping of L1-CAM Immunoreactivity in the adult mouse brain – light microscopic observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasaki Hironobu

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of L1 expression in the matured brain is suggested by physiological and behavioral studies showing that L1 is related to hippocampal plasticity and fear conditioning. The distribution of L1 in mouse brain might provide a basis for understanding its role in the brain. Results We examined the overall distribution of L1 in the adult mouse brain by immunohistochemistry using two polyclonal antibodies against different epitopes for L1. Immunoreactive L1 was widely but unevenly distributed from the olfactory bulb to the upper cervical cord. The accumulation of immunoreactive L1 was greatest in a non-neuronal element of the major fibre bundles, i.e. the lateral olfactory tract, olfactory and temporal limb of the anterior commissure, corpus callosum, stria terminalis, globus pallidus, fornix, mammillothalamic tract, solitary tract, and spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve. High to highest levels of non-neuronal and neuronal L1 were found in the grey matter; i.e. the piriform and entorhinal cortices, hypothalamus, reticular part of the substantia nigra, periaqueductal grey, trigeminal spinal nucleus etc. High to moderate density of neuronal L1 was found in the olfactory bulb, layer V of the cerebral cortex, amygdala, pontine grey, superior colliculi, cerebellar cortex, solitary tract nucleus etc. Only low to lowest levels of neuronal L1 were found in the hippocampus, grey matter in the caudate-putamen, thalamus, cerebellar nuclei etc. Conclusion L1 is widely and unevenly distributed in the matured mouse brain, where immunoreactivity was present not only in neuronal elements; axons, synapses and cell soma, but also in non-neuronal elements.

  5. Does social support impact depression in caregivers of adults ageing with spinal cord injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodakowski, Juleen; Skidmore, Elizabeth R.; Rogers, Joan C.; Schulz, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the role of social support in predicting depression in caregivers of adults aging with spinal cord injuries (SCI). Design Cross-sectional secondary data analyses were conducted for this study. Setting Participants were recruited from multiple community locations in Pittsburgh, PA and Miami, FL. Subjects Community-dwelling caregivers of aging adults with SCI (N=173) were interviewed as part of a multisite randomized clinical trial. Main measures The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale measured caregiver depression symptom levels. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis examined the effect of social support (social integration, received social support, and negative social interactions) on depressive symptoms levels for the caregivers of adults aging with SCI, controlling for demographic characteristics and caregiving characteristics. Results Caregivers were, on average, 53 years old (SD=15) and care-recipients were 55 years old (SD=13). Average Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores indicated that sixty-nine (40%) caregivers had significant depressive symptoms (mean 8.69, SD=5.5). Negative social interactions (β̂ =.27, P<.01) and social integration (β̂ =−.25, P<.01) were significant independent predictors of depressive symptom levels in caregivers of adults aging with SCI. Conclusions Findings demonstrate that negative social interactions and social integration are associated with burden in caregivers of adults aging with SCI. Negative social interactions and social integration should be investigated in assessments and interventions intended to target caregiver depressive symptom levels. PMID:23117350

  6. Liquid chromatography-electrospray linear ion trap mass spectrometry analysis of targeted neuropeptides in Tac1(-/-) mouse spinal cords reveals significant lower concentration of opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Mouna; Beaudry, Francis

    2015-08-01

    Tachykinin and opioid peptides play a central role in pain transmission, modulation and inhibition. The treatment of pain is very important in medicine and many studies using NK1 receptor antagonists failed to show significant analgesic effects in humans. Recent investigations suggest that both pronociceptive tachykinins and the analgesic opioid systems are important for normal pain sensation. The analysis of opioid peptides in Tac1(-/-) spinal cord tissues offers a great opportunity to verify the influence of the tachykinin system on specific opioid peptides. The objectives of this study were to develop an HPLC-MS/MRM assay to quantify targeted peptides in spinal cord tissues. Secondly, we wanted to verify if the Tac1(-/-) mouse endogenous opioid system is hampered and therefore affects significantly the pain modulatory pathways. Targeted neuropeptides were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography linear ion trap mass spectrometry. Our results reveal that EM-2, Leu-Enk and Dyn A were down-regulated in Tac1(-/-) spinal cord tissues. Interestingly, Dyn A was almost 3 fold down-regulated (p<0.0001). No significant concentration differences were observed in mouse Tac1(-/-) spinal cords for Met-Enk and CGRP. The analysis of Tac1(-/-) mouse spinal cords revealed noteworthy decreases of EM-2, Leu-Enk and Dyn A concentrations which strongly suggest a significant impact on the endogenous pain-relieving mechanisms. These observations may have insightful impact on future analgesic drug developments and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Calcium Imaging of Living Astrocytes in the Mouse Spinal Cord following Sensory Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cirillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytic Ca2+ dynamics have been extensively studied in ex vivo models; however, the recent development of two-photon microscopy and astrocyte-specific labeling has allowed the study of Ca2+ signaling in living central nervous system. Ca2+ waves in astrocytes have been described in cultured cells and slice preparations, but evidence for astrocytic activation during sensory activity is lacking. There are currently few methods to image living spinal cord: breathing and heart-beating artifacts have impeded the widespread application of this technique. We here imaged the living spinal cord by two-photon microscopy in C57BL6/J mice. Through pressurized injection, we specifically loaded spinal astrocytes using the red fluorescent dye sulforhodamine 101 (SR101 and imaged astrocytic Ca2+ levels with Oregon-Green BAPTA-1 (OGB. Then, we studied astrocytic Ca2+ levels at rest and after right electrical hind paw stimulation. Sensory stimulation significantly increased astrocytic Ca2+ levels within the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord compared to rest. In conclusion, in vivo morphofunctional imaging of living astrocytes in spinal cord revealed that astrocytes actively participate to sensory stimulation.

  8. Chandelier and interfascicular neurons in the adult mouse piriform cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A Larriva-Sahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure of two neuron types native to the adult mouse piriform cortex (PC is described. The first cell, termed an interfascicular neuron (IFN, lies between the axon fascicles of layer I. The IFN axon divides dichotomously and daughter fibrils run horizontally in the domain of layer Ia. The frequent apposition of the IFN axon to distal denrites of the underlying pyramidal cells suggests an en passage synaptic interaction with them. A second neuron observed in layer II, or less frequently in layer III, matched in most respects the structure of the chandelier cell described elsewhere in the neo- and archi-cortex. In the PC, chandelier cells (PC-CC display the following peculiarities. First, the PC-CC axonal field distributes in the neuropil of layers II and III and candlesticks are in close apposition to the initial axonal segment of the pyramidal cell, although somatic interactions cannot be rule out. Second, the PC-CC ascending dendrites pierce layer I, receiving short collaterals and boutons en passage from the olfactory axons therein. The possible role of IFN´s and PC-CC and their interactions with the adjacent cells is discussed in the broad context of the cellular organization of the PC.

  9. Malignant ventricular arrhythmia in a case of adult onset of spinal muscular atrophy (Kugelberg-Welander disease).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, M.; Sarkozy, A.; Chierchia, G.B.; Wilde, P.C.M. de; Schmedding, E.; Brugada, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient with adult onset of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The patient first came to our attention with atrioventricular (AV) block. A dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD-PM) was implanted. Four years later, the PM data log showed occurrence of frequent episodes of no

  10. The transformation of synaptic to system plasticity in motor output from the sacral cord of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mingchen C; Elbasiouny, Sherif M; Collins, William F; Heckman, C J

    2015-09-01

    Synaptic plasticity is fundamental in shaping the output of neural networks. The transformation of synaptic plasticity at the cellular level into plasticity at the system level involves multiple factors, including behavior of local networks of interneurons. Here we investigate the synaptic to system transformation for plasticity in motor output in an in vitro preparation of the adult mouse spinal cord. System plasticity was assessed from compound action potentials (APs) in spinal ventral roots, which were generated simultaneously by the axons of many motoneurons (MNs). Synaptic plasticity was assessed from intracellular recordings of MNs. A computer model of the MN pool was used to identify the middle steps in the transformation from synaptic to system behavior. Two input systems that converge on the same MN pool were studied: one sensory and one descending. The two synaptic input systems generated very different motor outputs, with sensory stimulation consistently evoking short-term depression (STD) whereas descending stimulation had bimodal plasticity: STD at low frequencies but short-term facilitation (STF) at high frequencies. Intracellular and pharmacological studies revealed contributions from monosynaptic excitation and stimulus time-locked inhibition but also considerable asynchronous excitation sustained from local network activity. The computer simulations showed that STD in the monosynaptic excitatory input was the primary driver of the system STD in the sensory input whereas network excitation underlies the bimodal plasticity in the descending system. These results provide insight on the roles of plasticity in the monosynaptic and polysynaptic inputs converging on the same MN pool to overall motor plasticity.

  11. Serotonin differentially modulates the intrinsic properties of spinal motoneurons from the adult turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Jean-François; Cotel, Florence

    2008-01-01

    This report considers serotonergic (5-HT) effects on spinal motoneurons, reviewing previous data and presenting a new study showing distinct effects of two 5-HT receptor subtypes. We previously investigated the effects of 5-HT on motoneurons in a slice preparation from the spinal cord of the adult turtle. In agreement with previous studies, we had found that 5-HT applied to the extracellular medium promoted a voltage sensitive plateau potential. However, we also reported that this effect was only observed in half of the motoneurons; 5-HT inhibited the firing of the other half of the motoneurons recorded from. To investigate the reasons for this, we applied 5-HT focally by means of the microiontophoresis technique. Facilitation of plateau potentials was observed when 5-HT was released at sites throughout the somatodendritic region. However, motoneurons were inhibited by 5-HT when selectively applied in the perisomatic region. These two effects could be induced in the same motoneuron. With pharmacological tools, we demonstrate here that the facilitation of plateau potentials is mediated by 5-HT2 receptors and the inhibitory effect is due to the activation of 5-HT1A/7 receptors. PMID:18096602

  12. [Macrophages promote the migration of neural stem cells into mouse spinal cord injury site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhijian; Zhu, Wen; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the role of macrophages in the migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo and in vitro . Methods NSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were isolated from GFP transgenic mice and the immunofluorescence cytochemical staining of nestin was used to identify NSCs. After spinal cord injury was induced, the tissue level of macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA was detected using quantitative real time PCR. The migration of GFP-NSCs was investigated 1 week after GFP-NSCs were injected into both sides of the damaged area. The effect of macrophage on the migration of NSCs in vitro was tested by Transwell(TM) system and the content of MCP-1 was detected by ELISA. Results NSCs highly expressed nestin. Compared with the control group, the level of MCP-1 mRNA significantly increased in the spinal cord injury group. The NSCs which were injected into the spinal cord migrated into the center of the injured site where F4/80 was highly expressed. Macrophages significantly increased the number of migrating NSCs in vitro and the secretion of MCP-1. Conclusion Macrophages induce NSC migrating into the spinal cord injury site possibly through promoting the secretion of MCP-1. PMID:27609570

  13. Establishment of leptin-Responsive cell lines from adult mouse hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Iwakura, Hiroshi; Dote, Katsuko; Bando, Mika; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-01-01

    Leptin resistance is considered to be the primary cause of obesity. However, the cause of leptin resistance remains incompletely understood, and there is currently no cure for the leptin-resistant state. In order to identify novel drug-target molecules that could overcome leptin resistance, it would be useful to develop in vitro assay systems for evaluating leptin resistance. In this study, we established immortalized adult mouse hypothalamus-derived cell lines, termed adult mouse hypothalamu...

  14. Establishment of Leptin-Responsive Cell Lines from Adult Mouse Hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Iwakura; Katsuko Dote; Mika Bando; Hiroyuki Koyama; Kiminori Hosoda; Kenji Kangawa; Kazuwa Nakao

    2016-01-01

    Leptin resistance is considered to be the primary cause of obesity. However, the cause of leptin resistance remains incompletely understood, and there is currently no cure for the leptin-resistant state. In order to identify novel drug-target molecules that could overcome leptin resistance, it would be useful to develop in vitro assay systems for evaluating leptin resistance. In this study, we established immortalized adult mouse hypothalamus-derived cell lines, termed adult mouse hypothalamu...

  15. Spinal shape analysis in 1,020 healthy young adults aged from 19 to 30 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Krejčí

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of studies on diseased spine have been published; however, there is a relative paucity of studies investigating spine shape characteristics in healthy populations. Such characteristics are needed for diagnostics of spine disorders and assessment of changes in the spinal shape that may have been caused by influence of the modern life style or intensive sport activity. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine characteristics of the spine shape in a large sample of healthy young adults. Methods: Population cross-sectional study. A non-radiographic surface method (system DTP-3 was used for the assessment of spine shape in the sagittal and frontal planes. A total of 1,020 participants (440 men, 580 women took part in the study, their mean (± SD age was 21.8 ± 1.9 years (range 19.1-29.7 for men and 21.9 ± 1.8 years (range 19.3-29.7 for women. All data were checked for normality and are presented as means, standard deviations, ranges, skewness, and kurtosis. Differences between the sexes were assessed with the two-sample t-test. Results: The average sagittal spinal shape was C3 - 12.9° - C7 - 43.0° - T10 - 27.1° - L5 for men and C3 - 12.1° - C6 - 44.5° - T11 - 34.1° - L5 for women. Men showed a significantly smaller thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis curvatures than women. The average curvature due to the lateral deviation in the frontal plane was 6.1° for both sexes, the curvature was larger than 10° in 9.1% of men and 8.8% of women. We found left lateral deviation in 72.5% of men and in 63.6% of women. Conclusions: The study provides characteristics of the spine shape in a large sample of healthy young adults. Such characteristics should be part and parcel of determining the cut-off level for physiological spinal shape. Based on the results of the study, we suggest a lateral deviation of 10° as the maximum for a curvature to be still considered non-pathological.

  16. Regional genome transcriptional response of adult mouse brain to hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Aigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since normal brain function depends upon continuous oxygen delivery and short periods of hypoxia can precondition the brain against subsequent ischemia, this study examined the effects of brief hypoxia on the whole genome transcriptional response in adult mouse brain. Result Pronounced changes of gene expression occurred after 3 hours of hypoxia (8% O2 and after 1 hour of re-oxygenation in all brain regions. The hypoxia-responsive genes were predominantly up-regulated in hindbrain and predominantly down-regulated in forebrain - possibly to support hindbrain survival functions at the expense of forebrain cognitive functions. The up-regulated genes had a significant role in cell survival and involved both shared and unshared signaling pathways among different brain regions. Up-regulation of transcriptional signaling including hypoxia inducible factor, insulin growth factor (IGF, the vitamin D3 receptor/retinoid X nuclear receptor, and glucocorticoid signaling was common to many brain regions. However, many of the hypoxia-regulated target genes were specific for one or a few brain regions. Cerebellum, for example, had 1241 transcripts regulated by hypoxia only in cerebellum but not in hippocampus; and, 642 (54% had at least one hepatic nuclear receptor 4A (HNF4A binding site and 381 had at least two HNF4A binding sites in their promoters. The data point to HNF4A as a major hypoxia-responsive transcription factor in cerebellum in addition to its known role in regulating erythropoietin transcription. The genes unique to hindbrain may play critical roles in survival during hypoxia. Conclusion Differences of forebrain and hindbrain hypoxia-responsive genes may relate to suppression of forebrain cognitive functions and activation of hindbrain survival functions, which may coordinately mediate the neuroprotection afforded by hypoxia preconditioning.

  17. Lentivector-mediated SMN replacement in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Le, Thanh; Ralph, G. Scott; Walmsley, Lucy; Monani, Umrao R.; Lee, Debbie C P; Wilkes, Fraser; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Mazarakis, Nicholas D.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent recessive autosomal disorder. It is caused by mutations or deletion of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene, leading to depletion in SMN protein levels. The treatment rationale for SMA is to halt or delay the degeneration of motor neurons, but to date there are no effective drug treatments for this disease. We have previously demonstrated that pseudotyping of the nonprimate equine infectious anemia virus (using the lentivector ...

  18. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than ty

  19. Ephrin-B3 decreases the survival of adult rat spinal cord-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro and after transplantation into the injured rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin Yan Susan; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2013-02-01

    Although transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPC) encourages regeneration and repair after spinal cord injury (SCI), the survival of transplanted NSPC is limited. Ephrin-B3 has been shown to reduce the death of endogenous NSPC in the subventricular zone of the mouse brain without inducing uncontrolled proliferation. Due to similarities in the environment of the brain and spinal cord, we hypothesized that ephrin-B3 might reduce the death of both transplanted and endogenous spinal cord-derived NSPC. Both normal and injured (26 g clip compression) spinal cords were examined. Ephrin-B3-Fc was tested, and Fc fragments and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. We found that EphA4 receptors were expressed by spinal cord-derived NSPC and expressed in the normal and injured rat spinal cord (higher expression in the latter). In vitro, ephrin-B3-Fc did not significantly reduce the survival of NSPC except at 1 μg/mL (Pinjured spinal cord compared with the infusion of PBS (Pinjured spinal cord, the infusion of either ephrin-B3-Fc or Fc fragments alone caused a 20-fold reduction in the survival of transplanted NSPC (P<0.001). Thus, after SCI, ephrin-B3-Fc and Fc fragments are toxic to transplanted NSPC.

  20. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrosky, Brian M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari L.; Fenton, Laura Z. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using 18F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in patients

  2. Bone marrow stromal cells elicit tissue sparing after acute but not delayed transplantation into the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tewarie, R.D.; Hurtado, A.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Wendell, D.F.; Barroso, M.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted into the contused spinal cord may support repair by improving tissue sparing. We injected allogeneic BMSC into the moderately contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord at 15 min (acute) and at 3, 7, and 21 days (delayed) post-injury and quantified tissue s

  3. A prospective evaluation of a pressure ulcer prevention and management E-Learning Program for adults with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Jacalyn A; Schubart, Jane R

    2010-08-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Pressure ulcer education programs for spinal cord injured individuals have been found to have a positive effect on care protocol adherence. A prospective study was conducted among hospitalized spinal cord-injured men and women to determine if viewing the Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Management Education for Adults with Spinal Cord Injury: E-Learning Program affects their knowledge scores. A 20-question multiple-choice pre-/post learning test was developed and validated by 12 rehabilitation nurses. Twenty (20) patients (13 men, seven women; mean age 49 years, [SD: 18.26] with injuries to the cervical [seven], thoracic [six], and lumbar [six] regions) volunteered. Most (42%) had completed high school and time since SCI ranged from 2 weeks to 27 years. Eighteen (18) participants completed both the pre- and post test. Of those, 16 showed improvement in pressure ulcer knowledge scores. The median scores improved from 65 (range 25 to 100) pre-program to 92.5 (range 75 to 100) post-program. Descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze the data. The results suggest that a single viewing of this e-learning program could improve pressure ulcer knowledge of hospitalized adults with SCI. Research to ascertain the effects of this and other educational programs on pressure ulcer rates is needed. PMID:20729562

  4. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome. PMID:27595822

  5. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of a small-molecule SMN2 splicing modifier in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K. Y.; Mollin, Anna; Sheedy, Josephine; Yeh, Shirley; Petruska, Janet; Narasimhan, Jana; Dakka, Amal; Welch, Ellen M.; Karp, Gary; Chen, Karen S.; Metzger, Friedrich; Ratni, Hasane; Lotti, Francesco; Tisdale, Sarah; Naryshkin, Nikolai A.; Pellizzoni, Livio; Paushkin, Sergey; Ko, Chien-Ping; Weetall, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by the loss or mutation of both copies of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The related SMN2 gene is retained, but due to alternative splicing of exon 7, produces insufficient levels of the SMN protein. Here, we systematically characterize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics properties of the SMN splicing modifier SMN-C1. SMN-C1 is a low-molecular weight compound that promotes the inclusion of exon 7 and increases production of SMN protein in human cells and in two transgenic mouse models of SMA. Furthermore, increases in SMN protein levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skin correlate with those in the central nervous system (CNS), indicating that a change of these levels in blood or skin can be used as a non-invasive surrogate to monitor increases of SMN protein levels in the CNS. Consistent with restored SMN function, SMN-C1 treatment increases the levels of spliceosomal and U7 small-nuclear RNAs and corrects RNA processing defects induced by SMN deficiency in the spinal cord of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. A 100% or greater increase in SMN protein in the CNS of SMNΔ7 SMA mice robustly improves the phenotype. Importantly, a ∼50% increase in SMN leads to long-term survival, but the SMA phenotype is only partially corrected, indicating that certain SMA disease manifestations may respond to treatment at lower doses. Overall, we provide important insights for the translation of pre-clinical data to the clinic and further therapeutic development of this series of molecules for SMA treatment. PMID:26931466

  6. Combining Adult Learning Theory with Occupational Therapy Intervention for Bladder and Bowel Management after Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Gina; Bell, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Bladder and bowel management is an important goal of rehabilitation for clients with spinal cord injury. Dependence is these areas have been linked to a variety of secondary complications, including decreased quality of life, urinary tract infections and pressure ulcers (Hammell, 2010; Hicken et al, 2001). Occupational therapists have been identified as important members of the health care team in spinal cord injury rehabilitation; however, specific roles and interventions have not been clearly described. This case report will describe occupational therapy interventions embedded with principles of adult learning theory to address bladder and bowel management with an adult client who sustained an incomplete thoracic level spinal cord injury. PMID:26694910

  7. The Effects of Cyclosporin-A on Functional Outcome and Axonal Regrowth Following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdollah Delaviz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the immunophilin ligands have the special advantage in spinal cord repair. In this study, the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA on functional recovery and histological outcome were evaluated following spinal cord injury in rats. After spinal cord hemisection in thirty six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (200- 250 g, treatment groups received CsA (2.5 mg/kg i.p. at 15min and 24h after lesion (CsA 15min group and CsA 24h group daily, for 8 weeks. Control and sham groups received normal saline and in sham operated animals the spinal cord was exposed in the same manner as treatment groups, but was not hemisected. Hindlimb motor function was assessed in 1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks after lesion, using locomotive rating scale developed by Basso, Bresnahan and Beattie (BBB. Motor neurons were counted within the lamina IX of ventral horn and lesion size was measured in 5 mm of spinal lumbar segment with the epicenter of the lesion site. The mean number of motor neurons and the mean BBB scale in 3, 5 and 7 weeks in CsA 15min groups significantly increased compared to the control group. Although, the lesion size reduced in rats with CsA treatment compared to the control group, no significant difference was observed. Thus, it can be concluded that CsA can improve locomotor function and histological outcome in the partial spinal cord injury.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Inst. Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City (Mexico)); Rivera, F. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico)); Babinski, E. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico)); Berlanga, E. (Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico)); Madrazo, M. (Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico)); Franco-Bourland, R. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Biochemistry, Inst. Nacional de la Nutricion, Mexico City (Mexico)); Grijalva, I. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo

    1994-08-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  9. Alteration of forebrain neurogenesis after cervical spinal cord injury in the adult rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Solenne eFELIX

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI triggers a complex cellular response at the injury site, leading to the formation of a dense scar tissue. Despite this local tissue remodeling, the consequences of SCI at the cellular level in distant rostral sites (i.e. brain, remain unknown. In this study, we asked whether cervical SCI could alter cell dynamics in neurogenic areas of the adult rat forebrain. To this aim, we quantified BrdU incorporation and determined the phenotypes of newly generated cells (neurons, astrocytes, or microglia during the subchronic and chronic phases of injury. We find that subchronic SCI leads to a reduction of BrdU incorporation and neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. By contrast, subchronic SCI triggers an increased BrdU incorporation in the dorsal vagal complex of the hindbrain, where most of the newly generated cells are identified as microglia. In chronic condition 90 days after SCI, BrdU incorporation returns to control levels in all regions examined, except in the hippocampus, where SCI produces a long-term reduction of neurogenesis, indicating that this structure is particularly sensitive to SCI. Finally, we observe that SCI triggers an acute inflammatory response in all brain regions examined, as well as a hippocampal-specific decline in BDNF levels, which could explain the SCI-mediated distant effects on forebrain neurogenesis. This study provides the first demonstration that forebrain neurogenesis is vulnerable to a distal SCI.

  10. The effect of July admission on inpatient morbidity and mortality after adult spinal deformity surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Passias, Peter G.; Schwab, Frank J.; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have suggested patients who undergo surgery in July have worse outcomes compared to patients treated during other months. The purpose of this study is to compare inpatient morbidity and mortality among patients who underwent adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery in July with those who underwent surgery in other months. Methods Admission data for patients who underwent ASD surgery were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2002 to 2011. Only adult patients (over 21 years of age) and elective admissions to teaching hospitals were included. A multivariable regression analysis was performed to examine the independent effect of July admissions on overall complications, major complications, and inpatient mortality. Results A total of 27,794 patients were identified, with 2,023 (7.8%) admitted in July and 25,771 (92.2%) in other months. Overall complication rates in July (43.1%) were not different from rates in other months (44.9%, p=0.468). Similarly, major complication rates were similar; 12.9% in July and 12.4% in other months (p=0.764). Mortality was not different between groups (p=0.807). After multivariable analysis, July admissions were not found to increase the odds of developing any complication (OR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77 - 1.12; p=0.403), major complications (OR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.76 - 1.41; p=0.788) or inpatient mortality (OR 1.35; 95% CI, 0.31 - 5.84; p=0.684). Conclusion In this study of a nationwide database, patients who underwent ASD surgery in July did not have increased odds of developing a complication or inpatient mortality compared to patients admitted in other months. PMID:26913223

  11. Impact of Increasing Age on Outcomes of Spinal Fusion in Adult Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verla, Terence; Adogwa, Owoicho; Toche, Ulysses; Farber, S. Harrison; Petraglia, Frank; Murphy, Kelly R.; Thomas, Steven; Fatemi, Parastou; Gottfried, Oren; Bagley, Carlos A.; Lad, Shivanand P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of advancing age on postoperative complications and revision surgery after fusion for scoliosis. Methods A retrospective, cohort study was performed using the Thomson Reuters MarketScan database, examining patients with adult scoliosis who underwent spinal fusion from 2000 to 2009. Primary outcomes included infection, hemorrhage and pulmonary embolism (PE) within 90 days of surgery, and refusion. The effect of increasing age was estimated using the odds ratio (OR) of complications in a multivariate logistic regression analysis, and a Cox proportional hazard model estimated the hazard ratio of refusion. Results A total of 8432 patients were included in this study. Overall, the average age was 53.3 years, with 26.90% males and 39% with a Charlson Comorbidity Score of ≥1. Most patients had commercial insurance (66.81%), with 26.03% and 7.16% covered by Medicare and Medicaid, respectively. Increasing age (per 5-year increment) was a significant predictor of hemorrhagic complication (OR, 1.06; confidence interval [CI], 1.01–1.11; P = 0.0196), PE (OR, 1.09; CI, 1.03–1.16; P = 0.0031), infection (OR, 1.04; CI, 1.01–1.07; P = 0.0053), and refusion (hazard ratio, 1.07; CI, 1.02–1.13; P = 0.0103). Conclusions In this study, age was associated with increased risk of hemorrhage, PE, infection, and refusion. With the aging population, the role of patient age on postoperative healing and outcomes deserves deeper investigation after repair of adult idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:26546999

  12. Isolation of mineralizing Nestin+ Nkx6.1+ vascular muscular cells from the adult human spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillon Hélène

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adult central nervous system (CNS contains different populations of immature cells that could possibly be used to repair brain and spinal cord lesions. The diversity and the properties of these cells in the human adult CNS remain to be fully explored. We previously isolated Nestin+ Sox2+ neural multipotential cells from the adult human spinal cord using the neurosphere method (i.e. non adherent conditions and defined medium. Results Here we report the isolation and long term propagation of another population of Nestin+ cells from this tissue using adherent culture conditions and serum. QPCR and immunofluorescence indicated that these cells had mesenchymal features as evidenced by the expression of Snai2 and Twist1 and lack of expression of neural markers such as Sox2, Olig2 or GFAP. Indeed, these cells expressed markers typical of smooth muscle vascular cells such as Calponin, Caldesmone and Acta2 (Smooth muscle actin. These cells could not differentiate into chondrocytes, adipocytes, neuronal and glial cells, however they readily mineralized when placed in osteogenic conditions. Further characterization allowed us to identify the Nkx6.1 transcription factor as a marker for these cells. Nkx6.1 was expressed in vivo by CNS vascular muscular cells located in the parenchyma and the meninges. Conclusion Smooth muscle cells expressing Nestin and Nkx6.1 is the main cell population derived from culturing human spinal cord cells in adherent conditions with serum. Mineralization of these cells in vitro could represent a valuable model for studying calcifications of CNS vessels which are observed in pathological situations or as part of the normal aging. In addition, long term propagation of these cells will allow the study of their interaction with other CNS cells and their implication in scar formation during spinal cord injury.

  13. EXPRESSION OF NESTIN AND GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN IN DIFFERENT PERIOD AFTER SPINAL INJURY IN ADULT RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈建强; 贺西京; 杨平林; 师蔚; 李浩鹏; 兰宾尚; 袁普卫; 王国毓

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study the expression of Nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in different period after spinal injury in adult rats. Methods Animal moels were created by artery clamp. Expression of Nestin and GFAP in different period (1,3,5days;1-8 weeks) and different area(injury locus and its surrounding tissue ) after spinal injury were observed pathologicaly using immunofluorescence and LeicaQ500IW imaging processing system. Results There was expression of Nestin and GFAP in injured area 1 day after injury.The expression increased not only in in injured area but its sourrounding 3-7 days later and gradually got to peak value. As the time went on, expression of Nestin and GFAP dereased. Conclusion Spinal injury can induce the expression of Nestin. Nerve stem cell has response to spinal injury. There is positive correlation between expression of Nestin and hyperplasia of reactivity astrocyte. Nerve stem cell maybe invovled in the repair of central nervous system (CNS).

  14. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui, E-mail: fuyh@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  15. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1+ or nestin+ stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU+ cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU+ cells, very few are mash1+ or nestin+ stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1+ microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition

  16. Upregulation of S100A4 after spinal cord transection in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-hua ZHANG; Shu HAN; Pei-hua LU; Xiao-ming XU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether spinal cord transection induces changes of gene expression of S 100A4 protein.METHODS: In a spinal cord transection model, S 100A4 expression and cellular localization were examined using cDNA microarray, Northern blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence double-labeling methods.RESULTS: There was very limited S 100A4 mRNA expression in the control spinal cord. However, S 100A4 mRNA expression was increased significantly in both the rostral and caudal spinal cord segments adjacent to the injury site.Specifically, S100A4 gene expression was substantially increased at d 2, peaked at d 7 and d 14, and remained high up to 28 d post-injury. During its peak expression, S100A4 protein was localized in astrocytes of the spinal cord within 5 mm from the site of spinal transection. CONCLUSION: Spinal cord transection induces prolonged S 100A4 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in areas close to the injury site. Increased expression of S100A4 in astrocytes after spinal cord transection may indicate that this molecule may play a role in astrocytic responses to injury.

  17. Lentivector-mediated SMN replacement in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Le, Thanh; Ralph, G Scott; Walmsley, Lucy; Monani, Umrao R; Lee, Debbie C P; Wilkes, Fraser; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Burghes, Arthur H M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-12-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent recessive autosomal disorder. It is caused by mutations or deletion of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene, leading to depletion in SMN protein levels. The treatment rationale for SMA is to halt or delay the degeneration of motor neurons, but to date there are no effective drug treatments for this disease. We have previously demonstrated that pseudotyping of the nonprimate equine infectious anemia virus (using the lentivector gene transfer system) with the glycoprotein of the Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth strain of the rabies virus confers retrograde axonal transport on these vectors. Here, we report that lentivector expressing human SMN was successfully used to restore SMN protein levels in SMA type 1 fibroblasts. Multiple single injections of a lentiviral vector expressing SMN in various muscles of SMA mice restored SMN to motor neurons, reduced motor neuron death, and increased the life expectancy by an average of 3 and 5 days (20% and 38%) compared with LacZ and untreated animals, respectively. Further extension of survival by SMN expression constructs will likely require a knowledge of when and/or where high levels of SMN are needed. PMID:15599397

  18. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo I. Santos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Powassan virus (POWV belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice.

  19. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo I; Hermance, Meghan E; Gelman, Benjamin B; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27529273

  20. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo I.; Hermance, Meghan E.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27529273

  1. Liver Repopulation and Correction of Metabolic Liver Disease by Transplanted Adult Mouse Pancreatic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Al-Dhalimy, Muhsen; Lagasse, Eric; Finegold, Milton; Grompe, Markus

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of cells with hepatocellular properties in the adult pancreas has been described in several experimental models. To determine whether adult pancreas contains cells that can give rise to therapeutically useful and biochemically normal hepatocytes, we transplanted suspensions of wild-type mouse pancreatic cells into syngeneic recipients deficient in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and manifesting tyrosinemia. Four of 34 (12%) mutant mice analyzed were fully rescued by donor-derived ...

  2. Retinoic acid fails to reverse emphysema in adult mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, M; Ye, Q.; Ouchi, H.; Nakashima, N; Hamada, N; Hagimoto, N; Kuwano, K.; Mason, R.; Nakanishi, Y

    2004-01-01

    Methods: The models used were an elastase induced emphysema model for acute alveolar destruction and a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α transgenic mouse which exhibits chronic air space enlargement, loss of elastic recoil, increased lung volume, and pulmonary hypertension comparable to human pulmonary emphysema. All-trans-retinoic acid (2 mg/kg) was injected for 12 successive days after the establishment of emphysema. The effects of treatment were evaluated using physiological and morphometric ...

  3. Propagation of Adult SSCs: From Mouse to Human

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Laura A.; Marco Seandel

    2013-01-01

    Adult spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) represent a distinctive source of stem cells in mammals for several reasons. First, by giving rise to spermatogenesis, SSCs are responsible for the propagation of a father’s genetic material. As such, autologous SSCs have been considered for treatment of infertility and other purposes, including correction of inherited disorders. Second, adult spermatogonia can spontaneously produce embryonic-like stem cells in vitro, which could be used a...

  4. Morphological and electrophysiological evidence for regeneration of transected spinal cord fibers and restoration of motor functions in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    After 2/3 transection of the right ninth thoracic spinal cord of an adult rat, a chitosan tube seeded with L-poly-lysine was implanted between the rostral and caudal end of the lesioned cord. Twelve months after the operation, regeneration of myelinated and non-myelinated axons and new blood vessels were observed along the wall of the chitosan tube implanted under an electron microscope. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) could be consistently recorded from the left somatosensory cortex following electrical stimulation of the right hind limb, while transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left motor cortex could also evoke motor activity from the right hind limb. The present result suggests that implanted chitosan tube might be useful in regeneration of injured nerve fibers of the spinal cord resulting in a long-term restoration of motor functions.

  5. Identification of different functional types of spinal afferent neurons innervating the mouse large intestine using a novel CGRPα transgenic reporter mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Kestell, Garreth R; Kyloh, Melinda A; Brookes, Simon J H; Wattchow, David A; Spencer, Nick J

    2016-04-15

    Spinal afferent neurons detect noxious and physiological stimuli in visceral organs. Five functional classes of afferent terminals have been extensively characterized in the colorectum, primarily from axonal recordings. Little is known about the corresponding somata of these classes of afferents, including their morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology. To address this, we made intracellular recordings from somata in L6/S1 dorsal root ganglia and applied intraluminal colonic distensions. A transgenic calcitonin gene-related peptide-α (CGRPα)-mCherry reporter mouse, which enabled rapid identification of soma neurochemistry and morphology following electrophysiological recordings, was developed. Three distinct classes of low-threshold distension-sensitive colorectal afferent neurons were characterized; an additional group was distension-insensitive. Two of three low-threshold classes expressed CGRPα. One class expressing CGRPα discharged phasically, with inflections on the rising phase of their action potentials, at low frequencies, to both physiological (30 mmHg) distensions. The second class expressed CGRPα and discharged tonically, with smooth, briefer action potentials and significantly greater distension sensitivity than phasically firing neurons. A third class that lacked CGRPα generated the highest-frequency firing to distension and had smaller somata. Thus, CGRPα expression in colorectal afferents was associated with lower distension sensitivity and firing rates and larger somata, while colorectal afferents that generated the highest firing frequencies to distension had the smallest somata and lacked CGRPα. These data fill significant gaps in our understanding of the different classes of colorectal afferent somata that give rise to distinct functional classes of colorectal afferents. In healthy mice, the majority of sensory neurons that respond to colorectal distension are low-threshold, wide-dynamic-range afferents, encoding both

  6. Effects of ethanol on glycinergic synaptic currents in mouse spinal cord neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariqueo, Trinidad A.; Agurto, Adolfo; Muñoz, Braulio; San Martin, Loreto; Coronado, Cesar; Fernández-Pérez, Eduardo J.; Murath, Pablo; Sánchez, Andrea; Homanics, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol increased the frequency of miniature glycinergic currents [miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs)] in cultured spinal neurons. This effect was dependent on intracellular calcium augmentation, since preincubation with BAPTA (an intracellular calcium chelator) or thapsigargin [a sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pump inhibitor] significantly attenuated this effect. Similarly, U73122 (a phospholipase C inhibitor) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate [2-APB, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) inhibitor] reduced this effect. Block of ethanol action was also achieved after preincubation with Rp-cAMPS, inhibitor of the adenylate cyclase (AC)/PKA signaling pathway. These data suggest that there is a convergence at the level of IP3R that accounts for presynaptic ethanol effects. At the postsynaptic level, ethanol increased the decay time constant of mIPSCs in a group of neurons (30 ± 10% above control, n = 13/26 cells). On the other hand, the currents activated by exogenously applied glycine were consistently potentiated (55 ± 10% above control, n = 11/12 cells), which suggests that ethanol modulates synaptic and nonsynaptic glycine receptors (GlyRs) in a different fashion. Supporting the role of G protein modulation on ethanol responses, we found that a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog [guanosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS)] increased the decay time constant in ∼50% of the neurons (28 ± 12%, n = 11/19 cells) but potentiated the glycine-activated Cl− current in most of the neurons examined (83 ± 29%, n = 7/9 cells). In addition, confocal microscopy showed that α1-containing GlyRs colocalized with Gβ and Piccolo (a presynaptic cytomatrix protein) in ∼40% of synaptic receptor clusters, suggesting that colocalization of Gβγ and GlyRs might account for the difference in ethanol sensitivity at the postsynaptic level. PMID:24572089

  7. Molecular properties of adult mouse gastric and intestinal epithelial progenitors in their niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannakis, Marios; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Mills, Jason C;

    2006-01-01

    We have sequenced 36,641 expressed sequence tags from laser capture microdissected adult mouse gastric and small intestinal epithelial progenitors, obtaining 4031 and 3324 unique transcripts, respectively. Using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, each data set was compared with cDNA libraries from intact...

  8. Thermomineral water promotes axonal sprouting but does not reduce glial scar formation in a mouse model of spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dubravka Aleksi; Milan Aksi; Nevena Divac; Vidosava Radonji; Branislav Filipovi; Igor Jakovevski

    2014-01-01

    Thermomineral water from the Atomic Spa Gornja Trepča has been used for a century in the treatment of neurologic disease. The thermomineral water contains microelements, including lithium and magnesium, which show neural regeneration-promoting effects after central nervous system injury. In this study, we investigated the effects of oral intake of thermomineral water from the Atomic Spa Gornja Trepča on nerve regeneration in a 3-month-old mouse model of spinal cord injury. The mice receiving oral intake of thermomineral water showed better locomo-tor recovery than those without administration of thermomineral water at 8 and 12 weeks after lower thoracic spinal cord compression. At 12 weeks after injury, sprouting of catecholaminergic axons was better in mice that drank thermomineral water than in those without administration of thermomineral water, but there was no difference in glial reaction to injury between mice with and without administration of thermomineral water. These ifndings suggest that thermomineral water can promote the nerve regeneration but cannot reduce glial scar formation in a mouse model of spinal cord injury.

  9. Evidence for a role of srGAP3 in the positioning of commissural axons within the ventrolateral funiculus of the mouse spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bacon

    Full Text Available Slit-Robo signaling guides commissural axons away from the floor-plate of the spinal cord and into the longitudinal axis after crossing the midline. In this study we have evaluated the role of the Slit-Robo GTPase activating protein 3 (srGAP3 in commissural axon guidance using a knockout (KO mouse model. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that srGAP3 interacts with the Slit receptors Robo1 and Robo2 and immunohistochemistry studies showed that srGAP3 co-localises with Robo1 in the ventral and lateral funiculus and with Robo2 in the lateral funiculus. Stalling axons have been reported in the floor-plate of Slit and Robo mutant spinal cords but our axon tracing experiments revealed no dorsal commissural axon stalling in the floor plate of the srGAP3 KO mouse. Interestingly we observed a significant thickening of the ventral funiculus and a thinning of the lateral funiculus in the srGAP3 KO spinal cord, which has also recently been reported in the Robo2 KO. However, axons in the enlarged ventral funiculus of the srGAP3 KO are Robo1 positive but do not express Robo2, indicating that the thickening of the ventral funiculus in the srGAP3 KO is not a Robo2 mediated effect. We suggest a role for srGAP3 in the lateral positioning of post crossing axons within the ventrolateral funiculus.

  10. Transplantation of an Acutely Isolated Bone Marrow Fraction Repairs Demyelinated Adult Rat Spinal Cord Axons

    OpenAIRE

    SASAKI, MASANORI; HONMOU, OSAMU; Akiyama, Yukinori; Uede,Teiji; Hashi,Kazuo; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of bone marrow cells to differentiate into myelin-forming cells and to repair the demyelinated rat spinal cord in vivo was studied using cell transplantation techniques. The dorsal funiculus of the spinal cord was demyelinated by x-irradiation treatment, followed by microinjection of ethidium bromide. Suspensions of a bone marrow cell fraction acutely isolated from femoral bones in LacZ transgenic mice were prepared by centrifugation on a density gradient (Ficoll-Paque) to remov...

  11. Ascl3 marks adult progenitor cells of the mouse salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugel-Stahl, Anastasia; Elliott, Marilyn E; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2012-05-01

    The Ascl3 transcription factor marks a subset of salivary gland duct cells present in the three major salivary glands of the mouse. In vivo, these cells generate both duct and secretory acinar cell descendants. Here, we have analyzed whether Ascl3-expressing cells retain this multipotent lineage potential in adult glands. Cells isolated from mouse salivary glands were cultured in vitro as non-adherent spheres. Lineage tracing of the Ascl3-expressing cells within the spheres demonstrates that Ascl3+ cells isolated from adult glands remain multipotent, generating both duct and acinar cell types in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the progenitor cells characterized by Keratin 5 expression are an independent population from Ascl3+ progenitor cells. We conclude that the Ascl3+ cells are intermediate lineage-restricted progenitor cells of the adult salivary glands.

  12. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h.

  13. Changes of gene expression profiles in the cervical spinal cord by acupuncture in an MPTP-intoxicated mouse model: microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Yeo, Sujung; Hong, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2011-07-15

    It has been shown that acupuncture at acupoints GB34 and LR3 inhibits the degeneration of nigrostriatal neurons in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The degeneration of spinal cord was reported to be induced in the MPTP-treated pre-symptomatic mouse. In this study, the gene expression profile changes following acupuncture at the acupoints were investigated in the cervical spinal cord of an MPTP-induced parkinsonism model using a whole transcript array (Affymetrix GeneChip mouse gene 1.0 ST array). It was shown that 8 of the probes up-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were down-regulated after acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 8 probes, 6 probes (4 annotated genes in 6 probes: Ctla2a, EG383229, Ppbp and Ube2l6) were exclusively down-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for 2 probes as these 2 probes were commonly down-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. In addition, 11 of the probes down-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were up-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 11 probes, 10 probes (5 annotated genes in 10 probes: EG665033, ENSMUSG00000055323, Obox6, Pbp2 and Tmem150) were exclusively up-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for the Fut11 because the Fut11 was commonly up-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. The expression levels of the representative genes in the microarray were validated by real-time RT-PCR. These data suggest that the expression of these exclusively regulated 16 probes (9 genes) may be, at least in part, affected by acupuncture at the acupoints in the cervical spinal cord which can be damaged by MPTP intoxication. PMID:21440609

  14. Involvement of TRPM2 in peripheral nerve injury-induced infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the spinal cord in mouse neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Isami

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 expressed in immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. We recently reported that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and spinal microglia contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain aggravating peripheral and central pronociceptive inflammatory responses in mice. To further elucidate the contribution of TRPM2 expressed by peripheral immune cells to neuropathic pain, we examined the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the infiltration of immune cells (particularly macrophages into the injured nerve and spinal cord by using bone marrow (BM chimeric mice by crossing wildtype (WT and TRPM2-knockout (TRPM2-KO mice. Four types of BM chimeric mice were prepared, in which irradiated WT or TRPM2-KO recipient mice were transplanted with either WT-or TRPM2-KO donor mouse-derived green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP(+ BM cells (TRPM2(BM+/Rec+, TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. Mechanical allodynia induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation observed in TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice was attenuated in TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. The numbers of GFP(+ BM-derived cells and Iba1/GFP double-positive macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve did not differ among chimeric mice 14 days after the nerve injury. In the spinal cord, the number of GFP(+ BM-derived cells, particularly GFP/Iba1 double-positive macrophages, was significantly decreased in the three TRPM2-KO chimeric mouse groups compared with TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice. However, the numbers of GFP(-/Iba1(+ resident microglia did not differ among chimeric mice. These results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerves and activation of spinal

  15. Upregulation of heparin-binding growth-associated molecule after spinal cord injury in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-ting WANG; Shu HAN; Kai-hua ZHANG; Yu JIN; Xiao-ming XU; Pei-hua LU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) induces changes of gene expression of heparinbinding growth-associated molecule (HB-GAM). METHODS: In a spinal cord transection model, HB-GAM expression and cellular localization were examined using Northern blot, RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence double-labeling methods. RESULTS: HB-GAM mRNA was significantly upregulated in spinal cord tissues rostral and caudal to the injury at 7 d after SCI. HB-GAM gene expression was markedly increased at 3 d,peaked at 7 d, and declined to the baseline level at 28 d post-injury. During its peak expression, HB-GAM was colocalized in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons in spinal cord tissues within 7 mm from the site of spinal transection. CONCLUSION: SCI induces HB-GAM expression at both mRNA and protein levels in areas close to the injury. Both neurons and glial cells expressed HB-GAM implying that HB-GAM played a role in the process of injury and/or repair following SCI.

  16. Role of ERK1/2, Akt, and PLCy pathways in proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the adult rat spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Si eChan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs has been identified in both normal and injured adult mammalian spinal cord. Yet the signaling mechanisms underlying the regulation of adult spinal cord NSPCs proliferation and commitment toward a neuronal lineage remain undefined. In this study, the role of three growth factor-mediated signaling pathways in proliferation and neuronal differentiation was examined. Adult spinal cord NSPCs were enriched in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2. We observed an increase in the number of cells expressing the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 over time, indicating neuronal differentiation in the culture. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase 1 and 2/ERK 1 and 2 (MEK/ERK1/2 or the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathways suppressed active proliferation in adult spinal cord NSPC cultures; whereas neuronal differentiation was negatively affected only when the ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited. Inhibition of the phospholipase C gamma (PLCy pathway did not affect proliferation or neuronal differentiation. Finally, we demonstrated that the blockade of either the ERK1/2 or PLCy signaling pathways reduced neurite branching of MAP2+ cells derived from the NSPC cultures. Many of the MAP2+ cells expressed synaptophysin and had a glutamatergic phenotype, indicating that over time adult spinal cord NSPCs had differentiated into mostly glutamatergic neurons. Our work provides new information regarding the contribution of these pathways to the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs derived from adult spinal cord cultures, and emphasizes that the contribution of these pathways is dependent on the origin of the NSPCs.

  17. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise: a parallel-group randomized clinical trial evaluating relative effectiveness and harms

    OpenAIRE

    Vihstadt, Corrie; Maiers, Michele; Westrom, Kristine; Bronfort, Gert; Evans, Roni; Hartvigsen, Jan; Schulz, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Background Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population and growing evidence in older adults. For older populations experiencing chronic spinal conditions, long term management may be more appropriate to maintain improvement and minimize the impact of futu...

  18. Transplantation of adult monkey neural stem cells into a contusion spinal cord injury model in rhesus macaque monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemati, Shiva Nemati; Jabbari, Reza; Hajinasrollah, Mostafa;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Currently, cellular transplantation for spinal cord injuries (SCI) is the subject of numerous preclinical studies. Among the many cell types in the adult brain, there is a unique subpopulation of neural stem cells (NSC) that can self-renew and differentiate into neurons. The study aims......, therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model...... was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analysis. Animals were clinically observed for 6 months. RESULTS: Analysis confirmed homing of mNSCs into the injury site. Transplanted cells expressed neuronal markers (TubIII). Hind limb performance improved in trans- planted animals based...

  19. Transcriptome signature of the adult mouse choroid plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the gene expression profile of several tissues in humans and in rodent animal models has been explored, analysis of the complete choroid plexus (CP transcriptome is still lacking. A better characterization of the CP transcriptome can provide key insights into its functions as one of the barriers that separate the brain from the periphery and in the production of cerebrospinal fluid. Methods This work extends further what is known about the mouse CP transcriptome through a microarray analysis of CP tissue from normal mice under physiological conditions. Results We found that the genes most highly expressed are those implicated in energy metabolism (oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and in ribosomal function, which is in agreement with the secretory nature of the CP. On the other hand, genes encoding for immune mediators are among those with lower expression in basal conditions. In addition, we found genes known to be relevant during brain development, and not previously identified to be expressed in the CP, including those encoding for various axonal guidance and angiogenesis molecules and for growth factors. Some of these are known to influence the neural stem cell niche in the subventricular zone, highlighting the involvement of the CP as a likely modulator of neurogenesis. Interestingly, our observations confirm that the CP transcriptome is unique, displaying low homology with that of other tissues. Of note, we describe here that the closest similarity is with the transcriptome of the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Conclusions Based on the data presented here, it will now be possible to further explore the function of particular proteins of the CP secretome in health and in disease.

  20. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties.

  1. Differentiations of transplanted mouse spermatogonial stem cells in the adult mouse renal parenchyma in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-peng WU; Da-lin HE; Xiang LI; Zhao-hui LIU

    2008-01-01

    Aim:Spermatogonial stem cells can initiate the process of cellular differentia-tion to generate mature spermatozoa, but whether it possess the characteristic of pluripotency and plasticity, similar to embryonic stem cells, has not been elucidated. This study was designed to evaluate the differentiation potential of spermatogonial stem cells into renal cells in vivo. Methods: Neonatal mouse spermatogonial stem cells were transplanted into mature male mice lacking en-dogenous spermatogenesis. The restoration of fertility in recipient males was observed. Spermatogonial stem cells were then injected into renal parenchyma of mature female mice to make a new extracellular environment for differentia-tion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technology (FISH) was used to detect the expression of chromosome Y in recipient renal tissues. To determine the type of cells differentiated from spermatogonial stem cells, the expression of ricinus communis agglutinin, vimentin, CD45, and F4/80 proteins were examined in the renal tissues by immunohistochemistry. Results: The proliferation of seminiferous epithelial cells was distinctly observed in seminiferous tubules of transplanted testes, whereas no regeneration of spermatogenesis was observed in non-transplanted control testes. In transplanted female renal tissues, FISH showed a much stronger immuno-fluorescence signal of chromosome Y in the nucleolus of epithelial cells of the renal tubule and podocytes of the glomerulus. Conclusion: The spermatogonial stem cells were successfully purified from mouse testicles. This finding demonstrated that spermatogonial stem cells could not only restore damaged spermatogenesis, but were also capable of differentiat-ing into mature renal parenchyma cells in vivo.

  2. Otx2 Gene Deletion in Adult Mouse Retina Induces Rapid RPE Dystrophy and Slow Photoreceptor Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Béby; Michael Housset; Nicolas Fossat; Coralie Le Greneur; Frédéric Flamant; Pierre Godement; Thomas Lamonerie

    2010-01-01

    Background : Many developmental genes are still active in specific tissues after development is completed. This is the case for the homeobox gene Otx2, an essential actor of forebrain and head development. In adult mouse, Otx2 is strongly expressed in the retina. Mutations of this gene in humans have been linked to severe ocular malformation and retinal diseases. It is, therefore, important to explore its post-developmental functions. In the mature retina, Otx2 is expressed in three cell type...

  3. Genetic influences on exercise-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis across 12 divergent mouse strains

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are continuously born in the hippocampus of several mammalian species throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis represents a natural model for understanding how to grow and incorporate new nerve cells into pre-existing circuits in the brain. Finding molecules or biological pathways that increase neurogenesis has broad potential for regenerative medicine. One strategy is to identify mouse strains that display large versus small increases in neurogenesis in response to wheel running ...

  4. Exercise during pregnancy protects adult mouse offspring from diet-induced obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Wasinski, F.; Bacurau, R.F.P.; Estrela, G.R.; Klempin, F.; Arakaki, A.M.; Batista, R.O.; Mafra, F.F.P.; do Nascimento, L.F.R.; M.I. Hiyane; L.A. Velloso; N.O.S. Camara; Araujo, R C

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical exercise induces positive alterations in gene expression involved in the metabolism of obesity. Maternal exercise provokes adaptations soon after birth in the offspring. Here, we investigated whether adult mouse offspring of swim-trained mothers is protected against the development of the deleterious effects of high fat diet (HFD). Methods Our study comprises two parts. First, female C57BL/6 mice were divided into one sedentary and one swim-trained group (before and during...

  5. Isolation and Culture of Dental Epithelial Stem Cells from the Adult Mouse Incisor

    OpenAIRE

    Chavez, Miquella G.; Hu, Jimmy; SEIDEL, KERSTIN; Li, Chunying; Jheon, Andrew; Naveau, Adrien; Horst, Orapin; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie tooth regeneration and renewal has become a topic of great interest1-4, and the mouse incisor provides a model for these processes. This remarkable organ grows continuously throughout the animal's life and generates all the necessary cell types from active pools of adult stem cells housed in the labial (toward the lip) and lingual (toward the tongue) cervical loop (CL) regions. Only the dental stem cells from the labial CL give...

  6. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1, encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs, leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA.

  7. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA. PMID:26258776

  8. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA. PMID:26258776

  9. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, V.; Kaila, R.; Wilson, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the safety and efficacy of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) compared with bone graft when used specifically for revision spinal fusion surgery secondary to pseudarthrosis. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched using defined search terms. The primary outcome measure was spinal fusion, assessed as success or failure in accordance with radiograph, MRI or CT scan review at 24-month follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was time to fusion. Results A total of six studies (three prospective and three retrospective) reporting on the use of BMP2 met the inclusion criteria (203 patients). Of these, four provided a comparison of BMP2 and bone graft whereas the other two solely investigated the use of BMP2. The primary outcome was seen in 92.3% (108/117) of patients following surgery with BMP2. Although none of the studies showed superiority of BMP2 to bone graft for fusion, its use was associated with a statistically quicker time to achieving fusion. BMP2 did not appear to increase the risk of complication. Conclusion The use of BMP2 is both safe and effective within the revision setting, ideally in cases where bone graft is unavailable or undesirable. Further research is required to define its optimum role. Cite this article: Mr P. Bodalia. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:145–152. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000418. PMID:27121215

  10. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

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    Béringue Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated.

  11. Running increases cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Praag, H; Kempermann, G; Gage, F H

    1999-03-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. Environmental enrichment, however, typically consists of many components, such as expanded learning opportunities, increased social interaction, more physical activity and larger housing. We attempted to separate components by assigning adult mice to various conditions: water-maze learning (learner), swim-time-yoked control (swimmer), voluntary wheel running (runner), and enriched (enriched) and standard housing (control) groups. Neither maze training nor yoked swimming had any effect on bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell number. However, running doubled the number of surviving newborn cells, in amounts similar to enrichment conditions. Our findings demonstrate that voluntary exercise is sufficient for enhanced neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

  12. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio

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    Eranée Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin.

  13. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  14. Exploration and visualization of gene expression with neuroanatomy in the adult mouse brain

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    Pathak Sayan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatially mapped large scale gene expression databases enable quantitative comparison of data measurements across genes, anatomy, and phenotype. In most ongoing efforts to study gene expression in the mammalian brain, significant resources are applied to the mapping and visualization of data. This paper describes the implementation and utility of Brain Explorer, a 3D visualization tool for studying in situ hybridization-based (ISH expression patterns in the Allen Brain Atlas, a genome-wide survey of 21,000 expression patterns in the C57BL6J adult mouse brain. Results Brain Explorer enables users to visualize gene expression data from the C57Bl/6J mouse brain in 3D at a resolution of 100 μm3, allowing co-display of several experiments as well as 179 reference neuro-anatomical structures. Brain Explorer also allows viewing of the original ISH images referenced from any point in a 3D data set. Anatomic and spatial homology searches can be performed from the application to find data sets with expression in specific structures and with similar expression patterns. This latter feature allows for anatomy independent queries and genome wide expression correlation studies. Conclusion These tools offer convenient access to detailed expression information in the adult mouse brain and the ability to perform data mining and visualization of gene expression and neuroanatomy in an integrated manner.

  15. Sertoli cells maintain Leydig cell number and peritubular myoid cell activity in the adult mouse testis.

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    Diane Rebourcet

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health.

  16. Ablation of mouse adult neurogenesis alters olfactory bulb structure and olfactory fear conditioning

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    Matthew Valley

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis replenishes olfactory bulb (OB interneurons throughout the life of most mammals, yet during this constant fl ux it remains unclear how the OB maintains a constant structure and function. In the mouse OB, we investigated the dynamics of turnover and its impact on olfactory function by ablating adult neurogenesis with an x-ray lesion to the subventricular zone (SVZ. Regardless of the magnitude of the lesion to the SVZ, we found no change in the survival of young adult born granule cells (GCs born after the lesion, and a gradual decrease in the population of GCs born before the lesion. After a lesion producing a 96% reduction of incoming adult born GCs to the OB, we found a diminished behavioral fear response to conditioned odor cues but not to audio cues. Interestingly, despite this behavioral defi cit and gradual anatomical changes, we found no electrophysiological changes in the GC population assayed in vivo through dendro-dendritic synaptic plasticity and odor-evoked local fi eld potential oscillations. These data indicate that turnover in the granule cell layer is generally decoupled from the rate of adult neurogenesis, and that OB adult neurogenesis plays a role in a wide behavioral system extending beyond the OB.

  17. The Ly-6A (Sca-1) GFP transgene is expressed in all adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Ma (Xiaoqian); C.I. Robin; K. Ottersbach (Katrin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe Sca-1 cell surface glycoprotein is used routinely as a marker of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), allowing a >100-fold enrichment of these rare cells from the bone marrow of the adult mouse. The Sca-1 protein is encoded by the Ly-6A/E gene, a small 4-exon gene

  18. Effects of glutamine supplementation on muscle function and stress responses in a mouse model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamney, Carissa; Godar, Michelle; Garrigan, Ethan; Huey, Kimberly A

    2013-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in loss of muscle function due to rapid breakdown of contractile proteins. Glutamine supplementation improves clinical outcomes, but its effects on muscle function after SCI are unknown. The benefits of glutamine in non-skeletal muscle tissues involve elevated heat shock protein (Hsp)70 and Hsp25, but the muscle response may differ because it is the largest contributor to plasma glutamine. We tested the hypothesis that glutamine preserves muscle function after SCI and that this is associated with increased heat shock protein and reduced inflammatory factors, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα). Changes in plantarflexor force, fatigability and total myofibrillar, Hsp70, Hsp25, IL-6 and TNFα muscle protein levels were measured 7 days after sham or spinal cord transection surgery in mice receiving daily placebo or glutamine. Compared with placebo, after SCI glutamine significantly attenuated the reductions in maximal isometric force (0.22 ± 0.01 versus 0.31 ± 0.03 N, respectively) and fatigue resistance (34 ± 4 versus 59 ± 4% of initial force, respectively). Glutamine significantly ameliorated the loss of myofibrillar protein with spinal cord transection. Spinal cord transection was associated with decreased Hsp70 and Hsp25 with glutamine only (45 ± 3 and 44 ± 5% of placebo, respectively). Glutamine significantly reduced spinal cord transection-associated increases in IL-6 and TNFα compared with placebo (38 ± 6 and 37 ± 8% of placebo, respectively). Functionally, early reductions in contractile protein, force and fatigue resistance after SCI were reversed with glutamine. Spinal cord transection-associated reductions in Hsp70, Hsp25, IL-6 and TNFα with glutamine versus placebo suggest lower stress in the muscle, possibly related to a reduced need to produce glutamine. These findings support glutamine as a therapeutic intervention to accelerate recovery of muscle function after SCI.

  19. p62/SQSTM1 differentially removes the toxic mutant androgen receptor via autophagy and inclusion formation in a spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shinjiro; Kondo, Naohide; Miyazaki, Yu; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Qiang, Qiang; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Yanagawa, Toru; Warabi, Eiji; Ishii, Tetsuro; Sobue, Gen

    2013-05-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are inherited neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by the expansion of trinucleotide CAG repeats in the causative genes. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease that is caused by the expansion of a polyQ tract within the androgen receptor (AR). p62 is a ubiquitin- and light-chain 3-binding protein that is known to regulate the degradation of targeted proteins via autophagy and inclusion formation. In this study, we examined the effects of p62 depletion and overexpression on cultured cells and in a transgenic mouse model that overexpressed the mutant AR. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of p62 significantly exacerbated motor phenotypes and the neuropathological outcome, whereas overexpression of p62 protected against mutant AR toxicity in SBMA mice. Depletion of p62 significantly increased the levels of monomeric mutant AR and mutant AR protein complexes in an SBMA mouse model via the impairment of autophagic degradation. In addition, p62 overexpression improved SBMA mouse phenotypes by inducing cytoprotective inclusion formation. Our results demonstrate that p62 provides two different therapeutic targets in SBMA pathogenesis: (1) autophagy-dependent degradation and (2) benevolent inclusion formation of the mutant AR.

  20. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl C H; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. PMID:26259873

  1. Liver repopulation and correction of metabolic liver disease by transplanted adult mouse pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Al-Dhalimy, M; Lagasse, E; Finegold, M; Grompe, M

    2001-02-01

    The emergence of cells with hepatocellular properties in the adult pancreas has been described in several experimental models. To determine whether adult pancreas contains cells that can give rise to therapeutically useful and biochemically normal hepatocytes, we transplanted suspensions of wild-type mouse pancreatic cells into syngeneic recipients deficient in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and manifesting tyrosinemia. Four of 34 (12%) mutant mice analyzed were fully rescued by donor-derived cells and had normal liver function. Ten additional mice (29%) showed histological evidence of donor-derived hepatocytes in the liver. Previous work has suggested that pancreatic liver precursors reside within or close to pancreatic ducts. We therefore performed additional transplantations using either primary cell suspensions enriched for ducts or cultured ducts. Forty-four mutant mice were transplanted with cells enriched for pancreatic duct cells, but only three of the 34 (9%) recipients analyzed displayed donor-derived hepatocytes. In addition, 28 of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient mice were transplanted with cultured pancreatic duct cells, but no donor-derived hepatocytes were observed. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult mouse pancreas contains hepatocyte progenitor cells capable of significant therapeutic liver reconstitution. However, contrary to previous reports, we were unable to detect these cells within the duct compartment. PMID:11159194

  2. A PET/CT-based Morphometric Study of Spinal Canal in Korean Young Adults: Anteroposterior Diameter from Cervical Vertebra to Sacrum

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Moo Sung; Park, Jeong Yoon; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish normative data for spinal canal AP diameter from cervical vertebra to sacrum in the Korean young and to assess the exposed spinal canal after laminectomy which was related with restenosis by post-laminectomy membrane formation. Methods From PET/CT, axial bone-window CT of 83 young adults (20-29 years) were obtained, and we measured AP diameters of C3, C5, C7, T1, T4, T8, T12, L1, L3, L5 and S1. We also measured exposed AP diameter of C3, C5, C7, T1 and T2 above imaginar...

  3. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

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    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi [Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Peters, Christoph [Institute fuer Molekulare Medizin und Zellforshung, Albert-Ludwings-Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Uchiyama, Yasuo [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakan@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  4. The use of PRV-Bartha to define premotor inputs to lumbar motoneurons in the neonatal spinal cord of the mouse.

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    Ksenija Jovanovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neonatal mouse has become a model system for studying the locomotor function of the lumbar spinal cord. However, information about the synaptic connectivity within the governing neural network remains scarce. A neurotropic pseudorabies virus (PRV Bartha has been used to map neuronal connectivity in other parts of the nervous system, due to its ability to travel trans-neuronally. Its use in spinal circuits regulating locomotion has been limited and no study has defined the time course of labelling for neurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the ability of PRV Bartha, expressing green and/or red fluorescence, to label spinal neurons projecting monosynaptically to motoneurons of two principal hindlimb muscles, the tibialis anterior (TA and gastrocnemius (GC. As revealed by combined immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, 24-32 h after the viral muscle injection the label was restricted to the motoneuron pool while at 32-40 h the fluorescence was seen in interneurons throughout the medial and lateral ventral grey matter. Two classes of ipsilateral interneurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons (Renshaw cells and cells of origin of C-terminals were consistently labeled at 40 h post-injection but also a group in the ventral grey matter contralaterally. Our results suggest that the labeling of last order interneurons occurred 8-12 h after motoneuron labeling and we presume this is the time taken by the virus to cross one synapse, to travel retrogradely and to replicate in the labeled cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study establishes the time window for virally-labelling monosynaptic projections to lumbar motoneurons following viral injection into hindlimb muscles. Moreover, it provides a good foundation for intracellular targeting of the labeled neurons in future physiological studies and better understanding the functional organization of

  5. TRPV4 mediates afferent pathways in the urinary bladder. A spinal c-fos study showing TRPV1 related adaptations in the TRPV4 knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Dick A W; Hoenderop, Joost G; Heesakkers, John P F A; Schalken, Jack A

    2016-10-01

    The role of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4) channels in urinary bladder afferent neural pathways was investigated using spinal c-fos measurements in mice. Anesthetized wild type and TRPV4 knockout (-/-) mice underwent noxious bladder distention and treatment with either intravesical instillation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX), vehicle or an intraperitoneal injected TRPV4 antagonist (HC067047). Mice underwent paraformaldehyde perfusion for rapid fixation and L6-S1 spinal cord sections were removed followed by immunohistochemical staining for c-fos. A number of c-fos expressing neurons in the dorsal horns of L6-S1 spinal cord transections were quantified. Groups were compared using univariate ANOVA. Even with the absence of bladder inflammation on H&E, the TRPV4 -/- mice still have a significant twofold higher c-fos expression (n = 39, SD 2) after noxious bladder distention compared to wild type mice (n = 20, SD 3). A twofold increase in c-fos expression was observed after LPS treatment in wild types (n = 42, SD 5), but no increase was seen in TRPV4 -/- mice (n = 42, SD 2). After desensitization of primary afferent C-nerve fibers with RTX, c-fos expression in TRPV4-/- mice decreased significantly (threefold) (n = 12, SD 4). Results imply that TRPV4 channels are important for bladder afferent signaling. TRPV4 -/- mice bladders generate more noxious sensory output, which is predominantly mediated through TRPV1 expressing high threshold nerve fibers. This study reveals TRPV1 related adaptive changes in afferent pathways of the TRPV4 -/- mouse. We propose that this effect is caused by a congenital impairment of low threshold nerves that mediate normal bladder filling sensations.

  6. Otx2 gene deletion in adult mouse retina induces rapid RPE dystrophy and slow photoreceptor degeneration.

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    Francis Béby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many developmental genes are still active in specific tissues after development is completed. This is the case for the homeobox gene Otx2, an essential actor of forebrain and head development. In adult mouse, Otx2 is strongly expressed in the retina. Mutations of this gene in humans have been linked to severe ocular malformation and retinal diseases. It is, therefore, important to explore its post-developmental functions. In the mature retina, Otx2 is expressed in three cell types: bipolar and photoreceptor cells that belong to the neural retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, a neighbour structure that forms a tightly interdependent functional unit together with photoreceptor cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conditional self-knockout was used to address the late functions of Otx2 gene in adult mice. This strategy is based on the combination of a knock-in CreERT2 allele and a floxed allele at the Otx2 locus. Time-controlled injection of tamoxifen activates the recombinase only in Otx2 expressing cells, resulting in selective ablation of the gene in its entire domain of expression. In the adult retina, loss of Otx2 protein causes slow degeneration of photoreceptor cells. By contrast, dramatic changes of RPE activity rapidly occur, which may represent a primary cause of photoreceptor disease. CONCLUSIONS: Our novel mouse model uncovers new Otx2 functions in adult retina. We show that this transcription factor is necessary for long-term maintenance of photoreceptors, likely through the control of specific activities of the RPE.

  7. Distinctive left-sided distribution of adrenergic-derived cells in the adult mouse heart.

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    Kingsley Osuala

    Full Text Available Adrenaline and noradrenaline are produced within the heart from neuronal and non-neuronal sources. These adrenergic hormones have profound effects on cardiovascular development and function, yet relatively little information is available about the specific tissue distribution of adrenergic cells within the adult heart. The purpose of the present study was to define the anatomical localization of cells derived from an adrenergic lineage within the adult heart. To accomplish this, we performed genetic fate-mapping experiments where mice with the cre-recombinase (Cre gene inserted into the phenylethanolamine-n-methyltransferase (Pnmt locus were cross-mated with homozygous Rosa26 reporter (R26R mice. Because Pnmt serves as a marker gene for adrenergic cells, offspring from these matings express the β-galactosidase (βGAL reporter gene in cells of an adrenergic lineage. βGAL expression was found throughout the adult mouse heart, but was predominantly (89% located in the left atrium (LA and ventricle (LV (p<0.001 compared to RA and RV, where many of these cells appeared to have cardiomyocyte-like morphological and structural characteristics. The staining pattern in the LA was diffuse, but the LV free wall displayed intermittent non-random staining that extended from the apex to the base of the heart, including heavy staining of the anterior papillary muscle along its perimeter. Three-dimensional computer-aided reconstruction of XGAL+ staining revealed distribution throughout the LA and LV, with specific finger-like projections apparent near the mid and apical regions of the LV free wall. These data indicate that adrenergic-derived cells display distinctive left-sided distribution patterns in the adult mouse heart.

  8. Mature teratoma of the spinal cord in adults: An unusual case

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuan; Yang, Bo; SONG, LAIJUN; Yan, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    Intraspinal mature teratomas rarely occur in adults. The present study describes an unusual case of adult intradural mature teratoma, which was completely resected. A 22-year-old female presented with an intermittent pinching pain in the lower right shank that had lasted for three months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results indicated a multicystic mass extending from the T12 to L2 vertebrae, and the tumors were certified as teratomas by a histopathological examination. The level of pain ...

  9. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    OpenAIRE

    Eranée Stewart; Moyosore Salihu Ajao; Amadi Ogonda Ihunwo

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. I...

  10. Ultrastructural Evidence of Exosome Secretion by Progenitor Cells in Adult Mouse Myocardium and Adult Human Cardiospheres

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    Lucio Barile

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The demonstration of beneficial effects of cell therapy despite the persistence of only few transplanted cells in vivo suggests secreted factors may be the active component of this treatment. This so-called paracrine hypothesis is supported by observations that culture media conditioned by progenitor cells contain growth factors that mediate proangiogenic and cytoprotective effects. Cardiac progenitor cells in semi-suspension culture form spherical clusters (cardiospheres that deliver paracrine signals to neighboring cells. A key component of paracrine secretion is exosomes, membrane vesicles that are stored intracellularly in endosomal compartments and are secreted when these structures fuse with the cell plasma membrane. Exosomes have been identified as the active component of proangiogenic effects of bone marrow CD34+ stem cells in mice and the regenerative effects of embryonic mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts in pigs and mice. Here, we provide electron microscopic evidence of exosome secretion by progenitor cells in mouse myocardium and human cardiospheres. Exosomes are emerging as an attractive vector of paracrine signals delivered by progenitor cells. They can be stored as an “off-the-shelf” product. As such, exosomes have the potential for circumventing many of the limitations of viable cells for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine.

  11. Immunostaining for Homer reveals the majority of excitatory synapses in laminae I-III of the mouse spinal dorsal horn

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Kuehn, Emily D.; Abraira, Victoria E.; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn processes somatosensory information before conveying it to the brain. The neuronal organization of the dorsal horn is still poorly understood, although recent studies have defined several distinct populations among the interneurons, which account for most of its constituent neurons. All primary afferents, and the great majority of neurons in laminae I–III are glutamatergic, and a major factor limiting our understanding of the synaptic circuitry has been the difficulty i...

  12. Spinal cord glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands with 1p/19q deletion in an adult with low-grade cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraum, Tyler J; Barak, Stephanie; Pack, Svetlana; Lonser, Russell R; Fine, Howard A; Quezado, Martha; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2012-04-01

    Glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands (GTNI) is considered a rare variant of astrocytoma, characterized by discrete aggregates of cells expressing neuronal markers that punctuate a GFAP-positive glial background. Of the 24 published GTNI cases, only two occurred in adult spinal cords; none occurred concurrent with another CNS tumor; and none of those tested exhibited the 1p/19q deletion typical of oligodendroglioma. A 48-year-old man without significant past medical history was diagnosed with a WHO grade II oligodendroglioma by stereotactic biopsy of a lesion discovered after the patient suffered a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. By FISH analysis, this tumor exhibited the 1p/19q deletion present in up to 80% of oligodendrogliomas. The patient received 14 monthly cycles of temozolomide, and his cerebral tumor had a minor response. When the patient subsequently reported progressive paresthesias of his lower extremities, an MRI revealed an enhancing, cystic tumor of the thoracic spinal cord that was diagnosed as GTNI by histological analysis. By FISH analysis, this lesion exhibited the same 1p/19q deletion present in the concurrent cerebral oligodendroglioma. This case of a spinal cord GTNI with 1p/19q deletions constitutes the third report of a spinal cord GTNI in an adult patient; the first report of a GTNI in an individual with a separate CNS neoplasm; and the first report of a GTNI with 1p/19q deletions. This case establishes a potential genetic kinship between GTNI and oligodendroglioma that warrants further investigation.

  13. Polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 delays motor function defects in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Frank; Elflein, Nicole; Saenger, Stefanie; Wirthgen, Elisa; Rak, Kristen; Frantz, Stefan; Hoeflich, Andreas; Toyka, Klaus V; Metzger, Friedrich; Jablonka, Sibylle

    2014-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of the diaphragm and skeletal muscles, leading to death in childhood. No effective treatment is available. The neuromuscular degeneration (Nmd(2J)) mouse shares a crucial mutation in the immunoglobulin mu-binding protein 2 gene (Ighmbp2) with spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 patients and also displays some basic features of the human disease. This model serves as a promising tool in understanding the complex mechanisms of the disease and in exploring novel treatment modalities such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) which supports myogenic and neurogenic survival and stimulates differentiation during development. Here we investigated the treatment effects with polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 and its mechanisms of action in neurons and muscles. Polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 was applied subcutaneously every second day from post-natal Day 14 to post-natal Day 42 and the outcome was assessed by morphology, electromyography, and molecular studies. We found reduced IGF1 serum levels in Nmd(2J) mice 2 weeks after birth, which was normalized by polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 treatment. Nmd(2J) mice showed marked neurogenic muscle fibre atrophy in the gastrocnemius muscle and polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 treatment resulted in muscle fibre hypertrophy and slowed fibre degeneration along with significantly higher numbers of functionally active axonal sprouts. In the diaphragm with predominant myogenic changes a profound protection from muscle fibre degeneration was observed under treatment. No effects of polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 were monitored at the level of motor neuron survival. The beneficial effects of polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 corresponded to a marked activation of the IGF1 receptor, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B) and the ribosomal protein S6 kinase in

  14. Androgen regulates development of the sexually dimorphic gastrin-releasing peptide neuron system in the lumbar spinal cord: evidence from a mouse line lacking androgen receptor in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Marie-Luce, Clarisse; Raskin, Kalina; Oti, Takumi; Satoh, Keita; Tamura, Kei; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2014-01-13

    Androgens including testosterone, organize the nervous system as well as masculine external and internal genitalia during the perinatal period. Androgen organization involves promotion of masculine body features, usually by acting through androgen receptors (ARs). We have recently demonstrated that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbar spinal cord also mediates spinal centers promoting penile reflexes during male sexual behavior in rats. Testosterone may induce sexual differentiation of this spinal GRP system during development and maintain its activation in adulthood. In the present study, we examined the role of ARs in the nervous system regulating the development of the sexually dimorphic GRP system. For this purpose, we used a conditional mouse line selectively lacking the AR gene in the nervous system. AR floxed males carrying (mutants) or not (controls) the nestin-Cre transgene were castrated in adulthood and supplemented with physiological amounts of testosterone. Loss of AR expression in the nervous system resulted in a significant decrease in the number of GRP neurons compared to control littermates. Consequently, the intensity of GRP axonal projections onto the lower lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord was greater in control males than in mutant males. These results suggest that ARs expressed in the nervous system play a significant role in the development of the GRP system in the male lumbar spinal cord. The AR-deletion mutation may attenuate sexual behavior and activity of mutant males via spinal GRP system-mediated neural mechanisms.

  15. Nogo-A is a reliable oligodendroglial marker in adult human and mouse CNS and in demyelinated lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Maruschak, Brigitte;

    2007-01-01

    to be strongly expressed in mature oligodendrocytes in vivo. In the present investigation we analyzed the expression patterns of Nogo-A in adult mouse and human CNS as well as in demyelinating animal models and multiple sclerosis lesions. Nogo-A expression was compared with that of other frequently used...... oligodendroglial markers such as CC1, CNP, and in situ hybridization for proteolipid protein mRNA. Nogo-A strongly and reliably labeled oligodendrocytes in the adult CNS as well as in demyelinating lesions and thus represents a valuable tool for the identification of oligodendrocytes in human and mouse CNS tissue...... Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar...

  16. Classification of neurons by dendritic branching pattern. A categorisation based on Golgi impregnation of spinal and cranial somatic and visceral afferent and efferent cells in the adult human.

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-01-01

    Neurons from adult human brainstem and spinal cord, fixed by immersion in formalin, were impregnated by a Golgi method and examined in sections 100 micron thick. Objective numerical criteria were used to classify completely impregnated neurons. Only the parameters mentioned below were found to be valid. Neurons in 100 micron sections were classified on the basis of (i) the primary dendrite number, indicated by a Roman numeral and called group; (ii) the dendritic branching pattern, comprising ...

  17. Health promotion through fitness for adolescents and young adults following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P A

    1996-09-01

    A study by Warms (1987) sought to determine both the health care actually received by individuals following a spinal cord injury and the services they desired but did not obtain. The findings suggest that the general health promotion needs of these individuals are the same as for the general population and, though disability related topics are discussed with health care providers, information on health promotion is not received. The leading two services desired by the respondents but not obtained were planning an exercise program (43%) and referral to a fitness center (26%). A plan for health promotion through fitness was designed for individuals with physical disabilities to assist in meeting the identified needs. The program provides several benefits which include: improved function, a positive impact on lifestyle, and a decrease in the risk of complications. The plan includes a general health appraisal and fitness assessment as well as an exercise and fitness prescription with adapted physical activity and sports participation as integral parts. Evaluation methodology is incorporated to demonstrate that health promotion activities positively effect function and lifestyle and decrease severity of complications.

  18. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse. PMID:26792809

  19. Characterization of neural stem cells and their progeny in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furube, Eriko; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    Although evidence has accumulated that neurogenesis and gliogenesis occur in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of adult mammalian brains, recent studies indicate the presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in adult brains, particularly the circumventricular regions. In the present study, we aimed to determine characterization of NSCs and their progenitor cells in the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, subfornical organ, and area postrema of adult mouse. There were two types of NSCs: tanycyte-like ependymal cells and astrocyte-like cells. Astrocyte-like NSCs proliferated slowly and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) actively divided. Molecular marker protein expression of NSCs and their progenitor cells were similar to those reported in the SVZ and SGZ, except that astrocyte-like NSCs expressed S100β. These circumventricular NSCs possessed the capacity to give rise to oligodendrocytes and sparse numbers of neurons and astrocytes in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. The inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling by using a VEGF receptor-associated tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 largely suppressed basal proliferation of OPCs. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide attenuated proliferation of OPCs and induced remarkable proliferation of microglia. The present study indicates that sensory circumventricular NSCs provide new neurons and glial cells in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. PMID:25994374

  20. Postural control during gait initiation and termination of adults with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Jean-François; Duclos, Cyril; Nadeau, Sylvie; Gagnon, Dany H

    2015-06-01

    Gait initiation and termination are potentially challenging tasks for balance due to the transition from a quasi-static bipedal phase to a dynamic single-support phase. The purpose of this study was to compare the bipedal and single-support phases of gait initiation and termination in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI). Twelve individuals with ISCI were evaluated on the dynamic and postural components of balance using the stabilizing and destabilizing forces during gait initiation, termination and natural gait. Phase comparisons were made using non parametric tests. Visual inspection of the force profile of the factors explaining the forces was also conducted. Gait termination challenged more the postural control during the single-support phase than the bipedal phase for the dynamic component of the stabilizing/destabilizing forces model (p=.002). For gait initiation, the most challenging phase varied with the components analyzed (single-support phase for the dynamic component, bipedal phase for the postural component) (p⩽.008). The single support phase is more challenged during gait termination (both components) (p⩽.015) while the bipedal phase is more challenged during gait initiation (dynamic components) (p=.012). The stabilizing force and the speed of the center of mass on the one hand, and destabilizing force and the distance between the center of pressure and the base of support on the other hand, had a similar profile. The single-support phase of gait termination was the most challenging among all phases evaluated, being as challenging as the single-support phase of level natural gait. This phase should be targeted in rehabilitation in order to improve balance and decrease the risk of falling in this population.

  1. Early Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Release for Correction of Sagittal Imbalance in Patients with Adult Spinal Deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen R. Deukmedjian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to evaluate a novel surgical technique in the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis and present our early experience with the minimally invasive lateral approach for anterior longitudinal ligament release to provide lumbar lordosis and examine its impact on sagittal balance. Methods. All patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD treated with the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas interbody fusion (MIS LIF for release of the anterior longitudinal ligament were examined. Patient demographics, clinical data, spinopelvic parameters, and outcome measures were recorded. Results. Seven patients underwent release of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALR to improve sagittal imbalance. All cases were split into anterior and posterior stages, with mean estimated blood loss of 125 cc and 530 cc, respectively. Average hospital stay was 8.3 days, and mean follow-up time was 9.1 months. Comparing pre- and postoperative 36′′ standing X-rays, the authors discovered a mean increase in global lumbar lordosis of 24 degrees, increase in segmental lumbar lordosis of 17 degrees per level of ALL released, decrease in pelvic tilt of 7 degrees, and decrease in sagittal vertical axis of 4.9 cm. At the last followup, there was a mean improvement in VAS and ODI scores of 26.2% and 18.3%. Conclusions. In the authors’ early experience, release of the anterior longitudinal ligament using the minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach may be a feasible alternative in correcting sagittal deformity.

  2. Adult human neural stem cells : Properties in vitro and as xenografts in the spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Westerlund, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    Though the presence of stem cells in the adult human brain has been presented earlier, much has yet to be discovered about these cells. However, the mere potential of these cells has had a significant impact of how we today evaluate the regenerative capacity of the central nervous system and, importantly, on the possible means for science to provide insights in neural repair. In this thesis a series of in vitro studies, based on the formation of neurospheres, was used to...

  3. Correlation of in vivo and ex vivo 1H-MRI with histology in two severities of mouse spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noristani, Harun N.; Lonjon, Nicolas; Cardoso, Maïda; Le Corre, Marine; Chan-Seng, Emilie; Captier, Guillaume; Privat, Alain; Coillot, Christophe; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Perrin, Florence E.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating neuropathology with no effective treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology is the only method used to assess the impact of an injury on the structure and function of the human spinal cord. Moreover, in pre-clinical SCI research, MRI is a non-invasive method with great translational potential since it provides relevant longitudinal assessment of anatomical and structural alterations induced by an injury. It is only recently that MRI techniques have been effectively used for the follow-up of SCI in rodents. However, the vast majority of these studies have been carried out on rats and when conducted in mice, the contusion injury model was predominantly chosen. Due to the remarkable potential of transgenic mice for studying the pathophysiology of SCI, we examined the use of both in and ex vivo 1H-MRI (9.4 T) in two severities of the mouse SCI (hemisection and over-hemisection) and documented their correlation with histological assessments. We demonstrated that a clear distinction between the two injury severities is possible using in and ex vivo 1H-MRI and that ex vivo MR images closely correlate with histology. Moreover, tissue modifications at a remote location from the lesion epicenter were identified by conventional ex vivo MRI analysis. Therefore, in vivo MRI has the potential to accurately identify in mice the progression of tissue alterations induced by SCI and is successfully implemented by ex vivo MRI examination. This combination of in and ex vivo MRI follow-up associated with histopathological assessment provides a valuable approach for further studies intended to evaluate therapeutic strategies on SCI. PMID:25798092

  4. Expression profiling of long noncoding RNAs in neonatal and adult mouse testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Sun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, advancements in genome-wide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs is pervasively transcribed in the genome and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated lncRNAs as a new class of regulatory molecules are involved in mammalian development (Carninci et al. (2005; Fatica and Bozzoni (2014, but very few studies have been conducted on the potential roles of lncRNAs in mammalian testis development. To get insights into the expression patterns of lncRNA during mouse testis development, we investigated the lncRNAs expression profiles of neonatal and adult mouse testes using microarray platform and related results have been published (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013 e75750.. Here, we describe in detail the experimental system, methods and validation for the generation of the microarray data associated with our recent publication (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013 e75750.. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE43442.

  5. Expression profile of microRNAs regulating proliferation and differentiation in mouse adult cardiac stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Brás-Rosário

    Full Text Available The identification of cardiac cells with stem cell properties changed the paradigm of the heart as a post mitotic organ. These cells proliferate and differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, providing for cardiac cell homeostasis and regeneration. microRNAs are master switches controlling proliferation and differentiation, in particular regulating stem cell biology and cardiac development. Modulation of microRNAs -regulated gene expression networks holds the potential to control cell fate and proliferation, with predictable biotechnologic and therapeutic applications. To obtain insights into the regulatory networks active in cardiac stem cells, we characterized the expression profile of 95 microRNAs with reported functions in stem cell and tissue differentiation in mouse cardiac stem cells, and compared it to that of mouse embryonic heart and mesenchymal stem cells. The most highly expressed microRNAs identified in cardiac stem cells are known to target key genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and adhesion, vascular function and cardiomyocyte differentiation. We report a subset of differentially expressed microRNAs that are proposed to act as regulators of differentiation and proliferation of adult cardiac stem cells, providing novel insights into active gene expression networks regulating their biological properties.

  6. Chronic morphine induces premature mitosis of proliferating cells in the adult mouse subgranular zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandyam, Chitra D; Norris, Rebekah D; Eisch, Amelia J

    2004-06-15

    The birth of cells with neurogenic potential in the adult brain is assessed commonly by detection of exogenous S phase markers, such as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Analysis of other phases of the cell cycle, however, can provide insight into how external factors, such as opiates, influence the cycling of newly born cells. To this end, we examined the expression of two endogenous cell cycle markers in relation to BrdU: proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phosphorylated histone H3 (pHisH3). Two hours after one intraperitoneal BrdU injection, BrdU-, PCNA-, and pHisH3-immunoreactive (IR) cells exhibited similar distribution in the adult mouse subgranular zone (SGZ). Quantitative analysis within the SGZ revealed a relative abundance of cells labeled for PCNA > BrdU > pHisH3. Similar to our reports in rat SGZ, chronic morphine treatment decreased BrdU- and PCNA-IR cells in mouse SGZ by 28 and 38%, respectively. We also show that pHisH3-IR cells are influenced by chronic morphine to a greater extent (58% decrease) than are BrdU- or PCNA-IR cells. Cell cycle phase analysis of SGZ BrdU-IR cells using triple labeling for BrdU, PCNA, and pHisH3 revealed premature mitosis in chronic morphine-treated mice. These results suggest that morphine-treated mice have a shorter Gap2/mitosis (G(2)/M) phase when compared to sham-treated mice. These findings demonstrate the power of using a combination of exogenous and endogenous cell cycle markers and nuclear morphology to track proliferating cells through different phases of the cell cycle and to reveal the regulation of cell cycle phase by chronic morphine. PMID:15160390

  7. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERT)Nat)/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  8. Illness experience of adults with cervical spinal cord injury in Japan: a qualitative investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ide-Okochi Ayako

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing recognition that healthcare policy should be guided by the illness experience from a layperson’s or insider’s perspective. One such area for exploration would include patient-centered research on traumatic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, a condition associated with permanent physical disability requiring long-term and often complex health care. The chronicity of SCI can, in turn, affect individuals’ sense of self. Although previous research in Western countries suggests that people with SCI find a way to cope with their disability through social participation and family bonds, the process of adjustment among people with cervical SCI (CSCI living in Japan may be different because of the restrained conditions of their social participation and the excessive burden on family caregivers. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of injury and the process of accommodation in people with CSCI in Japan. Methods Semi-structured home interviews were conducted with 29 participants who were recruited from a home-visit nursing care provider and three self-help groups. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed based on the grounded theory approach. Results Five core categories emerged from the interview data: being at a loss, discrediting self by self and others, taking time in performance, restoring competency, and transcending limitations of disability. Overall, the process by which participants adjusted to and found positive meaning in their lives involved a continuous search for comfortable relationships between self, disability and society. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that persons with CSCI do not merely have disrupted lives, but find positive meaning through meaningful interactions. Family members added to the discredit of self by making the injured person entirely dependent on them. Gaining independence from family members was the key to restoring competency in people with CSCI

  9. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-07-29

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes. PMID:26923756

  10. Growth Factors Released from Gelatin Hydrogel Microspheres Increase New Neurons in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Nakaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that new neurons are continuously generated by endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian brain. Some of these new neurons migrate to injured brain tissues and differentiate into mature neurons, suggesting that such new neurons may be able to replace neurons lost to degenerative disease or injury and improve or repair neurological deficits. Here, we tested whether delivering growth factors via gelatin hydrogel microspheres would support neurogenesis in the SVZ. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons in the SVZ. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons migrating from the SVZ towards the injured striatum in a stroke model in mouse. These results suggest that the strategy of using gelatin hydrogel microspheres to achieve the sustained release of growth factors holds promise for the clinical regeneration of damaged brain tissues from endogenous neural stem cells in the adult SVZ.

  11. Osteoporotic spinal burst fracture in a young adult as first presentation of systemic mastocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ble, Christina; Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P; Anestis, Dimitrios M; Hadjileontiadou, Sofia; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Papaioannou, Maria; Tsonidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are uncommon in young adults and usually indicate an underlying disease. Systemic mastocytosis is a myeloproliferative neoplasm, which can be associated with osteoporosis. A previously healthy 30-year-old man presented with an L4 burst fracture after lifting a heavy object. He was operated with laminectomy and posterior lumbar instrumentation. During surgery, abnormally soft bone was noted. Postoperatively, osteoporosis was confirmed with measurement of bone mineral density. Further investigation revealed elevated serum tryptase levels while bone marrow biopsy findings showed systemic mastocytosis. He was also tested positive for D816V KIT mutation. Treatment with biphosphonates and interferon was initiated. No extraskeletal involvement was noted up to the last checkup, 18 months after the first presentation. Abrupt vertebral fractures in apparently healthy young individuals should raise the suspicion of an underlying pathology. Prompt identification and treatment of systemic mastocytosis is crucial in order to avoid unexpected sequelae. PMID:27141048

  12. Superoxide dismutase 1 and tgSOD1 mouse spinal cord seed fibrils, suggesting a propagative cell death mechanism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Ruth Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that specifically affects motor neurons and leads to a progressive and ultimately fatal loss of function, resulting in death typically within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis. The disease starts with a focal centre of weakness, such as one limb, and appears to spread to other parts of the body. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 are known to cause disease and it is generally accepted they lead to pathology not by loss of enzymatic activity but by gain of some unknown toxic function(s. Although different mutations lead to varying tendencies of SOD1 to aggregate, we suggest abnormal proteins share a common misfolding pathway that leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that misfolding of superoxide dismutase 1 leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils associated with seeding activity, which can accelerate the formation of new fibrils in an autocatalytic cascade. The time limiting event is nucleation to form a stable protein "seed" before a rapid linear polymerisation results in amyloid fibrils analogous to other protein misfolding disorders. This phenomenon was not confined to fibrils of recombinant protein as here we show, for the first time, that spinal cord homogenates obtained from a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses mutant human superoxide dismutase 1 (the TgSOD1(G93A mouse also contain amyloid seeds that accelerate the formation of new fibrils in both wildtype and mutant SOD1 protein in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide new insights into ALS disease mechanism and in particular a mechanism that could account for the spread of pathology throughout the nervous system. This model of disease spread, which has analogies to other protein misfolding disorders such as prion disease, also suggests it may be possible to design assays for therapeutics that can inhibit fibril propagation and

  13. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vihstadt, Corrie; Maiers, Michele; Westrom, Kristine;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population...... 1:1 allocation; computer generated scheme, concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. BLINDING: Functional outcome examiners are blinded to treatment allocation; physical nature of the treatments prevents blinding of participants and providers to treatment assignment. PRIMARY...... outcomes include pain, general health status, improvement, self-efficacy, kinesiophobia, satisfaction, and medication use. Functional outcome assessment occurs at baseline and week 37 for hand grip strength, short physical performance battery, and accelerometry. Individual qualitative interviews...

  14. Temporal profiles of synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult mouse hippocampus with methotrexate treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miyoung Yang; Juhwan Kim; Sung-Ho Kim; Joong-Sun Kim; Taekyun Shin; Changjong Moon

    2012-01-01

    Methotrexate, which is used to treat many malignancies and autoimmune diseases, affects brain functions including hippocampal-dependent memory function. However, the precise mechanisms underlying methotrexate-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. To evaluate temporal changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals, the expression and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cAMP responsive element-binding protein, glutamate receptor 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were examined in the hippocampi of adult C57BL/6 mice after methotrexate (40 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Western blot analysis showed biphasic changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult hippocampi following methotrexate treatment. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, cal-cium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and glutamate receptor 1 were acutely activated dur-ing the early phase (1 day post-injection), while extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and cAMP responsive element-binding protein activation showed biphasic increases during the early (1 day post-injection) and late phases (7-14 days post-injection). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased significantly during the late phase (7-14 days post-injection). Therefore, methotrexate treatment affects synaptic plasticity-related signals in the adult mouse hippocampus, suggesting that changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals may be associated with neuronal survival and plasticity-related cellular remodeling.

  15. Stroke increases neural stem cells and angiogenesis in the neurogenic niche of the adult mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Lan Zhang

    Full Text Available The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction.

  16. Multipotent stem cells isolated from the adult mouse retina are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianqing Li; Michelle Lewallen; Shuyi Chen; Wei Yu; Nian Zhang; Ting Xie

    2013-01-01

    Various stem cell types have been tested for their potential application in treating photoreceptor degenerative diseases,such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).Only embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have so far been shown to generate functional photoreceptor cells restoring light response of photoreceptordeficient mice,but there is still some concern of tumor formation.In this study,we have successfully cultured Nestin+Sox2+Pax6+ multipotent retinal stem cells (RSCs) from the adult mouse retina,which are capable of producing functional photoreceptor cells that restore the light response of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice following transplantation.After they have been expanded for over 35 passages in the presence of FGF and EGF,the cultured RSCs still maintain stable proliferation and differentiation potential.Under proper differentiation conditions,they can differentiate into all the major retinal cell types found in the adult retina.More importantly,they can efficiently differentiate into photoreceptor cells under optimized differentiation conditions.Following transplantation into the subretinal space of slowly degenerating rd7 mutant eyes,RSC-derived photoreceptor cells integrate into the retina,morphologically resembling endogenous photoreceptors and forming synapases with resident retinal neurons.When transplanted into eyes of photoreceptor-deficient rd1 mutant mice,a RP model,RSC-derived photoreceptors can partially restore light response,indicating that those RSC-derived photoreceptors are functional.Finally,there is no evidence for tumor formation in the photoreceptor-transplanted eyes.Therefore,this study has demonstrated that RSCs isolated from the adult retina have the potential of producing functional photoreceptor cells that can potentially restore lost vision caused by loss of photoreceptor cells in RP and AMD.

  17. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanchun [Department of Histology and Embryology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Department of Histology and Embryology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Guan, Yingjun, E-mail: guanyj@wfmc.edu.cn [Department of Histology and Embryology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Department of Histology and Embryology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu, Huancai [Department of Orthopedic, Affiliated Hospital, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong (China); Wang, Xin, E-mail: xwang@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  18. Comparison of functional recovery of manual dexterity after unilateral spinal cord lesion or motor cortex lesion in adult macaque monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eHoogewoud

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In relation to mechanisms involved in functional recovery of manual dexterity from cervical cord injury or from motor cortical injury, our goal was to determine whether the movements that characterize post-lesion functional recovery are comparable to original movement patterns or do monkeys adopt distinct strategies to compensate the deficits depending on the type of lesion? To this aim, data derived from earlier studies, using a skilled finger task (the modified Brinkman board from which pellets are retrieved from vertical or horizontal slots, in spinal cord and motor cortex injured monkeys were analyzed and compared. Twelve adult macaque monkeys were subjected to a hemi-section of the cervical cord (n=6 or to a unilateral excitotoxic lesion of the hand representation in the primary motor cortex (n=6. In addition, in each subgroup, one half of monkeys (n=3 were treated for 30 days with a function blocking antibody against the neurite growth inhibitory protein Nogo-A, while the other half (n=3 represented control animals. The motor deficits, and the extent and time course of functional recovery were assessed.For some of the parameters investigated (wrist angle for horizontal slots and movement types distribution for vertical slots after cervical injury; movement types distribution for horizontal slots after motor cortex lesion, post-lesion restoration of the original movement patterns (true recovery led to a quantitatively better functional recovery. In the motor cortex lesion groups, pharmacological reversible inactivation experiments showed that the peri-lesion territory of the primary motor cortex or re-arranged, spared domain of the lesion zone, played a major role in the functional recovery, together with the ipsilesional intact premotor cortex.

  19. Perinatal modification of a sexually dimorphic motor nucleus in the spinal cord of the B6D2F1 house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C K; Clemens, L G

    1989-04-01

    The sexually dimorphic dorsomedial nucleus (DM) of the spinal cord of mice is affected by gonadal steroids in adulthood and these effects are dependent upon genotype. Following castration of adult mice there is a decrease in DM cell size in DBA/2J and hybrid B6D2F1 strains and a decrease in the number of cells staining with thionin in C57B1/6J and B6D2F1 strains. The effects of androgens on development of the DM nucleus were examined in B6D2F1 mice, which exhibit both characteristics in adulthood. Testosterone propionate (TP) administered to females pre- or postnatally resulted in a significantly larger number of motoneurons in the region of the DM when compared to administration of the vehicle alone, while soma area remained unchanged. Adult males castrated on the day of birth had significantly fewer cells in the DM than did intact males. Differences in cell size between shams and castrates were dependent upon age. PMID:2780856

  20. Testosterone treatment fails to accelerate disease in a transgenic mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S. Chevalier-Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from multiple animal models demonstrates that testosterone plays a crucial role in the progression of symptoms in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, a condition that results in neurodegeneration and muscle atrophy in affected men. Mice bearing a transgene encoding a human androgen receptor (AR that contains a stretch of 112 glutamines (expanded polyglutamine tract; AR112Q mice reproduce several aspects of the human disease. We treated transgenic male AR112Q mice with testosterone for 6 months. Surprisingly, testosterone treatment of AR112Q males did not exacerbate the disease. Although transgenic AR112Q males exhibited functional deficits when compared with non-transgenics, long-term testosterone treatment had no effect on motor function. Testosterone treatment also failed to affect cellular markers of disease, including inclusion formation (the accumulation of large nuclear aggregates of mutant AR protein and levels of unphosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain. These data suggest that the mechanism of disease in SBMA saturates at close to endogenous hormone levels and that individuals with SBMA who take, or have taken, testosterone for its putative therapeutic properties are unlikely to suffer adverse effects.

  1. Anoctamins support calcium-dependent chloride secretion by facilitating calcium signaling in adult mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Rainer; Faria, Diana; Skryabin, Boris V; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Rock, Jason R; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal epithelial electrolyte secretion is activated by increase in intracellular cAMP or Ca(2+) and opening of apical Cl(-) channels. In infants and young animals, but not in adults, Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels may cause secretory diarrhea during rotavirus infection. While detailed knowledge exists concerning the contribution of cAMP-activated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels, analysis of the role of Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels became possible through identification of the anoctamin (TMEM16) family of proteins. We demonstrate expression of several anoctamin paralogues in mouse small and large intestines. Using intestinal-specific mouse knockout models for anoctamin 1 (Ano1) and anoctamin 10 (Ano10) and a conventional knockout model for anoctamin 6 (Ano6), we demonstrate the role of anoctamins for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion induced by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCH). Ano1 is preferentially expressed in the ileum and large intestine, where it supports Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion. In contrast, Ano10 is essential for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in jejunum, where expression of Ano1 was not detected. Although broadly expressed, Ano6 has no role in intestinal cholinergic Cl(-) secretion. Ano1 is located in a basolateral compartment/membrane rather than in the apical membrane, where it supports CCH-induced Ca(2+) increase, while the essential and possibly only apical Cl(-) channel is CFTR. These results define a new role of Ano1 for intestinal Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion and demonstrate for the first time a contribution of Ano10 to intestinal transport.

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonist treatment during mouse embryogenesis impairs social behavior and cognitive function of adult male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanna M; Cuasay, Katrina; Abebe, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a regulator of rodent embryogenesis during the period of neural tube closure. VIP enhanced growth in whole cultured mouse embryos; treatment with a VIP antagonist during embryogenesis inhibited growth and development. VIP antagonist treatment during embryogenesis also had permanent effects on adult brain chemistry and impaired social recognition behavior in adult male mice. The neurological deficits of autism appear to be initiated during neural tube closure and social behavior deficits are among the key characteristics of this disorder that is more common in males and is frequently accompanied by mental retardation. The current study examined the blockage of VIP during embryogenesis as a model for the behavioral deficits of autism. Treatment of pregnant mice with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10 had no apparent effect on the general health or sensory or motor capabilities of adult offspring. However, male offspring exhibited reduced sociability in the social approach task and deficits in cognitive function, as assessed through cued and contextual fear conditioning. Female offspring did not show these deficiencies. These results suggest that this paradigm has usefulness as a mouse model for aspects of autism as it selectively impairs male offspring who exhibit the reduced social behavior and cognitive dysfunction seen in autism. Furthermore, the study indicates that the foundations of some aspects of social behavior are laid down early in mouse embryogenesis, are regulated in a sex specific manner and that interference with embryonic regulators such as VIP can have permanent effects on adult social behavior.

  3. Transplantation of adult mouse iPS cell-derived photoreceptor precursors restores retinal structure and function in degenerative mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budd A Tucker

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine whether adult mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, could be used to produce retinal precursors and subsequently photoreceptor cells for retinal transplantation to restore retinal function in degenerative hosts. iPSCs were generated using adult dsRed mouse dermal fibroblasts via retroviral induction of the transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, KLF4 and c-Myc. As with normal mouse ES cells, adult dsRed iPSCs expressed the pluripotency genes SSEA1, Oct4, Sox2, KLF4, c-Myc and Nanog. Following transplantation into the eye of immune-compromised retinal degenerative mice these cells proceeded to form teratomas containing tissue comprising all three germ layers. At 33 days post-differentiation a large proportion of the cells expressed the retinal progenitor cell marker Pax6 and went on to express the photoreceptor markers, CRX, recoverin, and rhodopsin. When tested using calcium imaging these cells were shown to exhibit characteristics of normal retinal physiology, responding to delivery of neurotransmitters. Following subretinal transplantation into degenerative hosts differentiated iPSCs took up residence in the retinal outer nuclear layer and gave rise to increased electro retinal function as determined by ERG and functional anatomy. As such, adult fibroblast-derived iPSCs provide a viable source for the production of retinal precursors to be used for transplantation and treatment of retinal degenerative disease.

  4. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the nociceptin-induced pain-related behaviors in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Shinobu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Orito, Tohru; Katsuyama, Sou; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Sakurada, Chikai; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Sakurada, Tsukasa

    2004-11-01

    Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of nociceptin elicited a behavioral response mainly consisting of biting and licking, which were eliminated by the i.t. co-administration of opioid receptor-like-1 (ORL-1) receptor antagonists. The behavioral response induced by nociceptin was characteristically similar to that by i.t.-administered histamine, and was attenuated by i.t. co-administration of the H1 receptor antagonists, but not by the H2 receptor antagonists, whereas the H3 receptor antagonist promoted the nociceptin-induced behavior. H1 receptor knockout (H1R-KO) mice did not show the nociceptin-induced nociceptive behavior, which was observed in wild-type mice. Pretreatment with a histamine antiserum or a histidine decarboxylase inhibitor resulted in a significant reduction of the response to nociceptin. The previous studies showed that NK1 receptor antagonists and a novel substance P (SP)-specific antagonist given i.t. could reduce the behavioral response to nociceptin and histamine. On the other hand, the nociceptive response induced by nociceptin, but not histamine, was completely attenuated by the i.t. co-administration of agonists for GABAA and GABAB receptors. In contrast, the antagonists for GABAA and GABAB receptors injected i.t. showed same nociceptive response with nociceptin and histamine, and their nociceptive responses were significantly blocked by the i.t. co-administration of the H1 receptor antagonists, but not H2 receptor antagonists or ORL-1 receptor antagonists. The present results suggest that the activation of the ORL-1 receptor by nociceptin may induce the disinhibition of histaminergic neuron and enhance the release of histamine, which subsequently acts on the H1 receptor located on the SP-containing neurons to produce the spinal cord-mediated nociceptive response.

  5. Immunostaining for Homer reveals the majority of excitatory synapses in laminae I-III of the mouse spinal dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Kuehn, Emily D; Abraira, Victoria E; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Todd, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    The spinal dorsal horn processes somatosensory information before conveying it to the brain. The neuronal organization of the dorsal horn is still poorly understood, although recent studies have defined several distinct populations among the interneurons, which account for most of its constituent neurons. All primary afferents, and the great majority of neurons in laminae I-III are glutamatergic, and a major factor limiting our understanding of the synaptic circuitry has been the difficulty in identifying glutamatergic synapses with light microscopy. Although there are numerous potential targets for antibodies, these are difficult to visualize with immunocytochemistry, because of protein cross-linking following tissue fixation. Although this can be overcome by antigen retrieval methods, these lead to difficulty in detecting other antigens. The aim of this study was to test whether the postsynaptic protein Homer can be used to reveal glutamatergic synapses in the dorsal horn. Immunostaining for Homer gave punctate labeling when viewed by confocal microscopy, and this was restricted to synapses at the ultrastructural level. We found that Homer puncta were colocalized with the AMPA receptor GluR2 subunit, but not with the inhibitory synapse-associated protein gephyrin. We also examined several populations of glutamatergic axons and found that most boutons were in contact with at least one Homer punctum. These results suggest that Homer antibodies can be used to reveal the great majority of glutamatergic synapses without antigen retrieval. This will be of considerable value in tracing synaptic circuits, and also in investigating plasticity of glutamatergic synapses in pain states. PMID:27185486

  6. Spinal cord pathology is ameliorated by P2X7 antagonism in a SOD1-mutant mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina Apolloni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the role of P2X7, a receptor for extracellular ATP, in modulating physiopathological mechanisms in the central nervous system. In particular, P2X7 has been shown to be implicated in neuropsychiatry, chronic pain, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Remarkably, P2X7 has also been shown to be a ‘gene modifier’ in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS: the receptor is upregulated in spinal cord microglia in human and rat at advanced stages of the disease; in vitro, activation of P2X7 exacerbates pro-inflammatory responses in microglia that have an ALS phenotype, as well as toxicity towards neuronal cells. Despite this detrimental in vitro role of P2X7, in SOD1-G93A mice lacking P2X7, the clinical onset of ALS was significantly accelerated and disease progression worsened, thus indicating that the receptor might have some beneficial effects, at least at certain stages of disease. In order to clarify this dual action of P2X7 in ALS pathogenesis, in the present work we used the antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG, a blood-brain barrier permeable and safe drug that has already been proven to reduce neuroinflammation in traumatic brain injury, cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, neuropathic pain and experimental autoimmune encephalitis. We tested BBG in the SOD1-G93A ALS mouse model at asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic and late pre-symptomatic phases of disease. BBG at late pre-onset significantly enhanced motor neuron survival and reduced microgliosis in lumbar spinal cord, modulating inflammatory markers such as NF-κB, NADPH oxidase 2, interleukin-1β, interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This was accompanied by delayed onset and improved general conditions and motor performance, in both male and female mice, although survival appeared unaffected. Our results prove the twofold role of P2X7 in the course of ALS and establish that P2X7 modulation might represent a promising

  7. Axon diameter and myelin sheath thickness in nerve fibres of the ventral spinal root of the seventh lumbar nerve of the adult and developing cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Berthold, C H; Nilsson, I; Rydmark, M

    1983-01-01

    The axon diameter (d) and the number of myelin sheath lamellae (nl) were estimated in electron micrographs of cross sectioned ventral spinal roots of the seventh lumbar nerve of adult cats, kittens and cat fetuses. Myelination started between the 40th and the 45th day after mating (about 3 weeks before birth). From birth onwards the calibre spectrum consisted of a group of small fibres and a group of large fibres. During the first two postnatal months the point distribution of the number of m...

  8. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Adult pallium transcriptomes surprise in not reflecting predicted homologies across diverse chicken and mouse pallial sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgard, T Grant; Montiel, Juan F; Wang, Wei Zhi; García-Moreno, Fernando; Margulies, Elliott H; Ponting, Chris P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    The thorniest problem in comparative neurobiology is the identification of the particular brain region of birds and reptiles that corresponds to the mammalian neocortex [Butler AB, Reiner A, Karten HJ (2011) Ann N Y Acad Sci 1225:14-27; Wang Y, Brzozowska-Prechtl A, Karten HJ (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(28):12676-12681]. We explored which genes are actively transcribed in the regions of controversial ancestry in a representative bird (chicken) and mammal (mouse) at adult stages. We conducted four analyses comparing the expression patterns of their 5,130 most highly expressed one-to-one orthologous genes that considered global patterns of expression specificity, strong gene markers, and coexpression networks. Our study demonstrates transcriptomic divergence, plausible convergence, and, in two exceptional cases, conservation between specialized avian and mammalian telencephalic regions. This large-scale study potentially resolves the complex relationship between developmental homology and functional characteristics on the molecular level and settles long-standing evolutionary debates.

  10. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25256750

  11. Time-lapse imaging of neuroblast migration in acute slices of the adult mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlghatyan, Jivan; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2012-01-01

    the stationary and migratory phases is crucial for the unambiguous interpretation of results. We also performed multiple z-step acquisitions to monitor neuroblasts migration in 3D. Wide-field fluorescent imaging has been used extensively to visualize neuronal migration. Here, we describe detailed protocol for labeling neuroblasts, performing real-time video-imaging of neuroblast migration in acute slices of the adult mouse forebrain, and analyzing cell migration. While the described protocol exemplified the migration of neuroblasts in the adult RMS, it can also be used to follow cell migration in embryonic and early postnatal brains. PMID:23007608

  12. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-Yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  13. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  14. Studies on repairing of hemisected thoracic spinal cord of adult rats by using a chitosan tube filled with alginate fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoguang; YANG Zhaoyang; YANG Yi

    2006-01-01

    A chitosan tube filled with alginate fibers was implanted into the injured spinal cord of a rat for repairing the damaged tissue. Twelve months after the operation, the morphological observation demonstrated that this chitosan tube could induce regeneration of myelinated and non-myelinated axons and blood vessels. The Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) behavioral evaluation confirmed that the implants played a key role in the long-term restoration of rats motor functions. It is a promising start in the treatment of the patients with the injury of the spinal cord.

  15. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α is required for cell differentiation and homeostasis in the adult mouse gastric epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Benjamin D; Khurana, Shradha S; Huh, Won Jae; Mills, Jason C

    2016-08-01

    We have previously shown that the sequential transcription factors Xbp1→Mist1 (Bhlha15) govern the ultrastructural maturation of the secretory apparatus in enzyme-secreting zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) in the gastric unit. Here we sought to identify transcriptional regulators upstream of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and MIST1. We used immunohistochemistry to characterize Hnf4α(flox/flox) adult mouse stomachs after tamoxifen-induced deletion of Hnf4α We used qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and chromatin immunoprecipitation to define the molecular interaction between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and Xbp1 in mouse stomach and human gastric cells. We show that HNF4α protein is expressed in pit (foveolar) cells, mucous neck cells, and zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) of the corpus gastric unit. Loss of HNF4α in adult mouse stomach led to reduced ZC size and ER content, phenocopying previously characterized effects of Xbp1 deletion. However, HNF4α(Δ/Δ) stomachs also exhibited additional phenotypes including increased proliferation in the isthmal stem cell zone and altered mucous neck cell migration, indicating a role of HNF4α in progenitor cells as well as in ZCs. HNF4α directly occupies the Xbp1 promoter locus in mouse stomach, and forced HNF4α expression increased abundance of XBP1 mRNA in human gastric cancer cells. Finally, as expected, loss of HNF4α caused decreased Xbp1 and Mist1 expression in mouse stomachs. We show that HNF4α regulates homeostatic proliferation in the gastric epithelium and is both necessary and sufficient for the upstream regulation of the Xbp1→Mist1 axis in maintenance of ZC secretory architecture. PMID:27340127

  16. Vitamin B(12) dependent changes in mouse spinal cord expression of vitamin B(12) related proteins and the epidermal growth factor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutti, Elena; Lildballe, Dorte L; Kristensen, Lise;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) deficiency in the mammalian central nervous system causes degenerative damage, especially in the spinal cord. Previous studies have shown that cobalamin status alters spinal cord expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor in rats. Employing...

  17. Brief Isoflurane Anesthesia Produces Prominent Phosphoproteomic Changes in the Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohtala, Samuel; Theilmann, Wiebke; Suomi, Tomi; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Elo, Laura L; Rokka, Anne; Rantamäki, Tomi

    2016-06-15

    Anesthetics are widely used in medical practice and experimental research, yet the neurobiological basis governing their effects remains obscure. We have here used quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the protein phosphorylation changes produced by a 30 min isoflurane anesthesia in the adult mouse hippocampus. Altogether 318 phosphorylation alterations in total of 237 proteins between sham and isoflurane anesthesia were identified. Many of the hit proteins represent primary pharmacological targets of anesthetics. However, findings also enlighten the role of several other proteins-implicated in various biological processes including neuronal excitability, brain energy homeostasis, synaptic plasticity and transmission, and microtubule function-as putative (secondary) targets of anesthetics. In particular, isoflurane increases glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylation at the inhibitory Ser(9) residue and regulates the phosphorylation of multiple proteins downstream and upstream of this promiscuous kinase that regulate diverse biological functions. Along with confirmatory Western blot data for GSK3β and p44/42-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase; reduced phosphorylation of the activation loop), we observed increased phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on residues (Thr(1620,1623)) that have been shown to render its dissociation from microtubules and alterations in microtubule stability. We further demonstrate that diverse anesthetics (sevoflurane, urethane, ketamine) produce essentially similar phosphorylation changes on GSK3β, p44/p42-MAPK, and MAP2 as observed with isoflurane. Altogether our study demonstrates the potential of quantitative phosphoproteomics to study the mechanisms of anesthetics (and other drugs) in the mammalian brain and reveals how already a relatively brief anesthesia produces pronounced phosphorylation changes in multiple proteins in the central nervous system. PMID:27074656

  18. Effect of cyanotoxins on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male adult mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Xiong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microcystins LR (MC-LR are hepatotoxic cyanotoxins that have been shown to induce reproductive toxicity, and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis (HPG is responsible for the control of reproductive functions. However, few studies have been performed to evaluate the effects of MC-LR on HPG axis. This study aimed to investigate the MC-LR-induced toxicity in the reproductive system of mouse and focus on the HPG axis. METHODS: Adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to various concentrations of MC-LR (0, 3.75, 7.50, 15.00 and 30.00 µg/kg body weight per day for 1 to 14 days, and it was found that exposure to different concentrations of MC-LR significantly disturbed sperm production in the mice testes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To elucidate the associated possible mechanisms, the serum levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH were assessed. Meanwhile, PCR assays were employed to detect alterations in a series of genes involved in HPG axis, such as FSH, LH, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH and their complement receptors. Furthermore, the effect of MC-LR on the viability and testosterone production of Leydig cells were tested in vitro. RESULTS: MC-LR significantly impaired the spermatogenesis of mice possibly through the direct or indirect inhibition of GnRH synthesis at the hypothalamic level, which resulted in reduction of serum levels of LH that lead to suppression of testosterone production in the testis of mice. CONCLUSIONS: MC-LR may be a GnRH toxin that would disrupt the reproductive system of mice.

  19. Release properties and functional integration of noradrenergic-rich tissue grafted to the denervated spinal cord of the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, G; Cataudella, T; Dimauro, R; Monaco, S; Stanzani, S

    1999-05-01

    Noradrenaline- (NA-) containing grafts of central (embryonic locus coeruleus, LC) or peripheral (juvenile adrenal medullary, AM, autologous superior cervical ganglionic, SCG) tissue were implanted unilaterally into rat lumbar spinal cord previously depleted of its NA content by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) intraventricularly. A microdialysis probe was implanted in the spinal cord 3-4 months after transplantation, and extracellular levels of noradrenaline were monitored in freely moving animals during basal conditions and following administration of pharmacological or behavioural stimuli. Age-matched normal and lesioned animals both served as controls. Morphometric analyses were carried out on horizontal spinal sections processed for dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunocitochemistry, in order to assess lesion- or graft-induced changes in the density of spinal noradrenergic innervation, relative to the normal patterns. In lesioned animals, the entire spinal cord was virtually devoid of DBH-positive fibers, resulting in a dramatic 88% reduction in baseline NA, compared with that in controls, which did not change in response to the various stimuli. LC and SCG grafts reinstated approximately 80% and 50% of normal innervation density, respectively, but they differed strikingly in their release ability. Thus, LC grafts restored baseline NA levels up to 60% of those in controls, and responded with significantly increased NA release to KCl-induced depolarization, neuronal uptake blockade and handling. In contrast, very low NA levels and only poor and inconsistent responses to the various stimuli were observed in the SCG-grafted animals. In AM-grafted animals, spinal extracellular NA levels were restored up to 45% of those in controls, probably as a result of nonsynaptic, endocrine-like release, as grafted AM cells retained the chromaffine phenotype, showed no detectable fibre outgrowth and did not respond to any of the pharmacological or behavioural challenges. Thus, both a

  20. The impact of maternal separation on adult mouse behaviour and on the total neuron number in the mouse hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, K.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    The maternal separation paradigm has been applied to C57BL/6J mice as an animal developmental model for understanding structural deficits leading to abnormal behaviour. A maternal separation (MS) model was used on postnatal day (PND) 9, where the pups were removed from their mother for 24 h (MS24......). When the pups were 10 weeks old, the level of anxiety and fear was measured with two behavioural tests; an open field test and an elevated plus maze test. The Barnes platform maze was used to test spatial learning, and memory by using acquisition trials followed by reverse trial sessions. The MS24 mice...... to controls. Apparently a single maternal separation can impact the number of neurons in mouse hippocampus either by a decrease of neurogenesis or as an increase in neuron apoptosis. This study is the first to assess the result of maternal separation combining behaviour and stereology Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  1. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius S Carreira

    Full Text Available The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR, either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease.

  2. Prospective multicenter assessment of perioperative and minimum 2-year postoperative complication rates associated with adult spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin S; Klineberg, Eric; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Renaud; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory M; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Han Jo; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Scheer, Justin K; Soroceanu, Alex; Kelly, Michael P; Line, Breton; Gupta, Munish; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert; Burton, Douglas C; Bess, Shay; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Although multiple reports have documented significant benefit from surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD), these procedures can have high complication rates. Previously reported complications rates associated with ASD surgery are limited by retrospective design, single-surgeon or single-center cohorts, lack of rigorous data on complications, and/or limited follow-up. Accurate definition of complications associated with ASD surgery is important and may serve as a resource for patient counseling and efforts to improve the safety of patient care. The authors conducted a study to prospectively assess the rates of complications associated with ASD surgery with a minimum 2-year follow-up based on a multicenter study design that incorporated standardized data-collection forms, on-site study coordinators, and regular auditing of data to help ensure complete and accurate reporting of complications. In addition, they report age stratification of complication rates and provide a general assessment of factors that may be associated with the occurrence of complications. METHODS As part of a prospective, multicenter ASD database, standardized forms were used to collect data on surgery-related complications. On-site coordinators and central auditing helped ensure complete capture of complication data. Inclusion criteria were age older than 18 years, ASD, and plan for operative treatment. Complications were classified as perioperative (within 6 weeks of surgery) or delayed (between 6 weeks after surgery and time of last follow-up), and as minor or major. The primary focus for analyses was on patients who reached a minimum follow-up of 2 years. RESULTS Of 346 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 291 (84%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean 2.1 years); their mean age was 56.2 years. The vast majority (99%) had treatment including a posterior procedure, 25% had an anterior procedure, and 19% had a 3-column osteotomy. At least 1 revision was required in 82

  3. Effects of C8 ventral root avulsion or transection on spinal alpha motoneurons in adult rats A qualitative light and electron microscopic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khulood M.AL-Khater; Bassem Y.Sheikh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Nerve root avulsion is a frequent finding in patients with brachial plexus injury following road traffic accidents or as a result of severe arm traction during complicated deliveries.This injury constitutes a challenging clinical and surgical problem.The orphological characteristics of motoneurons after nerve root avulsion deserve further analysis.OBJECTIVE:To study the different morphological changes of u -motoneurons under light and electron microscopy after C8 spinal ventral rootlets avulsion and transection at various stages.DESIGN:Controlled animal study.SETTING:Department of Anatomy,King Faisal University.MATERIALS:The experiment was carried out at the Department of Anatomy,College of Medicine,King Faisal University between January 2005 and March 2006.Six adult Sprague Dawley rats weighing 200-350 g, irrespective of gender,were used for this study.The animals were bred at the animal house,College of Medicine,King Faisal University,and fed on rat maintenance diet.Water and standard diet were supplied ad libitum.Animal interventions were carried out according to animal ethical standards.METHODS:Three animals were randomly chosen for avulsion of the right ventral rootlets of C8 spinal nerves.The other three received transection of the right ventral rootlets of C8 spinal nerves.①Avulsion experiment:After rats were anesthetized,the right ventral rootlets of C8 spinal nerves were identified.The ventral rootlets were avulsed from the spinal cord by traction with a fine hook(Fine Science Tools Inc.,No. 10031-13,Germany).Traction was exerted in a direction parallel to the course of the spinal root.Under the operating microscope,the Cs segment was exactly located.After checking the successfulness of the surgical procedure,the Ca segment was separated from the spinal cord.The outcome of the avulsion procedure was as follows:two animals had true avulsion,i.e.,no remaining stump was attached to the spinal cord surface.One rat had a stump still attached

  4. Huntingtin acts non cell-autonomously on hippocampal neurogenesis and controls anxiety-related behaviors in adult mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Pla

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, characterized by motor defects and psychiatric symptoms, including mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. HD is caused by an abnormal polyglutamine (polyQ expansion in the huntingtin (HTT protein. The development and analysis of various mouse models that express pathogenic polyQ-HTT revealed a link between mutant HTT and the development of anxio-depressive behaviors and various hippocampal neurogenesis defects. However, it is unclear whether such phenotype is linked to alteration of HTT wild-type function in adults. Here, we report the analysis of a new mouse model in which HTT is inducibly deleted from adult mature cortical and hippocampal neurons using the CreER(T2/Lox system. These mice present defects in both the survival and the dendritic arborization of hippocampal newborn neurons. Our data suggest that these non-cell autonomous effects are linked to defects in both BDNF transport and release upon HTT silencing in hippocampal neurons, and in BDNF/TrkB signaling. The controlled deletion of HTT also had anxiogenic-like effects. Our results implicate endogenous wild-type HTT in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and in the control of mood disorders.

  5. Multipotential stem cells from the adult mouse brain proliferate and self-renew in response to basic fibroblast growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, A; Parati, E A; Cova, L; Frolichsthal, P; Galli, R; Wanke, E; Faravelli, L; Morassutti, D J; Roisen, F; Nickel, D D; Vescovi, A L

    1996-02-01

    It has been established that the adult mouse forebrain contains multipotential (neuronal/glial) progenitor cells that can be induced to proliferate in vitro when epidermal growth factor is provided. These cells are found within the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles, together with other progenitor cell populations, whose requirements for proliferation remain undefined. Using basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), we have isolated multipotential progenitors from adult mouse striatum. These progenitors proliferate and can differentiate into cells displaying the antigenic properties of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. The neuron-like cells possess neuronal features, exhibit neuronal electrophysiological properties, and are immunoreactive for GABA, substance P, choline acetyl-transferase, and glutamate. Clonal analysis confirmed the multipotency of these bFGF-dependent cells. Most significantly, subcloning experiments demonstrated that they were capable of self-renewal, which led to a progressive increase in population size over serial passaging. These results demonstrate that bFGF is mitogenic for multipotential cells from adult mammalian forebrain that possess stem cell properties. PMID:8558238

  6. Voltage-gated calcium channels are abnormal in cultured spinal motoneurons in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motoneurons. Hyperexcitability and excitotoxicity have been implicated in the early pathogenesis of ALS. Studies addressing excitotoxic motoneuron death and intracellular Ca(2+) overload have mostly focused on Ca(2+) influx through AMPA glutamate receptors. However, intrinsic excitability of motoneurons through voltage-gated ion channels may also have a role in the neurodegeneration. In this study we examined the function and localization of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in cultured spinal cord motoneurons from mice expressing a mutant form of human superoxide dismutase-1 with a Gly93→Ala substitution (G93A-SOD1). Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we showed that high voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) currents are increased in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, but low voltage activated Ca(2+) currents are not affected. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons also have altered persistent Ca(2+) current mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Quantitative single-cell RT-PCR revealed higher levels of Ca1a, Ca1b, Ca1c, and Ca1e subunit mRNA expression in G93A-SOD1 motoneurons, indicating that the increase of HVA Ca(2+) currents may result from upregulation of Ca(2+) channel mRNA expression in motoneurons. The localizations of the Ca1B N-type and Ca1D L-type Ca(2+) channels in motoneurons were examined by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. G93A-SOD1 motoneurons had increased Ca1B channels on the plasma membrane of soma and dendrites. Ca1D channels are similar on the plasma membrane of soma and lower on the plasma membrane of dendrites of G93A-SOD1 motoneurons. Our study demonstrates that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels have aberrant functions and localizations in ALS mouse motoneurons. The increased HVA Ca(2+) currents and PCCa current could contribute to early pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27151771

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine.

  8. Spinal myxopapillary ependymoma in an adult male presenting with recurrent acute low back pain: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Dean; Lystad, Reidar P

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal intramedullary ependymomas are very rare and occur more commonly in the cervical and upper thoracic regions. These neoplasms tend to manifest in young adulthood, and patients typically present with mild clinical symptoms without objective evidence of neurologic deficits. The mean duration of symptoms is 40 months until the lesion is diagnosed. Case Presentation A 48-year-old male police officer was referred to a chiropractic clinic by a general practitioner for the evaluatio...

  9. Classification of neurons by dendritic branching pattern. A categorisation based on Golgi impregnation of spinal and cranial somatic and visceral afferent and efferent cells in the adult human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-06-01

    Neurons from adult human brainstem and spinal cord, fixed by immersion in formalin, were impregnated by a Golgi method and examined in sections 100 micron thick. Objective numerical criteria were used to classify completely impregnated neurons. Only the parameters mentioned below were found to be valid. Neurons in 100 micron sections were classified on the basis of (i) the primary dendrite number, indicated by a Roman numeral and called group; (ii) the dendritic branching pattern, comprising the highest branching order seen, indicated by an Arabic numeral and called category; the lowest dendritic branching order observed in complete neurons, indicated by an upper case letter and called class; and the number of branching orders seen between the two preceding, indicated by a lower case letter and called subclass. On the basis of the above characteristics, all neurons seen in the grey matter of the spinal cord and cranial nerve nuclei could be classified into thirteen 'families'. The results of other investigations (Abdel-Maguid & Bowsher, 1979, 1984) showed that this classification has functional value. PMID:6204961

  10. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Luchetti; Silvia Anna Ciafrè; Michela Murdocca; Arianna Malgieri; Andrea Masotti; Massimo Sanchez; Maria Giulia Farace; Giuseppe Novelli; Federica Sangiuolo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidatin...

  11. Induced Neural Stem Cells Achieve Long-Term Survival and Functional Integration in the Adult Mouse Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Kathrin Hemmer; Mingyue Zhang; Thea van Wüllen; Marna Sakalem; Natalia Tapia; Aidos Baumuratov; Christian Kaltschmidt; Barbara Kaltschmidt; Hans R. Schöler; Weiqi Zhang; Jens C. Schwamborn

    2014-01-01

    Summary Differentiated cells can be converted directly into multipotent neural stem cells (i.e., induced neural stem cells [iNSCs]). iNSCs offer an attractive alternative to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology with regard to regenerative therapies. Here, we show an in vivo long-term analysis of transplanted iNSCs in the adult mouse brain. iNSCs showed sound in vivo long-term survival rates without graft overgrowths. The cells displayed a neural multilineage potential with a clear ...

  12. "The preadipocyte factor" DLK1 marks adult mouse adipose tissue residing vascular cells that lack in vitro adipogenic differentiation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Jensen, Line; Schrøder, Henrik Daa;

    2009-01-01

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1) is expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and has frequently been referred to as "the" preadipocyte marker, yet the phenotype of DLK1(+) cells in adipose tissue remains undetermined. Herein, we demonstrate that DLK1(+) cells encompass around 1-2% of the adult mouse adipose stromal......, generation of tube-like structures on matrigel, and uptake of Acetylated Low Density-Lipoprotein, all characteristics of endothelial cells. We therefore suggest that DLK1(+)SVF cells are of a vascular origin and not them-selves committed preadipocytes as assumed hitherto....

  13. Isolation and Assessment of Single Long-Term Reconstituting Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Adult Mouse Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David G; Dykstra, Brad J; Eaves, Connie J

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells with long-term repopulating activity can now be routinely obtained at purities of 40% to 50% from suspensions of adult mouse bone marrow. Here we describe robust protocols for both their isolation as CD45(+) EPCR(+) CD150(+) CD48(-) (ESLAM) cells using multiparameter cell sorting and for tracking their clonal growth and differentiation activity in irradiated mice transplanted with single ESLAM cells. The simplicity of these procedures makes them attractive for characterizing the molecular and biological properties of individual hematopoietic stem cells with unprecedented power and precision. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532815

  14. Myelosuppressive conditioning using busulfan enables bone marrow cell accumulation in the spinal cord of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coral-Ann B Lewis

    Full Text Available Myeloablative preconditioning using irradiation is the most commonly used technique to generate rodents having chimeric bone marrow, employed for the study of bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in the healthy and diseased central nervous system. However, irradiation has been shown to alter the blood-brain barrier, potentially creating confounding artefacts. To better study the potential of bone marrow-derived cells to function as treatment vehicles for neurodegenerative diseases alternative preconditioning regimens must be developed. We treated transgenic mice that over-express human mutant superoxide dismutase 1, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with busulfan to determine whether this commonly used chemotherapeutic leads to stable chimerism and promotes the entry of bone marrow-derived cells into spinal cord. Intraperitoneal treatment with busulfan at 60 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg followed by intravenous injection of green fluorescent protein-expressing bone marrow resulted in sustained levels of chimerism (~80%. Bone marrow-derived cells accumulated in the lumbar spinal cord of diseased mice at advanced stages of pathology at both doses, with limited numbers of bone marrow derived cells observed in the spinal cords of similarly treated, age-matched controls; the majority of bone marrow-derived cells in spinal cord immunolabelled for macrophage antigens. Comparatively, significantly greater numbers of bone marrow-derived cells were observed in lumbar spinal cord following irradiative myeloablation. These results demonstrate bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in diseased spinal cord is possible without irradiative preconditioning.

  15. Outcomes of a skiing program on level and stability of self-esteem and physical self in adults with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbin, Jean-Marc; Ninot, Grégory

    2008-03-01

    This study explored the intraindividual level and variability of global self-esteem and physical self-worth in adults with spinal cord injury over three consecutive periods, 4 weeks at home, 1 week in an adapted skiing program, and 4 weeks at home. Ten participants responded twice a day over a period of 9 weeks with the Physical Self Inventory, a six-item questionnaire with a visual analogue scale. The results showed that the program significantly increased the level of global self-esteem, physical self-worth, and three subdomains. The variability of the physical condition, sport competence, and physical strength subdomains was diminished after the program. The changes are discussed in terms of impact of a specific adapted physical activities program on physical self conceived as a complex system.

  16. Regulation of DM-20 mRNA expression and intracellular translocation of glutathione-S-transferase pi isoform during oligodendrocyte differentiation in the adult rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Takeda, Kazuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that NG2-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) do not express DM-20 mRNA and identified a distinct DM-20 mRNA-positive cell population expressing glutathione-S-transferase pi isoform (GST-pi) in the nucleus (GST-pi(Nuc)) of the adult rat spinal cord. As GST-pi intranuclear localization correlates with progenitor cell properties, we examined the differentiation status of this cell population under the intensive 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) administration method, consisting of intraperitoneal BrdU injections every 2 h for 48 h. We observed that a certain population of proliferating/proliferated cells expressed DM-20 mRNA, and sometimes two proliferating/proliferated cells were observed still attached to each other. We performed triple staining for BrdU, DM-20 mRNA, and NG2 and found pairs of neighboring BrdU-positive cells, which were considered to originate from the same progenitor cells and where both cells expressed DM-20 mRNA. Triple staining for BrdU, DM-20 mRNA, and GST-pi detected proliferating/proliferated cells exhibiting the GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-positive expression pattern. These findings suggested the presence of a GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-positive oligodendrocyte-lineage progenitor cell population in the adult rat spinal cord. However, we did not find any pair of neighboring BrdU-positive cells with this expression pattern. These observations collectively support the idea that GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-expressing cells are the progeny of NG2-positive OPCs rather than a novel type of oligodendrocyte-lineage progenitor cells and that DM-20 mRNA expression is dynamically regulated during differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes.

  17. Blockage of VIP during mouse embryogenesis modifies adult behavior and results in permanent changes in brain chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanna M; Hauser, Janet M; Sheppard, Lia M; Abebe, Daniel; Spivak-Pohis, Irit; Kushnir, Michal; Deitch, Iris; Gozes, Illana

    2007-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) regulates growth and development during the early postimplantation period of mouse embryogenesis. Blockage of VIP with a VIP antagonist during this period results in growth restriction, microcephaly, and developmental delays. Similar treatment of neonatal rodents also causes developmental delays and impaired diurnal rhythms, and the adult brains of these animals exhibit neuronal dystrophy and increased VIP binding. These data suggest that blockage of VIP during the development of the nervous system can result in permanent changes to the brain. In the current study, pregnant mice were treated with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10. The adult male offspring were examined in tests of novelty, paired activity, and social recognition. Brain tissue was examined for several measures of chemistry and gene expression of VIP and related compounds. Glial cells from the cortex of treated newborn mice were plated with neurons and examined for VIP binding and their ability to enhance neuronal survival. Treated adult male mice exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior and deficits in social behavior. Brain tissue exhibited regionally specific changes in VIP chemistry and a trend toward increased gene expression of VIP and related compounds that reached statistical significance in the VIP receptor, VPAC-1, in the female cortex. When compared to control astrocytes, astrocytes from treated cerebral cortex produced further increases in neuronal survival with excess synaptic connections and reduced VIP binding. In conclusion, impaired VIP activity during mouse embryogenesis resulted in permanent changes to both adult brain chemistry/cell biology and behavior with aspects of autism-like social deficits. PMID:17726225

  18. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z-Y; McDowell, T; Wang, P; Alvarez, R; Gomez, T; Bjorling, D E

    2014-09-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100ng/ml) for 30 min significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca(2 +) concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling.

  19. Genetic manipulation of adult-born hippocampal neurons rescues memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richetin, Kevin; Leclerc, Clémence; Toni, Nicolas; Gallopin, Thierry; Pech, Stéphane; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2015-02-01

    In adult mammals, neural progenitors located in the dentate gyrus retain their ability to generate neurons and glia throughout lifetime. In rodents, increased production of new granule neurons is associated with improved memory capacities, while decreased hippocampal neurogenesis results in impaired memory performance in several memory tasks. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis is impaired and the granule neurons that are generated fail to integrate existing networks. Thus, enhancing neurogenesis should improve functional plasticity in the hippocampus and restore cognitive deficits in these mice. Here, we performed a screen of transcription factors that could potentially enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We identified Neurod1 as a robust neuronal determinant with the capability to direct hippocampal progenitors towards an exclusive granule neuron fate. Importantly, Neurod1 also accelerated neuronal maturation and functional integration of new neurons during the period of their maturation when they contribute to memory processes. When tested in an APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, directed expression of Neurod1 in cycling hippocampal progenitors conspicuously reduced dendritic spine density deficits on new hippocampal neurons, to the same level as that observed in healthy age-matched control animals. Remarkably, this population of highly connected new neurons was sufficient to restore spatial memory in these diseased mice. Collectively our findings demonstrate that endogenous neural stem cells of the diseased brain can be manipulated to become new neurons that could allow cognitive improvement. PMID:25518958

  20. Modifications of hippocampal circuits and early disruption of adult neurogenesis in the tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Krezymon

    Full Text Available At advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease, cognitive dysfunction is accompanied by severe alterations of hippocampal circuits that may largely underlie memory impairments. However, it is likely that anatomical remodeling in the hippocampus may start long before any cognitive alteration is detected. Using the well-described Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease that develops progressive age-dependent amyloidosis and cognitive deficits, we examined whether specific stages of the disease were associated with the expression of anatomical markers of hippocampal dysfunction. We found that these mice develop a complex pattern of changes in their dentate gyrus with aging. Those include aberrant expression of neuropeptide Y and reduced levels of calbindin, reflecting a profound remodeling of inhibitory and excitatory circuits in the dentate gyrus. Preceding these changes, we identified severe alterations of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in Tg2576 mice. We gathered converging data in Tg2576 mice at young age, indicating impaired maturation of new neurons that may compromise their functional integration into hippocampal circuits. Thus, disruption of adult hippocampal neurogenesis occurred before network remodeling in this mouse model and therefore may account as an early event in the etiology of Alzheimer's pathology. Ultimately, both events may constitute key components of hippocampal dysfunction and associated cognitive deficits occurring in Alzheimer's disease.

  1. A Novel Procedure for Rapid Imaging of Adult Mouse Brains with MicroCT Using Iodine-Based Contrast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Anderson

    Full Text Available High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has been the primary modality for obtaining 3D cross-sectional anatomical information in animals for soft tissue, particularly brain. However, costs associated with MRI can be considerably high for large phenotypic screens for gross differences in the structure of the brain due to pathology and/or experimental manipulations. MicroCT (mCT, especially benchtop mCT, is becoming a common laboratory equipment with throughput rates equal or faster than any form of high-resolution MRI at lower costs. Here we explore adapting previously developed contrast based mCT to image adult mouse brains in-situ. We show that 2% weight per volume (w/v iodine-potassium iodide solution can be successfully used to image adult mouse brains within 48 hours post-mortem when a structural support matrix is used. We demonstrate that hydrogel can be effectively used as a perfusant which limits the tissue shrinkage due to iodine.

  2. Loss of hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-1alpha impacts on adult mouse intestinal epithelial cell growth and cell lineages differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine R Lussier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although Hnf1alpha is crucial for pancreas and liver functions, it is believed to play a limited functional role for intestinal epithelial functions. The aim of this study was to assess the consequences of abrogating Hnf1alpha on the maintenance of adult small intestinal epithelial functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An Hnf1alpha knockout mouse model was used. Assessment of histological abnormalities, crypt epithelial cell proliferation, epithelial barrier, glucose transport and signalling pathways were measured in these animals. Changes in global gene expression were also analyzed. Mice lacking Hnf1alpha displayed increased crypt proliferation and intestinalomegaly as well as a disturbance of intestinal epithelial cell lineages production during adult life. This phenotype was associated with a decrease of the mucosal barrier function and lumen-to-blood glucose delivery. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signalling pathway was found to be overly activated in the small intestine of adult Hnf1alpha mutant mice. The intestinal epithelium of Hnf1alpha null mice displayed a reduction of the enteroendocrine cell population. An impact was also observed on proper Paneth cell differentiation with abnormalities in the granule exocytosis pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these results unravel a functional role for Hnf1alpha in regulating adult intestinal growth and sustaining the functions of intestinal epithelial cell lineages.

  3. A lacZ reporter gene expression atlas for 313 adult KOMP mutant mouse lines

    OpenAIRE

    West, David B.; Pasumarthi, Ravi K.; Baridon, Brian; Djan, Esi; Trainor, Amanda; Stephen M Griffey; Engelhard, Eric K.; Rapp, Jared; LI, BOWEN; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, K. C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter gene (lacZ) in the vector used for the Knockout Mouse Project (KOMP) is driven by the endogenous promoter of the target gene. In tissues from KOMP mice, histochemical staining for LacZ enzyme activity can be used to determine gene expression patterns. With this technique, we have produced a comprehensive resource of gene expression using both whole mount (WM) and frozen section (FS) LacZ staining in 313 unique KOMP mutant mouse lines. Of...

  4. Intraspinal transplantation of mouse and human neural precursor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weinger, Jason G.; Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Plaisted, Warren C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the preparation and transplantation of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and mouse neural precursor cells (mNPCs) into the thoracic region of the mouse spinal cord. The techniques in this unit also describe how to prepare the mouse for surgery by performing a laminectomy to expose the spinal cord for transplantation. Here we show NPCs genetically labeled with eGFP transplanted into the spinal cord of a mouse following viralmediated demyelination can efficiently be detec...

  5. Recurrent Autonomic Dysreflexia due to Chronic Aortic Dissection in an Adult Male with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic dysreflexia is a hypertensive clinical emergency for persons with spinal cord injury at T-6 level or above. Recurrent autonomic dysreflexia is uncommon in spinal cord injury patients and is usually caused by noxious stimuli that cannot be removed promptly, e.g., somatic pain, abdominal distension. A 61-year-old man, who sustained tetraplegia at C-5 (ASIA-A 38 years ago, was admitted with chest infection. Computerised tomography (CT of the chest showed the ascending aorta to measure 4 cm in anteroposterior diameter; descending thoracic aorta measured 3.5 cm. No dissection was seen. Normal appearances of abdominal aorta were seen. He was treated with noninvasive ventilation, antibiotics, and diuretics. Nineteen days later, when there was sudden deterioration in his clinical condition, CT of the pulmonary angiogram was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. This showed no pulmonary embolus, but the upper abdominal aorta showed some dissection with thrombosis of the false lumen. Blood pressure was controlled with perindopril 2 mg, once a day, doxazosin 4 mg, twice a day, and furosemide 20 mg, twice a day. Since this patient did not show clinical features of mesenteric or lower limb ischaemia, the vascular surgeon did not recommend subdiaphragmatic aortic replacement.

  6. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in the Adult Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Jesse M.; Eric Meadows; Marta Fiorotto; Klein, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Although skeletal muscle metabolism is a well-studied physiological process, little is known about how it is regulated at the transcriptional level. The myogenic transcription factor myogenin is required for skeletal muscle development during embryonic and fetal life, but myogenin's role in adult skeletal muscle is unclear. We sought to determine myogenin's function in adult muscle metabolism. A Myog conditional allele and Cre-ER transgene were used to delete Myog in adult mice. Mice were ana...

  7. YAC contigs of the Rab1 and wobbler (wr) spinal muscular atrophy gene region on proximal mouse chromosome 11 and of the homologous region on human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedemeyer, N.; Lengeling, A.; Ronsiek, M. [Univ. of Bielefeld (Germany)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    Despite rapid progress in the physical characterization of murine and human genomes, little molecular information is available on certain regions, e.g., proximal mouse chromosome 11 (Chr 11) and human chromosome 2p (Chr2p). We have localized the wobbler spinal atrophy gene wr to proximal mouse Chr 11, tightly linked to Rab1, a gene coding for a small GTP-binding protein, and Glns-ps1, an intronless pseudogene of the glutamine synthetase gene. We have not used these markers to construct a 1.3-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of the Rab1 region on mouse Chr 11. Four YAC clones isolated from two independent YAC libraries were characterized by rare-cutting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sequence-tagged site (STS) isolation and mapping. Rab1 and Glns-ps1 were found to be only 200 kb apart. A potential CpG island near a methylated NarI site and a trapped exon, ETG1.1, were found over 250 kb from Rab1. Two overlapping YACs were identified that contained a 150-kb region of human Chr 2p, comprising the RAB1 locus, AHY1.1, and the human homologue of ETG1.1, indicating a high degree of conservation of this region in the two species. We mapped AHY1.1 and thus human RAB1 on Chr 2p13.4-p14 using somatic cell hybrids and a radiation hybrid panel, thus extending a known region of conserved synteny between mouse Chr 11 and human Chr 2p. Recently, the gene LMGMD2B for a human recessive neuromuscular disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, has been mapped to 2p13-p16. The conservation between the mouse Rab1 and human RAB1 regions will be helpful in identifying candidate genes for the wobbler spinal muscular atrophy and in clarifying a possible relationship between wr and LMGMD2B. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Intrinsic properties of lumbar motor neurones in the adult G127insTGGG superoxide dismutase-1 mutant mouse in vivo: evidence for increased persistent inward currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Moldovan, Mihai; Marklund, Stefan L.;

    2010-01-01

    of lumbar motoneurones in the adult presymptomatic G127X mutant are not significantly different from those of wild type. However, at more depolarized membrane potentials, motoneurones in the G127X SOD1 mutants can sustain higher frequency firing, showing less spike frequency adaption and with persistent...... inward currents (PICs) being activated at lower firing frequencies and being more pronounced. Conclusion: We demonstrated that, in vivo, at resting membrane potential, spinal motoneurones of the adult G127X mice do not show an increased excitability. However, when depolarized they show evidence...

  9. Spinal brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  10. Enhancing physical activity guidelines: a needs survey of adults with spinal cord injury and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, Brianne L; Lemay, Valérie; Ainsworth, Victoria; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine preferences of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and health care professionals (HCP) regarding the content and format of a SCI physical activity guide to support recently released SCI physical activity guidelines. Seventy-eight people with SCI and 80 HCP completed a survey questionnaire. Participants with SCI identified desired content items and their preferences for format. HCP rated the helpfulness of content items to prescribe physical activity. All content items were rated favorably by participants with SCI and useful by HCP. The risks and benefits of activity and inactivity, and strategies for becoming more active, were rated high by both samples. Photographs and separate information for those with paraplegia versus tetraplegia were strongly endorsed. These data were used to guide the development of an SCI physical activity guide to enhance the uptake of physical activity guidelines for people with SCI. The guide was publically released November 11, 2011. PMID:23027146

  11. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronan, Mark R; Rosenberg, Allison F; Oehlers, Stefan H; Saelens, Joseph W; Sisk, Dana M; Jurcic Smith, Kristen L; Lee, Sunhee; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique) methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ. PMID:26449262

  12. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Cronan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ.

  13. Status epilepticus stimulates NDEL1 expression via the CREB/CRE pathway in the adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lee, Boyoung; Hansen, Katelin F; Aten, Sydney; Horning, Paul; Wheaton, Kelin L; Impey, Soren; Hoyt, Kari R; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear distribution element-like 1 (NDEL1/NUDEL) is a mammalian homolog of the Aspergillus nidulans nuclear distribution molecule NudE. NDEL1 plays a critical role in neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth and neuronal positioning during brain development; however within the adult central nervous system, limited information is available regarding NDEL1 expression and functions. Here, the goal was to examine inducible NDEL1 expression in the adult mouse forebrain. Immunolabeling revealed NDEL1 within the forebrain, including the cortex and hippocampus, as well as the midbrain and hypothalamus. Expression was principally localized to perikarya. Using a combination of immunolabeling and RNA seq profiling, we detected a marked and long-lasting upregulation of NDEL1 expression within the hippocampus following a pilocarpine-evoked repetitive seizure paradigm. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis identified a cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding site within the CpG island proximal to the NDEL1 gene, and in vivo transgenic repression of CREB led to a marked downregulation of seizure-evoked NDEL1 expression. Together these data indicate that NDEL1 is inducibly expressed in the adult nervous system, and that signaling via the CREB/CRE transcriptional pathway is likely involved. The role of NDEL1 in neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth during development raises the interesting prospect that inducible NDEL1 in the mature nervous system could contribute to the well-characterized structural and functional plasticity resulting from repetitive seizure activity. PMID:27298008

  14. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Soo Yook

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197 as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus.

  15. The Phospholipase D2 Knock Out Mouse Has Ectopic Purkinje Cells and Suffers from Early Adult-Onset Anosmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Schrewe, Heinrich; Wakelam, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is an enzyme that produces phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid messenger molecule involved in a number of cellular events including, through its membrane curvature properties, endocytosis. The PLD2 knock out (PLD2KO) mouse has been previously reported to be protected from insult in a model of Alzheimer's disease. We have further analysed a PLD2KO mouse using mass spectrophotometry of its lipids and found significant differences in PA species throughout its brain. We have examined the expression pattern of PLD2 which allowed us to define which region of the brain to analyse for defect, notably PLD2 was not detected in glial-rich regions. The expression pattern lead us to specifically examine the mitral cells of olfactory bulbs, the Cornus Amonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We find that the change to longer PA species correlates with subtle architectural defect in the cerebellum, exemplified by ectopic Purkinje cells and an adult-onset deficit of olfaction. These observations draw parallels to defects in the reelin heterozygote as well as the effect of high fat diet on olfaction. PMID:27658289

  16. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V; Yoon, Jin H; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-12-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages.

  17. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  18. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury. PMID:26611563

  19. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury.

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C.; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons “in vitro” and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease. PMID:27605908

  1. Axotomy of tributaries of the pelvic and pudendal nerves induces changes in the neurochemistry of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carly J; Tomasella, Eugenia; Malet, Mariana; Seroogy, Kim B; Hökfelt, Tomas; Villar, Marcelo J; Gebhart, G F; Brumovsky, Pablo R

    2016-05-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques, we characterized changes in the expression of several neurochemical markers in lumbar 4-sacral 2 (L4-S2) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron profiles (NPs) and the spinal cord of BALB/c mice after axotomy of the L6 and S1 spinal nerves, major tributaries of the pelvic (targeting pelvic visceral organs) and pudendal (targeting perineum and genitalia) nerves. Sham animals were included. Expression of cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 3 (ATF3), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT) types 1 and -2 was analysed seven days after injury. L6-S1 axotomy induced dramatic de novo expression of ATF3 in many L6-S1 DRG NPs, and parallel significant downregulations in the percentage of CGRP-, TRPV1-, TH- and VGLUT2-immunoreactive (IR) DRG NPs, as compared to their expression in uninjured DRGs (contralateral L6-S1-AXO; sham mice); VGLUT1 expression remained unaltered. Sham L6-S1 DRGs only showed a small ipsilateral increase in ATF3-IR NPs (other markers were unchanged). L6-S1-AXO induced de novo expression of ATF3 in several lumbosacral spinal cord motoneurons and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons; in sham mice the effect was limited to a few motoneurons. Finally, a moderate decrease in CGRP- and TRPV1-like-immunoreactivities was observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn neuropil. In conclusion, injury of a mixed visceral/non-visceral nerve leads to considerable neurochemical alterations in DRGs matched, to some extent, in the spinal cord. Changes in these and potentially other nociception-related molecules could contribute to pain due to injury of nerves in the abdominopelvic cavity. PMID:25749859

  2. Identification and quantification of neuropeptides in naïve mouse spinal cord using mass spectrometry reveals [des-Ser1]-cerebellin as a novel modulator of nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie; Sandor, Katalin; Sköld, Karl; Hökfelt, Tomas; Svensson, Camilla I; Kultima, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptide transmitters involved in nociceptive processes are more likely to be expressed in the dorsal than the ventral horn of the spinal cord. This study was designed to examine the relative distribution of neuropeptides between the dorsal and ventral spinal cord in naïve mice using liquid chromatography, high-resolution mass spectrometry. We identified and relatively quantified 36 well-characterized full-length neuropeptides and an additional 168 not previously characterized peptides. By extraction with organic solvents we identified seven additional full-length neuropeptides. The peptide [des-Ser1]-cerebellin (desCER), originating from cerebellin precursor protein 1 (CBLN1), was predominantly expressed in the dorsal horn. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of CBLN1 immunoreactivity with a punctate cytoplasmic pattern in neuronal cell bodies throughout the spinal gray matter. The signal was stronger in the dorsal compared to the ventral horn, with most CBLN1 positive cells present in outer laminae II/III, colocalizing with calbindin, a marker for excitatory interneurons. Intrathecal injection of desCER induced a dose-dependent mechanical hypersensitivity but not heat or cold hypersensitivity. This study provides evidence for involvement of desCER in nociception and provides a platform for continued exploration of involvement of novel neuropeptides in the regulation of nociceptive transmission. Neuropeptides involved in nociceptive processes are more likely to be expressed in the dorsal than the ventral horn of spinal cord. Well-characterized full-length neuropeptides as well as uncharacterized neuropeptides were quantified by mass spectrometry. The CBLN1-derived peptide [des-Ser1]-cerebellin (desCER) is predominantly expressed in the dorsal horn, and intrathecal injection of desCER induced a dose-dependent mechanical hypersensitivity.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of non-viral gene therapy treatment based on tetanus toxin C-fragment in a severe mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Olivan Garcia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC, which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons in vitro and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3 and p62 and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln, TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  4. Spinal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Spinal trauma in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, C.; Carty, H. [Radiology Dept., Royal Liverpool Children' s NHS Trust-Alder Hey (United Kingdom)

    2001-10-01

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Myogenin regulates exercise capacity and skeletal muscle metabolism in the adult mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Flynn

    Full Text Available Although skeletal muscle metabolism is a well-studied physiological process, little is known about how it is regulated at the transcriptional level. The myogenic transcription factor myogenin is required for skeletal muscle development during embryonic and fetal life, but myogenin's role in adult skeletal muscle is unclear. We sought to determine myogenin's function in adult muscle metabolism. A Myog conditional allele and Cre-ER transgene were used to delete Myog in adult mice. Mice were analyzed for exercise capacity by involuntary treadmill running. To assess oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, we performed indirect calorimetry, monitored blood glucose and lactate levels, and performed histochemical analyses on muscle fibers. Surprisingly, we found that Myog-deleted mice performed significantly better than controls in high- and low-intensity treadmill running. This enhanced exercise capacity was due to more efficient oxidative metabolism during low- and high-intensity exercise and more efficient glycolytic metabolism during high-intensity exercise. Furthermore, Myog-deleted mice had an enhanced response to long-term voluntary exercise training on running wheels. We identified several candidate genes whose expression was altered in exercise-stressed muscle of mice lacking myogenin. The results suggest that myogenin plays a critical role as a high-level transcriptional regulator to control the energy balance between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in adult skeletal muscle.

  7. Muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy show profound defects in neuromuscular development even in the absence of failure in neuromuscular transmission or loss of motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Il; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Rimer, Mendell; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-08-15

    A mouse model of the devastating human disease "spinal muscular atrophy" (SMA) was used to investigate the severe muscle weakness and spasticity that precede the death of these animals near the end of the 2nd postnatal week. Counts of motor units to the soleus muscle as well as of axons in the soleus muscle nerve showed no loss of motor neurons. Similarly, neither immunostaining of neuromuscular junctions nor the measurement of the tension generated by nerve stimulation gave evidence of any significant impairment in neuromuscular transmission, even when animals were maintained up to 5days longer via a supplementary diet. However, the muscles were clearly weaker, generating less than half their normal tension. Weakness in 3 muscles examined in the study appears due to a severe but uniform reduction in muscle fiber size. The size reduction results from a failure of muscle fibers to grow during early postnatal development and, in soleus, to a reduction in number of fibers generated. Neuromuscular development is severely delayed in these mutant animals: expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms, the elimination of polyneuronal innervation, the maturation in the shape of the AChR plaque, the arrival of SCs at the junctions and their coverage of the nerve terminal, the development of junctional folds. Thus, if SMA in this particular mouse is a disease of motor neurons, it can act in a manner that does not result in their death or disconnection from their targets but nonetheless alters many aspects of neuromuscular development.

  8. Cardiomyocyte proliferation and progenitor cell recruitment underlie therapeutic regeneration after myocardial infarction in the adult mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliaras, Konstantinos; Zhang, Yiqiang; Seinfeld, Jeffrey; Galang, Giselle; Tseliou, Eleni; Cheng, Ke; Sun, Baiming; Aminzadeh, Mohammad; Marbán, Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) have been shown to regenerate infarcted myocardium in patients after myocardial infarction (MI). However, whether the cells of the newly formed myocardium originate from the proliferation of adult cardiomyocytes or from the differentiation of endogenous stem cells remains unknown. Using genetic fate mapping to mark resident myocytes in combination with long-term BrdU pulsing, we investigated the origins of postnatal cardiomyogenesis in the normal, infarcted and cell-treated adult mammalian heart. In the normal mouse heart, cardiomyocyte turnover occurs predominantly through proliferation of resident cardiomyocytes at a rate of ∼1.3-4%/year. After MI, new cardiomyocytes arise from both progenitors as well as pre-existing cardiomyocytes. Transplantation of CDCs upregulates host cardiomyocyte cycling and recruitment of endogenous progenitors, while boosting heart function and increasing viable myocardium. The observed phenomena cannot be explained by cardiomyocyte polyploidization, bi/multinucleation, cell fusion or DNA repair. Thus, CDCs induce myocardial regeneration by differentially upregulating two mechanisms of endogenous cell proliferation.

  9. Expression of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in mature granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohira, Koji

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New granule cells are continuously generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus. During granule cell maturation, the mechanisms that differentiate new cells not only describe the degree of cell differentiation, but also crucially regulate the progression of cell differentiation. Here, we describe a gene, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO, whose expression distinguishes stem cells from more differentiated cells among the granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus. The use of markers for proliferation, neural progenitors, and immature and mature granule cells indicated that TDO was expressed in mature cells and in some immature cells. In mice heterozygous for the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, in which dentate gyrus granule cells fail to mature normally, TDO immunoreactivity was substantially downregulated in the dentate gyrus granule cells. Moreover, a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling experiment revealed that new neurons began to express TDO between 2 and 4 wk after the neurons were generated, when the axons and dendrites of the granule cells developed and synaptogenesis occurred. These findings indicate that TDO might be required at a late-stage of granule cell development, such as during axonal and dendritic growth, synaptogenesis and its maturation.

  10. The developmental regulator Pax6 is essential for maintenance of islet cell function in the adult mouse pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W Hart

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Pax6 is a developmental regulator with a crucial role in development of the eye, brain, and olfactory system. Pax6 is also required for correct development of the endocrine pancreas and specification of hormone producing endocrine cell types. Glucagon-producing cells are almost completely lost in Pax6-null embryos, and insulin-expressing beta and somatostatin-expressing delta cells are reduced. While the developmental role of Pax6 is well-established, investigation of a further role for Pax6 in the maintenance of adult pancreatic function is normally precluded due to neonatal lethality of Pax6-null mice. Here a tamoxifen-inducible ubiquitous Cre transgene was used to inactivate Pax6 at 6 months of age in a conditional mouse model to assess the effect of losing Pax6 function in adulthood. The effect on glucose homeostasis and the expression of key islet cell markers was measured. Homozygous Pax6 deletion mice, but not controls, presented with all the symptoms of classical diabetes leading to severe weight loss requiring termination of the experiment five weeks after first tamoxifen administration. Immunohistochemical analysis of the pancreata revealed almost complete loss of Pax6 and much reduced expression of insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. Several other markers of islet cell function were also affected. Notably, strong upregulation in the number of ghrelin-expressing endocrine cells was observed. These findings demonstrate that Pax6 is essential for adult maintenance of glucose homeostasis and function of the endocrine pancreas.

  11. Expression of the Argonaute protein PiwiL2 and piRNAs in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiuling; Ma, Qi; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Wilson, Amber; Xia, Linghui; Yu, Hong [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Vascular Biology Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Webster, Keith A., E-mail: kwebster@med.miami.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Vascular Biology Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Piwi (P-element-induced wimpy testis) first discovered in Drosophila is a member of the Argonaute family of micro-RNA binding proteins with essential roles in germ-cell development. The murine homologue of PiwiL2, also known as Mili is selectively expressed in the testes, and mice bearing targeted mutations of the PiwiL2 gene are male-sterile. PiwiL2 proteins are thought to protect the germ line genome by suppressing retrotransposons, stabilizing heterochromatin structure, and regulating target genes during meiosis and mitosis. Here, we report that PiwiL2 and associated piRNAs (piRs) may play similar roles in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells. We found that PiwiL2 is expressed in the cytoplasm of metaphase mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow of adult and aged mice. Knockdown of PiwiL2 with a specific siRNA enhanced cell proliferation, significantly increased the number of cells in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phases and was associated with increased expression of cell cycle genes CCND1, CDK8, microtubule regulation genes, and decreased expression of tumor suppressors Cables 1, LATS, and Cxxc4. The results suggest broader roles for Piwi in genome surveillance beyond the germ line and a possible role in regulating the cell cycle of mesenchymal stem cells.

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Psychological Issues After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury The Psychologist's Role After ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities After Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  15. Variable partial unilateral ureteral obstruction and its release in the neonatal and adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Barbara A; Chevalier, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is the most important cause of renal failure in children. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the neonatal mouse provides a useful model to investigate the response of the developing kidney to urine flow obstruction. Creation of reversible variable partial UUO (compared to complete UUO) more closely approximates congenital lesions, and permits the study of recovery following release of the obstruction. Implementation of this technique requires the appropriate optical, surgical, and anesthetic equipment, as well as adaptations appropriate to the very small animals undergoing surgical procedures. Care of the pups must include minimizing trauma to delicate tissues, close monitoring of anesthesia and body temperature, and ensuring acceptance of the pups by the mother. It is important to document the severity and patency of the partial UUO by ureteral measurement and pelvic injection of India ink. Finally, removal of kidneys for histologic examination should be accomplished with gentle handling and processing. PMID:22639278

  16. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-02-15

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36μM) for 18-96h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26792615

  17. Roles of Wnt Signaling in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse Ventricular-Subventricular Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawada, Masato; Huang, Shih-Hui; Ogino, Takashi; Ohata, Shinya; Kubo, Akiharu; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-02-01

    In many animal species, the production of new neurons (neurogenesis) occurs throughout life, in a specialized germinal region called the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ). In this region, neural stem cells undergo self-renewal and generate neural progenitor cells and new neurons. In the olfactory system, the new neurons migrate rostrally toward the olfactory bulb, where they differentiate into mature interneurons. V-SVZ-derived new neurons can also migrate toward sites of brain injury, where they contribute to neural regeneration. Recent studies indicate that two major branches of the Wnt signaling pathway, the Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/planar cell polarity pathways, play essential roles in various facets of adult neurogenesis. Here, we review the Wnt signaling-mediated regulation of adult neurogenesis in the V-SVZ under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26572545

  18. Functional correction of adult mdx mouse muscle using gutted adenoviral vectors expressing full-length dystrophin

    OpenAIRE

    DelloRusso, Christiana; Scott, Jeannine M.; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis; Salvatori, Giovanni; Barjot, Catherine; Robinson, Ann S.; Robert W Crawford; Brooks, Susan V; Jeffrey S. Chamberlain

    2002-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Delivery of functionally effective levels of dystrophin to immunocompetent, adult mdx (dystrophin-deficient) mice has been challenging because of the size of the gene, immune responses against viral vectors, and inefficient infection of mature muscle. Here we show that high titer stocks of three different gutted adenoviral vectors carrying full-length, muscle-specific, dystrophin ex...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations in adult mouse cardiac side population cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushaj, Entela B., E-mail: lushaj@surgery.wisc.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Lozonschi, Lucian; Barnes, Maria; Anstadt, Emily; Kohmoto, Takushi [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the presence and potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations in adult cardiac stem cells. Cardiac side population (SP) cells were isolated from 12-week-old mice. Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen for the presence of mtDNA deletion mutations in (a) freshly isolated SP cells and (b) SP cells cultured to passage 10. When present, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutation was analyzed in single cell colonies. The effect of different levels of deletion mutations on SP cell growth and differentiation was determined. MtDNA deletion mutations were found in both freshly isolated and cultured cells from 12-week-old mice. While there was no significant difference in the number of single cell colonies with mtDNA deletion mutations from any of the groups mentioned above, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutations was significantly higher in the cultured cells, as determined by quantitative PCR. Within a single clonal cell population, the detectable mtDNA deletion mutations were the same in all cells and unique when compared to deletions of other colonies. We also found that cells harboring high levels of mtDNA deletion mutations (i.e. where deleted mtDNA comprised more than 60% of total mtDNA) had slower proliferation rates and decreased differentiation capacities. Screening cultured adult stem cells for mtDNA deletion mutations as a routine assessment will benefit the biomedical application of adult stem cells.

  20. Promotion of Cortical Neurogenesis from the Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Mouse Subcallosal Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, Kyuhyun; Shaker, Mohammed R; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Boram; Lee, Eunsoo; Park, Jae-Yong; Lim, Mi-Sun; Park, Chang-Hwan; Shin, Ki Soon; Kim, Hyun; Geum, Dongho; Sun, Woong

    2016-04-01

    Neurogenesis occurs spontaneously in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle in adult rodent brain, but it has long been debated whether there is sufficient adult neurogenesis in human SVZ. Subcallosal zone (SCZ), a posterior continuum of SVZ closely associated with posterior regions of cortical white matter, has also been reported to contain adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in both rodents and humans. However, little is known whether SCZ-derived aNSC (SCZ-aNSCs) can produce cortical neurons following brain injury. We found that SCZ-aNSCs exhibited limited neuronal differentiation potential in culture and after transplantation in mice. Neuroblasts derived from SCZ initially migrated toward injured cortex regions following brain injury, but later exhibited apoptosis. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic bcl-xL in the SCZ by retroviral infection rescued neuroblasts from cell death in the injured cortex, but neuronal maturation was still limited, resulting in atrophy. In combination with Bcl-xL, infusion of brain-derived neurotropic factor rescued atrophy, and importantly, a subset of such SCZ-aNSCs differentiated and attained morphological and physiological characteristics of mature, excitatory neurons. These results suggest that the combination of anti-apoptotic and neurotrophic factors might enable the use of aNSCs derived from the SCZ in cortical neurogenesis for neural replacement therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:888-901. PMID:26701067

  1. Adult neurogenesis and specific replacement of interneuron subtypes in the mouse main olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaRocca Greg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New neurons are generated in the adult brain from stem cells found in the subventricular zone (SVZ. These cells proliferate in the SVZ, generating neuroblasts which then migrate to the main olfactory bulb (MOB, ending their migration in the glomerular layer (GLL and the granule cell layer (GCL of the MOB. Neuronal populations in these layers undergo turnover throughout life, but whether all neuronal subtypes found in these areas are replaced and when neurons begin to express subtype-specific markers is not known. Results Here we use BrdU injections and immunohistochemistry against (calretinin, calbindin, N-copein, tyrosine hydroxylase and GABA and show that adult-generated neurons express markers of all major subtypes of neurons in the GLL and GCL. Moreover, the fractions of new neurons that express subtype-specific markers at 40 and 75 days post BrdU injection are very similar to the fractions of all neurons expressing these markers. We also show that many neurons in the glomerular layer do not express NeuN, but are readily and specifically labeled by the fluorescent nissl stain Neurotrace. Conclusion The expression of neuronal subtype-specific markers by new neurons in the GLL and GCL changes rapidly during the period from 14–40 days after BrdU injection before reaching adult levels. This period may represent a critical window for cell fate specification similar to that observed for neuronal survival.

  2. Spinal Hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Norkin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The given article considers the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, classifications, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of spinal hemangiomas. Advantages of vertebroplasty over the other techniques of treatment of studied pathology are presented

  3. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make some changes in their activities or work. Spine surgery will often partly or fully relieve symptoms in ... disease of the bone Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 7/13/2015 Updated by: ...

  4. Reduced proliferation in the adult mouse subventricular zone increases survival of olfactory bulb interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sui

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult brain is largely restricted to the subependymal zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle, olfactory bulb (OB and the dentate subgranular zone, and survival of adult-born cells in the OB is influenced by factors including sensory experience. We examined, in mice, whether survival of adult-born cells is also regulated by the rate of precursor proliferation in the SVZ. Precursor proliferation was decreased by depleting the SVZ of dopamine after lesioning dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra compacta with 6-hydroxydopamine. Subsequently, we examined the effect of reduced SVZ proliferation on the generation, migration and survival of neuroblasts and mature adult-born cells in the SVZ, rostral migratory stream (RMS and OB. Proliferating cells in the SVZ, measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU injected 2 hours prior to death or by immunoreactivity against Ki67, were reduced by 47% or 36%, respectively, 7 days after dopamine depletion, and by 29% or 31% 42 days after dopamine depletion, compared to sham-treated animals. Neuroblast generation in the SVZ and their migration along the RMS were not affected, neither 7 nor 42 days after the 6-hydroxydopamine injection, since the number of doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the SVZ and RMS, as well as the number of neuronal nuclei-immunoreactive cells in the OB, were stable compared to control. However, survival analysis 15 days after 6-hydroxydopamine and 6 days after BrdU injections showed that the number of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ was 70% higher. Also, 42 days after 6-hydroxydopamine and 30 days after BrdU injections, we found an 82% increase in co-labeled BrdU+/γ-aminobutyric acid-immunoreactive cell bodies in the granular cell layer, while double-labeled BrdU+/tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cell bodies in the glomerular layer increased by 148%. We conclude that the number of OB interneurons following reduced SVZ proliferation is maintained through an increased

  5. Comparison of pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of spinal curvature of healthy adults

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jae Eung; Lee, Hye Young; Kim, Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Degree of curvature on the spine is known to affect respiratory function and back muscle activation. We compared pulmonary function and back muscle strength according to the degree of curvature of the spine of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three healthy volunteers were enrolled. They were divided into two groups according to the degree of curvature of the spine: the below 2° group, and the above 2° group. The degree of curvature was assessed using the Adams forward b...

  6. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  7. Human neural stem cells differentiate and promote locomotor recovery in an early chronic spinal cord injury NOD-scid mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée L Salazar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI results in partial or complete paralysis and is characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes, axonal injury, and demyelination/dysmyelination of spared axons. Approximately 1,250,000 individuals have chronic SCI in the U.S.; therefore treatment in the chronic stages is highly clinically relevant. Human neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns were prospectively isolated based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting for a CD133(+ and CD24(-/lo population from fetal brain, grown as neurospheres, and lineage restricted to generate neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. hCNS-SCns have recently been transplanted sub-acutely following spinal cord injury and found to promote improved locomotor recovery. We tested the ability of hCNS-SCns transplanted 30 days post SCI to survive, differentiate, migrate, and promote improved locomotor recovery. METHODS AND FINDINGS: hCNS-SCns were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD-scid mice 30 days post spinal cord contusion injury. hCNS-SCns transplanted mice demonstrated significantly improved locomotor recovery compared to vehicle controls using open field locomotor testing and CatWalk gait analysis. Transplanted hCNS-SCns exhibited long-term engraftment, migration, limited proliferation, and differentiation predominantly to oligodendrocytes and neurons. Astrocytic differentiation was rare and mice did not exhibit mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, differentiated hCNS-SCns integrated with the host as demonstrated by co-localization of human cytoplasm with discrete staining for the paranodal marker contactin-associated protein. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that hCNS-SCns are capable of surviving, differentiating, and promoting improved locomotor recovery when transplanted into an early chronic injury microenvironment. These data suggest that hCNS-SCns transplantation has efficacy in an early chronic SCI setting and thus expands the "window of opportunity" for

  8. Spinal vascular malformations; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal vascular malformations are a group of rare diseases with different clinical presentations ranging from incidental asymptomatic findings to progressive tetraplegia. This article provides an overview about imaging features as well as clinical and therapeutic aspects of spinal arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas and capillary telangiectasia. (orig.) [German] Spinale Gefaessmalformationen sind eine Gruppe seltener Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlichen klinischen Praesentationen, die vom asymptomatischen Zufallsbefund bis zur progredienten Tetraparese reichen. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber radiologische Befunde sowie klinische und therapeutische Aspekte von spinalen arteriovenoesen Malformationen, Kavernomen und kapillaeren Teleangiektasien. (orig.)

  9. Olfactory discrimination training up-regulates and reorganizes expression of microRNAs in adult mouse hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Smalheiser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult male mice (strain C57Bl/6J were trained to execute nose-poke responses for water reinforcement; then they were randomly assigned to either of two groups: olfactory discrimination training (exposed to two odours with reward contingent upon correctly responding to one odour or pseudo-training (exposed to two odours with reward not contingent upon response. These were run in yoked fashion and killed when the discrimination-trained mouse reached a learning criterion of 70% correct responses in 20 trials, occurring after three sessions (a total of ∼40 min of training. The hippocampus was dissected bilaterally from each mouse (N = 7 in each group and profiling of 585 miRNAs (microRNAs was carried out using multiplex RT–PCR (reverse transcription–PCR plates. A significant global up-regulation of miRNA expression was observed in the discrimination training versus pseudo-training comparison; when tested individually, 29 miRNAs achieved significance at P = 0.05. miR-10a showed a 2.7-fold increase with training, and is predicted to target several learning-related mRNAs including BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, CAMK2b (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIβ, CREB1 (cAMP-response-element-binding protein 1 and ELAVL2 [ELAV (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila-like; Hu B]. Analysis of miRNA pairwise correlations revealed the existence of several miRNA co-expression modules that were specific to the training group. These in vivo results indicate that significant, dynamic and co-ordinated changes in miRNA expression accompany early stages of learning.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Empowering the Patient After Spinal ...

  11. Characterizing newly repopulated microglia in the adult mouse: impacts on animal behavior, cell morphology, and neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica R P Elmore

    Full Text Available Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg or phosphate buffered saline (PBS was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function

  12. Characterizing newly repopulated microglia in the adult mouse: impacts on animal behavior, cell morphology, and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Monica R P; Lee, Rafael J; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R)/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS) resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function similarly to the

  13. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  14. Langerhans′ cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra K Tyagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  15. Morphological analysis of activity-reduced adult-born neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E Dahlen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult born neurons are added to the olfactory bulb (OB throughout life in rodents. While many factors have been identified as regulating the survival and integration of adult-born neurons (ABNs into existing circuitry, the understanding of how these factors affect ABN morphology and connectivity is limited. Here we compare how cell intrinsic (siRNA knock down of voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.1-1.3 and circuit level (naris occlusion reductions in activity affect ABN morphology during integration into the OB. We found that both manipulations reduce the number of dendritic spines (and thus likely the number of reciprocal synaptic connections formed with the surrounding circuitry and inhibited dendritic ramification of ABNs. Further, we identified regions of ABN apical dendrites where the largest and most significant decreases occur following siRNA knock down or naris occlusion. In siRNA knock down cells, reduction of spines is observed in proximal regions of the apical dendrite. This suggests that distal regions of the dendrite may remain active independent of NaV1.1-1.3 channel expression, perhaps facilitated by activation of T-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors. By contrast, circuit level reduction of activity by naris occlusion resulted in a global depression of spine number. Together, these results indicate that ABNs retain the ability to develop their typical overall morphological features regardless of experienced activity, and activity modulates the number and location of formed connections.

  16. CD133 does not enrich for the stem cell activity in vivo in adult mouse prostates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CD133 is widely used as a marker for stem/progenitor cells in many organ systems. Previous studies using in vitro stem cell assays have suggested that the CD133-expressing prostate basal cells may serve as the putative prostate stem cells. However, the precise localization of the CD133-expressing cells and their contributions to adult murine prostate homeostasis in vivo remain undetermined. We show that loss of function of CD133 does not impair murine prostate morphogenesis, homeostasis and regeneration, implying a dispensable role for CD133 in prostate stem cell function. Using a CD133-CreERT2 model in conjunction with a fluorescent report line, we show that CD133 is not only expressed in a fraction of prostate basal cells, but also in some luminal cells and stromal cells. CD133+ basal cells possess higher in vitro sphere-forming activities than CD133− basal cells. However, the in vivo lineage tracing study reveals that the two cell populations possess the same regenerative capacity and contribute equally to the maintenance of the basal cell lineage. Similarly, CD133+ and CD133− luminal cells are functionally equivalent in maintaining the luminal cell lineage. Collectively, our study demonstrates that CD133 does not enrich for the stem cell activity in vivo in adult murine prostate. This study does not contradict previous reports showing CD133+ cells as prostate stem cells in vitro. Instead, it highlights a substantial impact of biological contexts on cellular behaviors.

  17. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrón, S R; Radford, E J; Domingo-Muelas, A; Kleine, I; Ramme, A; Gray, D; Sandovici, I; Constancia, M; Ward, A; Menheniott, T R; Ferguson-Smith, A C

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  18. Robust Axonal Regeneration Occurs in the Injured CAST/Ei Mouse CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Omura, T; Omura, K.; Tedeschi, A; Riva, P; Painter, MW; L. Rojas; Martin, J.; Lisi, V; Huebner, EA; Latremoliere, A; Yin, Y.; Barrett, LB; Singh, B; Lee, S.; Crisman, T

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Axon regeneration in the CNS requires reactivating injured neurons' intrinsic growth state and enabling growth in an inhibitory environment. Using an inbred mouse neuronal phenotypic screen, we find that CAST/Ei mouse adult dorsal root ganglion neurons extend axons more on CNS myelin than the other eight strains tested, especially when pre-injured. Injury-primed CAST/Ei neurons also regenerate markedly in the spinal cord and optic nerve more than those from C57BL/6 mice a...

  19. MR imaging of spinal epidural sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal epidural abscess is uncommonly found in adults and children. Early diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis and prevents serious neurologic sequelae. Four patients with spinal epidural infections were recently evaluated with MR and CT of the spine. In all cases, MR and CT localized the site of infection accurately and showed adjacent bony osteomyelitis. MR proved superior in characterizing infection (abscess vs. inflammatory edema) and demonstrating epidural involvement and spinal cord compression. In all cases, MR obviated the need for myelography. Early recognition by MR of spinal epidural sepsis led to expeditious treatment and better clinical outcome

  20. A fluid secretion pathway unmasked by acinar-specific Tmem16A gene ablation in the adult mouse salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Marcelo A; Kondo, Yusuke; Peña-Munzenmayer, Gaspar; Jaramillo, Yasna; Liu, Frances; Choi, Sooji; Crandall, Edward; Borok, Zea; Flodby, Per; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E

    2015-02-17

    Activation of an apical Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CaCC) triggers the secretion of saliva. It was previously demonstrated that CaCC-mediated Cl(-) current and Cl(-) efflux are absent in the acinar cells of systemic Tmem16A (Tmem16A Cl(-) channel) null mice, but salivation was not assessed in fully developed glands because Tmem16A null mice die within a few days after birth. To test the role of Tmem16A in adult salivary glands, we generated conditional knockout mice lacking Tmem16A in acinar cells (Tmem16A(-/-)). Ca(2+)-dependent salivation was abolished in Tmem16A(-/-) mice, demonstrating that Tmem16A is obligatory for Ca(2+)-mediated fluid secretion. However, the amount of saliva secreted by Tmem16A(-/-) mice in response to the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (IPR) was comparable to that seen in controls, indicating that Tmem16A does not significantly contribute to cAMP-induced secretion. Furthermore, IPR-stimulated secretion was unaffected in mice lacking Cftr (Cftr(∆F508/∆F508)) or ClC-2 (Clcn2(-/-)) Cl(-) channels. The time course for activation of IPR-stimulated fluid secretion closely correlated with that of the IPR-induced cell volume increase, suggesting that acinar swelling may activate a volume-sensitive Cl(-) channel. Indeed, Cl(-) channel blockers abolished fluid secretion, indicating that Cl(-) channel activity is critical for IPR-stimulated secretion. These data suggest that β-adrenergic-induced, cAMP-dependent fluid secretion involves a volume-regulated anion channel. In summary, our results using acinar-specific Tmem16A(-/-) mice identify Tmem16A as the Cl(-) channel essential for muscarinic, Ca(2+)-dependent fluid secretion in adult mouse salivary glands.

  1. Build a better mouse: directly-observed issues in computer use for adults with SMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anne C; Serowik, Kristin L; Schensul, Jean J; Bowen, Anne M; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-03-01

    Integrating information technology into healthcare has the potential to bring treatment to hard-to-reach people. Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), however, may derive limited benefit from these advances in care because of lack of computer ownership and experience. To date, conclusions about the computer skills and attitudes of adults with SMI have been based primarily on self-report. In the current study, 28 psychiatric outpatients with co-occurring cocaine use were interviewed about their computer use and opinions, and 25 were then directly observed using task analysis and think aloud methods as they navigated a multi-component health informational website. Participants reported low rates of computer ownership and use, and negative attitudes towards computers. Self-reported computer skills were higher than demonstrated in the task analysis. However, some participants spontaneously expressed more positive attitudes and greater computer self-efficacy after navigating the website. Implications for increasing access to computer-based health information are discussed.

  2. PPARs Expression in Adult Mouse Neural Stem Cells: Modulation of PPARs during Astroglial Differentiaton of NSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cimini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available PPAR isotypes are involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, death, and differentiation, with different roles and mechanisms depending on the specific isotype and ligand and on the differentiated, undifferentiated, or transformed status of the cell. Differentiation stimuli are integrated by key transcription factors which regulate specific sets of specialized genes to allow proliferative cells to exit the cell cycle and acquire specialized functions. The main differentiation programs known to be controlled by PPARs both during development and in the adult are placental differentiation, adipogenesis, osteoblast differentiation, skin differentiation, and gut differentiation. PPARs may also be involved in the differentiation of macrophages, brain, and breast. However, their functions in this cell type and organs still awaits further elucidation. PPARs may be involved in cell proliferation and differentiation processes of neural stem cells (NSC. To this aim, in this work the expression of the three PPAR isotypes and RXRs in NSC has been investigated.

  3. Synaptic pathology and therapeutic repair in adult retinoschisis mouse by AAV-RS1 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jingxing; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ziccardi, Lucia; Chen, Shan; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Pope, Jodie G; Bush, Ronald A; Wu, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Sieving, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    Strategies aimed at invoking synaptic plasticity have therapeutic potential for several neurological conditions. The human retinal synaptic disease X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is characterized by impaired visual signal transmission through the retina and progressive visual acuity loss, and mice lacking retinoschisin (RS1) recapitulate human disease. Here, we demonstrate that restoration of RS1 via retina-specific delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8-RS1 (AAV8-RS1) vector rescues molecular pathology at the photoreceptor-depolarizing bipolar cell (photoreceptor-DBC) synapse and restores function in adult Rs1-KO animals. Initial development of the photoreceptor-DBC synapse was normal in the Rs1-KO retina; however, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6/transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily M member 1-signaling (mGluR6/TRPM1-signaling) cascade was not properly maintained. Specifically, the TRPM1 channel and G proteins Gαo, Gβ5, and RGS11 were progressively lost from postsynaptic DBC dendritic tips, whereas the mGluR6 receptor and RGS7 maintained proper synaptic position. This postsynaptic disruption differed from other murine night-blindness models with an electronegative electroretinogram response, which is also characteristic of murine and human XLRS disease. Upon AAV8-RS1 gene transfer to the retina of adult XLRS mice, TRPM1 and the signaling molecules returned to their proper dendritic tip location, and the DBC resting membrane potential was restored. These findings provide insight into the molecular plasticity of a critical synapse in the visual system and demonstrate potential therapeutic avenues for some diseases involving synaptic pathology. PMID:26098217

  4. 3D culture of adult mouse neural stem cells within functionalized self-assembling peptide scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Carla Cunha1,2, Silvia Panseri3,4, Omar Villa1,2, Diego Silva1,2, Fabrizio Gelain1,21Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University of Milano-Bicocca; 2Center for Nanomedicine and Tissue Engineering, CNTE – A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan; 3Laboratory of Biomechanics and Technology Innovation, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna; 4Laboratory of Nano-Biomagnetism, Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics, National Research Council, Faenza, ItalyAbstract: Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models of cell culture aim to fill the gap between the standard two-dimensional cell studies and the in vivo environment. Especially for neural tissue regeneration approaches where there is little regenerative capacity, these models are important for mimicking the extracellular matrix in providing support, allowing the natural flow of oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors, and possibly favoring neural cell regrowth. We have previously demonstrated that a new self-assembling nanostructured biomaterial, based on matrigel, was able to support adult neural stem cell (NSC culture. In this study, we developed a new 3D cell culture system that takes advantage of the nano- and microfiber assembling process, under physiologic conditions, of these biomaterials. The assembled scaffold forms an intricate and biologically active matrix that displays specifically designed functional motifs: RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp, BMHP1 (bone marrow homing peptide 1, and BMHP2, for the culture of adult NSCs. These scaffolds were prepared at different concentrations, and microscopic examination of the cell-embedded scaffolds showed that NSCs are viable and they proliferate and differentiate within the nanostructured environment of the scaffold. Such a model has the potential to be tailored to develop ad hoc designed peptides for specific cell lines.Keywords: biomaterials, tissue engineering, 3D in vitro model

  5. Induced neural stem cells achieve long-term survival and functional integration in the adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Kathrin; Zhang, Mingyue; van Wüllen, Thea; Sakalem, Marna; Tapia, Natalia; Baumuratov, Aidos; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Schöler, Hans R; Zhang, Weiqi; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2014-09-01

    Differentiated cells can be converted directly into multipotent neural stem cells (i.e., induced neural stem cells [iNSCs]). iNSCs offer an attractive alternative to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology with regard to regenerative therapies. Here, we show an in vivo long-term analysis of transplanted iNSCs in the adult mouse brain. iNSCs showed sound in vivo long-term survival rates without graft overgrowths. The cells displayed a neural multilineage potential with a clear bias toward astrocytes and a permanent downregulation of progenitor and cell-cycle markers, indicating that iNSCs are not predisposed to tumor formation. Furthermore, the formation of synaptic connections as well as neuronal and glial electrophysiological properties demonstrated that differentiated iNSCs migrated, functionally integrated, and interacted with the existing neuronal circuitry. We conclude that iNSC long-term transplantation is a safe procedure; moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for future personalized regenerative applications. PMID:25241741

  6. Induced Neural Stem Cells Achieve Long-Term Survival and Functional Integration in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Hemmer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated cells can be converted directly into multipotent neural stem cells (i.e., induced neural stem cells [iNSCs]. iNSCs offer an attractive alternative to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology with regard to regenerative therapies. Here, we show an in vivo long-term analysis of transplanted iNSCs in the adult mouse brain. iNSCs showed sound in vivo long-term survival rates without graft overgrowths. The cells displayed a neural multilineage potential with a clear bias toward astrocytes and a permanent downregulation of progenitor and cell-cycle markers, indicating that iNSCs are not predisposed to tumor formation. Furthermore, the formation of synaptic connections as well as neuronal and glial electrophysiological properties demonstrated that differentiated iNSCs migrated, functionally integrated, and interacted with the existing neuronal circuitry. We conclude that iNSC long-term transplantation is a safe procedure; moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for future personalized regenerative applications.

  7. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  8. RNA-sequencing of a mouse-model of spinal muscular atrophy reveals tissue-wide changes in splicing of U12-dependent introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Hua, Yimin; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard;

    2016-01-01

    unknown. It is likely that aberrant splicing of genes expressed in motor neurons is involved in SMA pathogenesis, but increasing evidence indicates that pathologies also exist in other tissues. We present here a comprehensive RNA-seq study that covers multiple tissues in an SMA mouse model. We show...... are reversed. Finally, we report on missplicing of several Ca(2+) channel genes that may explain disrupted Ca(2+) homeostasis in SMA and activation of Cdk5....

  9. Daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity indicate different adaptive strategies to cold exposure in adult and aged mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

    OpenAIRE

    Terrien, Jeremy; Zizzari, Philippe; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Daily variations in core temperature (Tc) within the normothermic range imply thermoregulatory processes that are essential for optimal function and survival. Higher susceptibility towards cold exposure in older animals suggests that these processes are disturbed with age. In the mouse lemur, a long-day breeder, we tested whether aging affected circadian rhythmicity of Tc, locomotor activity (LA), and energy balance under long-day conditions when exposed to cold. Adult (N = 7) and aged (N = 5...

  10. Characterization of Aromatase Expression in the Adult Male and Female Mouse Brain. I. Coexistence with Oestrogen Receptors α and β, and Androgen Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Davor Stanić; Sydney Dubois; Hui Kheng Chua; Bruce Tonge; Nicole Rinehart; Malcolm K Horne; Wah Chin Boon

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase catalyses the last step of oestrogen synthesis. There is growing evidence that local oestrogens influence many brain regions to modulate brain development and behaviour. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of aromatase in the adult male and female mouse brain, using mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is transcribed following the physiological activation of the Cyp19A1 gene. EGFP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in many brain regions, in...

  11. Cell size and geometry of spinal cord motoneurons in the adult cat following the intramuscular injection of adriamycin: comparison with data from aged cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R H; Yamuy, J; Engelhardt, J K; Xi, M C; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1996-10-28

    of neurons on the control side. We conclude that significant geometrical changes were induced in lumbar motoneurons of adult cats after ADM was injected to their muscles. In old cats, spinal cord motoneurons exhibit similar patterns of changes in their electrophysiological characteristics which have also been suggested to be correlated with changes in cell geometry. The question then arises as to whether the response of motoneurons to ADM and the aging process reflects a stereotypic reaction of motoneurons to a variety of insults or whether the response to ADM mirrors specific aspects of the aging process. PMID:8949934

  12. Health service use in adults 20-64 years with traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or pelvic fracture. A cohort study with 9-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bjarne; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the health service use over 9 years after the injury year for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI) and pelvic fracture (PF), and compare with non-injured.......To estimate the health service use over 9 years after the injury year for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI) and pelvic fracture (PF), and compare with non-injured....

  13. MRI Findings in Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barzin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal canal stenosis results from progressive narrowing of the central spinal canal and the lateral recesses. Primary (congenital lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with achondroplastic dwarfism. The spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposus posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the facet joints, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins and uncovertebral joint hypertrophy in the neck. The central canal and the neurorecess may be compromised by tumor infiltration, such as metastatic disease, or by infectious spondylitis."nAP diameter of the normal adult cervical canal has a mean value of 17-18 mm at vertebral levels C3-5. The lower cervical canal measures 12-14 mm. Cervical stenosis is associated with an AP diameter of less than 10 mm. The thoracic spinal canal varies from 12 to 14 mm in diameter in the adult. The diameter of the normal lumbar spinal canal varies from 15 to 27 mm. Lumbar stenosis results from a spinal canal diameter of less than 12 mm in some patients; a diameter of 10 mm is definitely stenotic."nSpinal MRI is the most suitable technique for the diagnosis of spinal stenosis. The examination should be performed using thin sections (3 mm and high resolution, including the axial and sagittal planes using T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted techniques. The bony and osteophytic components are seen best using a T2-weighted gradient-echo technique."nOn MRI, findings of spinal stenosis have a variable presentation depending on the specific disease. The goal of spinal imaging is to localize the site and level of disease and to help differentiate between conditions in which patients require surgery or conservative treatment."nIn this presentation, different kinds of spinal canal stenosis and their MRI findings would be discussed.

  14. Expression and regulation of the Fkbp5 gene in the adult mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian H Scharf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic stress has been found to be a major risk factor for various human pathologies. Stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, which is tightly regulated via, among others, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. The activity of the GR is modulated by a variety of proteins, including the co-chaperone FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5. Although FKBP5 has been associated with risk for affective disorders and has been implicated in GR sensitivity, previous studies focused mainly on peripheral blood, while information about basal distribution and induction in the central nervous system are sparse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we describe the basal expression pattern of Fkbp5 mRNA in the brain of adult male mice and show the induction of Fkbp5 mRNA via dexamethasone treatment or different stress paradigms. We could show that Fkbp5 is often, but not exclusively, expressed in regions also known for GR expression, for example the hippocampus. Furthermore, we were able to induce Fkbp5 expression via dexamethasone in the CA1 and DG subregions of the hippocampus, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN and the central amygdala (CeA. Increase of Fkbp5 mRNA was also found after restrained stress and 24 hours of food deprivation in the PVN and the CeA, while in the hippocampus only food deprivation caused an increase in Fkbp5 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Interestingly, regions with a low basal expression showed higher increase in Fkbp5 mRNA following induction than regions with high basal expression, supporting the hypothesis that GR sensitivity is, at least partly, mediated via Fkbp5. In addition, this also supports the use of Fkbp5 gene expression as a marker for GR sensitivity. In summary, we were able to give an overview of the basal expression of fkbp5 mRNA as well as to extend the findings of induction of Fkbp5 and its regulatory influence on GR sensitivity from peripheral blood to the brain.

  15. Characterization of spinal findings in children and adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 enrolled in a natural history study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Rosa; Dombi, Eva; Akshintala, Srivandana; Baldwin, Andrea; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2015-01-01

    To characterize spinal abnormalities in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). NF1 patients with at least one spine MRI were selected from participants prospectively enrolled in the National Cancer Institute NF1 Natural History Study. Data were analyzed retrospectively. Ninety-seven patients (38 females, median age 14.2 years, standard deviation [SD] 7.6) had baseline imaging of the spine, and 26 patients (27 %) had one follow-up spine MRI (follow up time 2.5 years, SD 1.1, range 0.7-4.7). Seventy-eight patients (80 %) had spinal neurofibromas, with rising frequency from 70 % in patients younger than 10 years to 80 % in patients aged 10-18 years to 89 % in individuals older than 18 years of age. At baseline, 33/97 patients (34 %) had MRI changes consistent with spinal cord compression that was most prevalent at the cervical (43 %) and lumbar spine region (40 %). Seven of nine patients with progression of their spinal neurofibromas developed cord compression. Paraspinal plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) were present in 77/97 patients (79 %), of which 68 patients (88 %) had concomitant spinal neurofibromas. Spinal curvature abnormality was present in 50/97 patients (51 %, 20 females, median age 14.6 years, SD 7.6). Patients with paraspinal PNs had six-fold higher odds of developing spinal curvature abnormalities compared to patients without PN (OR = 5.9, 95 % CI 1.81 to 19.44, p = 0.0033). A total of 58/97 patients (60 %, median age 16.1 years, SD 7.8, range 4.8-48.2 years) presented with neurologic abnormalities that progressed in 12/26 patients (46 %). Substantial spinal neurofibroma and paraspinal PN burden was observed in our study population, which represents a selective group of patients with specifically more severe tumor involvement than the general NF1 population. Occurrence and progression of spinal neurofibromas on repeat evaluations highlight the need for longitudinal clinical monitoring in patients with known

  16. Experimental study on spinal cord injury treated by embryonic spinal cord transplantation and greater omental transposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Dingjun(郝定均); Zheng Yonghong(郑永宏); Yuan Fuyong(袁福镛); He Liming; Wang Rong; Yuan Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of the embryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition for treatment of the spinal cord injury in 24 mongrel dogs. Methods: 24 adult mongrel dogs, weighing 10 ~ 13kg,bryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition group (group D). Each group consisted of 6 dogs. SEP(somatosensory evoked potential) and MEP (motor evoked potential) of the spinal cord were examed prior to the spinal cord injury and 2 months after the treatment to observe the changes of the animals' behavior. All dogs were killed 2 months after surgery and the spinal cord sections were obtained from T12 to L1 level for pathological analysis and observation under the electron microscope.Results: There was an obvious difference in the spinal somatosensory evoked potential and the motor evoked potential between the group D and the other three groups (group A, B, and C). Recovery of the behavior was noted. The spinal cells had survived for two months following the transplantation. Conclusion: Transplantation of the embryonic spinal cell and greater omentum for treatment of the spinal cord injury in dogs can gain a better outcome than the other groups in behavior and spinal somatosensory and motor evoked potential, but the further study is still essential to confirm its clinical efficacy.

  17. 自体骨髓基质干细胞移植对大鼠脊髓损伤的疗效%EFFECTS OF TRANSPLANTATION OF AUTOLOGOUS BONE MARROW STROMAL CELLS ON REPAIR OF SPINAL CORD INJURY IN ADULT RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈肖方; 王延伟; 刘晓阳; 刘洪涛

    2011-01-01

    [目的]观察自体骨髓基质干细胞(bone marrow stromal cells,BMSCs)移植对大鼠脊髓损伤(SCI)的治疗效果.[方法]体外分离纯化大鼠骨髓基质干细胞,取46例Wistar大鼠采用改良的Allen's装置在TIl水平制成大鼠脊髓损伤模型,随机分成基质干细胞(MSCs)移植组(n=23)和对照组(n=23),分别于术后1、4周通过BBB评分观察大鼠SCI后功能的恢复情况.[结果]术前所有大鼠BBB评分均为21分,脊髓损伤后为0分,所有大鼠神经功能缺损症状随着时间的推移都有不同程度的减轻.两组术后4周时BBB评分均较术后1周时高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).移植组术后1、4周时BBB评分均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).[结论]BMSCs移植有助予大鼠脊髓损伤后的修复重建和功能恢复.%[Objective] To observe the effects of transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult rats. [Methods] Autologous bone marrow stromal cells were isolated and purified. 46 Wistar rats with spinal cord injury were randomly divided into two groups (n = 23, each). The BMSCs group was received transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells, and the control group was only given spinal cord injury. At one and four weeks after surgery, the functional recovery of the hind limbs was evaluated by the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating score. [Results] The spinal cord function BBB scores at 4 weeks after bone marrow stromal cell transplantation were significantly higher than those at one week after bone marrow stromal cell transplantation in the two groups. At one and four weeks after bone marrow stromal cell transplantation, the BBB scores in the BMSCs group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05). [Conclusion] Autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation is effective for treatment of spinal cord injury of adult rats.

  18. In vivo 3D digital atlas database of the adult C57BL/6J mouse brain by magnetic resonance microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ma

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D digital atlas of the live mouse brain based on magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM is presented. C57BL/6J adult mouse brains were imaged in vivo on a 9.4 Tesla MR instrument at an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 μm. With sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, 20 brain regions were identified. Several atlases were constructed including 12 individual brain atlases, an average atlas, a probabilistic atlas and average geometrical deformation maps. We also investigated the feasibility of using lower spatial resolution images to improve time efficiency for future morphological phenotyping. All of the new in vivo data were compared to previous published in vitro C57BL/6J mouse brain atlases and the morphological differences were characterized. Our analyses revealed significant volumetric as well as unexpected geometrical differences between the in vivo and in vitro brain groups which in some instances were predictable (e.g. collapsed and smaller ventricles in vitro but not in other instances. Based on these findings we conclude that although in vitro datasets, compared to in vivo images, offer higher spatial resolutions, superior SNR and CNR, leading to improved image segmentation, in vivo atlases are likely to be an overall better geometric match for in vivo studies, which are necessary for longitudinal examinations of the same animals and for functional brain activation studies. Thus the new in vivo mouse brain atlas dataset presented here is a valuable complement to the current mouse brain atlas collection and will be accessible to the neuroscience community on our public domain mouse brain atlas website.

  19. Spinal cord injury reveals multilineage differentiation of ependymal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Meletis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury often results in permanent functional impairment. Neural stem cells present in the adult spinal cord can be expanded in vitro and improve recovery when transplanted to the injured spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of cells that can promote regeneration but that normally fail to do so efficiently. Using genetic fate mapping, we show that close to all in vitro neural stem cell potential in the adult spinal cord resides within the population of ependymal cells lining the central canal. These cells are recruited by spinal cord injury and produce not only scar-forming glial cells, but also, to a lesser degree, oligodendrocytes. Modulating the fate of ependymal progeny after spinal cord injury may offer an alternative to cell transplantation for cell replacement therapies in spinal cord injury.

  20. RNA-sequencing of a mouse-model of spinal muscular atrophy reveals tissue-wide changes in splicing of U12-dependent introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Hua, Yimin; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard;

    2016-01-01

    unknown. It is likely that aberrant splicing of genes expressed in motor neurons is involved in SMA pathogenesis, but increasing evidence indicates that pathologies also exist in other tissues. We present here a comprehensive RNA-seq study that covers multiple tissues in an SMA mouse model. We show...... is correlated with decreased snRNP assembly activity. In particular, the minor spliceosomal snRNPs are affected, and some U12-dependent introns have been reported to be aberrantly spliced in patient cells and animal models. SMA is characterized by loss of motor neurons, but the underlying mechanism is largely...... are reversed. Finally, we report on missplicing of several Ca(2+) channel genes that may explain disrupted Ca(2+) homeostasis in SMA and activation of Cdk5....

  1. Neuroendocrine and cardiac metabolic dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in adipose tissue and pancreas following chronic spinal cord injury in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Nash

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available CVD (cardiovascular disease represents a leading cause of mortality in chronic SCI (spinal cord injury. Several component risk factors are observed in SCI; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these risks have not been defined. Central and peripheral chronic inflammation is associated with metabolic dysfunction and CVD, including adipokine regulation of neuroendocrine and cardiac function and inflammatory processes initiated by the innate immune response. We use female C57 Bl/6 mice to examine neuroendocrine, cardiac, adipose and pancreatic signaling related to inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in response to experimentally induced chronic SCI. Using immuno-histochemical, -precipitation, and -blotting analysis, we show decreased POMC (proopiomelanocortin and increased NPY (neuropeptide-Y expression in the hypothalamic ARC (arcuate nucleus and PVN (paraventricular nucleus, 1-month post-SCI. Long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb, JAK2 (Janus kinase/STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/p38 and RhoA/ROCK (Rho-associated kinase signaling is significantly increased in the heart tissue post-SCI, and we observe the formation and activation of the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome in VAT (visceral adipose tissue and pancreas post-SCI. These data demonstrate neuroendocrine signaling peptide alterations, associated with central inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI, and provide evidence for the peripheral activation of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiac, VAT and pancreatic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI. Further understanding of biological mechanisms contributing to SCI-related inflammatory processes and metabolic dysfunction associated with CVD pathology may help to direct therapeutic and rehabilitation countermeasures.

  2. Toward a Broader View of Ube3a in a Mouse Model of Angelman Syndrome: Expression in Brain, Spinal Cord, Sciatic Nerve and Glial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Grier

    Full Text Available Angelman Syndrome (AS is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental delay, speech impairment, movement disorder, sleep disorders and refractory epilepsy. AS is caused by loss of the Ube3a protein encoded for by the imprinted Ube3a gene. Ube3a is expressed nearly exclusively from the maternal chromosome in mature neurons. While imprinting in neurons of the brain has been well described, the imprinting and expression of Ube3a in other neural tissues remains relatively unexplored. Moreover, given the overwhelming deficits in brain function in AS patients, the possibility of disrupted Ube3a expression in the infratentorial nervous system and its consequent disability have been largely ignored. We evaluated the imprinting status of Ube3a in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve and show that it is also imprinted in these neural tissues. Furthermore, a growing body of clinical and radiological evidence has suggested that myelin dysfunction may contribute to morbidity in many neurodevelopmental syndromes. However, findings regarding Ube3a expression in non-neuronal cells of the brain have varied. Utilizing enriched primary cultures of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, we show that Ube3a is expressed, but not imprinted in these cell types. Unlike many other neurodevelopmental disorders, AS symptoms do not become apparent until roughly 6 to 12 months of age. To determine the temporal expression pattern and silencing, we analyzed Ube3a expression in AS mice at several time points. We confirm relaxed imprinting of Ube3a in neurons of the postnatal developing cortex, but not in structures in which neurogenesis and migration are more complete. This furthers the hypothesis that the apparently normal window of development in AS patients is supported by an incompletely silenced paternal allele in developing neurons, resulting in a relative preservation of Ube3a expression during this crucial epoch of early development.

  3. Toward a Broader View of Ube3a in a Mouse Model of Angelman Syndrome: Expression in Brain, Spinal Cord, Sciatic Nerve and Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Mark D; Carson, Robert P; Lagrange, Andre Hollis

    2015-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental delay, speech impairment, movement disorder, sleep disorders and refractory epilepsy. AS is caused by loss of the Ube3a protein encoded for by the imprinted Ube3a gene. Ube3a is expressed nearly exclusively from the maternal chromosome in mature neurons. While imprinting in neurons of the brain has been well described, the imprinting and expression of Ube3a in other neural tissues remains relatively unexplored. Moreover, given the overwhelming deficits in brain function in AS patients, the possibility of disrupted Ube3a expression in the infratentorial nervous system and its consequent disability have been largely ignored. We evaluated the imprinting status of Ube3a in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve and show that it is also imprinted in these neural tissues. Furthermore, a growing body of clinical and radiological evidence has suggested that myelin dysfunction may contribute to morbidity in many neurodevelopmental syndromes. However, findings regarding Ube3a expression in non-neuronal cells of the brain have varied. Utilizing enriched primary cultures of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, we show that Ube3a is expressed, but not imprinted in these cell types. Unlike many other neurodevelopmental disorders, AS symptoms do not become apparent until roughly 6 to 12 months of age. To determine the temporal expression pattern and silencing, we analyzed Ube3a expression in AS mice at several time points. We confirm relaxed imprinting of Ube3a in neurons of the postnatal developing cortex, but not in structures in which neurogenesis and migration are more complete. This furthers the hypothesis that the apparently normal window of development in AS patients is supported by an incompletely silenced paternal allele in developing neurons, resulting in a relative preservation of Ube3a expression during this crucial epoch of early development. PMID:25894543

  4. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI. PMID:27316370

  5. Spinal injury - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  6. Quantitative evaluation of 3D mouse behaviors and motor function in the open-field after spinal cord injury using markerless motion tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L Sheets

    Full Text Available Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study's goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz. Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal's silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal's front Center of Volume (CoV height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005 and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01 were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative

  7. 浅析老年人外伤型脊柱骨折的临床特点%The Clinical Characteristics of SC Type Traumatic Spinal Fractures in Older Adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴财

    2016-01-01

    objective to study the clinical characteristics of type traumatic spinal fractures in older adults, and to provide basis for clinical treatment and prevention. Methods analyze the clinical characteristics of type traumatic spinal fractures in older adults. The re-sults in the elderly trauma patients with spinal fractures in women than men, patients with spinal fractures in the elderly trauma ratio of 55-69 years old was obviously higher than that of other age groups. Trauma type spine fractures in older adults in women in life and hurt more, men falling injury and heavy parts, see more at high proportion of female life hurt significantly higher than the male, male, falling injury and heavy parts Ratio is significantly higher than women. Life and high falling injury and heavy parts cause trauma type spine fractures in older adults in male patients with ISS score and the proportion of spinal cord injury than women, comparative differences are statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion traumatic type spine fractures in older adults is given priority to with life fall and fall injury, good hair at 55 -69 years old, so at ordinary times in life to win to prevention.%目的:探讨老年人外伤型脊柱骨折的临床特点,为临床治疗及预防提供依据。方法分析总结老年人外伤型脊柱骨折的临床特点。结果老年人外伤型脊柱骨折患者中女性明显高于男性,老年人外伤型脊柱骨折患者发于55~69岁的比率明显高于其他各年龄段。老年人外伤型脊柱骨折中女性多见于生活中摔伤,男性多见于高处坠落伤及重物砸伤,女性生活中地摔伤所占比率明显高于男性,男性高处坠落伤及重物砸伤比率明显高于女性。生活中地摔伤,高处坠落伤及重物砸伤导致老年人外伤型脊柱骨折中男性患者在ISS评分及脊髓损伤所占比率高于女性,比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论老年人外伤型脊柱骨折以生

  8. Spinal Cord Contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ju; Jian Wang; Yazhou Wang; Xianghui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and lim-ited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  9. 本体觉传入纤维在小鼠脊髓内的发育变化%DEVELOPMENTAL ALTERNATIONS IN PROPRIOCEPTIVE AFFERENT PROJECTIONS IN THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄静; 冯枫; 刘翔宇; 李云庆; 武胜昔

    2006-01-01

    目的观察本体觉传入纤维在小鼠脊髓内投射和终止的发育变化. 方法采用小牛白蛋白(PV)免疫组织化学染色特异标记本体觉传入纤维,用免疫荧光单标记和双标记方法观察本体觉传入纤维在脊髓内的生长模式以及与运动神经元的关系.染色后的切片用激光共聚焦显微镜进行观察. 结果PV样免疫阳性(LI)本体觉纤维最早于胚胎(E)14 d出现在后索,E15时进入脊髓灰质.E16时,已有较多的PV-LI纤维到达中间带灰质和前角(VH).此后,随着发育阶段的增长,脊髓VH内PV-LI本体觉纤维和终末的数量和密度逐渐增加,并在生后早期P0-P7达到最高水平.P14后,上述本体觉纤维和终末的数量逐渐减少.本体觉传入纤维的终末在E17时开始与脊髓VH运动神经元形成密切的接触.结论本体觉传入纤维在脊髓内的定位模式形成于小鼠胚胎后期和生后早期,本研究结果为深入理解脊髓反射运动环路的发育特点提供了依据.%Objective To observe the developmental changes of projection and termination of proprioceptive afferent fibers in the mouse spinal cord. Methods Parvalbumin (PV) immunohistochemistry was used to label the proprioceptive afferents. Single and dual immunofluorescence histochemistry were used to examine the growth pattern of proprioceptive afferents and their relationships with motoneurons in the spinal ventral horn (VH). The stained sections were observed under a confocal laserscanning microscope. Results PV-like immunoreactive (LI) proprioceptive fibers first appeared in the dorsal column on embryonic (E) day 14, then entered the gray matter on El5 and reached the intermediate gray matter and VH more obviously on E16. The number and intensity of PV-LI proprioceptive afferent fibers and punctata increased in the VH with age and reached a maximum during earlier postnatal (P) period (P0-P7). After P14, the number and intensity of proprioceptive afferents gradually

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help Transitions Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury How Occupational Therapists Work ...

  12. Long-term administration of scopolamine interferes with nerve cell proliferation, differentiation and migration in adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus, but it does not induce cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Chun Yan; Yun Lyul Lee; Il-Jun Kang; Moo-Ho Won; Joon Ha Park; Bai Hui Chen; Jeong-Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae-Chul Lee; In Koo Hwang; Jun Hwi Cho

    2014-01-01

    Long-term administration of scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, can inhibit the survival of newly generated cells, but its effect on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of nerve cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus remain poorly understood. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry and western blot methods to weekly detect the biological behaviors of nerve cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice that received intraperito-neal administration of scopolamine for 4 weeks. Expression of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN;a neuronal marker) and Fluoro-Jade B (a marker for the localization of neuronal degeneration) was also detected. After scopolamine treatment, mouse hippocampal neurons did not die, and Ki-67 (a marker for proliferating cells)-immunoreactive cells were reduced in number and reac hed the lowest level at 4 weeks. Doublecortin (DCX; a marker for newly generated neurons)-im-munoreactive cells were gradually shortened in length and reduced in number with time. After scopolamine treatment for 4 weeks, nearly all of the 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled newly generated cells were located in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, but they did not migrate into the granule cell layer. Few mature BrdU/NeuN double-labeled cells were seen in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These ifndings suggest that long-term administration of scopolamine interferes with the proliferation, differentiation and migration of nerve cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus, but it does not induce cell death.

  13. Inhibitory Interneurons That Express GFP in the PrP-GFP Mouse Spinal Cord Are Morphologically Heterogeneous, Innervated by Several Classes of Primary Afferent and Include Lamina I Projection Neurons among Their Postsynaptic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganley, Robert P; Iwagaki, Noboru; del Rio, Patricia; Baseer, Najma; Dickie, Allen C; Boyle, Kieran A; Polgár, Erika; Watanabe, Masahiko; Abraira, Victoria E; Zimmerman, Amanda; Riddell, John S; Todd, Andrew J

    2015-05-13

    The superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord contains numerous inhibitory interneurons, which regulate the transmission of information perceived as touch, pain, or itch. Despite the importance of these cells, our understanding of their roles in the neuronal circuitry is limited by the difficulty in identifying functional populations. One group that has been identified and characterized consists of cells in the mouse that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the prion protein (PrP) promoter. Previous reports suggested that PrP-GFP cells belonged to a single morphological class (central cells), received inputs exclusively from unmyelinated primary afferents, and had axons that remained in lamina II. However, we recently reported that the PrP-GFP cells expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and/or galanin, and it has been shown that nNOS-expressing cells are more diverse in their morphology and synaptic connections. We therefore used a combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, and anatomical approach to reexamine the PrP-GFP cells. We provide evidence that they are morphologically diverse (corresponding to "unclassified" cells) and receive synaptic input from a variety of primary afferents, with convergence onto individual cells. We also show that their axons project into adjacent laminae and that they target putative projection neurons in lamina I. This indicates that the neuronal circuitry involving PrP-GFP cells is more complex than previously recognized, and suggests that they are likely to have several distinct roles in regulating the flow of somatosensory information through the dorsal horn.

  14. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol. PMID:27560176

  15. Expression of C4.4A, a structural uPAR homolog, reflects squamous epithelial differentiation in the adult mouse and during embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Mette Camilla; Jacobsen, Benedikte; Hald, Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    by a comprehensive immunohistochemical mapping. This task was accomplished by staining paraffin-embedded tissues with a specific rabbit polyclonal anti-C4.4A antibody. In the adult mouse, C4.4A was predominantly expressed in the suprabasal layers of the squamous epithelia of the oral cavity, esophagus, non-glandular...... expression first appears in the developing squamous epithelium at embryonic day 13.5. This anatomical location of C4.4A is thus concordant with a possible functional role in early differentiation of stratified squamous epithelia....

  16. Kalsiyum Kanal Blokeri Verapamilin Spinal Reflekslere Etkisi

    OpenAIRE

    TAŞÇI, N.; GENÇ, O.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of calcium channel blocker verapamil on spinal reflexes were studied. Verapamil 5, 50, (iM locally. 10,20 mg/kg was administradet intraperitoneally and 10, 50, 100 (iM localyy. Experiments on adult spinal cats (n=10) were conducted. Animals weighing 1,5-3 kg were anesthetized with ketamine (45 mg/kg intramuscular) and artiflcally ventilated. Animals were spinalized at Cj level and a laminectomy was performed in the lumbosacral region. The ventral and dorsal roots of segment Lg were...

  17. Interneurons and proprioneurons in the adult human spinal grey matter and in the general somatic and visceral afferent cranial nerve nuclei.

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-01-01

    Using the classification of Abdel-Maguid & Bowsher (1984), interneurons of the dorsal horn of the grey matter of the human spinal cord and medulla oblongata were found to belong to only three 'families' of neurons, out of a possible thirteen. This is in itself one of the justifications for the method of classification. Functional identification of these human neurons has been made on the basis of topological, morphological and projectional comparison with known cells in other mammalian specie...

  18. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  19. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  20. The effect of microgene pSVPoMcat to modify Schwann cell on GAP- 43 expression after spinal cord injury in adult rats%微基因修饰雪旺氏细胞移植对大鼠脊髓损伤后GAP-43表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礼刚; 高立达; 毛伯镛; 杨立斌; 李开慧

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of microgene pSVPoMcat implanted to modify schwann cell on growth associated protein-43(GAP-43) expression after spinal cord injury in adult rats.Method Hemisected of the T8 segment of the spinal cord was performed for all the experiment rats.The rats were randomly divided into three groups as follows:Group A with microgene pSVPoMcat implanted to genetically modify SC;Group B with SC implanted ;Group C with hemisection of the spinal cord only.The changes of expression of GAP-43 in spinal cord were observed by immunochemistry with antibodies against GAP-43 .Simultaneous,the combined behavioral scores(CBS)was measured.Result There were not any different(P >0.05)among the three groups in first week and 12 week.There were significant diffeence(P<0.05)among three groups in 2nd,8th,and more dxpression of GAP-43 at the 2nd week in group A.The neurofunctional recovery was best in group A.Conclusion The microgene pSVPoMcat implanted to modify schwann cell can promote the expression of GAP-43 in spinal cord and functional recovery in adults rats after SCI.

  1. Electromyogram and pathological features of adult spinal muscle atrophy:analysis of 46 cases%成人型脊髓性肌萎缩症46例电生理与病理变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张平; 何晓军; 陈立晔

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the electromyogram and muscular pathological features of adult spinal muscular atrophy(SMA4). METHODS: 46 cases of SMA4 were evaluated based on clinical, histopathology, enzyme histochemistry and ultrastructure. RESULTS: A mean age of the patients with SMA4 was 38.7 years, clinical progressed was slowly. Clinic manifestations mainly appeared proximal muscular weakness and progressive muscular atrophy, and there was a relatively good prognosis. Laboratory found: one-fourth of the disease had elevated serum creatine kinase levels. Eletromyogram revealed neurogenic damages. The muscular pathological changes showed small groups of atrophy of denervation, ATPase reaction showed fibre-type grouping of renervation and hypertrophy in muscle fibers. CONCLUSION: Muscle biopsy was important; it could to help to establish to diagnose the disorder and provided available cases for gene study.

  2. Spinal sagittal imbalance in patients with lumbar disc herniation: its spinopelvic characteristics, strength changes of the spinal musculature and natural history after lumbar discectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Chen; Sun, Jianmin; Cui, Xingang; Jiang, Zhensong; Zhang, Wen; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal sagittal imbalance is a widely acknowledged problem, but there is insufficient knowledge regarding its occurrence. In some patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH), their symptom is similar to spinal sagittal imbalance. The aim of this study is to illustrate the spinopelvic sagittal characteristics and identity the role of spinal musculature in the mechanism of sagittal imbalance in patients with LDH. Methods Twenty-five adults with spinal sagittal imbalance who initially ...

  3. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  4. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Jennifer; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2 to 5 fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running. PMID:25435316

  5. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... remove some bone from the back of the rim of the pelvis. From a bone bank. This ... of your back at home Patient Instructions Bathroom safety - adults Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask ...

  6. Use of quadrupedal step training to re-engage spinal interneuronal networks and improve locomotor function after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Prithvi K.; Garcia-Alias, Guillermo; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Gerasimenko, Yury; Tillakaratne, Niranjala; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2013-01-01

    Can lower limb motor function be improved after a spinal cord lesion by re-engaging functional activity of the upper limbs? We addressed this issue by training the forelimbs in conjunction with the hindlimbs after a thoracic spinal cord hemisection in adult rats. The spinal circuitries were more excitable, and behavioural and electrophysiological analyses showed improved hindlimb function when the forelimbs were engaged simultaneously with the hindlimbs during treadmill step-training as oppos...

  7. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  8. Building bridges with astrocytes for spinal cord repair

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous suppression of glial scarring and a general enhancement of axonal outgrowth has now been accomplished in an adult rat model of spinal cord transection. Transplantation of a novel astrocyte cell type derived from glial-restricted precursors in vitro raise the eventual possibility of cellular therapy for spinal cord injury.

  9. Spontaneous axonal regeneration in rodent spinal cord after ischemic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler, Mia; Janson, A M; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard;

    2002-01-01

    Here we present evidence for spontaneous and long-lasting regeneration of CNS axons after spinal cord lesions in adult rats. The length of 200 kD neurofilament (NF)-immunolabeled axons was estimated after photochemically induced ischemic spinal cord lesions using a stereological tool. The total l...

  10. Development and regulation of response properties in spinal cord motoneurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, J F; Hounsgaard, J

    2000-01-01

    vertebrates in terms of both phylogeny and ontogeny. Spinal motoneurons in adults are remarkably similar in many respects ranging from the resting membrane potential to pacemaker properties. Apart from the axolotls, spinal motoneurons from all species investigated have latent intrinsic response properties...

  11. Protease-activated receptor-1 negatively regulates proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells derived from the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Yoneyama, Masanori; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Taro; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2016-07-01

    Thrombin-activated protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 regulates the proliferation of neural cells following brain injury. To elucidate the involvement of PAR-1 in the neurogenesis that occurs in the adult hippocampus, we examined whether PAR-1 regulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the murine hippocampal dentate gyrus. NPC cultures expressed PAR-1 protein and mRNA encoding all subtypes of PAR. Direct exposure of the cells to thrombin dramatically attenuated the cell proliferation without causing cell damage. This thrombin-induced attenuation was almost completely abolished by the PAR antagonist RWJ 56110, as well as by dabigatran and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF), which are selective and non-selective thrombin inhibitors, respectively. Expectedly, the PAR-1 agonist peptide (AP) SFLLR-NH2 also attenuated the cell proliferation. The cell proliferation was not affected by the PAR-1 negative control peptide RLLFT-NH2, which is an inactive peptide for PAR-1. Independently, we determined the effect of in vivo treatment with AEBSF or AP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mouse. The administration of AEBSF, but not that of AP, significantly increased the number of newly-generated cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone. These data suggest that PAR-1 negatively regulated adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus by inhibiting the proliferative activity of the NPCs. PMID:27426918

  12. Primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column: review of pathology and surgical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Eli, Ilyas M; Schmidt, Meic H; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Spinal column tumors are rare in children and young adults, accounting for only 1% of all spine and spinal cord tumors combined. They often present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. In this article, the authors review the current management of primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column and highlight diagnosis, management, and surgical decision making.

  13. Primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column: review of pathology and surgical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Eli, Ilyas M; Schmidt, Meic H; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-08-01

    Spinal column tumors are rare in children and young adults, accounting for only 1% of all spine and spinal cord tumors combined. They often present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. In this article, the authors review the current management of primary osseous tumors of the pediatric spinal column and highlight diagnosis, management, and surgical decision making. PMID:27476845

  14. Expression of gdnf and nos in adult zebrafish brain during the regeneration after spinal cord injury%成年斑马鱼脊髓损伤修复中脑gdnf 和nos 基因的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢琳; 房萍; 林金飞; 潘洪超; 张帆; 申延琴

    2013-01-01

    成年斑马鱼(Danio rerio)具有很强的脊髓损伤后自主修复的能力,但目前其机制不明.为了研究斑马鱼中脑组织对脊髓再生的影响,文章应用成年斑马鱼脊髓损伤模型,采用实时定量PCR 方法和原位杂交技术,检测了斑马鱼脑中胶质细胞源性神经营养因子(gdnf)和一氧化氮合酶(nos)基因在脊髓损伤后4 h、12 h、6 d、11 d的表达情况,展示了这两种基因在斑马鱼脑内不同核团的动态表达变化.结果显示,成年斑马鱼脊髓损伤后,神经营养因子gdnf 基因在损伤急性期(4 h、12 h)和神经修复期(6 d、11 d)于斑马鱼脑内呈现显著性升高(P<0.05),而一氧化氮合酶基因nos 的表达于损伤急性期显著性升高 (P<0.05),随后下降,并在修复期 (11 d)显著降低(P<0.05).这表明,脊髓损伤后,高表达gdnf 基因同时低表达nos 基因的脑环境给脊髓损伤提供了良好的神经再生微环境,从而可能促进轴突的再生长及运动能力的恢复.%Recently, it is unclear about the mechanism of notable regenerated ability of adult zebrafish after spinal cord injury. To investigate the effects of brain on restoration from spinal cord injury, adult zebrafish spinal cord injury model was built and brain samples were dissected at different time points after the injury. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization were applied to reveal the dynamics of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (gdnf) and nitric oxide synthases (nos) mRNA expression in various regions of zebrafish brain. The results showed that, compared to sham group at each time points separately, the expression of gdnf mRNA in adult zebrafish brain during both acute phase (4 h and 12 h) and chronic phase of neuroregeneration (6 d and 11d) increased significantly (P<0.05). The expression of nos mRNA in zebrafish brain enhanced during acute phase, and then reduced to the level lower than the sham group during the chronic phase of neuroregeneration

  15. A Comparison between the Colony Formation of Adult Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells in Co cultures with Sertoli and STO (Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Morteza Koruji

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the colony formation of spermatogonialstem cells (SSCs on sertoli and STO (Mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line feeder celllayers during a two-week period.Materials and Methods: Initially, sertoli cells and SSCs were isolated from adultmouse testes using a two-step enzymatic digestion and lectin immobilization. Characteristicsof the isolated cells were immunocytochemically confirmed by examiningfor the presence of Oct-4, CDH1, promyelocytic leukaemia zinc finger factor (PLZF,SSC C-kit, and the distribution of Sertoli cell vimentin. SSCs were then cultured abovethe Sertoli, STO and the control (without co-culture separately for two weeks. In allthree groups, the number and diameter of colonies were evaluated using an invert microscopeon the 3rd, 7th, 10th and 14th day. β1 and α6-integrin m-RNA expressions wereassessed using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and realtimePCR. Furthermore, Oct-4 m RNA expression was assessed using real time PCR.Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA; and the paired two-sample t test andTukey’s test were used as post-hoc tests for the data analysis of the three sertoli, STOand control cocultures.Results: At the four specified time points, our results showed significant differences (p<0.05in colony numbers and diameters among the sertoli, STO and control groups. The numberand diameter of colonies increased more rapidly in the sertoli coculture than in the othertwo Our results at all four time points also showed significant differences (p<0.05 in themean colony numbers and diameters between the three groups, with the Sertoli coculturehaving the highest mean values for colony numbers and diameters. The RT-PCR results,after two-weeks of culturing, showed that β1-integrin was expressed in all three groups cocultures,but α6-integrin was not expressed. Additionally, based on real time PCR results,the three genes (β1-integrin, α6-integrin

  16. Conditional transgenic expression of fibroblast growth factor 9 in the adult mouse heart reduces heart failure mortality after myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Kempf, Tibor; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Willenbockel, Christian; Brod, Torben; Heineke, Jörg; Volker J Schmidt; Jantzen, Franziska; Ralf P Brandes; Sugden, Peter H.; Drexler, Helmut; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Wollert, Kai C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is secreted from bone marrow cells, which have been shown to improve systolic function after myocardial infarction (MI) in a clinical trial. FGF9 promotes cardiac vascularization during embryonic development but is only weakly expressed in the adult heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a tetracycline-responsive binary transgene system based on the α-myosin heavy chain promoter to test whether conditional expression of FGF9 in the adult myocardiu...

  17. On-Going Frontal Alpha Rhythms Are Dominant in Passive State and Desynchronize in Active State in Adult Gray Mouse Lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infarinato, Francesco; Rahman, Anisur; Del Percio, Claudio; Lamberty, Yves; Bordet, Regis; Richardson, Jill C; Forloni, Gianluigi; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Lopez, Susanna; Aujard, Fabienne; Babiloni, Claudio; Pifferi, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is considered a useful primate model for translational research. In the framework of IMI PharmaCog project (Grant Agreement n°115009, www.pharmacog.org), we tested the hypothesis that spectral electroencephalographic (EEG) markers of motor and locomotor activity in gray mouse lemurs reflect typical movement-related desynchronization of alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz) in humans. To this aim, EEG (bipolar electrodes in frontal cortex) and electromyographic (EMG; bipolar electrodes sutured in neck muscles) data were recorded in 13 male adult (about 3 years) lemurs. Artifact-free EEG segments during active state (gross movements, exploratory movements or locomotor activity) and awake passive state (no sleep) were selected on the basis of instrumental measures of animal behavior, and were used as an input for EEG power density analysis. Results showed a clear peak of EEG power density at alpha range (7-9 Hz) during passive state. During active state, there was a reduction in alpha power density (8-12 Hz) and an increase of power density at slow frequencies (1-4 Hz). Relative EMG activity was related to EEG power density at 2-4 Hz (positive correlation) and at 8-12 Hz (negative correlation). These results suggest for the first time that the primate gray mouse lemurs and humans may share basic neurophysiologic mechanisms of synchronization of frontal alpha rhythms in awake passive state and their desynchronization during motor and locomotor activity. These EEG markers may be an ideal experimental model for translational basic (motor science) and applied (pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions) research in Neurophysiology. PMID:26618512

  18. On-Going Frontal Alpha Rhythms Are Dominant in Passive State and Desynchronize in Active State in Adult Gray Mouse Lemurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Infarinato

    Full Text Available The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus is considered a useful primate model for translational research. In the framework of IMI PharmaCog project (Grant Agreement n°115009, www.pharmacog.org, we tested the hypothesis that spectral electroencephalographic (EEG markers of motor and locomotor activity in gray mouse lemurs reflect typical movement-related desynchronization of alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz in humans. To this aim, EEG (bipolar electrodes in frontal cortex and electromyographic (EMG; bipolar electrodes sutured in neck muscles data were recorded in 13 male adult (about 3 years lemurs. Artifact-free EEG segments during active state (gross movements, exploratory movements or locomotor activity and awake passive state (no sleep were selected on the basis of instrumental measures of animal behavior, and were used as an input for EEG power density analysis. Results showed a clear peak of EEG power density at alpha range (7-9 Hz during passive state. During active state, there was a reduction in alpha power density (8-12 Hz and an increase of power density at slow frequencies (1-4 Hz. Relative EMG activity was related to EEG power density at 2-4 Hz (positive correlation and at 8-12 Hz (negative correlation. These results suggest for the first time that the primate gray mouse lemurs and humans may share basic neurophysiologic mechanisms of synchronization of frontal alpha rhythms in awake passive state and their desynchronization during motor and locomotor activity. These EEG markers may be an ideal experimental model for translational basic (motor science and applied (pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions research in Neurophysiology.

  19. Adult mouse motor units develop almost all of their force in the subprimary range: a new all-or-none strategy for force recruitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Marin; Heckman, C J

    2011-10-19

    Classical studies of the mammalian neuromuscular system have shown an impressive adaptation match between the intrinsic properties of motoneurons and the contractile properties of their motor units. In these studies, the rate at which motoneurons start to fire repetitively corresponds to the rate at which individual twitches start to sum, and the firing rate increases linearly with the amount of excitation ("primary range") up to the point where the motor unit develops its maximal force. This allows for the gradation of the force produced by a motor unit by rate modulation. In adult mouse motoneurons, however, we recently described a regime of firing ("subprimary range") that appears at lower excitation than what is required for the primary range, a finding that might challenge the classical conception. To investigate the force production of mouse motor units, we simultaneously recorded, for the first time, the motoneuron discharge elicited by intracellular ramps of current and the force developed by its motor unit. We showed that the motor unit developed nearly its maximal force during the subprimary range. This was found to be the case regardless of the input resistance of the motoneuron, the contraction speed, or the tetanic force of the motor unit. Our work suggests that force modulation in small mammals mainly relies on the number of motor units that are recruited rather than on rate modulation of individual motor units.

  20. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yoon Hee [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Gupta, Mukesh Kumar, E-mail: goops@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Shin Hye [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center/Animal Resources Research Center, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143 701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferous tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.

  1. Spinal osteomyelitis caused by Proteus mirabilis in a child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deWeerd, W; Kimpen, JLL; Miedema, CJ

    1997-01-01

    Osteomyelitis due to Proteus mirabilis is rare. Spinal osteomyelitis caused by this organism has only been described in adults. This is the first paediatric case of P. mirabilis vertebral osteomyelitis.

  2. Specific distribution of the autophagic protein GABARAPL1/GEC1 in the developing and adult mouse brain and identification of neuronal populations expressing GABARAPL1/GEC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn Nicole Le Grand

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy is a highly conserved cellular degradation process, regulated by autophagy-related (atg factors, in which a double membrane autophagosome engulfs cytoplasmic components to target them for degradation. In yeast, the Atg8 protein is indispensable for autophagosome formation. In mammals, this is complicated by the presence of six Atg8 homologues grouped into the GABARAP and MAP1LC3 subfamilies. Although these proteins share a high similarity, their transcript expression, regulation and protein interactions differ, suggesting they may display individual properties and specific functions. GABARAPL1/GEC1 is a member of the GABARAP subfamily and its mRNA is the most highly expressed Atg8 homologue in the central nervous system. Consequently, we performed an in depth study of GABARAPL1 distribution in the developing and adult murine brain. Our results show that GABARAPL1 brain expression is visible as early as embryonic day 11 and progressively increases to a maximum level in the adult. Immunohistochemical staining was detected in both fibers and immature neurons in embryos but was restrained to neurons in adult tissue. By E17, intense punctate-like structures were visible and these accumulated in cortical primary neurons treated with the autophagosome/lysosome fusion inhibitor Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1, suggesting that they represent autophagosomes. Finally, GABARAPL1 expression was particularly intense in motoneurons in the embryo and in neurons involved in somatomotor and neuroendocrine functions in the adult, particularly in the substantia nigra pars compacta, a region affected in Parkinson's disease. Our study of cerebral GABARAPL1 protein expression provides insight into its role in the development and homeostasis of the mouse brain.

  3. Spinal Cord Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments Functional and Dysfunctional Spinal Circuitry: Role for Rehabilitation and Neural Prostheses Summary of NINDS New Strategies in Spinal Cord Injury workshop held June, 2000. NINDS Workshop on Re- ...

  4. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? What is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? What is the "Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems" program? ... family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal cord injuries ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Partnerships How Social Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help Transitions Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury How Occupational Therapists Work How Occupational Therapists Work Occupational Therapy Enables Daily ...

  8. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that attacks nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord. These cells communicate with your voluntary muscles - the ones you can control, like in your ...

  9. Prospectively isolated CD133/CD24-positive ependymal cells from the adult spinal cord and lateral ventricle wall differ in their long-term in vitro self-renewal and in vivo gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenninger, Cosima V; Steinhoff, Christine; Hertwig, Falk; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to ependymal cells located above the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult lateral ventricle wall (LVW), adult spinal cord (SC) ependymal cells possess certain neural stem cell characteristics. The molecular basis of this difference is unknown. In this study, antibodies against multiple cell surface markers were applied to isolate pure populations of SC and LVW ependymal cells, which allowed a direct comparison of their in vitro behavior and in vivo gene expression profile. Isolated CD133(+)/CD24(+)/CD45(-)/CD34(-) ependymal cells from the SC displayed in vitro self-renewal and differentiation capacity, whereas those from the LVW did not. SC ependymal cells showed a higher expression of several genes involved in cell division, cell cycle regulation, and chromosome stability, which is consistent with a long-term self-renewal capacity, and shared certain transcripts with neural stem cells of the embryonic forebrain. They also expressed several retinoic acid (RA)-regulated genes and responded to RA exposure. LVW ependymal cells showed higher transcript levels of many genes regulated by transforming growth factor-β family members. Among them were Dlx2, Id2, Hey1, which together with Foxg1 could explain their potential to turn into neuroblasts under certain environmental conditions. PMID:21046556

  10. Conditional deletion of Ccm2 causes hemorrhage in the adult brain: a mouse model of human cerebral cavernous malformations

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Kirk; Uchida, Yutaka; O'Donnell, Erin; Claudio, Estefania; Li, Wenling; Soneji, Kosha; Wang, Hongshan; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are irregularly shaped and enlarged capillaries in the brain that are prone to hemorrhage, resulting in headaches, seizures, strokes and even death in patients. The disease affects up to 0.5% of the population and the inherited form has been linked to mutations in one of three genetic loci, CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3. To understand the pathophysiology underlying the vascular lesions in CCM, it is critical to develop a reproducible mouse genetic model of this di...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord ... Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life ...

  12. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  14. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  15. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate. PMID:25691247

  16. Isoform-Specific Modulation of Inflammation Induced by Adenoviral Mediated Delivery of Platelet-Derived Growth Factors in the Adult Mouse Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Betsholtz, Christer; Andrae, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are key regulators of mesenchymal cells in vertebrate development. To what extent PDGFs also exert beneficial homeostatic or reparative roles in adult organs, as opposed to adverse fibrogenic responses in pathology, are unclear. PDGF signaling plays critical roles during heart development, during which forced overexpression of PDGFs induces detrimental cardiac fibrosis; other studies have implicated PDGF signaling in post-infarct myocardial repair. Different PDGFs may exert different effects mediated through the two PDGF receptors (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) in different cell types. Here, we assessed responses induced by five known PDGF isoforms in the adult mouse heart in the context of adenovirus vector-mediated inflammation. Our results show that different PDGFs have different, in some cases even opposing, effects. Strikingly, whereas the major PDGFRα agonists (PDGF-A and -C) decreased the amount of scar tissue and increased the numbers of PDGFRα-positive fibroblasts, PDGFRβ agonists either induced large scars with extensive inflammation (PDGF-B) or dampened the adenovirus-induced inflammation and produced a small and dense scar (PDGF-D). These results provide evidence for PDGF isoform-specific inflammation-modulating functions that may have therapeutic implications. They also illustrate a surprising complexity in the PDGF-mediated pathophysiological responses. PMID:27513343

  17. Methods in laboratory investigation. Autoradiographic demonstration of the specific binding and nuclear localization of 3H-dexamethasone in adult mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, D G; Cunha, G R; Malkinson, A M

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the first autoradiographic demonstration of specific nuclear localization of 3H-dexamethasone in different cell types of the lung. Adult mouse lung tissue was incubated in vitro for 90 minutes with 17 nM 3H-dexamethasone in the presence or absence of various nonradioactive steroids. After extensive washing to remove any nonspecifically bound ligand, the specimens were processed for autoradiography using the thaw-mount method. In the absence of competing steroids, silver grains were localized in the nuclei of alveolar type II cells, bronchiolar and arteriolar smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary vasculature. No significant nuclear concentration of label was observed in the bronchiolar epithelium, however. The specificity of 3H-dexamethasone labeling was demonstrated by incubating 17 nM 3H-dexamethasone with a 600-fold excess of either unlabeled dexamethasone, estrogen, dihydrotestosterone, or progesterone. These autoradiographic binding and steroid competition studies were confirmed by quantifying with liquid scintillation counting the specific 3H-dexamethasone binding in nuclear and cytosolic fractions prepared from lung tissues that had undergone identical incubation and washing procedures as those for autoradiography. These results demonstrate that many cell types in adult lung are targets for glucocorticoids and may respond to physiologic concentrations of this hormone.

  18. Effects of maternal L-tryptophan depletion and corticosterone administration on neurobehavioral adjustments in mouse dams and their adolescent and adult daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoratto, Francesca; Berry, Alessandra; Anzidei, Francesca; Fiore, Marco; Alleva, Enrico; Laviola, Giovanni; Macrì, Simone

    2011-08-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD), a pathology characterized by mood and neurovegetative disturbances, depends on a multi-factorial contribution of individual predisposition (e.g., diminished serotonergic transmission) and environmental factors (e.g., neonatal abuse or neglect). Despite its female-biased prevalence, MDD basic research has mainly focused on male rodents. Most of present models of depression are also devalued due to the fact that they typically address only one of the aforementioned pathogenetic factors. In this paper we first describe the basic principles behind mouse model development and evaluation and then articulate that current models of depression are intrinsically devalued due to poor construct and/or external validity. We then report a first attempt to overcome this limitation through the design of a mouse model in which the genetic and the environmental components of early risk factors for depression are mimicked together. Environmental stress is mimicked through the supplementation of corticosterone in the maternal drinking water while biological predisposition is mimicked through maternal access to an L-tryptophan (the serotonin precursor) deficient diet during the first week of lactation. CD1 dams and their offspring exposed to the L-tryptophan deficient diet (T) and to corticosterone (80mg/l; C) were compared to animal facility reared (AFR) subjects. T and C mice served as intermediate reference groups. Adolescent TC offspring, compared to AFR mice, showed decreased time spent floating in the forced-swim test and increased time spent in the open sectors of an elevated 0-maze. Adult TC offspring showed reduced preference for novelty, decreased breakpoints in the progressive ratio operant procedure and major alterations in central BDNF levels and altered HPA regulation. The route of administration and the possibility to control the independent variables predisposing to depressive-like symptoms disclose novel avenues towards the development

  19. 痛温觉和本体觉传入纤维在小鼠脊髓内的不同发育特点%ALTERNATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF NOCICEPTIVE AND PROPRIOCEPTIVE AFFERENT FIBERS IN THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯枫; 黄静; 刘翔宇; 李云庆; 武胜昔

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the developmental changes in projection and termination of nociceptive and proprioceptive afferent fibers in the spinal cord by labeling those two fibers with calcitonion gene-related peptide (CGRP) and parvalbumin (PV)separately in mouse embryos and neonatal pups aged embryonic day 15 to posanatal day 3 (E15 -P3). CGRP-like immunoreactive (LI)nociceptive fibers first appeared in the superficial dorsal horn (DH) at E16. The afferent projections extended laterally to the DH and entered into the deep portions of the DH at E17 and E18. After birth, the projection pattern of CGRP-LI fibers remained unchanged but the intensity of afferent terminals increased in the superficial laminae and their branching patterns became more complicated. In addition,CGRP-LI collaterals that projected into the contralateral DH were also examined after E16. Around birth, the contralateral projections were also found originated from the lateral part of the DH. PV-LI proprioceptive afferents were first observed entering the gray matter at E15 and reached the intermediate gray matter (IG) and the ventral horn (VH) more obviously on E16. The number and intensity of PV-LI fibers increased in the the VH with age and reached a maximum during earlier postnatal period ( P0-P3 ). The proprioceptive terminals seemed to form close relationship with motoneurons in the VH from E17. Our results indicate that the somatotopic organization of nociceptive and proprioceptive afferents in the spinal cord both are established during the late embryonic and early postnatal stages. These results help to understand the development of the sensory transmission in more details.%本研究通过采用钙基因相关肽(CGRP)和小牛白蛋白(PV)分别标记胚胎15d(E15)到生后3d(P3)小鼠脊髓的痛温觉和本体觉两种初级传入纤维,观察了这两种纤维在小鼠脊髓内投射和终止的发育变化.结果显示:CGRP样免疫阳性(LI)纤维最早于E16出现

  20. Spinal infections in children: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Spinal infections are uncommon but significant causes of morbidity and hospitalization in the paediatric population. These infections encompass a broad range of conditions, from discitis to osteomyelitis and spinal epidural and intramedullary abscesses. Paediatric spinal infections can be caused by a range of bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic agents. Ultrastructural differences of the vertebrae and associated structures result in distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis of spinal infections in children compared to adults. The non-specific nature of symptoms produced by them can cause considerable diagnostic delays. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging can facilitate early identification of the disease, and distinguish it from other spinal pathologies. The association of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains from some of the cases appears worrisome; as is the increasing incidence of Kingella kingae infections causing spinal infections. Rest and immobilization are the general treatment, and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is warranted to ensure optimal clinical outcome. Most patients generally have a good prognosis; however, early identification and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential to achieve the best therapeutic response. PMID:27408498

  1. Fast, potent pharmacological expansion of endogenous hes3+/sox2+ cells in the adult mouse and rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pacioni

    Full Text Available The adult hippocampus is involved in learning and memory. As a consequence, it is a brain region of remarkable plasticity. This plasticity exhibits itself both as cellular changes and neurogenesis. For neurogenesis to occur, a population of local stem cells and progenitor cells is maintained in the adult brain and these are able to proliferate and differentiate into neurons which contribute to the hippocampal circuitry. There is much interest in understanding the role of immature cells in the hippocampus, in relation to learning and memory. Methods and mechanisms that increase the numbers of these cells will be valuable in this research field. We show here that single injections of soluble factors into the lateral ventricle of adult rats and mice induces the rapid (within one week increase in the number of putative stem cells/progenitor cells in the hippocampus. The established progenitor marker Sox2 together with the more recently established marker Hes3, were used to quantify the manipulation of the Sox2/Hes3 double-positive cell population. We report that in both adult rodent species, Sox2+/Hes3+ cell numbers can be increased within one week. The most prominent increase was observed in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. This study presents a fast, pharmacological method to manipulate the numbers of endogenous putative stem cells/progenitor cells. This method may be easily modified to alter the degree of activation (e.g. by the use of osmotic pumps for delivery, or by repeat injections through implanted cannulas, in order to be best adapted to different paradigms of research (neurodegenerative disease, neuroprotection, learning, memory, plasticity, etc.

  2. NTPDase2 and Purinergic Signaling Control Progenitor Cell Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches of the Adult Mouse Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gampe, Kristine; Stefani, Jennifer; Hammer, Klaus; Brendel, Peter; Pötzsch, Alexandra; Enikolopov, Grigori; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Robson, Simon C.; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Nerve cells are continuously generated from stem cells in the adult mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) and hippocampal dentate gyrus. We have previously noted that stem/progenitor cells in the SVZ and the subgranular layer (SGL) of the dentate gyrus express high levels of plasma membrane-bound nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 (NTPDase2), an ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleoside di- and triphosphates. We inferred that deletion of NTPDase2 would increase local extrace...

  3. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice. PMID:26231800

  4. Kinematic analysis of the gait of adult sheep during treadmill locomotion: Parameter values, allowable total error, and potential for use in evaluating spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safayi, Sina; Jeffery, Nick D; Shivapour, Sara K; Zamanighomi, Mahdi; Zylstra, Tyler J; Bratsch-Prince, Joshua; Wilson, Saul; Reddy, Chandan G; Fredericks, Douglas C; Gillies, George T; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-11-15

    We are developing a novel intradural spinal cord (SC) stimulator designed to improve the treatment of intractable pain and the sequelae of SC injury. In-vivo ovine models of neuropathic pain and moderate SC injury are being implemented for pre-clinical evaluations of this device, to be carried out via gait analysis before and after induction of the relevant condition. We extend previous studies on other quadrupeds to extract the three-dimensional kinematics of the limbs over the gait cycle of sheep walking on a treadmill. Quantitative measures of thoracic and pelvic limb movements were obtained from 17 animals. We calculated the total-error values to define the analytical performance of our motion capture system for these kinematic variables. The post- vs. pre-injury time delay between contralateral thoracic and pelvic-limb steps for normal and SC-injured sheep increased by ~24s over 100 steps. The pelvic limb hoof velocity during swing phase decreased, while range of pelvic hoof elevation and distance between lateral pelvic hoof placements increased after SC injury. The kinematics measures in a single SC-injured sheep can be objectively defined as changed from the corresponding pre-injury values, implying utility of this method to assess new neuromodulation strategies for specific deficits exhibited by an individual. PMID:26341152

  5. Expression of nerve growth factor in spinal dorsal horn following crushed spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the expression of nerve growth factor(NGF) in spinal dorsal horn following crushed spinal cord injury. METHODS: The adult Srague-Dawley rat model of crushed spinal cord injury was established by the method in our laboratory, and intact spinal cord was used as control. The rats were sacrificed respectively after 24 hours, 7 days, and 21 days of operation, and the L3 spinal segments were removed out and fixed in 4% polyformaldehyde. The segments were sectioned into sections of 20 μm in thickness. The sections were stained with anti-NGF antibody by ABC method of immunohistochemistry technique. The immunoreactive intensity of NGF and the number of positive neurons as well as glial cells in dorsal horn were observed and counted under light microscope. RESULTS: The number of positive cells and immunoreactive intensity of NGF increased gradually in the dorsal horn at 24 hours, 7 days and 21 days following crushed spinal cord injury compared with control group (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: These results indicated that NGF plays an important role in the postoperative reaction during the early period of the crushed spinal cord injury.

  6. Eggshell procedure combined with multi-segmental laminectomy for congenital spinal deformity in adults%蛋壳技术联合多椎板切除治疗成人先天性脊柱畸形

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤育森; 丁真奇; 林坤山; 何明长; 刘晖; 林达生

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨蛋壳技术联合多椎板切除治疗成人先天性脊柱畸形的安全性及有效性.方法 13例先天性脊柱畸形患者均采用后正中切口,通过蛋壳技术去除椎体松质骨使原发弯顶椎变为空壳样,顶椎相邻节段椎板全切除,应用平移、去旋转结合凸侧加压、凹侧撑开钉棒系统内固定矫正,同时行自体骨混合同种异体骨脊柱后外侧植骨融合治疗.结果 13例共切除36个节段椎板;行蛋壳技术的椎体共16个;融合节段8~15个.手术用时230~430 (305.4±62) min;术中出血量1 800~3 900 ml (2 646±651) ml.13例均获得随访,时间18~82 (43.5±7.6) 个月.末次随访时,脊柱主弯侧凸矫正率为49.2%,后凸矫正率为48.8%.未发现螺钉断裂、松动,无断棒现象.1例术后出现脑脊液漏,1例在末次随访时主诉有轻度腰背痛,1例随访71个月时出现相邻融合节段腰椎弓峡部裂.结论 蛋壳技术联合多椎板切除钉棒系统内固定治疗成人先天性脊柱畸形是一种较安全有效的治疗方法.%Objective To investigate the feasibility and safety of the treatment of congenital spinal deformity in adults with eggshell procedure combined with multi-segmental laminectomy. Methods 13 patients who underwent surgery for congenital spinal deformity in adults were retrospectively reviewed. A posterior medial incision was made for spinal exposure. According to the preoperative plan, all patients were operated with transpedicular eggshell procedure in a-pex vertebra and multi-segmental laminectomy to the adjacent apex vertebra. Application technique of translation, de-rotation with pressurized on convex side and concave side braced was used to correct scoliosis, and the autograft and allogeneic bone grafting for posterolateral spinal fusion. Results The number of vertebral lamina removed was 36 in all. The number of vertebrae with eggshell procedure was 16 in all. Fusion extent were range 8 ~ 15. Mean operating time was

  7. Lead induces similar gene expression changes in brains of gestationally exposed adult mice and in neurons differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Sánchez-Martín

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental toxicants during embryonic life causes changes in the expression of developmental genes that may last for a lifetime and adversely affect the exposed individual. Developmental exposure to lead (Pb, an ubiquitous environmental contaminant, causes deficits in cognitive functions and IQ, behavioral effects, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Long-term effects observed after early life exposure to Pb include reduction of gray matter, alteration of myelin structure, and increment of criminal behavior in adults. Despite growing research interest, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the effects of lead in the central nervous system are still largely unknown. To study the molecular changes due to Pb exposure during neurodevelopment, we exposed mice to Pb in utero and examined the expression of neural markers, neurotrophins, transcription factors and glutamate-related genes in hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus at postnatal day 60. We found that hippocampus was the area where gene expression changes due to Pb exposure were more pronounced. To recapitulate gestational Pb exposure in vitro, we differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC into neurons and treated ESC-derived neurons with Pb for the length of the differentiation process. These neurons expressed the characteristic neuronal markers Tubb3, Syp, Gap43, Hud, Ngn1, Vglut1 (a marker of glutamatergic neurons, and all the glutamate receptor subunits, but not the glial marker Gafp. Importantly, several of the changes observed in Pb-exposed mouse brains in vivo were also observed in Pb-treated ESC-derived neurons, including those affecting expression of Ngn1, Bdnf exon IV, Grin1, Grin2D, Grik5, Gria4, and Grm6. We conclude that our ESC-derived model of toxicant exposure during neural differentiation promises to be a useful model to analyze mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by Pb and other environmental agents.

  8. A comparison of the multiple oocyte maturation gene expression patterns between the newborn and adult mouse ovary

    OpenAIRE

    Soghra Bahmanpour; Tahereh Talaei Khozani; Nehleh Zarei fard; Mansoureh Jaberipour; Ahmah Hosseini; Tahereh Esmaeilpour

    2013-01-01

    Background: The interaction between follicular cells and oocyte leads to a change in gene expression involved in oocyte maturation processes. Objective: The purpose of this study was to quantify the expression of more common genes involved in follicular growth and oocyte developmental competence. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the expression of genes was evaluated with qRT-PCR assay in female BALB/c mice pups at 3-day of pre-pubertal and 8 week old virgin adult ovaries. Th...

  9. A chemokine targets the nucleus: Cxcl12-gamma isoform localizes to the nucleolus in adult mouse heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Torres

    Full Text Available Chemokines are extracellular mediators of complex regulatory circuits involved principally in cell-to-cell communication. Most studies to date of the essential chemokine Cxcl12 (Sdf-1 have focused on the ubiquitously expressed secreted isoforms alpha and beta. Here we show that, unlike these isoforms and all other known chemokines, the alternatively transcribed gamma isoform is an intracellular protein that localizes to the nucleolus in differentiated mouse Cardiac tissue. Our results demonstrate that nucleolar transportation is encoded by a nucleolar-localization signal in the unique carboxy-terminal region of Sdf-1gamma, and is competent both in vivo and in vitro. The molecular mechanism underlying these unusual chemokine properties involves cardiac-specific transcription of an mRNA containing a unique short-leader sequence lacking the signal peptide and translation from a non-canonical CUG codon. Our results provide an example of genome economy even for essential and highly conserved genes such as Cxcl12, and suggest that chemokines can exert tissue specific functions unrelated to cell-to-cell communication.

  10. The effects of cellular phone waves on the frequency micronucleus in newborn and adult Balb/C mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Baharara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, the widespread use of microwave producing instruments specially cell phones; result in growing concern regarding the possible effects associated with these waves on human health especially pregnant woman and neonates. In present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of cell phone radiation on the mice (Balb/C and their offspring. Materials and Method: In this experimental research, pregnant mice were irradiated with cell phone for 4 days of gestational age (days 14th-18th, 6h per day, from 9am until 3pm and after litter, 2nd-day offspring studied for morphology, weight and CR length. By following, for assessment of possible genetic damages in erythrocytes after bleeding from heart, smears of spleen tissue prepeard for histological studies. Mice peripheral blood and bone marrow smears prepared and stained with May-Granowald and Gimsa.Results: The finding in experimental group indicated that cell phone radiation decreased offsprings’ weight and CR length (p0.05. An increase in micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood erythrocytes were seen in experimental newborn (p=0.006 and adult mice (p0.05.Conclusion: Above findings indicated that cell phone radiation (940 MHZ are able to increase the frequency of micronucleus in peripheral blood erythrocytes of adult mice and their of fsprings and induce a genotoxic response

  11. Surgical treatment of primary intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adult patients Tratamento cirúrgico de tumores intramedulares primários em adultos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Augusto Taricco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary spinal cord intramedullary tumors are rare and present with insidious symptoms. Previous treatment protocols emphasized biopsy and radiation/chemotherapy but more aggressive protocols have emerged. OBJECTIVE: To report our experience. METHOD: Forty-eight patients were diagnosed with primary intramedullary tumors. The cervical cord was involved in 27% and thoracic in 42% of patients. Complete microsurgical removal was attempted whenever possible without added neurological morbidity. RESULTS: Complete resection was obtained in 33 (71% patients. Neurological function remained stable or improved in 32 patients (66.7%. Ependymoma was the most frequent tumor (66.7%. CONCLUSION: Neurological outcome is superior in patients with subtle findings; aggressive microsurgical resection should be pursued with acceptable neurological outcomes.INTRODUÇÃO: Tumores intramedulares primários são raros e apresentam-se com sintomas insidiosos. Protocolos de tratamento anteriores enfatizavam biópsia e radio/quimioterapia, mas protocolos mais agres-sivos têm surgido. OBJETIVO: Relatar nossa experiência. MÉTODO: Tumores intramedulares foram diagnosticados em 48 pacientes. O segmento cervical estava envolvido em 27% e torácico em 42% dos pacientes. Remoção completa foi tentada quando possível sem aumento da morbidade neurológica. RESULTADOS: Ressecção total foi obtida em 33 (71% pacientes. Função neurológica: permaneceu inalterada/melhorou em 32 (66,7% pacientes. O tumor mais freqüente foi ependimoma (66,7%. CONCLUSÃO: O prognóstico é melhor em pacientes oligossintomáticos; ressecção microcirúrgica agressiva deve ser tentada sempre, com resultados clínicos aceitáveis.

  12. The Cotransplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exerts Antiapoptotic Effects in Adult Rats after Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shifeng Wu; Guanqun Cui; Hua Shao; Zhongjun Du; Ng, Jack C.; Cheng Peng

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the repairing effects of the cotransplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have not been fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the cotransplantation of OECs with BMSCs on antiapoptotic effects in adult rats for which the models of SCI are induced. We examined the changes in body weight, histopathological changes, apoptosis, and the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins after 14 days an...

  13. Optical monitoring and detection of spinal cord ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickson C Mesquita

    Full Text Available Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings.

  14. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...

  15. Identification and Characterization of Lineage(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL Phenotypic Cells Residing in Adult Mouse Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Ryusuke; Iwaki, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Sumide, Keisuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Yutaka; Uemura, Yasushi; Asano, Hiroaki; Kwon, A-Hon; Sonoda, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Murine bone marrow (BM)-derived very small embryonic-like stem cells (BM VSELs), defined by a lineage-negative (Lin(-)), CD45-negative (CD45(-)), Sca-1-positive (Sca-1(+)) immunophenotype, were previously reported as postnatal pluripotent stem cells (SCs). We developed a highly efficient method for isolating Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) small cells using enzymatic treatment of murine bone. We designated these cells as bone-derived VSELs (BD VSELs). The incidences of BM VSELs in the BM-derived nucleated cells and that of BD VSELs in bone-derived nucleated cells were 0.002% and 0.15%, respectively. These BD VSELs expressed a variety of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), and endothelial cell markers. The gene expression profile of the BD VSELs was clearly distinct from those of HSCs, MSCs, and ES cells. In the steady state, the BD VSELs proliferated slowly, however, the number of BD VSELs significantly increased in the bone after acute liver injury. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-mouse derived BD VSELs transplanted via tail vein injection after acute liver injury were detected in the liver parenchyma of recipient mice. Immunohistological analyses suggested that these BD VSELs might transdifferentiate into hepatocytes. This study demonstrated that the majority of the Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL phenotypic cells reside in the bone rather than the BM. However, the immunophenotype and the gene expression profile of BD VSELs were clearly different from those of other types of SCs, including BM VSELs, MSCs, HSCs, and ES cells. Further studies will therefore be required to elucidate their cellular and/or SC characteristics and the potential relationship between BD VSELs and BM VSELs.

  16. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeh, Yazan N.; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25–P30, ≥50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  17. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeh, Yazan N; Rodriguez, Alexander V; Bellesi, Michele; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Funk, Chadd M; Harris, Julie; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25-P30, ≥ 50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  18. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Aloe; Patrizia Bianchi; Alberto De Bellis; Marzia Soligo; Maria Luisa Rocco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an in-creased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deifcits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells.

  19. SDF1 in the dorsal corticospinal tract promotes CXCR4+ cell migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hosung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1 and its major signaling receptor, CXCR4, were initially described in the immune system; however, they are also expressed in the nervous system, including the spinal cord. After spinal cord injury, the blood brain barrier is compromised, opening the way for chemokine signaling between these two systems. These experiments clarified prior contradictory findings on normal expression of SDF1 and CXCR4 as well as examined the resulting spinal cord responses resulting from this signaling. Methods These experiments examined the expression and function of SDF1 and CXCR4 in the normal and injured adult mouse spinal cord primarily using CXCR4-EGFP and SDF1-EGFP transgenic reporter mice. Results In the uninjured spinal cord, SDF1 was expressed in the dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST as well as the meninges, whereas CXCR4 was found only in ependymal cells surrounding the central canal. After spinal cord injury (SCI, the pattern of SDF1 expression did not change rostral to the lesion but it disappeared from the degenerating dCST caudally. By contrast, CXCR4 expression changed dramatically after SCI. In addition to the CXCR4+ cells in the ependymal layer, numerous CXCR4+ cells appeared in the peripheral white matter and in the dorsal white matter localized between the dorsal corticospinal tract and the gray matter rostral to the lesion site. The non-ependymal CXCR4+ cells were found to be NG2+ and CD11b+ macrophages that presumably infiltrated through the broken blood-brain barrier. One population of macrophages appeared to be migrating towards the dCST that contains SDF1 rostral to the injury but not towards the caudal dCST in which SDF1 is no longer present. A second population of the CXCR4+ macrophages was present near the SDF1-expressing meningeal cells. Conclusions These observations suggest that attraction of CXCR4+ macrophages is part of a programmed response to injury and that modulation of the

  20. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  1. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  2. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G;

    2015-01-01

    of the completion of the intervention or surgical closure; (6) Surgical procedure-open reduction, (7) Surgical procedure-direct decompression of neural elements, and (8 and 9) Surgical procedure-stabilization and fusion (spinal segment number and level). All variables are coded using numbers or characters. Each...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  3. Spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Anil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality is rare in adults. Below we present a case report of 20 yrs old male with isolated cervical cord injury, without accompanying vertebral dislocation or fracture involving the spinal canal rim. He fell down on plain and smooth ground while carrying 40 kg weight overhead and developed quadriparesis with difficulty in respiration. Plain radiographs of the neck revealed no fractures or dislocations. MRI showed bulky spinal cord and an abnormal hyper intense signal on the T2W image from C2 vertebral body level to C3/4 intervertebral disc level predominantly in the anterior aspect of the cord The patient was managed conservatively with head halter traction and invasive ventilatory support for the initial 7 days period in the ICU. In our patient recovery was good and most of the neurological deficit improved over 4 weeks with conservative management.

  4. Astrocytoma with involvement of medulla oblongata, spinal cord and spinal nerves in a raccoon (Procyon lotor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neoplasms affecting the central and peripheral nervous systems of wild animals are extremely rare. Described are clinical signs, pathologic and immunohistochemical findings in an adult female raccoon (Procyon lotor) with an astrocytoma which involved brainstem, cervical spinal cord and roots of the ...

  5. Single cell electroporation for longitudinal imaging of synaptic structure and function in the adult mouse neocortex in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane ePages

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal imaging studies of neuronal structures in vivo have revealed rich dynamics in dendritic spines and axonal boutons. Spines and boutons are considered to be proxies for synapses. This implies that synapses display similar dynamics. However, spines and boutons do not always bear synapses, some may contain more than one, and dendritic shaft synapses have no clear structural proxies. In addition, synaptic strength is not always accurately revealed by just the size of these structures. Structural and functional dynamics of synapses could be studied more reliably using fluorescent synaptic proteins as markers for size and function. These proteins are often large and possibly interfere with circuit development, which renders them less suitable for conventional transfection or transgenesis methods such as viral vectors, in utero electroporation and germline transgenesis. Single cell electroporation has been shown to be a potential alternative for transfection of recombinant fluorescent proteins in adult cortical neurons. Here we provide proof of principle for the use of single cell electroporation to express and subsequently image fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins over days to weeks in vivo.

  6. Dividing and newly produced cells in the corpus callosum of adult mouse cerebrum as detected by light microscopic radioautography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, J.A. (Winnipeg Univ., Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Anatomy)

    1983-01-01

    New cell production in the corpus callosum and subependyma of 4 month old mice was analyzed by light microscopic autoradiography after /sup 3/H-thymidine injections. In the subependymal region of the lateral ventricle, about 10% of cells were labelled in mice examined 2 h after /sup 3/H-thymidine, and 40 to 50% of cells were labelled after 7 d of isotope infusion. In corpus callosum of mice 2 h after precursor injection, the few cells (0.1 to 0.2 %) that were labelled had the appearance of 'immature cells', and were presumably incompletely differentiated neuroglial precursor cells which were preparing to divide. After 7 d of continuous /sup 3/H-thymidine administration, more labelled neuroglia (about 2%) were detected in corpus callosum; these newly produced cells included several astrocytes and some oligodendrocytes, as well as immature cells. Since the immature cells were the most frequently observed type of dividing cell within the normal adult corpus callosum, it is probable that the new astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were the products of divisions of their respective precursor cells.

  7. Schwann cells for spinal cord repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oudega M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex nature of spinal cord injury appears to demand a multifactorial repair strategy. One of the components that will likely be included is an implant that will fill the area of lost nervous tissue and provide a growth substrate for injured axons. Here we will discuss the role of Schwann cells (SCs in cell-based, surgical repair strategies of the injured adult spinal cord. We will review key studies that showed that intraspinal SC grafts limit injury-induced tissue loss and promote axonal regeneration and myelination, and that this response can be improved by adding neurotrophic factors or anti-inflammatory agents. These results will be compared with several other approaches to the repair of the spinal cord. A general concern with repair strategies is the limited functional recovery, which is in large part due to the failure of axons to grow across the scar tissue at the distal graft-spinal cord interface. Consequently, new synaptic connections with spinal neurons involved in motor function are not formed. We will highlight repair approaches that did result in growth across the scar and discuss the necessity for more studies involving larger, clinically relevant types of injuries, addressing this specific issue. Finally, this review will reflect on the prospect of SCs for repair strategies in the clinic.

  8. A Western diet ecological module identified from the 'humanized' mouse microbiota predicts diet in adults and formula feeding in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Siddharth

    Full Text Available The interplay between diet and the microbiota has been implicated in the growing frequency of chronic diseases associated with the Western lifestyle. However, the complexity and variability of microbial ecology in humans and preclinical models has hampered identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of the microbiota in this context. We sought to address two key questions. Can the microbial ecology of preclinical models predict human populations? And can we identify underlying principles that surpass the plasticity of microbial ecology in humans? To do this, we focused our study on diet; perhaps the most influential factor determining the composition of the gut microbiota. Beginning with a study in 'humanized' mice we identified an interactive module of 9 genera allied with Western diet intake. This module was applied to a controlled dietary study in humans. The abundance of the Western ecological module correctly predicted the dietary intake of 19/21 top and 21/21 of the bottom quartile samples inclusive of all 5 Western and 'low-fat' diet subjects, respectively. In 98 volunteers the abundance of the Western module correlated appropriately with dietary intake of saturated fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and fiber. Furthermore, it correlated with the geographical location and dietary habits of healthy adults from the Western, developing and third world. The module was also coupled to dietary intake in children (and piglets correlating with formula (vs breast feeding and associated with a precipitous development of the ecological module in young children. Our study provides a conceptual platform to translate microbial ecology from preclinical models to humans and identifies an ecological network module underlying the association of the gut microbiota with Western dietary habits.

  9. A Western diet ecological module identified from the 'humanized' mouse microbiota predicts diet in adults and formula feeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharth, Jay; Holway, Nicholas; Parkinson, Scott J

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between diet and the microbiota has been implicated in the growing frequency of chronic diseases associated with the Western lifestyle. However, the complexity and variability of microbial ecology in humans and preclinical models has hampered identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of the microbiota in this context. We sought to address two key questions. Can the microbial ecology of preclinical models predict human populations? And can we identify underlying principles that surpass the plasticity of microbial ecology in humans? To do this, we focused our study on diet; perhaps the most influential factor determining the composition of the gut microbiota. Beginning with a study in 'humanized' mice we identified an interactive module of 9 genera allied with Western diet intake. This module was applied to a controlled dietary study in humans. The abundance of the Western ecological module correctly predicted the dietary intake of 19/21 top and 21/21 of the bottom quartile samples inclusive of all 5 Western and 'low-fat' diet subjects, respectively. In 98 volunteers the abundance of the Western module correlated appropriately with dietary intake of saturated fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and fiber. Furthermore, it correlated with the geographical location and dietary habits of healthy adults from the Western, developing and third world. The module was also coupled to dietary intake in children (and piglets) correlating with formula (vs breast) feeding and associated with a precipitous development of the ecological module in young children. Our study provides a conceptual platform to translate microbial ecology from preclinical models to humans and identifies an ecological network module underlying the association of the gut microbiota with Western dietary habits.

  10. Despite strong behavioral disruption, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol does not affect cell proliferation in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochman, Linda J; dos Santos, Angela Amancio; Fornal, Casimir A; Jacobs, Barry L

    2006-10-01

    Marijuana is a widely abused illicit drug known to cause significant cognitive impairments. Marijuana has been hypothesized to target neurons in the hippocampus because of the abundance of cannabinoid receptors present in this structure. While there is no clear evidence of neuropathology in vivo, suppression of brain mitogenesis, and ultimately neurogenesis, may provide a sensitive index of marijuana's more subtle effects on neural mechanisms subserving cognitive functions. We examined the effects of different doses and treatment regimens of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active ingredient in marijuana, on cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult male mice. Following drug treatment, the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 200 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered two hours prior to sacrifice to assess cell proliferation, the first step in neurogenesis. Administration of THC produced dose-dependent catalepsy and suppression of motor activity. The number of BrdU-labeled cells was not significantly changed from vehicle control levels following either acute (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), sequential (two injections of 10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p., separated by 5 h), or chronic escalating (20 to 80 mg/kg, p.o.; for 3 weeks) drug administration. Furthermore, acute administration of the potent synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist R-(+)-WIN 55,212-2 (WIN; 5 mg/kg, i.p.) also had no significant effect on cell proliferation. These findings provide no evidence for an effect of THC on hippocampal cell proliferation, even at doses producing gross behavioral intoxication. Whether marijuana or THC affects neurogenesis remains to be explored.

  11. Adult mouse subventricular zone stem and progenitor cells are sessile and epidermal growth factor receptor negatively regulates neuroblast migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The adult subventricular zone (SVZ contains stem and progenitor cells that generate neuroblasts throughout life. Although it is well accepted that SVZ neuroblasts are migratory, recent evidence suggests their progenitor cells may also exhibit motility. Since stem and progenitor cells are proliferative and multipotential, if they were also able to move would have important implications for SVZ neurogenesis and its potential for repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied whether SVZ stem and/or progenitor cells are motile in transgenic GFP+ slices with two photon time lapse microscopy and post hoc immunohistochemistry. We found that stem and progenitor cells; mGFAP-GFP+ cells, bright nestin-GFP+ cells and Mash1+ cells were stationary in the SVZ and rostral migratory stream (RMS. In our search for motile progenitor cells, we uncovered a population of motile betaIII-tubulin+ neuroblasts that expressed low levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr. This was intriguing since EGFr drives proliferation in the SVZ and affects migration in other systems. Thus we examined the potential role of EGFr in modulating SVZ migration. Interestingly, EGFr(low neuroblasts moved slower and in more tortuous patterns than EGFr-negative neuroblasts. We next questioned whether EGFr stimulation affects SVZ cell migration by imaging Gad65-GFP+ neuroblasts in the presence of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha, an EGFr-selective agonist. Indeed, acute exposure to TGF-alpha decreased the percentage of motile cells by approximately 40%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, the present study directly shows that SVZ stem and progenitor cells are static, that EGFr is retained on some neuroblasts, and that EGFr stimulation negatively regulates migration. This result suggests an additional role for EGFr signaling in the SVZ.

  12. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhakumar, Rachen; Boontem, Parichart; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Mukda, Sujira; Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2015-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, is known to exert neurotoxic effects to the dopaminergic neural system. Long-term METH administration impairs brain functions such as cognition, learning and memory. Newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus play an important role in spatial learning and memory. Previous in vitro studies have shown that METH inhibits cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. On the other hand, melatonin, a major indole secreted by the pineal gland, enhances neurogenesis in both the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus. In this study, adult C57BL/6 mice were used to study the beneficial effects of melatonin on METH-induced alterations in neurogenesis and post-synaptic proteins related to learning and memory functions in the hippocampus. The results showed that METH caused a decrease in neuronal phenotypes as determined by the expressions of nestin, doublecortin (DCX) and beta-III tubulin while causing an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. Moreover, METH inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling activity and altered expression of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B as well as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). These effects could be attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. In conclusion, melatonin prevented the METH-induced reduction in neurogenesis, increase in astrogliogenesis and alteration of NMDA receptor subunit expression. These findings may indicate the beneficial effects of melatonin on the impairment of learning and memory caused by METH. PMID:26366944

  13. Subchronic inhalation of soluble manganese induces expression of hypoxia-associated angiogenic genes in adult mouse lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the lung constitutes the major exposure route for airborne manganese (Mn), little is known about the potential pulmonary effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Transition metals can mimic a hypoxia-like response, activating the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor family. Through binding to the hypoxia-response element (HRE), these factors regulate expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Increases in VEGF, an important biomarker of angiogenesis, have been linked to respiratory diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to evaluate pulmonary hypoxia-associated angiogenic gene expression in response to exposure of soluble Mn(II) and to assess the genes' role as intermediaries of potential pulmonary Mn toxicity. In vitro, 0.25 mM Mn(II) altered morphology and slowed the growth of human pulmonary epithelial cell lines. Acute doses between 0.05 and 1 mM stimulated VEGF promoter activity up to 3.7-fold in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the HRE within the promoter had no effect on Mn(II)-induced VEGF expression but decreased cobalt [Co(II)]-induced activity 2-fold, suggesting that HIF-1 may not be involved in Mn(II)-induced VEGF gene transcription. Nose-only inhalation to 2 mg Mn(II)/m3 for 5 days at 6 h/day produced no significant pulmonary inflammation but induced a 2-fold increase in pulmonary VEGF mRNA levels in adult mice and significantly altered expression of genes associated with murine angiogenesis. These findings suggest that even short-term exposures to soluble, occupationally relevant Mn(II) concentrations may alter pulmonary gene expression in pathways that ultimately could affect the lungs' susceptibility to respiratory disease

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... US ? A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information ... spinal cord injuries and the members of their families. Our website has more than 1,500 videos ...

  15. Spinal arteriography: a primer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A KUMPE

    2005-01-01

    Spinal arteriography is an esoteric procedure that is seldom performed by peripheral interventionalists. This presentation is intended to outline some of the essential points that the interventionalist performing the procedure should be aware of, especially about spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae (SDAVF).

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes ... Patient Partnerships How Social Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help ... advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. ...

  17. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school...

  18. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Coping with a New Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair ... after an injury? What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? What are the ...

  20. 5-HT2 and 5-HT7 receptor agonists facilitate plantar stepping in chronic spinal rats through actions on different populations of spinal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula eSlawinska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence from research in neonatal and adult rat and mouse preparations to warrant the conclusion that activation of 5-HT2 and 5-HT1A/7 receptors leads to activation of the spinal cord circuitry for locomotion. These receptors are involved in control of locomotor movements, but it is not clear how they are implicated in the responses to 5-HT agonists observed after spinal cord injury. Here we used agonists that are efficient in promoting locomotor recovery in paraplegic rats, 8-OHDPAT (acting on 5-HT1A/7 receptors and quipazine (acting on 5-HT2 receptors, to examine this issue. Analysis of intra- and interlimb coordination confirmed that the locomotor performance was significantly improved by either drug, but the data revealed marked differences in their mode of action. Interlimb coordination was significantly better after 8-OHDPAT application, and the activity of the extensor soleus muscle was significantly longer during the stance phase of locomotor movements enhanced by quipazine. Our results show that activation of both receptors facilitates locomotion, but their effects are likely exerted on different populations of spinal neurons. Activation of 5-HT2 receptors facilitates the output stage of the locomotor system, in part by directly activating motoneurons, and also through activation of interneurons of the locomotor CPG. Activation of 5-HT7/1A receptors facilitates the activity of the locomotor CPG, without direct actions on the output components of the locomotor system, including motoneurons. Although our findings show that the combined use of these two drugs results in production of well-coordinated weight supported locomotion with a reduced need for exteroceptive stimulation, they also indicate that there might be some limitations to the utility of combined treatment. Sensory feedback and some intraspinal circuitry recruited by the drugs can conflict with the locomotor activation.

  1. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley, Shanna L.; Welton, Amanda R.; Harwood, Kirsten M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus. Here we determined the extent and functional importance of macrophage infection by MAV-1. Bone marrow-derived macrophages expressed MAV-1 mRNAs and proteins upon ex vivo infection. Adherent perito...

  2. Mini-open pedicle subtraction osteotomy as a treatment for severe adult spinal deformities: case series with initial clinical and radiographic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Y; Bordon, Gerd

    2016-05-01

    lumbar Cobb angle improved from a mean of 41.2° ± 18.4° to 15.4° ± 9.6°, and lumbar lordosis improved from 23.1° ± 15.9° to 48.6° ± 11.7°. Pelvic tilt improved from a mean of 33.7° ± 8.6° to 24.4° ± 6.5°, and the sagittal vertical axis improved from 102.4 ± 73.4 mm to 42.2 ± 39.9 mm. The final lumbar lordosis-pelvic incidence difference averaged 8.4° ± 12.1°. There were 4 patients who failed to achieve less than or equal to a 10° mismatch on this parameter. Ten of the 16 patients underwent delayed postoperative CT, and 8 of these had developed a solid arthrodesis at all levels treated. A total of 6 complications occurred in this series. There were no cases of symptomatic proximal junction kyphosis. CONCLUSIONS Advancements in minimally invasive technique have resulted in the ability to manage increasingly complex deformities with hybrid approaches. In this limited series, the authors describe the results of utilizing a tissue-sparing mini-open PSO to correct severe spinal deformities. This method was technically feasible in all cases with acceptable radiographic outcomes similar to open surgery. However, high complication rates associated with these deformity corrections remain problematic. PMID:26745348

  3. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  4. Effects of cyclophosphamide and acrolein in organoid cultures of mouse limb bud cells grown in the presence of adult rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaida, J; Merker, H J

    1992-01-01

    The effects were evaluated of cyclophosphamide (CPA) and its metabolite, acrolein, on chondrogenesis in organoid cultures of mouse limb bud mesenchymal cells co-cultured with non-enzymatically isolated adult rat hepatocytes. The studies were conducted with or without the simultaneous addition of 2-mercaptoethanesulphonic acid sodium (mesna) or glutathione (GSH). Alcian blue binding assay and light and electron microscopic techniques were used. Increasing concentrations of the two compounds (bioactivated CPA, 18-180 mum; acrolein, 50-500 mum) led to a dose-dependent inhibition of chondrogenesis associated with cellular dedifferentiation and/or cytotoxicity. Addition of mesna (1 mm) or GSH (1 mm) partially protected the cultures against CPA and acrolein. However, the protective effect depended on the dose of CPA or acrolein used. A higher protection was observed with mesna than with GSH, and the effect was more pronounced with acrolein than with CPA. The morphological findings suggested that CPA and acrolein acted by different mechanisms. Bioactivated CPA primarily inhibited the differentiation process, whereas acrolein exhibited a high cytotoxic activity affecting particularly monolayer cells that normally grow on the periphery of the cultures. These findings suggest that acrolein possesses a specific mode of action directed towards this type of cell. This could be explained by the specific shape and/or behaviour of the cells (i.e. cytoskeletal arrangement, proliferation rate, migration activity, intercellular communication pattern, etc.). The results demonstrated that the cell system used was suitable for the performance of cytotoxicity and teratogenicity studies such as those conducted with CPA and acrolein.

  5. Oct4-induced oligodendrocyte progenitor cells enhance functional recovery in spinal cord injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Beom; Lee, Hyunah; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Hwang, Kyujin; Nam, Donggyu; Park, Myung Rae; Zaehres, Holm; Park, Kook In; Lee, Seok-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The generation of patient-specific oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) holds great potential as an expandable cell source for cell replacement therapy as well as drug screening in spinal cord injury or demyelinating diseases. Here, we demonstrate that induced OPCs (iOPCs) can be directly derived from adult mouse fibroblasts by Oct4-mediated direct reprogramming, using anchorage-independent growth to ensure high purity. Homogeneous iOPCs exhibit typical small-bipolar morphology, maintain their self-renewal capacity and OPC marker expression for more than 31 passages, share high similarity in the global gene expression profile to wild-type OPCs, and give rise to mature oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Notably, transplanted iOPCs contribute to functional recovery in a spinal cord injury (SCI) model without tumor formation. This study provides a simple strategy to generate functional self-renewing iOPCs and yields insights for the in-depth study of demyelination and regenerative medicine. PMID:26497893

  6. Human-derived neural progenitors functionally replace astrocytes in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Qian, Kun; Chen, Wei; Hu, Baoyang; Blackbourn, Lisle W.; Du, Zhongwei; Ma, Lixiang; Liu, Huisheng; Knobel, Karla M.; Ayala, Melvin; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are integral components of the homeostatic neural network as well as active participants in pathogenesis of and recovery from nearly all neurological conditions. Evolutionarily, compared with lower vertebrates and nonhuman primates, humans have an increased astrocyte-to-neuron ratio; however, a lack of effective models has hindered the study of the complex roles of human astrocytes in intact adult animals. Here, we demonstrated that after transplantation into the cervical spinal cords of adult mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), human pluripotent stem cell–derived (PSC-derived) neural progenitors migrate a long distance and differentiate to astrocytes that nearly replace their mouse counterparts over a 9-month period. The human PSC-derived astrocytes formed networks through their processes, encircled endogenous neurons, and extended end feet that wrapped around blood vessels without altering locomotion behaviors, suggesting structural, and potentially functional, integration into the adult mouse spinal cord. Furthermore, in SCID mice transplanted with neural progenitors derived from induced PSCs from patients with ALS, astrocytes were generated and distributed to a similar degree as that seen in mice transplanted with healthy progenitors; however, these mice exhibited motor deficit, highlighting functional integration of the human-derived astrocytes. Together, these results indicate that this chimeric animal model has potential for further investigating the roles of human astrocytes in disease pathogenesis and repair. PMID:25642771

  7. Use of dual section mRNA in situ hybridisation/immunohistochemistry to clarify gene expression patterns during the early stages of nephron development in the embryo and in the mature nephron of the adult mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgas, Kylie; Rumballe, Bree; Wilkinson, Lorine; Chiu, Han Sheng; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Gilbert, Thierry; Little, Melissa H

    2008-11-01

    The kidney is the most complex organ within the urogenital system. The adult mouse kidney contains in excess of 8,000 mature nephrons, each of which can be subdivided into a renal corpuscle and 14 distinct tubular segments. The histological complexity of this organ can make the clarification of the site of gene expression by in situ hybridisation difficult. We have defined a panel of seven antibodies capable of identifying the six stages of early nephron development, the tubular nephron segments and the components of the renal corpuscle within the embryonic and adult mouse kidney. We have analysed in detail the protein expression of Wt1, Calb1 Aqp1, Aqp2 and Umod using these antibodies. We have then coupled immunohistochemistry with RNA in situ hybridisation in order to precisely identify the expression pattern of different genes, including Wnt4, Umod and Spp1. This technique will be invaluable for examining at high resolution, the structure of both the developing and mature nephron where standard in situ hybridisation and histological techniques are insufficient. The use of this technique will enhance the expression analyses of genes which may be involved in nephron formation and the function of the mature nephron in the mouse.

  8. Effect of Regular Exercise on Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Males With Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Hee; Oh, Kyung Joon; Kong, In Deok; Kim, Sung Hoon; Shinn, Jong Mock; Kim, Jong Heon; Yi, Dongsoo; Lee, Jin Hyeong; Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance of subjects with spinal cord injury by measuring the maximal oxygen consumption with varying degrees of spinal cord injury level, age, and regular exercise. Methods We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer on healthy adults at 20 years of age or older with spinal cord injury, and their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured with a metabolic measurement system. The exercise proceeded stepwise according to ...

  9. Spinal cord abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abscess: Back injuries or trauma, including minor ones Boils on the skin, especially on the back or ... of spinal cord abscess. Prevention Thorough treatment of boils, tuberculosis, and other infections decreases the risk. Early ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we expect ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal cord injuries ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Experts Resources The Short List Government ... Home Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Spinal Cord Experts Resources Forums Peer ...

  13. Spinal cord trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oh's Intensive Care Manual . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 78. Bryce TN. Spinal cord injury. ... Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 49. Dalzell K, Nouri A, Fehlings ...

  14. Histopathologic characterization of the BTBR mouse model of autistic-like behavior reveals selective changes in neurodevelopmental proteins and adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephenson Diane T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inbred mouse strain BTBR T+ tf/J (BTBR exhibits behavioral deficits that mimic the core deficits of autism. Neuroanatomically, the BTBR strain is also characterized by a complete absence of the corpus callosum. The goal of this study was to identify novel molecular and cellular changes in the BTBR mouse, focusing on neuronal, synaptic, glial and plasticity markers in the limbic system as a model for identifying putative molecular and cellular substrates associated with autistic behaviors. Methods Forebrains of 8 to 10-week-old male BTBR and age-matched C57Bl/6J control mice were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using free-floating and paraffin embedded sections. Twenty antibodies directed against antigens specific to neurons, synapses and glia were used. Nissl, Timm and acetylcholinesterase (AchE stains were performed to assess cytoarchitecture, mossy fibers and cholinergic fiber density, respectively. In the hippocampus, quantitative stereological estimates for the mitotic marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU were performed to determine hippocampal progenitor proliferation, survival and differentiation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA was quantified by in situ hybridization. Quantitative image analysis was performed for NG2, doublecortin (DCX, NeuroD, GAD67 and Poly-Sialic Acid Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (PSA-NCAM. Results In midline structures including the region of the absent corpus callosum of BTBR mice, the myelin markers 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase and myelin basic protein (MBP were reduced, and the oligodendrocyte precursor NG2 was increased. MBP and CNPase were expressed in small ectopic white matter bundles within the cingulate cortex. Microglia and astrocytes showed no evidence of gliosis, yet orientations of glial fibers were altered in specific white-matter areas. In the hippocampus, evidence of reduced neurogenesis included significant reductions in the number of

  15. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  16. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  17. On-Going Frontal Alpha Rhythms Are Dominant in Passive State and Desynchronize in Active State in Adult Gray Mouse Lemurs

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Infarinato; Anisur Rahman; Claudio Del Percio; Yves Lamberty; Regis Bordet; Richardson, Jill C.; Gianluigi Forloni; Wilhelmus Drinkenburg; Susanna Lopez; Fabienne Aujard; Claudio Babiloni; Fabien Pifferi

    2015-01-01

    The gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is considered a useful primate model for translational research. In the framework of IMI PharmaCog project (Grant Agreement n°115009, www.pharmacog.org), we tested the hypothesis that spectral electroencephalographic (EEG) markers of motor and locomotor activity in gray mouse lemurs reflect typical movement-related desynchronization of alpha rhythms (about 8-12 Hz) in humans. To this aim, EEG (bipolar electrodes in frontal cortex) and electromyographi...

  18. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  19. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  20. Transgenic nude mouse with ubiquitous green fluorescent protein expression as a host for human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Jiang, Ping; Li, Lingna; Moossa, Abdool R; Hoffman, Robert M

    2004-12-01

    We report here the development of the transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous GFP expression. The GFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives GFP expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu GFP male mice and nu/+ GFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced green. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were GFP nude mice. Newborn mice and adult mice fluoresced very bright green and could be detected with a simple blue-light-emitting diode flashlight with a central peak of 470 nm and a bypass emission filter. In the adult mice, the organs all brightly expressed GFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. The following systems were dissected out and shown to have brilliant GFP fluorescence: the entire digestive system from tongue to anus; the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed GFP. Pancreatic islets showed GFP fluorescence. The spleen cells were also GFP positive. Red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing human cancer cell lines, including PC-3-RFP prostate cancer, HCT-116-RFP colon cancer, MDA-MB-435-RFP breast cancer, and HT1080-RFP fibrosarcoma were transplanted to the transgenic GFP nude mice. All of these human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic GFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction by whole-body imaging and at the cellular level in fresh and frozen tissues. The GFP mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of human tumor-host interaction. PMID:15574773

  1. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult prima

  2. Role of tumor necrosis factor-α in spinal cord in the development of mouse bone cancer pain%脊髓水平肿瘤坏死因子-α在小鼠骨癌痛发生中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高勤; 马正良; 张娟; 周晓芳; 王俊华; 顾小萍; 夏小萍

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)in spinal cord in the development of mouse bone cancer pain.Methods Forty eight C3H/He mice were divided randomly into tumor group and sham group.Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to the time-points at 7 th,10th and 14 th post-inoculating day (n=8).Osteosarcoma NCTC 2472 cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of fight femur to make model of bone can-cer pain.The sham grouP was inoculated with α-MEM containing no cell.Inoculated mice were killed according to the corre-sponding time-points.Reverse transcriptive polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)was applied to analysis the expression of TNF -α mRNA in spinal cord.Changes in pain behaviors including paw withdrawal mechanical threshold(PWMT)and paw with-drawal thermal latencv (PWTL) were observed before inoculation and at 3 rd,5th,7th,lOth and 14th post-inoculating day.Results After inoculation,coupled with pain aggravation,mRNA of TNF-α in spinal cord of tumor mice increased at each time-point(P<0.05).Conclusion TNF-α in spinal cord may participate in bone cancer pain.%目的 探讨脊髓水平肿瘤坏死因子-α(TNF-α)在小鼠骨癌痛中的作用.方法 48只G3H/He小鼠随机分为肿瘤组和假手术组,每组再次划分为术后7 d、10 d、14 d组(n=8).将含105个纤维肉瘤NCTC 2472细胞的最小必需培养基(α-MEM)注射到小鼠右侧股骨远端骨髓腔内,制作骨癌痛模型.假手术组注入不含肿瘤细胞的a-MEM.按照分组在相应时间点处死小鼠,用RT-PCR的方法检测脊髓腰膨大TNF-αmRNA水平,观察术前、术后3 d,5 d、7 d、10 d、14 d小鼠痛行为学的变化:机械痛缩足阈值(paw withdrawal mechanical threshold,PWMT)、热痛缩足潜伏期(paw withdrawal thermal latency,PWTL)和自发性抬足次数.结果 肿瘤细胞接种后,在各观察时间点,肿瘤组脊髓水平TNF-αmRNA表达较假手术组增高(P<0.05)并伴随痛觉过敏.结论 脊髓

  3. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in macropha

  4. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  5. MRI of closed spinal dysraphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Phillips, Grace S.; Thapa, Mahesh M.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital and University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We present a pictorial review of MRI features of various closed spinal dysraphisms based on previously described clinicoradiological classification of spinal dysraphisms proposed. The defining imaging features of each dysraphism type are highlighted and a diagnostic algorithm for closed spinal dysraphisms is suggested. (orig.)

  6. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  7. Spinal actinomycosis: A rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dua Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is an indolent, slowly progressive infection caused by Actinomyces species. Of human actinomycosis, the spinal form is rare and actinomycosis-related spinal neurological deficit is uncommon. We report two cases with cervical and dorsal actinomycosis and one of them with spinal neurological deficit.

  8. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  9. A 'tool box' for deciphering neuronal circuits in the developing chick spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Yoav; Etlin, Alex; Falk, Haya; Avraham, Oshri; Kobiler, Oren; Panet, Amos; Lev-Tov, Aharon; Klar, Avihu

    2014-10-29

    The genetic dissection of spinal circuits is an essential new means for understanding the neural basis of mammalian behavior. Molecular targeting of specific neuronal populations, a key instrument in the genetic dissection of neuronal circuits in the mouse model, is a complex and time-demanding process. Here we present a circuit-deciphering 'tool box' for fast, reliable and cheap genetic targeting of neuronal circuits in the developing spinal cord of the chick. We demonstrate targeting of motoneurons and spinal interneurons, mapping of axonal trajectories and synaptic targeting in both single and populations of spinal interneurons, and viral vector-mediated labeling of pre-motoneurons. We also demonstrate fluorescent imaging of the activity pattern of defined spinal neurons during rhythmic motor behavior, and assess the role of channel rhodopsin-targeted population of interneurons in rhythmic behavior using specific photoactivation.

  10. [Spinal cord infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  11. Spinal leptomeningeal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spinal forms of neurocysticercosis are extremely rare, with a frequency under 1% in large series. The types of involvement are a) subarachnoid cysts and b) intramedullary lesions (less frequent). The authors report the case of a 56-year-old female with central nervous system infection by the larval form of Taenia Solium, which conduced to a hydrocephalus, treated by neurosurgical ventricular-peritoneal shunting. After 2 years, the patient consulted due to paraesthesia, spastic paraparesis and incontinence. MRI showed an homogeneous cystic mass compressing the spinal cord at D5-D6 level. Laminectomies were performed and the arachnoid membrane appeared thickened (arachnoiditis); the larval cyst was removed. Anatomo-pathologic exam revealed a leptomeningeal cysticercosis. The patient had a favorable clinical evolution without spinal compression sings or symptoms. (author)

  12. Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA) – Clinical and Radiological Aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acronym SCIWORA (Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormality) was first developed and introduced by Pang and Wilberger who used it to define “clinical symptoms of traumatic myelopathy with no radiographic or computed tomographic features of spinal fracture or instability”. SCIWORA is a clinical-radiological condition that mostly affects children. SCIWORA lesions are found mainly in the cervical spine but can also be seen, although much less frequently, in the thoracic or lumbar spine. Based on reports from different authors, SCIWORA is responsible for 6 to 19% and 9% to 14% of spinal injuries in children and adults, respectively. Underlying degenerative changes, including spondylosis or spinal canal stenosis, are typically present in adult patients. The level of spinal cord injury corresponds to the location of these changes. With recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, especially in magnetic resonance imaging, and with increasing availability of MRI as a diagnostic tool, the overall detection rate of SCIWORA has significantly improved

  13. Serotonin Promotes Development and Regeneration of Spinal Motor Neurons in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Mysiak, Karolina S; Scott, Angela L; Reimer, Michell M; Yang, Yujie; Becker, Catherina G; Becker, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to mammals, zebrafish regenerate spinal motor neurons. During regeneration, developmental signals are re-deployed. Here, we show that, during development, diffuse serotonin promotes spinal motor neuron generation from pMN progenitor cells, leaving interneuron numbers unchanged. Pharmacological manipulations and receptor knockdown indicate that serotonin acts at least in part via 5-HT1A receptors. In adults, serotonin is supplied to the spinal cord mainly (90%) by descending axons from the brain. After a spinal lesion, serotonergic axons degenerate caudal to the lesion but sprout rostral to it. Toxin-mediated ablation of serotonergic axons also rostral to the lesion impaired regeneration of motor neurons only there. Conversely, intraperitoneal serotonin injections doubled numbers of new motor neurons and proliferating pMN-like progenitors caudal to the lesion. Regeneration of spinal-intrinsic serotonergic interneurons was unaltered by these manipulations. Hence, serotonin selectively promotes the development and adult regeneration of motor neurons in zebrafish.

  14. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.)

  15. Spinal Neurocysticercosis: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic illness of the central nervous system caused by the larval form of Taenia solium and its considered to be endemic in Latin America. Its diagnosis is based on imaging findings and epidemiological data; although its diagnosis can be made through the detection of specific IgG antibodies, these tests have limited availability in our environment. Central nervous system involvement is generally observed in the brain parenchyma, and less commonly in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space; only infrequently is reported to involve the structures within the spinal canal, in this article we review a case of a patient with spinal cysticercal involvement.

  16. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  17. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  18. Retinoic Acid Signaling during Early Spinal Cord Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Diez del Corral; Morales, Aixa V

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid signaling is required at several steps during the development of the spinal cord, from the specification of generic properties to the final acquisition of neuronal subtype identities, including its role in trunk neural crest development. These functions are associated with the production of retinoic acid in specific tissues and are highly dependent on context. Here, we review the defects associated with retinoic acid signaling manipulations, mostly in chick and mouse models, tr...

  19. Best practice guidelines for molecular analysis in spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Cobben, JM; Matthijs, G; Wirth, B

    2001-01-01

    With a prevalence of approximately 1/10 000, and a carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60 the proximal spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are among the most frequent autosomal recessive hereditary disorders. Patients can be classified clinically into four groups: acute, intermediate, mild, and adult (SMA type

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  1. Spinal computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartor, K.

    1980-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine and spinal cord is gaining more and more importance as a valuable investigative method in neuroradiology. Performed as a noninvasive procedure, with or without intravenous contrast enhancement, it can be used to diagnose paravertebral soft tissue lesions, constrictive lesions of the bony spinal canal, structure changes of the vertebral column or of individual vertebrae, vascular intraspinal lesions, and intraspinal tumors with abnormally high or abnormally low attenuation values. Performed as an invasive procedure, after intrathecal introduction of metrizamide, spinal CT can in selected cases be used in conjunction with conventional metrizamide myelography as an additional procedure (secondary CT-myelography) or even as initial procedure ( primary CT-myelography), taking advantage of its unique properties, namely to provide a transverse axial image of the spine and related soft tissue structures and to detect even small differences in density. Further improvement of spinal CT, particularly the routine non-invasive demonstration of the intraspinal soft tissues, is to be expected.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Spinal Cord Experts Resources Forums Peer Counseling Blog About Us Contact Donate Sitemap Privacy ... © 2011 – 2016 Hill Foundation for Families Living With Disabilities FacingDisability.com is an informational ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Spinal Cord Experts Resources Forums Peer Counseling Blog About Us Contact Donate Sitemap Privacy Statement Terms of Use © 2011 – 2016 Hill Foundation for Families Living With Disabilities FacingDisability.com is an informational ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How much do you know about taking good care of yourself? Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Illness & disability Types of ... Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Children’s National Medical Center. ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  6. Effective Isolation and Propagation of Adult Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cells in vitro%一种有效分离及在体外扩增成年小鼠精原干细胞的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉竞超; 曹文广; 孙红艳; 王令; 辛颖; 张智英

    2012-01-01

    尝试建立一种简便有效的成年小鼠精原干细胞分离培养及扩增的方法.从单只成年小鼠的睾丸中经过两步酶消化法分离精原干细胞,并在去除间质细胞、纯化后的支持细胞饲养层上培养与扩增,获得稳定增殖的精原干细胞系.此方法可显著提高建系成功率,保证细胞系的单一基因型,显著降低体外培养精原干细胞的成本.为成体基因来源的转基因动物的制作和疾病模型的建立提供技术支持.%In our study, we established a convenient and effective method for isolating and propagating the adult spermatogonial stem cells in vitro. We isolated the spermatogonial stem cells from the testes of one adult KM mouse by two-step digestion, and then cultured the cells on the purified Sertoli cells treated with mitomycin-C, eventually we established the stable adult spermatogonial stem cell lines. Our study increased the efficiency of cell line establishment prominently, guaranteed to achieve the single genotype cell line, and reduced the cost of culturing adult male germline stem cells in vitro. This method provided the foundation for producing the transgenic animals and disease models derived from adult genotype.

  7. The Overexpression of TDP-43 Protein in the Neuron and Oligodendrocyte Cells Causes the Progressive Motor Neuron Degeneration in the SOD1 G93A Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Tang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiao; Liang, Huiting; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Renshi

    2016-01-01

    The recent investigation suggested that the TDP-43 protein was closely related to the motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but the pathogenesis contributed to motor neuron degeneration largely remained unknown. Therefore, we detected the alteration of TDP-43 expression and distribution in the adult spinal cord of the SOD1 G93A transgenic mouse model for searching the possible pathogenesis of ALS. We examined the TDP-43 expression and distribution in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells in the adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic model by the fluorescent immunohistochemical technology. We revealed that the amount of TDP-43 positive cell was cervical>lumbar>thoracic segment, that in the ventral horn was more than that in the dorsal horn, a few of TDP-43 protein sparsely expressed and distributed in the other regions, the TDP-43 protein weren't detected in the white matter and the central canal. The TDP-43 protein was mostly expressed and distributed in the nuclear of neuron cells and the cytoplasm of oligodendrocyte cells of the gray matter surrounding the central canal of spinal cord by the granular shape in the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice. The amount of TDP-43 positive cell significantly increased at the onset and progression stages of ALS following with the increase of neuron death in spinal cord, particularly in the ventral horn of cervical segment at the progression stage. Our results suggested that the overexpression of TDP-43 protein in the neuron and oligodendrocyte cell causes the progressive motor neuron degeneration in the ALS-like mouse model. PMID:27570488

  8. New tools for studying microglia in the mouse and human CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mariko L; Bennett, F Chris; Liddelow, Shane A; Ajami, Bahareh; Zamanian, Jennifer L; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B; Mulinyawe, Sara B; Bohlen, Christopher J; Adil, Aykezar; Tucker, Andrew; Weissman, Irving L; Chang, Edward F; Li, Gordon; Grant, Gerald A; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G; Barres, Ben A

    2016-03-22

    The specific function of microglia, the tissue resident macrophages of the brain and spinal cord, has been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of tools to distinguish microglia from other immune cells, thereby limiting specific immunostaining, purification, and manipulation. Because of their unique developmental origins and predicted functions, the distinction of microglia from other myeloid cells is critically important for understanding brain development and disease; better tools would greatly facilitate studies of microglia function in the developing, adult, and injured CNS. Here, we identify transmembrane protein 119 (Tmem119), a cell-surface protein of unknown function, as a highly expressed microglia-specific marker in both mouse and human. We developed monoclonal antibodies to its intracellular and extracellular domains that enable the immunostaining of microglia in histological sections in healthy and diseased brains, as well as isolation of pure nonactivated microglia by FACS. Using our antibodies, we provide, to our knowledge, the first RNAseq profiles of highly pure mouse microglia during development and after an immune challenge. We used these to demonstrate that mouse microglia mature by the second postnatal week and to predict novel microglial functions. Together, we anticipate these resources will be valuable for the future study and understanding of microglia in health and disease.

  9. Posterior spinal cord infarction due to fibrocartilaginous embolization in a 16-year-old athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Seema; Brown, Wendy; Dayal, Anuradha; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-07-01

    Spinal cord infarction is extremely rare in children, and, similar to cerebrovascular infarcts, the pathogenesis is different from adults. Spinal cord infarcts are most commonly reported in adults in the context of aortic surgery; in children, the etiology is frequently unknown. Fibrocartilaginous embolization is a potential cause of spinal cord infarct in both populations. It is a process that occurs when spinal injury has resulted in disc disease, and subsequently disc fragments embolize to the cord, resulting in ischemia and/or infarction. In this report, we present a 16-year-old athlete who presented with symptoms of acute myelopathy after a period of intense exercise. Our original concern was for an inflammatory process of the spinal cord; however, given her history of competitive tumbling and degenerative disc changes on her initial spine magnetic resonance imaging scan, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed, which demonstrated acute spinal cord infarction. Unlike many cases of spinal cord infarction, our patient was fortunate to make a near-complete recovery. This case highlights the importance of recognizing rare causes of spinal cord pathology and considering infarction in the differential diagnosis of acute myelopathy because management and prognosis varies.

  10. 骨癌痛小鼠脊髓水平CREB转录共激活因子1表达的变化%Changes in the expression of CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 in spinal cord in mouse model of bone cancer pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨许丽; 刘玥; 侯百灵; 刘明; 夏天娇; 孙蓓; 张羽; 冷鑫; 石林玉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes in the expression of CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) in spinal cord during the development and maintenance of bone cancer pain in mice.Methods Forty six male C3H/HeJ mice were randomly divided into Sham group (n=23) and Tumor group (n=23).The mouse model of bone cancer pain was developed by intra-femur inoculation of α-minimal essence media (α-MEM) with osteolytic NCTC 2472 cells.The mice in sham group were inoculated with α-MEM without NCTC 2472 cells.Pain behaviors such as the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) and the number of spontaneous flinches (NSF) were assessed on 1 d before inoculation and on 4 d,7 d,10 d,14 d,21 d after inoculation.At each corresponding time point,three mice of each group were killed just after the pain behaviors assessment and the samples of spinal cord lumbar segment were obtained to detect the expression of CRTC1 using Western Blot.Results Compared with Sham group,PWMT((1.35±0.14) g,(1.10±0.28) g,(0.78±0.25) g,(0.47±0.16) g,(0.34±0.16)g) was significantly decreased (P<0.05) and NSF((3.12±0.74),(6.02±0.67),(7.42± 1.22),(10.824±0.98),(12.48±1.06)) was significantly increased (P<0.05) on 7 d,10 d,14 d and 21 d aftcr inoculation in Tumor group.Compared with baseline level,significant increase in the expression of CRTC1 in spinal cord was observed on 4 d in both Sham group and Tumor group (P<0.05).Compared with baseline level and Sham group,significant increase in the expression of CRTC1 in spinal cord was observed on 7 d,10 d,14 d and 21 d in Tumor group (P<0.05).Conclusion Expression of CRTC1 in spinal cord is up-regulated in mice with bone cancer pain,and this change may be involved in the development and maintenance of bone cancer pain.%目的 探讨骨癌痛小鼠脊髓水平CREB转录共激活因子1(CRTC1)表达的变化.方法 采用随机数字表法,46只C3H/HeJ雄性小鼠随机分为假手术组(Sham组,n=23)和肿瘤组(Tumor组,n=23),Tumor

  11. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  12. Dynamic, Sex-Differential STAT5 and BCL6 Binding to Sex-Biased, Growth Hormone-Regulated Genes in Adult Mouse Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yijing; Laz, Ekaterina V.; Waxman, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Sex-dependent pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretory patterns determine the sex-biased expression of >1,000 genes in mouse and rat liver, affecting lipid and drug metabolism, inflammation, and disease. A fundamental biological question is how robust differential expression can be achieved for hundreds of sex-biased genes simply based on the GH input signal pattern: pulsatile GH stimulation in males versus near-continuous GH exposure in females. STAT5 is an essential transcriptional mediator ...

  13. Differential diagnoses of spinal tumors; Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A wide variety of degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases can resemble the clinical presentation and imaging findings of spinal tumors. This article provides an overview of the most frequent diseases which are important to recognize for diagnostic imaging of the spine. (orig.) [German] Eine Vielzahl degenerativer, entzuendlicher und vaskulaerer Erkrankungen kann das klinische Bild und radiologische Befunde spinaler Tumoren imitieren. Dieser Artikel dient der Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten dieser Erkrankungen, deren Kenntnis wichtig fuer die spinale Bildgebung ist. (orig.)

  14. Distribution of immunoreactive glutamine synthetase in the adult human and mouse brain. Qualitative and quantitative observations with special emphasis on extra-astroglial protein localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bannier, Jana; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Steiner, Johann; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. Despite a plethora of studies on this enzyme, knowledge about the regional and cellular distribution of this enzyme in human brain is still fragmentary. Therefore, we mapped fourteen post-mortem brains of psychically healthy individuals for the distribution of the glutamine synthetase immunoreactive protein. It was found that glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is expressed in multiple gray and white matter astrocytes, but also in oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and certain neurons. Since a possible extra-astrocytic expression of glutamine synthetase is highly controversial, we paid special attention to its appearance in oligodendrocytes and neurons. By double immunolabeling of mouse brain slices and cultured mouse brain cells for glutamine synthetase and cell-type-specific markers we provide evidence that besides astrocytes subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, microglial cells and neurons express glutamine synthetase. Moreover, we show that glutamine synthetase-immunopositive neurons are not randomly distributed throughout human and mouse brain, but represent a subpopulation of nitrergic (i.e. neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing) neurons. Possible functional implications of an extra-astrocytic localization of glutamine synthetase are discussed.

  15. Early gene expression changes in spinal cord from SOD1G93A Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Pintar Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is an adult-onset and fast progression neurodegenerative disease that leads to the loss of motor neurons. Mechanisms of selective motor neuron loss in ALS are unknown. The early events occurring in the spinal cord that may contribute to motor neuron death are not described, neither astrocytes participation in the pre-symptomatic phases of the disease. In order to identify ALS early events, we performed a microarray analysis employing a whole mouse genome platform to evaluate the gene expression pattern of lumbar spinal cords of transgenic SOD1G93A mice and their littermate controls at pre-symptomatic ages of 40 and 80 days. Differentially expressed genes were identified by means of the Bioconductor packages Agi4x44Preprocess and limma. FunNet web based tool was used for analysis of over-represented pathways. Furthermore, immunolabeled astrocytes from 40 and 80 days old mice were submitted to laser microdissection and RNA was extracted for evaluation of a selected gene by qPCR. Statistical analysis has pointed to 492 differentially expressed genes (155 up and 337 down regulated in 40 days and 1105 (433 up and 672 down in 80 days old ALS mice. KEGG analysis demonstrated the over-represented pathways tight junction, antigen processing and presentation, oxidative phosphorylation, endocytosis, chemokine signaling pathway, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis and glutamatergic synapse at both pre-symptomatic ages. Ube2i gene expression was evaluated in astrocytes from both transgenic ages, being up regulated in 40 and 80 days astrocytes enriched samples. Our data points to important early molecular events occurring in pre-symptomatic phases of ALS in mouse model. Early SUMOylation process linked to astrocytes might account to non autonomous cell toxicity in ALS. Further studies on the signaling pathways presented here may provide new insights to better understand the events triggering motor neuron death in this devastating

  16. Primary spinal epidural lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutham Cugati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidural location for lymphoma is observed in 0.1-6.5% of all the lymphomas. Primary spinal epidural lymphoma (PSEL is a subset of lymphomas, where there are no other recognizable sites of lymphomas at the time of diagnosis. The incidence of this subset of lymphomas is much less. It, however, is increasingly diagnosed, due to the increased use of more sensitive imaging modalities. For the electronic search, Pubmed was used to identify journals that enlisted and enumerated PSEL from 1961 to January 2011. The following combination of terms: "primary," "spinal," "epidural," and "lymphoma" were used. The most significant articles and their bibliographies were analyzed by the authors. The symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, histopathology, treatment, and outcome have been analyzed in a systematic manner

  17. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  18. Transverse myelitis following spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Sanjeev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal anesthesia is widely used during surgical procedures. It is generally safe and the frequency of severe, permanent neurological complications associated with it has been reported to be extremely low. We report a patient, who developed paraplegia following spinal anesthesia. A 29-year-old male was referred with acute, flaccid, sensory motor paraplegia, with bladder and bowel involvement. He developed this immediately after an operation for inguinal hernia under spinal anesthesia. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed hemorrhagic myelitis in the conus at D12. He was referred after he did not respond to intravenous methylprednisolone for 10 days. This case brings up the difficulty encountered in determination of the interspace used for spinal anesthesia and the potential for traumatic injury to the spinal cord. It also demonstrates the tragic outcome after a clinician violates some important, standard and established guidelines.

  19. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander [Institut M T Kassab d' orthopedie, Department of Radiology, Ksar Said (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  20. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  1. Infections in spinal instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerometta, Antoine; Olaverri, Juan Carlos Rodriguez; Bitan, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    Surgical-site infection (SSI ) in the spine is a serious postoperative complication. Factors such as posterior surgical approach, arthrodesis, use of spinal instrumentation, age, obesity, diabetes, tobacco use, operating-room environment and estimated blood loss are well established in the literature to affect the risk of infection. Infection after spine surgery with instrumentation is becoming a common pathology. The reported infection rates range from 0.7% to 11.9%, depending on the diagnos...

  2. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  3. Complications of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dursun, Erbil; Hamamci, Nigar; Ozbey, Aydan; Cakci, Aytul

    2004-01-01

    Spinal cord injury and its complications cause important physical, psychosocial and economical problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications resulting from spinal cord injury, to show their adverse effects on the rehabilitation program, and to make related clinicians to call attention especially to preventable complications. Sixty-two spinal cord injured patients were included in the study. All the patients were evaluated regarding age, gender, etiology, time since inj...

  4. Mouse adhalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, L; Vachon, P H; Kuang, W;

    1997-01-01

    analyze the biological roles of adhalin, we cloned the mouse adhalin cDNA, raised peptide-specific antibodies to its cytoplasmic domain, and examined its expression and localization in vivo and in vitro. The mouse adhalin sequence was 80% identical to that of human, rabbit, and hamster. Adhalin was...... specifically expressed in striated muscle cells and their immediate precursors, and absent in many other cell types. Adhalin expression in embryonic mouse muscle was coincident with primary myogenesis. Its expression was found to be up-regulated at mRNA and protein levels during myogenic differentiation in...

  5. Spinal angiography. Anatomy, technique and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal angiography is a diagnostic modality requiring detailed knowledge of spinal vascular anatomy. The cervical spinal cord is supplied by the vertebral arteries while segmental arteries which are preserved from fetal anatomy, supply the thoracic and lumbar regions. As spinal angiography carries the risk of paraplegia the indications have to be considered very carefully. Nevertheless, spinal angiography should be performed if there is reason to suspect a spinal vascular malformation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (orig.)

  6. Sagittal Spinal Morphology in Highly Trained Adolescent Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyor, José M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, Estefanía; Sanz-Rivas, David; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Sports with a predominance of forward-bending and extension postures have been associated with alterations in the sagittal spinal curvatures and greater risk of spinal injury. Because, the tennis players adopt these postures, the aims of this study were: 1) to describe spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in male and female highly trained adolescent tennis players during relaxed standing posture and with thoracic spine corrected (in prone lying on the floor); and 2) to determine the frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and lumbar hypo/hyper lordosis in these postures. Forty adolescent tennis players (24 male and 16 female) aged 13-18 years, participated voluntarily in this study. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt. The mean values in the relaxed standing posture were 43.83° ± 7.87° (thoracic kyphosis), - 27.58° ± 7.01° (lumbar lordosis), and 13.38° ± 5.57° (pelvic tilt) for male tennis players, respectively; and 36.13° ± 6.69° (thoracic kyphosis), - 32.69° ± 5.06° (lumbar lordosis), 20.94° ± 5.36° (pelvic tilt) for female tennis players (p tennis players showed a frequency of 62.5% and 93.8% (p = 0.032) for neutral thoracic kyphosis, and 83.3% and 93.8% (p = 0.062) in neutral lumbar lordosis, respectively. In conclusion, due to the high percentage of neutral spinal curvatures in both male and female tennis players, to practice tennis in these levels does not alter sagittal spinal morphology in the relaxed standing posture in adolescent highly trained tennis players. Key Points This study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt during several postures in young highly trained tennis players. Female tennis players showed statistically significant greater anterior pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis and lower thoracic kyphosis than male tennis players. The high percentage of neutral thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis posture in both groups of young tennis players in relaxed standing

  7. Spinal muscular atrophy astrocytes exhibit abnormal calcium regulation and reduced growth factor production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, Jered V; Patitucci, Teresa N; Nord, Joshua A; Barabas, Marie-Elizabeth A; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ebert, Allison D

    2013-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disorder caused by the deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene that leads to loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Although motor neurons are selectively lost during SMA pathology, selective replacement of SMN in motor neurons does not lead to full rescue in mouse models. Due to the ubiquitous expression of SMN, it is likely that other cell types besides motor neurons are affected by its disruption and therefore may contribute to disease pathology. Here we show that astrocytes in SMAΔ7 mouse spinal cord and from SMA-induced pluripotent stem cells exhibit morphological and cellular changes indicative of activation before overt motor neuron loss. Furthermore, our in vitro studies show mis-regulation of basal calcium and decreased response to adenosine triphosphate stimulation indicating abnormal astrocyte function. Together, for the first time, these data show early disruptions in astrocytes that may contribute to SMA disease pathology. PMID:23839956

  8. Unpredicted spontaneous extrusion of a renal calculus in an adult male with spina bifida and paraplegia: report of a misdiagnosis. Measures to be taken to reduce urological errors in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A delay in diagnosis or a misdiagnosis may occur in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI or spinal bifida as typical symptoms of a clinical condition may be absent because of their neurological impairment. Case presentation A 29-year old male, who was born with spina bifida and hydrocephalus, became unwell and developed a swelling and large red mark in his left loin eighteen months ago. Pyonephrosis or perinephric abscess was suspected. X-ray of the abdomen showed left-sided staghorn calculus. Since ultrasound scan showed no features of pyonephrosis or perinephric abscess, he was prescribed a prolonged course of antibiotics for infection presumed to arise from the site of metal implant in spine. He developed a discharging sinus, following which the loin swelling and red mark subsided. About three months ago, he again developed a red mark and minimal swelling in the left loin. Ultrasound scan detected no abnormality in the renal or perinephric region. Therefore, the red mark and swelling were attributed to pressure from the backrest of his chair. Five weeks later, the swelling in the left loin burst open and a large stone was extruded spontaneously. An X-ray of the abdomen showed that he had extruded the central portion of the staghorn calculus from left kidney. With hindsight, the extruded renal calculus could be seen lying in the subcutaneous tissue of left loin lateral to the 10th rib in the X-ray of abdomen, which was taken when he presented with red mark and minimal swelling. Conclusion This case illustrates how mistakes in diagnosis could occur in spinal cord injury patients, and highlights the need for corrective measures to reduce urological errors in these patients. Voluntary reporting of urological errors is recommended to facilitate learning from our mistakes. In the patients who have marked spinal curvature, ultrasonography of kidneys and perinephric region may not be entirely reliable. As clinical symptoms and

  9. Complement Plays an Important Role in Spinal Cord Injury and Represents a Therapeutic Target for Improving Recovery following Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Fei; Atkinson, Carl; Song, Hongbin; Pannu, Ravinder; Singh, Inderjit; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Initiation of an inflammatory cascade following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is thought to cause secondary injury and to adversely impact functional recovery, although the mechanisms involved are not well defined. We report on the dynamics of complement activation and deposition in the mouse spinal cord following traumatic injury, the role of complement in the development of SCI, and the characterization of a novel targeted complement inhibitor. Following traumatic injury, mice deficien...

  10. Erythropoietin attenuates the sequels of ischaemic spinal cord injury with enhanced recruitment of CD34+ cells in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Koji; Wagner, Klaus; Mark, Peter; Pittermann, Erik; Gäbel, Ralf; Furlani, Dario; Li, Wenzhong; Vollmar, Brigitte; Yamada, Tomomi; Steinhoff, Gustav; Ma, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Erythropoietin has been shown to promote tissue regeneration after ischaemic injury in various organs. Here, we investigated whether Erythropoietin could ameliorate ischaemic spinal cord injury in the mouse and sought an underlying mechanism. Spinal cord ischaemia was developed by cross-clamping the descending thoracic aorta for 7 or 9 min. in mice. Erythropoietin (5000 IU/kg) or saline was administrated 30 min. before aortic cross-clamping. Neurological function was assessed using t...

  11. Motor-circuit communication matrix from spinal cord to brainstem neurons revealed by developmental origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Chiara; Esposito, Maria Soledad; Sigrist, Markus; Arber, Silvia

    2014-01-30

    Accurate motor-task execution relies on continuous comparison of planned and performed actions. Motor-output pathways establish internal circuit collaterals for this purpose. Here we focus on motor collateral organization between spinal cord and upstream neurons in the brainstem. We used a newly developed mouse genetic tool intersectionally with viruses to uncover the connectivity rules of these ascending pathways by capturing the transient expression of neuronal subpopulation determinants. We reveal a widespread and diverse network of spinal dual-axon neurons, with coincident input to forelimb motor neurons and the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN) in the brainstem. Spinal information to the LRN is not segregated by motor pool or neurotransmitter identity. Instead, it is organized according to the developmental domain origin of the progenitor cells. Thus, excerpts of most spinal information destined for action are relayed to supraspinal centers through exquisitely organized ascending connectivity modules, enabling precise communication between command and execution centers of movement.

  12. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  13. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  14. Adult glucocorticoid exposure leads to transcriptional and DNA methylation changes in nuclear steroid receptors in the hippocampus and kidney of mouse male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Matthews, Stephen G; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids (sGCs) are commonly prescribed for the management of inflammatory and endocrine disorders. However, nothing is known regarding the effects of sGC on adult germline methylome and whether these effects can be transmitted to the next generation. We hypothesized that administration of sGC to adult male mice alters DNA methylation in mature sperm and modifies the transcription and methylation of steroid receptors in male F1 offspring. Adult C57BL/6 males (n = 10/group) were injected on five consecutive days with 1 mg/kg sGC (i.e., dexamethasone) or vehicle and euthanized 35 or 60 days after initial treatment or bred with control females (60 days postinitial treatment; n = 5/group). A significant increase in global non-CpG methylation was observed in F0 sperm 60 days following sGC treatment. In the hippocampus and kidney of Postnatal Day 50 (PND50) and PND240 male offspring derived from fathers exposed to sGC, significant differences in mineralocorticoid receptor (Nr3c2; Mr), estrogen alpha receptor (Nr3a1; Ers1), and glucocorticoid receptor (Nr3c1; Gr) expression were observed. Furthermore, significant demethylation in regulatory regions of Mr, Gr, and Esr1 was observed in the PND50 kidney derived from fathers exposed to sGC. This is the first demonstration that paternal pharmacological exposure to sGC can alter the expression and DNA methylation of nuclear steroid receptors in brain and somatic tissues of offspring. These findings provide proof of principle that adult male exposure to sGC can affect DNA methylation and gene expression in offspring, indicating the possibility that adult experiences that evoke increases in endogenous glucocorticoid (i.e., stress) might have similar effects.

  15. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.)

  16. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  17. Electroacupuncture in the repair of spinal cord injury: inhibiting the Notch signaling pathway and promoting neural stem cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroacupuncture for the treatment of spinal cord injury has a good clinical curative effect, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In our experiments, the spinal cord of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was clamped for 60 seconds. Dazhui (GV14 and Mingmen (GV4 acupoints of rats were subjected to electroacupuncture. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the expression of serum inflammatory factors was apparently downregulated in rat models of spinal cord injury after electroacupuncture. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that electroacupuncture contributed to the proliferation of neural stem cells in rat injured spinal cord, and suppressed their differentiation into astrocytes. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot assays showed that electroacupuncture inhibited activation of the Notch signaling pathway induced by spinal cord injury. These findings indicate that electroacupuncture repaired the injured spinal cord by suppressing the Notch signaling pathway and promoting the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells.

  18. Electroacupuncture in the repair of spinal cord injury:inhibiting the Notch signaling pathway and promoting neural stem cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Geng; Tao Sun; Jing-hui Li; Ning Zhao; Yong Wang; Hua-lin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Electroacupuncture for the treatment of spinal cord injury has a good clinical curative effect, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In our experiments, the spinal cord of adult Sprague-Daw-ley rats was clamped for 60 seconds.Dazhui (GV14) andMingmen (GV4) acupoints of rats were subjected to electroacupuncture. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the expres-sion of serum inlfammatory factors was apparently downregulated in rat models of spinal cord injury after electroacupuncture. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that electroacupuncture contributed to the proliferation of neural stem cells in rat injured spinal cord, and suppressed their differentiation into astrocytes. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot assays showed that electroacupuncture inhibited activation of the Notch signaling pathway induced by spinal cord injury. These ifndings indicate that electroacupuncture repaired the injured spinal cord by suppressing the Notch signaling pathway and promoting the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells.

  19. Gestational and Lactational Exposure to Atrazine via the Drinking Water Causes Specific Behavioral Deficits and Selectively Alters Monoaminergic Systems in C57BL/6 Mouse Dams, Juvenile and Adult Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Saritha; Ye, Xiaoqin; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is one of the most frequently detected pesticides in the U.S. water supply. This study aimed to investigate neurobehavioral and neurochemical effects of ATR in C57BL/6 mouse offspring and dams exposed to a relatively low (3 mg/l, estimated intake 1.4 mg/kg/day) concentration of ATR via the drinking water (DW) from gestational day 6 to postnatal day (PND) 23. Behavioral tests included open field, pole, grip strength, novel object recognition (NOR), forced swim, and marble burying tests. Maternal weight gain and offspring (PND21, 35, and 70) body or brain weights were not affected by ATR. However, ATR-treated dams exhibited decreased NOR performance and a trend toward hyperactivity. Juvenile offspring (PND35) from ATR-exposed dams were hyperactive (both sexes), spent less time swimming (males), and buried more marbles (females). In adult offspring (PND70), the only behavioral change was a sex-specific (females) decreased NOR performance by ATR. Neurochemically, a trend toward increased striatal dopamine (DA) in dams and a significant increase in juvenile offspring (both sexes) was observed. Additionally, ATR exposure decreased perirhinal cortex serotonin in the adult female offspring. These results suggest that perinatal DW exposure to ATR targets the nigrostriatal DA pathway in dams and, especially, juvenile offspring, alters dams’ cognitive performance, induces sex-selective changes involving motor and emotional functions in juvenile offspring, and decreases cognitive ability of adult female offspring, with the latter possibly associated with altered perirhinal cortex serotonin homeostasis. Overall, ATR exposure during gestation and lactation may cause adverse nervous system effects to both offspring and dams. PMID:24913803

  20. Irregular Firing and High-Conductance States in Spinal Motoneurons during Scratching and Swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzulaitis, Robertas; Hounsgaard, Jorn; Alaburda, Aidas

    2016-01-01

    in general. Here we compare conductance and firing patterns in spinal motoneurons during network activity for scratching and swimming in an ex vivo carapace-spinal cord preparation from adult turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans). The pattern and relative engagement of motoneurons are distinctly different...... in scratching and swimming. Nevertheless, we found increased synaptic fluctuations in membrane potential, irregular firing, and increased conductance in spinal motoneurons during scratch and swim network activity. Our finding indicates that intense synaptic activation of motoneurons is a general feature...... not only during scratching but also during swimming. Our findings suggest that irregular firing and high-conductance states could be a general feature for motor behaviors....