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Sample records for adult immunocompromised patients

  1. [Toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, L; Kodym, P; Malý, M; Geleneky, M; Beran, O; Jilich, D

    2015-06-01

    In humans, toxoplasmosis mostly occurs as a latent infection, but in immunocompromised individuals, the agent may reactivate and cause severe to life-threatening disease. HIV positive individuals and transplant recipients, in particular hematopoietic stem cell transplant and heart transplant recipients, are at highest risk. The disease most often affects the central nervous system but can involve any organ. Because of the alteration of the immune response in these patients, the serodiagnosis is not reliable and direct detection of the causative agent is needed--namely by microscopy and DNA PCR. If inadequately treated or left untreated, toxoplasmosis generally has a fatal prognosis in immunocompromised patients and therefore, the treatment must be started as early and energetically as possible. The gold standard both in the treatment of reactivation and secondary prophylaxis is the pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine combination while co-trimoxazole can be used in the primary prophylaxis for high-risk patients.

  2. Diarrhea in the immunocompromised patient.

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    Krones, Elisabeth; Högenauer, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common problem in patients with immunocompromising conditions. The etiologic spectrum differs from patients with diarrhea who have a normal immune system. This article reviews the most important causes of diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, ranging from infectious causes to noninfectious causes of diarrhea in the setting of HIV infection as a model for other conditions of immunosuppression. It also deals with diarrhea in specific situations, eg, after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation, diarrhea induced by immunosuppressive drugs, and diarrhea in congenital immunodeficiency syndromes.

  3. Utility of adding Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA detection in nasopharyngeal aspirates in immunocompromised adult patients with febrile pneumonia.

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    Guigue, Nicolas; Alanio, Alexandre; Menotti, Jean; Castro, Nathalie De; Hamane, Samia; Peyrony, Olivier; LeGoff, Jérôme; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Detection of viral and bacterial DNA in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) is now a routine practice in emergency cases of febrile pneumonia. We investigated whether Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA could also be detected in these cases by conducting retrospective screening of 324 consecutive NPAs from 324 adult patients (198 or 61% were immunocompromised) admitted with suspected pulmonary infections during the 2012 influenza epidemic season, using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (PjqPCR), which targets the P. jirovecii mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene. These NPAs had already been tested for 22 respiratory pathogens (18 viruses and 4 bacteria), but we found that 16 NPAs (4.9%) were PjqPCR-positive, making P. jirovecii the fourth most prevalent of the 23 microorganisms in the screen. Eleven of the 16 PjqPCR-positive patients were immunocompromised, and five had underlying pulmonary conditions. Nine NPAs were also positive for another respiratory pathogen. Six had PjqPCR-positive induced sputa less than 3 days after the NPA procedure, and five were diagnosed with pneumocystis pneumonia (four with chronic lymphoproliferative disorders and one AIDS patient). In all six available pairs quantification of P. jirovecii DNA showed fewer copies in NPA than in induced sputum and three PjqPCR-negative NPAs corresponded to PjqPCR-positive bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, underscoring the fact that a negative PjqPCR screen does not exclude a diagnosis of pneumocystosis. Including P. jirovecii DNA detection to the panel of microorganisms included in screening tests used for febrile pneumonia may encourage additional investigations or support use of anti-pneumocystis pneumonia prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients.

  4. HPV Carcinomas in Immunocompromised Patients

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    Nicole M. Reusser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and can result in pre-malignancies or overt malignancies of the skin and mucosal surfaces. HPV-related illnesses are an important personal and public health problem causing physical, mental, sexual and financial detriments. Moreover, this set of malignancies severely affects the immunosuppressed population, particularly HIV-positive patients and organ-transplant recipients. There is growing incidence of HPV-associated anogenital malignancies as well as a decrease in the average age of affected patients, likely related to the rising number of high-risk individuals. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of HPV-related malignancy. Current treatment options for HPV infection and subsequent disease manifestations include imiquimod, retinoids, intralesional bleomycin, and cidofovir; however, primary prevention with HPV vaccination remains the most effective strategy. This review will discuss anogenital lesions in immunocompromised patients, cutaneous warts at nongenital sites, the association of HPV with skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, warts and carcinomas in organ-transplant patients, HIV-positive patients with HPV infections, and the management of cutaneous disease in the immunocompromised patient.

  5. Diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijen, JW; van der Werf, TS; Ligtenberg, JJM; Tulleken, JE; Zijlstra, JG

    1999-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of bilateral interstitial pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients is very extensive. We describe two immunocompromised patients with diffuse pulmonary infiltrative changes. Bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage after orotracheal intubation using topical anaesthe

  6. Prevalence of Campylobacter concisus in diarrhoea of immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune Munck; Permin, Henrik; On, Stephen L W;

    2002-01-01

    assigned C. concisus into 2 groups. The predominant C. concisus group 2 was the only strain to infect immunocompetent patients and children: 71% of the infected patients were immunocompromised, the majority being adults (84%). C. concisus may be a frequent cause of diarrhoea in immunocompromised patients...

  7. Noma in an immunocompromised patient.

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    Silva, Igor Henrique Morais; Faria, Andreza Barkokebas S de; Fonseca, Deborah Daniela Diniz; Aguiar, Carlos Menezes; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino; Leao, Jair Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    Noma (also known as cancrum oris) is classified by the World Health Organization as a necrotizing ulcerative stomatitis, an invasive acute infection which affects the orofacial tissues. Patients who are subject to such risk factors as severe malnutrition or alteration of the immune system are predominantly affected. This article presents a case of noma in a 62-year-old immunocompromised patient with pain and tooth mobility in the mandibular region, ulceration, bleeding, gingival inflammatory secretion, and oral malodor. The signs and symptoms were controlled only after the intravenous administration of 500 mg tid of imipenem/cilastatin sodium and 2 g qd of vancomycin. After infection control was maintained, the patient was directed to surgery for removal of bone sequestration and curettage of the maxillary sinus. The patient was prescribed 1 g qd of oral clindamycin for 3 months postsurgery.

  8. Comparative Diagnosis of Strongyloidiasis in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvira, Viravarn; Trakulhun, Kitti; Mungthin, Mathirut; Naaglor, Tawee; Chantawat, Nirattar; Pakdee, Wallop; Phiboonbanakit, Danabhand; Dekumyoy, Paron

    2016-08-01

    Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome and disseminated strongyloidiasis frequently occur in immunocompromised persons and can lead to high complication and mortality rates. Thus, detection of Strongyloides stercolaris in those patients is crucial. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of strongyloidiasis and compare the detection rates of different strongyloidiasis detection methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 135 adults with various immunocompromising conditions (corticosteroid usage, chemotherapy, hematologic malignancies, organ transplants, use of immunosuppressive agents, and symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection) in Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. All patients were asked to undergo serology testing for Strongyloides IgG by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and 3 days of stool collection for use in a simple smear along with formalin-ether concentration and agar plate techniques. Prevalence rates of strongyloidiasis were 5% by stool concentration technique, 5.4% by IgG-ELISA, and 6.7% by agar plate culture. Three of the eight strongyloidiasis cases in this study had hyperinfection syndrome. The tested risk factors of age, sex, occupation, and immunocompromising condition were not associated with Strongyloides infestation. Serology was only 42.9% sensitive (positive predictive value), but it was 96.3% specific (negative predictive value). In conclusion, prevalence rates of strongyloidiasis in this study were 5-7%. Although agar plate culture was the most sensitive technique, the other diagnostic methods might be alternatively used.

  9. CT findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic and immunocompromised patients

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    Takeuchi, Noriyuki; Ikezoe, Junpei; Johkoh, Tsuyoshi (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic or immunocompromised patients, we reviewed CT of the chest in 42 adult patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Forty-two had some underlying diseases or immunocompromised conditions (31 diabetes mellitus, 6 malignancies, 2 long-term steroid therapy, 2 pneumoconiosis, and one anorexia nervosa). In diabetic or immunocompromised patients, a high incidence of non-segmental distribution (27%) and multiple small cavities in a cavitary lesion (45%) was observed. Unusual localization of the lesions such as lower lung field disease was observed in 18% of cases (the incidence of unusual localization in patients with no underlying disease was equal to diabetic or immunocompromised patients). (author).

  10. [Candida ciferrii in an immunocompromised patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martos, Pedro; Ruiz-Aragón, Jesús; García-Agudo, Lidia; Saldarreaga, Abel; Lozano, María Carmen; Marín, Pilar

    2004-06-01

    A case of possible infection due to Candida ciferrii in an immunocompromised patient is presented. This fungal species has been rarely reported as cause of human infection. The isolate showed in vitro resistance to fluconazole.

  11. Amebic osteomyelitis in an immunocompromised patient.

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    Breland, Matthew; Beckmann, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are pathogenic protozoa that are uncommonly encountered. They tend to infect immunocompromised patients, most often causing cutaneous lesions and in some instances granulomatous amebic encephalitis, as well as rare instances of dissemination to other organs. We present a case of amebic osteomyelitis of the fibula in a patient with rejection of a transplanted kidney who was chronically immune-suppressed.

  12. Amebic osteomyelitis in an immunocompromised patient

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    Matthew Breland, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba spp. are pathogenic protozoa that are uncommonly encountered. They tend to infect immunocompromised patients, most often causing cutaneous lesions and in some instances granulomatous amebic encephalitis, as well as rare instances of dissemination to other organs. We present a case of amebic osteomyelitis of the fibula in a patient with rejection of a transplanted kidney who was chronically immune-suppressed.

  13. ANTIFUNGAL PROPHYLAXIS IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENTS

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    Lourdes Vazquez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFIs represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication.

  14. Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients

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    Sylwia Rynans

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses belong to the Adenoviridae family and they are divided into seven species, including 56 types. Adenoviruses are common opportunistic pathogens that are rarely associated with clinical symptoms in immunocompetent patients. However, they are emerging pathogens causing morbidity and mortality in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplants, HIV infected patients and patients with primary immune deficiencies. Clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic viraemia to respiratory and gastrointestinal disease, haemorrhagic cystitis and severe disseminated illness. There is currently no formally approved therapy for the treatment of adenovirus infections.This article presents current knowledge about adenoviruses, their pathogenicity and information about available methods to diagnose and treat adenoviral infections.

  15. Pulmonary considerations in the immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleza, Walter G; Browne, Brian

    2003-05-01

    The compromised patient who presents to the emergency department with pulmonary complaints is becoming a common occurrence. An immunocompromised state can result from a disease process such as HIV or from medications used to prevent graft rejection in solid organ recipients or to treat conditions such as collagen vascular disease. The emergency department physician should be familiar with the more common complications that can afflict this unique patient group. This article addresses the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of the more common pulmonary complications that can occur in solid organ transplant recipients, cancer patients, patients suffering from collagen vascular disease, and patients with HIV disease.

  16. Inhaled medicinal cannabis and the immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchlemer, Rosa; Amit-Kohn, Michal; Raveh, David; Hanuš, Lumír

    2015-03-01

    Medicinal cannabis is an invaluable adjunct therapy for pain relief, nausea, anorexia, and mood modification in cancer patients and is available as cookies or cakes, as sublingual drops, as a vaporized mist, or for smoking. However, as with every herb, various microorganisms are carried on its leaves and flowers which when inhaled could expose the user, in particular immunocompromised patients, to the risk of opportunistic lung infections, primarily from inhaled molds. The objective of this study was to identify the safest way of using medicinal cannabis in immunosuppressed patients by finding the optimal method of sterilization with minimal loss of activity of cannabis. We describe the results of culturing the cannabis herb, three methods of sterilization, and the measured loss of a main cannabinoid compound activity. Systematic sterilization of medicinal cannabis can eliminate the risk of fatal opportunistic infections associated with cannabis among patients at risk.

  17. Risk assessment of tuberculosis in immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sester, Martina; van Leth, Frank; Bruchfeld, Judith

    2014-01-01

    of TST and IGRAs in five different groups of immunocompromised patients, and evaluated their ability to identify those at risk for development of tuberculosis. METHODS: Immunocompromised patients with HIV infection, chronic renal failure, rheumatoid arthritis, solid-organ or stem-cell transplantation......, and healthy control subjects were evaluated head-to-head by the TST, QuantiFERON-TB-Gold in-tube test (ELISA), and T-SPOT.TB test (enzyme-linked immunospot) at 17 centers in 11 European countries. Development of tuberculosis was assessed during follow-up. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Frequencies of positive...... test results varied from 8.7 to 15.9% in HIV infection (n = 768), 25.3 to 30.6% in chronic renal failure (n = 270), 25.0% to 37.2% in rheumatoid arthritis (n = 199), 9.0 to 20.0% in solid-organ transplant recipients (n = 197), 0% to 5.8% in stem-cell transplant recipients (n = 103), and 11.2 to 15...

  18. ZYGOMYCOSIS IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED NON-HAEMATOLOGICAL PATIENTS

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    George Petrikkos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Zygomycoses are rare emerging diseases with a high fatality rate.  The most important risk factors include neutropenia or functional neutropenia, diabetic ketoacidosis, iron overload, major trauma, prolonged use of corticosteroids, illicit intravenous drug use, neonatal prematurity, malnourishment, and pre-exposure to antifungal agents with no activity against zygomycetes, such as voriconazole and caspofungin. A high index of suspicion is crucial for the diagnosis, as prompt and appropriate management can considerably reduce morbidity and mortality. Suspicion index can be increased through recognition of the differential patterns of clinical presentation. In the non- haematological immunocompromised patients, zygomycosis can manifest in various clinical forms, depending on the underlying condition: mostly as rhino-orbital or rhino-cerebral in diabetes patients, pulmonary infection in patients with malignancy or solid organ transplantation, disseminated infection in iron overloaded or deferoxamine treated patients, cerebral - with no sinus involvement - in ID users, gastrointestinal in premature infants or malnourishment, and cutaneous after direct inoculation in immunocompetent individuals with trauma or burns. Treating a patient’s underlying medical condition and reducing immunosuppression are essential to therapy. Rapid correction of metabolic abnormalities is mandatory in cases such as uncontrolled diabetes and corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs should be discontinued where feasible. AmphotericinB or its newer and less toxic lipid formulations are the drugs of choice regarding antifungal chemotherapy, while extensive surgical debridemend is essential to reduce infected and necrotic tissue. A high number of cases could be prevented through measures including diabetes control programmes and proper pre- and post-surgical hygiene.

  19. Pneumoniae in immunocompromised patients; Pneumonien bei Immunsuppression

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    Jacobi, Volkmar; Lehnert, Thomas; Thalhammer, Axel [Klinikum der Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2009-12-15

    Due to the large surface area, heat, high humidity and high oxygen supply in the lung makes an ideal environment for the propagation of germs. The purpose of the immune system is to establish and maintain the balance between saprophytes and immune defense so as to depress and ultimately kill germs as they infiltrate the body. This usually is achieved by the use of a highly complex immune system. It is a perfect combination of non-specific, cellular and humoral immune mechanisms with very specific immune cells and antibodies, which are specialized on particular pathogens. The specific defenses potentiate the effect of the nonspecific defense in a large extent so as to prevent re-infection and ultimately eliminate recognized pathogens. The causes of immune deficiency can be related to either the cellular or humoral level and affect both the specific and nonspecific defenses. There is a different excitation spectrum depending on the type of immune deficiency. Immune deficiency can prevalently cause complications in the course of infections, decelerate the healing and allow the occurrence of rare pathogens. In particular, the radiological characteristics of typical and atypical pneumonia in immunocompromised patients will be discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the appearance of bacterial infections, mycobacterioses, PCP, CMV, and laid fungual pneumonia. Even it is not possible to identify certain pathogens radiologically, it is often possible to narrow the spectrum of germs causing pulmonary infections significantly by comparing with other pulmonary complications such as lymphoma or kaposisarcomas. (orig.)

  20. Pulmonary Talcosis in an Immunocompromised Patient

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    Thanh-Phuong Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of pulmonary talcosis or talc pneumoconiosis related to inhalation of talc during its extraction and processing in mines was described by Thorel in 1896. Pulmonary talcosis is most commonly seen secondary to occupational exposure or intravenous (IV drug abuse and, occasionally, in excessive use of cosmetic talc. Based on literature review, there has been an increase in reported incidents of pulmonary talcosis due to various forms of exposure to the mineral. We report an 82-year-old man who is diagnosed with Philadelphia chromosome positive pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL treated with palliative imatinib who presented with chronic hemoptysis and dyspnea shortly after his diagnosis. His symptoms were initially thought to be due to an infectious etiology due to his malignancy, immunocompromised state, and radiographic findings until high-resolution computerized tomographic (HRCT findings showed a diffuse pulmonary fibrosis picture that prompted further questioning and a more thorough history inquiry on his exposure to causative agents of interstitial lung disease. Very often, patients do not recognize their exposure, especially in those whose exposure is unrelated to their occupation. Our case emphasizes the need for thorough and careful history taking of occupational and nonoccupational exposure to known causative agents of interstitial lung disease.

  1. Clostridium difficile infections among adults and children in Mwanza/Tanzania: is it an underappreciated pathogen among immunocompromised patients in sub-Saharan Africa?

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    M. Seugendo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known regarding the epidemiology Clostridium difficile in developing countries. Fresh stool samples from patients with diarrhoea were cultured anaerobically. C. difficile was detected in nine (6.4% of 141 (95% confidence interval 4.2–13.1, of which seven (77.8% were from children. HIV infection, prolonged hospitalization and antibiotic use were independent factors associated with the occurrence of C. difficile in the gastrointestinal tract. Two of the toxigenic isolates were typed as ribotype 045, and the other two had unknown ribotype. All C. difficile isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, moxifloxacin and clarithromycin, while three isolates were resistant to clarithromycin. C. difficile may be an important pathogen causing diarrhoea in sub-Saharan Africa among immunocompromised patients.

  2. ZYGOMYCOSIS IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED NON-HAEMATOLOGICAL PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Petrikkos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Zygomycoses are rare emerging diseases with a high fatality rate.  The most important risk factors include neutropenia or functional neutropenia, diabetic ketoacidosis, iron overload, major trauma, prolonged use of corticosteroids, illicit intravenous drug use, neonatal prematurity, malnourishment, and pre-exposure to antifungal agents with no activity against zygomycetes, such as voriconazole and caspofungin.

    A high index of suspicion is crucial for the diagnosis, as prompt and appropriate management can considerably reduce morbidity and mortality. Suspicion index can be increased through recognition of the differential patterns of clinical presentation. In the non- haematological immunocompromised patients, zygomycosis can manifest in various clinical forms, depending on the underlying condition: mostly as rhino-orbital or rhino-cerebral in diabetes patients, pulmonary infection in patients with malignancy or solid organ transplantation, disseminated infection in iron overloaded or deferoxamine

  3. Reconstructive surgery in immunocompromised patients: evaluation and therapy

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    Dunda, Sebastian E.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increasing number of patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are immunocompromised due to different reasons and different medical treatments. Some of the used immunosuppressive drugs may affect the process of wound healing and thereby, impair the long-term success of surgical treatment. Therefore, this retrospective analysis aimed at the evaluation of the perioperative treatment and surgical outcome of immunocompromised patients undergoing different reconstructive procedures.Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 8 immunocompromised patients with different primary diseases who needed reconstructive surgery: 2 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with an acute myeloid leukemia, 1 patient with colitis ulcerosa, 1 patient with liver cirrhosis, 1 patient with chronic polyarthritis, and 2 patients with malignant melanoma.Results: In 7 of our 8 presented cases, multiple operations with wound debridements have been necessary to optimize the granulation of the wound bed before reconstructive surgery. 3 out of these 7 patients required further operations due to wound dehiscence or necrosis, with 2 of them as a result of increased immunosuppressive therapy. 5 out of 8 patients needed no further surgical treatment.Conclusions: Both the perioperative drug therapy and the reconstructive surgery concept need to be determined carefully in each individual case of the immunocompromised patients. Thus, the appropriate point in time of operation to achieve the best possible wound healing as well as the complexity of the procedure will require the consideration of a ‘less is more’ strategy in selected cases.

  4. A comparative study of clinical manifestations caused by tuberculosis in immunocompromised and non-immunocompromised patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵长周; 瞿介明; 何礼贤

    2003-01-01

    Objective To characterize the differences between clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients (ICPs) and non-immunocompromised patients (non-ICPs) with tuberculosis.Methods Underlying diseases, clinical presentations, misdiagnosis, treatment and prognosis, etc, were analyzed retrospectively in 115 tuberculosis patients, including 39 ICPs and 76 non-ICPs.Results Compared with non-ICPs, the individuals who were ICP had more expectoration (64.1% vs 35.5%), pulmonary moist rale (41.0% vs 9.2%), miliary pulmonary tuberculosis (30.8% vs 2.6%), pleural effusion (48.7% vs 25.0%) and lymphadenopathy (18.0% vs 4.0 %). ICPs had less lung cavity (15.4% vs 22.4%) and pleural thickening (15.4% vs 23.7%) compared to non-ICPs. Pulmonary tuberculosis in ICPs was prone to be misdiagnosed as pneumonia (23.1% vs 6.6%). Pulmonary tuberculosis was found in the apicoposterior segment (SI+SII) in more cases in non-ICPs (21.7%, 10/46) than ICPs (10.3%, 3/29). The diagnostic value of tuberculin skin test and adenosine deaminase in pleural effusions was limited in ICPs. ICPs had significantly poorer prognoses than non-ICPs.Conclusion The clinical manifestations of ICPs with tuberculosis are atypical, misdiagnosis often occurs, resulting in a worse prognosis.

  5. Pulmonary fungal infection: Imaging findings in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients

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    Chong, Semin [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: kyungs.lee@samsung.com; Yi, Chin A [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung Jin [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Sung [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joungho [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in North America, and is followed by coccidioidomycosis and blastomycosis. Although the majority of these infections in immunocompetent persons are self-limited, some patients can develop severe pneumonitis or various forms of chronic pulmonary infection. Cryptococcoci, Aspergillus, Candidas, and Mucorals are ubiquitous organisms, which may affect immunocompromised patients. Specific imaging findings can be expected, depending on the organisms involved, underlying patients' conditions (immune status), and specific situations after immune depleting procedures.

  6. Some Aspects of Protozoan Infections in Immunocompromised Patients: A Review

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    Ferreira Marcelo Simão

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoa are among the most important pathogens that can cause infections in immunocompromised hosts. These microorganisms particularly infect individuals with impaired cellular immunity, such as those with hematological neoplasias, renal or heart transplant patients, patients using high doses of corticosteroids, and patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The protozoa that most frequently cause disease in immunocompromised patients are Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi, different Leishmania species, and Cryptosporidium parvum; the first two species cause severe acute meningoencephalitis and acute myocarditis, Leishmania sp. causes mucocutaneous or visceral disease, and Cryptosporidium can lead to chronic diarrhea with hepatobiliary involvement. Various serological, parasitological, histological and molecular methods for the diagnosis of these infections are currently available and early institution of specific therapy for each of these organisms is a basic measure to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these infections.

  7. Herpes zoster infection, vaccination and immunocompromised rheumatology patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Mortimer B

    2013-01-01

    Varicella is a self-limiting and relatively mild disease of childhood, although it is frequently more severe and complicated among the immunocompromised rheumatology patients on immunomodulator therapies. In addition, future reactivation of the dormant virus in dorsal root ganglia may cause herpes zoster infection, which can be very debilitating. In this manuscript, we discuss the nature of this infection along with its potential vaccine especially among rheumatology patients.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin in critically ill immunocompromised patients

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    Legriel Stéphane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognizing infection is crucial in immunocompromised patients with organ dysfunction. Our objective was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT in critically ill immunocompromised patients. Methods This prospective, observational study included patients with suspected sepsis. Patients were classified into one of three diagnostic groups: no infection, bacterial sepsis, and nonbacterial sepsis. Results We included 119 patients with a median age of 54 years (interquartile range [IQR], 42-68 years. The general severity (SAPSII and organ dysfunction (LOD scores on day 1 were 45 (35-62.7 and 4 (2-6, respectively, and overall hospital mortality was 32.8%. Causes of immunodepression were hematological disorders (64 patients, 53.8%, HIV infection (31 patients, 26%, and solid cancers (26 patients, 21.8%. Bacterial sepsis was diagnosed in 58 patients and nonbacterial infections in nine patients (7.6%; 52 patients (43.7% had no infection. PCT concentrations on the first ICU day were higher in the group with bacterial sepsis (4.42 [1.60-22.14] vs. 0.26 [0.09-1.26] ng/ml in patients without bacterial infection, P 0.5 ng/ml had 100% sensitivity but only 63% specificity for diagnosing bacterial sepsis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was 0.851 (0.78-0.92. In multivariate analyses, PCT concentrations > 0.5 ng/ml on day 1 independently predicted bacterial sepsis (odds ratio, 8.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.53-29.3; P = 0.0006. PCT concentrations were not significantly correlated with hospital mortality. Conclusion Despite limited specificity in critically ill immunocompromised patients, PCT concentrations may help to rule out bacterial infection.

  9. Necrotizing gastritis due to Bacillus cereus in an immunocompromised patient.

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    Le Scanff, J; Mohammedi, I; Thiebaut, A; Martin, O; Argaud, L; Robert, D

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly being acknowledged as a serious bacterial pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of acute necrotizing gastritis caused by B. cereus in a 37-year-old woman with acute myeloblastic leukemia, who recovered following total parenteral nutrition and treatment with imipenem and vancomycin. B. cereus was isolated from gastric mucosa and blood cultures. Up to now, no case of acute necrotizing gastritis due to this organism has been reported.

  10. Intestinal parasites infection among immunocompromised patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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    Al-Megrin, Wafa A I

    2010-04-15

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among immunocompromised patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Fecal samples were collected from 136 immunocompromised patients (52 females and 84 males), aged 2 to 69 years. Specimens were fixed with 10% formalin for 30 min (2-3 g fecal(-1)) and then concentrated by a formalin-ether sedimentation technique. Samples were examined as wet saline mounts and in iodine preparation for detection of protozoan oocysts, cysts, helminthic eggs and larvae. Permanent stained smears were performed for intestinal coccidian parasites by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique and the modified trichrome stain. Intestinal parasites were detected in 54 (39.7%) most of them (25.7%) were with diarrhea. More specifically the following parasites were detected Cryptosporidium parvum 11(8.1%), Giardia lamblia 9 (6.6%), Cyclospora cayetanensis 8 (5.9%), Blastocystis hominis 7 (5.2%), Entamoeba histolytica 7 (5.2%), Entamoeba coli 5 (3.7%), Strongyloides stercoralis 3 (2.2%), Ascaris lumbricoides 1 (0.7%), Hymenolepis nana 1 (0.7%), Dicrocoelium dendriticum 1 (0.7%) and Hook worm 1 (0.7%). The most common parasite associated with diarrhea in patients, was C. parvum (p < 0.001), followed by G. lamblia, C. cayetanensis and E. histolytica. However, differences between different age groups were statistically non-significant. Similarly, no significant difference in the infection rate were found between male and female patients.

  11. Immunocompromised patients and their pets: still best friends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of immunosuppressive human diseases and therapies in the last decades has raised the question of the risks and benefits for this group of patients deriving from their interaction with pets and the necessity to balance them in the best interest of the pet owner. Risks are related to the possibility of contracting zoonotic infections that are more severe and occasionally lethal in immunocompromised patients. To mitigate the risks and allow the owner to keep the pet, guidelines have been devised. The cooperation and communication between the owner, the physician and the veterinarian are fundamental for a rational approach in evaluating of the potential health risks associated with pets as sources of zoonotic diseases. The final decision should, however, be made by the owner, who alone will enjoy the benefits of the relationship but also be the one to bear the consequences.

  12. Cutaneous Paecilomyces lilacinus infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahindokht Bassiri-Jahromi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paecilomyces is a genus of saprophytic fungus that has been associated, in rare instances, with human disease. We report two cases in which Paecilomyces lilacinus was isolated from cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions in an immunocompromised and an immunocompetent host. The first case was a subcutaneous infection due to P. lilacinus in a patient with a renal transplant and diabetes mellitus. The second case was an immunocompetent young woman who developed a cutaneous infection, with no identified predisposing factors. A biopsy from each patient provided an initial diagnosis of fungal elements in the tissues under examination and multiple positive fungal cultures were obtained from the tissue biopsy samples. Both microscopic and macroscopic examinations of the biopsy revealed the presence of P. lilacinus. Each of the two cases was successfully treated with oral ketoconazole (200 mg/day and itraconazole. We also review previously reported cases in which the clinical history and response to therapy were noted.

  13. Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis in an immunocompromised young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jessie; Kent, Paul; Lennon, Joshua M; Logan, Latania K

    2015-09-16

    Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivitis is an acute onset disease characterised by ulceration, necrosis, pain and bleeding in gingival surfaces. It is predominantly seen in severely malnourished children and young adults with advanced HIV infection. We present a unique presentation in a young adult with high-grade osteogenic sarcoma.

  14. Primary breast lymphoma in an immunocompromised male patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Bong Guk; Park, Jeong Seon; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Kim, Soo Yeon; Jang, Ki Seok [Hanyang University Medical Center, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Young; Choi, Yun Young [Dept. of Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Primary breast lymphoma in a male patient is extremely rare. We report a case of primary breast lymphoma in an immunocompromised male patient, after renal transplantation. The sonographic and histological features are described in depth.

  15. Live attenuated varicella vaccine use in immunocompromised children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S P; Gelb, L

    1986-10-01

    Live attenuated varicella vaccine has been administered to 307 children with leukemia in remission and to 86 healthy adults. The vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic. The major side effect in leukemic children receiving maintenance chemotherapy was development of a vaccine-associated rash. Vaccinees in whom a rash developed were potentially somewhat infectious to others about 1 month after immunization. Vaccination was not associated with an increase in the incidence of herpes zoster or in relapse of leukemia. Vaccination provided excellent protection against severe varicella. It was associated with a significant decrease in the attack rate of chickenpox following an intimate exposure to varicella-zoster virus, conferring about 80% protection in leukemic children. The cases of breakthrough varicella that occurred were mild. Thus, the vaccine may either prevent or modify varicella in high-risk individuals. It may also have use for prevention of nosocomial varicella.

  16. Epidemiology of Norovirus Infection Among Immunocompromised Patients at a Tertiary Care Research Hospital, 2010–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Bok, Karin; Prevots, D. Rebecca; Binder, Alison M.; Parra, Gabriel I.; Strollo, Sara; Fahle, Gary A.; Behrle-Yardley, Allison; Johnson, Jordan A.; Levenson, Eric A.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Holland, Steven M.; Palmore, Tara N.; Green, Kim Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Noroviruses are a major cause of infectious gastroenteritis worldwide, and viruses can establish persistent infection in immunocompromised individuals. Risk factors and transmission in this population are not fully understood. Methods.  From 2010 through 2013, we conducted a retrospective review among immunocompromised patients (n = 268) enrolled in research studies at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center and identified a subset of norovirus-positive patients (n = 18...

  17. Rhinocerebral Mucor circinelloides infection in immunocompromised patient following yogurt ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Stephen P; Lukaszewicz, Jennifer M; Persad, Kamleish A; Reinhardt, John F

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this case report is to illustrate the cause of this patient's headache and sinus pain in the setting of a unique environmental exposure: the patient ingested yogurt only days before presentation. This particular brand of yogurt caused controversy in early September 2013 when the manufacturer voluntarily recalled all flavors. The yogurt was found to be contaminated with Mucor circinelloides. The recall was triggered by the FDA, after receiving many complaints from consumers affected by temporary gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal cramping, diarrhea, and nausea. This patient was diagnosed with Rhinocerebral mucormycosis through fungal culture of the affected area. He was specifically colonized with Mucor circinelloides, a variant that rarely causes disease in humans. According to a literature review, only eight cases of mucormycosis in adults caused by this strain were documented before 2009.

  18. Herpesvirus Respiratory Infections in Immunocompromised Patients: Epidemiology, Management, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gail E; Lynch, Joseph P; Weigt, Samuel; Sayah, David; Belperio, John A; Grim, Shellee A; Clark, Nina M

    2016-08-01

    Among immunocompromised individuals, members of the human Herpesviridae family are frequently encountered pathogens. Cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, varicella zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesvirus-6, -7, and -8 all establish latency after infection and can reactivate during periods of immunosuppression, leading to both direct and indirect adverse effects on the host including severe organ dysfunction as well as allograft rejection and loss after transplantation. While not all herpesviruses are primary respiratory pathogens, many of their manifestations include involvement of the respiratory tract. This article discusses the individual viruses, their epidemiology, and clinical manifestations as well as recommended treatment and preventive strategies.

  19. Serotype Distribution, Antibiotic Resistance and Clonality of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Immunocompromised Patients in Tunisia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Raddaoui

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally, has higher incidence among young children, the elderly and the immunocompromised of all ages. In Tunisia, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs are not included in the national immunization program. Also, few studies have described the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in this country and, in particular, no molecular typing studies have been performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and clonality of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from neutropenic patients in Tunisia.Fifty-nine S. pneumoniae were isolated from infection (n = 31 and colonization (n = 28 sites of patients (children and adults attending the National Centre of Bone Marrow Transplantation in Tunis between 2005-2011. All isolates were characterized by serotype, antimicrobial resistance pattern and multilocus sequence typing (MLST.The majority (66.1% of the isolates belonged to five serotypes all included in PCVs: 6B, 9V, 14, 19F and 23F. The potential coverage of the 10-valent and 13-valent PCV was of 71.2% and 76.3% respectively. Resistance rates were very high and 69.5% of the isolates were multidrug resistant: non-susceptibility rates to penicillin, amoxicillin and cefotaxime were 66.1%, 40.7% and 27.1%, respectively; resistance rates to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, were 69.5%, 61.0%, 37.3%, 22.0% and 67.8%, respectively. The most frequent serotypes had STs characteristic of multidrug resistant international clones known to be highly successful and important causes of pneumococcal infection: Spain 23F-ST81, France 9V/14-ST156, Spain 6B-ST90, 19F-ST320, and Portugal 19F-ST177.The majority of S. pneumoniae strains recovered from immunocompromised patients in Tunisia are representatives of multidrug resistant pandemic clones that express serotypes targeted by PCVs. To contain the burden of

  20. The Giant Condyloma (Buschke-Löwenstein Tumor in the Immunocompromised Patient

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    Andrew L. Atkinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since Buschke and Löwenstein first described the giant condyloma in 1925 (which subsequently was named Buschke-Löwenstein tumor, there have been scattered reports over the past 90 years describing presentation and different avenues of treatment for patients with this condition. It is well known that immunocompromised individuals are at an increased risk of anogenital disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV. In this report, we present the management of two HIV positive patients with giant condylomas. Both patients presented with urinary outflow obstruction and sepsis. Though giant condylomas are a rare phenomenon, these two cases underscore the importance of early treatment intervention, especially in the immunocompromised patient.

  1. Management and Prevention of Herpes Zoster in the Immunocompromised Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient: A Clinical Quandary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté-Daigneault, Justin; Peerani, Farhad; MacMahon, Eithne; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Rahier, Jean-François; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the 2 main clinical phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are diseases that result from a dysregulated immune response to gut microbiota in genetically susceptible hosts. This aberrant immune response may intrinsically predispose IBD patients to infectious complications. Moreover, immunosuppressive medications used to treat IBD including corticosteroids, thiopurines, methotrexate, calcineurin inhibitors, anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents and other biologics, further increase patients' susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Herpes zoster (HZ), also known as shingles, is an opportunistic viral reactivation often observed in IBD patients with several case reports demonstrating complicated or disseminated disease in those on immunosuppression. While HZ vaccination is recommended in all immunocompetent adults aged ≥60 years, as a live virus vaccine, it is currently contraindicated in IBD patients on anti-TNF therapy and in other significantly immunocompromised patient groups. While caution is still warranted in these circumstances, recent clinical data has emerged which has prompted us to review and examine the universal approach to HZ vaccination in the immunosuppressed IBD population. In the following narrative review, we will discuss and provide an overview of the clinical manifestations, incidence, management and prevention of HZ in the IBD patient.

  2. Relationship between Radiological Stages and Prognoses of Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Non-AIDS Immunocompromised Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Dong Mu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Based on the radiological manifestations, the course of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients can be divided into three stages: early stage, mid stage, and late stage. The prognoses of patients treated at early stage are good, and those at late stage are poor. Furthermore, the CFR of patients with barotrauma is high.

  3. A case report on management of synergistic gangrene following an incisional abdominal hernia repair in an immunocompromised obese patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Merali

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case has demonstrated how a planned multidisciplinary action can produce prosperous results in a severely obese immunocompromised patient with an SSI, following an incisional hernia repair.

  4. Lesion mimicking perianal abscess in an immunocompromised patient: Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranzazu Calero-Lillo

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Intramuscular administration of drugs should be avoided in patients with thrombocytopenia. Gluteal region is connected to perianal area through the sciatic notch. Usually perianal abscess in immunocompromised patients arise from proctologic origin, but other causes may be taken into account.

  5. Genotyping and molecular analysis of Enterocytozoon bieneusi isolated from immunocompromised patients in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjalali, Hamed; Mirhendi, Hossein; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Mohebali, Mehdi; Askari, Zeynab; Mirsamadi, Elnaz Sadat; Rezaeian, Mostafa

    2015-12-01

    Microsporidia are known as opportunistic unicellular pathogens, particularly so in individuals with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency. Enterocytozoon bieneusi is one of the most common species infecting both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of E. bieneusi genotypes among immunocompromised patients in Iran. From 329 stool samples referred for parasitological analysis during 2011-2014, 14 samples from immunocompromised patients proving positive for E. bieneusi by SSU rDNA analysis were selected. Genotyping was carried out using specific primers targeting the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region. Subsequently, all samples were sequenced and results queried against the GenBank database. Moreover, sequences were subject to phylogenetic analysis. The expected amplification product was generated for all samples. Genotype D was identified in patients with HIV+/AIDS, transplant recipients, and cancer patients, while Genotype E was identified only in cancer and HIV+/AIDS patients. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that there was no relationship between genotypes and types of immunosuppression, whereas most genotype D isolates grouped with those described previously from cattle, horses, birds, and humans. E. bieneusi genotype D appears to be the most frequent genotype in immunocompromised patients, while Genotype E was observed only in HIV+/AIDS patients and cancer patients, not transplant recipients.

  6. Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Immunocompromised Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Dong; Liu, Huan-Huan; Ma, Zhan-Xi; Ma, Hong-Yu; Li, Zhong-Yu; Yang, Zhi-Bin; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Xu, Bin; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii has been suggested as an important opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We conducted a global meta-analysis to assess the prevalence and odds ratios (ORs) of T. gondii infection in immunocompromised individuals. Electronic databases were reviewed for T. gondii infection in HIV/AIDS patients, cancer patients, and transplant recipients, and meta-analyses were conducted to calculate overall estimated prevalence and ORs using random or fixed-effects models. Totally, 72 eligible studies were included. The estimated pooled prevalence of T. gondii infection in immunocompromised patients and the control was 35.9 and 24.7% (p HIV/AIDS patients and the control (p 0.05), whose estimated pooled ORs were 1.92 (95% CI, 1.44–2.55), 2.89 (95% CI, 2.36–3.55), and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.16–1.95), respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate that the immunocompromised patients are associated with higher odds of T. gondii infection, and appropriate prevention and control measures are highly recommended for these susceptible populations.

  7. Clinical evaluation of QuantiFERON TB-2G test for immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Y; Mouri, K; Obase, Y; Fukuda, M; Miyashita, N; Oka, M

    2007-11-01

    The usefulness of the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON TB-2G (QFT-TB) test were compared in immunocompromised patients. The subjects consisted of 252 immunocompromised patients who were clinically suspected of tuberculosis (TB) infection between April 2005 and December 2006. Regarding the underlying diseases, 74 subjects had malignant diseases, 72 were undergoing immunosuppressive treatment, 52 had diabetes mellitus, 50 had chronic renal failure and four had HIV infection. While the positive rate of the QFT-TB test for the diagnosis of TB infection (TB disease or latent TB infection) was 78.1%, that of TST for TB infection was 50.0%. The QFT-TB test was significantly better than TST. However, 32 (13%) patients had an indeterminate QFT-TB result. Indeterminate findings were significantly more frequent in patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment (28%), especially with lymphocytopaenia in the peripheral blood, than in those who had other underlying diseases. While TST-positive and QFT-TB test-negative results were recognised in immunocompromised patients with bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination or nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, TST-negative and QFT-TB test-positive results were recognised in immunocompromised patients with a past history of TB infection. It was concluded that the QuantiFERON TB-2G test is a more useful diagnostic method for tuberculosis infection than tuberculin skin test for immunocompromised patients suspected of tuberculosis disease. However, because the results of the QuantiFERON TB-2G test show an indeterminate response for patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment, especially for those with lymphocytopaenia due to severe underlying diseases, care must be taken in the interpretation of the QuantiFERON TB-2G test for these patients.

  8. Epidemiology of Norovirus Infection Among Immunocompromised Patients at a Tertiary Care Research Hospital, 2010–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Karin; Prevots, D. Rebecca; Binder, Alison M.; Parra, Gabriel I.; Strollo, Sara; Fahle, Gary A.; Behrle-Yardley, Allison; Johnson, Jordan A.; Levenson, Eric A.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Holland, Steven M.; Palmore, Tara N.; Green, Kim Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Noroviruses are a major cause of infectious gastroenteritis worldwide, and viruses can establish persistent infection in immunocompromised individuals. Risk factors and transmission in this population are not fully understood. Methods. From 2010 through 2013, we conducted a retrospective review among immunocompromised patients (n = 268) enrolled in research studies at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center and identified a subset of norovirus-positive patients (n = 18) who provided stool specimens for norovirus genotyping analysis. Results. Norovirus genome was identified by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction in stools of 35 (13%) of the 268 immunocompromised patients tested, and infection prevalence was 21% (11 of 53) in persons with primary immune deficiencies and 12% (20 of 166) among persons with solid tumors or hematologic malignancies. Among 18 patients with norovirus genotyping information, norovirus GII.4 was the most prevalent genotype (14 of 18, 78%). Persistent norovirus infection (≥6 months) was documented in 8 of 18 (44%) individuals. Phylogenetic analysis of the GII.4 capsid protein sequences identified at least 5 now-displaced GII.4 variant lineages, with no evidence of their nosocomial transmission in the Clinical Center. Conclusions. Norovirus was a leading enteric pathogen identified in this immunocompromised population. Both acute and chronic norovirus infections were observed, and these were likely community-acquired. Continued investigation will further define the role of noroviruses in these patients and inform efforts toward prevention and treatment. PMID:27800529

  9. Disseminated Legionella pneumophila infection in an immunocompromised patient treated with tigecycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valve, Kirsi; Vaalasti, Annikki; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Vuento, Risto

    2010-01-01

    We describe an immunocompromised patient with disseminated Legionella pneumophila infection. A chronic leg ulcer was probably the port of entry for the infection. Treatment required several operations and prolonged antimicrobial treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of Legionella soft tissue infection and pneumonia treated with tigecycline.

  10. Deep dermatophyte infection with chronic draining nodules in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidovich, C W; Kornfeld, B W; Gentry, R H; Fitzpatrick, J E

    1995-04-01

    Chronic superficial dermatophyte infection may predispose the immunocompromised patient to invasive or disseminated involvement. We report a case of deep dermatophyte infection in a patient treated with long-term corticosteroid therapy for lung disease. The patient responded well to oral griseofulvin. Previously reported cases are reviewed along with recent investigative findings in the pathogenesis of chronic dermatophyte infections. Recommendations are made for diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Outcomes of early administration of cidofovir in non-immunocompromised patients with severe adenovirus pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Jin Kim

    Full Text Available The benefits of treatment with antiviral therapy for severe adenovirus (AdV pneumonia are not well established. We described the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of early cidofovir treatment of severe AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients diagnosed with severe AdV pneumonia between 2012 and 2014. A total of seven non-immunocompromised patients with severe AdV pneumonia were identified, and all isolates typed (n = 6 were human AdV-B55. All patients had progressive respiratory failure with lobar consolidation with or without patchy ground glass opacity. Three patients required vasopressors and mechanical ventilation. All patients had abnormal laboratory findings including: leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, or elevated liver enzymes. After admission, all patients received antiviral therapy with cidofovir, and the median time from admission to cidofovir administration was 48 h and median the time from onset of symptoms to cidofovir administration was 7.1 days. After cidofovir administration, complete symptomatic improvement occurred after a median of 12 days and radiographic resolution occurred after a median of 21 days. Consequently, all patients completely improved without complications. Our data suggest that early administration of cidofovir in the course of treatment for respiratory failure as a result of AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients could be a treatment strategy worth considering, especially in cases of HAdV-55 infection.

  12. Outcomes of early administration of cidofovir in non-immunocompromised patients with severe adenovirus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Jin; Kim, Kang; Park, Sung Bum; Hong, Duck Jin; Jhun, Byung Woo

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of treatment with antiviral therapy for severe adenovirus (AdV) pneumonia are not well established. We described the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of early cidofovir treatment of severe AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients diagnosed with severe AdV pneumonia between 2012 and 2014. A total of seven non-immunocompromised patients with severe AdV pneumonia were identified, and all isolates typed (n = 6) were human AdV-B55. All patients had progressive respiratory failure with lobar consolidation with or without patchy ground glass opacity. Three patients required vasopressors and mechanical ventilation. All patients had abnormal laboratory findings including: leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, or elevated liver enzymes. After admission, all patients received antiviral therapy with cidofovir, and the median time from admission to cidofovir administration was 48 h and median the time from onset of symptoms to cidofovir administration was 7.1 days. After cidofovir administration, complete symptomatic improvement occurred after a median of 12 days and radiographic resolution occurred after a median of 21 days. Consequently, all patients completely improved without complications. Our data suggest that early administration of cidofovir in the course of treatment for respiratory failure as a result of AdV pneumonia in non-immunocompromised patients could be a treatment strategy worth considering, especially in cases of HAdV-55 infection.

  13. Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycoplasma arginini in an Immunocompromised Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Mayumi; Hitomi, Shigemi; Goto, Miki; Hasegawa, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma arginini, an organism usually recovered from mammals, was isolated from the blood of a febrile patient with advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient's condition improved without administration of antimycoplasmal drugs. Simulation of blood culture showed that automated blood culture instruments may fail to detect the organism.

  14. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of lung infections in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franquet, Tomas [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Thoracic Radiology Section, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-03-15

    Non-AIDS immunocompromised patients are susceptible to infections by a wide range of organisms. In the past several decades, advances in the treatment of cancer, organ transplantation, and immunosuppressive therapy have resulted in large numbers of patients who develop abnormalities in their immune system. Moreover, mildly impaired host immunity as it occurs in chronic debilitating illness, diabetes mellitus, malnutrition, alcoholism, advanced age, prolonged corticosteroid administration, and chronic obstructive lung disease have also been regarded as predisposing factors of pulmonary infections. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and management of patients with pulmonary infectious diseases. When pulmonary infection is suspected, knowledge of the varied radiographic manifestations will narrow the differential diagnosis, helping to direct additional diagnostic measures and serving as an ideal tool for follow-up examinations. Combination of pattern recognition with knowledge of the clinical setting is the best approach to pulmonary infection occurring in the immunocompromised patients. (orig.)

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Mimicking Bullous Disease in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L.Y. Lecluse

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient patients are at risk of developing extended or atypical herpes simplex virus infections, which can be easily misdiagnosed. We present the case of a 79-year-old, treatment-induced (oral corticosteroid, immunocompromised female with an extensive atypical herpes simplex virus infection. This patient presented with multiple erosions and vesicles on the trunk with a subacute onset. The clinical differential diagnosis was herpes simplex infection, herpes zoster infection, pemphigus vulgaris or bullous pemphigoid. Due to the atypical clinical presentation and negative Tzanck test, suspicion of viral infection was low. High-dose steroid treatment was initiated. Subsequent histopathology, however, showed a herpes simplex virus infection. After discontinuing steroid treatment and initiating antiviral treatment, the patient recovered within a week. Emphasis must be placed on the importance of clinical awareness of extended and clinically atypical herpes simplex infections in immunocompromised patients. A negative Tzanck test does not rule out the possibility of a herpes infection.

  16. Polyomaviruses KI and WU in immunocompromised patients with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourez, Thomas; Bergeron, Anne; Ribaud, Patricia; Scieux, Catherine; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Tazi, Abdellatif; Socié, Gérard; Simon, François; LeGoff, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Polyomaviruses KI (KIPyV) and WU (WUPyV) were recently identified, mainly in respiratory specimens from children. Among 200 patients with respiratory disorders admitted to Saint Louis Hospital, Paris, France, KIPyV was detected in 8% and WUPyV in 1%. KIPyV was significantly more frequent among human stem cell transplant patients (17.8% vs. 5.1%; p = 0.01).

  17. [Comparative study of the Candida albicans genotypes isolated from immunocompromised patients and health carriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnovale, S; Elias Costa, M R; Relloso, S; Negroni, R; Negroni, M B; Iovannitti, C

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Candida albicans strain genotype isolates from oral cavity of immunocompromised patients due to different immunologic impairments with apparently normal carriers. Four populations were studied: 1) HIV positive hospitalized patients, 2) HIV negative immunocompromised patients (leukemia, lymphoma, organ transplant recipients), 3) drug addicts prior to AIDS pandemia in Argentina, 4) apparently normal carriers. DNA extracted was digested with the enzyme Eco RI, electrophoresed, transferred to nitrocellulose membrane and hybridized with the 27A probe labelled with 32P. The comparison between the profiles obtained permitted the differentiation of 16 genotypes. The distribution of the strains led to the conclusion that: a) all the isolated strains from AIDS patients were closely related and distributed in only three genotypes (1, 3, 11); b) a major genetic relationship between the isolates from AIDS patients and HIV negative immunocompromised patients was observed; c) strains from carriers showed a minor genetic similarity with those obtained from AIDS patients; d) characteristic profiles belonging to any of the studied groups were not found; e) significant genomic changes have not been observed during the last twenty years.

  18. Prevalence of Campylobacter concisus in diarrhoea of immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Permin, Henrik; On, Stephen L.W.;

    2002-01-01

    The importance of Campylobacter species other than C. jejuni/coli in diarrhoeal disease is largely unknown. We wished to determine the prevalence and clinical presentation of C. concisus infection in patients with enteric disease in a tertiary hospital. Stool specimens were routinely tested...... for the presence of Campylobacter species, by use of the filter isolation method. The medical records of the C. concisus-positive patients were reviewed. Of 224 Campylobacter isolates obtained, 110 were identified as C. concisus. Concomitant infection occurred in only 27% of cases. 13 means of protein profiling we...

  19. Human Papillomavirus Infection and p16 Expression in Extragenital/Extraungual Bowen Disease in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švajdler, Marián; Mezencev, Roman; Kašpírková, Jana; Kacerovská, Denisa; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Ondič, Ondrej; Michal, Michal

    2016-10-01

    An increased rate of second nonmelanoma skin cancers is found in immunocompromised patients. Epidemiological and molecular data implicate ultraviolet radiation as the major risk factor. In addition, there is increasing evidence supporting the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of premalignant and malignant skin lesions in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. In a retrospective cross-sectional study, the authors examined the expression of p16 by immunohistochemistry and the presence of mucosal (α-genus) and cutaneous/epidermodysplasia verruciformis (β-genus) HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction in 29 biopsy specimens of extragenital/extraungual Bowen disease (BD) from 24 Eastern European white immunocompromised patients. Furthermore, the author evaluated the association between the expression of p16 protein and the presence of HPV DNA. Among 25 specimens from 21 patients evaluable by polymerase chain reaction, HPV DNA was detected in 10 (40%) BD lesions from 9 patients. Beta-HPV predominated over alpha-HPV types. Among 29 immunohistochemically evaluable BD specimens, 22 lesions (∼76%) from 20 patients were scored as p16 positive. HPV DNA-positive and HPV DNA-negative lesions displayed the same proportion of p16 positivity (80%) and no correlation was found between the HPV DNA presence and the p16 expression status. Our pilot study demonstrated that β-HPV infections predominate in BD cases diagnosed among immunocompromised patients, although high- and low-risk mucosal (alpha) HPV genotypes may be detected in a minority of cases. In contrast to anogenital HPV-associated lesions, positive p16 expression is not a reliable marker of high-risk α-HPV infection in BD cases, as it can be also detected in β-HPV infected and HPV-negative cases.

  20. Amphotericin B colloidal dispersion for treatment of candidemia in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskin, G A; Pietrelli, L; Coffey, G; Gurwith, M; Liang, L J

    1998-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion (ABCD; Amphotec, Sequus Pharmaceuticals, Menlo Park, CA), a lipid complex of amphotericin B, were evaluated in immunocompromised patients with candidemia. These patients were recruited from five open-label clinical trials of ABCD therapy for fungal infections subsequent to bone marrow transplantation, hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, solid-organ transplantation, or other severe underlying disorders. ABCD was given intravenously in a median daily dose of 3.9 mg/kg for or =1 mg/dL or a > or =50% decrease in calculated creatinine clearance. On average, there were no significant changes in the levels of serum creatinine or bilirubin from baseline to the end of treatment. In conclusion, ABCD was safe and effective for treating immunocompromised patients with candidemia.

  1. Toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Daryani, Ahmad; Sharif, Mahdi; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Aarabi, Mohsen; Mizani, Azadeh; Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi; Shokri, Azar

    2014-12-15

    Although toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent individuals is generally asymptomatic, in immunocompromised patients (HIV/AIDS, cancer, and transplant patients), it can lead to serious pathological effects. This study included a systematic review and meta-analysis to comprehensively assess the seroprevalence rate of Toxoplasma infection in immunocompromised patients in Iran. Electronic English and Persian databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Magiran, Scientific Information Database [SID], IranMedex, and IranDoc), parasitology congresses, and projects and theses of Iranian medical universities, were systematically searched from 1997 to 2013 (published or unpublished data). In this paper, several studies that used serological methods for diagnosis of toxoplasmosis were selected. Analysis of seroprevalence estimates was pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. Twenty-two studies, comprising 2,805 individuals, were included in the meta-analysis. Overall seroprevalence rate of Toxoplasma infection in Iranian immunocompromised patients was 50.01% (95% confidence interval, 43.85 to 56.17); however, there was significant heterogeneity among study groups. The results showed that seroprevalence rate of toxoplasmosis among transplant recipients, HIV/AIDS, and cancer patients in Iran was 55.1%, 50.05%, and 45.06%, respectively. In addition, IgM seroprevalence rate was estimated to be 4.85% (95% confidence interval, 2.22 to 8.41). This systematic review and meta-analysis identified a high seroprevalence rate of Toxoplasma infection among immunocompromised patients (50%). Consideration of management, design and provision of appropriate control measures of toxoplasmosis is highly recommended.

  2. Plasma protein C levels in immunocompromised septic patients are significantly lower than immunocompetent septic patients: a prospective cohort study

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    Bird Robert

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Activated Protein C [APC] improves outcome in immunocompetent patients with severe sepsis particularly in those who are perceived to have high mortality risk. Before embarking on a trial of APC administration in immunocompromised septic patients, a preliminary study on plasma levels of protein C in this cohort is essential. Objective To assess serum Protein C concentrations in immunocompromised patients as compared to immunocompetent patients during sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock and recovery. Methods Prospective cohort study in a tertiary hospital. Patients satisfying inclusion criteria were enrolled after informed consent. Clinical variables were noted with sample collection when patients met criteria for sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock and recovery. Protein C levels were measured using monoclonal antibody based fluorescence immunoassay. Results Thirty one patients participated in this study (22 immunocompromised, 9 immunocompetent. Protein C levels were found to be significantly lower in the immunocompromised group compared to the immunocompetent group, particularly observed in severe sepsis [2.27 (95% CI: 1.63-2.9 vs 4.19 (95% CI: 2.87-5.52 mcg/ml] (p = 0.01 and sepsis [2.59 (95% CI: 1.98-3.21 vs 3.64 (95% CI: 2.83-4.45 mcg/ml] (p = 0.03. SOFA scores were similar in both the groups across sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock categories. Protein C levels improved significantly in recovery (p = 0.001 irrespective of immune status. Conclusion Protein C levels were significantly lower in immunocompromised patients when compared to immunocompetent patients in severe sepsis and sepsis categories. Our study suggests a plausible role for APC in severely septic immunocompromised patients which need further elucidation.

  3. Deep-Seated Fungal Infections in Immunocompromised Patients in Iran before and after Treatments

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    Shahindokht Bassiri Jahromi Ali Asghar Khaksar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades or so, the incidence of fungal infections has increased dramatically. Deep- seated mycoses are creating serious problems for clinicians working with certain populations of patients, such as those with cancer, the immunocompromised, and physiologically compromised.A study of fungal isolated for identification of deep fungal infections, risk factors and etiologic agents in immunocompromised patients was carried out in the section of Medical Mycology, Pasteur Institute of Iran from 1994 to 2001. Eighty two immunosupressed patients with deep fungal infection were retrospectively analyzed for etiology and risk factors. They had one or more predisposing factors to disseminated fungal infections. Diagnosis was established by demonstration of fungus in direct and cultural examinations. Candida spp. were isolated in 67% (36.5% C. albicans and 30.5% non-albincans, and Aspergillus spp. were isolated in 15% of cases. The most frequent risk factors were hematologic malignancy (ALL, lymphoma, Hodgkin, multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus. This study suggests that in immunocompromised patients, fungal infections especially in saprophytic infections, back ground evaluation and clinical features, correspondence of clinical symptoms and laboratory examinations should be considered and investigation of other factors which created the infection will lead us to a clear picture of patients situation.

  4. Invasive facial fungal infections: Orofacial soft-tissue infiltration in immunocompromised patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Peter; Russell, Matthew; El-Sayed, Ivan; Dillon, William; Glastonbury, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Invasive facial fungal infections affect the orofacial soft tissues in immunocompromised patients and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Primary infection occurs from direct inoculation of the skin surface, while secondary infection occurs from extension from an adjacent sinonasal process. The imaging features of secondary infection are similar to acute fulminant invasive fungal sinusitis with infiltration of the orofacial soft tissues in combination with sinonasal disease. Howeve...

  5. Thoracic spinal metastasis of merkel cell carcinoma in an immunocompromised patient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Nicholas A; Thomas, Patricia A; Johnson, Philip L; Anderson, Karen K; Arnold, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), an uncommon cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy, is a rare cause of spinal metastasis, with only five cases previously reported. We report a rare case of MCC metastatic to the spine in an immunocompromised patient. Methods A 55-year-old male with previously resected MCC, immunocompromised due to cardiac transplant, presented with sharp mid-thoracic back pain radiating around the trunk to the midline. Computed tomography of the thoracic spine showed a dorsal epidural mass from T6 to T8 with compression of the spinal cord. Laminectomy and subtotal tumor resection were performed, and pathology confirmed Merkel cell tumor through immunohistochemistry staining positive for cytokeratin 20 and negative for thyroid transcription factor-1. Results Further treatment with radiation therapy was initiated, and the patient did well for 4 months after surgery, but returned with a lesion in the cervical spine. He then opted for hospice care. Conclusions With an increasing number of immunocompromised patients presenting with back pain, MCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal metastatic disease.

  6. Applicability of a real-time quantitative PCR assay for diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus infection in immunocompromised adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elden, L.J. van; Loon, A.M. van; Beek, A.J. van der; Hendriksen, K.A.; Hoepelman, A.I.; Kraaij, M.G.J. van; Schipper, P.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) accounts for the majority of respiratory virus infections, producing high mortality rates in immunocompromised patients with hematologic malignancies. The available methods for the rapid detection of RSV by antigen detection or PCR either lack sensitivity, require c

  7. DIAGNOSIS OF Strongyloides stercoralis INFECTION IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENTS BY SEROLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR METHODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Fabiana Martins de; Malta, Fernanda Mello; Corral, Marcelo Andreetta; Marques, Priscilla Duarte; Gottardi, Maiara; Meisel, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; Yamashiro, Juliana; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Castilho, Vera Lucia Pagliusi; Gonçalves, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2016-09-22

    Strongyloidiasis is a potentially serious infection in immunocompromised patients. Thus, the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic methods is desirable, especially in the context of immunosuppressed patients in whom the diagnosis and treatment of strongyloidiasis is of utmost importance. In this study, serological and molecular tools were used to diagnose Strongyloides stercoralis infections in immunosuppressed patients. Serum and stool samples were obtained from 52 patients. Stool samples were first analyzed by Lutz, Rugai, and Agar plate culture methods, and then by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Serum samples were evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a soluble (AS) or a membrane fractions antigen (AM) obtained from alkaline solutions of the filariform larvae of Strongyloides venezuelensis. Of the 52 immunosuppressed patients, three (5.8%) were positive for S. stercoralis by parasitological methods, compared to two patients (3.8%) and one patient (1.9%) who were detected by ELISA using the AS and the AM antigens, respectively. S. stercoralis DNA was amplified in seven (13.5%) stool samples by qPCR. These results suggest the utility of qPCR as an alternative diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection in immunocompromised patients, considering the possible severity of this helminthiasis in this group of patients.

  8. DIAGNOSIS OF Strongyloides stercoralis INFECTION IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENTS BY SEROLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de PAULA, Fabiana Martins; MALTA, Fernanda Mello; CORRAL, Marcelo Andreetta; MARQUES, Priscilla Duarte; GOTTARDI, Maiara; MEISEL, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; YAMASHIRO, Juliana; PINHO, João Renato Rebello; CASTILHO, Vera Lucia Pagliusi; GONÇALVES, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; GRYSCHEK, Ronaldo César Borges; CHIEFFI, Pedro Paulo

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Strongyloidiasis is a potentially serious infection in immunocompromised patients. Thus, the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic methods is desirable, especially in the context of immunosuppressed patients in whom the diagnosis and treatment of strongyloidiasis is of utmost importance. In this study, serological and molecular tools were used to diagnose Strongyloides stercoralis infections in immunosuppressed patients. Serum and stool samples were obtained from 52 patients. Stool samples were first analyzed by Lutz, Rugai, and Agar plate culture methods, and then by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Serum samples were evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a soluble (AS) or a membrane fractions antigen (AM) obtained from alkaline solutions of the filariform larvae of Strongyloides venezuelensis. Of the 52 immunosuppressed patients, three (5.8%) were positive for S. stercoralis by parasitological methods, compared to two patients (3.8%) and one patient (1.9%) who were detected by ELISA using the AS and the AM antigens, respectively. S. stercoralis DNA was amplified in seven (13.5%) stool samples by qPCR. These results suggest the utility of qPCR as an alternative diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection in immunocompromised patients, considering the possible severity of this helminthiasis in this group of patients. PMID:27680168

  9. Necrotizing Fasciitis of Odontogenic Origin in a Non-Immunocompromised Patient- A Rare Case Report

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    Sulabha A.N.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly spreading infection involving the superficial fat, fascial layers with necrosis of skin and is a disfiguring condition that is fatal. Head and neck is an unusual site which is rarely affected. It is characterized by its fulminating, devastating and rapid progressive course. It usually occurs in patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes mellitus, renal disease, cardiovascular disease, HIV infections etc. A case of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin occurring in a non-immunocompromised patient is reported here who was treated successfully by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy

  10. Rapidly expanding lung abscess caused by Legionella pneumophila in immunocompromised patients: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyara, Takayuki; Tokashiki, Kaori; Shimoji, Tsutomu; Tamaki, Kazunori; Koide, Michio; Saito, Atsushi

    2002-02-01

    We describe two cases of lung abscess caused by Legionella pneumophila in immunocompromised patients. The first case had been treated initially with 60 mg prednisolone for ulcerative colitis, and L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from sputum samples after cavitation of the lung lesion. The second case was diagnosed as plasma cell lymphoma at post-mortem examination. L. pneumophila serogroup 5 was isolated from the contents of lung abscess, together with Enterococcus faecium and Prevotella intermedia in the post-mortem examination. Lung abscess caused by Legionella is unusual. Here, we discuss the difficulty of diagnosis of legionellosis in patients with unusual chest radiographic findings.

  11. Relationship between Radiological Stages and Prognoses of Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Non-AIDS Immunocompromised Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Dong Mu; Peng Jia; Li Gao; Li Su; Cheng Zhang; Ren-Gui Wang; Guang-Fa Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Although radiological features ofpneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) immunocompromised patients have been reported by other authors,there were no studies on the radiological stages of PCP previously.This study aimed to elucidate the radiological stages and prognoses of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients.Methods:Retrospective analysis ofradiological manifestations and prognoses of 105 non-AIDS PCP immunocompromised patients from August 2009 to April 2016 was conducted.Chest radiograph was divided into three stages:early stage (normal or nearly normal chest radiograph),mid stage (bilateral pulmonary infiltrates),and late stage (bilateral pulmonary consolidations);chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was also divided into three stages:early stage (bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacity [GGO]),mid stage (bilateral diffuse GGO and patchy consolidations),and late stage (bilateral diffuse consolidations).Results:The case fatality rate (CFR) of all patients was 34.3% (36/105),all of them took routine chest X-ray (CXR),and 84 underwent chest CT examinations.According to the CXR most near the beginning of anti-PCP therapy,18 cases were at early stage and CFR was 0 (0/18,P < 0.0 1),50 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 28.0% (14/50,P > 0.05),and 37 cases were at late stage and CFR was 59.5% (22/37,P < 0.01).According to the chest HRCT most near the beginning ofanti-PCP therapy,40 cases were at early stage and CFR was 20.0% (8/40,P > 0.05),34 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 47.1% (16/34,P > 0.05),and 10 cases were at late stage and CFR was 80.0% (8/10,P < 0.05);barotrauma,including pneumothorax,pneumomediastinum,and pneumohypoderma,was found in 18 cases and the C FR was 77.8% (14/18,P < 0.01).Conclusions:Based on the radiological manifestations,the course of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients can be divided into three stages:early stage,mid stage,and late stage

  12. Isolation on Chocolate Agar Culture of Legionella pneumophila Isolates from Subcutaneous Abscesses in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalie, Laurent; Daviller, Benjamin; Dubois, Damien; Mantion, Benoît; Delobel, Pierre; Debard, Alexa; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Marchou, Bruno; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous infections due to Legionella species have rarely been reported (L. J. Padrnos, J. E. Blair, S. Kusne, D. J. DiCaudo, and J. R. Mikhael, Transpl Infect Dis 16:307–314, 2014; P. W. Lowry, R. J. Blankenship, W. Gridley, N. J. Troup, and L. S. Tompkins, N Engl J Med 324:109–113, 1991; M. K. Waldor, B. Wilson, and M. Swartz, Clin Infect Dis 16:51–53, 1993). Here we report the identification of Legionella pneumophila isolates, from subcutaneous abscesses in an immunocompromised patient, that grew in an unusual medium for Legionella bacteria. PMID:26292305

  13. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods.

  14. Retrospective Study of Cryptococcal Meningitis With Elevated Minimum Inhibitory Concentration to Fluconazole in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Hashem; Kabbani, Sarah; Bou Alwan, Melhim; Wang, Yun F; Rebolledo, Paulina A; Kraft, Colleen S; Nguyen, Minh L; Anderson, Albert M; Rouphael, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Background.  Mortality for cryptococcal meningitis remains significant, in spite of available treatment. Resistance to first-line maintenance therapy, particularly fluconazole, has been reported. Methods.  A retrospective chart review was performed on immunocompromised patients with cryptococcal meningitis, who had susceptibility testing performed between January 2001 and December 2011, at 3 hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia. Results.  A total of 35 immunocompromised patients with cryptococcal meningitis were identified, 13 (37.1%) of whom had an elevated minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to fluconazole (MIC ≥16 µg/mL). Eighty percent of patients were males with African American predominance, the median age was 37 years, and 80% of the patients were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive. Subsequent recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis was more likely in HIV patients compared with solid organ transplant patients (P = .0366). Overall, there was a statistically significant increase in an elevated MIC to fluconazole in patients who had a history of prior azole use (odds ratio, 10.12; 95% confidence interval, 2.04-50.16). Patients with an elevated MIC to fluconazole and those with a high cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen load (≥1:512) were more likely to have central nervous system complications (P = .0358 and P = .023, respectively). Although no association was observed between an elevated MIC to fluconazole and mortality, those who received voriconazole or high-dose fluconazole (≥800 mg) for maintenance therapy were more likely to survive (P = .0288). Conclusions.  Additional studies are required to further investigate the morbidity and mortality associated with an elevated MIC to fluconazole in cryptococcal meningitis, to determine when it is appropriate to perform susceptibility testing, and to evaluate its cost effectiveness.

  15. Candida ciferrii, a new fluconazole-resistant yeast causing systemic mycosis in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsilius, E; Lass-Flörl, C; Kähler, C M; Gastl, G; Petzer, A L

    2001-03-01

    Systemic infections related to fluconazole-resistant yeasts are increasingly observed in immunocompromised patients receiving fluconazole as a prophylactic antifungal treatment. Here, we report a case of invasive candidiasis caused by Candida ciferrii in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and who suffered a relapse after autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation. Erythematous skin papulae and spotted pulmonary infiltrations were present. A skin biopsy led to the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis, emphasizing the diagnostic usefulness of this procedure. The yeast was identified as Candida ciferrii and in vitro susceptibility testing revealed its resistance to fluconazole. Until now, Candida ciferrii has not been known to cause invasive fungal infections in humans. Thus, we add another fungus to the list of flucanozole-resistant yeasts and suggest that in vitro susceptibility testing of isolated fungi should be performed for the selection of appropriate antimycotic drugs.

  16. Herpes Zoster Induced Osteomyelitis in the Immunocompromised Patients: A 10-year Multicenter Study

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    Reza Tabrizi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Alveolar bone necrosis induced by Herpes zoster infection is considered as a rare manifestation of osteomyelitis and few case reports are presented in the literature. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate mandibular osteomyelitis caused by herpes zoster in the immunocompromised patients with histopathologically documented osteomyelitis in the mandible and herpes zoster infection. Materials and Method: 30 patients were recruited in this cross-sectional study. 19 patients were completely edentulous, 4 patients were partially edentulous and 7 with complete dentition. In all cases, specimens were analyzed using a conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR test for varicella zoster virus. Results: 16 patients underwent dialysis, 9 patients received chemotherapy treat-ments and 5 patients had transplantation (four kidneys and one liver. Histopa-thological assessment demonstrated a nonspecific bone necrosis exhibiting an eosinophilic, homogeneous non-vital bone tissue with peripheral resorption sur-rounded by reactive connective tissue. PCR test was positive in 21 cases. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the frequency of osteomyelitis induced by herpes zoster could be more than the records provided by previous studies. Histopathological findings might be nonspecific in such patients. PCR test was not positive for all HZ induced osteomyelitis patients.

  17. Rare presentation of gall bladder tuberculosis in a non immuno-compromised patient

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    Pawan Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The gall bladder is least common intraabdominal organ to be involved by tuberculosis. It is either part of systemic miliary tuberculosis or abdominal tuberculosis. Isolated gall bladder tuberculosis is even rarer, can presents either as calculus or acalculus cholecystitis. Gall bladder tuberculosis presenting as a localized perforation with a sinus formation into anterior abdominal wall is unreported complication in a non immuno-compromised person. A 48-year old female presented with a gradually increasing swelling in right hypochondrium. Abdominal ultrasound showed superficial collection over right hypochondrium with intraperitoneal extension. Computed tomography showed localized gall bladder perforation with extension to the abdominal wall. Patient underwent emergency exploration and cholecystectomy with excision of sinus tract and drainage of abdominal wall abscess. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous cholecystitis suggestive of tuberculosis of gall bladder with extension into the sinus tract. She had an uneventful recovery and was treated with 6-month antitubercular therapy after surgery.

  18. Molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients: a 3-year multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Sterkers, Yvon; Yera, Hélène; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Menotti, Jean; Cassaing, Sophie; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Hennequin, Christophe; Delhaes, Laurence; Bonhomme, Julie; Villena, Isabelle; Scherer, Emeline; Dalle, Frédéric; Touafek, Feriel; Filisetti, Denis; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Pelloux, Hervé; Bastien, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients (ICPs). The definitive diagnosis relies on parasite DNA detection, but little is known about the incidence and burden of disease in HIV-negative patients. A 3-year retrospective study was conducted in 15 reference laboratories from the network of the French National Reference Center for Toxoplasmosis, in order to record the frequency of Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection in ICPs and to review the molecular methods used for diagnosis and the prevention measures implemented in transplant patients. During the study period, of 31,640 PCRs performed on samples from ICPs, 610 were positive (323 patients). Blood (n = 337 samples), cerebrospinal fluid (n = 101 samples), and aqueous humor (n = 100 samples) were more frequently positive. Chemoprophylaxis schemes in transplant patients differed between centers. PCR follow-up of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) patients was implemented in 8/15 centers. Data from 180 patients (13 centers) were further analyzed regarding clinical setting and outcome. Only 68/180 (38%) patients were HIV(+); the remaining 62% consisted of 72 HSCT, 14 solid organ transplant, and 26 miscellaneous immunodeficiency patients. Cerebral toxoplasmosis and disseminated toxoplasmosis were most frequently observed in HIV and transplant patients, respectively. Of 72 allo-HSCT patients with a positive PCR result, 23 were asymptomatic; all were diagnosed in centers performing systematic blood PCR follow-up, and they received specific treatment. Overall survival of allo-HSCT patients at 2 months was better in centers with PCR follow-up than in other centers (P toxoplasmosis in HIV-negative ICPs and suggests that regular PCR follow-up of allo-HSCT patients could guide preemptive treatment and improve outcome.

  19. Wooden sticks as the source of a pseudoepidemic of infection with Rhizopus microsporus var. rhizopodiformis among immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, P E; Voss, A; Donnelly, J P; de Pauw, B E; Meis, J F

    1997-09-01

    Wooden sticks used to suspend feces obtained for surveillance cultures were found to be the source of Rhizopus microsporus var. rhizopodiformis causing a pseudo-outbreak among 17 immunocompromised patients cared for in three different wards. Nonsterile wooden products should therefore not be used for collecting, handling, and processing specimens for microbiological examination.

  20. Wooden sticks as the source of a pseudoepidemic of infection with Rhizopus microsporus var. rhizopodiformis among immunocompromised patients

    OpenAIRE

    Verweij, P.E.; Voss, A.; Donnelly, J P; de Pauw, B E; Meis, J. F. G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Wooden sticks used to suspend feces obtained for surveillance cultures were found to be the source of Rhizopus microsporus var. rhizopodiformis causing a pseudo-outbreak among 17 immunocompromised patients cared for in three different wards. Nonsterile wooden products should therefore not be used for collecting, handling, and processing specimens for microbiological examination.

  1. Life-Threatening Adenovirus Infections in the Setting of the Immunocompromised Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

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    Cedar J. Fowler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A single institution case series of adenovirus infections after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is presented to highlight the consideration for adenovirus infections as an etiology in patients with rapid hepatic or other sudden organ deterioration in the setting of apparent GVHD stabilization. The series also highlights that survival is limited with these infections often due in part to concomitant opportunistic infections. In addition, the pathophysiological events, such as GVHD and hepatic dysfunction, may complicate the clinical picture and delay therapy of an opportunistic infection. This is particularly true for adenoviral infections as they also have a distinct clinical picture in immunocompromised patients when compared to immune competent patients. Adenovirus infections also have the additional challenge that its treatment, cidofovir, has associated toxicities that can delay its administration. Recent developments has yielded an assay that can be used in the early detection and for serial determinations of adenovirus in patients with advanced GVHD, as well as a new therapeutic agent currently undergoing clinical trials.

  2. Comparison of chest-CT findings of Influenza virus-associated pneumonia in immunocompetent vs. immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, C., E-mail: christopher.kloth@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Forler, S.; Gatidis, S. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Beck, R. [Institute of Medical Virology and Epidemiology of Viral Diseases, Eberhard-Karls-University, Elfriede-Aulhorn-Straße 6, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Spira, D.; Nikolaou, K.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses do not significantly differ between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients or between different types and subtypes of Influenza virus. • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses seem to be interchangeable which might in part explain the great overlap in CT-imaging findings that has been reported in the past. • Interestingly, pattern transition from interstitial into airway-centric pattern seems to be frequent in immunocompromised patients receiving specific antiviral therapy, whereas the conversion of the airway-centric pattern into an interstitial pattern was observed more frequent in immunocompetent patients developing ARDS. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively compare CT-patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by different Influenza virus types and subtypes in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients for possible discrimination. Materials and methods: Retrospective database search at our institution yielded 237 patients who were tested positive for Influenza virus type A or type B by bronchoalveolar lavage between January 2009 and April 2014. Fifty-six of these patients (female 26; male 30; median age 55.8 y, range 17–86 y; SD ± 14.4 y) underwent chest-HRCT due to a more severe clinical course of pulmonary infection. We registered all CT-findings compatible with pulmonary infection classifying them as airway predominant (tree-in-bud, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening ± peribronchial ground-glass opacity and consolidation) vs. interstitial-parenchymal predominant (bilateral, symmetrical GGO, consolidation, crazy paving and/or interlobular septal thickening). Twenty-six patients (46.4%) had follow-up CT-studies (0.78 mean, SD ± 5.8 scans). Results: Thirty-six patients were immunocompromised (group I) whereas 20 patients were immunocompetent (group II). An airway-centric pattern of infection was found in 15 patients (group

  3. Varicella-zoster virus infections in immunocompromised patients - a single centre 6-years analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liese Johannes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with varicella-zoster virus (VZV contemporaneously with malignant disease or immunosuppression represents a particular challenge and requires individualized decisions and treatment. Although the increasing use of varicella-vaccines in the general population and rapid initiation of VZV-immunoglobulins and acyclovir in case of exposure has been beneficial for some patients, immunocompromised individuals are still at risk for unfavourable courses. Methods In this single center, 6-year analysis we review incidence, hospitalization and complication rates of VZV-infections in our center and compare them to published data. Furthermore, we report three instructive cases. Results Hospitalization rate of referred children with VZV-infections was 45%, among these 17% with malignancies and 9% under immunosuppressive therapy. Rate of complications was not elevated in these two high-risk cohorts, but one ALL-patient died due to VZV-related complications. We report one 4-year old boy with initial diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who showed a rapidly fatal outcome of his simultaneous varicella-infection, one 1.8-year old boy with an identical situation but a mild course of his disease, and an 8.5-year old boy with a steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome. This boy developed severe hepatic involvement during his varicella-infection but responded to immediate withdrawl of steroids and administration of acyclovir plus single-dose cidofovir after nonresponse to acyclovir after 48 h. Conclusion Our data show that patients with malignant diseases or immunosuppressive therapy should be hospitalized and treated immediately with antiviral agents. Despite these measures the course of VZV-infections can be highly variable in these patients. We discuss aids to individual decision-making for these difficult situations.

  4. The epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infections in developed countries and among immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kenrad E; Kmush, Brittany; Labrique, Alain B

    2011-12-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important cause of acute hepatitis in humans worldwide, both as epidemic and sporadic disease. Since the virus was identified in 1983, epidemics have occurred regularly in many countries across South and Southeast Asia when seasonal floods have contaminated drinking water supplies and in Africa during humanitarian crises among refugee populations without access to clean water. In addition, sporadic cases and small clusters of HEV infections have been recognized throughout the world in developed countries over the past couple of decades. This review will focus on emerging evidence of HEV infection as an under-recognized pathogen in Europe, the USA and other industrialized countries. We will discuss some of the issues associated with the recognition, diagnosis and treatment of these sporadic cases. We will also summarize the recent literature on autochthonous HEV infection among populations in developed countries in industrialized Europe, the USA, Japan and other industrialized Asian countries. We will review recent reports of acute and chronic HEV infections among transplant recipients and other immunocompromised individuals including HIV/AIDS patients.

  5. Influenza vaccination for immunocompromised patients: systematic review and meta-analysis from a public health policy perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R Beck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunocompromised patients are vulnerable to severe or complicated influenza infection. Vaccination is widely recommended for this group. This systematic review and meta-analysis assesses influenza vaccination for immunocompromised patients in terms of preventing influenza-like illness and laboratory confirmed influenza, serological response and adverse events. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Electronic databases and grey literature were searched and records were screened against eligibility criteria. Data extraction and risk of bias assessments were performed in duplicate. Results were synthesised narratively and meta-analyses were conducted where feasible. Heterogeneity was assessed using I(2 and publication bias was assessed using Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression test. Many of the 209 eligible studies included an unclear or high risk of bias. Meta-analyses showed a significant effect of preventing influenza-like illness (odds ratio [OR]=0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.16-0.34; p<0.001 and laboratory confirmed influenza infection (OR=0.15; 95% CI=0.03-0.63; p=0.01 through vaccinating immunocompromised patie nts compared to placebo or unvaccinated controls. We found no difference in the odds of influenza-like illness compared to vaccinated immunocompetent controls. The pooled odds of seroconversion were lower in vaccinated patients compared to immunocompetent controls for seasonal influenza A(H1N1, A(H3N2 and B. A similar trend was identified for seroprotection. Meta-analyses of seroconversion showed higher odds in vaccinated patients compared to placebo or unvaccinated controls, although this reached significance for influenza B only. Publication bias was not detected and narrative synthesis supported our findings. No consistent evidence of safety concerns was identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Infection prevention and control strategies should recommend vaccinating immunocompromised patients. Potential for bias

  6. Rhino-oculo-cerebral aspergillus and mucor co-infections in an immunocompromised patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalidas Rit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis are pathogenic moulds of the mucorales species usually occurring in immunocompromised patients or in patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Aspergillosis is the clinical condition caused by Aspergillus species and may cause an invasive disease with high case fatality rate, especially in immunosuppressed patients. A 46-year-old male patient with Type 2 diabetes mellitus with underlying malignancy presented with proptosis of left eye. Combined infections of Mucor and Aspergillus were diagnosed by means of computed tomography (CT scan and biopsy. Treatment with Amphotericin B and Voriconazole was started, the patient died within 3 months, from multi-organ failure.

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin enhances the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hidemasa; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Naoko; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Takeshi; Shiga, Shuichi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Kondo, Tadakazu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-08-14

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is periodically administered to immunocompromised patients together with antimicrobial agents. The evidence that supports the effectiveness of IVIG is mostly based on data from randomized clinical trials; the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A recent study revealed that killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains by neutrophils isolated from healthy donors is enhanced by an IVIG preparation. However, the effectiveness of IVIG in immunocompromised patients remains unclear. The present study found that IVIG increased both killing activity and O2(-) release by neutrophils isolated from six patients receiving immune-suppressive drugs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); these neutrophils killed both multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Moreover, IVIG increased the autophagy of the neutrophils, which is known to play an important role in innate immunity. These results suggest that IVIG promotes both the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  8. Successful Treatment of Liver Aspergilloma by Caspofungin Acetate First-Line Therapy in a Non-Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Juan Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis remains to be a life-threatening complication in immunocompromised patients. However, Aspergillus infection can be observed in non-immunocompromised individuals in rare cases. We report a case of liver aspergilloma in a chronic aplastic anemia patient under relatively intact immune status. Therapeutic strategy for this rare condition was extensively discussed and caspofungin acetate single agent first-line therapy was applied after careful consideration. Encouraging clinical and radiologic improvements were achieved in response to the antifungal salvage. Our long-term follow-up study also revealed a favorable prognosis. Based on this experience, we suggest caspofungin acetate as first-line therapy for treatment plans of liver aspergilloma.

  9. Diagnosis of pulmonary infection with Toxoplasma gondii in immunocompromised HIV-positive patients by real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E.; Edvinsson, B.; Lundgren, Bettina;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study presented here was to evaluate the use of PCR for improving the diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection in immunocompromised hosts. Three hundred thirty-two bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples were analyzed by real-time PCR targeting a 529 bp element of T. gondii...... be performed in all immunosuppressed HIV-positive patients with symptoms of a systemic infection of unknown etiology. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis does not exclude concomitant infection with T. gondii....

  10. A Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Surgery for Infectious Spondylodiscitis of the Thoracic and Upper Lumbar Spine in Immunocompromised Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chuan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography- (CT- assisted endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine in immunocompromised patients. From October 2006 to March 2014, a total of 41 patients with infectious spondylodiscitis underwent percutaneous endoscopic surgery under local anesthesia, and 13 lesions from 13 patients on the thoracic or upper lumbar spine were selected for evaluation. A CT-guided catheter was placed before percutaneous endoscopic surgery as a guide to avoid injury to visceral organs, major vessels, and the spinal cord. All 13 patients had quick pain relief after endoscopic surgery without complications. The bacterial culture rate was 77%. Inflammatory parameters returned to normal after adequate antibiotic treatment. Postoperative radiographs showed no significant kyphotic deformity when compared with preoperative films. As of the last follow-up visit, no recurrent infections were noted. Traditional transthoracic or diaphragmatic surgery with or without posterior instrumentation is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, or immunocompromised patients. Percutaneous endoscopic surgery assisted by a CT-guided catheter provides a safe and effective alternative treatment for infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine.

  11. Prevalence of cryptosporidium in children under 5 years of age, immunocompromised patients and high risk persons in Isfahan province

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    Mehdi Azami

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cryptosporidium is an important enteric parasite which causes diarrheal illness in humans and animals worldwide. With attention to the role of cryptosporidium in producing diarrhea and mortality in immunocopromised patients and children under 5 years of age, the present study was designed to identify the prevalence of cryptosporidium and potential risk factors in Isfahan province. Methods: This descriptive study was done in Isfahan province from October 2003 to April 2004. A total of 642 children under 5 years of age, immunocompromised patients and high risk persons selected randomly and their stool samples were studied microscopically using Sheater's Sucrose Flotation technique and stained by modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining method. Results: The overall prevalence of cryptosporidium was 4.7% (30 samples. The prevalence rates of infection were 4.6%, 3.5% and 5.4% in children under 5 years of age, immunocompromised patients and high risk persons, respectively. The highest prevalence of infection (6.2% belonged to 1-2 years old children in the group of under 5 years of age, 3-4 years in immunocompromised patients group and 5-10 years in high risk persons group (10%, 6.2% and 14.8% respectively. Conclusion: Cryptosporidium is significantly prevalent in children under 5 years of age, immune compromised patients and high risk persons in Isfahan province. Therefore, health policy makers have to design a plan to identify and treat infected subjected with cryptosporidium thus as a result the transmission of the disease can be prevented in the society.

  12. No evidence of presence of parvovirus 4 in a Swedish cohort of severely immunocompromised children and adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Tolfvenstam

    Full Text Available The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4 has been associated with seropositivity for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. High prevalence is seen especially in intravenous drug users. The virus has been detected in blood products and persons who have been repeatedly transfused have shown to be a risk-group. Furthermore, reports from different parts of the world suggesting a prevalence ranging from zero to one third of the healthy population and the virus is thought to cause a latent or persistent infection. We investigated the presence of PARV4 DNA and parvovirus B19 (B19 DNA in serum from 231 severely immunocompromised cancer patients that have been exposed for blood products. Compared to B19, which was found in 3.9% of the patients, we found no evidence of PARV4. Our results may indicate a very low prevalence of the virus in Sweden, and it would be useful to measure the real PARV4 exposure of the healthy population as well as individuals with known risk factors by serology.

  13. No evidence of presence of parvovirus 4 in a Swedish cohort of severely immunocompromised children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Norbeck, Oscar; Ohrmalm, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been associated with seropositivity for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. High prevalence is seen especially in intravenous drug users. The virus has been detected in blood products and persons who have been repeatedly transfused have shown to be a risk-group. Furthermore, reports from different parts of the world suggesting a prevalence ranging from zero to one third of the healthy population and the virus is thought to cause a latent or persistent infection. We investigated the presence of PARV4 DNA and parvovirus B19 (B19) DNA in serum from 231 severely immunocompromised cancer patients that have been exposed for blood products. Compared to B19, which was found in 3.9% of the patients, we found no evidence of PARV4. Our results may indicate a very low prevalence of the virus in Sweden, and it would be useful to measure the real PARV4 exposure of the healthy population as well as individuals with known risk factors by serology.

  14. Severe metapneumovirus infections among immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients admitted to hospital with respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Juliana Sinohara; Watanabe, Aripuana; Carraro, Emerson; Granato, Celso; Bellei, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is considered an important cause of acute respiratory infections. hMPV can cause morbidity in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and recent research has demonstrated that it is an important virus in patients admitted to hospital with respiratory infections and suspected of having pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1pdm09) virus. The purpose of this study was to investigate infections caused by hMPV in two groups of patients admitted to hospital: Immunocompromized patients with a potential risk of severe outcomes and immunocompetent patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome. A total of 288 samples were tested: 165 samples were collected from patients with suspected influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 infection during the first pandemic wave in 2009; and 123 samples were collected from patients of a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation program in 2008-2009. Amplification of the hMPV genes was performed by polymerase chain reaction. This was followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. hMPV was detected in 14.2% (41/288) of all samples: 17% (28/165) of immunocompetent patients with suspected H1N1 infection and 10.6% (13/123) among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. hMPV accounted for 12.1% (8/66) of immunocompetent adults patients with severe respiratory infections (median age, 55.9 years). Two hMPV subtypes were identified, A2 (26.9%; 7/26) and B2 (73.1%; 19/26) but no difference was observed between the patient groups in terms of age or immunosuppression level. This study highlights the significance of hMPV in immunocompetent adult patients with severe infections and further investigations are recommended for understanding the impact of this virus.

  15. Initial CT manifestations of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in 45 non-HIV immunocompromised patients: association with patient outcome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horger, Marius [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: mshorger@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Hebart, Holger [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Einsele, Hermann [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Lengerke, Claudia [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, C.D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Vonthein, Reinhard [Department of Medical Biometry, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Westbahnhofstrasse 55, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Pfannenberg, Christina [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To assess early high-resolution computer tomographic (CT) signs of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in non-HIV immunosuppressed patients and their potential association with patient's outcome, including frequency and severity of pulmonary hemorrhage, taking also in consideration the impact of other known risk factors contributory to IPA. Material and methods: A retrospective review of serial CT scans was performed in 45 immunocompromised patients with a total of 46 episodes of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. All patients underwent CT beginning with the day they showed clinical or laboratory signs of infection. Serial follow-up CT included more than two, up to 12 CT examinations. Patient's outcome was judged by clinical and radiological follow-up and classified as survival, death by IPA, or death unrelated to IPA. The influence of patient's age, underlying disease, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, neutropenia, graft versus host disease, and antifungal therapy onset was also statistically considered. Results: Three main CT findings were identified: small nodules (<1 cm) 43% (20/46), large nodules 21% (10/46) and consolidations, either in patchy {+-} segmental 26% (12/46), or peribronchial distribution {+-} tree in bud 9% (4/46). In 11 patients (24%) we found a combination of two or more of these signs: 9 (19%) patients presented concurrent small nodules accompanied by reticulation, tree in bud or peribronchial infiltrates, while 2 (4%) patients showed large pulmonary nodules accompanied by large consolidations. An accompanying 'halo' sign was observed in 38 patients (82%). Crescent sign followed by cavitation was encountered in 29 patients (63%). Two patients succumbed to massive pulmonary bleeding caused by IPA. Twenty-one patients (15/46) deceased in this series, 12 of them succumbed to IPA, 1 died from cerebral invasive aspergillosis, while in 9 patients the cause of death was not primarily IPA. Manifest pulmonary

  16. Salmonella meningitis and septicaemia in an non-immunocompromised adult, associated with a cluster of Salmonella Enteritidis PT 14b, Ireland, November 2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OhAiseadha, C O

    2010-01-01

    We report a fatal case of meningitis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b in a middle-aged man who had no history or findings to suggest he was immunocompromised. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Salmonella meningitis in an adult in Ireland, and the first case of meningitis in an adult caused by phage type 14b. This case was associated with a nationwide cluster of salmonellosis which is still under investigation at the time of writing.

  17. Oral ulceration associated with concurrent herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus infection in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainville, Gisele N; Marsh, William L; Allen, Carl M

    2015-06-01

    In immunocompromised patients, oral ulcerations are common and have a wide spectrum of causes, including herpesvirus infection. We report on a case in which an oral ulcer was simultaneously infected by herpes simplex (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in a kidney-pancreas transplant recipient. A 46-year-old woman presented with a clinically nonspecific dorsal tongue ulcer of 3 months duration. Histopathologic evaluation indicated keratinocytes exhibiting herpetic viral cytopathic effect. Nuclear and cytologic alterations suggestive of CMV infection were found in endothelial cells subjacent to the ulcer. Immunohistochemistry testing for HSV and CMV was positive in these cells. Large atypical mononuclear cells were also evident in the ulcer bed's inflammatory infiltrate, which had intense nuclear positivity for Epstein-Barr encoding region in situ hybridization. We believe this is the first well-documented report of the definitive concomitant presence of HSV, CMV, and EBV in an immunocompromised patient. Although the pathogenesis of coinfected ulcers remains unknown, a synergistic effect is possible.

  18. A rare cause of drug-induced hepatitis in an immunocompromised patient and the role of glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadhi, Viplove; Arora, Deepika; Arora, Manish; Marsh, Franklin

    2012-08-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning on numerous herbal drugs, including many popular products at General Nutrition Centers (GNC), regarding unstudied hepatotoxicity. There have been recent reports of GNC products such as hydroxycut and herbalife, causing drug-induced hepatitis. Herbal medications are over-the-counter products and are not investigated thoroughly by the FDA. Given that the most common outpatient laboratory abnormality is elevated liver transaminases, a sign of hepatocellular toxicity; it is not surprising that some of these products end up causing hepatic dysfunction, especially when taken in large volume. There are numerous herbal supplements that are hepatotoxic, however, these medications have a much more significant effect in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients, which is secondary to depleted glutathione. We present a rare case of drug induced hepatitis secondary to herbal medications used to treat HIV and elucidate the role of glutathione depletion in immunocompromised patients.

  19. Metabolic and immune effects of dietary arginine, glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntrasakul, C; Siltharm, S; Sarasombath, S; Sittapairochana, C; Leowattana, W; Chockvivatanavanit, S; Bunnak, A

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the nutritional, metabolic and immune effects of dietary arginine, glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in immunocompromised patients, we performed a prospective study on the effect of immune formula administered to 11 severe trauma patients (average ISS = 24), 10 burn patients (average % TBSA = 48) and 5 cancer patients. Daily calorie and protein administration were based on the patient's severity (Stress factor with the range of 35-50 kcal/kg/day and 1.5-2.5 g/kg/day, respectively) Starting with half concentration liquid immune formula through nasogastric tube by continuous drip at 30 ml/h and increasing to maximum level within 4 days. The additional energy and protein requirement will be given either by parenteral or oral nutritional support. Various nutritional, metabolic, immunologic and clinical parameters were observed on day 0 (baseline), day 3, 7, and 14. Analysis was performed by paired student-t test. Initial mean serum albumin and transferrin showed mild (trauma) to moderate (burn and cancer) degree of malnutrition. Significant improvement of nutritional parameters was seen at day 7 and 14 in trauma and burn patients. Significant increase of total lymphocyte count (day 7, P patients. C-reactive protein decreased significantly on day 7 (p patients were observed. Two cases of nausea, 4 cases of vomiting, 5 cases of diarrhea (critically ill patients will be clarified.

  20. Clinical significance of quantifying Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA by using real-time PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botterel, Françoise; Cabaret, Odile; Foulet, Françoise; Cordonnier, Catherine; Costa, Jean-Marc; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is more sensitive than microscopy for detecting Pneumocystis jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. We therefore developed a qPCR assay and compared the results with those of a routine immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and clinical data. The assay included automated DNA extraction, amplification of the mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA gene and an internal control, and quantification of copy numbers with the help of a plasmid clone. We studied 353 consecutive BAL fluids obtained for investigation of unexplained fever and/or pneumonia in 287 immunocompromised patients. No qPCR inhibition was observed. Seventeen (5%) samples were both IFA and qPCR positive, 63 (18%) were IFA negative and qPCR positive, and 273 (77%) were both IFA and qPCR negative. The copy number was significantly higher for IFA-positive/qPCR-positive samples than for IFA-negative/qPCR-positive samples (4.2 ± 1.2 versus 1.1 ± 1.1 log(10) copies/μl; P < 10(-4)). With IFA as the standard, the qPCR assay sensitivity was 100% for ≥2.6 log(10) copies/μl and the specificity was 100% for ≥4 log(10) copies/μl. Since qPCR results were not available at the time of decision-making, these findings did not trigger cotrimoxazole therapy. Patients with systemic inflammatory diseases and IFA-negative/qPCR-positive BAL fluid had a worse 1-year survival rate than those with IFA-negative/qPCR-negative results (P < 10(-3)), in contrast with solid-organ transplant recipients (P = 0.88) and patients with hematological malignancy (P = 0.26). Quantifying P. jirovecii DNA in BAL fluids independently of IFA positivity should be incorporated into the investigation of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. The relevant threshold remains to be determined and may vary according to the underlying disease.

  1. Detection of Low Frequency Multi-Drug Resistance and Novel Putative Maribavir Resistance in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients with Cytomegalovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Margetts, Ben K.; Simmonds, Jacob; Nicolaou, Stephanos; Tutill, Helena J.; Williams, Rachel; Worth, Austen J. J.; Marks, Stephen D.; Veys, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed pediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1–27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analyzed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54) and C480F (UL97). In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of 11 subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome. PMID:27667983

  2. Detection of low frequency multi-drug resistance and novel putative maribavir resistance in immunocompromised paediatric patients with cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jane Houldcroft

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed paediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1-27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analysed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54 and C480F (UL97. In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of eleven subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome.

  3. [Management of aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Recommendations of Lille University Hospital--4th version--November 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfandari, S; Leroy, O; de Botton, S; Yakoub-Agha, I; Durand-Joly, I; Leroy-Cotteau, A; Beaucaire, G

    2005-03-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a severe complication in immunocompromised patients. The arrival of new antifungal agents motivated the redaction of guidelines, regularly updated, by a Lille University hospital multidisciplinary task force. These guidelines assess diagnostic and therapeutic issues. The main recommended diagnosis tool is the chest CT scan, ordered at the smallest suspicion and, also, measure of the blood and broncho alveolar lavage fluid galactomannan. Treatment guidelines assess prophylaxis, empirical and documented therapy. Primary prophylaxis is warranted in only two cases, pulmonary graft or stem cell transplant in patients with chronic GVH and receiving corticosteroids. Empirical therapy should use one of the available amphotericin B formulations, chosen according to the patient history. Caspofungin is another choice. Documented therapy, depending on presentation, can be a single drug or a combination. First line therapy for single drug is i.v. voriconazole. Lipid formulations of amphotericin B are another choice. A combination therapy can be used as a first line treatment, for multiple lesions, or as salvage therapy. It must include caspofungin, associated with liposomal amphotericin B or voriconazole. A tight cooperation with thoracic surgeons is recommended.

  4. Invasive mycosis due to species of Blastobotrys in immunocompromised patients with reduced susceptibility to antifungals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, A.; Babu, R.; Bijulal, S.; Abraham, M.; Sasidharan, P.; Kathuria, S.; Sharma, C.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Chowdhary, A.

    2014-01-01

    Cases of invasive mycosis due to Blastobotrys serpentis and B. proliferans identified by sequencing in a preterm patient and a rhabdomyosarcoma patient, respectively, are reported. Both species revealed elevated fluconazole and echinocandin MICs by the CLSI broth microdilution method. Additionally,

  5. Prevention of Infection Due to Pneumocystis spp. in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Immunocompromised Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Martin; Fishman, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    Pneumocystis infection in humans was originally described in 1942. The organism was initially thought to be a protozoan, but more recent data suggest that it is more closely related to the fungi. Patients with cellular immune deficiencies are at risk for the development of symptomatic Pneumocystis infection. Populations at risk also include patients with hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies, hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, solid-organ recipients, and patients receiving i...

  6. The uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among immunocompromised patients attending rheumatology outpatient clinics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-07-01

    PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES: The patients using immunosuppressive agents are considered at high risk for acquiring different infections. Accordingly, international guidelines recommend vaccinating such patients against influenza and pneumococcal organisms. The aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to assess the influenza and pneumococcal vaccination uptake among our rheumatology outpatients who are immunosuppressed; (2) to identify the factors influencing immunisation uptake among our sample of patients.

  7. Invasive mycosis due to species of Blastobotrys in immunocompromised patients with reduced susceptibility to antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Babu, Rachana; Bijulal, Swapna; Abraham, Mohan; Sasidharan, P; Kathuria, Shallu; Sharma, Cheshta; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2014-11-01

    Cases of invasive mycosis due to Blastobotrys serpentis and B. proliferans identified by sequencing in a preterm patient and a rhabdomyosarcoma patient, respectively, are reported. Both species revealed elevated fluconazole and echinocandin MICs by the CLSI broth microdilution method. Additionally, B. serpentis exhibited high amphotericin B MICs, thus posing serious therapeutic challenges.

  8. A real time PCR assay on blood for diagnosis of invasive candidiasis in immunocompromised patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Ashrafi

    2015-01-01

    Results: From 2009 to 2011, 72 patients with hematologic malignancies and bone marrow transplant recipients were evaluated for IC. The female to male ratio was 27:45; the mean age was 32.1 years. The most common malignancy in this patient was acute myeloid leukemia (AML (27.8% and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL (26.4%. Out of 72 patients, 11 patients (15.3% had positive real time PCR /probe results. Based on the melting temperature (Tm analysis, 5 (45.4% C. krusei, 3 (27.2% C. tropicalis, 2 (18.1% C. parapsilosis and 1 C. albicans (9% were identified. According to the revised EORTC / MSG, 1 patient (9% and 10 patients (91% were defined as proven and possible groups of IC, respectively. The mortality rate in proven and possible IC patient was found 54.5%. Conclusion: The established Real-time PCR/FRET probe assay is an appropriate diagnostic tool for the detection of Candida species DNA and the management of patients suffering from hematologic malignancies and bone marrow recipient are at risk for IC.

  9. Prevention of infection due to Pneumocystis spp. in human immunodeficiency virus-negative immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Martin; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-10-01

    Pneumocystis infection in humans was originally described in 1942. The organism was initially thought to be a protozoan, but more recent data suggest that it is more closely related to the fungi. Patients with cellular immune deficiencies are at risk for the development of symptomatic Pneumocystis infection. Populations at risk also include patients with hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies, hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, solid-organ recipients, and patients receiving immunosuppressive therapies for connective tissue disorders and vasculitides. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is the agent of choice for prophylaxis against Pneumocystis unless a clear contraindication is identified. Other options include pentamidine, dapsone, dapsone-pyrimethamine, and atovaquone. The risk for PCP varies based on individual immune defects, regional differences, and immunosuppressive regimens. Prophylactic strategies must be linked to an ongoing assessment of the patient's risk for disease.

  10. Percutaneous treatment with amphotericin B of mycotic lung lesions from invasive aspergillosis: results in 10 immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltri, A.; Anselmetti, G.C.; Bartoli, G.; Martina, M.C.; Galli, J. [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, DiUniv. Torino (Italy); Regge, D. [Servizio di Radiodiagnostica, Istituto di Ricerca e Cura per il Cancro, Ordine Mauriziano, Candiolo (Italy); Bertini, M. [U.O.A. Ematologia, Azienda Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Torino (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous treatment of pulmonary lesions from invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. From 1992 to 1998, ten patients (seven men and three women; mean age 56 years) affected by hematological neoplasms (8 acute myeloid leukemias, 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas) and post-chemotherapy prolonged neutropenia developed pulmonary lesions from invasive aspergillosis. A total of 13 lesions (diameter 2-7 cm, median 5 cm) were treated percutaneously due to insufficiency of the high-dose i. v. therapy; under CT guidance, a median of 10 cm{sup 3} per session of a 1 mg/cm{sup 3} diluted solution of amphotericin B was injected through a fine needle (21-22 G); 45 sessions overall were performed (one to five per lesion, median four), according to the volume of the nodules, tolerance, and complications. The results were retrospectively evaluated either radiologically or clinically. Complications were cough, mild hemoptysis, and small pneumothorax and/or pleural effusion. No major complications occurred. One month after the beginning of treatment, 8 lesions completely resolved, 4 greatly improved, and 1 was not significantly reduced. In all ten patients symptoms improved (eight of ten could restart chemotherapy as scheduled). After antiblastic retreatment, 1 patient had mycotic recurrence. In our experience transthoracic topical treatment with amphotericin B of single or few lung lesions from invasive aspergillosis was effective, affording a rapid improvement of the lesions and symptoms, and allowing continuation of chemotherapy as scheduled, thereby reducing the risk of recurrences. (orig.)

  11. Chronic cavitary pulmonary histoplasmosis in a non-HIV and immunocompromised patient without overseas travel history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun Ju; Park, Dae Won; Choi, Jung-Woo; Choi, Won Suk

    2015-05-01

    Korea is not known as an endemic area for Histoplasma. However, we experienced a case of histoplasmosis in a person who had never been abroad. A 65-year-old female was admitted to the hospital for evaluation of multiple lung nodules. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest showed multiple ill-defined consolidations and cavitations in all lobes of both lungs. The patient underwent a CT-guided lung biopsy, and a histopathology study showed findings compatible with histoplasmosis. Based on biopsy results and clinical findings, the patient was diagnosed with chronic cavitary pulmonary histoplasmosis. The patient recovered completely following itraconazole treatment. This is the first case report of pulmonary histoplasmosis unconnected with either HIV infection or endemicity in Korea.

  12. Type 2 lepra reaction in an immunocompromised patient precipitated by filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Sharma, Taniya; Rai, Tulika; Prabhu, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Though patients affected with both acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and leprosy commonly present with type 1 lepra reaction, there are few isolated reports of type 2 lepra reaction in retropositive patients affected with leprosy. We are presenting a case report of 35-year-old male affected with AIDS, tubercular lymphadenitis, and lepromatous leprosy with recurrent episodes of type 2 lepra reaction manifesting as erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). Dipstick enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for filarial antigen was also positive. The patient was treated with 100 mg thalidomide daily, 300 mg diethylcarbamazine, and modified multidrug therapy (MDT) for leprosy. He responded well and has not had any further reaction in the last 6 months.

  13. Successful Treatment of Mucormycosis and Aspergillus sp. Rhinosinusitis in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges; Medeiros; Ziomkowski; Machado

    1998-08-01

    Fungal rhinosinusitis is a serious infection related to immunosuppressive conditions. It is caused by common opportunistic mycoses, such as Mucor, Aspergillus sp. and Candida sp. Treatment is difficult and most of the patients with an invasive form, die. We report a case of a 13 year old boy who developed Mucor and Aspergillus sp rhinosinusitis while receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Even though the patient was intensely immunossupressed, early diagnoses associated with surgical debridement and effective doses of amphotericin B allowed a favorable outcome and hospital discharge.

  14. Microbiological Isolation of Sporothrix Schenckii in an Immunocompromised Patient. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledys Pérez Morales

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis with a variable course caused by a fungus of the genus Sporothrix. We present the case of 67-year-old white patient of rural origin with a history of myelofibrosis that had evolved for ten years and was treated with thalidomide and prednisone. He was admitted to the University General Hospital of Cienfuegos in August 2013 because of skin lesions on the left cheek, chest and forearms. During his stay in the Hematology ward due to his underlying disease, we consulted with the specialists of the Dermatology Department. Several diagnoses were established and multiple antimicrobial treatments were prescribed. No clinical improvement of the lesions was observed. A mycological study showed the presence of Sporothrix schencckii; hence, the patient underwent treatment for sporotrichosis. Given the rarity of this diagnosis in our institution, we decided to present this case.

  15. Disseminated Strongyloidiasis in an Iranian Immunocompro-mised Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges NAJAFI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth (STH widespread in various part of the world. A 78-yr-old peasant diabetic female from Mazandaran Province northern Iran, was admitted to Infection Department of the Razi Hospital in city of Qaemshahr, north of Iran complaining about abdominal skin rash, pruritus, itching, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, dysuria and cough. This patient had cutaneous migration effects of S. stercoralis larvae in her abdominal skin (larva currents and urticaria. Lung CT without contrast demonstrates bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity draws attention. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastro esophageal reflux with antral gastritis. Duodenal endoscopy showed unusual mucosa and a biopsy from it sent to the pathology laboratory. Histopathology of duodenal bulb and duodenum biopsy showed mild villous atrophy and S. stercoralis infection. The patient was treated with albendazole and clinical sings improved completely after treatment. Strongyloidiasis should be care­fully considered by clinicians who practice in endemic areas. Clinicians must keep a high level of skepticism for patients from endemic area.

  16. Aspergillus Thyroiditis: A Complication of Respiratory Tract Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiha M. Alvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old male with past medical history significant for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma status after chemotherapy presented with acute onset of neck pain, odynophagia, and dysphagia associated with subjective fever, chills, and dyspnea. Physical findings included a temperature of 38.4°C, hypertension, and tachycardia. Patient was found to have anterior neck tenderness. Laboratory evaluation revealed neutropenia. The patient was started on empiric antibacterial and antiviral therapy and continued on home prophylactic antifungal treatment. Thyroid function tests revealed overt hyperthyroidism. A thyroid ultrasound showed heterogeneous echotexture without discrete nodules. Subacute thyroiditis was treated with methylprednisolone, metoprolol, and opiate analgesics. Patient’s antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral treatments were broadened. A fine needle aspiration was not conducted. The patient’s condition deteriorated rapidly over his brief hospital course and he expired. Autopsy showed fungal thyroiditis secondary to disseminated invasive Aspergillus. This report describes the presentation of fungal thyroiditis secondary to disseminated invasive Aspergillus originating from the respiratory tract. The authors review the diagnostic challenges, pathophysiology, and treatment of this condition.

  17. Use of real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia in immunocompromised patients: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanssa Summah; ZHU Ying-gang; Matthew E Falagas; Evridiki K Vouloumanou; QU Jie-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised patients is still challenging today due to the absence of an in vitro culture system and the low diagnostic accuracy of microscopic examinations.Herein,weperformed a meta-analysis to evaluate the accuracy of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the diagnosis of PCP.Methods We searched Web of Knowledge and Medline from 1990 to May 2010 for studies reporting diagnostic accuracy data regarding the use of real-time PCR in the diagnosis of PCP in immunocompromised patients.Results Ten individual studies were included.Overall,the sensitivity of real-time PCR was 97% (95% CI:93%-99%);the specificity was 94% (95% CI:90%-96%).The area under the HSROC curve (95% CI) for real-time PCR was 0.99(0.97-0.99).In a subgroup analysis regarding studies involving HIV patients among the study population,the sensitivity and specificity were 97% (95% CI:93%-99%) and 93% (95% CI:89%-96%),respectively.Regarding studies using Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples only:sensitivity =98% (95% CI:94%-99%); specificity =93% (95% CI:89%-96%),respectively.Regarding studies using microscopy as a reference standard:sensitivity =97% (95% CI:92%-99%);specificity =93% (95% CI:88%-96%).However,high between-study statistical heterogeneity was observed in all analyses.Conclusions Real-time PCR has a good diagnostic accuracy and may provide a useful adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of PCP in immunocompromised patients.Further studies are needed in order to identify any differences in the diagnostic performance of real-time PCR in HIV and non-HIV immunocompromised patients.

  18. A CASE OF SUBCUTANEOUS PHAEOHYPHOMYCOSIS CAUSED BY EXSEROHILUM SPECIES IN AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppada Rajasekhar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycoses are rare fungal infections, caused by dematiaceous fungi, manifested as cutaneous and subcutaneous infections, meningitis, sinusitis, keratitis, osteomyelitis and disseminated infection. This is a case report of a 45year old immuno compromised female on ART (Anti Retroviral therapy presented with fever and generalized nodular lesions draining pus on face, hands, axilla, groin and labia majora since one month. Biopsy of the subcutaneous nodule on the lateral aspect of the thigh revealed septate fungal hyphae on 10% KOH (10% Potassium Hydroxide mount. Fungal culture of the biopsy material on SDA (Sabouraud’s Dextrose Agar at 250C showed cotton wooly, dark gray to olivaceous black growth with black reverse and identified as dematiaceous fungi belonging to Exserohilum species by microscopy. The patient was put on Itraconazole 200mg BD in combination with Terbinafine 250mg BD for which she responded with healing of pustular lesions in two weeks and complete remission in two months..

  19. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge García-Méndez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis.

  20. Bilateral atypical optic neuritis associated with tuberculosis in an immunocompromised patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juanarita Jaafar; Wan Hazabbah Wan Hitam; Raja Azmi Mohd Noor

    2012-01-01

    A 27 year-old lady, presented with sudden loss of vision in the right eye for a week. It was followed by poor vision in the left eye after 3 days. It involved the whole entire visual field and was associated with pain on eye movement. She was diagnosed to have miliary tuberculosis and retroviral disease 4 months ago. She was started on anti-TB since then but defaulted highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). On examination, her visual acuity was no perception of light in the right eye and 6/120 (pinhole 3/60) in the left eye. Anterior segment in both eyes was unremarkable. Funduscopy showed bilateral optic disc swelling with presence of multiple foci of choroiditis in the peripheral retina. The vitreous and retinal vessels were normal. Chest radiography was normal. CT scan of orbit and brain revealed bilateral enhancement of the optic nerve sheath that suggest the diagnosis of bilateral atypical optic neuritis. This patient was managed with infectious disease team. She was started on HAART and anti-TB treatment was continued. She completed anti-TB treatment after 9 months without any serious side effects. During follow up the visual acuity in both eyes was not improved. However, funduscopy showed resolving of disc swelling and choroiditis following treatment.

  1. Prevention of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients: the role of delayed-release posaconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Posaconazole is a triazole antifungal agent that has broad-spectrum activity against many yeasts and filamentous fungi, including Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus species, and Zygomycetes. This drug has been approved for the prevention of invasive fungal infections in patients with neutropenia and for the treatment of invasive fungal infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with graft-versus-host disease. Studies on the clinical efficacy, safety, tolerability, and cost-effectiveness of posaconazole therapy were performed using the oral suspension form of the drug. Pharmacokinetic studies have found that the oral suspension form of posaconazole has problemeatic bioavailability: its absorption is affected by concomitant medication and food. This article discusses the pharmacokinetic properties of the newly developed posaconazole delayed-release tablet formulation and reviews the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of both the oral suspension and the new tablet formulation. In conclusion, the posaconazole tablet formulation has better systemic bioavailability, thereby enabling once-daily administration and better absorption in the presence of concomitant medication and food. However, well-designed clinical studies are needed to evaluate the use of the tablet formulation in real-life settings.

  2. Prevention of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients: the role of delayed-release posaconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soysal A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet SoysalDivision of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Marmara University, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Posaconazole is a triazole antifungal agent that has broad-spectrum activity against many yeasts and filamentous fungi, including Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus species, and Zygomycetes. This drug has been approved for the prevention of invasive fungal infections in patients with neutropenia and for the treatment of invasive fungal infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with graft-versus-host disease. Studies on the clinical efficacy, safety, tolerability, and cost-effectiveness of posaconazole therapy were performed using the oral suspension form of the drug. Pharmacokinetic studies have found that the oral suspension form of posaconazole has problemeatic bioavailability: its absorption is affected by concomitant medication and food. This article discusses the pharmacokinetic properties of the newly developed posaconazole delayed-release tablet formulation and reviews the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of both the oral suspension and the new tablet formulation. In conclusion, the posaconazole tablet formulation has better systemic bioavailability, thereby enabling once-daily administration and better absorption in the presence of concomitant medication and food. However, well-designed clinical studies are needed to evaluate the use of the tablet formulation in real-life settings.Keywords: posaconazole delayed-release tablet, prophylaxis, invasive fungal infections

  3. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioverti, M Veronica; Cawcutt, Kelly A; Abidi, Maheen; Sohail, M Rizwan; Walker, Randall C; Osmon, Douglas R

    2015-12-01

    Invasive mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts, but it carries a high mortality rate. Primary gastrointestinal disease is the least frequent form of presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical in the management; however, symptoms are typically non-specific in gastrointestinal disease, leading to delayed therapy. To describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts, we reviewed all cases of primary gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts reported in English literature as well as in our Institution from January 1st 1991 to December 31st 2013 for a total of 31 patients. About 52% of patients underwent solid organ transplant (SOT), while the rest had an underlying haematologic malignancy. Abdominal pain was the most common presenting symptom, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding and fever. Gastric disease was more common in SOT, whereas those with haematologic malignancy presented with intestinal disease (P = 0.002). Although gastrointestinal mucormycosis remains an uncommon condition in immunocompromised hosts, it carries significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in cases with intestinal involvement. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance to institute early and appropriate therapy and improve outcomes.

  4. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C. Tylka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU in four children’s hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58% did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p=0.015, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p=0.001, requirement of renal replacement therapy (p=0.01, ICU admission severity of illness score (p=0.011, and treatment with cidofovir (p=0.005. Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p=0.01, require renal replacement therapy (p=0.02, and not survive to hospital discharge (p=0.004. One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children.

  5. Immunocompromised Children with Severe Adenoviral Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, Joanna C; McCrory, Michael C; Gertz, Shira J; Custer, Jason W; Spaeder, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the impact of severe respiratory adenoviral infection on morbidity and case fatality in immunocompromised children. Methods. Combined retrospective-prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in four children's hospitals with severe adenoviral respiratory infection and an immunocompromised state between August 2009 and October 2013. We performed a secondary case control analysis, matching our cohort 1 : 1 by age and severity of illness score with immunocompetent patients also with severe respiratory adenoviral infection. Results. Nineteen immunocompromised patients were included in our analysis. Eleven patients (58%) did not survive to hospital discharge. Case fatality was associated with cause of immunocompromised state (p = 0.015), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.001), requirement of renal replacement therapy (p = 0.01), ICU admission severity of illness score (p = 0.011), and treatment with cidofovir (p = 0.005). Immunocompromised patients were more likely than matched controls to have multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (p = 0.01), require renal replacement therapy (p = 0.02), and not survive to hospital discharge (p = 0.004). One year after infection, 43% of immunocompromised survivors required chronic mechanical ventilator support. Conclusions. There is substantial case fatality as well as short- and long-term morbidity associated with severe adenoviral respiratory infection in immunocompromised children.

  6. Diagnosis of pulmonary infection with Toxoplasma gondii in immunocompromised HIV-positive patients by real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Edvinsson, B; Lundgren, B

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study presented here was to evaluate the use of PCR for improving the diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection in immunocompromised hosts. Three hundred thirty-two bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples were analyzed by real-time PCR targeting a 529 bp element of T. gondii...

  7. High diversity of non-sporulating moulds in respiratory specimens of immunocompromised patients: should all the species be reported when diagnosing invasive aspergillosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Alanio, Alexandre; Cabaret, Odile; Olivi, Martine; Foulet, Françoise; Cordonnier, Catherine; Costa, Jean-Marc; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    Non-sporulating moulds (NSMs) isolated from respiratory specimens are usually discarded without further testing although they may have pathogenic effects in immunocompromised patients. The objective of this study was to determine the identity and frequency of NSMs in patients with haematological malignancies. We analysed the mycological results of 251 consecutive respiratory samples from 104 haematology patients. Yeast and sporulating moulds were identified at the genus/species level according to their phenotypic features. NSMs were identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. We detected 179 positive samples, of which 10.1% (18/179) were mixtures of moulds and 26.3% (47/179) were mixtures of moulds and yeast. We identified 142 moulds belonging to 11 different genera/species or groups, with Aspergillus fumigatus (n = 50), Penicillium spp. (n = 31) and NSM (n = 24) being the most frequently isolated species. Twenty-two NSMs were successfully sequenced: 18 were basidiomycetes and six were ascomycetes, corresponding to 16 different genera/species. NSMs were isolated with A. fumigatus in the same sample or in a subsequent sample in five patients with probable invasive aspergillosis. The conclusion is that the respiratory specimens of immunocompromised patients frequently contain very diverse mould species that may increase the virulence of pathogenic species. Reporting all mould species isolated when diagnosing invasive fungal infection could test this hypothesis.

  8. Surveillance of antiviral resistance markers in Argentina: detection of E119V neuraminidase mutation in a post-treatment immunocompromised patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontoriero, Andrea; Avaro, Martín; Benedetti, Estefania; Russo, Mara; Czech, Andrea; Periolo, Natalia; Campos, Ana; Zamora, Ana; Baumeister, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines are the best means of protection against influenza, neuraminidase inhibitors are currently the main antiviral treatment available to control severe influenza cases. One of the most frequent substitutions in the neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A(H3N2) viruses during or soon after oseltamivir administration is E119V mutation. We describe the emergence of a mixed viral population with the E119E/V mutation in the NA protein sequence in a post-treatment influenza sample collected from an immunocompromised patient in Argentina. This substitution was identified by a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol and was confirmed by direct Sanger sequencing of the original sample. In 2014, out of 1140 influenza samples received at the National Influenza Centre, 888 samples (78%) were A(H3N2) strains, 244 (21.3%) were type B strains, and 8 (0.7%) were A(H1N1)pdm09 strains. Out of 888 A(H3N2) samples, 842 were tested for the E119V substitution by quantitative RT-PCR: 841 A(H3N2) samples had the wild-type E119 genotype and in one sample, a mixture of viral E119/ V119 subpopulations was detected. Influenza virus surveillance and antiviral resistance studies can lead to better decisions in health policies and help in medical treatment planning, especially for severe cases and immunocompromised patients. PMID:27849220

  9. Risk Factors for Sporadic Non-Pregnancy Associated Listeriosis in Germany-Immunocompromised Patients and Frequently Consumed Ready-To-Eat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preußel, Karina; Milde-Busch, Astrid; Schmich, Patrick; Wetzstein, Matthias; Stark, Klaus; Werber, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Non-pregnancy associated (N-PA) listeriosis, caused by Listeria monocytogenes, is a rare but severe disease, and is predominantly food-borne. Most cases appear sporadic and their infection vehicle remains unknown. Incidence has increased since 2008 in Germany. We aimed to identify underlying conditions and foods associated with sporadic N-PA listeriosis in Germany. We performed a nationwide case-control study from March 2012-December 2013. Cases were sporadic N-PA listeriosis patients notified to public health. Control subjects were age (40-65 years, 66-75 years, ≥ 76 years) frequency-matched persons from a nationwide random telephone sample. A structured questionnaire collected information on underlying diseases, therapies and >60 food items. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis, adjusting for host factors identified by causal diagram theory, and calculated population attributable fractions. We enrolled 109 cases and 1982 controls. Cases' median age was 69 years, 55% were male, 44% received immunosuppressive therapy within 3 months prior to illness onset; a further 28% had at least one immunocompromising disease. In multivariable analysis, immunosuppressive therapy (OR 8.8, 95%CI 4.9-15.6), immunocompromising disease (OR 2.7; 95%CI 1.4-5.2), gastric acid suppression (OR 3.0; 95%CI 1.4-6.3), the consumption of cold cooked sausages (OR 2.6; 95%CI 1.6-4.4), the preferred consumption of packaged cheese (OR 2.1; 95%CI 1.3-3.5) and pre-sliced cheese (OR 2.2; 95%CI 1.3-3.7) were significantly associated with N-PA listeriosis. These foods accounted for 59% of all cases. Typical high risk foods, e.g. cold seafood, certain types of cheeses, tended to be negatively associated with disease. In conclusion, immunosuppressive therapy and frequently consumed ready-to-eat foods are the main risk factors for sporadic N-PA listeriosis in Germany. To reduce their risk, immunocompromised persons should consume the identified foods well before the 'use-by' date

  10. Hepatosplenic gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma: a report of two cases in immunocompromised patients, associated with isochromosome 7q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, A; Lesesve, J F; Stamatoullas, A; Comoz, F; Lenormand, B; Etienne, I; Mendel, I; Hémet, J; Bastard, C; Tilly, H

    1997-07-01

    Two cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, characterized by hepatosplenic presentation and gamma/delta T-cell receptor phenotype on malignant cells, are reported. Little is known about the chromosomal changes in these peculiar lymphomas. We report the cytogenetic analysis of these two patients. Isochromosome 7q and trisomy 8 were observed. These abnormalities were reported previously in five cases of gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma. These two patients had lymphomatous infiltration of the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and (in one case) lymph nodes. These abnormalities occurred in immunocompromised patients (i.e., immunosuppressive therapy for kidney transplantation and chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease), without Epstein-Barr virus infection stigmata in tumor cells.

  11. Safety and efficacy of liposomal amphotericin B for the empirical therapy of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients

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    Miceli MH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marisa H Miceli1, Pranatharthi Chandrasekar21Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center, Dearborn, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Liposomal amphotericin B is a "true" liposomal formulation of amphotericin B with greatly reduced nephrotoxicity and minimal infusion-related toxicity. This broad spectrum polyene is well tolerated and effective against most invasive fungal infections. In view of the current limitations on diagnostic capability of invasive fungal infections, most clinicians are often compelled to use antifungal drugs in an empiric manner; liposomal amphotericin B continues to play an important role in the empiric management of invasive fungal infections, despite the recent availability of several other drugs in the azole and echinocandin classes.Keywords: invasive fungal infections, immunocompromised hosts, empiric therapy, polyenes, efficacy and safety

  12. A novel comprehensive set of fungal Real time PCR assays (fuPCR) for the detection of fungi in immunocompromised haematological patients-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Sebastian; Schuck, Anna; Kondakci, Mustafa; Haas, Rainer; Neuhausen, Nicole; Pfeffer, Klaus; Henrich, Birgit

    2016-12-01

    Fungal infections are recognized in an increasing number of patients with immunological deficits and are associated with high rates of mortality (Brown et al., 2012a). In this pilot-study, a rapid Real time PCR (fuPCR) was designed for the detection and differentiation of fungal pathogens in clinical specimens of haematological patients. The fuPCR, targeting the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) of rDNA region, is comprised of seven multiplex reactions, which were shown to be specific and sensitive for a comprehensive spectrum of clinically relevant fungal species. This was validated by testing respective fungal DNAs in each fuPCR reaction and 28 respiratory samples of fungal pneumonia-proven patients. Clinical sample sets of throat swab, EDTA-blood and blood sera from 50 patients with severe haematological malignancies, including haematopoietic stem cell transfer (HSCT), and samples from 30 healthy individuals were then analysed. In a first step, 198 samples of immunosuppressed patients were solely examined by fuPCR; and 50.8% (33/65) respiratory swabs, 4.8% (3/63) EDTA blood samples and 1.4% (1/70) blood serum samples were tested positive. In a second step, 56 respiratory samples of immunosuppressed patients and 30 of healthy individuals were simultaneously analysed by fuPCR and standard cultivation techniques. By both methods 30.4% (17/56) swabs of the immunocompromised patients were tested positive, 37.5% (21/56) were tested negative and 32.1% (18/56) were tested fuPCR positive and culture negative. In analysing the blood samples of the immunocompromised patients 5.4% (3/56) EDTA blood samples and 16.1% (9/56) sera samples were tested fuPCR-positive, whereas all samples of 30 healthy individuals with no signs of immunological deficits were tested negative by fuPCR. 38.9% (14/36) of the fungi detected in respiratory samples of the immunosuppressed patients, belonged to Candida spp., 47.2% (17/36) to Saccharomyces spp., 5.6% (2/36) to Cladosporium spp

  13. Impact of a 4th generation iterative reconstruction technique on image quality in low-dose computed tomography of the chest in immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, A.; Hennes, F.O.; Klink, T.; Schultzendorff, H.C. von; Hammerle, D.; Adam, G.; Regier, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Buhk, J.H. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology; Sehner, S. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology; Nagel, H.D. [Dr. HD Nagel, Science and Technology for Radiology, Buchholz (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the image quality of an iterative reconstruction (IR) technique in low-dose MDCT (LDCT) of the chest of immunocompromised patients in an intraindividual comparison to filtered back projection (FBP) and to evaluate the dose reduction capability. Materials and Methods: 30 chest LDCT scans were performed in immunocompromised patients (Brilliance iCT; 20 - 40 mAs; mean CTDIvol: 1.7 mGy). The raw data were reconstructed using FBP and the IR technique (iDose4 trademark, Philips, Best, The Netherlands) set to seven iteration levels. 30 routine-dose MDCT (RDCT) reconstructed with FBP served as controls (mean exposure: 116 mAs; mean CDTIvol: 7.6 mGy). Three blinded radiologists scored subjective image quality and lesion conspicuity. Quantitative parameters including CT attenuation and objective image noise (OIN) were determined. Results: In LDCT high iDose4 trademark levels lead to a significant decrease in OIN (FBP vs. iDose7: subscapular muscle 139.4 vs. 40.6 HU). The high iDose4 trademark levels provided significant improvements in image quality and artifact and noise reduction compared to LDCT FBP images. The conspicuity of subtle lesions was limited in LDCT FBP images. It significantly improved with high iDose4 trademark levels (> iDose4). LDCT with iDose4 trademark level 6 was determined to be of equivalent image quality as RDCT with FBP. Conclusion: iDose4 trademark substantially improves image quality and lesion conspicuity and reduces noise in low-dose chest CT. Compared to RDCT, high iDose4 trademark levels provide equivalent image quality in LDCT, hence suggesting a potential dose reduction of almost 80%. (orig.)

  14. Disseminated Gastrointestinal Mucormycosis in Immunocompromised Disease

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    Tae Sun Ha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic fungal infection mostly affecting immunocompromised patients and gastrointestinal mucormycosis is a rare and life-threatening. We describe a 31-year-old man with a history of idiopathic cyclic neutropenia who developed perforations of the stomach and intestine and intra-abdominal bleeding due to disseminated gastrointestinal mucormycosis after the initial operation.

  15. Limitations of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Mortensen, Klaus Leth; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2008-01-01

    Four cases are presented, immunosuppressed by at least three different mechanisms: one HIV-positive patient with a CD4 count of 0.29 x 10(6)/ml, one malnourished patient, and two kidney-transplanted patients. All patients had a negative interferon (IFN)-gamma test for suspected tuberculosis (TB...

  16. Strongyloides stercolaris infection mimicking a malignant tumour in a non-immunocompromised patient. Diagnosis by bronchoalveolar cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayayo, E; Gomez-Aracil, V; Azua-Blanco, J; Azua-Romeo, J; Capilla, J; Mayayo, R

    2005-01-01

    Autoinfective strongyloidiasis is often fatal in immunosuppressed patients or in immunocomprised hosts. An interesting case of Strongyloides stercolaris hyperinfection was seen in an immunocompetent patient. This report describes a case of fatal strogyloidiasis in a 79 year old man, who had suffered gastrointestinal discomfort for years, and who presented because of respiratory illness. A chest radiograph showed an irregular mass close to the mediastinum and interstitial infiltrates, but blood eosinophilia was not observed. Cytological examination of the samples obtained from bronchial aspiration and brushing identified several filariform larvae. Thus, cytology was essential for the correct diagnosis in this patient and is a very reliable method to diagnose lung parasitosis. PMID:15790710

  17. The clinical benefits of antiretroviral therapy in severely immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients with and without complete viral suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression.......The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression....

  18. Cost benefit and cost effectiveness of antifungal prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients treated for haematological malignancies : reviewing the available evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pechlivanoglou, Petros; De Vries, Robin; Daenen, Simon M. G. J.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a large increase in the incidence of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) over the past decades, largely because of the increasing size of the population at risk. One of the major risk groups for IFIs are patients with haematological malignancies treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy or un

  19. Purple patches in an immunocompromised patient: a report of secondary disseminated cutaneous mucormycosis in a man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Sanjana; Chambers, Cindy J; Millsop, Jillian W; Fung, Maxwell A; Sharon, Victoria R

    2017-03-15

    A 60-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemiadeveloped a deeply violaceous annular patchwith a halo of erythema on the right thigh duringhospitalization for neutropenic fever. Associatedsymptoms included chronic cough and fatigue.Bilateral lung opacities with hilar lymphadenopathywere noted on chest computed tomographyscan. Punch biopsy and tissue culture confirmeda diagnosis of secondary disseminated cutaneousmucormycosis. Although rare, physicians shouldinclude mucormycosis in the differential diagnosisof purpuric patches in immunosuppressed patients.Prompt skin biopsy and tissue culture may optimizethe success of treatment.

  20. Neumonía por virus parainfluenza 3 en paciente inmunocomprometido PARAINFLUENZA 3 PNEUMONIA IN AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA CRISTINA AJENJO H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Un paciente de 45 años bajo tratamiento corticoidal por una probable sarcoidosis y una pancitopenia moderada ingresa por una neumonía que no responde a antibióticos ni a tratamiento antimicótico indicado a raíz del aislamiento de Aspergillus fumigatus en expectoración. Desarrolla una insuficiencia respiratoria progresiva e hipotensión y una inmunofluorescencia para virus parainfluenza 3 resulta positiva. Fallece al séptimo día y la necropsia muestra una neumonía necrotizante, daño alveolar difuso y abundantes partículas viralesA 45 years old patient under corticosteroid treatment for a probable sarcoidosis and a moderate pancytopenia, presents a pneumonia which did not respond to antibiotics nor to antifungal treatment indicated after isolation of aspergillus fumigatus in sputum. He progressively develops respiratory insufficiency and arterial hypotension. Immunofluorescense for parainfluenza 3 is positive. He dies after seven days and the necropsy shows a necrotizing pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage and abundant viral particles

  1. Capítulo 8 - Infecções fúngicas em imunocomprometidos Chapter 8 - Fungal infections in immunocompromised patients

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    Rodney Frare e Silva

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As complicações pulmonares se constituem na maior causa de morbidade e mortalidade no hospedeiro imunocomprometido, devido à deficiência nos mecanismos básicos de defesa. Independente da causa da imunodepressão, infecções bacterianas, virais e fúngicas são as mais frequentes. Entre as infecções fúngicas, a aspergilose é a mais comum (incidência de 1-9% e mortalidade de 55-92% nos diferentes tipos de transplantados. Embora a forma pneumônica seja a mais frequente, lesões do sistema nervoso central e sinusite não são raras. O sinal do halo em TC de tórax representa uma área de baixa atenuação em volta do nódulo, revelando edema ou hemorragia. O padrão ouro para o diagnóstico é a identificação do fungo por cultura de escarro, amostras de LBA ou biópsia. Na falta dessa identificação, a detecção de galactomanana, um dos componentes da parede celular de Aspergillus sp., tem mostrado sensibilidade e especificidade de 89% e 98%, respectivamente. Anfotericina B, anfotericina B lipossomal, caspofungina e voriconazol têm efeito sobre o fungo, com destaque para esse último. A pneumonia por Pneumocystis jirovecii, que pode ser fatal, teve sua incidência reduzida pelo uso preventivo de sulfametoxazol/trimetoprima. Dispneia e hipoxemia em pacientes imunodeprimidos indicam a necessidade da pesquisa de fungos. O uso de sulfametoxazol/trimetoprima por 14-21 dias associado com corticosteroides costuma ser eficaz. A candidíase disseminada é outra rara enfermidade fúngica causada por Candida spp.Pulmonary complications are the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, who lack of the basic mechanisms of cellular defense. Regardless of the cause of the immunodeficiency, the most common complications are infections (bacterial, viral or fungal. Among the fungal infections, aspergillosis is the most common (incidence, 1-9%; mortality, 55-92% following organ transplant. Although pulmonary

  2. Diagnostic value of bronchoalveolar lavage in immunocompromised patients with pneumonia%支气管肺泡灌洗在免疫抑制患者肺部感染中的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐翠萍; 张波

    2014-01-01

    肺部感染是导致免疫抑制患者死亡的重要原因之一.支气管肺泡灌洗是研究肺泡表面液细胞成分和可溶性物质的一种方法,被广泛用于免疫抑制宿主肺部病变的诊断中,是下呼吸道微生物取样的标准方法.现将支气管肺泡灌洗在免疫抑制患者肺部感染中的诊断价值作一综述.%Pneumonia is a major cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients.Bronchoalveolar lavage,as a tool for investigation of the cellular and soluble components in alveolar lining fluid,has been extensively used for diagnosis of pulmonary disease in immunocompromised hosts.It has become a standard tool in investigation of lower respiratory pathogens.This paper reviews the diagnostic value of bronchoalveolar lavage in immunocompromised patients with pneumonia.

  3. Infections by protozoa in immunocompromised hosts

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    Ferreira Marcelo Simão

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoa are among the most important pathogens that can cause infection in immunocompromised patients. They infect particularly individuals with impaired cell immunity, such as those with hematologic neoplasias, those submitted to transplant of solid organs, those under high-dose corticosteroid therapy, and carriers of the human immunodeficiency virus. Among the protozoa that most commonly cause disease in immunocompromised individuals are Toxoplasma gondii, Trypanosoma cruzi, Cryptosporidium parvum, Isospora belli, Cyclospora cayetanensis and microsporidia; the former two cause severe encephalitis and myocarditis, and the others cause gastrointestinal infections. Early diagnosis and prompt institution of specific therapy for each of these organisms are basic measures to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with these infections.

  4. Diagnosis of Cellulitis in the Immunocompromised Host

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    Charles F Carey

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study of diagnostic techniques in cellulitis was performed on 28 patients with malignancy. Twenty-two (78% of the fine needle aspiration cultures and 10 (35% of the blood cultures were positive in this immunocompromised population. The incidence of positive fine needle aspiration cultures (P<0.005 or bacteremia (P<0.0005 was significantly higher than results obtained in an immunocompetent population with cellulitis at the same institution. Staphylococci or streptococci were recovered in 59% of positive cultures, while aerobic Gram-negative bacilli grew in 33%. This study indicates that in the immunocompromised population with cellulitis, fine needle aspiration and blood cultures should be obtained, and the antibiotic regimen should cover Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative bacilli pending the results of cultures.

  5. Invasive trichosporonosis due to Trichosporon asahii in a non-immunocompromised host: A rare case report

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    Rastogi V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of invasive Trichosporonosis due to Trichosporon asahii in an otherwise healthy young adult male presenting as meningoencephalitis and pneumonia is reported here. T. asahii was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid and sputum of the patient and morphologic forms of organism was also demonstrated on direct Gram stain of sputum. The isolate was identified as T. asahii. The patient partially responded to fluconazole therapy. Our case suggests that T. asahii can no longer be linked with Trichospronosis in immunocompromised patient alone and any case of meningitis needs thorough mycological workup for its correct etiological identification and appropriate management.

  6. Altered CD8+ T-cell counts as an early predictor of prognosis in critically ill immunocompromised patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Na; Wang Hao; Long Yun; Liu Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of critically ill immunocompromised (CIIC) patients has increased dramatically in recent years,and they represent a high risk population for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) infection.Host immunity should play a major role in determining the outcome and recovery of these patients.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamic changes in host immune status and its potential influence on prognosis in CIIC patients with IPA.Methods We monitored the evolution of a number of key cellular and humoral parameters on days 1,3,and 10 (D1,D3 and D10) following ICU admission in sixty-two CIIC patients with microbiological evidence of IPA.We included immunoglobulins IgG,IgA and IgM,complement factors C3 and C4,and lymphocyte subgroups CD3+,CD4+,CD8+,CD28+CD4+,and CD28+CD8+ T cells,CD19+B cells,and CD3-CD16+CD56+ natural killer cells (NK).Results The primary outcome was 28-day mortality.Thirty-eight (61.3%) patients died within the 28 days following ICU admission.Compared to patients who died,CD3+,CD8+,CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts on D1,D3,and D10,CD28+CD4+ T-cell counts on D3 and D10,and NK counts on D3 and D10 were significantly higher in survivors.Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of immune parameters predicting 28-day mortality revealed area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.82 (95% CI 0.71-0.92),0.94 (95% CI 0.87-0.99),and 0.94 (95% CI 0.85-0.99) for CD8+ T-cell counts for D1,D3,and D10 respectively,and 0.84 (95% CI 0.75-0.94),0.92 (95% CI 0.85-0.99),and 0.90 (95% CI 0.79-0.99) for CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts for D1,D3,and D10 respectively.Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that CD8+ T-cell counts <149.5×106 cells/L and CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts <75×106 cells/L at ICU admission were associated with lower survival probabilities in CIIC patients with IPA (both Log rank:P<0.001).Conclusions Low CD8+ and CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts were associated with high mortality in CIIC patients with IPA.Early counts of CD8+ and

  7. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12 months after a successful transplant, regardless of vaccination history; at least 4 weeks should separate doses. 7 ... supplemental doses for splenectomized patients with incomplete Hib vaccination histories. PCV13 vaccine is recommended for asplenic patients and ...

  8. Economic analysis of empiric versus diagnostic-driven strategies for immunocompromised patients with suspected fungal infections in the People's Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao NY

    2016-06-01

    in immunocompromised patients with suspected IFIs. Keywords: aspergillosis, cost-effectiveness analysis, voriconazole, caspofungin, itraconazole

  9. [Usefulness of topical cidofovir treatment for recalcitrant molluscum contagiosum in immunocompromised children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, M; Lepêcheur, V; Rachieru-Sourisseau, P; Réguerre, Y; Pellier, I; Martin, L

    2012-11-01

    Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is common and often numerous and recalcitrant in immunocompromised children. The response to available treatments is frequently unsatisfactory. Cidofovir is a nucleoside analog of the deoxycytidine antiviral drug approved for the intravenous treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis in AIDS patients. We report four cases of children, 5-8 years old, who developed extensive MC in the context of chemotherapy for acute lymphoid leukemia and who were treated with a cream containing cidofovir 1%. In all patients, the lesions began to regress within 2 to 4 months. For three patients, complete regression was observed in 7 to 9 months, and the children remained clear of recurrence. For one patient, partial regression was obtained after 17 months of treatment. No side effects have been observed. Treatment of MC in immunocompromised children is difficult because the usual treatments are inappropriate. Successful use of either topically or intralesionally administered cidofovir in several virally induced cutaneous diseases has been demonstrated and recently documented in the treatment of MC in immunocompromised adults. Conversely, its use in children is not documented. Although intravenous use of cidofovir may lead to severe adverse effects, one single case of a systemic side effect has been reported after topical use at a greater concentration, but no changes in laboratory data were observed. Topical cidofovir offers an effective and well-tolerated therapeutic alternative option for the treatment of MC in immunosuppressed children.

  10. A preliminary study of the prevalence of intestinal parasites in immunocompromised patients with and without gastrointestinal manifestations Frequência de parasitas intestinais em pacientes imunocomprometidos com e sem manifestações gastrointestinais: estudo preliminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Humberto Botero

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of the intestinal parasites most commonly found in immunocompromised patients. A group of 111 individuals with acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other immunocompromised conditions (principally haematological disorders was selected. A battery of tests was performed on each individual to identify the presence of parasites (three stool specimens with saline solution and Lugol both directly and by concentration, culture and special staining. No significant differences were found among the frequencies of the different parasites with the several types of immunocompromised conditions. The overall frequencies of potentially pathogenic and opportunistic parasites were 32.4% (36/111 and 9% (10/111 respectively, the most frequently encountered among the latter being Cryptosporidium sp., Microsporidia spp. and Strongyloides stercoralis.O objetivo do presente estudo é avaliar a frequência de parasitas intestinais em pacientes com alterações imunológicas. Foram analisadas 111 pessoas com leucemia linfóide aguda (LLA, leucemia mieloide crônica, virus da imunodeficiência humana (VIH e outras doenças, principalmente alterações sanguíneas. Para cada indivíduo foram realizados exames seriados de fezes tanto com solução salina quanto com lugol #3, direto e por concentração, culturas de fezes e colorações específicas. Não houve diferenças significativas na frequência de parasitoses nos distintos grupos avaliados. A frequência de parasitas potencialmente patogênicos foi de 32.4% (36/111 enquanto a de parasitas oportunistas foi de 9.0% (10/111. As espécies mais observadas foram C. parvum, microsporídios spp. e S. stercoralis.

  11. Use of prophylactic antifungals in the immunocompromised host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ship, Jonathan A.; Vissink, Arjan; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    This literature review assessed the effectiveness of interventions for the prevention of oral candidiasis in immunocompromised patients and in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. The studies reviewed provide strong evidence that oral candidiasis is associated with greater

  12. Tula hantavirus infection in immunocompromised host, Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelená, Hana; Mrázek, Jakub; Kuhn, Tomáš

    2013-11-01

    We report molecular evidence of Tula hantavirus as an etiologic agent of pulmonary-renal syndrome in an immunocompromised patient. Acute hantavirus infection was confirmed by using serologic and molecular methods. Sequencing revealed Tula virus genome RNA in the patient's blood. This case shows that Tula virus can cause serious disease in humans.

  13. Food irradiation: Special solutions for the immuno-compromised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla

    2016-12-01

    Safety of food is particularly important for immuno-compromised patients, because these people are vulnerable to all sorts of infectious complications and foodborne pathogens as well, and even organisms normally considered non-pathogenic may cause problems. According to the guidelines published by the FDA, immunocompromised patients have to avoid high-risk foods, and advised to consume only pasteurized juice, milk or cheese, and well-cooked eggs, poultry, meat and fish. In the frame of an IAEA CRP the objective was to develop, in collaborations with the healthcare community, the use of irradiation to increase the variety, availability and acceptability of foods for immunocompromised, for example irradiated fresh produce (fruits, vegetables, salads) and ready-to-eat meals. Further aim was to widen the acceptance of irradiated foods by the healthcare and regulatory communities.

  14. First Case of Lung Abscess due to Salmonella enterica Serovar Abony in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient

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    Vassiliki Pitiriga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, nontyphoidal Salmonella species predominantly cause a self-limited form of gastroenteritis, while they infrequently invade or cause fatal disease. Extraintestinal manifestations of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections are not common and mainly occur among individuals with specific risk factors; among them, focal lung infection is a rare complication caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella strains typically occurring in immunocompromised patients with prior lung disease. We describe the first case of a localized lung abscess formation in an immunocompetent healthy female adult due to Salmonella enterica serovar Abony. The patient underwent lobectomy and was discharged after full clinical recovery. This case report highlights nontyphoidal Salmonellae infections as a potential causative agent of pleuropulmonary infections even in immunocompetent healthy adults.

  15. Human Bocavirus in an Immunocompromised Child Presenting with Severe Diarrhea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Jutte J. C.; Bredius, Robbert G. M.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Smiers, Frans J. W.; Scholvinck, Elizabeth H.; Vossen, Ann C. T. M.; Claas, Eric C. J.; Niesters, Hubert G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is frequently detected in young children with respiratory symptoms. However, the prevalence and pathogenicity of HBoV in immunocompromised patients are largely unknown. This report describes a case of life-threatening hypovolemic shock due to diarrhea associated with dissemina

  16. Opportunistic intestinal protozoal infections in immunocompromised children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldin, M S; Shaltout, A A; El Hamshary, E M; Ali, M E

    1999-01-01

    Hundred immunocompromised children and 100 house contact controls were chosen. Patients included: 52 nephrotic syndrome children receiving corticosteroids for more than one month (age 5.28 +/- 2.32 years), 14 protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) patients (8 cases of marasmus aged 6 +/- 2.27 months and 6 cases of marasmic kwashiorkor aged 1.39 +/- 0.88 years) and 34 lymphomas patients (22 cases of Hodgkin's disease and 12 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; age 4.5 +/- 3.54 years). Examination of concentrated stool was done using iodine stain of fresh mounts and modified Ziehl-Neelsen (cold acid-fast) to fixed smears. T-cell subsets were counted after staining with mouse monoclonal antibodies against CD4 and CD8 labeled with fluorescein. Both nephrotic syndrome and lymphomas groups showed affection of cellular immunity in the form of significant decrease in T-helper and H/S ratio and significant increase in suppressor T-cell subsets. Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium parvum and Blastocystis hominis were the most frequent in patients group and were significantly more prevalent among patients than controls. No significant difference in the prevalence of Entamoeba coli and Chylomastix mesnili between the two groups. C. parvum infection were strictly confined to groups with T-cell subsets abnormalities i.e. nephrotic syndrome and lymphomas groups.

  17. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  18. Patient education for adults with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsma, R.P.; Kirwan, J.R.; Taal, E.; Rasker, H.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Patient education shows short-term benefits for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of patient education interventions on health status (pain, functional disability, psychological well-being and disease activity) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  19. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  20. Roseolovirus-associated encephalitis in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongrádi, Joseph; Ablashi, Dharam V; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Stercz, Balázs; Ogata, Masao

    2017-02-01

    The roseoloviruses, human herpesvirus (HHV)-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-7, can cause severe encephalitis or encephalopathy. In immunocompetent children, primary HHV-6B infection is occasionally accompanied by diverse clinical forms of encephalitis. Roseolovirus coinfections with heterologous viruses and delayed primary HHV-7 infection in immunocompetent adults result in very severe neurological and generalized symptoms. Recovery from neurological sequelae is slow and sometimes incomplete. In immunocompromised patients with underlying hematological malignancies and transplantation, frequent single or simultaneous reactivation of roseoloviruses elicit severe, lethal organ dysfunctions, including damages in the limbic system, brain stem, and hippocampus. Most cases have been due to HHV-6B with HHV-6A accounting for 2-3%. The most severe manifestation of HHV-6B reactivation is post-transplantation limbic encephalitis. Seizures, cognitive problems, and abnormal EEG are common. Major risk factors for HHV-6B-associated encephalitis include unrelated cord blood cell transplantation and repeated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Rare genetic disorders, male gender, certain HLA constellation, and immune tolerance to replicating HHV-6 in persons carrying chromosomally integrated HHV-6 might also predispose an individual to roseolovirus-associated brain damage. At this time, little is known about the risk factors for HHV-7-associated encephalitis. Intrathecal glial cell destruction due to virus replication, overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines, and viral mimicry of chemokines all contribute to brain dysfunction. High virus load in the cerebrospinal fluid, hippocampal astrogliosis, and viral protein expression in HHV-6B-associated cases and multiple microscopic neuronal degeneration in HHV-7-associated cases are typical laboratory findings. Early empirical therapy with ganciclovir or foscarnet might save the life of a patient with roseolovirus-associated encephalitis.

  1. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of amphotericin B colloidal dispersion versus amphotericin B for treatment of invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Raleigh; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi; White, Mary H; Li, Xin; Pietrelli, Larry; Gurwith, Marc; van Burik, Jo-Anne; Laverdiere, Michel; Safrin, Sharon; Wingard, John R

    2002-08-15

    We report a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial in which amphotericin B colloidal dispersion (ABCD [Amphotec]; 6 mg/kg/day) was compared with amphotericin B (AmB; 1.0-1.5 mg/kg/day) for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis in 174 patients. For evaluable patients in the ABCD and AmB treatment groups, respective rates of therapeutic response (52% vs. 51%; P=1.0), mortality (36% vs. 45%; P=.4), and death due to fungal infection (32% vs. 26%; P=.7) were similar. Renal toxicity was lower (25% vs. 49%; P=.002) and the median time to onset of nephrotoxicity was longer (301 vs. 22 days; P<.001) in patients treated with ABCD. Rates of drug-related toxicity in patients receiving ABCD and AmB, respectively, were 53% versus 30% (chills), 27% versus 16% (fever), 1% versus 4% (hypoxia) and 22% versus 24% (toxicity requiring study drug discontinuation). ABCD appears to have equivalent efficacy and superior renal safety, compared with AmB, in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis. However, infusion-related chills and fever occurred more frequently in patients receiving ABCD than in those receiving AmB.

  2. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    AIDS patients and pets; Bone marrow transplant patients and pets; Chemotherapy patients and pets ... systems may be advised to give up their pets to avoid getting diseases from the animals. People ...

  3. Topical cidofovir-induced acute kidney injury in two severely immunocompromised patients with refractory multidrug-resistant herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Ila M; Lahoti, Amit; Chemaly, Roy F; Trevino, Cynthia; Westmoreland, Michael; Hosing, Chitra

    2016-04-01

    Cidofovir, a nucleoside analog of deoxycytidine monophosphate, is a water-soluble polar molecule that exhibits antiviral activity against a broad range of DNA viruses. Cidofovir for injection is approved for the treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The safety and efficacy of topical cidofovir has been described in a limited number of patients. We present two cases of multidrug-resistant herpes simplex virus infections that responded to topical cidofovir therapy yet resulted in irreversible acute kidney injury.

  4. Autopsy-proven causes of death in lungs of patients immunocompromised by secondary interstitial pneumonia Causas de óbito por pneumonia intersticial secundária em autópsias pulmonares de pacientes imunocomprometidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Antonio Terrabuio Junior

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present the more frequent associations found in autopsies of immunocompromised patients who developed secondary interstitial pneumonia as well as the risk of death (odds ratio in having specific secondary interstitial pneumonia according to the cause of immunocompromise. METHOD: From January 1994 to March 2004, 17,000 autopsies were performed at Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School. After examining the pathology report review, we selected 558 of these autopsies (3.28% from patients aged 15 years or more with primary underlying diseases who developed radiologically diffuse infiltrates of the lung during their hospital course and died after secondary interstitial pneumonia (bronchopneumonia, lobar pneumonia, interstitial pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary recurrence of underlying disease, drug-induced lung disease, cardiogenic pulmonary edema, or pulmonary embolism. Histology slides were reviewed by experienced pathologists to confirm or not the presence of secondary interstitial pneumonia. Statistical analysis included the Fisher exact test to verify any association between histopathology and the cause of immunocompromise; a logistic regression was used to predict the risk of death for specific histological findings for each of the independent variables in the model. RESULTS: Secondary interstitial pneumonia was histologically represented by diffuse interstitial pneumonitis ranging from mild nonspecific findings (n = 213 to a pattern of diffuse alveolar damage (n = 273. The principal causes of immunocompromise in patients with diffuse alveolar damage were sepsis (136 cases, neoplasia (113 cases, diabetes mellitus (37 cases, and transplantation (48 cases. A high risk of death by pulmonary edema was found for patients with carcinoma of colon. Similarly, in patients with lung cancer or cachexia, A high risk of death by bronchopneumonia (OR = 3.6; OR = 2.6, respectively was found. Pulmonary

  5. Challenges in Treating Secondary Syphilis Osteitis in an Immunocompromised Patient with a Penicillin Allergy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that remains fairly commonplace. The introduction of penicillin aided in curbing the incidence of disease; however, with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, syphilis is now on a resurgence with sometimes curious presentations. We present a case of a 36-year-old Caucasian gentleman with untreated HIV who complained of a skin eruption and joint pains for 6 weeks, prompting the diagnosis of secondary syphilis osteitis. Skin lesions were reminiscent of “malignant” syphilis. CD4 count was 57 cells/μL. RPR was elevated with 1 : 64 titer and positive confirmatory TP-PA. Radiography of the limbs revealed polyostotic cortical irregularities corroborated on bone scintigraphy. The patient had an unknown penicillin allergy and was unwilling to conduct a trial of penicillin-based therapy. He was subsequently treated with doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for 6 weeks and commenced antiretroviral therapy, noting dramatic improvement in both the skin lesions and joint pains. Unfortunately, he defaulted on follow-up, precluding serial RPR and bone imaging. Penicillin allergies have proven to be quite a conundrum in such patients, without much recourse for alternative therapy. Doxycycline with/without azithromycin is other options worth considering.

  6. The identification of Candida species isolated from clinical specimens of immunocompromised patients with PCR and determination of antifungal resistance genes with RFLP and sequencing analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız Yeğenoğlu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate PCRtechnique and antifungal resistance genes with RFLP andsequencing analysis in Candida species isolated fromclinical specimens of immune-compromised patients.Materials and methods: Clinical samples (96 bronchoalveolarlavages, 56 biopsy-abscess, 8 blood specimens,15 peritoneal fluid specimens, 15 pleural fluid, 5 cerebrospinalfluid and 5 pericard fluid specimens from 200 immunosuppressedpatients were studied by conventionaland molecular methods. Antifungal susceptibility testingwas performed by the E-test method. Firstly, fungal DNAwas isolated from specimens, and then the resultantproducts are defined with multiplex PCR. Antifungal resistanceand resistance genes were established by E-testand RFLP analysis.Results: Thirty of 200 samples (15% were culture positive[20 Candida albicans (67%, five Candida parapsilosis(17%, five Candida tropicalis (17%], and 170 ofsamples were found culture negative (85%. PCR with theuniversal primers detected fungal DNA in all 30 culturepositive samples. One strain was determined as resistant;2 strains were dose dependent susceptible and 27 strainswere sensitive to fluconazole by E-test. The resistancegene (ERG11 was detected by BamHI and SalI enzymesrevealed fluconazole resistance in one of C.albicansstrains. The identification was successful in Candida dubliniensis(950 bp and Candida krusei (360 bp with multiplexPCR. D132E and E216D mutations were detected insequencing of ERG 11 gene of this isolate and comparedwith reference gene in GenBank by clustal analysis.Conclusion: The molecular test methods supplies correcttherapy rather early in immunosuppressive patientstherefore it is important for the survival.

  7. Diagnóstico rápido de citomegalovirus (CMV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos mediante anticuerpos monoclonales que reconocen proteinas precoces virales Rapid diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompromised patients by using monoclonal antibodies against early viral antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Alvarez

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Se aplicó la técnica de detección de antigenos precoces fluorescentes (DAPF usando el anticuerpo monoclonal E-13 McAb, mediante el cual se lograron detectar 15 casos positivos a CMV de 75 muestras de orina o sangre ("buffy coat" tomadas de 52 pacientes inmunocomprometidos ingresados en el Instituto de Nefrología de ciudad Habana. Aplicando las técnicas clásicas de aislamiento en fibroblastos humanos diploides (MRC-5, se lograron aislar 12 cepas de CMV de casos previamente positivos por DAPF; lográndose además un aislamiento en una muestra reportada negativa por fluorescencia. Se observó una coincidencia de un 80% entre ambas técnicas. Se detectó la presencia de anticuerpos IgG contra CMV en todos los casos estudiados, utilizando para ello la técnica ELISA.A technique was applied to detect early fluorescent antigens (DEFA of cytomegalovirus (CMV using the E13 monoclonal antibodies in 52 immunocompromised patients hospitalized in the Nephrology Institute of Havana. Of the 75 urine or blood (buffy coat samples taken, 15 were found positive to CMV. Using classical diploide human fibroblast isolation technique, 12 CMV strains were isloation of previously detected positive samples by DEFA. In addition, CMV was isolated from one sample reported to be negative by DEFA. A coincidence of 80% was found between both techniques. With the ELISA test, all the sample studied have IgG antibodies to CMV.

  8. Aneurysms complicating inflammatory diseases in immunocompromised hosts: value of contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heussel, C.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Heussel, G. [Dept. of Hematology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Mildenberger, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Dueber, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    We studied the value of contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of aneurysms in immunocompromised patients suffering from inflammatory diseases eventually complicated by hemorrhage. Contrast-enhanced spiral CT was applied in three patients with immunocompromise due to chemotherapy, alcohol abuse or HIV. They suffered from invasive aspergillosis, chronic pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation, and acute pancreatitis together with HIV-associated lymphadenopathy. Complicating hemorrhage was present in two cases. Contrast-enhanced CT showed aneurysms complicating the underlying inflammatory disease in all three cases. The feeding vessels were identified and the patients with signs of bleeding were subsequently referred for angiography and embolization. Contrast-enhanced spiral CT is suited to detect aneurysms in immunocompromised patients suffering from inflammatory disease. It is recommended in these patients prior to angiography and intervention. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  9. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male patient presented with fever, epistaxis and multiple lymphadenopathy since 15 days. In the light of the above presentation a complete workup was initiated to exclude common conditions like tuberculosis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, lymphoid malignancy and sarcoidosis. After excluding common conditions a biopsy of cervical lymph node demonstrated reactive lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated double negative lymphocytes (CD4-, CD8-. A diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder syndrome (ALPS (probable was made and patient was started on 1 mg/kg of steroids. Patient showed a dramatic improvement with respect to general wellbeing, fever and regression of lymphadenopathy. This entity of ALPS has been recently identified and classified; most of the reports are from the pediatric population. To the best of our knowledge ours is one of the few cases of this entity being reported in an adult patient from India.

  10. Pentamidine as secondary prophylaxis for visceral leishmaniasis in the immunocompromised host: report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, T A; Lockwood, D N

    2009-09-01

    We report a retrospective and descriptive study of four immunocompromised patients (three with HIV-1 and one with idiopathic CD4+-lymphopenia) with relapsing visceral leishmaniasis seen at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, in whom pentamidine was used as secondary prophylaxis to prevent relapse. Patients experienced between one and four relapses before commencing prophylaxis with subsequent relapse-free periods ranging from 5 to 98 months. Based on these observational data, we recommend large trials to investigate the efficacy of pentamidine over other agents in preventing relapse of VL in the immunocompromised patient.

  11. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  12. Immunity to Diphtheria in Haemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolreza S. Jahromi; Mortaza Pourahmd; Sara Azhdari; Gita Manshoori; Abdolhossain Madani; Seyed H. Moosavy

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The incidence of infectious diseases is increased in patients with chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure severely influences the immune functions of the host. Diphtheria is of great epidemiological concern. Although mainly observed during childhood, unvaccinated adults and relatively immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for acquiring diphtheria. Approach: To evaluate the anti-Diphtheria immunity level in southern Iranian patients ...

  13. Cranial CT of the unconscious adult patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harden, S.P. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dey, C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Gawne-Cain, M.L. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mary.gawne@suht.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-05-15

    Unconscious patients are frequently referred to radiology departments for computed tomography (CT) of the brain. The objectives of these examinations are to define the underlying cause of impaired consciousness and in some cases to determine the severity of associated brain injury. There is often little history available to guide the clinician or radiologist, particularly in patients referred from the casualty department. In this review, we present the typical CT appearances of adult patients presenting with loss of consciousness for CT examination. We focus on the most common abnormalities that are identified in everyday radiological practice, emphasize important diagnostic signs that may enable a confident diagnosis to be made and discuss when further imaging may be warranted.

  14. Voriconazole-Resistant Penicillium oxalicum: An Emerging Pathogen in Immunocompromised Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Kathuria, Shallu; Agarwal, Kshitij; Sachdeva, Neelam; Singh, Pradeep K.; Jain, Sandeep; Meis, Jacques F.

    2014-01-01

    Penicillium species are rarely reported agents of infections in immunocompromised patients. We report 3 cases of invasive mycosis caused by voriconazole-resistant Penicillium oxalicum in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, while on voriconazole therapy. Penicillium oxalicum has not been previously recognized as a cause of invasive mycoses.

  15. Cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Rutten, Frans H; Kors, Jan A;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias in asthma patients has not been fully elucidated. Adverse drug effects, particularly those of β2-mimetics, may play a role. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma is associated with the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardio......OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias in asthma patients has not been fully elucidated. Adverse drug effects, particularly those of β2-mimetics, may play a role. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma is associated with the risk of cardiac arrhythmias...... and electrocardiographic characteristics of arrhythmogenicity (ECG) and to explore the role of β2-mimetics. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 158 adult patients with a diagnosis of asthma and 6303 participants without asthma from the cohort of the Utrecht Health Project-an ongoing, longitudinal, primary...... or flutter). Secondary outcomes were tachycardia, bradycardia, PVC, atrial fibrillation or flutter, mean heart rate, mean corrected QT (QTc) interval length, and prolonged QTc interval. RESULTS: Tachycardia and PVCs were more prevalent in patients with asthma (3% and 4%, respectively) than those without...

  16. Emerging pathogen in immunocompromised hosts: Exophiala dermatitidis mycosis in graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, S; Alonso, C D; Levine, J D; Wong, M T

    2014-08-01

    Infection with the dematiaceous environmental fungus Exophiala, an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Herein, we report the first Exophiala dermatitidis fungemia case, to our knowledge, in an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient with graft-versus-host disease, expanding the clinical setting where Exophiala species mycosis should be suspected.

  17. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and meningitis in immunocompromised children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, A H; Patrick, C C; McCullers, J A; Flynn, P M; Pearson, T A; Razzouk, B I; Thompson, S J; Shenep, J L

    2001-05-15

    Two cases of Bacillus cereus meningitis in immunocompromised children at our hospital within a 2-month period prompted us to review B. cereus--related invasive disease. We identified 12 patients with B. cereus isolated in blood cultures from September 1988 through August 2000 at our institution. Three of these patients also had B. cereus isolated from CSF specimens; 1 additional patient had possible CNS involvement (33%, group A), whereas 8 patients had no evidence of CNS involvement (67%, group B). Patients in group A were more likely to have neutropenia at the onset of sepsis and were more likely to have an unfavorable outcome. They were also more likely to have received intrathecal chemotherapy in the week before the onset of their illness. Two patients from group A died. One survived with severe sequelae. The fourth patient had mild sequelae at follow-up. No sequelae or deaths occurred among patients in group B. In patients with unfavorable outcomes, the interval from the time of recognition of illness to irreversible damage or death was short, which demonstrates a need for increased awareness, early diagnosis, and more-effective therapy, particularly that which addresses B. cereus toxins.

  18. The predictive value of clinical and radiographic features in fungal pathogen identification in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary invasive fungal infection%肺侵袭性真菌感染患者临床与影像学特征对真菌病原体的提示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷兴丽; 曹明芹; 徐思成; 万秋风; 刘光明; 王静; 刘文亚

    2016-01-01

    液的判断价值大(均 P <0.05),预测判别的准确率为77.6%。结论对于免疫抑制合并肺 IFI 患者,多数危险因素、临床和 HRCT 主要特征不能提示真菌病原体,而且 BALF 分离的非隐球菌之类酵母菌可能是伴随菌或定植菌。%Objective To investigate the predictive value of clinical and radiographic features in fungal pathogen identification in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary invasive fungal infection (IFI).Methods All consecutive immunocompromised adult patients with pulmonary IFI in respiratory intensive care unit (ICU)in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University were recruited during a 2 year period.All patients met the 2008 European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Mycoses Study Group (EORTC /MSG) criteria were studied for proved or probable IFI responding to antifungal agents.The data of demographic,clinical and radiographic features,as well as serological test results of the patients were collected.Differences in the clinical and radiographic features of pulmonary IFIs caused by yeasts and molds were compared by χ2 test.A logistic regression model was used to perform discriminant analysis,and the effect of discrimination was assessed for accuracy.Results The study included 143 patients with a probable diagnosis of IFI who had the following risk factors:diabetes mellitus (43.4%),chronic lung disease (32.2%),broad-spectrum antibiotics administration (≥14 days;35.7%),malignancy (23.1%),corticosteroid therapy (≥14 days;23.1%),chronic renal failure and renal replacement therapy (16.1%),and immunological disease (10.5%).Frequent broad-spectrum antibiotics administration was associated with yeast infection (P <0.05 ),while mold infection was associated with chronic lung disease (P <0.05 ) .Yeast was more often isolated from patients with concurrent bacterial infection and on mechanical ventilation (P <0.05 ) . Thoracic high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT)showed the

  19. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients: comparing adults and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henyse Gómez Valiente da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category Methods: Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. Results: A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p < 0.01 and a lower frequency of being overweight (7% vs. 15.1%, p < 0.01 than adults. Both, adult and older adults had a high frequency of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. The older adults had lower consumption of calories, intake of iron and folic acid. Inadequacy of vitamin intake was observed in both groups; respectively, 52%, 43%, 95%, 76% and 88% for Vitamin A, C, D, E and folic acid. The older adults had a higher folic acid and calcium inadequacy than the adults (97% vs 82%, p <0.01; 88% vs 72%, p < 0.01. There was no association of micronutrient intake with cancer, nor with nutritional status. Conclusion: The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category.

  20. "Mycobacterium tilburgii" infection in two immunocompromised children: Importance of molecular tools in culture-negative mycobacterial disease diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G. Hartwig (Nico); A. Warris (Adilia); E. van de Vosse (Esther); A. van der Zanden (Adri); T. Schülin-Casonato (Tanja); J. van Ingen (Jakko); R.M. van Hest (Reinier)

    2011-01-01

    textabstract"Mycobacterium tilburgii" is a nontuberculous mycobacterium that cannot be cultured by current techniques. It is described as causing disseminated disease in adults. We present the first cases of disseminated disease in 2 immunocompromised children. This paper stresses the importance of

  1. "Mycobacterium tilburgii" Infection in Two Immunocompromised Children: Importance of Molecular Tools in Culture-Negative Mycobacterial Disease Diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartwig, N.G.; Warris, A.; Vosse, E. van de; Zanden, A.G. van der; Schulin-Casonato, T.; Ingen, J. van; Hest, R. van

    2011-01-01

    "Mycobacterium tilburgii" is a nontuberculous mycobacterium that cannot be cultured by current techniques. It is described as causing disseminated disease in adults. We present the first cases of disseminated disease in 2 immunocompromised children. This paper stresses the importance of molecular te

  2. Microbiological, physicochemical and sensory evaluation of cabbage and carrot minimally processed salad after radiation treatment intended to immunocompromised patients or with special diets; Avaliacao microbiologica, fisico-quimica e sensorial de salada de repolho com cenoura minimamente processada apos o tratamento por radiacao gama destinado a pacientes imunocomprometidos ou com dietas especiais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Thaise Cristine Fernandes

    2015-09-01

    During and after the treatment of cancer, people with HIV or transplants, the food intake can offer a well-being to the patient, because the action of eating right helps people to feel strong. Healthy people have their immune system working properly and can tolerate small amounts of bacteria. However, immunocompromised persons may not be able to and however immunocompromised people cannot fight this small amount of microorganisms and require a diet with very low microbiological count to avoid contact with potentially harmful bacteria. This is called neutropenic diet. These patients are susceptible to food contamination, so that it's not advisable the ingestion of raw products. The vegetable irradiation with low doses has the purpose of reducing the microbial load. The aim of this study was to obtain data on microbiological, sensorial e physicochemical aspects in minimally processed 'Primavera' salad irradiated with different doses of gamma radiation designed to immunocompromised patients. It were used doses of 1.0kGy, 2.0kGy, 3.0kGy and 4.0kGy irradiated in the Multipurpose Irradiator {sup 60}Co located in Radiation Technology Center. Microbiological analyzes were performed (n=25) using Petrifilm, sensory analysis using the sensory acceptance test (n=30) and triangular (n=15) and texture analysis (n=90) in the Food Microbiology Laboratory located at the Radiation Technology Center. The texture analysis was performed with the aid of a texturometer equipped with 5 kg load cell using a triangular cutting Warner-Bratzler Knife blade probe with the descent speed of 2mm/sec. All results were expressed in Newtons (N). The results showed that for microbiological analyzes the standards were followed according to the RDC 12/01 ANVISA. For the sensory test of acceptation no difference was found among the samples, however in the triangular test could be found slight differences between samples irradiated with 4.0kGy and control and there was significant

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Inconspicuous Infection of Aeromonas hydrophila in an Immunocompromised Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chun Liao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of serious necrotizing fasciitis due to Aeromonas hydrophila without a suggestive history of routes of pathogen invasion in a 60-year-old male. Despite prompt broad-spectrum antibiotic and extensive surgical therapies, the patient died within 72 hours following initial presentation. Our experience suggests clinicians be highly alert to the disease when an immunocompromised patient featured fulminant soft-tissue infection in the endemic area.

  4. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  5. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    duTreil S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sue duTreil Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. Keywords: adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, adherence, physical challenges, psychosocial challenges, health-related quality of life

  6. Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection among immunocompro-mised and immunocompetent humans in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaia Saif ABU-AKKADA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Encephalitozoon cuniculi infects a wide range of homoeothermic animals, including man. Complications due to this microsporidian have been reported only in immunocompromised patients. Reports on E. cuniculi in immunocompetent humans are lacking, most probably, because it is not linked to any clinical manifestations in such hosts. The present work was carried out with the aim of studying, for the first time in Egypt, the prevalence of E. cuniculi infection of urinary tract among non-HIV immunocompromised patients and immunocompetent individuals. It tested also the influence of some factors on the risk of infection.Methods: Blood and urine samples were collected from 88 persons (44 non-HIV immunocompromised patients and 44 subjects as immunocompetent control group. IFAT serological assay and Weber’s green modified trichrome stain (MTS urine smears were carried out. Molecular study by PCR was also performed to detect DNA of E. cuniculi in urine samples. A full history sheet was fulfilled for each subject to test the suspected risk factors.Results: The IFAT examination confirmed the presence of antibodies against E. cunic­uli in 44.3% of the human subjects. The seroprevalence of E. cuniculi was significantly higher in the immunocompromised patients compared with the immunocompetent individuals (77.3% versus 11.4%. Compared with IFAT (the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of Weber’s green MTS smears were 69.23% and 89.80%. By using PCR, no positive cases were detected among human subjects.Conclusion: A high prevalence of E. cuniculi infection in the studied individuals was noted. Although infection was found in some immunocompetent individuals, the im­mune status of the host remains the corner stone for occurrence of the infection.

  7. Preventing zoonotic diseases in immunocompromised persons: the role of physicians and veterinarians.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We surveyed physicians and veterinarians in Wisconsin about the risk for and prevention of zoonotic diseases in immunocompromised persons. We found that physicians and veterinarians hold significantly different views about the risks posed by certain infectious agents and species of animals and communicate very little about zoonotic issues; moreover, physicians believe that veterinarians should be involved in many aspects of zoonotic disease prevention, including patient education.

  8. The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in adult hypopituitary patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filipsson Nyström, Helena; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Kourides, Ione;

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in patients with central hypothyroidism (CH) need to be evaluated. The aim was to examine the outcome of thyroxine replacement in CH. Adult hypopituitary patients (n = 1595) with and without CH from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database...

  9. Co-morbidity in adult haemophilia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen van de Putte, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder, caused by a deficiency of clotting factor VIII or IX. Due to the availability of treatment with clotting factor concentrates, life expectancy of haemophilia patients is now approaching that of the general population. Haemophilia patients are th

  10. Crisis homes for adult psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Freiesleben, Michael; Foldager, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inspired by the Crisis Home programme in Madison, we have adapted and evaluated the programme at the Community Mental Health (CMH) Centre in Tønder, Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Procedures and schedules from the Crisis Home programme were applied in this open trial. Questionnaire...... data concerning satisfaction with the stay and registration data concerning the admissions and bed days two years before and two years after the first stay were obtained. RESULTS: During four years, 52 different patients had a total of 187 stays in a crisis home. Twenty (38.5%) of the patients were...... attached to the ACT team. The average duration of the stays was 4.0 days. The number of readmissions and bed days after the first stay showed a significant downward tendency for the subgroup of patients with a more severe mental disorder, but not for the whole group. The patients, the crisis homes families...

  11. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder.

  12. Características clínicas e evolução de pacientes imunocomprometidos não HIV com diagnóstico intra-hospitalar de tuberculose Clinical characteristics and evolution of non-HIV-infected immunocompromised patients with an in-hospital diagnosis of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Rossato Silva

    2010-08-01

    .OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics of and risk factors for mortality among non-HIV-infected immunocompromised patients with an in-hospital diagnosis of tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a two-year, retrospective cohort study of patients with an in-hospital diagnosis of tuberculosis. The predictive factors for mortality were evaluated. RESULTS: During the study period, 337 hospitalized patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis, and 61 of those patients presented with immunosuppression that was unrelated to HIV infection. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis was found in 47.5% of cases. In the latter group, the in-hospital mortality rate was 21.3%, and the mortality rate after discharge was 18.8%. One-year survival was significantly higher among the immunocompetent patients than among the HIV patients (p = 0.008 and the non-HIV-infected immunocompromised patients (p = 0.015, although there was no such difference between the two latter groups (p = 0.848. Among the non-HIV-infected immunocompromised patients, the only factor statistically associated with mortality was the need for mechanical ventilation. Among the patients over 60 years of age, fibrosis/atelectasis on chest X-rays and dyspnea were more common, whereas fever and consolidations were less common. Fever was also less common among the patients with neoplasms. The time from admission to the initiation of treatment was significant longer in patients over 60 years of age, as well as in those with diabetes and those with end-stage renal disease. Weight loss was least common in patients with diabetes and in those using corticosteroids. CONCLUSIONS: The lower prevalence of classic symptoms, the occurrence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the delayed initiation of treatment, and the high mortality rate reflect the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of tuberculosis in non-HIV-infected immunocompromised patients.

  13. Hematological abnormalities in adult patients with Down's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of data regarding hematological abnormalities in adults with Down\\'s syndrome (DS). AIMS: We aimed to characterize hematological abnormalities in adult patients with DS and determine their long-term significance. METHODS: We retrospectively studied a cohort of nine DS patients referred to the adult hematology service in our institution between May 2001 and April 2008. Data collected were: full blood count (FBC), comorbidities, investigations performed, duration of follow-up and outcome to most recent follow-up. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 26 months (9-71). Of the nine patients, two had myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) at presentation. Of these, one progressed, with increasing marrow failure, and requiring support with transfusions and gCSF. The remaining eight patients, with a variety of hematological abnormalities including leukopenia, macrocytosis, and thrombocytopenia, had persistently abnormal FBCs. However there was no evidence of progression, and no patient has evolved to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). CONCLUSIONS: MDS is a complication of DS and may require supportive therapy. However, minor hematological abnormalities are common in adult DS patients, and may not signify underlying marrow disease.

  14. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu-Sheng Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81 of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227 of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001. Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD.

  15. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels.

  16. Kingella kingae Causing Septic Arthritis of the Knee in an Immunocompetent Adult

    OpenAIRE

    Ricketts, J.; N. N. T. Rehmatullah; Sutton, P

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Kingella kingae is a species of Gram-negative coccobacillus usually found in the oropharynx. This is an emerging pathogen reported to cause bacteraemia, endocarditis, and osteoarticular infections in children and endocarditis in the immunocompromised adult. However, there are few cases of isolated joint infections reported in the immunocompetent adult. Due to specific isolation techniques required, delay in diagnosis can compromise patient outcome. We report a rare case of septi...

  17. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Vlychou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p<0.01 in both groups, whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p=0.02. Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients.

  18. Movement disorders in adult patients with classical galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Carecchio, Miryam; Bhatia, Kailash P; Kojovic, Maja; Parees, Isabel; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S; Footitt, Emma J; Burke, Derek; Edwards, Mark J; Lachmann, Robin H L; Murphy, Elaine

    2013-06-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. It presents with acute systemic complications in the newborn. Galactose restriction resolves these symptoms, but long-term complications, such as premature ovarian failure and neurological problems including motor dysfunction, may occur despite adequate treatment. The objective of the current study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of motor problems in adult patients with classical galactosemia. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients with a biochemically confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia attending our clinic were assessed with an interview and neurological examination and their notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the presence/absence of motor dysfunction on examination. Patients with motor dysfunction were further categorized according to the presence/absence of reported motor symptoms. Forty-seven patients were included. Thirty-one patients showed evidence of motor dysfunction including: tremor (23 patients), dystonia (23 patients), cerebellar signs (6 patients), and pyramidal signs (4 patients). Tremor and dystonia were often combined (16 patients). Thirteen patients reported motor symptoms, with 8 describing progressive worsening. Symptomatic treatment was effective in 4 of 5 patients. Nonmotor neurological features (cognitive, psychiatric, and speech disorders) and premature ovarian failure were more frequent in patients with motor dysfunction. Motor dysfunction is a common complication of classical galactosemia, with tremor and dystonia the most frequent findings. Up to one third of patients report motor symptoms and may benefit from appropriate treatment. Progressive worsening is not uncommon and may suggest ongoing brain damage in a subset of patients.

  19. Milrinone for cardiac dysfunction in critically ill adult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koster, Geert; Bekema, Hanneke J; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Milrinone is an inotrope widely used for treatment of cardiac failure. Because previous meta-analyses had methodological flaws, we decided to conduct a systematic review of the effect of milrinone in critically ill adult patients with cardiac dysfunction. METHODS: This systematic...... review was performed according to The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Searches were conducted until November 2015. Patients with cardiac dysfunction were included. The primary outcome was serious adverse events (SAE) including mortality at maximum follow-up. The risk of bias...... analyses displayed statistical and/or clinical heterogeneity of patients, interventions, comparators, outcomes, and/or settings and all featured missing data. DISCUSSION: The current evidence on the use of milrinone in critically ill adult patients with cardiac dysfunction suffers from considerable risks...

  20. Ocular disorders in adult leukemia patients in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoti Afekhide

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Leukemias may present with, or be associated with ocular disorders. Aims: To determine the rates of ophthalmic disorders in adult patients with leukemia. Settings and Design: A prospective study of ocular disorders in adult patients with leukemia at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, between July 2004 and June 2008 was conducted. Methods and Materials: The patients were interviewed and examined by the authors and the ocular findings were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Instat GraphPad™ v2.05a statistical package software. The means, standard deviation, and the Kruskal-Wallis non parametric test were performed. Results: Forty-seven patients with leukemias were seen. Nineteen patients (40.4% had CLL, 14(29.8% had CML, 9(19.1% had AML and 5(10.6% had ALL. Seven patients (14.9% had ocular disorders due to leukemia. The ocular disorders due to the leukemia were proptosis in two patients (4.3%, retinopathy in one patient (2.1%, conjunctival infiltration in one patient (2.1%, periorbital edema in one patient (2.1%, retinal detachment in one patient (2.1%, and subconjunctival hemorrhage in one patient (2.1%. There was no significant difference in rate of the ocular disorders in the various types of leukemia (Kruskal-Wallis KW= 4.019; corrected for ties. P=0.2595. One patient (2.1% was blind from bilateral exudative retinal detachment while 1 patient (2.1% had monocular blindness from mature cataract. Conclusions: Ophthalmic disorders that are potentially blinding occur in leukemias. Ophthalmic evaluation is needed in these patients for early identification and treatment of blinding conditions.

  1. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients With Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Tribler, Siri; Hvistendahl, Mark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Catheter-related complications (CRCs) cause mortality and morbidity in patients dependent on parenteral support at home (HPN) due to intestinal failure (IF). This study describes the incidences of CRCs in an adult IF cohort over 40 years. It illustrates the evolution and conseque...

  2. Focal epilepsies in adult patients attending two epilepsy centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilioli, Isabella; Vignoli, Aglaia; Visani, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To classify the grade of antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance in a cohort of patients with focal epilepsies, to recognize the risk factors for AED resistance, and to estimate the helpfulness of "new-generation" AEDs. METHODS: We included 1,155 adults with focal epilepsies who were observe...

  3. Prevalence of Peptostreptococcus micros morphotypes in patients with adult periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, PJ; van Winkelhoff, AJ; van Steenbergen, TJM

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence of the smooth and rough colonial morphotypes of Peptostreptococcus micros was examined with culture technique in 123 patients with adult periodontitis (age 24-68 years). Of all subgingival samples, 91% contained the smooth morphotype of P. micros. The smooth morphotype constituted a m

  4. Visceral leishmaniasis and immunocompromise as a risk factor for the development of visceral leishmaniasis: a changing pattern at the hospital for tropical diseases, london.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Fletcher

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of imported VL to the HTD, London including patients diagnosed and/or managed at the HTD between January 1995 and July 2013. We analyse patient demographics, risk factors for developing VL, diagnosis, investigation, management and outcome. Twenty-eight patients were treated for VL at the HTD over an 18 year period. The median age at VL diagnosis was 44 years (range 4-87 years with a male to female ratio of 2:1. Most patients were British and acquired their infection in the Mediterranean basin. The median time from first symptom to diagnosis was six months with a range of 1-12 months and diagnosis included microscopic visualisation of leishmania amastigotes, positive serological tests (DAT and k39 antibody or identification of leishmania DNA. Nineteen patients had some form of immunocompromise and this has increased proportionally compared to previously described data. Within the immunocompromised group, the ratio of those with autoimmune disease has increased. Immunocompromised patients had lower cure and higher relapse rates.The rise of VL in patients with immunocompromise secondary to autoimmune disease on immunomodulatory drugs presents new diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. VL should be a differential diagnosis in immunocompromised patients with pyrexia of unknown origin returning from travel in leishmania endemic areas.

  5. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  6. Something fishy: an unusual Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection in an immunocompromised individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Marie; Hawkins, Angela; Testro, Adam

    2013-04-03

    A 39-year-old man with a history of Crohn's disease presented to the emergency department with a 12-h history of worsening febrile illness. He deteriorated rapidly with progression to sepsis and was admitted to the intensive care unit. Initial treatment comprised broad spectrum antibiotics and inotropic support resulting in rapid improvement. With the immunocompromised state of the patient, and multiple blood cultures revealing Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a detailed history disclosed a recent injury sustained from a fishing wire as the probable source of an infection. Treatment was narrowed to target the identified pathogen, the patient made a full recovery, and was counselled to be more cautious in future fishing activities.

  7. Noroviruses as a Cause of Diarrhea in Immunocompromised Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Xunyan; Van, John N.; Munoz, Flor M.; Revell, Paula A; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Krance, Robert A.; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Hoonmo L Koo

    2015-01-01

    Case reports describe significant norovirus gastroenteritis morbidity in immunocompromised patients. We evaluated norovirus pathogenesis in prospectively enrolled solid organ (SOT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients with diarrhea who presented to Texas Children’s Hospital and submitted stool for enteric testing. Noroviruses were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical outcomes of norovirus diarrhea and non-norovirus diarrhea patients...

  8. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  9. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe.

  10. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijie; Liu, Yuhao; Lu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Li; Wang, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is usually present in patients with pancreatic diseases. Surprisingly, recent studies indicated that patients with critical illness often suffer from pancreatic injury due to non-specific reasons other than pancreatic diseases, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is also commonly observed in critically ill adult patients without preexisting pancreatic diseases. It is well known that malnutrition is the main clinical consequence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, thus, the high incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is most likely to be an important contributor of malnutrition which is a frequent problem associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in critically ill patients admitted into intensive care unit. In order to prevent pancreatic exocrine insufficiency due to primary pancreatic diseases, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is indispensable to treat indigestion, malabsorption and nutritional deficiency. Similarly, pancreatic enzyme supplementation has the potential to be an adjuvant therapy in critically ill patients with enteral nutrition therapy, which may be helpful to improve the nutritional status and the prognosis of critically ill patients by reducing the occurrence of malnutrition. Here, we reviewed the diagnostic methods of pancreatic exocrine function, the epidemiology and risk factors of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and potential treatment strategies for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in critically ill adult patients.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS VIRULENCE USING AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED MOUSE MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    An immunocompromised mouse model was used to characterize Aeromonas strains for their ability to cause opportunistic, extraintestinal infections. A total of 34 isolates of Aeromonas (A. hydrophila [n = 12]), A. veronii biotype sobria [n = 7], A. caviae [n = 4], A. enchelia [n = 4...

  12. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient.

  13. Dysnatremias and Survival in Adult Burn Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    DOI: 10.1159/000346206 Dysnatremias and Survival in Adult Burn Patients: A Retrospective Analysis Ian J. Stewart a Benjamin D. Morrow a... mortality rate of 4.3%. On Cox proportional hazard regres- sion age, %TBSA, ISS, and AKIN stage were found to be sig- nificant predictors of mortality ...hypernatremia [1–4] and hyponatremia [1, 4, 5] have been examined in the hospital setting and have been found to be significantly associated with mortality

  14. Giant Primary Mature Retroperitoneal Teratomain in Adult Male Patient

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ebrahimian; D. Tasa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Teratomas are congenital tumors consisting of derivatives from the ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm germ cell layers. A teratoma is considered to be a non-seminomatous germ cell tumor and is typically located in either the sacrococcygeal region or in the gonads. Giant retroperitoneal teratomas in adults are even rarer, with only a few cases previously described in the literature. Case report: A 35-year-old male patient with severe nausea and vomiting was taken to the emergency wa...

  15. Interventional radiology procedures in adult patients who underwent liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Miraglia; Luigi Maruzzelli; Settimo Caruso; Mariapina Milazzo; Gianluca Marrone; Giuseppe Mamone; Vincenzo Carollo; Salvatore Gruttadauria; Angelo Luca; Bruno Gridelli

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every liver transplantation (LT) program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplantation. The aim of this paper is to review indications, technical consideration, results achievable and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after deceased donor LT and living related adult LT.

  16. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  17. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Moraes-Fontes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs.

  18. Stepping to stability and fall prevention in adult psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emory, Sara L; Silva, Susan G; Christopher, Eric J; Edwards, Pamela B; Wahl, Leanne E

    2011-12-01

    Fall prevention is a major area of concern in inpatient settings. This article reports on the feasibility of implementing a daily exercise program that features line dancing to promote stability, balance, and flexibility in adult psychiatric patients and describes the impact of that program. Six hundred sixty-five patient charts drawn from before and after the practice change were reviewed. The fall rate after the introduction of line dancing was 2.8% compared with 3.2% before implementation. In a setting that treats both men and women of many ages and with varying levels of mobility, line dancing offers a viable approach to exercise in a secure setting.

  19. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  20. [The definition of the medical clown's role with adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyer, Rachel; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Ziyoni, Herzel

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the healthcare system has grown increasingly aware of the need to develop and adopt new models and intervention methods aimed at improving patients' quality of life. As part of this perception, medical clowns have been integrated into hospitals, primarily in work with children. Recently, there have been attempts to integrate clowns into work with adult patients in emergency rooms, but this intervention method has not yet been systematically implemented and studied. This article describes and examines the definition of the medical clown's role as an intervention strategy with adult outpatients suffering from chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The study is qualitative and based on a content analysis of the documentation of the work of two medical clowns over two years. The dominant theme arising from this analysis involves the definition of the clown's role within the medical space of the hospital and includes perspectives on his integration into the hospital's multidisciplinary medical staff and his impact on the staff and on patients and their families. The findings indicate that, from the clowns' point of view, integrated medical clowns as part of the medical team, would contribute to the functioning of both patients and staff. This is in accord with additional studies conducted recently in medical centers around the world. Since this is a pioneering study, there is room to further probe and research the medical clown's contribution to assisting and improving patients' and staff's quality of life and to develop ways of increasing his integration and professionalism.

  1. Aspergillus and mucormycosis presenting with normal chest X-ray in an immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipin; Rajagopalan, Natarajan; Patil, Mahantesh; Shivaprasad, C

    2014-04-09

    Invasive aspergillus and mucormycosis infection are not uncommon in immunocompromised individuals. Endobronchial fungal infections have been reported in the literature, especially in patient's with diabetes complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis, but end bronchial coinfection with aspergillus and mucormycosis without pulmonary involvement has not been described in the literature. We report the case of a woman with diabetes who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms, ketoacidosis and respiratory distress, with an apparently normal chest X-ray. Investigations revealed a cavitatory lesion in the left lower lobe of the lungs on CT scan. Bronchoscopy revealed intense mucosal oedema and whitish plaques at the lower end of the trachea and right main stem bronchus with a normal left bronchial tree. Microbiological and pathological results confirmed aspergillus and mucormycosis. Despite aggressive medical management, the patient deteriorated and died of respiratory failure. Strong suspicion of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients with respiratory failure and minimal chest infiltrates, early fibreoptic bronchoscopy and early aggressive treatment is crucial for the patient's survival.

  2. Triage in an adult emergency service: patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyane Liliane Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Assess the degree of patient satisfaction with triage in the adult emergency service of a public hospital. METHOD Exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Three hundred patients were interviewed and the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics based on sociodemographic variables and those related to patient satisfaction. RESULTS There was a predominance of women, with elementary education and a mean age of 41 years. Most of the interviewees reported being satisfied in regard to the following items: timely service, embracement, trust, environment (comfort, cleanliness and signage, humanization (courtesy, respect, and interest, timely referral/scheduling of appointments and care expectations. CONCLUSION There was a high level of patient satisfaction, evidenced by the strong association of user satisfaction with the items investigated.

  3. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira Melo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. METHODS: Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index, sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal, tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with P < 0.05. RESULTS: The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001 and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037 significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic, tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. CONCLUSIONS: The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  4. Paramedic assessment of pain in the cognitively impaired adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lord Bill

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paramedics are often a first point of contact for people experiencing pain in the community. Wherever possible the patient's self report of pain should be sought to guide the assessment and management of this complaint. Communication difficulty or disability such as cognitive impairment associated with dementia may limit the patient's ability to report their pain experience, and this has the potential to affect the quality of care. The primary objective of this study was to systematically locate evidence relating to the use of pain assessment tools that have been validated for use with cognitively impaired adults and to identify those that have been recommended for use by paramedics. Methods A systematic search of health databases for evidence relating to the use of pain assessment tools that have been validated for use with cognitively impaired adults was undertaken using specific search criteria. An extended search included position statements and clinical practice guidelines developed by health agencies to identify evidence-based recommendations regarding pain assessment in older adults. Results Two systematic reviews met study inclusion criteria. Weaknesses in tools evaluated by these studies limited their application in assessing pain in the population of interest. Only one tool was designed to assess pain in acute care settings. No tools were located that are designed for paramedic use. Conclusion The reviews of pain assessment tools found that the majority were developed to assess chronic pain in aged care, hospital or hospice settings. An analysis of the characteristics of these pain assessment tools identified attributes that may limit their use in paramedic practice. One tool - the Abbey Pain Scale - may have application in paramedic assessment of pain, but clinical evaluation is required to validate this tool in the paramedic practice setting. Further research is recommended to evaluate the Abbey Pain Scale and to

  5. Analysis of Adult Trauma Patients Admitted to Emergency Department

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    Sema Puskulluoglu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Trauma is one of the most common reason of admissions to emergency departments. In this study, it was aimed to determine the demographic characteristics, etiology, morbidity and mortality rates and prognosis of adult trauma patients admitted to our emergency department (ED. Materials and Methods: Patients over the age of 18 years, who admitted to ED between 01 March 2011 and 31 August 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Patient examination cards, hospitalization files and records entered with ICD 10 codes to hospital automation system were analyzed. Patients with inaccessible data were excluded from the study. Results: During the study period, total number of 110495 patients admitted to ED, and 13585 (12,29% of them admitted with trauma. Simple extremity injuries (38,28% and falls (31,7% were most common etiological factors. Glasgow coma scales of 99,71% of the patients were between 13 and 15. Of the patients with trauma, 9,6% had a Computed Tomography (CT scan, and 84,5% of CT scans were evaluated as normal, and cranial CT was the most requested one. Only 6% of the patients were hospitalized, and 0,9% of the trauma patients died. Falls from height in females and traffic accidents in males were the leading causes of death. Conclusion: Most of the patients with simple traumas admitted to ED can be discharged from the hospital with a complete history and careful examination. The rate of unnecessary medical tests, loss of time and waste money should be reduced, and the time and labor allocated to severe patients can be increased by this way. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 569-579

  6. An Adult Patient with Fontan Physiology: A TEE Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gologorsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fontan and Baudet described in 1971 the separation of the pulmonary and systemic circulations resulting in univentricular physiology. The evolution of the Fontan procedure, most notably the substitution of right atrial-to-pulmonary artery anastomosis with cavopulmonary connections, resulted in significantly improved late outcomes. Many patients survive well into adulthood and are able to lead productive lives. While ideally under medical care at specialized centers for adult congenital cardiac pathology, these patients may present to the outside hospitals for emergency surgery, electrophysiologic interventions, and pregnancy. This presentation presents a “train of thought,” linking the TEE images to the perioperative physiologic considerations faced by an anesthesiologist caring for a patient with Fontan circulation in the perioperative settings. Relevant effects of mechanical ventilation on pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood flow and cardiac preload, presence of coagulopathy and thromboembolic potential, danger of abrupt changes of systemic vascular resistance and systemic venous return are discussed.

  7. A rare agent of spondylodiscitis in adult patient: Salmonella enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgehan Aygen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella infections are a public health problem in Turkey,as all over the world. Salmonella spp. can causevery different infections such as gastroenteritis, typhoidparatyphoidfever, bacteremia, local metastatic infectionsand chronic carriage. Salmonella spondylodiscitis occursrarely in the adult population. In this case report, we havepresented a 66 years old female patient followed with thediagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and treated with prednisolone.The patient had a new diagnosis of Salmonellaenteritidis and we aimed to discuss similar cases by theculture of lumbar empyema culture ampiciline, cefotaxime,trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin was revealedthe presence of resistant S.enteritidis. The patienthas received ciprofloxacin 2x200 mg per day for 3 weeksas intravenous. And patient was discharged with advice ofusing ciprofloxacin as per oral long three months.

  8. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  9. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  10. Dense Persistent Pupillary Membrane in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Altay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent pupillary membranes (PPM are congenital abnormalities which results from an incomplete involution of tunica vasculosa lentis and are rarely seen in adults. A thirty-year old man applied to the hospital with the complaint of uncommon-looking pupils and progressive blurring of vision in the left eye. On examination, uncorrected visual acuity (Snellen were 20/100 in the right eye and 20/640 in the left eye with amblyopia. On biomicroscopic examination, there were bilateral dense PPM and cataract in the left eye. Visual field analysis of right and left eyes showed great narrowing of visual fields. We present our case in order to emphasize that analysis of visual field of patients with PPM is as important as central vision when planning its treatment. For planning treatment of patients with PPM, visual impairment, size of pupillary opening, and visual field analysis should be considered.

  11. Comparing postural balance among older adults and Parkinson's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Andrelino de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to compare postural balance among healthy older adults and Parkinson's disease (PD patients during one-legged stance balance. We recruited 36 individuals of both sexes and divided them into two groups: healthy older adults (HG, and individuals with PD (PG. All the participants were assessed through a single-leg balance test, with eyes open, during 30 seconds (30 seconds of rest across trials on a force platform. Balance parameters were computed from mean across trials to quantify postural control: center of pressure (COP area and mean velocity in both directions of movement, anterior-posterior and medial-lateral. Significant differences between-group were reported for area of COP (P=0.002 and mean velocity in anterior-posterior direction (P=0.037, where poor postural control was related to PD patients rather than to healthy individuals. One-legged stance balance was a sensitive task used to discriminate poor postural control in Parkinson individuals.

  12. Respiratory pattern in an adult population of dystrophic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, M G; Romei, M; Lo Mauro, A; Marchi, E; Gandossini, S; Bonato, S; Comi, G P; Magri, F; Turconi, A C; Pedotti, A; Bresolin, N; Aliverti, A

    2011-07-15

    We studied respiratory function and Chest Wall kinematics in a large population of adult patients affected by slow course muscular dystrophies such as Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD, n=38), Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, n=20) and Facio-Scapulo Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD, n=30), through standard spirometry and through the Optoelectronic Plethysmography, to measure the thoraco-abdominal motion during Quiet Breathing and Slow Vital Capacity maneuvers. Within the restrictive pulmonary syndrome characterizing LGMD and FSHD, several different thoraco-abdominal patterns compared to those of healthy subjects were present in the more advanced stages of the disease. These differences were present in the seated position, during the execution of a maximal maneuver such as Slow Vital Capacity. A global respiratory (both inspiratory and expiratory) muscle involvement was more pronounced in the LGMD and FSHD than in the BMD patients, and a significant reduction of abdominal contribution in wheelchair bound patients was observed. In conclusion, OEP technique is able to reveal mild initial modifications in the respiratory muscles in FSHD and LGMD patients, which could be helpful for functional and new therapeutic strategy evaluation.

  13. 血清降钙素原在免疫受损危重患者感染诊断中的临床意义%Diagnostic value of serum procalcitonin for infection in the immunocompromised critically ill patients with ;suspected infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于歆; 马新华; 艾宇航

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of the serum procalcitonin ( PCT ) level in the non-acquired immune deficiency syndrome ( AIDS ) immunocompromised critically ill patients suspected to have infection. Methods A retrospective study was conducted in the non-AIDS immunocompromised patients who were admitted to Department of Critical Care Medicine of Xiangya Hospital, Central South University during January 2011 to December 2014. Demographic characteristics, underlying disease, acute physiology and chronic health evaluationⅡ( APACHEⅡ) score at admission, and clinical records including baseline and peak levels of temperature, white blood count ( WBC ), PCT, and survival rate within 28 days, infection focus, infectious agents ( bacterial, fungi or mixed infection ), and the severity of infection ( sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock ) were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic ( ROC ) curve was plotted, and the diagnostic and protective value of above parameters was evaluated. Results A total of 98 patients ( 43 male and 55 female ) were enrolled in the study with a median age of 44 ( 28, 52 ) years old and a median APACHEⅡscore of 17 ( 11, 20 );47 with malignant hematological tumor, 45 with autoimmune diseases, and 6 post solid organ transplantation. Among them 53 patients ( 54.1%) died within 28 days. Twenty-seven patients were diagnosed as systemic inflammatory response syndrome ( SIRS ) without infection. Among 71 patients with infection, 45 were diagnosed as bacterial infection, 10 with fungal infection, and 16 with mixed infection. Sepsis was diagnosed in 7 patients, severe sepsis in 32 patients , and septic shock in 32 patients .①There was no statistical significance in the baseline and peak levels of PCT and WBC, or baseline level of temperature between the groups of SIRS patients without infection and infected patients. The peak level of temperature was significantly higher in the patients with infection as compared with

  14. Cervical column morphology in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Petri, Niels; Kjaer, Inger; Svanholt, Palle

    2008-10-01

    Cervical column morphology was examined in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and compared with the cervical morphology of an adult control group with neutral occlusion, normal craniofacial morphology, and no history of sleep apnoea. The sleep apnoea group consisted of 91 patients, 16 females aged 29-59 years (mean 49.4 years) and 75 males aged 27-65 years (mean 49.0 years). All patients were diagnosed with OSA by overnight polysomnography. The control group consisted of 21 subjects, 15 females aged 23-40 years (mean 29.2 years) and 6 males aged 25-44 years (mean 32.8 years). From each individual, a visual assessment of the cervical column was performed on the radiograph. Differences in the cervical column morphology, between the genders and the groups were assessed by Fisher's exact test and the effect of age by logistic regression analysis. In the OSA group, 46.2 per cent had fusion anomalies of the cervical column and 5.5 per cent a posterior arch deficiency. Fusion anomalies occurred in 26.4 per cent as fusions between two cervical vertebrae. Block fusions occurred in 12.1 per cent and occipitalization in 14.3 per cent. A posterior arch deficiency occurred in 2.2 per cent as a partial cleft of C1 and in 3.3 per cent as dehiscence of C3 and C4. No statistical gender differences were found in the occurrence of morphological characteristics of the cervical column. The fusion anomalies of the cervical column occurred significantly more often in the OSA group. The results indicate that the morphological deviations of the upper cervical vertebrae play a role in the phenotypical subdivision and diagnosis of OSA.

  15. Adult growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients demonstrate heterogeneity between childhood onset and adult onset before and during human GH treatment. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attanasio, A F; Lamberts, S W; Matranga, A M

    1997-01-01

    -deficient adult patients have been compared. The first 6 months comprised randomized, double-blind treatment with GH or placebo, then all patients were GH-treated for a further 12 months. At baseline the height, body weight, body mass index, lean body mass, and waist/hip ratio of AO patients were significantly (P...

  16. Kingella kingae Causing Septic Arthritis of the Knee in an Immunocompetent Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, J; Rehmatullah, N N T; Sutton, P

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Kingella kingae is a species of Gram-negative coccobacillus usually found in the oropharynx. This is an emerging pathogen reported to cause bacteraemia, endocarditis, and osteoarticular infections in children and endocarditis in the immunocompromised adult. However, there are few cases of isolated joint infections reported in the immunocompetent adult. Due to specific isolation techniques required, delay in diagnosis can compromise patient outcome. We report a rare case of septic arthritis of the knee in an immunocompetent adult caused by K. kingae.

  17. Kingella kingae Causing Septic Arthritis of the Knee in an Immunocompetent Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ricketts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Kingella kingae is a species of Gram-negative coccobacillus usually found in the oropharynx. This is an emerging pathogen reported to cause bacteraemia, endocarditis, and osteoarticular infections in children and endocarditis in the immunocompromised adult. However, there are few cases of isolated joint infections reported in the immunocompetent adult. Due to specific isolation techniques required, delay in diagnosis can compromise patient outcome. We report a rare case of septic arthritis of the knee in an immunocompetent adult caused by K. kingae.

  18. C7a, a Biphosphinic Cyclopalladated Compound, Efficiently Controls the Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Figueiredo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a highly aggressive disease that occurs in individuals infected with the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1. Patients with aggressive ATLL have a poor prognosis because the leukemic cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We have investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(−C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppeCl2}, termed C7a, in a patient-derived xenograft model of ATLL, and investigated the mechanism of C7a action in HTLV-1-positive and negative transformed T cell lines in vitro. In vivo survival studies in immunocompromised mice inoculated with human RV-ATL cells and intraperitoneally treated with C7a led to significantly increased survival of the treated mice. We investigated the mechanism of C7a activity in vitro and found that it induced mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, caspase activation, nuclear condensation and DNA degradation. These results suggest that C7a triggers apoptotic cell death in both HTLV-1 infected and uninfected human transformed T-cell lines. Significantly, C7a was not cytotoxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy donors and HTLV-1-infected individuals. C7a inhibited more than 60% of the ex vivo spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HTLV-1-infected individuals. These results support a potential therapeutic role for C7a in both ATLL and HTLV-1-negative T-cell lymphomas.

  19. Clinical characteristics of intermediate uveitis in adult Turkish patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Esra; Kardes; Betul; Ilkay; Sezgin; Akcay; Kansu; Bozkurt; Cihan; Unlu; Gurkan; Erdogan; Gulunay; Akcali

    2015-01-01

    ·AIM: To describe the clinical characteristics of Turkish patients with intermediate uveitis(IU) and to investigate the effect of clinical findings and complications on final visual acuity(VA).·METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with IU who had at least 6mo of follow-up and were older than 16 y.· RESULTS: A total of 78 eyes of 45 patients were included in the study and the mean follow-up period was19.4mo. The mean age at the time of presentation was42.9s. Systemic disease associations were found in17.7% of cases; sarcoidosis(8.8%) and multiple sclerosis(6.6%) were the most common diseases. Recurrence rate(odds ratio=45.53; 95%CI: 2.181-950.58), vitritis equals to or more than 3+ cells(odds ratio =57.456; 95%CI: 4.154-794.79) and presenting with VA less than 20/40(odds ratio =43.81; 95% CI: 2.184-878.71) were also found as high risk factors for poor final VA. At the last follow-up examination, 67.9% of eyes had VA of 20/40 or better.·CONCLUSION: IU is frequently seen at the beginning of the fourth decade of life. The disease is most commonly idiopathic in adult Turkish patients. Patients with severe vitritis at presentation and patients with frequent recurrences are at high risk for poor visual outcome.

  20. Osteoporosis in adult Sri Lankan inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arjuna Priyadarsin de Silva; Aranjan Lionel Karunanayake; Thalahitiya Gamaralalage Iruka Dissanayaka; Anuradha Supun Dassanayake; Hewa Kattadi Kankanamgae Tilak Duminda; Arunasalam Pathmeswaran; Ananda Rajitha Wickramasinghe; Hithanadura Janaka de Silva

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine if inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a risk factor for osteoporosis in adult Sri Lankans. METHODS: We identified eligible subjects from among consecutive patients diagnosed with IBD who attended our outpatient clinic. We included only patients aged between 20 and 70 years. Patients who were pregnant, had significant comorbidity, or were on calcium supplements or treatment for osteoporosis within the past 6 mo, were excluded. Healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were also recruited, in a control to patient ratio of 3:1. Both groups were screened for osteoporosis using peripheral dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 111 IBD patients (male:female = 43:68; mean age 42.5 years) and 333 controls (male:female = 129:204; mean age 43.8 years). The occurrence of osteoporosis among IBD patients (13.5%) was significantly higher than among controls (4.5%) ( P = 0.001). The frequency of osteoporosis was not significantly different between ulcerative colitis (14.45%) and Crohn's disease (10.7%). However, on multivariate analysis, only age ( P = 0.001), menopause ( P = 0.024) and use of systemic steroids ( P < 0.001) were found to be associated independently with the occurrence of osteoporosis, while IBD, severity of disease, number of relapses, duration of illness or treatment other than systemic steroids were not. CONCLUSION: IBD does not appear to be an independent risk factor for the occurrence of osteoporosis in this population. However, the use of systemic steroids was a risk factor.

  1. Orthodontics in the adult patient, with special reference to the periodontally compromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, A; Ide, M

    1999-04-01

    There is increasing demand from adult patients for orthodontic treatment, either purely for aesthetics, to improve aesthetics or function following previous disease, or to facilitate the stabilization, restoration or replacement of teeth. Orthodontics may have a major role in the rehabilitation of patients suffering the effects of advanced periodontal disease, but there are a number of important factors to be considered in the management of such patients if the optimal outcome is to be obtained. This paper summarizes important aspects of treatment and the potential complications and how to avoid them.

  2. Humidification during mechanical ventilation in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ashry, Haitham S; Modrykamien, Ariel M

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions.

  3. Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in the Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham S. Al Ashry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions.

  4. EPIGLOTTIS MICROFLORA OF ADULT PATIENTS WITH ACUTE EPIGLOTTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golovko NA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays acute infectious-inflammatory processes of upper respiratory tract, including acute epiglottitis retain a high proportion among human pathology. In the literature acute epiglottitis is allocated into an independent nosology as severe acute phlegmonous bacterial inflammation of the epiglottis and hypopharynx. There are currently no clear guidelines on how to classify an acute epiglottitis, as well as protocols for patients at various stages of the pathological process. According to common belief, Haemophilus influenzae type -B (Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib is the most common cause of epiglottitis. At present, the main etiological role in the genesis of acute epiglottitis in children belongs to haemophilus influenzae. In adults the causes of the disease are beta hemolytic streptococci groups A, B, pneumococcus, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus aureus, herpes simplex virus (type 1 and parainfluenza, and others.The aim of this work is to study: the mucosal microflora of the epiglottis in adult patients with acute epiglottitis and to study sensitivity of certain isolates to antimicrobial agents. Material & methods. 86 adult patients with acute epiglottitis were observed: 36 with abscess form of epiglottitis and 50 - with infiltrative. Microbiological analysis of mucosal swab samples taken from hypopharynx were conducted by the conventional technology: for seeding solid or liquid nutrient medium, followed by allocation of isolith and its microscopic, biochemical and serological identification. Microorganisms were classified according to schemes of Bergy. Antimicrobial susceptibility of each strain was determined in accordance with the guidelines. We used discs with antibacterial drugs. The availability of sensitive and resistant strains of microorganisms to antibiotics was assessed. A mucous membrane of the epiglottis was analyzed through microbiological investigation in 86 patients with acute epiglottitis. As a

  5. Migraine pain location in adult patients from eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Ambar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sparse literature documenting the location of pain at the onset of migraine attacks and during established headaches is available. Objectives: A prospective study (2003-05 on 800 adult migraine patients (International Classifications of Headache Disorders (ICHD, 2:1.1, 1.2.1 and 1.6.1 was conducted to document (a sites of onset of pain and (b location of pain during established attacks (in> 50% occasions through semistructured interviews. Results: Demography: N = 800; M:F = 144:656 (1:4.56; age, 16-42 years (mean, 26 years; duration of migraine, 1-18 years (mean, 6.8 years. 87% of the subjects were ethnic Bengalis from the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, Calcutta being the capital city. Migraine types (on the basis of> 50% headache spells: N = 800; 1.1:668 (83.5%; 1.2.1:18 (2.25%; 1.6.1:114 (14.25%. Location of pain at onset: Unilateral onset was present in 41.38% of the patients; of these, 53.17% had eye pain; 8.16%, frontal pain and 38.67%, temporal pain. In 32.25% of the patients, bilateral/central location of pain, mostly bitemporal or at vertex was noted. Cervico-occipital pain onset was noted in 26.43% patients (predominantly occipital, 14.68%; predominantly cervical, 11.75%. Location of established headaches: In 47.4% of the patients, with unilateral ocular or temporal onset, pain remained at the same site. Pain became hemicranial in 32.9%. In most patients, unilateral frontal onset pain (55.5% became bilateral or holocranial. Most bilateral ocular (69.4% and temporal onset (69.7% pains remained at the same location. However, most bifrontal (55.6% and vertex onset (56.9% pains subsequently became holocranial. Most occipital pains at onset became holocranial (45.3%, but cervical pains subsequently became either hemicranial (38.3% or holocranial (36.2%. Conclusions: This study documents location of pain at the onset and during established headaches in migraine patients largely from a specific ethnic group. Migraine with

  6. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Silva, Mayra; Bazzana, Caroline Moreira; de Souza, Altay Lino; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Lucchesi, Lígia M.; Lopes, Guiomar Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Aging is a multifactorial process that elicits changes in the duration and quality of sleep. Polysomnography is considered to be the standard examination for the analysis of sleep and consists of the simultaneous recording of selected physiological variables during sleep. Objective The objective of this study was to use polysomnography to compare sleep reported by senior citizens. Methods We selected 40 patients, both male and female, with ages ranging from 64 to 89 years from the Center for the Study of Aging at the Federal University of São Paulo. Patients answered questions about sleep on the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and underwent polysomnography. Results The results were compared, and agreement between perceived sleep and polysomnography was found in several areas. There was an association between difficulty sleeping and sleep onset latency (p=0.015), waking up at night with sleep onset latency (p=0.005), total sleep time with daytime sleepiness (0.005) and snoring (0.027), sleep efficiency with sleepiness (0.004), snoring (0.033) and pause in breathing (p=0.024), awakenings with snoring (p=0.012) and sleep apnea with pauses in breathing (p=0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography. PMID:26483948

  7. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains.

  9. Surgical management of 143 patients with adult primary retroperitoneal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Hong Xu; Ke-Jian Guo; Ren-Xuan Guo; Chun-Lin Ge; Yu-Lin Tian; San-Guang He

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the surgical management of adult primary retroperitoneal tumors (APRT) and the factors influencing the outcome after operation.METHODS: Data of 143 cases of APRT from 1990 to 2003 in the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University were evaluated retrospectively.RESULTS: A total of 143 cases of APRT were treated surgically. Among them, 122 (85.3%) underwent complete resection, 16 (11.2%) incomplete resection,and 3 (3%) surgical biopsies. Twenty-nine (20.2%)underwent tumor resection plus multiple organ resections. Ninety-five malignant cases were followed up for 1 mo to 5 years. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival rates of the patients subject to complete resection was 94.9%, 76.6% and 34.3% and that of patients with incomplete resection was 80.4%, 6.7%,and 0%, respectively (P < 0.001). The Cox multi-various regression analysis showed the completeness of tumor,sex and histological type were associated closely with local recurrence.CONCLUSION: Sufficient preoperative preparation and complete tumor resection play important roles in reducing recurrence and improving survival.

  10. [Acute hepatitis in a patient with adult onset Still disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, M; Calvanese, A; Oscuro, F; Gallo, A; Caso, P; Annibale, E; Farinato, N

    1997-04-01

    Liver abnormalities in the course of Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD), both in form of hepatomegaly and elevation of hepatic enzymes, have been reported in up to three-quarts of the affected patients. These abnormalities may reflect disease activity or may be induced by drugs. Only in a few of this patients a liver biopsy was performed. However liver histology has shown, generally, non specific abnormalities or even normal pictures. We have recently observed a 47-year-old woman with a febrile illness started five months before, who after pertinent investigation was diagnosed as AOSD (according to criteria of Yamaguchi et al.). Apart from laboratory findings characteristic of an inflammatory disease, in absence of drug therapies the biochemical data showed raised levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and aminoglutamil transferase. Serological tests for either viral hepatitis viruses (HAV, HBV, HCV) or other viruses were negative. Ultrasonographic examination of gallbladder and bile ducts did not find gallstones or other abnormalities. A liver biopsy was performed, which histopathologic examination showed moderate fatty methamorphosis with focal areas of hepatocellular swelling with minimal necrosis, mild Kuppfer cell hyperplasia, portal and sinusoidal infiltrates of mononuclear cells. This picture consisted with the diagnosis of an acute unspecific reactive hepatitis.

  11. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  12. Patient knowledge and pulmonary medication adherence in adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ann Hsu-An; Kendrick, Jennifer G; Wilcox, Pearce G; Quon, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Patient knowledge of lung function (ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]% predicted) and the intended benefits of their prescribed pulmonary medications might play an important role in medication adherence, but this relationship has not been examined previously in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods All patients diagnosed with CF and without prior lung transplantation were invited to complete knowledge and self-reported medication adherence questionnaires during routine outpatient visits to the Adult CF Clinic, St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada from June 2013 to August 2014. Results A total of 142 out of 167 (85%) consecutive adults attending CF clinic completed patient knowledge and medication adherence survey questionnaires. Sixty-four percent of the patients recalled their last FEV1% predicted value within 5%, and 70% knew the intended benefits of all their prescribed medications. Self-reported adherence rates were highest for inhaled antibiotics (81%), azithromycin (87%), and dornase alpha (76%) and lowest for hypertonic saline (47%). Individuals who knew their FEV1% predicted value within 5% were more likely to self-report adherence to dornase alpha (84% vs 62%, P=0.06) and inhaled antibiotics (88% vs 64%, P=0.06) compared to those who did not, but these associations were not statistically significant. There were no significant associations observed between patient knowledge of intended medication benefits and self-reported medication adherence. Conclusion Contrary to our hypothesis, disease- and treatment-related knowledge was not associated with self-reported medication adherence. This suggests other barriers to medication adherence should be targeted in future studies aiming to improve medication adherence in adults with CF.

  13. Asymmetric periflexural exanthema: A report in an adult patient

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    Zawar V

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric periflexural exanthem (APE is a distinctive exanthem, probably viral in origin. It is largely a disease of childhood and is uncommon in adults. We report an adult man presenting with the typical clinical findings of APE.

  14. Clinical features of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome associated with different types of congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈果

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical features and hemodynamics of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in different types of congenital heart diseases (CHD) .Methods Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome with different types of CHD diagnosed by right heart

  15. Adult attachment status and psychological disorder: the predictive validity of adult attachment in violent, personality-disordered patients

    OpenAIRE

    McGauley, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores the role of attachment in a group of violent, personality-disordered patients in a high secure hospital. The research examines the mental representation of attachment and the perception of parenting, as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview and the Parental Bonding Instrument, in this patient group and examines whether these differ from those of non-violent psychiatric patients. A prospective study examines whether the attachment measures predict change across a rang...

  16. Intensified microbiological investigations in adult patients admitted to hospital with lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Jens; Rasmussen, TR; Sommer, T;

    2002-01-01

    September 1st 1997 to May 31st 1998 and were compared with a control group from the preceding year. A total of 67 adult patients were included in the study group and they were compared with 122 adult patients in the control group. The study group underwent fibre-optic bronchoscopy (FOB) with bronchoalveolar...

  17. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  18. Giant Primary Mature Retroperitoneal Teratomain in Adult Male Patient

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    R. Ebrahimian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teratomas are congenital tumors consisting of derivatives from the ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm germ cell layers. A teratoma is considered to be a non-seminomatous germ cell tumor and is typically located in either the sacrococcygeal region or in the gonads. Giant retroperitoneal teratomas in adults are even rarer, with only a few cases previously described in the literature. Case report: A 35-year-old male patient with severe nausea and vomiting was taken to the emergency ward of Hamadan Be’sat Hospital. He had not been feeling well, and had suffering from abdominal pain for a month. A physical examination showed some concretion in the right side of his abdomen. A CT scan of his abdomen and pelvis with IV and oral contrast re-vealed that the concretion was formed by aggregates of solid, cystic, and calcareous compo-nents. It compressed stomach and caused the rotation of the stomach around its longitudinal axis. Conclusion: Following the diagnosis, we performed a laparotomy and respected a concretion with dimension 20?25?22cm. Interestingly, we found out all mature tissues within the con-cretion in the pathology examination of an adequate sample (such as trachea, bone, GI lu-men…. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (2: 165-169

  19. Localized Tetanus in an Adult Patient: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulamhussein, Mohamed Amirali; Li, Yueyang; Guha, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tetanus is a severe and potentially fatal infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. Of all the cases described in literature, generalized tetanus is by far the most common presentation, but it may also present as neonatal tetanus, cephalic tetanus, and localized tetanus, the latter two being much rarer. In this case report, we present the rare form of this disease, i.e., localized tetanus in an adult male with a history of minimal trauma as well as a late, unusual mode of presentation. Case Report: A 35-year-old Caucasian male presented with an acutely painful, swollen right thumb associated with a small superficial collection on the dorsal aspect of the base of the thumb. A formal wound exploration and washout were carried out in theater, however, at the time of tourniquet inflation, the right hand went into a carpopedal spasm and remained in that position until an infusion of a muscle relaxant was given. The findings were consistent with a case of localized tetanus. The patient was treated with human immunoglobulin and tetanus toxoid and safely discharged home 48 h later without any complications. Conclusion: This case report emphasizes the importance of the recognition of a rare form of this fatal infectious disease, which may present with prodromal symptoms before the generalized form shows its clinical effects. Moreover, the astute clinician should be aware of the variable presentations of this infectious disease, with early identification greatly reducing the associated risks of morbidity and mortality. PMID:28164065

  20. Role of L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: focus on adult patients

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    Rytting ME

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael E RyttingDepartment of Pediatrics and Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Asparaginase preparations deplete asparagine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL blasts. Asparaginase in its various forms is an important component of treatment regimens for pediatric ALL. Recently, interest and use of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL has increased, particularly in young adults. There is much less information on asparaginase use and toxicity in adult compared with pediatric populations. This review surveys prior published studies of the three most commonly used asparagine preparations as used in adult patients, and discusses important toxicities encountered in adult patients who receive asparaginase preparations.Keywords: asparaginase, leukemia, adults, children

  1. Appreciation of music in adult patients with cochlear implants: a patient questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, S; Douglas, S A; Lindsey, P; Hildreth, T; Hawthorne, M

    2003-06-01

    Many cochlear implant candidates express hopes of enjoying music following implantation. Our aim was to assess the appreciation of music after cochlear implantation in adult patients. Thirty-five out of 45 cochlear implantees (78%) from the North East Programme responded to a questionnaire. Only 16 out of 35 patients (46%) listened to music after implantation. Enjoyment of music on a self-assessment scale was graded a mean of 8.7/10 before deafness but only 2.6/10 after implantation. Listening to music after implantation was more likely in younger patients, those with higher speech perception scores and those with a shorter length of deafness, but was not found to be related to gender, type of implant, processing strategy, time since implant or music enjoyment before becoming deaf. Appreciation of music after cochlear implantation is disappointingly low. Future developments in implant technology should strive to improve satisfaction with music listening.

  2. Latanoprost systemic exposure in pediatric and adult patients with glaucoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raber, Susan; Courtney, Rachel; Maeda-Chubachi, Tomoko;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate short-term safety and steady-state systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of latanoprost acid in pediatric subjects with glaucoma or ocular hypertension who received the adult latanoprost dose.......To evaluate short-term safety and steady-state systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of latanoprost acid in pediatric subjects with glaucoma or ocular hypertension who received the adult latanoprost dose....

  3. Motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment: an application of Q-methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang X

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Xia Tang,1 Jiaxin Cai,1 Beibei Lin,1 Linjie Yao,2 Feiou Lin3 1School of Stomatology, 2Department of Pedodontics, 3Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Lu Cheng District, People’s Republic of China Background: Motivation is the impetus for patients to seek orthodontic treatment, affecting adherence, treatment outcomes, and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to assess the motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment, and classify the patients according to their motivations.Methods: This study used Q-methodology as the main tool. Q-samples were collected and categorized (35 items. Forty-two adult female patients were interviewed before treatment as the P-sample, and their responses were categorized into the Q-methodology grid. Participants were asked to rank-order a set of 35 statements (Q-sample from “agree most” to “disagree most” (Q-sorting. The finished Q-grids were analyzed using PQ method 2.35.Results: Four main factors were identified based on how adult female patients ranked statements: factor 1, patients who focus on their self-perception of their appearance; factor 2, patients who are concerned about the esthetics and function of their teeth; factor 3, patients who are easily influenced by others; factor 4, patients who want to improve their confidence and avoid negative thoughts caused by their teeth. The remaining patients who had other views did not match any of the above four groups.Conclusion: The motivations of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment are complex. This study found that most adult female patients fell into one of four typical factor groups. Our findings may improve the adherence of adult female patients by developing a more ideal treatment program. Keywords: adult female patients, orthodontic treatment, Q-methodology

  4. Mandibular fractures: a comparative analysis between young and adult patients in the southeast region of Turkey

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    Serhat Atilgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to review and compare the differences between mandibular fractures in young and adult patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients treated at the Oral and Maxillofacial Department of Dicle University during a five-year period between 2000 and 2005 were retrospectively evaluated with respect to age groups, gender, etiology, localization and type of fractures, treatment methods and complications. RESULTS: 532 patients were included in the study, 370 (70% males and 162 (30% females, with a total of 744 mandibular fractures. The mean age of young patients was 10, with a male-female ratio of 2:1. The mean age of adult patients was 28, with a male-female ratio of 3:1. The most common causes of injury were falls (65% in young patients and traffic accidents (38% in adults. The most common fracture sites were the symphysis (35% and condyle (36% in young patients, and the symphysis in adults (36%. Mandibular fractures were generally treated by arch bar and maxillomandibular fixation in both young (67% and adult (39% patients, and 43% of the adult patients were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. CONCLUSION: There was a similar gender, monthly and type of treatment distribution in both young and adult patients in the southeast region of Turkey. However, there were differences regarding age, etiology and fracture site. These findings between young and adult patients are broadly similar to those from other studies. Analysis of small differences may be an important factor in assessing educational and socioeconomic environments.

  5. A Case of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in an HIV-Positive Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is commonly known to cause an influenza-like illness. However, it can also cause more severe disease in young children and older adults comprising of organ transplant patients with immunocompromised status. Till date, only four cases of RSV infections have been reported in HIV-positive adults. We describe here a case of HIV-positive female with relatively preserved immune function who presented with RSV infection requiring ventilation and showed improvement after prompt treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin.

  6. Anxiety and depression in adult patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winfried; Huser; Karl-Heinz; Janke; Bodo; Klump; Michael; Gregor; Andreas; Hinz

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To compare anxiety and depression levels in adult patients with celiac disease (CD) on a gluten-free diet (GFD) with controls.METHODS: The levels of anxiety, depression and of a probable anxiety or depressive disorder were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in 441 adult patients with CD recruited by the German Celiac Society, in 235 age-and sex-matched patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in remission or with slight disease activity, and in 441 adult persons of a representa...

  7. Patient-reported outcomes in adult survivors with single-ventricle physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Dorthe; Schrader, Anne-Marie; Lisby, Karen H

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Data on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with single-ventricle physiology (SVP) are scarce. We sought (1) to describe the perceived health status, quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and sense of coherence in adult survivors with SVP, (2) to compare PROs...... across functional classes, and (3) to compare PROs between patients and controls. Methods: A case-control study in two adult congenital heart programmes with 62 adult survivors with SVP were matched to 172 healthy controls. A wide range of PROs were measured using validated questionnaires. The treating...

  8. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra dos Santos Silva

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography.

  9. Loss of Olfactory Function and Nutritional Status in Vital Older Adults and Geriatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, N.; Roon, de M.; Campen, van J.P.C.M.; Kremer, S.; Boesveldt, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the association of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients. Three hundred forty-five vital (mean age 67.1 years) and 138 geriatric older adults (mean age 80.9 years) were included. Nutritional status w

  10. Seizure detection in adult ICU patients based on changes in EEG synchronization likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, A. J. C.; Vriens, E. M.; Spijkstra, J. J.; Girbes, A. R. J.; van Huffelen, A. C.; Stam, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Seizures are common in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients, and may increase neuronal injury. Purpose: To explore the possible value of synchronization likelihood (SL) for the automatic detection of seizures in adult ICU patients. Methods: We included EEGs from ICU patients with a varie

  11. Oral Impacts on Quality of Life in Adult Patients with Class I, II and III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Omair; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the social impact of malocclusion on quality of life between adult patients with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion.MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 222 adult patients (139, 42 and 41 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion, respectively) were recruited voluntarily from those attending the Orthodontic Clinic of Khyber College of Dentistry in Pesh awar, Pakistan. Participants were asked to complete the Urdu version of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profil...

  12. Campylobacter fetus Bacteremia in a Healthy Patient Returning from a Trip to the Ecuadorian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, A C; Barrera, S; Leon, A; Trueba, G

    2016-12-27

    Campylobacter fetus is an opportunistic pathogen which causes bacteremia and other invasive infections in immunocompromised patients who have been exposed to livestock or ingested animal products (uncooked meat or unpasteurized milk). The present report describes a C. fetus infection in a healthy adult (immunocompetent) who returned from a visit to the Ecuadorian Amazonia and who did not report exposure to the typical sources of infection.

  13. Cardiovascular effects of growth hormone in adult hemodialysis patients: results from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Rustom, Rana; Wiedmann, Jonas;

    2010-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality rates in hemodialysis (HD) patients are due, at least in part, to their increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This prospective study evaluated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on a number of CVD risk markers in adult patients on HD.......The high morbidity and mortality rates in hemodialysis (HD) patients are due, at least in part, to their increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This prospective study evaluated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on a number of CVD risk markers in adult patients on HD....

  14. The adult cystic fibrosis patient with abdominal pain: what the radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liong, S.Y.; Awad, D. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jones, A.M. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sukumar, S.A., E-mail: Sathi.Sukumar@uhsm.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    As the life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients continues to increase, abdominal manifestations of CF are increasingly being encountered by clinicians and radiologists. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of adult CF patients with abdominal pain as a cause is often not discernable clinically. Accurate diagnosis is crucial in these patients as some causes may be managed conservatively, whilst others may require surgical intervention. In this review, we describe clinical presentation, imaging findings, and management of adult CF patients presenting with abdominal pain.

  15. [Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae in healthy adults. Description of 2 new cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Marcotegui, M; Hidalgo Ovejero, A; Lecumberri, M Cía; Otermin Maya, I; Pereda García, A

    2009-10-01

    The importance of Streptococcus agalactiae as a pathogen in nonpregnant adults has been widely recognized in recent years, especially in the elderly or immunocompromised patients. Two cases of vertebral osteomyelitis caused by S. agalactiae in young patients with no known underlying diseases or predisposing factor to infection are reported. A systematic review of the literature (MEDLINE, 1976-May 2008) was performed, 10 cases previously reported in the literature of vertebral osteomyelitis due to S. agalactiae being found in adults under 65 years of age with no predisposing risk factors for infection, most of which have been reported over the last 10 years. We believe that this microbial etiology should be considered in patients of any age and immunological status. Other factors, other than increasing the number of patients with chronic diseases, explaining the increased rate of S. agalactiae infections in adults need to be studied.

  16. Structural myocardial involvement in adult patients with type 1 myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upinder K. Dhand

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is the commonest muscular dystrophy in adults, affecting multiple organs in addition to skeletal muscles. Cardiac conduction system abnormalities are well recognized as an important component of DM1 phenotype; however, primary structural myocardial abnormalities, which may predispose these patients to congestive heart failure, are not as well characterized. We reviewed the retrospective analysis of the clinical and echocardiographic findings in adult patients with DM1. Among 27 patients (16 male; age 19-61 years with DM1, the echocardiogram (ECHO was abnormal in 10 (37% including one of 6 patients (16% with congenital myotonic dystrophy. Reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤50% was noted in 5, diastolic dysfunction in 4, left atrial dilatation in 3, left ventricular hypertrophy in 2, apical hypokinesia in 1 and mitral valve prolapse in 3 patients. One patient had paradoxical septal movement in the setting of left bundle branch block. Echocardiographic abnormalities significantly correlated with older age; however, patients with systolic dysfunction on echocardiogram ranged in age from 27 to 52 years including 2 patients aged 27 and 34 years. We can conclude that echocardiographic abnormalities are frequent in adult patients with DM1. The incidence is similar in the classical and congenital type of DM1. Overall, echocardiographic abnormalities in DM1 correlate with increasing age; however, reduced LVEF is observed even at young age. Cardiac assessment and monitoring in adult patients with DM1 should include evaluation for primary myocardial involvement.

  17. Influence of Marital Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Li; Gu, Xiang-Min; Hao, Bao-Yun; Wang, Shan; Chen, Ze-Jie; Ding, Cheng-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by recurrent seizures and has significant psychological and social consequence for everyday living. Epilepsy affects various aspects of ones’ social life. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of marital status on the quality of life of adult Chinese patients with epilepsy. Methods: This study surveyed 805 Chinese adults who have been clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for longer than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing. In this survey, 532 (66.1%) participants were married. All of them completed the case report form with enquiries on demographic data, social factors, and illness. The marriage status of adult epileptic quality of life was the dependent variable, and demographic data and clinical data were independent variables, analyzed through the multiple linear regression analysis methods. The patients’ quality of life was assessed using the Quality of Life in patients with Epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items (GAD-7). Results: The PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores in the unmarried group (PHQ-9 = 6.0 and GAD-7 = 5.0) were significantly higher than that of the married group (PHQ-9 = 4.0 and GAD-7 =3.0). The scores of married adult patients with epilepsy on QOLIE (61.8 ± 15.3) and social function (70.9 ± 22.7) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients aged between 20 and 44 years. The scores of married adult epileptics on the QOLIE (58.4 ± 14.6) and the energy/fatigue (62.1 ± 20.4) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients (QOLIE = 58.4 ± 14.6 and the energy/fatigue = 62.1 ± 20.4) aged between 45 and 59 years. For the adult epilepsy patients, depression, anxiety, seizures within the last year, disease course, medical expense category, and marriage* age are negatively correlated with the quality of life. Occupation, educational level, and average monthly income are closely

  18. Campylobacter fetus bacteremia with purulent pleurisy in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagami, Keiko; Miyashita, Tomoko; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Shirano, Michinori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kameda, Kazuaki; Nishijima, Masayoshi; Imanishi, Masahiro; Yang, Xi; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with fever and pleural effusion predominantly containing lymphocytes. Cultures of the pleural effusion and blood revealed Campylobacter fetus, and laboratory studies showed a low serum level of immunoglobulin. The patient was diagnosed with C. fetus pleuritis, bacteremia and primary hypogammaglobulinemia, and subsequent treatment with meropenem and immunoglobulin improved his condition. Although the underlying cause of the primary hypogammaglobulinemia remains unclear, the patient's status improved under immunoglobulin replacement therapy. C. fetus pleuritis is a rare infectious disease usually observed in immunocompromised hosts. We herein describe the first report of C. fetus pleuritis in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

  19. Outbreak of gut colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in immunocompromised children undergoing total digestive decontamination: analysis by pulsed-field electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukadida, J; de Montalembert, M; Gaillard, J L; Gobin, J; Grimont, F; Girault, D; Véron, M; Berche, P

    1991-01-01

    We analyzed an outbreak of gut colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurring in an intensive care hematology unit by using conventional typing methods and pulsed-field electrophoresis. In October and November 1989, the feces of four immunocompromised children undergoing total digestive decontamination were colonized by P. aeruginosa. Ten isolates were obtained from the gut flora in pure culture. Retrospective investigations found that one P. aeruginosa isolate from stools of one of the patients was already present at high counts 6 months before the outbreak. This patient had been discharged from the unit in May 1989 and had been readmitted concomitantly with the outbreak. Only pulsed-field electrophoresis could demonstrate that a single epidemic strain was present in the fecal flora of the children. This strain had probably been brought into the unit by the patient with chronic fecal carriage. Images PMID:1774336

  20. Comparison of biological characteristics of marrow mesenchymal stem cells in hepatitis B patients and normal adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Peng; Hua Li; Lin Gu; Xiao-Mou Peng; Yang-Su Huang; Zhi-Liang Gao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish a culture system of marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from hepatitis B patients and normal adults and to compare their biological characteristics.METHODS: MSCs were isolated from bone marrow in 34 male hepatitis B patients and 15 male normal adults and cultivated in vitro. Their biological characteristics including surface markers, shapes and appearances, growth curves, first passage time and passage generations were compared.RESULTS: Cultivation achievement ratio of hepatitis B patients was lower than that of normal adults, no statistical significance (82.35% vs 100%, P >0.05). Compared with MSCs of normal adults, MSCs of hepatitis B patients presented a statistical lower growth curve, longer first passage time (13.0 ± 1.6 d vs 11.4 ± 1.5 d, P < 0.05), fewer passaging generation numbers (10.5 ± 1.4 generations vs 12.3±1.7 generations, P < 0.05), though both shared same appearances, shapes and surface markers. MSCs in hepatitis B patients would expand, spread out and age more easily and there were more refractive particles in the cytoplasm.CONCLUSION: MSCs from hepatitis B patients can be cultured in vitro. Although their appearance, shape and surface marker are similar to those of MSCs from normal adults, there are differences in their biological characteristics.

  1. Neoplastic Disorders in 100 Patients with Adult Celiac Disease

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    HUGH J Freeman

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports have suggested that the incidence of some neoplastic disorders, particularly malignant lymphoma, is increased in patients with celiac disease. In this study, the type and number of neoplastic disorders detected in 100 consecutive celiac disease patients were explored. Sixty-five patients were initially diagnosed with celiac disease before, and 35 after, age 60 years. Ten elderly celiac patients had lymphoma or small intestinal adenocarcinoma. Although the overall incidence of malignant lymphoma was 8%, similar to that in other centres, the incidence in elderly celiac patients was 23% in this study. Celiac disease was detected before or after the diagnosis of lymphoma or small intestinal adenocarcinoma. In some patients, epithelial lymphocytosis was evident in the gastric, colonic or biliary tract epithelium. In addition, other immune-mediated disorders, dermatitis herpetiformis and autoimmune thyroiditis, were common. Finally, other malignant disorders of the esophagus, stomach and colon were not detected.

  2. Reference values for frequency volume chart and uroflowmetry parameters in adolescent and adult enuresis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, Ilse; Brinker, Astrid E.; Steffens, Martijn G.; Mulder, Zwaan; van Capelle, Jan Willem; Feitz, Wout F.J.; Blanker, Marco H.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Reference values of Frequency Volume Chart (FVC) and uroflowmetry parameters for adolescent and adult enuresis patients are lacking. In this study, we aim to describe those parameters, in order to interpret findings from FVCs and uroflowmetries in those patients. Methods: Retrospective, descri

  3. Presentations and outcome analysis of 205 adult patients with Henoch-Schnlein purpura nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣萍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical,pathological data and outcomes of the adult patients with HenochSchnlein purpura nephritis(HSPN).Methods The data of 205 HSPN patients who were diagnosed in Kidney Disease Center of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University betwee Jan 2004 and May 2013 were collected and analyzed in different groups.Results The average

  4. Predictors of Death in Contemporary Adult Patients with Eisenmenger Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempny, Aleksander; Hjortshøj, Cristel S; Gu, Hong;

    2017-01-01

    syndrome). The majority had a post-tricuspid defect (n=643, 58.6%), followed by patients with a complex (n=315, 28.7%) and pre-tricuspid lesion (n=, 12.7%). Over a median follow-up of 3.1years [IQR 1.4-5.9], allowing for 4361.6 patient-years observation, 278 patients died and six and six underwent...

  5. Persistent Airflow Obstruction in Young Adult Asthma Patients

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    Kiyoshi Sekiya

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: In this study, patients not undergoing treatment for asthma were examined. History of childhood asthma and smoking history may be the risk factors for persistent airway obstruction in the asthma patients with mild subjective symptoms. Tests on the bronchodilator change in FEV1 should be performed in patients with history of childhood asthma and smoking history, even if they have only mild subjective symptoms.

  6. Cognitive deficits in adult patients with brain tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Klein, M.

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive function, with survival and response on brain imaging, is increasingly regarded as an important outcome measure in patients with brain tumours. This measure provides us with information on a patient's clinical situation and adverse treatment effects. Radiotherapy has been regarded as the m

  7. Long-term outcome of correction of tetralogy of Fallot in 56 adult patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Da-wei; SHAO Guo-feng; FENG Qiang; NI Yi-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Although most patients with tetralogy of Fallot undergo radical repair during infancy and childhood,patients that remain undiagnosed and untreated until adulthood can still be treated.This study aimed to evaluate longterm outcomes of adult patients with tetralogy of Fallot who were treated surgically,and to determine the predictors of postoperative pulmonary regurgitation.Methods Fifty-six adult patients underwent complete surgical repair.Forty-three patients (76.8%) required a transannular patch.Systolic,diastolic,and mean pressure in the main pulmonary artery were measured after repair.Results The early mortality rate was 3.6%.The 16-year survival rate was (84.4±11.5)%.Late echocardiography revealed 41 patients with transannular patch who had pulmonary regurgitation,consisting of mild pulmonary regurgitation in 28 patients,moderate in eight,and severe regurgitation in five patients.In addition,there was right ventricular outflow tract stenosis in nine patients,moderate/severe tricuspid valve regurgitation in seven,and residual ventricular septal defect in five.Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the mean pulmonary pressure measured just after repair predicted late pulmonary regurgitation.Conclusions The long-term survival of surgically treated adult patients with tetralogy of Fallot is acceptable.The mean pressure >20 mmHg in the main pulmonary artery measured right after surgical repair may be a feasible reference to time the reconstruction of the pulmonary valve.

  8. Virally mediated cervical cancer in the iatrogenically immunocompromised: applications for psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sally E; Lehman, Brandy; Antoni, Michael H; Pereira, Deidre B

    2007-08-01

    Oncogenic or high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of cancers, including cervical cancer. HPV infected individuals who are immunocompromised secondary to acquired (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]) or iatrogenic (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE] patients and organ and hematopoeitic stem cell transplant recipients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy) immune deficiency are particularly at risk for HPV-initiated cervical neoplasia and cancer. Psychoneuroimmunologic (PNI) research has demonstrated that psychosocial factors such as stress, pessimism, and sleep quality may play a role in the promotion of HPV-mediated cervical neoplasia in HIV-positive women. However, no research to our knowledge has examined PNI mechanisms of HPV-mediated cervical neoplasia and cancer in women who are undergoing iatrogenic immunosuppressive therapy for the treatment of autoimmune disease or the prevention of graft-rejection. This article reviews the PNI mechanisms that may underlie the promotion of HPV-mediated cervical neoplasia and applies this model to HPV-infected women who are iatrogenically immunosuppressed, an understudied population at-risk for cervical cancer. Female transplant recipients, one such group, may provide a unique paradigm in which to explore further PNI mechanisms of HPV-mediated cervical neoplasia.

  9. Lichen Striatus in a UVB Treated Adult Psoriasis Patient

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    Pınar Özuğuz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lichen striatus is a self-limited lichenoid eruption that follows Blaschko’s lines. It is particularly common in children and rarely seen in adults. Cases related to atopic diathesis are common, besides it is reported among family members. Viral infections, vaccines and trauma related cases are also present. Various environmental stimuli in the setting of genetic predisposition may play a role. We herein, reported a forty eight year-old woman who developed lichen striatus eruptions in her arm and trunk while she was receiving UVB treatment with maintenance dose for psoriasis. Phototherapy might act as a stimulant with its immunosuppressive and traumatic effects.

  10. Borderline typical symptoms in adult patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Feige, Bernd; Hesslinger, Bernd; Scheel, Corinna; Ebert, Dieter; Matthies, Swantje; Limberger, Matthias F; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Bohus, Martin; Lieb, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) share several clinical features, e.g. emotional lability and impulsivity. This study aimed to delineate differences and similarities between ADHD and BPD with respect to borderline typical symptomatology and gender specifics. Borderline symptomatology was assessed in 60 adult patients with ADHD with the borderline symptom list (BSL) and compared to both 60 gender- and age-matched BPD patients and control subjects. The BSL is a standardized instrument including 95 items on 7 subscales (self-perception, affect regulation, self-destruction, dysphoria, loneliness, intrusions and hostility). Adult ADHD patients showed significantly higher BSL total scores and all of the seven subscales compared to healthy controls (p ADHD and BPD patients were found with respect to self-destruction (d = 1.12) and affect dysregulation (d = 0.90), whereas the smallest difference was found with respect to loneliness (d = 0.36). In females, the BSL subscales "loneliness" and "hostility" did not differentiate between BPD and ADHD. Borderline typical symptoms are common in adult patients with ADHD but seem to be less pronounced than in patients with BPD. Females with ADHD and BPD share more clinical features than males. However, symptoms of self-destruction and affect dysregulation appear to be more severe in BPD patients.

  11. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ADULT PATIENTS WITH CONGENITAL CLUBFOOT IN SEVERITY DEGREE

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    A. A. Mukhamadeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There were treated 48 patients (adolescents and adults with severe congenital clubfoot in Saratov Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics. 43 patients had the age ranged from 16 to 30, 5 patients had the age over 30. 19 patients had bilateral clubfoot, 29 patients had unilateral clubfoot including 19 on right side and 10 left side. To improve treatment results and to prevent deformity recurrence we developed two-staged surgery for congenital clubfoot treatment in adults. Cartilages of talo-navicular, talo-calcanean, cuneo-talar joints are deleted and deformity is corrected with external fixator on I stage. Surgeon performs external fixator resetting, autobone grafting of these joints with compressive arthrodesis on second stage. This method results in full foot reconstruction, good functional outcome, full weight-bearing and improves patient life’s quality.

  12. Assessment of adult patients with hypernatremia: A single center experience

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    Ercan Gündüz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, determination of symptoms, clinical characteristics, prevalence and recovery rates was aimed in patients who applied to the emergency service and diagnosed with hypernatremia. Methods: Patients who applied to Dicle University Medical School Emergency Service during January 2013-December 2014 and whose serum Na>148 mEq/L were included in the study. The study was conducted retrospectively. Results: Hypernatremia prevalence was determined as 0.21% in the cases who applied to the emergency service. The average age in all patients was 69±22 and the median age was 72 years. The average hospitalization period was 13.3±10.9 days. The mortality rate was 75.7% and male gender domination (56% was determined in patients who developed mortality. When mortality and recovery groups were compared statistically; significant difference was determined (p<0.05 in terms of hospitalization period, glucose, urea, creatinine and calcium averages. The complaints of our patients who applied to the emergency service were changes in consciousness (92.7%, oral intake disorder (83.4% and fever (48.6% based on frequency order. The accompanying comorbid states were cerebrovascular illness (36.9%, Dementia/Alzheimer (32.4% and hypertension (28.9% based on frequency order. Conclusion: Consequently, hypernatremia is a fluid-electrolyte disorder progressing with high mortality and could be observed in older patients and in patients whose oral intake is defective and who have cerebrovascular illness and dementia.

  13. Autistic-Like Traits in Adult Patients with Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Junko Matsuo; Yoko Kamio; Hidetoshi Takahashi; Miho Ota; Toshiya Teraishi; Hiroaki Hori; Anna Nagashima; Reiko Takei; Teruhiko Higuchi; Nobutaka Motohashi; Hiroshi Kunugi

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and...

  14. Ingestion and Pharyngeal Trauma Causing Secondary Retropharyngeal Abscess in Five Adult Patients

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    Sudhir B. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retropharyngeal abscess most commonly occurs in children. When present in adults the clinical features may not be typical, and associated immunosuppression or local trauma can be part of the presentation. We present a case series of five adult patients who developed foreign body ingestion trauma associated retropharyngeal abscess. The unusual pearls of each case, along with their outcomes, are discussed. Pertinent information for the emergency medicine physician regarding retropharyngeal abscess is presented as well.

  15. [Acute cerebral ischemia: an unusual clinical presentation of isolated left ventricular noncompaction in an adult patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorencis, Andrea; Quadretti, Laura; Bacich, Daniela; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Mele, Donato; Fiorencis, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction in adults is uncommon. The most frequent clinical manifestations are heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, which may be sustained and associated with sudden death. Thromboembolic complications are also possible. We report the case of an adult patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction who came to our observation because of acute cerebral ischemia, an initial presentation of the disease only rarely described.

  16. Paradoxical Embolization in an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient

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    Nabil M Al Lawati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis patients with an implantable venous access device (IVAD and a patent foramen ovale (PFO are at an increased risk of developing paradoxical embolism. A 33-year-old patient who had a cerebrovascular accident in the above setting is described. She had been anticoagulated because she had thrombosis of the tip of the indwelling catheter, and her PFO was closed percutaneuosly followed by replacement of her IVAD. She made a full neurological recovery. Echocardiography and prophylactic closure of the PFO, when present, as primary prevention for paradoxical embolism may be warranted in cystic fibrosis patients before placement of an IVAD.

  17. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  18. Sabril® registry 5-year results: Characteristics of adult patients treated with vigabatrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Gregory; Faught, Edward; Foroozan, Rod; Pellock, John M; Sergott, Robert C; Shields, W Donald; Ziemann, Adam; Dribinsky, Yekaterina; Lee, Deborah; Torri, Sarah; Othman, Feisal; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-03-01

    Vigabatrin (Sabril®), approved in the US in 2009, is currently indicated as adjunctive therapy for refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) in patients ≥ 10 years old who have responded inadequately to several alternative treatments and as monotherapy for infantile spasms (IS) in patients 1 month to 2 years of age. Because of reports of vision loss following vigabatrin exposure, FDA approval required a risk evaluation mitigation strategy (REMS) program. Vigabatrin is only available in the US through Support, Help, And Resources for Epilepsy (SHARE), which includes a mandated registry. This article describes 5 years of demographic and treatment exposure data from adult patients (≥ 17 years old) in the US treated with vigabatrin and monitored in the ongoing Sabril® registry. Registry participation is mandatory for all US Sabril® prescribers and patients. A benefit-risk assessment must be documented by the physician for a patient to progress to maintenance therapy, defined as 1 month of vigabatrin treatment for patients with IS and 3 months for patients with rCPS. Ophthalmologic assessments must be documented during and after completion of therapy. As of August 26, 2014, a total of 6823 patients were enrolled in the registry, of which 1200 were adults at enrollment. Of these patients, 1031 (86%) were naïve to vigabatrin. The majority of adult patients (n=783, 65%) had previously been prescribed ≥ 4 AEDs, and 719 (60%) were receiving ≥ 3 concomitant AEDs at vigabatrin initiation. Prescribers submitted an initial ophthalmological assessment form for 863 patients; an ophthalmologic exam was not completed for 300 (35%) patients and thus, were considered exempted from vision testing. Of these patients, 128 (43%) were exempted for neurologic disabilities. Clinicians discontinued treatment in 8 patients because of visual field deficits (VFD) (5 patients naïve to vigabatrin and 3 patients previously exposed). Based on Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, it is

  19. Congenital tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare and late presentation in adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem M Hajjar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital H-type tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF in adults is a rare presentation and can test the diagnostic acumen of a surgeon, endoscopist, and the radiologist. These undetected fistulas may present as chronic lung disease of unknown origin because repeated aspirations can lead to recurrent lung infections and bronchiectasis. Congenital TEFs should be considered in the diagnosis of infants and young adults with recurrent respiratory distress and/or infections. Here, we present the successful management of this rare case in an adult patient.

  20. Nail involvement in adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis: prevalence and clinical features

    OpenAIRE

    Schons,Karen Regina Rosso; Beber,André Avelino Costa; Beck, Maristela de Oliveira; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a disease of worldwide distribution with a prevalence of 1 to 3%. Nail psoriasis is estimated in 50% of patients with psoriasis, and in the presence of joint involvement, it can reach 80%. OBJECTIVE: To study the nail changes - and their clinical implications - presented by patients with psoriasis vulgaris under surveillance in a university hospital from the south of Brazil. METHODS: his cross-sectional study evaluated 65 adult patients from January 2012 to M...

  1. Factors affecting ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Khan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Patients with increased age, prolonged hospital stay, GCS score of less than 13, extra-ventricular drains in situ, or excision of brain tumors were more likely to experience early shunt malfunction.

  2. Giardia Assemblages A and B in Diarrheic Patients: A Comparative Study in Egyptian Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Basha, Noussa R; Zaki, Mayssa M; Hassanin, Omayma M; Rehan, Mohamed K; Omran, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Giardia duodenalis is considered the most common intestinal parasite in humans worldwide. Children are especially affected, with more severe consequences than adults. The present study was designed to determine the distribution of assemblages A and B Giardia infection in children and adults, with the use of light microscopy and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) as diagnostic procedures, and to investigate its associations with clinical and epidemiological data collected from children and adult groups. This cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2012 to October 2013 by collecting fecal samples from 200 children and 200 adults complaining of diarrhea. Samples were subjected to parasitological examination by direct wet smear and formol-ether methods. Genotyping of G. doudenalis samples was conducted by PCR-RFLP analysis. Giardia duodenalis infection caused by assemblages A and B was identified in 60 samples, 34 from children and 26 from adults. Assemblage B was detected in 38 patients (63.34%), and assemblage A was detected in 22 patients (36.66%). Assemblage A was significantly more frequent in children with age range 2-8 yr, and assemblage B was higher in children with age range 6-16 yr old. Diarrhea frequency/day and recurrences per month affected patients infected with assemblage A (P value Giardia assemblages A and B were identified in children and adults, assemblage A infected younger children more frequently and was more closely related to severe clinical manifestations than assemblage B.

  3. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  4. Monitoring of the Adult Patient on Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Chung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO provides mechanical support to the patient with cardiac or cardiopulmonary failure. This paper reviews the physiology of VA ECMO including the determinants of ECMO flow and gas exchange. The efficacy of this therapy may be determined by assessing patient hemodynamics and device flow, overall gas exchange support, markers of adequate oxygen delivery, and pulsatility of the arterial blood pressure waveform.

  5. Analysis of adult patients with epilepsy in the age continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karlov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the presence of comorbidities and to investigate quality of life in patients with main types of epilepsy in relation to age.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 150 patients aged 17 to 64 years with idiopathic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic types of epilepsy. The investigators studied the presence of sleep disorders using the questionnaires designed by the Somnology Center, Ministry of Health of Russia, and that of daytime sleepiness by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, determined the level of anxiety and depression by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and assessed the severity of seizures by the National Hospital Seizure Severity Scale. Quality of life was investigated using the QOLIE-89 questionnaire. A cluster analysis was carried out to divide all the patients into three age groups (mean age, 27.3; 30.7; and 37.7 years.Results and discussion. A positive relationship was obtained between some indicators of sleep disorders, level of anxiety, and age. There were significant differences between the above three age groups in the following indicators: sleep disorders; daytime sleepiness; level of anxiety, severity of seizures, and scores of the QOLIE-89 questionnaire (p<0.001. Since the patients suffer from different basic types of epilepsy (cryptogenic, idiopathic, and symptomatic, the findings testify to age as an independent factor that modifies quality of life in epileptic patients.

  6. [Perspectives in the management of congenital heart defects in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartyánszky, István; Varga, Sándor; Havasi, Kálmán; Babik, Barna; Katona, Márta; Bogáts, Gábor

    2015-01-18

    Due to improving results in congenital heart surgery, the number of adult patients with congenital heart defect is increasing. The question is: what kind of problems can be managed in this patient-group? The authors review the different problems of management of congenital heart defects in adults based on national and international literature data. Simple defects recognised in adults, postoperative residual problems, changing of small grafts and valves, correction of primary or operated coarctation aortae can be usually managed without problems. A very close follow-up is necessary to establish the correct period for heart transplantation in patients with transposition of great arteries with Senning/Mustard operation, and univentricular heart corrected with "Fontan-circulation" type surgical procedure. The authors conclude that although the number of patients increases, only a few congenital heart diseases may cause problems. It seems important (1) to monitor asymptomatic patient who underwent operation (Fallot-IV, Ross procedure, etc.), (2) follow up regularly patients who underwent Senning/Mustard procedure (magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, brain natriuretic peptide measurement), (3) define the proper period of preparation for heart transplantation of patients with a univentricular heart, with special attention to the possibility of multiorgan (lung, liver, etc.) failure. Due to the improvement of foetal diagnosis of congenital heart defects, the number of patients with complex congenital heart defects is decreasing. The standard management of these patients could be primary heart transplantation in infancy.

  7. Split-liver transplantation in the high-MELD adult patient: are we being too cautious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadalin, Silvio; Schaffer, Randolph; Fruehauf, Nils

    2009-07-01

    The fear that patients with high-mathematical model for end stage liver disease (MELD) score may not be suitable candidates for segmental grafts because of their need for greater liver mass has continued to push the transplant community toward the use of whole LT (WLT) in preference to split LT (SLT). In order to define the outcome of segmental liver transplantation in a better manner in high-MELD patients (score > or =26), we queried the UNOS registry for graft and patient survival results according to MELD score in adult patients receiving WLT and SLT in the United States from the inception of MELD allocation (February 27, 2002) through March 9, 2007. A total of 316 adult patients received a SLT as compared with 20 778 WLTs. Patient and graft survival rates at 6 and 12 months were comparable for all MELD ranges, including the 'high-MELD' recipients (e.g. at MELD score 31-35, patients' and grafts' survival rates at 12 months was 87.5% in SLT group vs. 84.4% and 76.7% in WLT group respectively). The results even at higher MELD scores (i.e. >35) were more than acceptable. In conclusion, patient and graft survival rates for SLT in high-MELD adult patients are comparable to the same for WLT.

  8. Patient safety in the rehabilitation of the adult with an amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latlief, Gail; Elnitsky, Christine; Hart-Hughes, Stephanie; Phillips, Samuel L; Adams-Koss, Laurel; Kent, Robert; Highsmith, M Jason

    2012-05-01

    This article reviews and summarizes the literature on patient safety issues in the rehabilitation of adults with an amputation. Safety issues in the following areas are discussed; the prosthesis, falls, wound care, pain, and treatment of complex patients. Specific recommendations for further research and implementation strategies to prevent injury and improve safety are also provided. Communication between interdisciplinary team members and patient and caregiver education are crucial to executing a safe treatment plan. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team members should feel comfortable discussing safety issues with patients and be able to recommend preventive approaches to patients as appropriate.

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUAN ZHOU; YU XIA CUI; XI QIANG YANG; ZHOU FU; LI PING JIANG; LI JIA WANG

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to distinguish respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and immunology between immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine and to explore immune mechanism of RSV infection. At various time points after RSV infection of BALB/c mice and nude mice, pulmonary viral titers were assayed, RSV antigen was tested by direct immunofluorescent assay and immunohistochemistry. Pulmonary mRNA expressions of Toll like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were assayed by RT-PCR. CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells in peripheral blood were examined by flow cytometry and plasma total IgE was assayed by ELISA. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and pulmonary histology were identified to reflect airway inflammation. It was found that RSV titers of both mice peaked on the 3rd day post infection with a much higher level of viral titer in nude mice than in BALB/c mice and a longer viral duration in nude mice (over 9 days post infection) than in BALB/c mice (6 days post infection). RSV infection induced higher viral antigen expression in nude mice (0.267 ±0.045) than in BALB/c mice (0. 168 ± 0.031). RSV infection enhanced pulmonary TLR4 expression of BALB/c mice (51.96% ± 11.34%) and nude mice (48.96% ± 12.35%) compared with each control (34.04% ± 10.06% and 32.37% ± 9.87% respectively). CD4+ peripheral blood cells increased in RSV infected BALB/c mice (66.51% ± 2.09% ) compared with the control BALB/c mice (51.63% ± 5.90% ), and CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells were deficient in nude mice. RSV infection increased plasma total IgE in both mice, and BALB/c mice had a larger amount of IgE on the 7th day post infection (9.02 ng/ml ± 2.90 ng/ml) and on the 14th day post infection (12.76 ng/ml ± 4.15 ng/ml) than corresponding nude mice (3.72 ng/ml ± 1.06 ng/ml and 7.62 ng/ml ± 3.08 ng/ml respectively on the 7th and 14th day post infection). RSV infected nude mice had more severe airway inflammation than infected BALB/c mice. It is concluded that BALB/c mice and

  10. Symptoms and aetiology of delirium: a comparison of elderly and adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, S; Agarwal, M; Sharma, A; Mattoo, S K; Avasthi, A; Chakrabarti, S; Malhotra, S; Kulhara, P; Bas, D

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. To compare the symptoms of delirium as assessed by the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98) and associated aetiologies in adult and elderly patients seen in a consultation-liaison service. METHODS. A total of 321 consecutive patients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of delirium were assessed on the DRS-R-98 and a study-specific aetiology checklist. RESULTS. Of the 321 patients, 245 (76%) aged 18 to 64 years formed the adult group, while 76 (24%) formed the elderly group (≥ 65 years). The prevalence and severity of various symptoms of delirium as assessed using the DRS-R-98 were similar across the 2 groups, except for the adult group having statistically higher prevalence and severity scores for thought process abnormalities and lability of affect. For both groups and the whole sample, factor analysis yielded a 3-factor model for the phenomenology. In the 2 groups, the DRS-R-98 item loadings showed subtle differences across various factors. The 2 groups were similar for the mean number of aetiologies associated with delirium, the mean number being 3. However, the 2 groups differed with respect to hepatic derangement, substance intoxication, withdrawal, and postpartum causes being more common in the adult group, in contrast lung disease and cardiac abnormalities were more common in the elderly group. CONCLUSION. Adult and elderly patients with delirium are similar with respect to the distribution of various symptoms, motor subtypes, and associated aetiologies.

  11. The level of specialist assessment of adult asthma is influenced by patient age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, C; Sverrild, A; Stensen, L;

    2014-01-01

    is sparse. AIM: To examine the impact of patient age on the type and proportion of diagnostic tests performed in patients undergoing specialist assessment for asthma. METHODS: Data from a clinical population consisting of all patients consecutively referred over a 12 months period to a specialist clinic...... adults, and were more frequently smokers. However, a regression analysis showed that older age was associated with a lower likelihood of diagnostic assessment with a reversibility test, a bronchial challenge test, or measurement of exhaled NO, independently of a known diagnosis of asthma, smoking habits......BACKGROUND: Late onset asthma is associated with more severe disease and higher morbidity than in younger asthma patients. This may in part relate to under recognition of asthma in older adults, but evidence on the impact of patient age on diagnostic assessment of asthma in a specialist setting...

  12. Health-related quality of life in adult dermatitis patients stratified by filaggrin genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G; Thyssen, Jacob P; Thuesen, Betina H;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information concerning health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and comorbidities of adult dermatitis patients stratified by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) is limited. OBJECTIVE: To investigate HRQoL, skin symptoms and comorbidities in adult FLG mutation carriers......, as measured by use of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), no association with self-reported anxiety or depression was identified. Notably, the highest median DLQI score, reflecting greater impairment, was reported by patients with both FLG mutations and atopic dermatitis. Overall, 19.7% of patients....... METHODS: This cross-sectional study included patients diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema (n = 520). Patients completed questionnaires about dermatitis, skin symptoms, HRQoL, and comorbidities, including actinic keratosis, and atopic and mental disorders. RESULTS: FLG mutations (R501X...

  13. Demographic characteristics of epilepsy patients and antiepileptic drug utilization in adult patients: Results of a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanket Newale

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Epilepsy is common in adult patients. Hypertension is the most common comorbidity. Levetiracetam is the most commonly used AED across all studied age groups and both genders. Control of epilepsy with current treatment is satisfactory with no major adverse events.

  14. Modern treatment of adult short bowel syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, E; Jeppesen, P B

    2011-01-01

    By definition, intestinal failure prevails when oral compensation is no longer feasible and parenteral support is necessary to maintain nutritional equilibrium. In the past, conventional treatment has mainly focused on "making the most of what the short bowel syndrome patient still had" by optimi......By definition, intestinal failure prevails when oral compensation is no longer feasible and parenteral support is necessary to maintain nutritional equilibrium. In the past, conventional treatment has mainly focused on "making the most of what the short bowel syndrome patient still had...

  15. Adult patients' adjustability to orthodontic appliances. Part I: a comparison between Labial, Lingual, and Invisalign™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalish, Miri; Cooper-Kazaz, Rena; Ivgi, Inbal; Canetti, Laura; Tsur, Boaz; Bachar, Eytan; Chaushu, Stella

    2012-12-01

    This prospective study examined the adult patient's perception of recovery after insertion of three types of orthodontic appliances: Buccal, Lingual and Invisalign. The sample consisted of sixty-eight adult patients (45 females and 23 males) who comprised three groups: 28 Buccal, 19 Lingual, and 21 Invisalign patients. After appliance insertion, patients completed a Health-Related Quality of Life questionnaire daily for the first week and again on day 14, in order to assess patients' perception of pain and analgesic consumption. In addition, four areas of dysfunction were assessed: oral dysfunction, eating disturbances, general activity parameters, and oral symptoms. Lingual appliance was associated with more severe pain and analgesic consumption, the greatest oral and general dysfunction, and the most difficult and longest recovery. The Invisalign patients complained of relatively high levels of pain in the first days after insertion; however this group was characterized by the lowest level of oral symptoms and by a similar level of general activity disturbances and oral dysfunction compared to the Buccal appliance. Many Lingual and some Buccal patients did not reach a full recovery from their eating difficulties by the end of the study period. The present study provides information to adult patients and clinicians assisting them in choosing the most appropriate treatment modality in relation to Health-Related Quality of Life parameters.

  16. Simultaneous premaxillary repositioning and cheiloplasty in adult patients with unrepaired bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ui-Lyong; Cho, Jun-Bum; Choung, Pill-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    Primary cheiloplasty in adult patients with unrepaired complete bilateral cleft lip and palate is quite challenging due to severe premaxillary anterior projection. To get the best repair results, the author carried out repositioning of the premaxilla and repair of the lip deformity in a single stage. Positive results for the primary lip repair and appropriate repositioning of the premaxilla were achieved. No avascular necrosis of the premaxilla was observed. Repositioning of the premaxilla and repair of the lip deformity in a single operation appears to be a reliable method for treating adult patients with previously unrepaired or poorly repaired bilateral cleft lip and palate.

  17. Corticosteroids for all adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

    OpenAIRE

    Ger Rijkers; Simone Spoorenberg; Stefan Vestjens; Werner Albrich

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid therapy as adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a promising but controversial subject. The potentially beneficial effect of corticosteroids is based on the ability of steroids to dampen an excessive inflammatory response that often occurs in patients with CAP. This excessive inflammatory response can cause damage to the lungs and other organs, and is associated with poor outcome.

  18. Intravenous lipids in adult intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Matthias; Mayer, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition of critically ill patients is a widespread phenomenon in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. Lipid emulsions (LEs) are able to provide sufficient caloric support and essential fatty acids to correct the energy deficit and improve outcome. Furthermore, components of LEs might impact cell and organ function in an ICU setting. All currently available LEs for parenteral use are effective in providing energy and possess a good safety profile. Nevertheless, soybean oil-based LEs have been associated with an elevated risk of adverse outcomes, possibly due to their high content of omega-6 fatty acids. More newly developed emulsions partially replace soybean oil with medium-chain triglycerides, fish oil or olive oil in various combinations to reduce its negative effects on immune function and inflammation. The majority of experimental studies and smaller clinical trials provide initial evidence for a beneficial impact of these modern LEs on critically ill patients. However, large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate which LE offers the greatest advantages concerning clinical outcome. Lipid emulsions (LEs) are a powerful source of energy that can help to adjust the caloric deficit of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. LEs possess various biological activities, but their subsequent impact on critically ill patients awaits further investigations.

  19. Effectiveness of sulpiride in adult patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Hsien; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Lin, Chia-Yin

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness among sulpiride, risperidone, olanzapine, and haloperidol by evaluating the persistence of drug use. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. Patients with schizophrenia aged 18-65 years and newly prescribed with a single oral antipsychotic medication between years 2003 and 2008 were included. The primary outcome was the persistence of antipsychotic agents by calculating the treatment duration till treatment changed. All defined treatment changes were also analyzed separately, including discontinuation, switching, augmentation, and hospitalization. A total of 1324 eligible patients were included, with an average age of 36 years old and approximately 45% of them were female. The most prevalent antipsychotic use was risperidone (42.1%), followed by sulpiride (36.0%), haloperidol (14.2%), and olanzapine (7.7%). After adjusting for patient demographics, mental illness characteristics, and propensity score, the Cox regression models found that the risk of nonpersistence was significantly higher in patients receiving risperidone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.40), haloperidol (HR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.63-2.40), and olanzapine (HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.07-1.68), as compared with sulpiride, suggesting the effectiveness of sulpiride was better than the other 3 antipsychotics. Therefore, this study would provide strong grounds for a properly conducted randomized controlled trial of the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of sulpiride vs atypical antipsychotics.

  20. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients With Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Hvistendahl, Mark; Naimi, Rahim M

    2017-01-01

    in treating IF with home parenteral nutrition (HPN), this study documents the HPN evolution and describes the demographics and outcome in one of the world's largest single-center cohorts. METHODS: We included patients with IF discharged with HPN from 1970-2010. Data were extracted according to European...

  1. Analgesia for terminally ill adult patients. Preserve quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Adequate pain management is crucial in maintaining the best possible quality of life for terminally ill patients. This article examines pain management in the palliative care setting, based on a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. Accurate pain evaluation, preferably by the patient, is essential for guiding treatment decisions. Some causes of pain are amenable to specific treatments. The expected benefits and harms of the various treatment options and procedures must be weighed on a case by case basis. Quality of life should always be the first priority. The World Health Organization has developed a "three-step analgesic ladder", based on the use of increasingly potent analgesics: step I analgesics include paracetamol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); codeine is the standard step II analgesic; and morphine is the standard step III analgesic. Fentanyl is an alternative to morphine. The daily morphine dose must be determined for each patient. Morphine titration starts with oral doses given every 4 hours, but additional doses can be taken every hour if necessary. Total consumption is then used to calculate the dose required the following day. A sustained-release product can be used to reduce the number of doses required when a consistently effective daily dose has been established. When patients are unable to take morphine orally, it can be given by subcutaneous injection, and by subcutaneous or intravenous infusion. Pumps allow the patient to self-administer morphine on demand. Fentanyl transdermal patches are another option for stable pain. Immediate-release oral forms and injections are useful for preventing or treating breakthrough pain. If morphine requirements increase during treatment, the most likely explanations are exacerbations of pain or an excessively long interval between doses. Pharmacological tolerance and psychological dependence are rare during palliative care. In case of renal failure, the morphine

  2. Validity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) as a screener for adult ADHD in treatment seeking substance use disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Glind, Geurt; van den Brink, Wim; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Kaye, Sharlene; Skutle, Arvid; Bu, Eli-Torild H.; Franck, Johan; Konstenius, Maija; Moggi, Franz; Dom, Geert; Verspreet, Sofie; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Kapitany-Foeveny, Mate; Fatseas, Melina; Auriacombe, Marc; Schillinger, Arild; Seitz, Andrea; Johnson, Brian; Faraone, Stephen V.; Ramos-Quiroga, J. Antoni; Casas, Miguel; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Bartar, Csaba; Schoevers, Robert A.; Levin, Frances R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To detect attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in treatment seeking substance use disorders (SUD) patients, a valid screening instrument is needed. Objectives: To test the performance of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale V 1.1(ASRS) for adult ADHD in an international sample of

  3. Comparison of human growth hormone products' cost in pediatric and adult patients. A budgetary impact model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalo, Gary R; Joshi, Ashish V; Germak, John

    2007-09-01

    We assessed the economic impact to the United States payer of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization, comparing the relative dosage efficiency of marketed pen-based and vial-based products in a pediatric and in an adult population. A budgetary impact model calculated drug costs based on product waste and cost. Waste was the difference between prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and actual delivered dose, based on dosing increments and maximum deliverable dose for pens and a fixed-percent waste as derived from the literature for vials. Annual wholesale acquisition costs were calculated based upon total milligrams delivered, using a daily dose of 0.03 mg/kg for pediatric patients and 0.016 mg/kg for adults. Total annual drug costs were compared for two scenarios: 1) a product mix based on national market share and 2) restricting use to the product with lowest waste. Based on the literature, waste for each vial product was 23 percent. Among individual pens, waste was highest for Humatrope 24 mg (19.5 percent pediatric, 14.3 percent adult) and lowest for Norditropin Nordi-Flex 5 mg (1.1 percent pediatric, 1 percent adult). Restricting use to the brand with least waste (Norditropin), compared to national product share mix, resulted in a 10.2 percent reduction in annual pediatric patient cost from $19,026 to $17,089 and an 8 percent reduction in annual adult patient cost from $24,099 to $22,161. We concluded that pen delivery systems result in less waste than vial and syringe. Considering all approved delivery systems, Norditropin resulted in the least product waste and lower annual patient cost for both pediatric and adult populations.

  4. Enterocolitis without diarrhoea in an adult patient: a clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Gaurang Nandkishor; Sharma, Amit; Khorasani-Zadeh, Arman; John, Savio

    2014-03-04

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common causes of bloody diarrhoea in the USA. We report a case of a young woman who presented with a clinical picture reminiscent of acute appendicitis. Ultrasonography and CT of the abdomen performed subsequently revealed evidence of colitis. Quite unexpectedly, she had no symptoms of diarrhoea and the stool Gram stain and culture were negative. Nevertheless, due to high clinical suspicion of infectious colitis, appendectomy was deferred. Blood culture was later reported positive for Campylobacter species and the patient responded to quinolones. With this case report we try to highlight one of the unusual presentations of C jejuni infection, closely mimicking acute appendicitis in the absence of classical symptoms of bacterial enteritis. In such cases, a high index of suspicion, astute history taking skills and the proper use of imaging studies can save the patient from the surgical knife.

  5. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bühler, Silja; Eperon, Gilles; Ribi, Camillo; Kyburz, Diego; van Gompel, Fons; Visser, Leo G.; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hatz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The number of individuals with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRDs) treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and, in particular, biological therapies is also rising. The immunosuppressants, as well as the AIIRD itself, increase the risk of infection in this population. Thus, preventing infections by means of vaccination is of utmost importance. New Swiss vaccination recommendations for AIIRD patients were in...

  6. HIV Risk Reduction Among Young Adult Chronic Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-28

    test was subsequently licensed in 1985, Even though HlV -antibodles were nearly universal in AIDS patients, the antibodies serve no apparent protective...for Disease Control, 1989; Confronting AIDS Directions for Public Health. Health Care, and Research. 1986), Although some temporizing drug therapy...sharing of needles by Intravenous drug users (IVDA), and transplacental spread, The most dangerous types of sexual contact are anal and vaginal

  7. Effectiveness of Sulpiride in Adult Patients With Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness among sulpiride, risperidone, olanzapine, and haloperidol by evaluating the persistence of drug use. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. Patients with schizophrenia aged 18–65 years and newly prescribed with a single oral antipsychotic medication between years 2003 and 2008 were included. The primary outcome was the persistence of antipsychotic agents by c...

  8. Treatment of adult short bowel syndrome patients with teduglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholk, Lærke Marijke; Holst, Jens Juul; Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parenteral support is lifesaving in short bowel syndrome patients with intestinal failure (SBS-IF), who are unable to compensate for their malabsorption by metabolic or pharmacologic adaptation. Mutually, the symptoms of SBS-IF and the inconveniences and complications in relation...... support were obtained. EXPERT OPINION: Teduglutide seems to be safe and well-tolerated and demonstrates restoration of structural and functional integrity of the remaining intestine with significant intestinotrophic and proabsorptive effects, facilitating a reduction in diarrhea and an equivalent...

  9. Antigenic and anticorpal diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis and candidosis in immunocompromised host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Machetti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA and candidemia are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, but diagnostic procedures are often hampered by critical patients conditions. In recent years, non-culture methods have reached a standardization level suitable to be marketed and widely employed. A method for a panfungal antigenic diagnosis, is the detection in serum of (1→3-ß-D-Glucan (BDG, a polisaccaridic component of fungal cell wall. Best results can be obtained in Aspergillus, Candida and Fusarium infections, while the test performs poorly with Cryptococcus and in zygomycosis. The use of this method are limited by the high costs and by the need of disposable materials certified as glucan-free, in order to avoid false positive results. Galactomannan (GM antigen detection is a method for non-invasive diagnosis of IA. The assay, in latex agglutination (LA and enzymeimmunoassay (EIA format, detect GM in serum, whose presence correlates with IA. Sensitivity and specificity strongly fluctuate (50-100% and 81-98% respectively depending on the time of sampling, the positivity cut-off employed, the concomitant administration of antifungal drugs and of some antibiotics. Nevertheless the method is a very useful and widely employed tool for the diagnosis of IA. For the diagnosis of candidemia, two Candida antigens may be detected in serum: the 56°C heat-labile antigen in LA format, and the mannan antigen, in LA and EIA format. Both the methods perform quite well, but sensitivities and specificities are not so good to allow a routinely and useful use in clinical practice.

  10. Is the medical home for adult patients with sickle cell disease a reality or an illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, Samir K; Vichinsky, Elliott P

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) emerged as a viable method to improve delivery of medical care. Due to all the promotion about the effectiveness of the PCMH, patients with sickle cell disease, their families and the community hoped that this could be a possible solution to the problems that arise in the treatment of adult patients with sickle cell disease. Review of the literature and review of the criteria for the establishment of a PCMH show that the PCMH is not an ideal model for patients with sickle cell disease because finding a personal physician, which is the first criteria of a functional PCMH, is a major problem in the process of transitioning the care of patients with sickle cell disease from pediatrics to adult care. Moreover, garnering hospital support to defray the initial costs to establish a PCMH for adults with sickle cell disease is unlikely given the already high costs of care for patients with sickle cell disease. Moreover, recent studies have shown insufficient evidence to determine the presumed beneficial effects of the PCMH, especially in patients with chronic disease.

  11. Loss of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Nicole; de Roon, Margot; van Campen, Jos P C M; Kremer, Stefanie; Boesveldt, Sanne

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the association of olfactory function and nutritional status in vital older adults and geriatric patients. Three hundred forty-five vital (mean age 67.1 years) and 138 geriatric older adults (mean age 80.9 years) were included. Nutritional status was assessed using the mini nutritional assessment-short form. The Sniffin' Sticks was used to measure olfactory function. Eleven percentage of the vital older adults were at risk of malnutrition, whereas 60% of the geriatric participants were malnourished or at risk. Only 2% of the vital older adults were anosmic, compared with 46% of the geriatric participants. Linear regression demonstrated a significant association (P = 0.015) between olfactory function and nutritional status in the geriatric subjects. However, this association became insignificant after adjustment for confounders. Both crude and adjusted analysis in the vital older adults did not show a significant association. The results indicate that, in both groups of elderly, there is no direct relation between olfactory function and nutritional status. We suggest that a decline in olfactory function may still be considered as one of the risk-factors for malnutrition in geriatric patients-once co-occurring with other mental and/or physical problems that are more likely to occur in those patients experience.

  12. Upper and lower urinary tract outcomes in adult myelomeningocele patients: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Veenboer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The introduction of sophisticated treatment of bladder dysfunction and hydrocephalus allows the majority of SB patients to survive into adulthood. However, no systematic review on urological outcome in adult SB patients is available and no follow-up schemes exist. OBJECTIVES: To systematically summarize the evidence on outcome of urinary tract functioning in adult SB patients. METHODS: A literature search in PubMed and Embase databases was done. Only papers published in the last 25 years describing patients with open SB with a mean age >18 years were included. We focused on finding differences in the treatment strategies, e.g., clean intermittent catheterization and antimuscarinic drugs versus early urinary diversion, with regard to long-term renal and bladder outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 13 articles and 5 meeting abstracts on urinary tract status of adult SB patients were found describing a total of 1564 patients with a mean age of 26.1 years (range 3-74 years, with a few patients <18 years. All were retrospective cohort studies with relatively small and heterogeneous samples with inconsistent reporting of outcome; this precluded the pooling of data and meta-analysis. Total continence was achieved in 449/1192 (37.7%; range 8-85% patients. Neurological level of the lesion and hydrocephalus were associated with incontinence. Renal function was studied in 1128 adult patients. In 290/1128 (25.7%; range 3-81.8% patients some degree of renal damage was found and end-stage renal disease was seen in 12/958 (1.3% patients. Detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy and detrusor-overactivity acted as adverse prognostic factors for the development of renal damage. CONCLUSIONS: These findings should outline follow-up schedules for SB patients, which do not yet exist. Since renal and bladder deterioration continues beyond adolescence, follow-up of these individuals is needed. We recommend standardization in reporting the outcome of urinary tract function in

  13. Patient Priority-Directed Decision Making and Care for Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Mary E; Esterson, Jessica; Ferris, Rosie; Posner, Philip; Blaum, Caroline S

    2016-05-01

    Older adults with multiple conditions receive care that is often fragmented, burdensome, and of unclear benefit. An advisory group of patients, caregivers, clinicians, health system engineers, health care system leaders, payers, and others identified three modifiable contributors to this fragmented, burdensome care: decision making and care focused on diseases, not patients; inadequate delineation of roles and responsibilities and accountability among clinicians; and lack of attention to what matters to patients and caregivers (ie, their health outcome goals and care preferences). The advisory group identified patient priority-directed care as a feasible, sustainable approach to addressing these modifiable factors.

  14. Tinea capitis in the form of concentric rings in an HIV positive adult on antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatophyte infection may present in the form of concentric rings caused by Trichophyton concentricum, known as Tinea Imbricata. In immunosuppressed patients, there are reports of lesions in the form of concentric rings caused by dermatophytes other than Trichophyton concentricum too, mostly by Trichophyton tonsurans, known as Tinea indesiciva or Tinea pseudoimbricata. We report a case of tinea capitis in a HIV-positive adult woman on antiretroviral therapy, who presented with concentric rings of papules and pustules with slight scaling on the scalp along with diffuse thinning of hair. Both Potassium hydroxide mount and culture showed the presence of Dermatophytes. Tinea capitis is considered rare in adults, but new cases are being reported in immunocompromised as well as in immunocompetent patients. The pertinent features of this case are: HIV-positive adult female on antiretroviral therapy, presenting with tinea capitis in the form of concentric rings; culture from the lesion grew Microsporum audouinii; responding to oral Terbinafine.

  15. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  16. Successful Non-Invasive treatment of stricturing fibrosing colonopathy in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terheggen G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Fibrosing colonopathy (FC is a rare entity associated with cystic fibrosis (CF. Until now, patients with stricturing FC have usually been treated surgically. In this instance, we aimed at avoiding surgery by applying a new conservative approach. Methods Case report on an adult with CF who developed persistent abdominal pain due to a non-passable stricture in the right transverse colon. Histology confirmed fibrosing colonopathy. Results Initially we treated the patient with prednisolone pulse therapy and additive antibiotic therapy. For maintenance therapy we administered budesonide. The patient underwent clinical, laboratory and endoscopic follow-up over a three-year period. The stricture healed and was easy to pass. A relapse in the cecum at the ileocecal valve again improved under steroid and antibiotic therapy. Conclusions We present a novel therapeutic approach for advanced stricturing FC in an adult patient which successfully avoided surgery (right hemicolectomy over a three year follow up.

  17. Comparative Study of Early Maladaptive Schemas in Rheumatoid Arthrits Patients and Normal Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rezaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early maladaptive schemas (EMSs designed to ases early distres. EMSs are at he core of personality pathology and psychological distres. The main objective of this study was to find out he diferences betwen rheumatoid arthrits (RA patients and normal adults on EMSs. 10 RA patients and 10 normal adults completed Young’s Schema Questionaire developed by Jefery Young (198. The results showed that data was subjected to statistical analysis; T- test showed that the RA patients reported a signifcantly greater severity of early maladaptive schemata than the normal subjects. This study sugested that a remarkable amount of RA patients may sufer from EMSs which have an efect on their pain situation. These findings confirm those pieces of evidence indicating the psychological treatments included in multidisciplinary programs for this disorder.

  18. FUNGAL INFECTIONS OF THE EAR IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOST: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlingegowda Viswanatha

    2011-01-01

           Hematological investigations play a very important role in confirming the diagnosis and immunity status of the patients. In diabetic patients with otomycosis, along with antifungal therapy blood sugar levels should be controlled with medical therapy to prevent complications.

  19. The Impact of Loneliness on Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction Among Older, Sicker Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Shirley Musich PhD; Shaohung S. Wang PhD; Kevin Hawkins PhD; Charlotte S. Yeh MA, FACEP

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study estimated prevalence rates of loneliness, identified characteristics associated with loneliness, and estimated the impact of loneliness on quality of life (QOL) and patient satisfaction. Method: Surveys were mailed to 15,500 adults eligible for care management programs. Loneliness was measured using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) three-item scale, and QOL using Veteran’s RAND 12-item (VR-12) survey. Patient satisfaction was measured on a 10-point scale. ...

  20. Effects of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in adult patients with Kaschin-Beck disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ya-xu; Dong, Wei; Liu, Hui;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate the effects of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine on adult patients with Kaschin-Beck disease (KBD). A total of 80 patients, aged over 40 years, were randomized into two groups receiving either 1,600 mg oral mixture of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine or placebo......). But the overall mean change in joint space was significant between the two groups (P glucosamine might play a protective role in preserving articular cartilage and provide...

  1. Clinical effectiveness of first and repeat influenza vaccination in adult and elderly diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijmans-Van den Akker, I.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Buskens, E.; Nichol, K.L.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Hak, E.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Influenza vaccine uptake remains low among the high-risk group of patients with diabetes, partly because of conflicting evidence regarding its potential benefits. We assessed the clinical effectiveness of influenza vaccination in adults with diabetes and specifically examined potential mo

  2. Reduced corticosteroid use in adult patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia receiving romiplostim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Michel (Marc); P.A.W. te Boekhorst (Peter); A. Janssens (Andre); I. Pabinger-Fasching (Ingrid); M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel); K. Nie (Kun); G. Kreuzbauer (Georg)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAdult patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia requiring first-line treatment typically receive corticosteroids, which are associated with low response rates and many potential side effects. In a retrospective analysis of two 6-month, placebo-controlled, phase III trials, corticoste

  3. The relationships among separation anxiety disorder, adult attachment style and agoraphobia in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Stefano; Abelli, Marianna; Troisi, Alfonso; Siracusano, Alberto; Cassano, Giovanni B; Shear, Katherine M; Baldwin, David

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that separation anxiety disorder occurs more frequently in adults than children. It is unclear whether the presence of adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD) is a manifestation of anxious attachment, or a form of agoraphobia, or a specific condition with clinically significant consequences. We conducted a study to examine these questions. A sample of 141 adult outpatients with panic disorder participated in the study. Participants completed standardized measures of separation anxiety, attachment style, agoraphobia, panic disorder severity and quality of life. Patients with ASAD (49.5% of our sample) had greater panic symptom severity and more impairment in quality of life than those without separation anxiety. We found a greater rate of symptoms suggestive of anxious attachment among panic patients with ASAD compared to those without ASAD. However, the relationship between ASAD and attachment style is not strong, and adult ASAD occurs in some patients who report secure attachment style. Similarly, there is little evidence for the idea that separation anxiety disorder is a form of agoraphobia. Factor analysis shows clear differentiation of agoraphobic and separation anxiety symptoms. Our data corroborate the notion that ASAD is a distinct condition associated with impairment in quality of life and needs to be better recognized and treated in patients with panic disorder.

  4. Fractures in pituitary adenoma patients from the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C. Van Varsseveld; C.C. van Bunderen (Christa); A.A.M. Franken (Anton); H.P.F. Koppeschaar (Hans); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); M.L. Drent (Madeleine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on fracture risk in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients with different etiologies of pituitary GHD are not well known, due to limited data. The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics and fracture occurrence at st

  5. A computerized algorithm for arousal detection in healthy adults and patients with Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul; Kempfner, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    polysomnographic (PSG) recordings from a total of 24 subjects. Eight of the subjects were diagnosed with Parkinson disease (PD) and the rest (16) were healthy adults in various ages. The performance of the algorithm was validated in 3 settings: testing on the 8 patients with PD using the leave-one-out method...

  6. Myotonia and flaccid dysarthria in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, B.J.M. de; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kerkhof, J.P. van de; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonia and weakness are the most important components of dysarthric speech in myotonic dystrophy. OBJECTIVE: To specify and quantify possible defects in speech execution in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. METHODS: Studies on speech production were done on 30 mildly affect

  7. An Examination of Intimate Partner Violence and Psychological Stressors in Adult Abortion Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Gretchen E.; Otis, Melanie D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an exploratory study examining the relationship between intimate partner violence and psychological stressors in a sample of 188 adult abortion patients. Results indicate the almost 15% of respondents report a history of abuse by the coconceiving partner. In addition, women who reported having had one or…

  8. Routine radiography does not have a role in the diagnostic evaluation of ambulatory adult febrile neutropenic cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, CSMO; Gietema, JA; Vellenga, E; Daenen, SMGJ; De Bont, ESJM; Kamps, WA; Groen, HJM; van der Jagt, EJ; van der Graaf, WTA

    2003-01-01

    Cancer patients treated with chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections. When an adult patient presents with febrile neutropenia. standard diagnostic care includes physical examination, laboratory diagnostics, chest X-ray (CXR) and sinus radiography. However, the yield of routine radiograp

  9. Pathology of nondiabetic glomerular disease among adult Iraqi patients from a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim Al-Saedi Ali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all forms of glomerular diseases have been reported in diabetics. In a recent series, 12% of those with type I and 27% of those with type II diabetes were found to have non diabetic renal disease. We studied 80 adult diabetic Iraqi patients who were diagnosed with glo-merular disease on native kidney biopsies from January 2000 to April 2008. Membranoproliferative GN was seen in 32 patients (40%, Focal and Segmental glomerulosclerosis in 16 patients (20%, Membranous nephropathy in 20 patients (25%, Minimal change disease in 8 patients (10%, Renal amyloidosis in 4 patients (5%. In conclusion Membranoproliferative GN was the most common histological diagnosis in our diabetic patients undergoing renal biopsy.

  10. CT diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis in adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamase, Hiroshi; Sahashi, Kiyomi; Kawai, Masayuki; Kishida, Yoshihiko; Sumida, Kei; Kawamura, Ken-ichi [Gifu Syakaihoken Hospital (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    In order to assess the CT diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis, we performed abdominal contrasted CT measurements in 77 patients from 20 to 86 years old, and of 50 men and 27 women from June 1993 to June 1996. The surgical findings were compared with the preoperative CT findings. By the preoperative CT imaging, we can know the degree and the position of inflammation in appendix vermiformis and the degree and the spread of periappendicular inflammation in the case of appendicitis, and can make a differential diagnosis of diverticulitis or gynecological diseases from appendicitis. It is important to make a preoperative diagnosis by the objectively excellent abdominal CT imaging and to avoid unnecessary surgery. (K.H.)

  11. Intrusion of incisors in adult patients with marginal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsen, B; Agerbaek, N; Markenstam, G

    1989-09-01

    Elongated and spaced incisors are common problems in patients suffering from severe periodontal disease. Thirty patients characterized by marginal bone loss and deep overbite were treated by intrusion of incisors. Three different methods for intrusion were applied: (1) J hooks and extraoral high-pull headgear, (2) utility arches, (3) intrusion bent into a loop in a 0.17 x 0.25-inch wire, and (4) base arch as described by Burstone. The intrusion was evaluated from the displacement of the apex, incision, and the center of resistance of the most prominent or elongated central incisor. Change in the marginal bone level and the amount of root resorption were evaluated on standardized intraoral radiographs. The pockets were assessed by standardized probing and the clinical crown length was measured on study casts. The results showed that the true intrusion of the center of resistance varied from 0 to 3.5 mm and was most pronounced when intrusion was performed with a base arch. The clinical crown length was generally reduced by 0.5 to 1.0 mm. The marginal bone level approached the cementoenamel junction in all but six cases. All cases demonstrated root resorption varying from 1 to 3 mm. The total amount of alveolar support--that is, the calculated area of the alveolar wall--was unaltered or increased in 19 of the 30 cases. The dependency of the results on the oral hygiene, the force distribution, and the perioral function was evaluated in relation to the individual cases. It was obvious that intrusion was best performed when (1) forces were low (5 to 15 gm per tooth) with the line of action of the force passing through or close to the center of resistance, (2) the gingiva status was healthy, and (3) no interference with perioral function was present.

  12. Psychiatric stigma in treatment seeking adults with personality problems: evidence from a sample of 214 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten eCatthoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatization is a major hindrance in adult psychiatric patients with Axis-I diagnoses, as shown consistently in most studies. Significantly fewer studies on the emergence of psychiatric stigma in adult patients with personality disorders exist, although the resulting evidence is conclusive. Some authors consider patients with personality disorders at risk for severe stigmatization because of intense difficulties during interpersonal contact, even in a psychotherapeutic relationship. The aim of this study was primarily the assessment of pre-existing stigma in patients referred for intensive treatment for personality disorders. The study enrolled 214 patients admitted to the adult department of a highly specialized mental health care institute offering psychotherapy for patients with severe and complex personality pathology. All patients underwent a standard assessment with self-report questionnaires and a semi-structured interview to measure Axis II personality disorders. The Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ and the Perceived Devaluation-Discrimination Questionnaire (DDQ, both validated instruments, were used to measure perceived and actual experiences of stigma. Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean total stigma scores for patients both with and without a personality disorder. One-way ANOVA’s were performed to assess the differences between having a borderline personality disorder, another personality disorder, or no personality disorder diagnosis.Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted in order to explore the impact of the different personality disorder diagnosis on the level of stigma. The mean scores across all patient groups were consistent with rather low stigma. No differences were found for patients with or without a personality disorder diagnosis. Level of stigma in general was not associated with an accumulating number of personality disorders.

  13. Altered aiming movements in Parkinson's disease patients and elderly adults as a function of delays in movement onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, D.H.; Gemmert, A.W.A. van; Adler, C.H.; Bekkering, H.; Stelmach, G.E.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of lengthening the time the hand remains immobilized on an aiming movement performed by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and elderly adults, and whether visual information could compensate for the effects of delay. In Experiment One, PD patients and elderly adults

  14. Anemia among adult HIV patients in Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melese, Hermela; Wassie, Molla Mesele; Woldie, Haile; Tadesse, Abilo; Mesfin, Nebiyu

    2017-01-01

    Background Anemia is a major public health problem in HIV patients around the world. It has a negative effect on the quality of life of HIV patients and progression of the HIV disease. In the sub-Saharan African setting, including Ethiopia where both HIV infection and under-nutrition are expected to be high, there is a paucity of data on the matter. This study was aimed to reveal the magnitude and factors associated with anemia among adult HIV patients in Debre-Tabor Hospital, northwest Ethiopia. Methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was used among adult HIV patients in Debre-Tabor Hospital from April 1 to May 30, 2015. The diagnosis of anemia was made following the 2011 World Health Organization recommendation on hemoglobin cut-off points. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression was carried out to assess factors associated with anemia. Results A total of 377 patients’ charts were reviewed. Most of the participants (n=237, 62.9%) were taking antiretroviral treatment (ART). The overall prevalence of anemia was 23% (95% CI: 19.1, 27.6). Being ART-naïve (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.37; 95% CI: 1.59, 7.14), having treatment history with anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug (AOR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.19, 8.67), taking zidovudine (ZDV)-containing ART regimen (AOR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.03, 4.57), and having recent CD4+ T-lymphocytes count of HIV patients. Conclusion and recommendation Anemia continues to be a major co-morbidity among adult HIV patients in Ethiopia. Adult HIV patients who are taking ZDV-containing ART, with a history of TB treatment, have a low CD4+T-lymphocytes count and are ART-naïve should be carefully screened and treated for anemia. PMID:28243151

  15. Dietary grape polyphenol resveratrol increases mammary tumor growth and metastasis in immunocompromised mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Pichardo Linette

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resveratrol, a polyphenol from grapes and red wine has many health beneficial effects, including protection against cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. However, our group and others have provided evidence for a dual cancer promoting or inhibitory role for resveratrol in breast cancer, dependent on estrogenic or antiestrogenic activities. Moreover, much of the inhibitory effects of resveratrol have been reported from studies with high non-physiological concentrations. Methods We investigated the effects of a range of concentrations (0.5, 5, 50 mg/kg body weight of resveratrol on mammary tumor development post-initiation, using immunocompromised mice. Results Our findings suggest promotion of mammary tumor growth and metastasis by resveratrol at all concentrations tested in tumors derived from the low metastatic estrogen receptor (ERα(-, ERβ(+ MDA-MB-231 and the highly metastatic ER(- MDA-MB-435 cancer cell lines. Additionally, the activity of the migration/invasion regulator Rac, which we have previously shown to be regulated by resveratrol in vitro, was measured in tumors from resveratrol treated mice. Our results show a significant induction of tumoral Rac activity and a trend in increased expression of the Rac downstream effector PAK1 and other tumor promoting molecules following resveratrol treatment. Conclusion Taken together, our findings implicate low concentrations of resveratrol in potential promotion of breast cancer. Therefore, this study illuminates the importance of further delineating resveratrol’s concentration dependent effects, particularly in breast cancer, before it can be tested in the clinic or used as a dietary supplement for breast cancer patients.

  16. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based ebola vaccine is well-tolerated and protects immunocompromised nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Geisbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. A concern that has been raised regarding the replication-competent VSV vectors that express EBOV glycoproteins is how these vectors would be tolerated by individuals with altered or compromised immune systems such as patients infected with HIV. This is especially important as all EBOV outbreaks to date have occurred in areas of Central and Western Africa with high HIV incidence rates in the population. In order to address this concern, we evaluated the safety of the recombinant VSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP in six rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV. All six animals showed no evidence of illness associated with the VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP vaccine, suggesting that this vaccine may be safe in immunocompromised populations. While one goal of the study was to evaluate the safety of the candidate vaccine platform, it was also of interest to determine if altered immune status would affect vaccine efficacy. The vaccine protected 4 of 6 SHIV-infected macaques from death following ZEBOV challenge. Evaluation of CD4+ T cells in all animals showed that the animals that succumbed to lethal ZEBOV challenge had the lowest CD4+ counts, suggesting that CD4+ T cells may play a role in mediating protection against ZEBOV.

  17. Prevalence of alcohol problems among adult somatic in-patients in Naples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C; Belli, A;

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of alcohol problems among adult somatic in-patients in urban hospitals of Naples. The patients were screened with a structured questionnaire regarding life style. After discharge, the patient records were examined and the hospi......The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of alcohol problems among adult somatic in-patients in urban hospitals of Naples. The patients were screened with a structured questionnaire regarding life style. After discharge, the patient records were examined...... and the hospital discharge diagnoses were registered. A patient was considered having an alcohol problem if one or more of the following criteria were fulfilled: (1) a Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test score at or above five; (2) a self-reported daily consumption for at least 2 years of at least 60 g of ethanol...... for males and 36 g for females; (3) an alcohol-related discharge diagnosis. The prevalence of patients with alcohol problems was significantly (P

  18. Subclinical anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    Patients with chronic hypoxaemia develop secondary polycythaemia that improves oxygen-carrying capacity. Therefore, normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in the presence of chronic arterial hypoxaemia in cystic fibrosis constitute \\'relative anaemia\\'. We sought to determine the cause of this relative anaemia in patients with cystic fibrosis. We studied haematological indices and oxygen saturation in healthy volunteers (n=17) and in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (n=15). Patients with cystic fibrosis had lower resting arterial oxygen saturation when compared with normal volunteers (P<0.0001), and exercise led to a greater reduction in arterial oxygen saturation (P<0.0001). However, haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis did not significantly differ from normal volunteers. Serum iron (P=0.002), transferrin (P=0.02), and total iron-binding capacity (P=0.01) were lower in patients with cystic fibrosis. There were no significant differences in serum ferritin, percentage iron saturation, serum erythropoietin or red cell volume between the groups. The data presented demonstrate a characteristic picture of anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis, except for normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values. Normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis appear to represent a combination of the effects of arterial hypoxaemia promoting polycythaemia, counterbalanced by chronic inflammation promoting anaemia of chronic disease.

  19. Clinical and MRI findings of cerebellar agenesis in two living adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazil Mustafa Gelal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar agenesis (CA is an extremely rare entity. We present two adult patients with CA. The 61-year-old man had ataxia, dysarthria, abnormalities in cerebellar tests, severe cognitive impairment, and moderate mental retardation. The 26-year-old woman had dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, and dysarthria as well as mild cognitive impairment and mild mental retardation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed complete absence of the cerebellum with small residual vermis. Brainstem was hypoplastic and structures above tentorium were normal. Supratentorial white matter bundles were unaffected in diffusion tensor tractography. Only few adult patients with CA have so far been published. These cases show that patients with CA present with a variety of developmental, clinical, and mental abnormalities; and emphasize the role of the cerebellum in normal motor, language, and mental development.

  20. Gender differences among young adult cancer patients: a study of blogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Gillham, David

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has increasing relevance and practical use as a tool to support cancer care. For example, health support Web sites are now widely used to connect specific groups of patients who may otherwise have remained isolated, and understanding their health-related online behaviors will help in the development of more effective health support Web sites. This article examined blogs written by young adults affected by cancer and in particular examined the gender differences in these blog entries through content analysis. The results showed there is little difference in blog content between genders. This suggests that the blog environment could lessen the gender-typical behaviors often expected by society and may provide an outlet for young adult cancer patients to more freely share their cancer-related experiences, at the same time providing an opportunity for social connection. This is particularly significant for male patients who are known to inhibit their emotions as well as the expression of their health concerns.

  1. Theory of mind deficit in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavarino, Claudia; Bianchino, Claudia; Brach-Prever, Silvia; Riggi, Chiara; Palumbo, Luigi; Bara, Bruno G; Bosco, Francesca M

    2015-10-01

    This article provides the first assessment of theory of mind, that is, the ability to reason about mental states, in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease and matched healthy controls were administered classical theory of mind tasks and a semi-structured interview which provides a multidimensional evaluation of theory of mind (Theory of Mind Assessment Scale). The patients with congenital heart disease performed worse than the controls on the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale, whereas they did as well as the control group on the classical theory-of-mind tasks. These findings provide the first evidence that adults with congenital heart disease may display specific impairments in theory of mind.

  2. Concomitant therapies (glucocorticoids and sex hormones) in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaroni, C; Ceccato, F; Rizzati, S; Mantero, F

    2008-09-01

    Adult-onset GH deficiency (GHD), mostly due to organic lesions of the pituitary-hypothalamic region, is frequently associated with multiple anterior pituitary deficiencies that need long-term substitutive treatment. The GH-IGF-I axis may play an important role in modulating peripheral metabolism of hormones (adrenal, thyroid, and sex hormones) and these interactions may have clinically significant implications on the phenotypes of adult GHD patients and on the effects of the combined replacement hormonal treatment of this condition. By accelerating the peripheral metabolism of cortisol, GH therapy may precipitate adrenal insufficiency in susceptible hypopituitary patients; estrogen replacement blunts the response to GH in women whereas in men with androgen substitution the responsivity increases over time. Endocrinologists should be mindful of these phenomena when starting patients with hypopituitarism on GH replacement therapy.

  3. THE MEANING OF INSULIN PUMPE THERAPY TO ADULT PATIENTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Heidi; Aagaard, Hanne

    and meaningfulness in relation to diabetes self-care and self-management. The bolus guide, as a rather new feature, seem to play an important role. Conclusion: Based on The Shifting Perspectives Model of Chronic Illness, we concluded that a well established insulin pump therapy lead to changing the patients......Background: Insulin pump therapy is an increasing field. Studies have documented a clinical relevant decrease in HbA1c, especially among adults type 1 diabetes patients with initial high HbA1c. However, only few studies investigate the lived experience with and the meaning of the insulin pump...... therapy in adulthood. Aim: The study explore the lived experiences and the meaning of insulin pump therapy in adulthood. Method: The study is based on a phenomenological – hermeneutic approach. Four adult type 1 diabetes patients were interviewed about their insulin pump therapy. The interviews were based...

  4. MRI in adult patients with aortic coarctation: diagnosis and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, B; Abbas, A; McParland, P; Fitzsimmons, S; Shambrook, J; Peebles, C; Brown, I; Harden, S

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation is a disease that usually presents in infancy; however, a proportion of patients present for the first time in adulthood. These lesions generally require repair with either surgery or interventional techniques. The success of these techniques means that increasing numbers of patients are presenting for follow-up imaging in adulthood, whether their coarctation was initially repaired in infancy or as adults. Thus, the adult presenting to the radiologist for assessment of possible coarctation or follow-up of coarctation repair is not an uncommon scenario. In this review, we present details of the MRI protocols and MRI findings in these patients so that a confident and accurate assessment can be made.

  5. Combined duplication of the colon and vermiform appendix in an adult patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sahin Kabay; Mehmet Yucel; Faik Yaylak; Alper Hacioglu; Mustafa C Algin; Esra G Olgun; Levent Sahin; Tayfun Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Combined duplication of the colon and vermiform appendix is one of the rare congenital anomalities of the alimentary tract. Only a few cases have been reported in the adult population. A 28-year-old man presented to the clinic with a mass in the right flank. Imaging showed only a hydronephrotic atrophic kidney. The final diagnosis was only available at exploration. Combined duplication of the tubular colon and vermiform appendix was confirmed histopathologically. The patient was treated with nephrectomy and complete resection of the duplicated colon and vermiform appendix. The patient recovered uneventfully, and has done well for the past year. This is believed to be one of the first reports of combined duplication of the tubular colon and vermiform appendix as a cause of hydronephrotic atrophic kidney in an adult patient.

  6. New Guidelines for Assessment of Malnutrition in Adults: Obese Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, Kasuen; O'Leary-Kelley, Colleen

    2015-08-01

    Recently released recommendations for detection and documentation of malnutrition in adults in clinical practice define 3 types of malnutrition: starvation related, acute disease or injury related, and chronic disease related. The first 2 are more easily recognized, but the third may be more often unnoticed, particularly in obese patients. Critical care patients tend to be at high risk for malnutrition and thus require a thorough nutritional assessment. Compared with patients of earlier times, intensive care unit patients today tend to be older, have more complex medical and comorbid conditions, and often are obese. Missed or delayed detection of malnutrition in these patients may contribute to increases in hospital morbidity and longer hospital stays. Critical care nurses are in a prime position to screen patients at risk for malnutrition and to work with members of the interprofessional team in implementing nutritional intervention plans.

  7. Importance of measuring Bone Mineral Density in Adult Coeliac Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. DI Hobday

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with an aim to confirm the presence of osteoporosis in patients proven to be suffering from Coeliac Disease and compare present practice in the hospital against the guidelines suggested in the published literature. Information was obtained by retrospective analysis by reviewing notes of 73 patients with coeliac disease, who are registered in the database of a busy Gastroenterology Department of Sunderland Royal Hospital. Of the total of 73 patients, 54 patients underwent a DEXA scan at diagnosis and the Osteoporosis (WHO defined criteria of T score below 2.5 SD the mean adult was detected in 15(27.3% of them. 6 of the 15 patients detected to have osteoporosis were less than 53 years of age. Osteoporosis is common in patients with coeliac disease, and need regular monitoring for osteoporosis, as they are at significant risk of developing it.

  8. A CASE REPORT OF TUBERCULOUS PALMAR GANGLION IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED

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    Mahaboob

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous tenosynovitis of flexor tendons of wrist and hand is a rare disease. The incidence of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis including musculoskeletal system has also increased with re-emergence of tuberculosis due to increase in HIV/AIDS cases. We are reporting a case of 45 years old HIV and diabetic male who presented with a swelling and pain in left wrist. Patient was managed by open biopsy with excision of thickened synovium and sample send for histopathological examination. Histopathological report revealed inflammatory lesions with granulomatous epitheloid and giant cells, staining for AFB was negative. ATT was advised to patient for 9 months with regular follow-up. Patient gained full range of motion in wrist last follow-up. The tuberculous tenosynovitis is rare but must be kept in mind as differential diagnosis of chronic tenosynovitis.

  9. Progressive outer retinal necrosis in immunocompromised kidney allograft recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turno-Kręcicka, A; Boratyńska, M; Tomczyk-Socha, M; Mazanowska, O

    2015-06-01

    Ocular complications in patients who underwent renal transplantation are attributed to side effects of the immunosuppressive regimen. Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy and it occurs almost exclusively in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We present a case of a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient who underwent renal transplant and, after a few years, developed bilateral PORN associated with viral infections. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) and BK virus were identified by polymerase chain reaction from the vitreous fluid. It is unclear which of the viruses identified had the dominant role in the pathogenesis of PORN and other organ damage, or whether their actions were synergistic. Adequate antiviral immune surveillance, as well as pre-transplant vaccination against VZV, may reduce the incidence of VZV infection and its complications.

  10. Comprehensive Orthodontic Treatment of Adult Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate

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    Noemí Leiva Villagra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy. Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable.

  11. Nebulised dornase alfa versus placebo or hypertonic saline in adult critically ill patients

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    Claudius, Casper; Perner, Anders; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nebulised dornase alfa is used off-label in critically ill patients. We aimed to assess the benefits and harms of nebulised dornase alfa versus placebo, no prophylaxis, or hypertonic saline on patient-important outcome measures in adult critically ill patients. METHODS: We performed...... a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA) using the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. Eligible trials were randomised clinical trials comparing nebulised dornase alfa with placebo, no prophylaxis, or hypertonic saline. The predefined outcome measures were all-cause mortality...

  12. Surgical repair of chronic complete hamstring tendon rupture in the adult patient.

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    Cross, M J; Vandersluis, R; Wood, D; Banff, M

    1998-01-01

    Complete rupture of the hamstring tendons in the adult is a rare injury. This report discusses complete rupture of the hamstring tendons in nine patients treated by late operative repair. All patients were referred from outside centers for a second opinion after failed nonoperative treatment. The diagnosis was made quite easily on clinical grounds and was confirmed at surgery. Surgical treatment in all cases consisted of reattachment of the hamstring tendons to the origin on the ischium, and in all cases it was necessary to perform neurolysis of the sciatic nerve. Good results were achieved in all cases, at follow-up all patients were satisfied with the surgery.

  13. Radiotherapy in Gorlin Syndrome: Can It Be Safe and Effective in Adult Patients?

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    Baker, Sarah; Joseph, Kurian; Tai, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is a rare autosomal dominant disorder with multiple manifestations including early onset of cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Radiotherapy has traditionally been contraindicated due to reports of BCC induction. We describe here a patient treated successfully with radiotherapy with no tumour induction at 57 months of follow-up. A comprehensive literature review of radiotherapy outcomes in patients with Gorlin syndrome suggests radiotherapy may be a feasible treatment option for adult patients with treatment refractory lesions or surgical contraindication.

  14. Comprehensive orthodontic treatment of adult patient with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable.

  15. The safe practice of CT coronary angiography in adult patients in UK imaging departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, S P; Bull, R K; Bury, R W; Castellano, E A; Clayton, B; Hamilton, M C K; Morgan-Hughes, G J; O'Regan, D; Padley, S P G; Roditi, G H; Roobottom, C A; Stirrup, J; Nicol, E D

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography is increasingly used in imaging departments in the investigation of patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. Due to the routine use of heart rate controlling medication and the potential for very high radiation doses during these scans, there is a need for guidance on best practice for departments performing this examination, so the patient can be assured of a good quality scan and outcome in a safe environment. This article is a summary of the document on 'Standards of practice of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in adult patients' published by the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in December 2014.

  16. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database.

  17. CLINICAL, BIOCHEMICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF ADULT NEPHROTIC SYNDROME PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Krishnamoorthy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nephrotic syndrome is recognized as an independent entity of renal disease for over half a century . 1 Causes of nephrotic syndrome varies with age, time period, geographical location and race. In children, minimal change nephrotic syndrome is the commonest 2 ; however, membranous nephropathy is most frequent in adults . 3 As it commonly affects the younger age group and is associated with high morbidity and mortality, there is a need to understand and diagnose the disease at an early stage. Hence, this study has been done to identify the clinical presentation, biochemical parameters and histopathology associated with nephrotic syndrome in adults and its subtypes. OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, biochemical and histopathological profile of patients with Adult Nephrotic Syndrome admitted in our tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Prospective study of 100 patients with Adult Nephrotic Syndrome admitt ed in our tertiary care hospital were screened with facial puffiness and pedal edema. They were tested for urine proteinuria, urine protein creatinine ratio or 24 hour urine protein estimation. Later renal biopsy was done for all patients to stratify the subtypes. RESULTS: In this study, males were predominantly affected. Most common presenting complaints were facial puffiness and pedal edema. Systolic BP was increased in 96% of patients and diastolic BP was elevated in 50% of patients. Serum LDL and TGL were elevated in nephrotic syndrome. In young patients less than 40 years Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is the commonest type, then Membrano Proliferative Glomerulo Nephritis (MPGN and Minimal Change Disease (MCD. In individuals more than 40 years, membranous nephropathy was predominantly seen followed by FSGS. CONCLUSION: There is a changing trend in primary nephrotic syndrome and FSGS was found to be the commonest subtype. Male preponderance was noticed and also FSGS was found to be more common in younger adults. Most

  18. Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and the immunocompromised: a clinical and autopsy study of HSE in the settings of cancer and human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, D; Rosenblum, M K

    1998-03-01

    Although herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is not regarded as an opportunistic infection, the occurrence of HSE in immunocompromised patients has been documented and the suggestion made that unusual clinical and neuropathologic features characterize the disorder in this population. To further characterize HSE as it affects the immunodeficient, the authors reviewed the clinical and pathological findings in three immunocompromised patients with autopsy-proven HSE. Two patients had cancer (one with lymphoma and another with glioblastoma multiforme), one was known to be human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive and a second was suspected of harboring underlying HIV-1 infection. Two were receiving dexamethasone at onset of HSE. All had fever, mental status changes and new, focal neurological deficits or worsening of established deficits. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis was absent or minimal and head computerized tomographic (CT) scans, performed in all cases, were unrevealing. No patient was clinically suspected of having HSE, only one received acyclovir (for concurrent mucocutaneous herpes) and HSE played a major role in all deaths. Autopsy revealed an unusual form of HSE characterized by a noninflammatory, pseudoischemic histological presentation and the unexpected persistence of viral antigens in abundance despite survival beyond the clinical stage during which inflammatory responses usually peak and productive brain infection wanes. The incidence of HSE in the immunocompromised may be underestimated. Preexistent neurological disease, a noninflammatory CSF profile and negative CT scan may confound the diagnosis in this population, a typical clinical presentation notwithstanding. Increased clinical suspicion, the use of magnetic resonance imaging and polymerase chain reaction analysis of CSF for herpes simplex virus nucleic acid sequences may permit more rapid diagnosis and treatment. The absence of inflammatory infiltrates in some fatal cases of

  19. Nutritional status and nosocomial infections among adult elective surgery patients in a Mexican tertiary care hospital.

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    Judith Rodríguez-García

    Full Text Available Controversy exists as to whether obesity constitutes a risk-factor or a protective-factor for the development of nosocomial Infection (NI. According to the obesity-paradox, there is evidence that moderate obesity is a protective-factor. In Mexico few studies have focused on the nutritional status (NS distribution in the hospital setting.The aim of this study was to estimate the distribution of NS and the prevalence of nosocomial infection NI among adult elective surgery (ES patients and to compare the clinical and anthropometric characteristics and length of stays (LOS between obese and non-obese patients and between patients with and without NI.We conducted a cross-sectional study with a sample (n = 82 adult ES patients (21-59 years old who were recruited from a tertiary-care hospital. The prevalences of each NS category and NI were estimated, the assessments were compared between groups (Mann-Whitney, Chi-squared or the Fisher's-exact-test, and the association between preoperative risk-factors and NI was evaluated using odds ratios.The distribution of subjects by NS category was: underweight (3.66%, normal-weight (28.05%, overweight (35.36%, and obese (32.93%. The prevalence of NI was 14.63%. The LOS was longer (p<0.001 for the patients who developed NI. The percentages of NI were: 33.3% in underweight, 18.52% in obese, 17.39% in normal-weight, and 6.90% in overweight patients.The prevalence of overweight and obesity in adult ES patients is high. The highest prevalence of NI occurred in the underweight and obese patients. The presence of NI considerably increased the LOS, resulting in higher medical care costs.

  20. Social determinants and health-related dimensions of quality of life in adult patients with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatkhah, R; Fakhari, A; Pezeshki, M Z; Shabanlouei, R; Tavassoli, N; Gholchin, M

    2014-05-01

    The availability of safe and effective factor replacement therapies, in persons with haemophilia (PWH), has in some countries answered the basic need for treatment of these patients. The findings suggest that adult patients who have always been on prophylaxis reported significantly better physical functioning, and thus better quality of life. This study is designed to evaluate the QoL in adult PWH, by focusing on social determinants of QoL and their relationship with health-related dimensions, in Tabriz, Iran. The survey instrument was a self-report 36 items questionnaire, 'A36 Hemofilia - QoL', which is a disease-specific questionnaire for the assessment of the health-related QoL in adults living with haemophilia. A total of 100 haemophilia A and B patients, aged over 17 years participated in this study within 1 year. QoL total score was 71.88 (±26.89 SD). Patients who treat in our Hemophilia Treatment Center, had better QoL score (P = 0.000), and education has a significant impact on the social aspects of QoL (P = 0.18). The QoL was very poor in urban area in contrast to patients who lived in the city (54.45 vs. 74.21 respectively). Single patients have a better QoL than married patients (76.56 vs. 68.50 respectively). Our results showed that low education and lack of awareness of the diseases among PWH lead to reduce of QoL and more disease complications. More and wider treatment and psychological care for improving quality of life of these patients are seriously recommended.

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy in adult medulloblastoma: is it an option for average-risk patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, E; Bartolotti, M; Paccapelo, A; Marucci, G; Agati, R; Volpin, L; Danieli, D; Ghimenton, C; Gardiman, M P; Sturiale, C; Poggi, R; Mascarin, M; Balestrini, D; Masotto, B; Brandes, A A

    2016-06-01

    The standard treatment in children with average-risk medulloblastoma (MB) is reduced-dose radiotherapy (RT) followed by chemotherapy. However, in adults, there is no agreement on the use of adjuvant chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of adult MB patients with average-risk disease, defined as no postsurgical residual (or ≤1.5 cm(2)) and no metastatic disease (M0). Main inclusion criteria were: age >16 years, post-surgical treatment with craniospinal irradiation with or without adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin and etoposide ± cyclophosphamide). From 1988 to 2012 were accrued 43 average-risk MB patients treated with surgery and adjuvant RT. Fifteen (34.9 %) patients received also chemotherapy: 7 before RT, 5 after RT, and 3 before and after RT. Reasons to administer chemotherapy were presence of residual disease (even if ≤1.5 cm) and delay in RT. After a median follow up time of 10 years (range: 8-13), median survival was 18 years (95 % CI 9-28) in patients who receive RT alone, and was not reached in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years were 100 %, 78.6 % (95 % CI 60.0-97.2 %) and 60.2 % (95 % CI 36.9-83.5 %), in patients treated with RT alone, and 100, 100 and 100 %, in patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy (p = 0.079). Our findings suggest a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of average-risk MB adult patients. Further improvements might drive to add chemotherapy in average-risk setting with less favourable biological signatures (i.e., non-WNT group).

  2. Celiac Disease in Adult Patients: Specific Autoantibodies in the Diagnosis, Monitoring, and Screening

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    Evagelia Trigoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of celiac disease (CD, especially in adults, its atypical clinical presentation, and the strict, lifelong adherence to gluten-free diet (GFD as the only option for healthy state create an imperative need for noninvasive methods that can effectively diagnose CD and monitor GFD. Aim. Evaluation of anti-endomysium (EmA and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (tTG-A antibodies in CD diagnosis, GFD monitoring, and first degree relatives screening in CD adult patients. Methods. 70 newly diagnosed Greek adult patients, 70 controls, and 47 first degree relatives were tested for the presence of EmA and tTG-A. The CD patients were monitored during a 3-year period. Results. EmA predictive ability for CD diagnosis was slightly better compared to tTG-A (P=0.043. EmA could assess compliance with GFD already from the beginning of the diet, while both EmA and tTG-A had an equal ability to discriminate between strictly and partially compliant patients after the first semester and so on. Screening of first degree relatives resulted in the identification of 2 undiagnosed CD cases. Conclusions. Both EmA and tTG-A are suitable markers in the CD diagnosis, in the screening of CD among first degree relatives, having also an equal performance in the long term monitoring.

  3. Celiac disease in adult patients: specific autoantibodies in the diagnosis, monitoring, and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigoni, Evagelia; Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Pipi, Elena; Mantzaris, Gerassimos; Papasteriades, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of celiac disease (CD), especially in adults, its atypical clinical presentation, and the strict, lifelong adherence to gluten-free diet (GFD) as the only option for healthy state create an imperative need for noninvasive methods that can effectively diagnose CD and monitor GFD. Aim. Evaluation of anti-endomysium (EmA) and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA (tTG-A) antibodies in CD diagnosis, GFD monitoring, and first degree relatives screening in CD adult patients. Methods. 70 newly diagnosed Greek adult patients, 70 controls, and 47 first degree relatives were tested for the presence of EmA and tTG-A. The CD patients were monitored during a 3-year period. Results. EmA predictive ability for CD diagnosis was slightly better compared to tTG-A (P = 0.043). EmA could assess compliance with GFD already from the beginning of the diet, while both EmA and tTG-A had an equal ability to discriminate between strictly and partially compliant patients after the first semester and so on. Screening of first degree relatives resulted in the identification of 2 undiagnosed CD cases. Conclusions. Both EmA and tTG-A are suitable markers in the CD diagnosis, in the screening of CD among first degree relatives, having also an equal performance in the long term monitoring.

  4. Visual and SPM analysis of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in adult patients with neurofibromatosis

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    Yoon, Joon Kee; An, Young Sil; Hong, Seon Pyo; Joh, Chul Woo; Yoon, Seok Nam [Ajou University, School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We evaluated the regional cerebral glucose metabolism in adult patients with neurofibromatosis (NF) using visual and SPM analysis, and compared with MRI findings. A total of 11 adult patients with NF type I were prospectively included in the study. All patients underwent F-18 FDG PET and brain MRI within 2 month of each other. All hypometabolic areas on PET were determined visually by 2 nuclear medicine physician and compared with MRI findings. SPM analysis was done using 42 normal controls with p = 0.005. Seven of 11 PET images showed 10 hypometabolic areas and 4 of 11 MRIs showed 6 areas of signal change brain parenchyma. Hypometabolic areas were bilateral thalamus (n=5), left temporal cortex (n=4) and dentate nucleus (n=1). In only 2 lesions (thalamus and dentate nucleus), hypometabolic foci were consistently related to signal change on MRI. SPM analysis revealed significantly decreased area in bilateral thalamus and left temporal cortex. F-18 FDG PET revealed significant hypometabolism in bilateral thalamus and left temporal cortex in adult patients with NF, and it might be helpful in understanding developmental abnormality of NF.

  5. Health-related quality of life outcome of adult patients after otoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwentner, Ilona; Schmutzhard, Joachim; Deibl, Martina; Sprinzl, Georg M

    2006-07-01

    Prominent ears are relatively frequent. Decreased self-esteem, increased anxiety, behavioral problems and social avoidance may result from disfigurement. In modern medicine it is becoming increasingly important to measure the benefit of surgical intervention by its impact on the patient's Quality of Life (QOL). Our study was performed in a retrospective manner at our institution including 40 adult patients with prominent ears. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), a reproducible, valid and responsive questionnaire, was the basis of the used inquiry for detecting the changes in HRQOL after otoplasty. We showed an improvement in GBI subscores after intervention. There was no difference in GBI subscores between men and women. The follow-up time as well as critical life event and chronic concomitant disease have no influence on the GBI results. Otoplasty has a positive impact on the HRQOL of adult patients with prominent ears. The importance of this benefit is not only of individual nature. In times of healthcare economization, an amelioration of QOL followed by increased productivity at work of the individual is an important argument to justify health care expenditures. We believe that otoplasty is an appropriate therapy for selected adult patients burdened by prominent ears.

  6. Statin therapy reduces the likelihood of suboptimal blood pressure control among Ugandan adult diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumu, William; Kampiire, Leaticia; Akabwai, George Patrick; Kiggundu, Daniel Ssekikubo; Kibirige, Davis

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension is one of the recognized risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in adult diabetic patients. High prevalence of suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control has been well documented in the majority of studies assessing BP control in diabetic patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, there is a dearth of similar studies. This study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of suboptimal BP control in an adult diabetic population in Uganda. Patients and methods This was a cross-sectional study that enrolled 425 eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending three urban diabetic outpatient clinics over 11 months. Data about their sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history were collected using pre-tested questionnaires. Suboptimal BP control was defined according to the 2015 American Diabetes Association standards of diabetes care guideline as BP levels ≥140/90 mmHg. Results The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, with the majority being females (283, 66.9%). Suboptimal BP control was documented in 192 (45.3%) study participants and was independently associated with the study site (private hospitals; odds ratio 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.18–3.43, P=0.01) and use of statin therapy (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.26–0.96, P=0.037). Conclusion Suboptimal BP control was highly prevalent in this study population. Strategies to improve optimal BP control, especially in the private hospitals, and the use of statin therapy should be encouraged in adult diabetic patients.

  7. Diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, H J; Groll, A; Walsh, T J

    2010-09-01

    Early recognition and rapid initiation of effective treatment is a prerequisite for successful management of children with invasive fungal infections. The increasing diversity of fungal pathogens in high-risk patients, the differences in the antifungal spectra of available agents and the increasing rates of resistance call for identification of the infecting isolate at the species level and for information on drug resistance, in order to provide state-of-the-art patient care. Microscopy and culture of appropriate specimens remain the reference standard for mycological diagnosis, despite difficulties in obtaining appropriate and/or sufficient specimens, long durations of culture and false-negative results. Modern imaging studies and detection of circulating fungal cell wall components and DNA in blood and other body fluids or in affected tissues may improve the laboratory diagnosis of invasive mycoses.

  8. Iron Overload Assessment in Adult Thalassaemic Patients Using MRI T2

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    Azita Azarkeivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nd anemia in our country. Blood transfusion is the continual treatment of this disease. But transfusion causes a serious side effect which is iron overload in vital organs such as the heart, liver and the endocrine system. Accumulated iron in these organs may cause high risk secondary problems which threaten the patients' life. Early assessment of the iron overload in vital organs and applying for early treatment can be beneficial for increasing life quality in these patients. Assessment of cardiac and hepatic iron overload using MRI T2 technique and comparing it with serum ferritin level was the goal of this study. "nMaterials and Methods: The referred thalassaemic patients to Zafar adult thalassaemia clinic were the population of this study. Serum ferritin test was carried out for all these patients. Cardiac and hepatic iron overload assessment of these patients was performed in Noor medical imaging center using MRI T2 technique. The iron overload results of all patients were classified as normal, mild, moderate and severe. We compared them with the patients’ clinical parameters, especially the serum ferritin level. Results were analyzed by SPSS software. "nResults: 700 adult patients with the mean age of 25.76 (SD±10.4 were studied in this research project. There were 360 males (51.4% and 340 (48.6% females enrolled in this study. Among them, there were 502 (71.7% major thalassaemia, 158 (22.6% intermediate thalassaemia, 7 alpha thalassaemia, 9 sickle cell anemia and 10 hemochromatosis patients. The mean of serum ferritin level was 2327.6 mg/dl (SD±2095.8. Classified results of cardiac iron overload assessment were normal in 366 (66.5% patients, mild in 44 (8% patients, moderate in 64 (11.6% patients, and severe in 76 (13.8%patients. The classified results of hepatic iron overload assessment were: normal in 122 (22.2% patients, mild in 137 (25% patients, moderate in 235 (42.8% patients and severe in 55 (10% patients. Iron overload

  9. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives

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    Ramsay JR

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available J Russell Ramsay Adult ADHD Treatment & Research Program, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to “get by” before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians’ practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD. Keywords: adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, adult ADHD, pharmacotherapy, psychosocial treatment, symptoms, functional impairments, executive functions

  10. Management of asthma in adults: do the patients get what they need--and want?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Harving, H;

    2007-01-01

    Suboptimal asthma control may be caused by a combination of factors, such as nonadherence to guidelines, lack of compliance, and poor asthma education. The aim was to assess patients' knowledge of asthma and different management strategies, including patients' attitudes toward involvement...... in treatment decisions. The participants (n=509) were recruited from all parts of Denmark through a web-based panel (Zapera Danmarkspanel). A questionnaire concerning asthma knowledge, compliance, and treatment was fulfilled through the Internet. Among the participating adult asthmatic patients, signs...... function measured and peak flow monitoring was reported by 5%. Written action plans were provided for 12% of patients and 50% had had their inhaler technique checked. Although 59% of patients were instructed to adjust their controller therapy if needed, only 23% reported that they had done so...

  11. Campylobacter enteritis in adult patients with acute diarrhea from 2005 to 2009 in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; SUN Xin-ting; ZENG Zheng; YU Yan-yan

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been a marked global increase in the incidence of human Campylobacter enteritis in recent years. This study investigated the epidemiological and clinical features of Campylobacter enteritis in adult patients suffering from acute diarrhea.Methods This was a retrospective review of Campylobacter enteritis in adult patients with acute diarrhea presenting at Beijing University First Hospital, Beijing, China, in the summer and autumn (April to October) of 2005 to 2009. The data collected included the species of campylobacter identified, and the age, gender, clinical manifestations and results of laboratory test on stool samples collected from the patients. Campylobacter sensitivity tests to various antimicrobial agents were conducted on 80 specimens. Chi-square tests were applied using SPSS13.0 software and a two-sided P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results Campylobacter spp. isolated from the stool specimens of 142 patients with diarrhea represented 14.9% of all the cases examined. C. jejuni was identified in 127 patients (89.4%) and C. coli in 15 others (10.6%). The infection incidence was highest in the age range of 21-30 years which comprised 21.7% of the total cases examined. Most cases of diarrhea (46 patients) occurred in June. Watery diarrhea (97.2%), abdominal pain (72.5%) and fever (64.8%) were the most common manifestations of enteric campylobacteriosis. Only four patients (2.8%) had bloody diarrhea. The antimicrobial resistance rates were: cefoperazone (100%), levofloxacin (61.3%), gentamicin (12.5%), erythromycin (6.3%), and azithromycin (2.5%).Conclusions Campylobacter was prevalent among adults with acute diarrhea from 2005 to 2009 in Beijing, China. The large number of those afflicted by the disease warrants the commission of a large multicenter study to determine the extent of enteric campylobacteriosis in this region.

  12. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  13. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Carr

    Full Text Available There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported.A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis.98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions.No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this

  14. [Clinical study of 32 patients with adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Zheng, Yong-Liang; Chen, Yi-Jian

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib in the treatment of patients with adult Ph chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+)ALL). A total of 32 diagnosed adult Ph(+)ALL patients from July 2007 to February 2014 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed and were divided into two groups: imatinib plus chemotherapy group and traditional chemotherapy group. The differences between two groups were analysed in disease-free survival time (DFS), overall survival time (OS) and toxicity. The G banding technigue was used to analyse the karyotype, and the flow cytometry was applyed to detect the immune markers on surface of cells. The results showed that all patients expressed B cell and hematopietic stem/progenitor cell immune markers, out of them 21 patients (65.6%) were with myeloid antigens, 27 patients with simple Ph (+) phenotype and 5 patients with additional chromosome abnormality. The DFS and OS of the imatinib group were statistically longer than those of the traditional chemotherapy group (14.3 ± 4.7 months vs 10.7 ± 3.8 months) (P 0.05)). It is concluded that the all cases of adult Ph(+)ALL are with B cell phenotype and express hematopietic stem/progenitor cell antigen. They often accompanied by expression of myeloid antigens and additonal chromosome abnormality in genetics. The combination of imatinib with chemotherapy can prolong remission time and survival time for patients of non-hematopietic stem cell transplantation on the basis of no notably increasing the toxic effects.

  15. Experiences from Cochlear Implantation and Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Adults and Children : Electrophysiological Measurements, Hearing Outcomes and Patient Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lundin, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) and auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) are prostheses for hearing used in patients with profound hearing impairment. A CI requires an operational cochlear nerve to function in contrast to an ABI. ABIs were initially designed for adult patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), suffering from bilateral vestibular schwannomas. Now ABIs are also used for patients, both adults and children, with congenital cochlear malformations, cochlear nerve hypoplasia/aplasia, and c...

  16. Distinct quasispecies characteristics and positive selection within the core gene in chronic hepatitis B virus infected child and adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haijun, Deng; Yong, Huang; Ailong, Huang; Quanxin, Long

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences in clinical characteristics between chronic hepatitis B virus infected (CHB) child and adult patients. Viral quasispecies characteristics are associated with its pathogenic properties. For hepatitis B virus (HBV), its core region is the main immune recognition region for its enriched epitopes. In our study, we discuss the quasispecies characteristics and positive selection within core gene within chronic HBV infected child and adult patients. By analyzing 170 core gene sequences from child CHB patients and 121 core genes sequences from adult CHB patients, quasispecies characteristics were described by sequence complexity, diversity, non-synonymous substitution ratio (dN) and synonymous substitution ratios (dS). In addition, positive selection sites were also determined by bioinformatics tools. Then, all these parameters were compared between child and adult CHB patient groups. Compared with child patients, adult patients with CHB showed distinct quasispecies characteristics within the core region, had a higher sequence complexity and diversity and more positive selection sites, suggesting that the adult CHB patients had a higher immune selection pressure on the HBV core gene. Reduced selection pressure on the HBV core gene in hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive CHB patients than HBeAg negative CHB patients were observed in both adult and child patient groups. The majority of the screened positive selection sites lay within human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-restricted epitopes. In conclusion, this study analyzed the quasispecies characteristics discrepancy between child and adult patients with CHB, and revealed the possible reason for the distinct clinical characteristics in the perspective of population genetics.

  17. Anemia among adult HIV patients in Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional study

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    Melese H

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hermela Melese,1 Molla Mesele Wassie,2 Haile Woldie,2 Abilo Tadesse,3 Nebiyu Mesfin3 1HIV Follow-up Care Clinic, Debre-Tabor Hospital, Debre‑Tabor, 2Department of Human Nutrition, Institute of Public Health, 3Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Anemia is a major public health problem in HIV patients around the world. It has a negative effect on the quality of life of HIV patients and progression of the HIV disease. In the sub-Saharan African setting, including Ethiopia where both HIV infection and under-nutrition are expected to be high, there is a paucity of data on the matter. This study was aimed to reveal the magnitude and factors associated with anemia among adult HIV patients in Debre-Tabor Hospital, northwest Ethiopia. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was used among adult HIV patients in Debre-Tabor Hospital from April 1 to May 30, 2015. The diagnosis of anemia was made following the 2011 World Health Organization recommendation on hemoglobin cut-off points. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression was carried out to assess factors associated with anemia. Results: A total of 377 patients’ charts were reviewed. Most of the participants (n=237, 62.9% were taking antiretroviral treatment (ART. The overall prevalence of anemia was 23% (95% CI: 19.1, 27.6. Being ART-naïve (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.37; 95% CI: 1.59, 7.14, having treatment history with anti-tuberculosis (TB drug (AOR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.19, 8.67, taking zidovudine (ZDV-containing ART regimen (AOR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.03, 4.57, and having recent CD4+ T-lymphocytes count of <200 cells/µL (AOR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.04, 4.36 were associated with occurrence of anemia among adult HIV patients. Conclusion and recommendation: Anemia continues to be a major co-morbidity among adult HIV patients in Ethiopia. Adult HIV patients who are taking ZDV-containing ART

  18. Movement disorders in adult surviving patients with maple syrup urine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carecchio, Miryam; Schneider, Susanne A; Chan, Heidi; Lachmann, Robin; Lee, Philip J; Murphy, Elaine; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2011-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease is a rare metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex gene. Patients generally present early in life with a toxic encephalopathy because of the accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine and the corresponding ketoacids. Movement disorders in maple syrup urine disease have typically been described during decompensation episodes or at presentation in the context of a toxic encephalopathy, with complete resolution after appropriate dietary treatment. Movement disorders in patients surviving childhood are not well documented. We assessed 17 adult patients with maple syrup urine disease (mean age, 27.5 years) with a special focus on movement disorders. Twelve (70.6%) had a movement disorder on clinical examination, mainly tremor and dystonia or a combination of both. Parkinsonism and simple motor tics were also observed. Pyramidal signs were present in 11 patients (64.7%), and a spastic-dystonic gait was observed in 6 patients (35.2%). In summary, movement disorders are common in treated adult patients with maple syrup urine disease, and careful neurological examination is advisable to identify those who may benefit from specific therapy. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Clinical and hepatic evaluation in adult dengue patients: a prospective two-month cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tristão-Sá

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To analyze the liver dysfunction and evolution of signs and symptoms in adult dengue patients during a two-month follow-up period. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted in Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from January to July, 2008. The evolution of laboratory and clinical manifestations of 90 adult dengue patients was evaluated in five scheduled visits within a two-month follow-up period. Twenty controls were enrolled for the analysis of liver function. Patients with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, those known to be human immunodeficiency virus (HIV seropositive and pregnant women were excluded from the study. RESULTS: At the end of the second month following diagnosis, we observed that symptoms persisted in 33.3% (30/90 of dengue patients. We also observed that, 57.7% (15/26 of the symptoms persisted at the end of the second month. The most persistent symptoms were arthralgia, fatigue, weakness, adynamia, anorexia, taste alteration, and hair loss. Prior dengue virus (DENV infection did not predispose patients to a longer duration of symptoms. Among hepatic functions, transaminases had the most remarkable elevation and in some cases remained elevated up to the second month after the disease onset. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels overcame aspartate aminotransferase (AST during the convalescent period. Male patients were more severely affected than females. CONCLUSIONS: Dengue fever may present a wide number of symptoms and elevated liver transaminases at the end of the second month.

  20. Methimazole-Induced Goitrogenesis in an Adult Patient With the Syndrome of Resistance to Thyroid Hormone

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    Kathleen Glymph DO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with the syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH have clinical (tachycardia and anxiety and biochemical (elevated thyroid hormones level features of hyperthyroidism. Based on previous reports in pediatric patients with the RTH, antithyroid treatment in these patients is not indicated. Clinical and biochemical sequel of antithyroid therapy in an adult patient with RTH was not previously reported. A 63-year-old African American female with history of RTH was treated with a therapy consisting of methimazole 15 mg daily and atenolol. Methimazole treatment resulted in reduction in thyroid hormone level while the patient’s TSH increased with a peak of 24.88 mIU/L. Having achieved biochemical euthyroidism, the patient developed thyroid gland enlargement associated with progressive symptoms of dysphagia and dyspnea. Examination demonstrated globally enlarged firm thyroid gland with areas of nodularity in both lobes. A computed tomography of the neck showed enlarged thyroid gland with extension around bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles and compression onto the trachea. Methimazole therapy was discontinued and patient was treated just on atenolol. Over 12 months following discontinuation of methimazole, the patient experienced marked clinical and radiographic improvement of the goiter size associated with TSH reduction to 1.26 mIU/L and modest free thyroxine increase as expected in RTH. It seems appealing to treat patients with the RTH with antithyroid medications. However, in these patients decrease in thyroid hormone levels will stimulate TSH production, which can, in turn, predispose to goiter formation. Our report supports prior observations in children with RTH that treatment with methimazole is not indicated in adult patients with RTH.

  1. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired urinary tract infections in adult hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piljic, Dilista; Piljic, Dragan; Ahmetagic, Sead; Ljuca, Farid; Porobic Jahic, Humera

    2010-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) cause a great number of morbidity and mortality. These infections are serious complications in pregnancy, patients with diabetes, polycystic kidneys disease, sickle cell anaemia, kidney transplant and in patients with functional or structural anomalies of the urinary tract. The aim of this investigation was to determine a dominant causative agents of UTI and some of the clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired UTI in adult hospitalised patients. We studied 200 adult patients with acute community-acquired UTI hospitalised in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases Tuzla from January 2006 to December 2007. The patients were divided into two groups: a group of patients with E. coli UTI (147) and a group of patients with non-E. coli UTI (53). In these two groups, the symptoms and signs of illness, blood test and urine analysis results were analysed. Our results have shown that the patients with E. coli UTI frequently had fever higher than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001), chills (p=0,0349), headache (p=0,0499), cloudy urine (p<0,0001), proteinuria (p=0,0011) and positive nitrite-test (p=0,0002). The patients with non-E. coli UTI frequently had fever lower than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001) and urine specific gravity <1015 (p=0,0012). There was no significant difference in blood test results between patients with E. coli and non-E. coli UTI. These clinical and laboratory findings can lead us to early etiological diagnosis of these UTI before urine culture detection of causative agents, which takes several days. Early etiological diagnosis of the E. coli and non-E. coli UTI is necessary for an urgent administration of appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. This is very important in prevention of irreversible kidney damage, prolonged treatment, complications, as well as recidives and chronicity of the illness.

  2. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Exophiala spinifera in an immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Deepa; Jayalakshmi, G; Madhumathy, A; Banu, S Thasneem; Geethalakshmi, S; Sumathi, G

    2010-01-01

    A case of phaeohyphomycosis presenting as multiple subcutaneous abscesses in a young lady with deteriorating liver function was reported here. The lesion started as a solitary abscess in the neck, mimicking tuberculous cold abscess and rapidly involved the face, chest, arms, and legs within six months with ulceration and discharge of thick brownish foul smelling pus. Potassium hydroxide mount of pus from various sites revealed septate dematiaceous hyphae and pseudohyphae. Culture yielded pure growth of Exophiala spinifera. Tissue debridement was done along with initiation of antifungal therapy with ketoconazole. As liver function deteriorated, antifungal therapy was withdrawn after seven days. Patient expired three weeks after admission due to hepatic failure.

  3. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Exophiala spinifera in an immunocompromised host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Deepa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of phaeohyphomycosis presenting as multiple subcutaneous abscesses in a young lady with deteriorating liver function was reported here. The lesion started as a solitary abscess in the neck, mimicking tuberculous cold abscess and rapidly involved the face, chest, arms, and legs within six months with ulceration and discharge of thick brownish foul smelling pus. Potassium hydroxide mount of pus from various sites revealed septate dematiaceous hyphae and pseudohyphae. Culture yielded pure growth of Exophiala spinifera. Tissue debridement was done along with initiation of antifungal therapy with ketoconazole. As liver function deteriorated, antifungal therapy was withdrawn after seven days. Patient expired three weeks after admission due to hepatic failure.

  4. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention.

  5. Temporomandibular disorders and psychological status in adult patients with a deep bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Svensson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and psychological status were examined in adult patients with a deep bite and compared with an adult age- and gender-matched control group with neutral occlusion. The deep bite group consisted of 20 females (mean age 30.3 years) and 10 males (mean age 33.1 years......). The control group comprised 20 females (mean age 29.4 years) and 10 males (mean age 34.2 years). TMD examination, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD), cephalometric lateral radiographs, registration of occlusion, and bite force were performed. To test the mean differences between...... craniofacial morphology, bite force, the occurrence of RDC/TMD diagnostic groups, and headache between the two groups, unpaired t-test, Fisher's exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Deep bite patients more frequently reported nocturnal and diurnal clenching...

  6. Infliximab dependency is related to decreased surgical rates in adult Crohn's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N.; Duricova, D.; Lenicek, M.

    2010-01-01

    last intended infusion: prolonged response (maintenance of complete/partial response), infliximab dependency (relapse requiring repeated infusions to regain complete/partial response or need of infliximab > 12 months to sustain response). Results Forty-seven percent obtained prolonged response, 29...... on maintenance versus on demand regime was 33 and 31%, respectively (P = 0.63). No relevant clinical or genetic predictors were identified. Conclusion The infliximab dependency response seems to be equivalent to the prolonged response in adult CD patients when comparing surgery rates. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol......Background Infliximab dependency in children with Crohn's disease (CD) has recently been described and found to be associated with a decreased surgery rate. Aim To assess infliximab dependency of adult CD patients, evaluate the impact on surgery, and search for possible clinical and genetic...

  7. Nonmetastatic Ewing's Sarcoma of the Lumbar Spine in an Adult Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Dobran, Mauro; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; di Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Moriconi, Elisa; Nocchi, Niccolò; Gladi, Maurizio; Scerrati, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Although the spine is frequently involved in metastatic Ewing's sarcoma, primary involvement of the spine, beside sacrum, is much less frequent, especially in adult patients. Because of the low incidence of these tumors, there are currently no clinical guidelines outlining their management and a multitude of therapeutic strategies have been employed with varying success. The definitive management of Ewing's sarcoma of the spine, as in other locations, could include the combination of three main modalities: aggressive surgery, radiotherapy, and combined chemotherapy. Whenever possible, en bloc spondylectomy or extralesional resection is preferable, providing a better oncological result with a longer survival and a better preservation of the spine biomechanics. This is the lesson we learned about the case, we present here, of nonmetastatic lumbar localization by Ewing's sarcoma in as adult patient. PMID:23133768

  8. Nonmetastatic Ewing’s Sarcoma of the Lumbar Spine in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Iacoangeli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the spine is frequently involved in metastatic Ewing's sarcoma, primary involvement of the spine, beside sacrum, is much less frequent, especially in adult patients. Because of the low incidence of these tumors, there are currently no clinical guidelines outlining their management and a multitude of therapeutic strategies have been employed with varying success. The definitive management of Ewing's sarcoma of the spine, as in other locations, could include the combination of three main modalities: aggressive surgery, radiotherapy, and combined chemotherapy. Whenever possible, en bloc spondylectomy or extralesional resection is preferable, providing a better oncological result with a longer survival and a better preservation of the spine biomechanics. This is the lesson we learned about the case, we present here, of nonmetastatic lumbar localization by Ewing’s sarcoma in as adult patient.

  9. Behavior of sensitivity and resistance in urine cultures of adult patients with urinary infection Manizales, 2009.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona Botero, Marcela; Coral Castro, Sayra Catalina; Castaño Castrillón, José Jaime; Profesor titular, facultad de ciencias de la salud, universidad de manizales.; Gallo Martínez, Ximena; Gañán Luque, Alejandra; García Fernández, Yandri Lorena; López Cardona, Viviana; Pineda Hernández, Paula Johana; Serna Osorio, Carlos Fernando; Villegas Arenas, Oscar Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background: In medical practice, Urinary Infection is among the most common community-acquired infections, mainly affecting the female population and occupies between the second and third leading cause of consultations in health centers. This study aims to describe and analyze the epidemiology of this disease in adult patients who consulted in two health centers Manizales(Caldas, Colombia) 2009.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study which included clinical and laboratory findings of 1...

  10. Jarcho-Levin syndrome with diastematomyelia: Case report of an adult patient and review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Seon; Lee, Ji Hae; Kang, Mi Jin; Baek Kyung Eun; Kim, Jae Hyung; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Soung Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Han Bee [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (JLS) is a rare congenital dysostosis characterized by multiple vertebral and costal anomalies. The combination of JLS and neural tube defect is rare. Only six cases of JLS accompanying diastematomyelia have been reported; all were in infants or children. We present the case of a 37-year-old female patient with JLS who also had diastematomyelia in lumbar vertebral level. This is the seventh case of JLS with diastematomyelia, and the first adult case.

  11. Urticaria and dermographism in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Ayabe, Liliane Akemi; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Romiti, Ricardo; Maruta, Celina W

    2012-08-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients typically present with arthralgia, fever, lymphadenopathy and a transient salmon maculopapular rash. Only approximately 25 cases of AOSD with urticaria were described in the literature. In this article, the authors report three additional cases of AOSD with urticarial and dermographic lesions who had a good clinical response to glucocorticoid and antihistamines. A review of the literature concerning this issue is also herein written.

  12. Microvascular Blood Flow Improvement in Hyperglycemic Obese Adult Patients by Hypocaloric Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Mastantuono, T; Di Maro, M.; Chiurazzi, M.; Battiloro, L.; Starita, N.; Nasti, G; Lapi, D.; Iuppariello, L.; M. Cesarelli; D’Addio, G.; Colantuoni, A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the changes in skin microvascular blood flow (SBF) in newly diagnosed hyperglycemic obese subjects, administered with hypocaloric diet. Adult patients were recruited and divided in three groups: NW group (n=54), NG (n=54) and HG (n=54) groups were constituted by normal weight, normoglycemic and hyperglycemic obese subjects, respectively. SBF was measured by laser Doppler perfusion monitoring technique and oscillations in blood flow were analyzed by spectr...

  13. Reduced transcription of TCOF1 in adult cells of Treacher Collins syndrome patients

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    Camargo Anamaria A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder caused by frameshift deletions or duplications in the TCOF1 gene. These mutations cause premature termination codons, which are predicted to lead to mRNA degradation by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD. Haploinsufficiency of the gene product (treacle during embryonic development is the proposed molecular mechanism underlying TCS. However, it is still unknown if TCOF1 expression levels are decreased in post-embryonic human cells. Methods We have estimated TCOF1 transcript levels through real time PCR in mRNA obtained from leucocytes and mesenchymal cells of TCS patients (n = 23 and controls (n = 18. Mutational screening and analysis of NMD were performed by direct sequencing of gDNA and cDNA, respectively. Results All the 23 patients had typical clinical features of the syndrome and pathogenic mutations were detected in 19 of them. We demonstrated that the expression level of TCOF1 is 18-31% lower in patients than in controls (p , even if we exclude the patients in whom we did not detect the pathogenic mutation. We also observed that the mutant allele is usually less abundant than the wild type one in mesenchymal cells. Conclusions This is the first study to report decreased expression levels of TCOF1 in TCS adult human cells, but it is still unknown if this finding is associated to any phenotype in adulthood. In addition, as we demonstrated that alleles harboring the pathogenic mutations have lower expression, we herein corroborate the current hypothesis of NMD of the mutant transcript as the explanation for diminished levels of TCOF1 expression. Further, considering that TCOF1 deficiency in adult cells could be associated to pathologic clinical findings, it will be important to verify if TCS patients have an impairment in adult stem cell properties, as this can reduce the efficiency of plastic surgery results during rehabilitation of these

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of rocuronium delivered by target-controlled infusion in adult patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lu; WANG Hui-ling; ZHANG Li-ping; BI Shan-shan; LU Wei; YANG Ba-xian; GUO Xiang-yang

    2010-01-01

    Background Target-controlled infusion (TCI) has been recently developed and successfully implemented in clinical practice. The current study was to estimate the population pharmacokinetics of rocuronium TCI in adult patients using nonlinear mixed-effects model (NONMEM), and to investigate the influence of relevant factors in adult patients.Methods Fourteen ASA Ⅰ-Ⅱ patients undergoing elective laparoscopy operation with general anesthesia were included.After induction, all patients received rocuronium by TCI system. The beginning target plasma concentration (Cpt) was 2.0 μg/ml, then increased Cpt according to the neuromuscular transmission monitoring. The endpoint of Cpt was determined when the T1 scale was blocked by 90%-95%. TCI rocuronium was stopped 30 minutes before the end of the operation.Arterial blood was drawn before anesthesia at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 120, 180, 240 and 360 minutes after the infusion of rocuronium was stopped for the analysis of plasma concentrations of rocuronium by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The population pharmacokinetics analysis was performed using NONMEM program.Results The pharmacokinetics of TCI rocuronium in adult patients was best described by a three-comparment model.Pharmacokintic parameters were clearance (CL)1=0.205 L/min, CL2=0.324 L/min, CL3=0.0292 L/min, volumes of distribution (V)1=4.00 L, V2=2.28 L, V3=4.26 L, Vdss=10.54 L. Both age and weight as covariates affected the pharmacokinetic parameters. V1 and CL1 were negatively correlated with patient age. CL1 was positively correlated with weight.Conclusions No pharmacokinetic change was noted when rocuronium was administered via TCI. Both age and weight as covariates affected the pharmacokinetic parameters.

  15. Prevalence of Thrombocytopenia among Chinese Adult Antiretroviral-naïve HIV-positive Patients

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    Hong-Wei Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of thrombocytopenia among Chinese antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve HIV-infected adults has not been well-described. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors of thrombocytopenia among Chinese ART-naïve HIV-infected adults. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of Chinese adult ART-naïve HIV-infected patients from September 2005 through August 2014. Socio-demographic variables and laboratory results including platelets, CD4+ cell count, and viral load were obtained from medical records. Factors and outcomes associated with thrombocytopenia were assessed using logistic regression. Results: A total of 1730 adult ART-naïve HIV-infected patients was included. The mean age was 38 years. The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was 4.5%. There were significant differences in the prevalence of thrombocytopenia between patients 350 cells/mm 3 (2.8% compared with patients with CD4+ counts of 50-199 cells/mm 3 (7.1% (P = 0.002 and P = 0.005, respectively. The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was significantly different by hepatitis C virus antibody (HCV-Ab seropositivity (10.2% for HCV-Ab positive vs. 3.9% for HCV-Ab negative, P = 0.001. We observed differences in prevalence of thrombocytopenia by mode of transmission of HIV infection: Blood transmission (10.7% versus men who have sex with men (3.9% (P = 0.002 and versus heterosexual transmission (3.9% (P = 0.001. In binary logistic regression analyses, age ≥50 years, HCV-Ab positivity and having a CD4+ cell count of 50-199 cells/mm 3 were significantly associated with thrombocytopenia with adjusted odds ratio of 2.482 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.167, 5.281, P = 0.018, 2.091 (95% CI: 1.078, 4.055, P = 0.029 and 2.259 (95% CI: 1.028, 4.962, P = 0.042, respectively. Conclusions: Thrombocytopenia is not common among adult ART-naïve HIV-infected patients in China. Older age (age over 50 years, HCV-Ab positivity and lower CD4

  16. [Assessment of the burden of adult wheelchair-bound patients with neurological disabilities on the caregiver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Luiz Carlos; Borges, Heloise Cazangi; Ozaki, Armando Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate factors that influence the burden of adult wheelchair-bound patients with neurological alterations on informal caregivers. Sixteen informal caregivers of adult wheelchair-bound patients with neurological alterations were evaluated, using the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) scale to evaluate the burden on caregivers, as well as gather data on the care and socio-demographic profile of the caregivers, on the socio-economic data and the degree of functional independence of adult wheelchair-bound patients with neurological alterations. Student's t-test, the one-way ANOVA with Tukey method and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. The results associated lower education level of the caregiver (p = 0.01) and lower level of information of the affected pathology (p-value = 0.01) to a heavier burden on the caregiver. The therapeutic and social support provided by the support institutions, such as the Physiotherapy Clinic/School of CEUNSP, was revealed as being important to help caregivers to handle situations in an easier manner. Understanding the factors that influence the burden on the caregiver is important for planning and intervention for this specific population group.

  17. Burns ITU admissions: length of stay in specific levels of care for adult and paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Zeshaan N; Frew, Quentin; Din, Asmat H; Unluer, Zeynep; Smailes, Sarah; Philp, Bruce; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of total length of stay (LOS) for burns patients based on the total burn surface area (TBSA) is well accepted. Total LOS is a poor measure of resource consumption. Our aim was to determine the LOS in specific levels of care to better inform resource allocation. We performed a retrospective review of LOS in intensive treatment unit (ITU), burns high dependency unit (HDU) and burns low dependency unit (LDU) for all patients requiring ITU admission in a regional burns service from 2003 to 2011. During this period, our unit has admitted 1312 paediatric and 1445 adult patients to our Burns ITU. In both groups, ITU comprised 20% of the total LOS (mean 0.23±0.02 [adult] and 0.22±0.02 [paediatric] days per %burn). In adults, 33% of LOS was in HDU (0.52±0.06 days per %burn) and 48% (0.68±0.06 days per %burn) in LDU, while in children, 15% of LOS was in HDU (0.19±0.03 days per %burn) and 65% in LDU (0.70±0.06 days per %burn). When considering Burns ITU admissions, resource allocation ought to be planned according to expected LOS in specific levels of care rather than total LOS. The largest proportion of stay is in low dependency, likely due to social issues.

  18. Proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease is not associated with identifiable risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleem Aamer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal involvement in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD is associated with signi-ficant morbidity and mortality. Proteinuria is common in patients with SCD and is a risk factor for future development of renal failure. We sought to identify risk factors, if any, associated with pro-teinuria in adult Saudi patients with SCD. We studied 67 patients with SCD followed-up at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients underwent 24-hour urine collection to measure creatinine clearance and to quantify proteinuria. In addition, blood was examined for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Clinical information was gathered from review of the patients′ charts. A urine protein level of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours was consi-dered abnormal. Urine protein was correlated with various clinical and laboratory parameters. Thirty-one males and 36 females were evaluated. The mean age of the cohort was 23.8 (± 7.2 years. Twenty-seven patients (40.3% had proteinuria of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours. The study group had a mean hemoglobin level of 8.5 (± 2.8 g/dL and mean fetal hemoglobin (HbF level of 14.4% (± 7.3%. Majority of the patients (61 had hemoglobin SS genotype and six patients had S-β0 thala-ssemia. None of the parameters evaluated correlated with proteinuria although there was a border-line association with older age and higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.073 and 0.061 respec-tively. Hydroxyurea use for more than a year was not beneficial. In conclusion, our study suggests that proteinuria in adult Saudi patients is not associated with any clear identifiable risk factors.

  19. Long term follow-up of remission patients in adult acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerecke, D; Kress, M; Hirschmann, W D

    1983-10-03

    31 adults suffering from acute leukemia were followed for a period of more than 5 years after achieving complete remission. Maintenance chemotherapy consisted of antimetabolite treatment (mercaptopurine + methotrexate) as well as COAP reinduction every 3 months. Chemotherapy was stopped if the first complete remission lasted for 3 years ("long term remission"). This was the case in 8 out of 31 remission patients (26%). Analysis of hematological parameters at diagnose for long term remission patients revealed that the initial leukocyte count was of prognostic significance.

  20. Severe aortic coarctation in an adult patient with normal brachial blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leetmaa, Tina H; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Mølgaard, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The present case shows that a normal brachial blood pressure (BP) does not exclude severe coarctation and should be considered in normotensive patients presenting with a systolic murmur and/or unexplained severe left ventricular hypertrophy. Congenital coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing...... of the descending aorta, usually located distal to the origin of the subclavian artery, causing hypertension in the upper part of the body. This condition may be undiagnosed until adult life where the clinical presentation most often is high BP in the upper extremities. A 57-year-old patient with severe aortic...

  1. Therapeutic application of inhaled nitric oxide in adult cardiac surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Robina; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh; Bapna, Rk

    2006-01-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance can be detrimental to the cardiac output in post-operative cardiac surgical patients. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy by systemic pharmacologic agents is non-selective. Inhaled nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator and does not cause systemic hypotension. In this prospective study, 14 adult post-operative cardiac surgical patients with pulmonary hypertension underwent inhaled nitric oxide therapy and their hemodynamic changes were evaluated. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered in doses of 5 ppm-25 ppm. The result was a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance from 456.57 +/- 137.13 to 357.64 +/- 119.80 dynes-sec- Continued. - See Free Full Text.

  2. An Adult Patient with Ocular Myasthenia and Unusually Long Spontaneous Remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Al-Hashel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A male patient developed ocular myasthenia gravis (MG at the age of 33. He was anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR Ab negative. He received cholinesterase blocker for 5 months and went into a complete clinical remission that lasted untreated for 17 years. He relapsed recently with ocular symptoms only. He is now anti-AChR Ab positive and SFEMG is abnormal in a facial muscle. The patient is controlled with steroids. He had one of the longest spontaneous remissions reported in the natural history of MG, particularly unusual for an adult with the disease.

  3. Infliximab dependency is related to decreased surgical rates in adult Crohn's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N.; Duricova, D.; Lenicek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Infliximab dependency in children with Crohn's disease (CD) has recently been described and found to be associated with a decreased surgery rate. Aim To assess infliximab dependency of adult CD patients, evaluate the impact on surgery, and search for possible clinical and genetic...... predictors. Methods Two hundred and forty-five CD patients treated with infliximab were included from Danish and Czech Crohn Colitis Database (1999-2006). Infliximab response was assessed as immediate outcome, 1 month after infliximab start: complete, partial, and no response. Three months outcome, after...

  4. Barriers to adult hemodialysis patients' self-management of oral medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Teri; Merighi, Joseph R

    2010-09-01

    Hemodialysis patients use a variety of oral medications on a daily basis to control their kidney disease and comorbid illnesses. Under the new paradigm of kidney disease care for dialysis units outlined in the 2008 US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Conditions for Coverage, there has been a formal shift in the role of the hemodialysis patient from a passive participant in care planning to a fully collaborative member of the interdisciplinary team. In the chronic disease care field, the focus from patient compliance or patient adherence to patient self-management complements this paradigm shift in dialysis care. In this narrative review, we discuss key barriers to adult hemodialysis patient self-management of oral medications that include pill burden, demographic and socioeconomic variables, psychosocial factors, health literacy, patient satisfaction, and health beliefs. We further examine these barriers in the context of the 2008 Medicare Conditions for Coverage. To promote hemodialysis patients' self-management of oral medication regimens, additional research and behavioral interventions are needed to help hemodialysis patients overcome obstacles that impede their ability to effectively manage chronic illness and improve health outcomes.

  5. Intraosseous injection of iodinated computed tomography contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Thomas E; Paxton, James H; Myers, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Intraosseous venous access can be life-saving in trauma patients when traditional methods for obtaining venous access are difficult or impossible. Because many blunt trauma patients require expeditious evaluation by computed tomography (CT) scans with intravenous contrast, it is important to evaluate whether intraosseous catheters can be used for administering CT contrast agents in lieu of waiting until secure peripheral intravenous or central venous catheter access can be established. Previous case reports have demonstrated that tibial intraosseous catheters can be used to safely administer CT contrast in the pediatric patient population. Here we report a case in which intraosseous access was the only means of administering intravenous contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient. An intraosseous catheter was placed in the standard manner in the right proximal humerus. Intravenous contrast agent was administered through the intraosseous catheter, using the standard blunt trauma protocol at our institution. CT scans were evaluated by a staff radiologist and assessed for the adequacy of diagnosis for blunt traumatic injuries. CT scans of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were considered to be adequate for diagnostic purposes and subjectively equivalent to those of studies using traditional central venous access. The intraosseous catheter was discontinued the following day. No complications of intraosseous placement or of contrast administration were identified. Intraosseous catheterization appears to be a feasible and effective alternative to traditional methods of venous access in the administration of iodinated contrast agents for CT evaluation in adult blunt trauma patients. Further study is warranted.

  6. Adult Patients with Congenital Muscular Torticollis Treated with Bipolar Release: Report of 31 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Sang; Lee, Myung Ki; Kim, Woo Jae; Kim, Ho Sang; Kim, Jeong Ho; Kim, Yun-Suk

    2017-01-01

    Objective We assessed the surgical results of bipolar release in 31 adult patients with uncorrected congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) and more than 12 months of follow-up. Methods Thirty-one patients underwent a bipolar release of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and were retrospectively analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 14.9 months (range, 12–30). The mean age at time of surgery was 30.3 years (range, 20–54). Patients were evaluated with a modified Lee’s scoring system, cervicomandibular angle (CMA) measurement, and a global satisfaction rating scale using patient self-reporting. Results The modified Lee’s scoring system indicated excellent results in 4 (12.9%) patients, good in 18 (58.1%), and fair in 9 (29.0%) at the last follow-up after surgery. The improvements in neck movement and head tilt were statistically significant (pSCM is a safe and reliable technique for the treatment of CMT in adults. PMID:28061496

  7. Methylphenidate normalizes emotional processing in adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzelmann, Annette; Woidich, Eva; Mucha, Ronald F; Weyers, Peter; Jacob, Christian P; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Pauli, Paul

    2011-03-24

    Emotional-motivational dysfunctions may significantly contribute to symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Hyperactive-impulsive symptoms and sensation seeking could be the result of a search for reinforcers, and cognitive dysfunctions might be due to a low motivational drive. Emotional-motivational dysfunctions could also explain social dysfunctions in ADHD patients because they may lead to misinterpretations of emotional and social clues. Since methylphenidate (MPH) is the first choice as a pharmacological treatment in ADHD, we examined its influence on dysfunctional emotional processes. 13 adult ADHD patients were examined twice, without and after intake of MPH according to their personal medication regimen. The affect-modulated startle paradigm was used to assess physiological (affect-modulated startle response) and subjective (valence and arousal ratings) responses to pleasant, neutral and unpleasant visual stimuli. Healthy controls displayed affective startle modulation as expected, with startle attenuation and potentiation while watching pleasant and unpleasant pictures, respectively. In contrast, unmedicated ADHD patients displayed deficient responses to pleasant stimuli; no startle attenuation during the exposure to pleasant pictures was observed. However, MPH reinstated a normal affective startle modulation, as indicated by attenuation and potentiation associated with pleasant and unpleasant pictures, respectively. Valence and arousal ratings of patients were not affected by MPH. The data suggest that MPH as first choice treatment in ADHD has a positive impact on emotional processes in adult ADHD patients and points to the clinical relevance of emotional-dysfunctions in ADHD.

  8. Restructuring a rehabilitation program for older adults: effects on patient outcomes and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jennifer; Hopper, Tammy

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods research study was to examine the impact of organizational change on patient outcomes and staff experiences in a rehabilitation program for older adults. Program restructuring focused on reducing patient length of stay and increasing admissions to the rehabilitation program. Study findings revealed that patients admitted after restructuring, as compared to the time period just prior, experienced shorter lengths of stay yet made similar progress towards rehabilitation goals. The average discharge Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores between the two time periods were not significantly different. Yet FIM efficiency scores improved after the restructuring. With this reorganization, rehabilitation staff reported working harder to help patients achieve satisfactory outcomes, although initially staff reported lower morale. Findings extend the current literature and have practical implications for health care professionals interested in facilitating successful organizational change.

  9. Spontaneous resolution of syringomyelia in an adult patient with tight cisterna magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrini, Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous resolution of syringomyelia in adult patients with Chiari malformation is exceptionally rare, with only 10 cases having been reported. A 21-year-old man working as a carpenter presented with a 1-year history of paresthesias in his right arm. A magnetic resonance imaging scan disclosed a cervicothoracic syrinx associated with tight tonsillar impaction of the cisterna magna without herniation. The patient left the carpentry job and underwent close monitoring with serial clinical and neuroradiological controls. The patient's symptoms gradually disappeared and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed progressive shrinkage of the syrinx despite persistence of crowding of posterior fossa structures at the level of the foramen magnum. This case suggests that spontaneous resolution of syringomyelia can occasionally be triggered by the cessation of daily physical strain in patients with tight cisterna magna. Health care professionals should be aware that strenuous physical activities could affect the natural history of syringomyelia.

  10. Atypical course of Henoch-Schonlein purpura in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielewicz-Zielińska, Agnieszka; Górnikiewicz-Brzezicka, Bożena; Brzezicki, Jan; Rymko, Marcin; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura is vasculitis of small blood vessels characterized by deposits of IgA immune complexes and also non-thrombocytopenic purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and renal involvement. It affects people of all ages, but most cases occur in children between 2 and 11 years old, more frequently in boys. The disease is much less common in adults, who often have a more severe course of the disease. The paper presents the case of a 38-year-old female patient with insidious course of the disease, initially dominant skin symptoms and joint pain without signs of inflammation. Symptoms of the disease were initially uncharacteristic and mild, and did not suggest severe and rapid course of the disease. The patient required hospitalization in several departments before final diagnosis of Henoch-Schonlein purpura. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppression. Despite the rapid course of the disease, treatment was effective. The patient was discharged in good condition.

  11. High Prevalence of Stress Urinary Incontinence in Adult Patients with Bronchiectasis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duignan, N

    2016-07-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is frequently under-reported in patients with chronic lung disease and may have negative psychosocial consequences. We conducted a prospective study to determine the prevalence, severity and treatment outcomes of SUI in female bronchiectasis patients referred for airway clearance techniques. Nineteen out of 40 (48%) patients reported SUI symptoms. Of these, 14 (74%) reported a reduced quality of life secondary to SUI. Following personalised intervention, symptom improvement was observed in 13\\/19 (68%). Five out of 19 (26%) required specialist referral for further continence care. No associations with lung disease severity and SUI were noted. SUI is common in adult female bronchiectasis patients and should be routinely screened for to improve patients’ overall quality of life.

  12. One Health in Practice: A Pilot Project for Integrated Care of Zoonotic Infections in Immunocompromised Children and Their Pets in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, A; Abarca, K; Weitzel, T; Gallegos, J; Cerda, J; García, P; López, J

    2016-08-01

    Although pets provide physiological and psychological benefits to their owners, they are a potential source of zoonotic infections, especially for vulnerable individuals such as immunocompromised patients. During 1 year, we therefore performed a pilot project, which included 32 immunocompromised Chilean children and their family pets (35 dogs and 9 cats) with the aim of detecting, treating and preventing zoonotic infections. Children were examined by Infectious Diseases paediatricians and demographical and clinical information related to zoonotic infections were recorded. Pets were examined and sampled by veterinarians, who also administered missing routine vaccines and anti-parasitics. During family visits, all members were informed and educated about zoonoses and a satisfaction survey was performed. Visits also included vector control and indoor residual spraying with pyrethroids. Children were re-examined and re-tested according to the findings of their pets, and all detected zoonotic infections were treated both in children and pets. Physical examination revealed abnormalities in 18 dogs (51.4%) and three cats (33.3%). Twenty-eight (63.6%) of the pets were diagnosed with a zoonotic pathogen, and seven (15.9%) with a facultative pathogen. Most zoonotic agents were isolated from the pet's external ear and intestine. Bacteria with the highest pathogenic potential were Campylobacter jejuni and Brucella canis. In two children and their respective pets, the same zoonotic diseases were diagnosed (toxocariasis and giardiasis). Arthropods serving as potential vectors of zoonotic infections were found in 49% of dogs and 44% of cats. The pilot project was positively evaluated by the participating families. Our pilot project confirmed that pets are reservoir for various zoonotic agents in Chile and that the implementation of an integrated multidisciplinary programme was a valuable tool to prevent, diagnose and treat such zoonotic infections in vulnerable patients such as

  13. Vaccination in adult patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases : A systematic literature review for the European League Against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, S.; Elkayam, O.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Cervera, R.; Doran, M. F.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Geborek, P.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Jayne, D. R. W.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Mueller-Ladner, U.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Stojanovich, L.; Valesini, G.; Wulffraat, N. M.; Bijl, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To present the systematic literature review (SLR), which formed the basis for the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) evidence-based recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD). Methods: AIIRD, vaccines and immunomodula

  14. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale: validity and reliability in adult intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Curtis N; Gosnell, Mark S; Grap, Mary Jo; Brophy, Gretchen M; O'Neal, Pam V; Keane, Kimberly A; Tesoro, Eljim P; Elswick, R K

    2002-11-15

    Sedative medications are widely used in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Structured assessment of sedation and agitation is useful to titrate sedative medications and to evaluate agitated behavior, yet existing sedation scales have limitations. We measured inter-rater reliability and validity of a new 10-level (+4 "combative" to -5 "unarousable") scale, the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), in two phases. In phase 1, we demonstrated excellent (r = 0.956, lower 90% confidence limit = 0.948; kappa = 0.73, 95% confidence interval = 0.71, 0.75) inter-rater reliability among five investigators (two physicians, two nurses, and one pharmacist) in adult ICU patient encounters (n = 192). Robust inter-rater reliability (r = 0.922-0.983) (kappa = 0.64-0.82) was demonstrated for patients from medical, surgical, cardiac surgery, coronary, and neuroscience ICUs, patients with and without mechanical ventilation, and patients with and without sedative medications. In validity testing, RASS correlated highly (r = 0.93) with a visual analog scale anchored by "combative" and "unresponsive," including all patient subgroups (r = 0.84-0.98). In the second phase, after implementation of RASS in our medical ICU, inter-rater reliability between a nurse educator and 27 RASS-trained bedside nurses in 101 patient encounters was high (r = 0.964, lower 90% confidence limit = 0.950; kappa = 0.80, 95% confidence interval = 0.69, 0.90) and very good for all subgroups (r = 0.773-0.970, kappa = 0.66-0.89). Correlations between RASS and the Ramsay sedation scale (r = -0.78) and the Sedation Agitation Scale (r = 0.78) confirmed validity. Our nurses described RASS as logical, easy to administer, and readily recalled. RASS has high reliability and validity in medical and surgical, ventilated and nonventilated, and sedated and nonsedated adult ICU patients.

  15. Introduction of a Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Protocol for Older Adult Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Anna; Clare, Adam; McCurdy, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-Acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. In psychiatric patients these risks are increased due to multiple factors including poor mobility, restraint, catatonia, sedation, and conventional antipsychotic use. Diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric patients presenting with signs and symptoms of a VTE can be delayed due to a patient's communication difficulties, non-compliance, or attribution of symptoms to a psychosomatic cause. However, despite the increased risk, approved VTE prophylaxis protocols are infrequently used on Psychiatric wards. On one Older Adult Psychiatric Ward, two patients presented with VTE (a fatal pulmonary embolism and a symptomatic deep vein thrombosis) over a 6 month period demonstrating the necessity for prophylactic assessment. A baseline audit over 3 months showed that 63-83% of patients on the ward had received no assessment of VTE risk, on any given week, although this improved slightly following the critical incidents. A VTE prophylaxis protocol, based on NICE guidance for VTE risk assessment in Medical and Surgical patients, was developed with consideration given to additional Psychiatric risk factors. This took the form of a pro-forma with a tick-box design that included mobility assessment, VTE risk factors, bleeding risk factors, and guidance on prescribing decisions. This was implemented on an Older Adult Psychiatric ward and prophylaxis was provided to those meeting the threshold. Weekly audit of all pro-formas (including assessments completed within 48 hours of admission and prophylaxis prescription) was conducted after the pro-forma introduction from 1st February 2013 to 24th May 2013. Frequency of assessments increased after protocol implementation with between 36% and 85% of all patients being assessed for VTE risk post intervention. Fluctuations in numbers assessed may have related to ward pressures, staff changes, and practicalities of pro-forma use. After

  16. A comprehensive comparison between pediatric and adult patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Natale, Marco Francesco; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Andreozzi, Laura; Frediani, Bruno; D'Errico, Francesca; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is a mysterious disorder characterized by periodically recurrent fevers, oropharyngeal inflammation, and adenitis, which mainly affects children, though in very recent times, it has been also recognized in adulthood. We enrolled 115 unrelated pediatric and adult patients with history of periodic fevers who fulfilled the current diagnostic criteria for PFAPA syndrome in three Italian referral centers and highlighted differences between children and adults. Eighty-five children and 30 adults were evaluated: the frequency of flares was significantly higher in pediatric cases, while febrile attack duration was significantly longer in adults. Clockwork periodicity of fever and recurrent pharyngitis were more frequently observed in childhood, but no differences were identified for aphthosis and cervical adenopathy. Conversely, joint symptoms, myalgia, headache, fatigue, ocular signs, and rashes were more common in adults. The simultaneous occurrence of two or three cardinal PFAPA signs did not show any statistical difference between the groups, while the occurrence of only one cardinal manifestation was more frequent in adults. Corticosteroids were effective in 98.82 % of children and 88.2 % of adults. Tonsillectomy was rarely performed, resulting effective in only two patients. Our data illustrate the clinical overlap between pediatric and adult cases of PFAPA syndrome. Adults are characterized by a wider repertoire of inflammatory signs, suggesting that onset in adulthood might leave the disease misdiagnosed. Clinicians, not only pediatricians, should take into account this clinical entity in every patient of whatever age suffering from recurrent fevers of unknown origin.

  17. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  18. Long-Term Effects of Exercise Training and Hyperalimentation in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Severe Pulmonary Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijerman, Harry G. M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study, with 10 adult patients with cystic fibrosis, found that the improvement in lung function and ergometry parameters obtained by a short in-patient training program could be maintained on an out-patient basis through a voluntary self-treatment program. (DB)

  19. Psychometric evaluation of the Sheehan Disability Scale in adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coles T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Theresa Coles,1 Cheryl Coon,1 Carla DeMuro,1 Lori McLeod,1 Ari Gnanasakthy21Patient-Reported Outcomes, RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ, USAAbstract: Inattention and impulsivity symptoms are common among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, which can lead to difficulty concentrating, restlessness, difficulty completing tasks, disorganization, impatience, and impulsiveness. Many adults with ADHD find it difficult to focus and prioritize. Resulting outcomes, such as missed deadlines and forgotten engagements, may ultimately impact the ability to function at work, school, home, or in a social environment. The European Medicines Agency guidelines for evaluating medicinal products for ADHD recommend inclusion of both functional outcomes, such as school, social, or work functioning, and outcomes related to symptoms of ADHD in clinical studies of novel medication primary efficacy endpoints. Due to its performance in other disease areas and the relevance of its items as evidenced by content validity analyses, the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS was chosen to assess functional impairment in ADHD. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the SDS, used as a brief measure of functional impairment in a number of psychiatric disorders, in adult patients with ADHD. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the reliability of the SDS (based on Cronbach's coefficient alpha and test-retest reliability, its validity (construct and known-groups validity, and its ability to detect change in this patient population. This study also established a preliminary responder definition for the SDS in this study population to determine when change can be considered clinically beneficial in a clinical trial setting. The psychometric results support the use of the SDS subscales (items 1–3 and total score (sum of items 1–3 in an ADHD

  20. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, J Russell

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to “get by” before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians’ practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD. PMID:28184164

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Novel Plant Cell-Expressed Taliglucerase Alfa in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Gaucher Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richat Abbas

    Full Text Available Taliglucerase alfa is a beta-glucocerebrosidase enzyme replacement therapy approved in the United States, Israel, and other countries for treatment of Type 1 Gaucher disease in adults, and is the first approved plant cell--expressed recombinant protein. In this report, taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetics were assessed in adult and pediatric patients with Gaucher disease from separate multicenter trials of 30 Units/kg and 60 Units/kg doses infused every 2 weeks. Serial blood samples were obtained from adult patients following single-dose administration on day 1 (n = 26 and multiple doses at week 38 (n = 29, and from pediatric patients following administration of multiple doses of taliglucerase alfa for 10-27 months (n = 10. In both adult and pediatric patients, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to last measureable concentration (AUC0-t, and from time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞ were higher after 60 Units/kg dose than 30 Units/kg dose. No tendency for accumulation or change in taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetic parameters over time from day 1 to week 38 was observed with repeated doses of 30 or 60 Units/kg in adults. After multiple doses, mean (range dose-normalized pharmacokinetic parameters were similar for adult versus pediatric patients receiving 60 Units/kg: Cmax expressed in ng/mL/mg was 42.4 (14.5-95.4 in adults and 46.6 (34.4-68.4 in pediatric patients, AUC0 t expressed in ng • h/mL/mg was 63.4 (26.3-156 in adults and 63.9 (39.8-85.1 in pediatric patients, t1/2 expressed in minutes was 34.8 (11.3-104 in adults and 31.5 (18.0-42.9 in pediatric patients and total body clearance expressed in L/h was 19.9 (6.25-37.9 in adults and 17.0 (11.7-24.9 in pediatric patients. These pharmacokinetic data extend the findings of taliglucerase alfa in adult and pediatric patients.ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT00376168 (in adults; NCT01411228 (in children.

  2. The Impact of Loneliness on Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction Among Older, Sicker Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Musich PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study estimated prevalence rates of loneliness, identified characteristics associated with loneliness, and estimated the impact of loneliness on quality of life (QOL and patient satisfaction. Method: Surveys were mailed to 15,500 adults eligible for care management programs. Loneliness was measured using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA three-item scale, and QOL using Veteran’s RAND 12-item (VR-12 survey. Patient satisfaction was measured on a 10-point scale. Propensity weighted multivariate regression models were utilized to determine characteristics associated with loneliness as well as the impact of loneliness on QOL and patient satisfaction. Results: Among survey respondents (N = 3,765, 28% reported severe and 27% moderate loneliness. The strongest predictor of loneliness was depression. Physical and mental health components of QOL were significantly reduced by loneliness. Severe loneliness was associated with reduced patient satisfaction. Discussion: Almost 55% of these adults experienced loneliness, negatively affecting their QOL and satisfaction with medical services. Screening for loneliness may be warranted.

  3. The Impact of Loneliness on Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction Among Older, Sicker Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Shirley; Wang, Shaohung S; Hawkins, Kevin; Yeh, Charlotte S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study estimated prevalence rates of loneliness, identified characteristics associated with loneliness, and estimated the impact of loneliness on quality of life (QOL) and patient satisfaction. Method: Surveys were mailed to 15,500 adults eligible for care management programs. Loneliness was measured using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) three-item scale, and QOL using Veteran's RAND 12-item (VR-12) survey. Patient satisfaction was measured on a 10-point scale. Propensity weighted multivariate regression models were utilized to determine characteristics associated with loneliness as well as the impact of loneliness on QOL and patient satisfaction. Results: Among survey respondents (N = 3,765), 28% reported severe and 27% moderate loneliness. The strongest predictor of loneliness was depression. Physical and mental health components of QOL were significantly reduced by loneliness. Severe loneliness was associated with reduced patient satisfaction. Discussion: Almost 55% of these adults experienced loneliness, negatively affecting their QOL and satisfaction with medical services. Screening for loneliness may be warranted.

  4. High-resolution CT of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in adult CF patients: diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, Sinead; Lavelle, Lisa; Kilcoyne, Aoife; McCarthy, Colin; Dodd, Jonathan D. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); DeJong, Pim A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles G. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine and National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-12-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the detection of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection (NTM) in adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Twenty-seven CF patients with sputum-culture-proven NTM (NTM+) underwent HRCT. An age, gender and spirometrically matched group of 27 CF patients without NTM (NTM-) was included as controls. Images were randomly and blindly analysed by two readers in consensus and scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Significant differences were seen between NTM (+) and NTM (-) patients in the severity of the bronchiectasis subscore [45 % (1.8/4) vs. 35 % (1.4/4), P = 0.029], collapse/consolidation subscore [33 % (1.3/3) vs. 15 % (0.6/3)], tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules subscore [43 % (1.7/3) vs. 25 % (1.0/3), P = 0.002] and the total CT score [56 % (18.4/33) vs. 46 % (15.2/33), P = 0.002]. Binary logistic regression revealed BMI, peribronchial thickening, collapse/consolidation and tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules to be predictors of NTM status (R{sup 2} = 0.43). Receiver-operator curve analysis of the regression model showed an area under the curve of 0.89, P < 0.0001. In adults with CF, seven or more bronchopulmonary segments showing tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules on HRCT is highly suggestive of NTM colonisation. (orig.)

  5. Follicular lymphoma in young adults: a clinicopathological and molecular study of 200 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ivison X; Domeny-Duarte, Pollyanna; Wludarski, Sheila C L; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2013-09-01

    Follicular lymphoma is clinically heterogenous, and therefore necessitates the identification of prognostic markers to stratify risk groups and optimize clinical management. It is relatively rare in patients younger than 40 years, and the clinicopathologic characteristics and biological behavior in this age group are poorly understood. In the current study, samples from a cohort of 200 patients between 19 and 40 years were evaluated retrospectively with respect to clinical, histologic, and genetic features. These were then correlated with clinical outcome. The median age at presentation was 35 years with a slight female prepoderance (56%). Most of the cases are presented with nodal disease (90%). Concomitant follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were observed in 7 (4%) patients. Immunohistologic studies showed the expression of CD10 (91%), BCL6 (97%), BCL2 (95%), MUM1/IRF4 (12%), MDM2 (17%), and CD23 (25%). BCL2 rearrangement was present in 74%, and BCL6 in 20%. The estimated overall survival of patients was 13 years (mean). The presence of anemia, elevated lactose dehydrogenase, bone marrow involvement, and high-risk follicular lymphoma international prognostic index correlated with adverse overall survival. Our findings revealed that follicular lymphoma in young adults demonstrate similarities with that of older adults, including the frequency of presentation at various anatomic sites, grade, and adverse prognostic factors.

  6. Psychometric testing of the Revised Humane Caring Scale for adult patients in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Mien Li; Ang, Emily N K; Chan, Yiong-Huak; He, Hong-Gu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we examined the validity and reliability of the Revised Humane Caring Scale as used by adult patients in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. A three-phase descriptive quantitative study was conducted. In phase I, an expert panel of nurses and inpatients examined the content validity of the scale; phase II comprised a pilot study on 20 patients; and in phase III, a large-scale study on 235 patients was implemented to test the internal consistency of the scale. The results revealed that the content validity index of the scale ranged from 0.856 to 1, and the scale had a high inter-rater agreement kappa value of 0.940. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.798 to 0.877 in phase II, and from 0.579 to 0.760 in phase III, respectively. The Revised Humane Caring Scale revealed good content validity and an acceptable level of internal consistency. The scale is an acceptable measurement tool for evaluating adult patients' satisfaction during hospitalization.

  7. Nasal symptoms and clinical findings in adult patients treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morén, Staffan; Mani, Maria; Lundberg, Kristina; Holmström, Mats

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate self-experienced nasal symptoms among adults treated for UCLP and the association to clinical findings, and to evaluate whether palate closure in one-stage or two-stages affected the symptoms or clinical findings. All people with UCLP born between 1960-1987, treated at Uppsala University Hospital, were considered for participation in this cross-sectional population study with long-term follow-up. Eighty-three patients (76% participation rate) participated, a mean of 37 years after the first operation. Fifty-two patients were treated with one-stage palate closure and 31 with two-stage palate closure. An age-matched group of 67 non-cleft controls completed the same study protocol, which included a questionnaire regarding nasal symptoms, nasal inspection, anterior rhinoscopy, and nasal endoscopy. Patients reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms compared with the control group, e.g., nasal obstruction (81% compared with 60%) and mouth breathing (20% compared with 5%). Patients also rated their nasal symptoms as having a more negative impact on their daily life and physical activities than controls. Nasal examination revealed higher frequencies of nasal deformities among patients. No positive correlation was found between nasal symptoms and severity of findings at nasal examination. No differences were identified between patients treated with one-stage and two-stage palate closure regarding symptoms or nasal findings. Adult patients treated for UCLP suffer from more nasal symptoms than controls. However, symptoms are not associated with findings at clinical nasal examination or method of palate closure.

  8. A course on the transition to adult care of patients with childhood-onset chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, James S; Lenker, Claire V; Thrasher, Staci

    2005-04-01

    Children with special health care needs born today have a 90% chance of surviving into adulthood, making their transition to adult systems of care an issue that will affect almost all physicians. However, many adult generalists and specialists are not familiar with the management of chronic diseases that begin in childhood. While the public health system has made transition to appropriate adult care a priority, and many specialty organizations have endorsed this concept, there are no published studies addressing how the concept of transition can be taught to medical students or residents. The authors describe a one-week course for medical students, begun in 2001 at their institution, that addresses the transition for youth with special health care needs, emphasizing patient and family-centered care, cultural competence, and decision making in end-of-life issues. Cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disease with increasing life expectancy, is used as the model for the course. Involvement of interdisciplinary faculty, interviews with youth with special health care needs and family caregivers, readings from academic and nonacademic literature, and group discussions are presented as teaching methods. Key insights based on experience with the course are the need to include the voices of patients and families, the use of faculty from various professions and specialties to model interdisciplinary care, and the insight that problems specific to transition offer into contemporary health care financing. Future studies should measure the impact of such courses on students' knowledge of transition issues, and determine essential information required for physicians in practice.

  9. Prognostic value of cytogenetics in adult patients with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Seguí, Inés; Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Luna, Irene; Ibáñez, Mariam; López-Pavía, María; Gascón, Adriana; Roig, Mónica; Martínez, Jesús; Sanz, Jaime; Montesinos, Pau; Martín-Aragonés, Guillermo; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Senent, Leonor; Barragán, Eva; Cordón, Lourdes; Sempere, Amparo; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    The prognostic value of cytogenetics in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is not as established as in childhood ALL. We have analyzed the outcome and prognostic value of karyotype in 84 adults diagnosed with Philadelphia-negative ALL from a single institution that received induction chemotherapy and had successful karyotype performed. The most frequent finding was normal karyotype in 35 (42%) cases, followed by aneuploidies in 20 cases (24%) and t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL/AF4 in 5 (6%), and the remaining 24(27%) cases carried miscellaneous clonal abnormalities. The group of patients with t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL/AF4, hypodiploidy and low hyperdiploidy (less than 50 chromosomes) showed a worse outcome than those with normal karyotype and miscellaneous abnormalities in terms of overall survival (OS) (3 years OS; 47% vs. 13%, p = 0.014) and relapse-free survival (RFS) (3 years RFS; 44% vs. 27%, p = 0.005). Other cytogenetic prognostic classifications reported to date were tested in our series, but any was fully reproducible. In conclusion, karyotype is a useful tool for risk assessment in adult ALL. We have confirmed the bad prognosis of t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL/AF4 and hypodiploidy. Besides, low hyperdiploidy could also define a high-risk group of patients who might be candidates for more intensive treatment.

  10. Management of acne vulgaris with hormonal therapies in adult female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husein-ElAhmed, Husein

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common condition affecting up of 93% of adolescents. Although rare, this disease may persist in adulthood. In adult women with acne (those older than 25 years old), this condition is particularly relevant because of the refractory to conventional therapies, which makes acne a challenge for dermatologists in this group of patients. In order to its potential risk for chronicity and the involvement of visible anatomical sites such as face and upper torso, acne has been associated with a wide spectrum of psychological and social dysfunction such as depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, somatization, and social inhibition. In particular, adult women with acne have been shown to be adversely impacted by the effect of acne on their quality of life. For the last four decades, dermatologists have used hormonal therapies for the management of acne vulgaris in adult women, which are considered a rational choice given the severity and chronicity of this condition in this group of patients. The aim of this work is to review the hormonal drugs for management of acne.

  11. Pattern of postoperative pain management among adult surgical patients in a low-resource setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogboli-Nwasor E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Ogboli-Nwasor,1 Sa’adatu T Sule,2 Lazarus MD Yusufu31Department of Anaesthesia, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria; 3Department of Surgery, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, NigeriaObjective: Postoperative pain is one of the most common complications of surgery. The pattern of management varies between centers. The current study aimed to study the prescription pattern and the common drugs used in the management of postoperative pain in adult surgical patients at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH; Zaria, Nigeria.Methods: Following ethical approval, a prospective observational study of consecutive adult patients who had surgery at the ABUTH Zaria was performed from January to December 2005. The data were entered into a proforma and analyzed using the Minitab statistical package.Results: One hundred and thirty-eight patients were included in the study. The age range was 17 to 80 years, with a mean age of 41 years. One hundred and thirty-two (95.7% of the prescriptions were written solely by the surgeon or surgical resident; passive suggestions were given by the anesthetists for only six patients (4.3%. Intermittent intramuscular injections of opioids/opiates were prescribed for 126 patients (91.3%, while nine patients (6.5% received intermittent intramuscular injections with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Oral paracetamol was prescribed for six patients (4.3%, while three patients (2.1% received no postoperative analgesic. Moderate pain was recorded in 48 patients (34.8%, and 90 patients (65.2% had mild pain 8 hours after their operation before subsequent doses of analgesics were given. More females (81 patients [58.7%], than males (42 patients [29.7%] suffered moderate to severe pain. The reported side effects were nausea (reported by 32.6% of patients, dry mouth (21

  12. Prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia in non-ventilated adult patients: a narrative review

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    Leonor Pássaro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is one of the leading hospital-acquired infections worldwide and has an important impact. Although preventive measures for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP are well known, less is known about appropriate measures for prevention of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP. Aim The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the current standards for preventing HAP in non-ventilated adult patients. Methods A search of the literature up to May 2015 was conducted using Medline for guidelines published by national professional societies or professional medical associations. In addition, a comprehensive search for the following preventive measures was performed: hand hygiene, oral care, bed position, mobilization, diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, aspiration prevention, viral infections and stress bleeding prophylaxis. Findings Regarding international guidelines, several measures were recommended for VAP, whilst no specific recommendations for HAP prevention in non-ventilated patients are available. There is reasonable evidence available that oral care is associated with a reduction in HAP. Early mobilization interventions, swift diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia, and multimodal programmes for the prevention of nosocomial influenza cross-infection, have a positive impact on HAP reduction. The impact of bed position and stress bleeding prophylaxis remains uncertain. Systematic antibiotic prophylaxis for HAP prevention should be avoided. Conclusion Scant literature and little guidance is available for the prevention of HAP among non-ventilated adult patients. In addition, the criteria used for the diagnosis of HAP and the populations targeted in the studies selected are heterogeneous. Oral care was the most studied measure and was commonly associated with a decrease in HAP rate, although a broad range of interventions are proposed. No robust evidence is available for other measures. Further high

  13. Influence of Occupational Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Min Gu; Cheng-Yun Ding; Ning Wang; Cheng-Feng Xu; Ze-Jie Chen; Qin Wang; Qin Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background:Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological disorders.The present study aimed to investigate the influence of occupational status on the quality of life of Chinese adult patients with epilepsy.Methods:This study surveyed 819 subjects clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for more than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing;586 were employed (71.55%).All subjects completed the case report form with inquiries on demographic data,social factors,and illness.The patients' quality of life was assessed using the quality of life in patients with epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire.Results:The QOLIE-31 score in the employed group was significantly higher than that in the unemployed group.Furthermore,the scores in all the sections (overall quality of life,energy/fatigue,emotional well-being,seizure worry,cognition,social function,and medication effects) of the employed group were higher than those of the unemployed group.Both the employed and unemployed groups achieved the highest difference in social function.The QOLIE-31 score of students was higher than those of farmers and workers.Both the students and workers scored higher in the quality of life compared with the adult peasants living with epilepsy.The students and farmers showed significant differences in QOLIE-31 score,cognition,emotional well-being,overall quality of life,energy/fatigue,and social function.In contrast,no significant difference was noted in seizure worry and medication effects across the three different kinds of occupation.Conclusion:Occupational status might affect the quality of life of Chinese adult patients with epilepsy,and social function is the most important contributing factor.

  14. Psychological functioning after growth hormone therapy in adult growth hormone deficient patients: endocrine and body composition correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Lašaitė, Lina; Bunevičius, Robertas; Lašienė, Danutė Teresė; Lašas, Liudvikas

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement in adult growth hormone deficient patients improves psychological well-being and the quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate relationship between changes in mood, cognitive functioning, quality of life, changes in body composition and hormone concentration at baseline and six months after treatment with human recombinant growth hormone. Eighteen adult patients with growth hormone deficiency syndrome were recruited to the study. Growth hormone was a...

  15. Lymphatic Reprogramming of Adult Endothelial Stem Cells for a Cell-Based Therapy for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Therapy for Lymphedema inBreast Cancer Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Young Kwon Hong, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lymphatic Reprogramming of Adult Endothelial Stem Cells for a Cell-Based Therapy for Lymphedema in... lymphedema patients. The key significance of our proposal is to utilize the elusive circulating adult stem cells to avoid the ethical and immunological

  16. Evolving radiological features of hypothalamo-pituitary lesions in adult patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)

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    Makras, P. [Athens General Hospital, Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Athens (Greece); Athens General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Samara, C.; Antoniou, M.; Nikolakopoulou, Z. [Athens Hospital, 9. Pulmonary Department, Athens (Greece); Zetos, A. [General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Athens (Greece); Papadogias, D.; Piaditis, G.; Kaltsas, G.A. [Athens General Hospital, Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Athens (Greece); Toloumis, G. [Athens General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Andreakos, E.; Kontogeorgos, G.

    2006-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare, systemic disease caused by monoclonal expansion of dendritic cells that shows a particular predilection for the hypothalamic-pituitary system (HPS). We studied the function (anterior and posterior pituitary hormonal secretion) and morphology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the HPS in 17 adult patients (seven males, median age 35 years, range 18-59 years) with multisystem LCH. We also evaluated the evolution of structural HPS abnormalities in relation to pituitary function and response to treatment in 12 of these patients during a median follow-up period of 3.75 years (range 1.5-10 years). Of the 17 patients, 14 (82%) had abnormal HPS imaging, and 12 (70%) had more than one area involved. Lack of the bright spot of the posterior pituitary lobe was typically found in all patients with the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus (DI). Eight patients (47%) had infundibular enlargement, six (35%) pituitary infiltration, four (24%) partially or completely empty sella, three (18%) hypothalamic involvement, and two (12%) infundibular atrophy. DI was found in 16 patients (94%) and anterior pituitary hormonal deficiency (APHD) in 10 patients (59%); two patients had single (12%) and 8 (47%) multiple APHD. During the follow-up period there was improvement of the initially demonstrated HPS pathology in seven (47%) patients, and five (33%) of them had received at least one form of treatment. APHD and DI persisted in all patients except in one in whom established gonadotrophin deficiency recovered. In summary, DI and APHD are very common in patients with multisystem LCH and are almost always associated with abnormal HPS imaging. (orig.)

  17. Identification and Clinical Characterization of Adult Patients with Multigenerational Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Ornella Ludovico

    Full Text Available Some patients diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are, instead, affected by multigenerational diabetes whose clinical characteristics are mostly undefined.1. To identify among patients who had been previously defined as affected by T2DM those, in fact, affected by multigenerational diabetes; 2. After excluding patients carrying the most common MODY genes and mitochondrial mutations, we compared clinical features of remaining patients with those of patients with T2DM.Among 2,583 consecutive adult patients who had been defined as affected by T2DM, we looked for those with diabetes in ≥3 consecutive generations. All probands were screened for mutations in six MODY genes (HNF4A, GCK, HNF1A, PDX1, HNF1B and NeuroD1 and for the A3243G mitochondrial mutation. After excluding patients with mutations in one of such genes, we compared clinical features of the remaining 67 patients (2.6% of the whole initial sample affected by multigenerational "familial diabetes of the adulthood" (FDA and of their diabetic relatives (n = 63 to those with T2DM (n = 1,028 by generalized hierarchical linear models followed by pairwise comparisons.Age, age at diagnosis, proportion of hypertension (all p<0.001, and waist circumference (p<0.05 were lower in FDA than T2DM. Nonetheless, the two groups had similar age-adjusted incidence rate of all-cause mortality.Beside younger age at diagnosis, FDA patients show lower waist circumference and reduced proportion of hypertension as compared to those with T2DM; despite such reduced potential cardiovascular risk factors, FDA patients did not show a reduced mortality risk than patients with T2DM.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-2 detection and typing in immunocompromised children correlated with lymphoproliferative disorder biopsy findings

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    Thiago Marques Mendes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis, plays a significant role as a cofactor in the process of tumorigenesis, and has consistently been associated with a variety of malignancies especially in immunocompromised patients. Forty-four children and adolescents (21 liver transplant patients, 7 heart transplant, 5 AIDS, 3 autoimmune hepatitis, 2 nephritic syndromes, 2 medullar aplasia, 2 primary immunodeficiency disorder patients, 1 thrombocytopenic purpura and 1 systemic lupus erythematosus presenting with chronic active EBV infection (VCA-IgM persistently positive; VCA-IgG > 20 AU/mL and positive IgG _ EBNA had peripheral blood samples obtained during clinically characterized EBV reactivation episodes. DNA samples were amplified in order to detect and type EBV on the basis of the EBNA-2 sequence (EBNA2 protein is essential for EBV-driven immortalization of B lymphocytes. Although we have found a predominance of type 1 EBNA-2 virus (33/44; 75%, 10 patients (22.73% carried type 2 EBNA-2, and one liver transplant patient (2.27% a mixture of the two types, the higher proportion of type 2 EBV, as well as the finding of one patient bearing the two types is in agreement with other reports held on lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD patients, which analyzed tumor biopsies. We conclude that EBNA-2 detection and typing can be performed in peripheral blood samples, and the high prevalence of type 2 in our casuistic indicates that this population is actually at risk of developing LPD, and should be monitored.

  19. Satisfaction Domains Differ between the Patient and Their Family in Adult Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ge; Sim, Pei Zhen; Ting, Kit Cheng; Yoo, Jeffrey Kwang Sui; Wang, Qing Li; Mascuri, Raudhah Binte Haji Mohamad; Ong, Venetia Hui Ling; Phua, Jason; Kowitlawakul, Yanika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients' and family's satisfaction data from the Asian intensive care units (ICUs) is lacking. Objective. Domains between patient and family satisfaction and contribution of each domain to the general satisfaction were studied. Method. Over 3 months, adult patients across 4 ICUs staying for more than 48 hours with abbreviated mental test score of 7 or above and able to understand English and immediate family members were surveyed by separate validated satisfaction questionnaires. Results. Two hundred patients and 194 families were included in the final analysis. Significant difference in the satisfaction scores was observed between the ICUs. Patients were most and least satisfied in the communication (4.2 out of 5) and decision-making (2.9 out of 5) domains, respectively. Families were most and least satisfied in the relationship with doctors (3.9 out of 5) and family's involvement domains (3.3 out of 5), respectively. Domains contributing most to the general satisfaction were the illness management domain for patients (β coefficient = 0.44) and characteristics of doctors and nurses domain for family (β coefficient = 0.45). Discussion. In an Asian ICU community, patients and families differ in their expectations and valuations of health care processes. Health care providers have difficult tasks in attending to these different domains. PMID:28044138

  20. Satisfaction Domains Differ between the Patient and Their Family in Adult Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Song, Ge; Sim, Pei Zhen; Ting, Kit Cheng; Yoo, Jeffrey Kwang Sui; Wang, Qing Li; Mascuri, Raudhah Binte Haji Mohamad; Ong, Venetia Hui Ling; Phua, Jason; Kowitlawakul, Yanika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients' and family's satisfaction data from the Asian intensive care units (ICUs) is lacking. Objective. Domains between patient and family satisfaction and contribution of each domain to the general satisfaction were studied. Method. Over 3 months, adult patients across 4 ICUs staying for more than 48 hours with abbreviated mental test score of 7 or above and able to understand English and immediate family members were surveyed by separate validated satisfaction questionnaires. Results. Two hundred patients and 194 families were included in the final analysis. Significant difference in the satisfaction scores was observed between the ICUs. Patients were most and least satisfied in the communication (4.2 out of 5) and decision-making (2.9 out of 5) domains, respectively. Families were most and least satisfied in the relationship with doctors (3.9 out of 5) and family's involvement domains (3.3 out of 5), respectively. Domains contributing most to the general satisfaction were the illness management domain for patients (β coefficient = 0.44) and characteristics of doctors and nurses domain for family (β coefficient = 0.45). Discussion. In an Asian ICU community, patients and families differ in their expectations and valuations of health care processes. Health care providers have difficult tasks in attending to these different domains.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Nakayama, Yohei; Tatsumi, Junichi; Kubota, Takehiko; Sato, Shuichi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Onitsuka, Tokuya; Sakagami, Ryuji; Nozaki, Takenori; Murakami, Shinya; Matsubara, Naritoshi; Tanaka, Maki; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Ota, Junya; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Ishihara, Yuichi; Ito, Taichi; Saito, Atsushi; Yamaki, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Etsuko; Hidaka, Toshirou; Sasaki, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Takashi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Araki, Hisao; Ikumi, Noriharu; Aoyama, Yukihiko; Kogai, Hideki; Nemoto, Kenji; Deguchi, Shinji; Takiguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Inokuchi, Keita; Ito, Takatoshi; Kado, Takashi; Furuichi, Yasushi; Kanazashi, Mikimoto; Gomi, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yukie; Kubokawa, Keita; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Tetsushi; Sase, Toshinaga; Arita, Hirokazu; Kodama, Toshiro; Shin, Kitetsu; Izumi, Yuichi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2017-03-31

    We investigated the prevalences and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients attending a follow-up visit at dental hospitals or clinics as part of their maintenance program. This cross-sectional multicenter study enrolled patients with dental implants who attended regular check-ups as part of a periodontal maintenance program during the period from October 2012 through September 2013. Patients with implants with at least 3 years of loading time were included in the study. The condition of peri-implant tissue was examined and classified into the following categories: healthy, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis. Patients were also evaluated for implant risk factors. A total of 267 patients (110 men, 157 women; mean age: 62.5 ± 10.7 years) were analyzed. The prevalence of patient-based peri-implant mucositis was 33.3% (n = 89), and the prevalence of peri-implantitis was 9.7% (n = 26). Poor oral hygiene and a history of periodontitis were strong risk factors for peri-implant disease. The present prevalences were lower than those previously reported. The quality of periodontal therapy before and after implant installation and patient compliance and motivation, as indicated by plaque control level, appear to be important in maintaining peri-implant tissue health.

  2. CT features of neutropenic enterocolitis in adult patients with hematological diseases undergoing chemotherapy

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    Vogel, M.N.; Brodoefel, H.; Claussen, C.D.; Horger, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Goeppert, B. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pathology; Maksimovic, O.; Faul, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the features of neutropenic enterocolitis (NE) in adults. Materials and Methods: Chart and radiology report reviews were used to identify neutropenic patients with hematological diseases undergoing chemotherapy, who had CT scans for the clarification of abdominal symptoms between October 2003 and October 2009. Patients with any cause for enteritis other than NE were excluded. The scans were analyzed with respect to imaging features and location. Morphological findings were correlated with clinical data. Results: Thirty-one patients with NE (median age 46 years; range 20 - 75) could be identified. Wall thickening and hyperemia could be found in all bowel segments from jejunum to rectum. The right hemicolon was the most frequent location in 19 patients (61 %). Involvement was generalized in 6 patients (19 %) and segmental in 25 cases (81 %). The longer the duration of neutropenia, the more likely generalized involvement of the bowel was. In 8 patients who underwent CT follow-up, the appearance of bowel segments had completely (n = 5) or partially (n = 3) returned to normal at the latest 14 days after the initial diagnosis. Eight patients (26 %) died 1 - 78 days after NE, 7 of who had previously recovered from NE. Conclusion: CT findings are useful for the diagnosis of NE and should be considered even in the presence of isolated small bowel involvement. The terms NE and typhlitis should thus no longer be used synonymously. (orig.)

  3. Cytomegalovirus infections following umbilical cord blood transplantation using reduced intensity conditioning regimens for adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Tomoko; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Kami, Masahiro; Yuji, Koichiro; Kusumi, Eiji; Hori, Akiko; Murashige, Naoko; Tanaka, Yuji; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Wake, Atsushi; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2007-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT); however, we have little information on the clinical features of CMV reactivation after cord blood transplantation using reduced-intensity regimens (RI-CBT) for adults. We reviewed medical records of 140 patients who underwent RI-CBT at Toranomon Hospital between January 2002 and March 2005. All the patients were monitored for CMV-antigenemia weekly, and, if turned positive, received preemptive foscarnet or ganciclovir. Seventy-seven patients developed positive antigenemia at a median onset of day 35 (range, 4-92) after transplant. Median of the maximal number of CMV pp65-positive cells per 50,000 cells was 22 (range, 1-1806). CMV disease developed in 22 patients on a median of day 35 (range, 15-106); 21 had enterocolitis and 1 had adrenalitis. CMV antigenemia had not been detected in 2 patients, when CMV disease was diagnosed. CMV disease was successfully treated using ganciclovir or foscarnet in 14 patients. The other 8 patients died without improvement of CMV disease. In multivariate analysis, grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease was a risk factor of CMV disease (relative risk 3.48, 95% confidential interval 1.47-8.23). CMV reactivation and disease develop early after RI-CBT. CMV enterocolitis may be a common complication after RI-CBT.

  4. Patient compliance and supportive periodontal therapy: Study among young adults of Namakkal district

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    Subramanium Gokulanathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the patient compliance to supportive and maintenance periodontal therapy and to determine the reason for noncompliance among young adult patients of Namakkal district, India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 400 patients who underwent periodontal therapy and subsequently recalled for supportive and maintenance periodontal treatment in the Department of Periodontics, Vivekanandha Dental College for Women, Namakkal. Patients age group 25-35 years and of both gender were equally selected and grouped by occupation and socioeconomic status. According to their compliance with appointments, they are categorized as complete compliance, partially compliance and insufficient or noncompliance. Noncompliance and partially compliance patients were contacted and asked to rate their experience and reason for noncompliance. Results: In this study, 80% of patients showed complete compliance and were regular for supportive periodontal therapy appointments. Women were more regular in maintaining recall appointments than men. Salaried employers showed 84.3% complete compliance, while self-employed personals showed 77% complete compliance and 75% of nonworking personals were regular to the appointment schedule. Noncompliance person has quoted lack of time and forgetting the appointment date as a major reason for missed appointments. Conclusions: This study recommends the need for improvement in communication skills of practitioners and weekend appointment for patient undergoing periodontal maintenance therapy.

  5. Substance use, dental hygiene, and physical activity in adult patients with single ventricle physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Dorthe; Schrader, Anne-Marie; Lisby, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study aims to describe substance use, dental hygiene, and physical activity in adult survivors with single ventricle physiology (SVP) and to compare the behaviors with matched controls, while the patients are particularly at risk for general health problems. DESIGN: The present...... differences in overall health behaviors between SVP patients and controls, SVP patients are less physically active and are less likely to binge drink........596); 20% have had no dental visits during the last year (25% in controls; OR = 1.07; P = 0.684); 46% are not flossing their teeth (32% in controls; OR = 1.32; P = 0.239); and 39% are not physically active (24% in controls; OR = 1.63; P = 0.069). CONCLUSIONS: While in general there was no significant...

  6. Multidisciplinary Treatments, Patient Characteristics, Context of Care, and Adverse Incidents in Older, Hospitalized Adults

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    Leah L. Shever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contribute to adverse incidents by creating a model that included patient characteristics, clinical conditions, nursing unit context of care variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing treatments. Data were abstracted from electronic, administrative, and clinical data repositories. The sample included older adults hospitalized during a four-year period at one, academic medical facility in the Midwestern United States who were at risk for falling. Relational databases were built and a multistep, statistical model building analytic process was used. Total registered nurse (RN hours per patient day (HPPD and HPPDs dropping below the nursing unit average were significant explanatory variables for experiencing an adverse incident. The number of medical and pharmaceutical treatments that a patient received during hospitalization as well as many specific nursing treatments (e.g., restraint use, neurological monitoring were also contributors to experiencing an adverse incident.

  7. Renal histology in two adult patients with type I glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, K; Saito, T; Sato, H; Ogawa, M; Igarashi, Y; Yoshinaga, K

    1993-02-01

    Two adult patients with type I glycogen storage disease (I-GSD) had chronic renal disease with heavy proteinuria. Renal biopsies showed focal glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy or vacuolation, and prominent arteriosclerosis. Marked glomerular hypertrophy was demonstrated histometrically. Oil red O staining in one patient revealed numerous lipid deposits in the glomerular mesangium, tubular epithelial cells and interstitium. Electron microscopy in the other patient revealed diffuse thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and lipid droplets within the mesangium. The glomerular hypertrophy, thickening of the GBM, and subsequent sclerosis were similar to those in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. These findings may explain the similarities between the natural histories of renal involvement in the two disorders. Particularly, glomerular hypertrophy may be a key step leading to glomerular sclerosis, which is the predominant finding I-GSD. Hyperlipidemia, which is commonly seen in I-GSD, may also accelerate the glomerular sclerosing process.

  8. Mental health care Monitor Older adults (MEMO) : monitoring patient characteristics and outcome in Dutch mental health services for older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerbeek, Marjolein; Voshaar, Richard Oude; Depla, Marja; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2013-01-01

    Information on which older adults attend mental health care and whether they profit from the care they receive is important for policy-makers. To assess this information in daily practice, the Mental health care Monitor Older adults (MEMO) was developed in the Netherlands. The aim of this paper is t

  9. Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

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    Junko Matsuo

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65. Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the

  10. Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Junko; Kamio, Yoko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Nagashima, Anna; Takei, Reiko; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65). Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the importance of

  11. Effects of nebulized sodium cromoglycate on adult patients with severe refractory asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yasuyuki; Adachi, Mitsuru; Kiuchi, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Terumasa

    2006-03-01

    Many patients with severe refractory asthma, which is insufficiently controlled by additional high-dose of inhaled corticosteroids, require oral corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressant. Clinicians should seek for suitable medications, for its' chronic use may induce high risk of side effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nebulized sodium cromoglycate (3-4 times/day) in adult severe asthmatic patients with poorly controlled asthmatic symptoms, despite treatments with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids. Adult patients with severe asthma (n=251) were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial at 30 medical centers in Japan. Isotonic saline was used as placebo. The study was conducted for 10 weeks; with initial 2 weeks of observation followed by 8 weeks of treatments. Efficacy was primarily evaluated based on improvements in morning peak expiratory flow after treatment. All patients who applied inhalation of nebulized sodium cromoglycate (SCG group) or saline (Controls) were treated with high-dose of inhaled corticosteroids (median of beclomethasone dipropionate equivalent dose: 1600 microg/days) and second-line control therapy including oral corticosteroids. There was no significant difference in morning peak expiratory flow between SCG group and controls. However, when patients were stratified into atopic and non-atopic groups, morning peak expiratory flow had significantly improved in the atopic SCG group compared to atopic Controls. Additional inhalation of nebulized sodium cromoglycate with inhaled corticosteroids is effective even in patients with severe atopic asthma. This finding shows that nebulized sodium cromoglycate is expected to be new second-line therapeutic option in severe asthma.

  12. Etiology and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia in adult patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Li-li; DENG Wei-wu; HU Bi-jie; HE Li-xian; WEI Li; XIE Hong-mei; WANG Bao-qing; LI Hua-ying; CHEN Xue-hua; ZHOU Chun-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Appropriate antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is mainly based on the distribution of etiology and antimicrobial resistance of major pathogens.We performed a prospective observational study of adult with CAP in 36 hospitals in China.Methods Etiological pathogens were isolated in each of the centers,and all of the isolated pathogens were sent to Zhongshan Hospital for antimicrobial susceptibility tests using agar dilution.Results A total of 593 patients were enrolled in this study,and 242 strains of bacteria were isolated from 225 patients.Streptococcus pneumoniae (79/242,32.6%) was the most frequently isolated pathogen,followed by Haemophilus influenzae (55/242,22.7%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (25/242,10.3%).Totally 527 patients underwent serological tests for atypical pathogens; Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections were identified in 205 (38.9%)and 60 (11.4%) patients respectively.Legionella pneumophila infections were identified in 4.0% (13/324) of patients.The non-susceptibility rate of isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae to erythromycin and penicillin was 63.2% and 19.1%respectively.Six patients died from the disease,the 30-day mortality rate was 1.1% (6/533).Conclusions The top three bacteria responsible for CAP in Chinese adults were Streptococcus pneumonia,Haemophitus influenza and Klebsiella pneumonia.There was also a high prevalence of atypical pathogens and mixed pathogens.The resistance rates of the major isolated pathogens were relatively low except for the high prevalence of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  13. Vaccination of immune-compromised patients with the focus on patients with autoimmune-inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, M.; Kallenberg, C.G.M.; van Assen, S.

    2011-01-01

    Among immunocompromised patients morbidity and mortality due to vaccine-preventable infections is high. Although vaccination seems indicated, controversy exists about which vaccines should be offered, at what moment, and to whom. Guidelines are needed as the number of immunocompromised individuals i

  14. Loneliness and coping among tertiary-level adult cancer patients in the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G R

    1990-10-01

    This exploratory study measured the degree of loneliness experienced by adult cancer patients. All were in the initial phases of the illness, that is, currently receiving treatment consisting of either chemotherapy or radiation therapy on an outpatient basis and/or recuperating from surgery in the home setting. All were within 100 days of initial diagnosis of cancer. The UCLA Loneliness Scale by Peplau was used in measuring loneliness. In addition, the coping methods of this same group of patients were examined using the Jalowiec Coping Scale to determine predominant methods of coping with the situational crisis imposed by cancer diagnosis and treatment. The instruments were administered in the home or in an outpatient setting and patients were accessed through cancer treatment centers and from oncologists in the southern Illinois area. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of loneliness, to identify predominant coping methods, and to discern the relationship, if any, between coping methods employed and the degree of loneliness reported by the adult cancer patients. The conceptual framework chosen for the study was taken from the work of Lazarus and Jalowiec with regard to coping; the work of Peplau, Russell, and Cutrone on loneliness formed the conceptual basis for the portion of the study regarding that dimension. A total of 41 cancer patients were surveyed--21 were male and 20 were female. The median age was 60 years, and the mean educational level was 10.5 years. There were significant differences found between loneliness scores by age categories and by marital status, as well as a relationship between membership in organizations and loneliness scores. There were significant relationships found between coping methods (confrontive, emotive, palliative) employed and the degree of loneliness experienced by these cancer patients. Coping methods were also ranked by frequency of use, and interesting patterns emerged--especially noteworthy were group

  15. Prevalence of Thrombocytopenia among Chinese Adult Antiretroviral-na(i)ve HIV-positive Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Wei Fan; Fu-Ping Guo; Yi-Jia Li; Ning Li; Tai-Sheng Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:The prevalence ofthrombocytopenia among Chinese antiretroviral therapy (ART)-na(i)ve HIV-infected adults has not been well-described.The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors of thrombocytopenia among Chinese ART-na(i)ve HIV-infected adults.Methods:We performed a cross-sectional study of Chinese adult ART-na(i)ve HIV-infected patients from September 2005 through August 2014.Socio-demographic variables and laboratory results including platelets,CD4+ cell count,and viral load were obtained from medical records.Factors and outcomes associated with thrombocytopenia were assessed using logistic regression.Results:A total of 1730 adult ART-na(i)ve HIV-infected patients was included.The mean age was 38 years.The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was 4.5%.There were significant differences in the prevalence of thrombocytopenia between patients <30 years of age (2.8%) and 30-39 years (4.0%) compared with patients greater than 50 years (7.0%) (P =0.006 and P =0.044,respectively).The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was also significantly different between patients with CD4+ counts of 200-349 cells/mm3 (3.3%) and >350 cells/mm3 (2.8%) compared with patients with CD4+ counts of50-199 cells/mm3 (7.1%) (P =0.002 and P =0.005,respectively).The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was significantly different by hepatitis C virus antibody (HCV-Ab) seropositivity (10.2% for HCV-Ab positive vs.3.9% for HCV-Ab negative,P =0.001).We observed differences in prevalence of thrombocytopenia by mode of transmission of HIV infection:Blood transmission (10.7%) versus men who have sex with men (3.9%) (P =0.002) and versus heterosexual transmission (3.9%) (P =0.001).In binary logistic regression analyses,age ≥>50 years,HCV-Ab positivity and having a CD4+ cell count of 50-199 cells/mm3 were significantly associated with thrombocytopenia with adjusted odds ratio of 2.482 (95% confidence interval [CI]:1.167,5.281,P=0

  16. [An interdisciplinary approach to complex orthodontic-periodontal clinical situations in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetu, Irina; Ogodescu, Emilia; Zetu, L; Stratul, S I; Rusu, D; Talpoş, S; Ogodescu, A

    2011-01-01

    Between orthodontics and periodontology there are many correlations, especially in the treatment of adults with already-damaged periodontal tissues and malocclusions. Aim of this paper was to emphasize that an interdisciplinary periodontal-orthodontic treatment could be beneficial even in a case that seemed hopelessly. A typical case of an adult patient with extensive bone loss due to periodontal disease, occlusal trauma caused by dental malpositions, spacing due to early loss of teeth in the lateral segments and pathologic tooth migration will be presented. The orthodontic treatment was initiated at 3 months after the stabilization of the periodontal therapy and was done with a fixed appliance. During the orthodontic stage periodontal maintenance visits continued at 2-month intervals. The therapy of"black triangles" occurred due to the loss of interdental gingiva was done by stripping followed by a space-closure procedure. A permanent retainer was applied. Benefits and problems of the comprehensive periodontal-orthodontic therapy and treatment protocols will be presented. In conclusion the interdisciplinary therapy of this patient, with a good compliance, was beneficial, improved esthetics, the periodontal status, the ability of the patient to clean the teeth and also led to best position of the abutments for optimal placement of prosthetic reconstructions.

  17. Systematic review of transition from adolescent to adult care in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lanetta; Swerdlow, Paul; Coates, Thomas D

    2013-04-01

    Awareness and practice of appropriate treatment for childhood sickle cell disease (SCD) has improved, and survival rates have increased significantly. Today, most patients will eventually require treatment in the adult-care setting. Adolescents who are transferred out from successful pediatric programs face numerous challenges regarding continuity of care, and mortality rates remain high in this age group. Here, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to examine the barriers to and approaches for successful transition of patients with SCD from adolescent to adult care. Articles were primarily located through the US National Library of Medicine (Pubmed.gov) and were omitted if their principal focus was not SCD transition treatment. A secondary search of 5 additional sources was conducted regarding relevant guidelines or meta-analyses. Current publications describe barriers to continuity of care in this group, proposals for improving the transition process, and contemporary models for SCD care transition. Clinical recommendations include development of a flexible, patient-centric transition plan and education for health care providers.

  18. Ethical issues of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult thalassemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Eugenia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta thalassemia major is a severe inherited form of hemolytic anemia that results from ineffective erythropoiesis. Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the only potentially curative therapy. Unfortunately, the subgroup of adult thalassemia patients with hepatomegaly, portal fibrosis and a history of irregular iron chelation have an elevated risk for transplantation-related mortality that is currently estimated to be about 29 percent. Discussion Thalassemia patients may be faced with a difficult choice: they can either continue conventional transfusion and iron chelation therapy or accept the high mortality risk of HSCT in the hope of obtaining complete recovery. Throughout the decision making process, every effort should be made to sustain and enhance autonomous choice. The concept of conscious consent becomes particularly important. The patient must be made fully aware of the favourable and adverse outcomes of HSCT. Although it is the physician's duty to illustrate the possibility of completely restoring health, considerable emphasis should be put on the adverse effects of the procedure. The physician also needs to decide whether the patient is eligible for HSCT according to the "rule of descending order". The patient must be given full details on self-care and fundamental lifestyle changes and be fully aware that he/she will be partly responsible for the outcome. Summary Only if all the aforesaid conditions are satisfied can it be considered reasonable to propose unrelated HSCT as a potential cure for high risk thalassemia patients.

  19. The Neuropsychological Course of Acute Delirium in Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beglinger, Leigh J.; Mills, James A.; Vik, Stacie M.; Duff, Kevin; Denburg, Natalie L.; Weckmann, Michelle T.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Gingrich, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Although delirium is a common medical comorbidity with altered cognition as its defining feature, few publications have addressed the neuropsychological prodrome, profile, and recovery of patients tested during delirium. We characterize neuropsychological performance in 54 hemapoietic stem cell/bone marrow transplantation (BMT) patients shortly before, during, and after delirium and in BMT patients without delirium and 10 healthy adults. Patients were assessed prospectively before and after transplantation using a brief battery. BMT patients with delirium performed more poorly than comparisons and those without delirium on cross-sectional and trend analyses. Deficits were in expected areas of attention and memory, but also in psychomotor speed and learning. The patients with delirium did not return to normative “average” on any test during observation. Most tests showed a mild decline in the visit before delirium, a sharp decline with delirium onset, and variable performance in the following days. This study adds to the few investigations of neuropsychological performance surrounding delirium and provides targets for monitoring and early detection; Trails A and B, RBANS Coding, and List Recall may be useful for delirium assessment. PMID:21183605

  20. Disseminated tuberculosis following reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation for adult patients with hematological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, T; Kusumi, E; Kami, M; Kawabata, M; Le Pavoux, A; Hara, S; Chizuka, A; Murashige, N; Tanimoto, T E; Matsumura, T; Yuji, K; Yuji, Ko; Wake, A; Miyakoshi, S; Morinaga, S; Taniguchi, S

    2005-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) recipients are prone to infections. The incidences of mycobacterial infections after allo-SCT in several case series vary from less than 0.1-5.5%. However, no study has been published on tuberculosis following unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT). We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 113 adult patients with a median age of 54 years who underwent reduced-intensity UCBT (RI-UCBT) at Toranomon Hospital from March 2002 to May 2004. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections were diagnosed in three patients (2.7%), of these two patients developed primary infection and one patient developed reactivation of latent tuberculosis. The interval between RI-UCBT and the diagnosis of tuberculosis was 34, 41 and 61 days. All the patients had disseminated disease at diagnosis. Histological examination showed the lack of granuloma in caseous necrosis. Combination antituberculous treatments showed limited efficacy, and two patients died immediately after diagnosis. M. tuberculosis caused life-threatening illness, rapidly progressing in RI-UCBT recipients. The lack of granuloma in caseous necrosis suggests the impaired T-cell function in early post transplant phase of RI-UCBT. We should consider M. tuberculosis in the differential diagnoses of fever of unknown source after RI-UCBT.

  1. A Systematic Review of Psychological Interventions for Adult and Pediatric Patients with Vocal Cord Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loveleen eGuglani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD or Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion (PVFM is a functional disorder of the vocal cords that requires multidisciplinary treatment. Besides relaxation techniques, the use of psychological interventions can help treat the underlying psychological co-morbidities. There is currently no literature that examines the effectiveness of psychological interventions for VCD/PVFM. Objectives: To review the evidence for psychological interventions used for the treatment of patients with VCD/PVFM. Data Sources: We searched electronic databases for English medical literature using Pubmed (Medline, PsycInfo, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials and Clinicaltrials.gov. The date range for our search is from July 1963 to July 2013. Study Eligibility Criteria, Participants and Interventions: We included studies that reported the use of psychological interventions in both adults and children diagnosed with VCD/PVFM. We included randomized controlled trials, case-control studies, retrospective chart reviews, prospective case series, and individual case reports. Results: Most reported studies are small case series or individual case reports that have described the use of interventions such as psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, use of anti-anxiety and anti-depressant medications, and hypnotherapy in conjunction with breathing exercises taught by speech therapists for symptomatic relief. Among the various psychological interventions that have been reported, there is no data regarding effectiveness and/or superiority of one approach over another in either adult or pediatric patients. Conclusions: Psychological interventions have a role to play in the management of adult and pediatric patients with VCD/PVFM. Future prospective studies using uniform approaches for treatment of associated psychopathology may help address this question. Systematic Review Registration Number: CRD42013004873

  2. Cleft palate and ADULT phenotype in a patient with a novel TP63 mutation suggests lumping of EEC/LM/ADULT syndromes into a unique entity: ELA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Paolo; Garelli, Emanuela; Isidori, Ilenia; Mencarelli, Amedea; Carando, Adriana; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Donti, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    Acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome is a rare condition belonging to the group of ectodermal dysplasias caused by TP63 mutations. Its clinical phenotype is similar to ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (EEC) and limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), and differs from these disorders mainly by the absence of cleft lip and/or palate. We report on a 39-year-old patient who was found to be heterozygous for a c.401G > T (p.Gly134Val) de novo mutation of TP63. This patient had the ADULT phenotype associated with cleft palate. Our findings, rather than extend the clinical spectrum of ADULT syndrome, suggest that cleft palate can no longer be considered an element for differential diagnosis for ADULT, EEC, and LMS. Our data, added to other reports on overlapping phenotypes, support the combining of these three phenotypes into a unique entity that we propose to call "ELA syndrome," which is an acronym of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate, limb-mammary, and ADULT syndromes.

  3. The experience of specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa: A qualitative study from adult patients' perspectives.

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    Smith, Vivien; Chouliara, Zoe; Morris, Paul G; Collin, Paula; Power, Kevin; Yellowlees, Alex; Grierson, David; Papageorgiou, Elena; Cook, Moira

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore experiences of women currently undergoing specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa. Interviews were carried out with 21 women with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa from a specialist adult inpatient eating disorder unit. Five master themes emerged using thematic analysis: (1) shifts in control, (2) experience of transition, (3) importance of supportive staff relationships, (4) sharing with peers and (5) process of recovery and self-discovery. Findings suggest that patients experience a process of change and adjustment in relation to levels of perceived personal control, attachment to the treatment environment and a sense of self-identity.

  4. STUDY ON THE CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ADULT PATIENTS WITH KETOSISONSET DIABETES

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    叶新华; 成金罗

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the classification and analyze the clinical characteristics of adult diabetic patients with ketosis as initial manifestation.Methods 142 cases with initial onset of ketosis were retrospectively analyzed and the levels of blood lipid,random blood glucose,glycosylated hemoglobin,islet function and islet autoantibody[insulin autoantibody (IAA) ,glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA) ]were measured.The blood pressure and family history of diabetes were also documented.Based on the presence of islet autoantibodies (A+or

  5. Surgical correction of class II skeletal malocclusion in an adult patient

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    Ramakrishnan Balachander

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Correction of skeletal deformities in adult patients with orthodontics is limited. Orthognathic surgery is the best option for cases when camouflage treatment is questionable and growth modulation is not possible. This case report illustrates the benefit of the team approach in correcting vertical maxillary excess along with class II skeletal deformity. A cosmetic correction was achieved by superior repositioning of maxilla with LeFort I osteotomy and augmentation genioplasty, along with orthodontic treatment. The patient′s facial appearance was markedly improved along with functional and stable occlusion

  6. Traumatic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation associated with C2 articular facet fracture in adult patient: Case report

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    Mehdi Bellil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation is a very rare injury in adults which is often misdiagnosed initially. Its combination with C2 fractures is predominated by dens lesions. Therapeutic management is challenging because of the difficulty to achieve optimal reduction and permanent stability. We report a rare case of traumatic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation in a 56-year-old women associated with C2 articular facet fracture successfully treated by conservative means after patient-awake manual reduction with optimal functional and radiographic outcome.

  7. Prevalence of thyroid disorders and metabolic syndrome in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    B. Siddhartha Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA and hypothyroidism is important as both these conditions are associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS which in turn makes the patients more prone for cardiovascular disease. Material and methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prevalence of thyroid disorders and MetS were studied in 54 consecutive adult patients with RA (mean age 46.0±10.4 years; 48 females and 54 age - and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Results: The prevalence of thyroid disorders was higher in patients with RA than in control subjects; however, this difference was not statistically significant [19/54 (35.2% Vs 12/54 (22.2%; p=0.201]. Nine patients with RA already known to have hypothyroidism were receiving levothyroxine treatment. Among the remaining RA patients (n=45, a significantly higher prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD (10/45 Vs 4/54;  2=4.437, p=0.045 and subclinical hypothyroidism with anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibody positivity (4/45 Vs 0/54;  2=5.002, p=0.040 were observed compared with healthy control subjects. The prevalence of MetS was higher in patients with RA than in control subjects; however, this difference was not statistically significant [31/54 (57.4% Vs 25/54 (46.3%; p=0.336]. Conclusions: A significantly higher prevalence of AITD and subclinical hypothyroidism with anti-TPO antibody positivity in patients with RA suggests that these patients would benefit from screening for AITD. The co-existence of hypothyroidism and RA reiterates the need for monitoring and early identification of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with RA.

  8. Identifying Adult Dengue Patients at Low Risk for Clinically Significant Bleeding.

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    Joshua G X Wong

    Full Text Available Clinically significant bleeding is important for subsequent optimal case management in dengue patients, but most studies have focused on dengue severity as an outcome. Our study objective was to identify differences in admission parameters between patients who developed clinically significant bleeding and those that did not. We sought to develop a model for discriminating between these patients.We conducted a retrospective study of 4,383 adults aged >18 years who were hospitalized with dengue infection at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 2005 to 2008. Patients were divided into those with clinically significant bleeding (n = 188, and those without (n = 4,195. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables on admission were compared between groups to determine factors associated with clinically significant bleeding during hospitalization.On admission, female gender (p38°C (p38°C (aOR 1.81; 95% CI: 1.27-2.61, nausea/vomiting (aOR 1.39; 95% CI: 0.94-2.12, ANC (aOR 1.3; 95% CI: 1.15-1.46, ALC (aOR 0.4; 95% CI: 0.25-0.64, hematocrit percentage (aOR 0.96; 95% CI: 0.92-1.002 and platelet count (aOR 0.993; 95% CI: 0.988-0.998. At the cutoff of -3.919, the model achieved an AUC of 0.758 (sensitivity:0.87, specificity: 0.38, PPV: 0.06, NPV: 0.98.Clinical risk factors associated with clinically significant bleeding were identified. This model may be useful to complement clinical judgement in triaging adult dengue patients given the dynamic nature of acute dengue, particularly in pre-identifying those less likely to develop clinically significant bleeding.

  9. The impact of patient self assessment of deformity on HRQL in adults with scoliosis

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    Moss Nathan D

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body image and HRQL are significant issues for patients with scoliosis due to cosmetic deformity, physical and psychological symptoms, and treatment factors. A selective review of scoliosis literature revealed that self report measures of body image and HRQL share unreliable correlations with radiographic measures and clinician recommendations for surgery. However, current body image and HRQL measures do not indicate which aspects of scoliosis deformity are the most distressing for patients. The WRVAS is an instrument designed to evaluate patient self assessment of deformity, and may show some promise in identifying aspects of deformity most troubling to patients. Previous research on adolescents with scoliosis supports the use of the WRVAS as a clinical tool, as the instrument shares strong correlations with radiographic measures and quality of life instruments. There has been limited use of this instrument on adult populations. Methods The WRVAS and the SF-36v2, a HRQL measure, were administered to 71 adults with scoliosis, along with a form to report age and gender. Preliminary validation analyses were performed on the WRVAS (floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency and collinearity, correlations with the SF-36v2, and multiple regression with the WRVAS total score as the predictor, and SF-36v2 scores as outcomes. Results The psychometric properties of the WRVAS were acceptable. Older participants perceived their deformities as more severe than younger participants. More severe deformities were associated with lower scores on the Physical Component Summary Score of the SF-36v2. Total WRVAS score also predicted Physical Component Summary scores. Conclusion The results of the current study indicate that the WRVAS is a reliable tool to use with adult patients, and that patient self assessment of deformity shared a relationship with physical rather than psychological aspects of HRQL. The current and previous studies

  10. Psychometric Assessment of a Physician-Patient Communication Behaviors Scale: The Perspective of Adult HIV Patients in Kenya

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    Juddy Wachira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There have been no scales specifically developed to assess physician-patient communication behaviors (PPCB in the sub-Saharan population. Aim. We revised an existing PPCB scale and tested its psychometric properties for HIV patients in Kenya. Methods. 17 items (five-point scale measuring PPCB were initially adopted from the Matched Pair Instrument (MPI. Between July and August 2011, we surveyed a convenient sample of 400 HIV adult patients, attending three Academic Model Providing Healthcare program (AMPATH clinics in Eldoret, Kenya. Of these 400, eight also participated in cognitive interviews, and 200 were invited to return after one week for follow-up interviews; 134 (67% returned and were interviewed. Construct and content validity were established using an exploratory factor analysis, bivariate analyses, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and cognitive interviews. Results. Construct and content validity supported a one-dimensional measure of 13 PPCB items. Items assessed physicians’ effort to promote a favorable atmosphere for interaction with HIV patients. Biases associated with encoding and comprehension of specific terms, such as “discussion, involvement or concerns,” were noted. Internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = .81 and one-week retest reliability scores (.82 supported the reliability of the 13-item scale. Discussion. The revised PPCB scale showed acceptable validity and reliability in Kenya.

  11. Optimal management of venous thromboembolism in adolescent and young adult oncology patients

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    McKillop S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarah McKillop,1 Cynthia Wu,2 Aisha Bruce,1 Joseph Brandwein2 1Division of Immunology, Hematology, Oncology, Palliative Care and Environmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, 2Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a serious complication experienced by adolescents and young adults (AYAs diagnosed with cancer. Data exist in the adult literature to guide the management of cancer-associated thrombosis. Unfortunately, little is known regarding the epidemiology of cancer-associated thrombosis in AYAs. As a result, evidence on the treatment and prevention of thrombosis in this vulnerable population is lacking, posing a great challenge to physicians caring for AYAs with cancer. It is clear that the basic principles of VTE likely apply to AYAs and that low-molecular-weight heparin is the drug of choice for the treatment of VTE regardless of age. We review the available data on the epidemiology, diagnostic methods, and management of AYAs with cancer and VTE. Recognizing the lack of accepted guidelines for the prevention or management of VTE in this population, we offer expert opinion recommendations to serve as guidance to improve management of thrombosis in AYA cancer patients. Keywords: adolescents, young adults, thrombosis, cancer, venous thromboembolism, anticoagulation

  12. Functional MRI evidence for language plasticity in adult epileptic patients: Preliminary results

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    Emilie Cousin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Emilie Cousin1, Monica Baciu1, Cédric Pichat1, Philippe Kahane2, Jean-François Le Bas31UMR CNRS/UPMF 5105, Laboratoire de Psychologie et Neurocognition; 2Laboratoire de Neurophysiopathologie de l’Epilepsie, CHU Grenoble; 3Unité IRM, CHU Grenoble, FranceAbstract: The present fMRI study explores the cerebral reorganisation of language in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, according to the age of seizures onset (early or late and the hippocampal sclerosis (associated or not. Seven right-handed control volunteers and seven preoperative adult epileptic patients performed a rhyme decision (language condition and a visual detection (control condition tasks in visually presented words and unreadable characters, respectively. All patients were left hemisphere dominant for language. Appropriate statistical analyses provided the following preliminary results: (1 patients compared with healthy subjects showed lower degree of hemispheric lateralization with supplementary involvement of the right hemisphere; (2 the degree of hemispheric specialization depends on the considered region; (3 patients with early seizures show signs of temporal and parietal reorganization more frequently than patients with late onset of seizures; (4 patients with early seizures show a tendency for intra-hemispheric frontal reorganisation; (5 associated hippocampal sclerosis facilitates the inter-hemispheric shift of temporal activation. Although our patients were left hemisphere predominant for language, the statistical analyses indicated that the degree of lateralization was significantly lower than in healthy subjects. This result has been considered as the indication of atypical lateralization of language.Keywords: language, fMRI, plasticity, temporal epilepsy, age, hippocampal sclerosis

  13. Risk factors for pressure sores in adult patients with myelomeningocele – a questionnaire-based study

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    Frøslie Kathrine

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelomeningocele (MMC is a part of a complex neural tube defect and a disorder of the cerebrospinal fluid system. Pressure sores are a frequent complication for patients with MMC. Little is known about the risk factors for pressure sores in adults with MMC. The aim of this study was to investigate an association between the presence of pressure sores and other patient characteristics, in order to develop an improved strategy for the management of sores. Methods A structured questionnaire regarding sores, medical condition, function and living factors was designed and sent to the 193 patients with MMC registered in the year 2003 at TRS, a National Centre for Rare Disorders in Norway. Results Out of 193 total, 87 patients participated and 71 patients (82% reported sores; 26 (30% at the time of the interview and 45 (52% during the last 5 years. Sores were mostly localized on toes and feet and occurred exclusively in regions with reduced or missing sensibility. A significant association was found between sores and memory deficit (p = 0.02, Arnold Chiari malformation (p = 0.02 and a record of previous sores (p = 0.004. Sores were not significantly associated with hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, nutrition, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, employment or living together with other persons. Some patients (18, 21% reported skin inspection by others and the remainder relied on self-inspection. Conclusion Patients with sensory deficit, memory problems, and Arnold Chiari malformation had a higher risk of having pressure sores. This patient group needs improved skin inspection routines and sore treatment.

  14. Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy for distantly metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in juvenile versus adult patients.

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    Kammori, Makoto; Fukumori, Tatsuya; Sugishita, Yoshiyuki; Hoshi, Masae; Shimizu, Kazuo; Yamada, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    In general, juvenile differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) demonstrate indolent characteristics and favorable prognosis are observed in comparison with many other carcinomas. However, recurrence is frequent, necessitating additional treatment, including radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. In this report, the probability of recurrence, prognostic factors, treatment, and outcomes in both juvenile- and adult-onset DTC were analyzed and compared. At our institution, a total of 1552 DTC patients underwent thyroidectomy and/or lymph node dissection. The patients included 23 in their teens, 118 in their twenties, and 1412 in their thirties or older. The risk factors for distant metastases for DTC were male gender, follicular carcinoma, size of the PTC primary tumor, cervical lymph node metastases from PTC, and the presence of more than two distant metastatic foci. Patients with the highest risk underwent RAI ablation in line with institutional guidelines. Although the overall outcome in our juvenile patients was excellent, during follow-up, 4 (17.4%) of the 23 patients developed recurrent disease: 91.3% achieved complete remission, 4.35% partial remission, and 4.35% stable disease, with no disease-related deaths. Among the 118 patients in their twenties to thirties, 1 (0.8%) experienced progressive disease and disease-related death. A younger age at diagnosis and less radical primary surgery without subsequent RAI ablation are factors strongly predictive of distant metastases in patients with juvenile-onset DTC. To reduce the rate of relapse and improve surveillance for recurrent disease, total thyroidectomy followed by RAI appears to be the most beneficial initial treatment for patients with high- and intermediate-risk juvenile DTC.

  15. Clinical characteristics of adult epilepsy patients in the 1997 Hong Kong epilepsy registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics of 2952 patients with epilepsy who had received drug treatment from the neurology outpatient clinics of eight major hospitals in Hong Kong. Methods Retrospective review of outpatient records. Results 1601 (54.3%) males and 1351 (45.7%) females with a median age of 35.8 years (range, 10-94.8) were studied. Seizure types included generalized tonic-clonic in 80.7% of patients, complex partial in 28.3%, simple partial in 14.4%, atypical absence in 2.6% and myoclonic in 1.4%, and 30.4% of patients had more than one seizure type. EEG, CT brain, MRI brain and neuropsychological evaluation were obtained in 81.2%, 61.7%, 17.0% and 2.2% of patients, respectively. The etiology of epilepsy was cryptogenic in 59.9%, symptomatic in 35.1% and idiopathic in 3.9%; the commonest were intracranial infection, cerebral vascular disease, cranial trauma and perinatal insult. Phenytoin, carbamazepine and valproate were the most frequently used drugs and 25.9% of patients were taking more than two drugs. 48.3% of patients had active seizures in the past six months and 26.4% were considered to have unsatisfactory control of their epilepsy. Medical refractoriness of epilepsy was associated with a history of perinatal insult, intracranial infection, congenital brain malformation, intracranial neoplasm, cerebral vascular disease, hippocampal sclerosis, mental retardation and a history of status epilepticus (P<0.05). Conclusion In this local cohort of adult patients with epilepsy under specialist care, there were a considerable number of patients falling into the category of cryptogenic epilepsy. Risk factors associated with medical refractoriness are similar to previous studies.

  16. Acute rheumatic fever in adults: case report together with an analysis of 25 patients with acute rheumatic fever.

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    Kasitanon, Nuntana; Sukitawut, Waraporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2009-07-01

    We reported the oldest acute rheumatic fever (ARF) patient with initial attack at the age of 90 years and experience with ARF in adults in 20 years of observation. The case files of all ARF patients treated by rheumatology unit, Chiang Mai University, were reviewed. Demographic data and clinical profile were recorded and compared between patients with initial attack and patients with recurrent attack. A total of 25 patients with ARF were included. There was no different incidence of arthritis and carditis between two groups. Initial attack patients have higher incidence of prolonged PR-interval (67 vs. 12%, P = 0.049) and longer duration of admission to diagnosis (5 vs. 2 days, P = 0.05). Thirty percent presented initial attack after 30 years of age. ARF is more common in adults than previously recognized. Therefore, clinicians should be aware of this condition and include it in their differential diagnosis of the febrile patients with arthritis.

  17. Blood transcriptomic biomarkers in adult primary care patients with major depressive disorder undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy.

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    Redei, E E; Andrus, B M; Kwasny, M J; Seok, J; Cai, X; Ho, J; Mohr, D C

    2014-09-16

    An objective, laboratory-based diagnostic tool could increase the diagnostic accuracy of major depressive disorders (MDDs), identify factors that characterize patients and promote individualized therapy. The goal of this study was to assess a blood-based biomarker panel, which showed promise in adolescents with MDD, in adult primary care patients with MDD and age-, gender- and race-matched nondepressed (ND) controls. Patients with MDD received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and clinical assessment using self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The measures, including blood RNA collection, were obtained before and after 18 weeks of CBT. Blood transcript levels of nine markers of ADCY3, DGKA, FAM46A, IGSF4A/CADM1, KIAA1539, MARCKS, PSME1, RAPH1 and TLR7, differed significantly between participants with MDD (N=32) and ND controls (N=32) at baseline (qdepressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals.

  18. Autoantibodies in adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in Buenos Aires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Graciela N; Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Pérez, Nicolás; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena V; Khoury, Marina; Sarano, Judith F

    2016-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies(IIM) are a heterogeneous group of diseases of the skeletal muscle. On the basis of clinical, serologic and histological differences, they are classified in dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis and immunomediated necrotizing myopathy. Autoantibodies directed against nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens are present with variable frequencies among studies. Myositis-specific antibodies (MSAs) are useful in IIM because they contribute to the diagnosis, help to identify different clinical subsets, and have prognostic value. This study aimed to explore the frequency of autoantibodies, especially MSAs, and their relationship with clinical features in adult patients with DM, PM and overlap syndrome. Medical records were reviewed. Myositis-associated antibodies (non-specific) and MSAs (anti Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, Mi-2 and SRP) were measured using commercial kits. Twelve patients had MSAs, an overall frequency similar to those of international series, but PL-12 and Mi-2 were more frequent than Jo-1, which is the most frequently observed elsewhere. All five patients with Mi-2 had classical DM with a favorable response to treatment. Interstitial pneumonia (n: 4) and/or treatment-refractory disease (n: 3) were found in the presence of anti-PL-12, alone or associated with anti-SRP and/or Jo-1. In conclusion, the coexistence of AEM, a rare finding, was found in three patients. The presence of MSAs aided to the diagnosis of IIM, in particular in those patients without available or conclusive biopsy results.

  19. Multicenter study on adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing-min; Gu, Jian-wen; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Xia, Xun; Yang, Tao; Lu, Min; He, Wei-qi; Sun, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Yan-chao

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients of multi-centers, and explore the change of hypophyseal hormones in postoperative pituitary tumor patients. Sixty patients with pituitary tumor admitted during March, 2011-March, 2012 were selected. Postoperative hypophyseal hormone deficiency and the change of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative growth hormone levels were recorded. Growth hormone hypofunction was the most common hormonal hypofunction, which took up to 85.0 %. Adrenocortical hormone hypofunction was next to it and accounted for 58.33 %. GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn deficiency was the most common in postoperative hormone deficiency, which took up to 40.00 %, and GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn + AVP and GH deficiencies were next to it and accounted for 23.33 and 16.67 %, respectively. The hormone levels in patients after total pituitary tumor resection were significantly lower than those after partial pituitary tumor resection, and the difference was statistically significant; growth hormone and serum prolactin levels after surgery in two groups were decreased, and the difference was statistically significant. The incidence rate of growth hormone deficiency in postoperative pituitary tumor patients is high, which is usually complicated with deficiency of various hypophyseal hormones. In clinical, we should pay attention to the levels of the hypopnyseal hormones, and take timely measures to avoid postoperative complications.

  20. Incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 complications among Saudi adult patients at primary health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsenany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed type 2 diabetes and its role in complications among adult Saudi patients. [Subjects] Patients attending four primary health care centers in Jeddah were enrolled. [Methods] A cross-sectional design study among Saudi patients attending Ministry of Health primary health care centers in Jeddah was selected for use by the Primary Health Care administration. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires to determine the presence of diabetes and risk factors using questions about the history of any disease. [Results] Diabetes mellitus was present in 234 subjects during the data collection period (March-June 2014). Mean patient age was 58 years; diabetes prevalence was 42% in males and 58% in females. The mean age for diabetes onset in males and females was 34 and 39 years, respectively. There was a higher incidence of obesity (75%) associated with a sedentary lifestyle (body mass index ≥25) in females (N= 96; 40%) compared with males (N= 87; 36%). In this study, >44% of individuals aged 55 or older had severe to uncontrolled diabetes with long-term complications. The age-adjusted incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease was 38% and 24%, respectively, showing a clear incidence of diabetes associated with cardiovascular disease in Saudi Arabia. [Conclusion] This study found that a multifactorial approach to managing diabetes complication risks is needed.