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Sample records for adult human phantoms

  1. Development and application of the Chinese adult female computational phantom Rad-HUMAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yican; Cheng, Mengyun; Wang, Wen; Fan, Yanchang; Zhao, Kai; He, Tao; Pei, Xi; Shang, Leiming; Chen, Chaobin; Long, Pengcheng; Cao, Ruifen; Wang, Guozhong; Zhou, Shaoheng; Yu, Shengpeng; Hu, Liqin; Zeng, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Rad-HUMAN is a whole-body numerical phantom of a Chinese adult woman which contains 46 organs and tissues and was created by MCAM6 software using the color photographs of the Chinese Visible Human dataset. This dataset was obtained from a 22-year old Chinese female cadaver judged to represent normal human anatomy as much as possible. The density and elemental composition recommended in the ICRP Publication 89 and in the ICRU report 44 were assigned to the organ and tissue in Rad-HUMAN for radiation protection purpose. The last step was to implement the anatomical data into a Monte Carlo code. Rad-HUMAN contains more than 28.8 billion tiny volume units, which produces an accurately whole-body numerical phantom of a Chinese adult female

  2. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: II. Dosimetric calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, R; Cassola, V F; Khoury, H J [Department of Nuclear Energy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, CEP 50740-540, Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J W [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); De Melo Lima, V J [Department of Anatomy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Robson Brown, K [Imaging Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.br

    2010-01-07

    Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been developed in the first part of this study using 3D animation software and anatomical atlases to replace the image-based FAX06 and the MAX06 voxel phantoms. 3D modelling methods allow for phantom development independent from medical images of patients, volunteers or cadavers. The second part of this study investigates the dosimetric implications for organ and tissue equivalent doses due to the anatomical differences between the new and the old phantoms. These differences are mainly caused by the supine position of human bodies during scanning in order to acquire digital images for voxel phantom development. Compared to an upright standing person, in image-based voxel phantoms organs are often coronally shifted towards the head and sometimes the sagittal diameter of the trunk is reduced by a gravitational change of the fat distribution. In addition, volumes of adipose and muscle tissue shielding internal organs are sometimes too small, because adaptation of organ volumes to ICRP-based organ masses often occurs at the expense of general soft tissues, such as adipose, muscle or unspecified soft tissue. These effects have dosimetric consequences, especially for partial body exposure, such as in x-ray diagnosis, but also for whole body external exposure and for internal exposure. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, internal and external exposure to photons and electrons has been simulated with both pairs of phantoms. The results show differences between organ and tissue equivalent doses for the upright standing FASH/MASH and the image-based supine FAX06/MAX06 phantoms of up to 80% for external exposure and up to 100% for internal exposure. Similar differences were found for external exposure between FASH/MASH and REGINA/REX, the reference voxel phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Comparison of effective doses for external photon

  3. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: II. Dosimetric calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; de Melo Lima, V. J.; Robson Brown, K.

    2010-01-01

    Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been developed in the first part of this study using 3D animation software and anatomical atlases to replace the image-based FAX06 and the MAX06 voxel phantoms. 3D modelling methods allow for phantom development independent from medical images of patients, volunteers or cadavers. The second part of this study investigates the dosimetric implications for organ and tissue equivalent doses due to the anatomical differences between the new and the old phantoms. These differences are mainly caused by the supine position of human bodies during scanning in order to acquire digital images for voxel phantom development. Compared to an upright standing person, in image-based voxel phantoms organs are often coronally shifted towards the head and sometimes the sagittal diameter of the trunk is reduced by a gravitational change of the fat distribution. In addition, volumes of adipose and muscle tissue shielding internal organs are sometimes too small, because adaptation of organ volumes to ICRP-based organ masses often occurs at the expense of general soft tissues, such as adipose, muscle or unspecified soft tissue. These effects have dosimetric consequences, especially for partial body exposure, such as in x-ray diagnosis, but also for whole body external exposure and for internal exposure. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, internal and external exposure to photons and electrons has been simulated with both pairs of phantoms. The results show differences between organ and tissue equivalent doses for the upright standing FASH/MASH and the image-based supine FAX06/MAX06 phantoms of up to 80% for external exposure and up to 100% for internal exposure. Similar differences were found for external exposure between FASH/MASH and REGINA/REX, the reference voxel phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Comparison of effective doses for external photon

  4. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: I. Development of the anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, V. F.; de Melo Lima, V. J.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Among computational models, voxel phantoms based on computer tomographic (CT), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or colour photographic images of patients, volunteers or cadavers have become popular in recent years. Although being true to nature representations of scanned individuals, voxel phantoms have limitations, especially when walled organs have to be segmented or when volumes of organs or body tissues, like adipose, have to be changed. Additionally, the scanning of patients or volunteers is usually made in supine position, which causes a shift of internal organs towards the ribcage, a compression of the lungs and a reduction of the sagittal diameter especially in the abdominal region compared to the regular anatomy of a person in the upright position, which in turn can influence organ and tissue absorbed or equivalent dose estimates. This study applies tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animated films to the creation and modelling of 3D human organs, tissues, skeletons and bodies based on polygon mesh surfaces. Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been designed using software, such as MakeHuman, Blender, Binvox and ImageJ, based on anatomical atlases, observing at the same time organ masses recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the male and female reference adult in report no 89. 113 organs, bones and tissues have been modelled in the FASH and the MASH phantoms representing locations for adults in standing posture. Most organ and tissue masses of the voxelized versions agree with corresponding data from ICRP89 within a margin of 2.6%. Comparison with the mesh-based male RPI_AM and female RPI_AF phantoms shows differences with respect to the material used, to the software and concepts applied, and to the anatomies created.

  5. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: I. Development of the anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassola, V F; Kramer, R; Khoury, H J; De Melo Lima, V J

    2010-01-01

    Among computational models, voxel phantoms based on computer tomographic (CT), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or colour photographic images of patients, volunteers or cadavers have become popular in recent years. Although being true to nature representations of scanned individuals, voxel phantoms have limitations, especially when walled organs have to be segmented or when volumes of organs or body tissues, like adipose, have to be changed. Additionally, the scanning of patients or volunteers is usually made in supine position, which causes a shift of internal organs towards the ribcage, a compression of the lungs and a reduction of the sagittal diameter especially in the abdominal region compared to the regular anatomy of a person in the upright position, which in turn can influence organ and tissue absorbed or equivalent dose estimates. This study applies tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animated films to the creation and modelling of 3D human organs, tissues, skeletons and bodies based on polygon mesh surfaces. Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been designed using software, such as MakeHuman, Blender, Binvox and ImageJ, based on anatomical atlases, observing at the same time organ masses recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the male and female reference adult in report no 89. 113 organs, bones and tissues have been modelled in the FASH and the MASH phantoms representing locations for adults in standing posture. Most organ and tissue masses of the voxelized versions agree with corresponding data from ICRP89 within a margin of 2.6%. Comparison with the mesh-based male RPI A M and female RPI A F phantoms shows differences with respect to the material used, to the software and concepts applied, and to the anatomies created.

  6. Construction of average adult Japanese voxel phantoms for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira

    2011-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted the adult reference voxel phantoms based on the physiological and anatomical reference data of Caucasian on October, 2007. The organs and tissues of these phantoms were segmented on the basis of ICRP Publication 103. In future, the dose coefficients for internal dose and dose conversion coefficients for external dose calculated using the adult reference voxel phantoms will be widely used for the radiation protection fields. On the other hand, the body sizes and organ masses of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasian. In addition, there are some cases that the anatomical characteristics such as body sizes, organ masses and postures of subjects influence the organ doses in dose assessment for medical treatments and radiation accident. Therefore, it was needed to use human phantoms with average anatomical characteristics of Japanese. The authors constructed the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms by modifying the previously developed high-resolution adult male (JM) and female (JF) voxel phantoms. It has been modified in the following three aspects: (1) The heights and weights were agreed with the Japanese averages; (2) The masses of organs and tissues were adjusted to the Japanese averages within 10%; (3) The organs and tissues, which were newly added for evaluation of the effective dose in ICRP Publication 103, were modeled. In this study, the organ masses, distances between organs, specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and dose conversion coefficients of these phantoms were compared with those evaluated using the ICRP adult reference voxel phantoms. This report provides valuable information on the anatomical and dosimetric characteristics of the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms developed as reference phantoms of adult Japanese. (author)

  7. The Japanese adult, child and infant phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, Mark; Egbert, Stephen D.

    1987-01-01

    The mathematical phantom for adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors is a modification of the 57-kg ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) phantom for Western 15-year-old males and adult females. For younger Japanese survivors mathematical phantoms were similarly modified from the 18 and 9 kg ORNL phantoms for Western 5- and 1-year-olds, respectively. To make the phantom correspond more closely with dimensions and organ sizes recommended for Japanese adults by Maruyama and coworkers (cf E184), changes were made in the size of the lungs, the pancreas, the thyroid, and the testes and in the length of the legs. Also, the head-and-neck region was modified to improve the dose estimates for the thyroid from external radiation, after the ideas of Nagarajan et al. The arms were separated from the trunk to represent more accurately the shielding by the phantom in external exposures. Furthermore, provisions were made to provide a phantom in a kneeling posture. The elemental composition of the tissues was changed to that given by Kerr. The resulting phantom is slightly smaller in mass (55 kg). Details of these changes are given

  8. Standing adult human phantoms based on 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of male and female Caucasian populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassola, V F; Kramer, R; De Oliveira Lira, C A B; Khoury, H J [Department of Nuclear Energy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire, 1000, CEP 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Milian, F M, E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.br [Department of Exact Science and Technology, State University of Santa Cruz, Campus Soane Nazare de Andrade, Km 16 Rodovia Ilheus-Itabuna, CEP 45662-000, Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2011-07-07

    Computational anthropomorphic human phantoms are useful tools developed for the calculation of absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues of the human body. The problem is, however, that, strictly speaking, the results can be applied only to a person who has the same anatomy as the phantom, while for a person with different body mass and/or standing height the data could be wrong. In order to improve this situation for many areas in radiological protection, this study developed 18 anthropometric standing adult human phantoms, nine models per gender, as a function of the 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of Caucasian populations. The anthropometric target parameters for body mass, standing height and other body measures were extracted from PeopleSize, a well-known software package used in the area of ergonomics. The phantoms were developed based on the assumption of a constant body-mass index for a given mass percentile and for different heights. For a given height, increase or decrease of body mass was considered to reflect mainly the change of subcutaneous adipose tissue mass, i.e. that organ masses were not changed. Organ mass scaling as a function of height was based on information extracted from autopsy data. The methods used here were compared with those used in other studies, anatomically as well as dosimetrically. For external exposure, the results show that equivalent dose decreases with increasing body mass for organs and tissues located below the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer, such as liver, colon, stomach, etc, while for organs located at the surface, such as breasts, testes and skin, the equivalent dose increases or remains constant with increasing body mass due to weak attenuation and more scatter radiation caused by the increasing adipose tissue mass. Changes of standing height have little influence on the equivalent dose to organs and tissues from external exposure. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have also

  9. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Tunja 15001000 (Colombia); Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47012 Valladolid (Spain) and Departamento de Radiologia, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid E-47071 (Spain); CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid, E-28040 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, Granada E-18071 (Spain)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to {mu}Gy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. Methods: MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Results: Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 {mu}SvMU{sup -1} were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in

  10. Code system to compute radiation dose in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Davis, J.L.; Tang, J.S.; Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo photon transport code and a code using Monte Carlo integration of a point kernel have been revised to incorporate human phantom models for an adult female, juveniles of various ages, and a pregnant female at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy, in addition to the adult male used earlier. An analysis code has been developed for deriving recommended values of specific absorbed fractions of photon energy. The computer code system and calculational method are described, emphasizing recent improvements in methods

  11. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  12. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  13. Composition of MRI phantom equivalent to human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Shibuya, Koichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-01-01

    We previously developed two new MRI phantoms (called the CAG phantom and the CAGN phantom), with T1 and T2 relaxation times equivalent to those of any human tissue at 1.5 T. The conductivity of the CAGN phantom is equivalent to that of most types of human tissue in the frequency range of 1 to 130 MHz. In this paper, the relaxation times of human tissues are summarized, and the composition of the corresponding phantoms are provided in table form. The ingredients of these phantoms are carrageenan as the gelling agent, GdCl 3 as a T1 modifier, agarose as a T2 modifier, NaCl (CAGN phantom only) as a conductivity modifier, NaN 3 as an antiseptic, and distilled water. The phantoms have T1 values of 202-1904 ms and T2 values of 38-423 ms when the concentrations of GdCl 3 and agarose are varied from 0-140 μmol/kg, and 0%-1.6%, respectively, and the CAGN phantom has a conductivity of 0.27-1.26 S/m when the NaCl concentration is varied from 0%-0.7%. These phantoms have sufficient strength to replicate a torso without the use of reinforcing agents, and can be cut by a knife into any shape. We anticipate the CAGN phantom to be highly useful and practical for MRI and hyperthermia-related research

  14. Construction of Chinese adult male phantom library and its application in the virtual calibration of in vivo measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yizheng; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Junli

    2016-01-01

    In vivo measurement is a main method of internal contamination evaluation, particularly for large numbers of people after a nuclear accident. Before the practical application, it is necessary to obtain the counting efficiency of the detector by calibration. The virtual calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation usually uses the reference human computational phantom, and the morphological difference between the monitored personnel with the calibrated phantom may lead to the deviation of the counting efficiency. Therefore, a phantom library containing a wide range of heights and total body masses is needed. In this study, a Chinese reference adult male polygon surface (CRAM-S) phantom was constructed based on the CRAM voxel phantom, with the organ models adjusted to match the Chinese reference data. CRAM-S phantom was then transformed to sitting posture for convenience in practical monitoring. Referring to the mass and height distribution of the Chinese adult male, a phantom library containing 84 phantoms was constructed by deforming the reference surface phantom. Phantoms in the library have 7 different heights ranging from 155 cm to 185 cm, and there are 12 phantoms with different total body masses in each height. As an example of application, organ specific and total counting efficiencies of Ba-133 were calculated using the MCNPX code, with two series of phantoms selected from the library. The influence of morphological variation on the counting efficiency was analyzed. The results show only using the reference phantom in virtual calibration may lead to an error of 68.9% for total counting efficiency. Thus the influence of morphological difference on virtual calibration can be greatly reduced using the phantom library with a wide range of masses and heights instead of a single reference phantom. (paper)

  15. Construction of Chinese adult male phantom library and its application in the virtual calibration of in vivo measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizheng; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Junli

    2016-03-01

    In vivo measurement is a main method of internal contamination evaluation, particularly for large numbers of people after a nuclear accident. Before the practical application, it is necessary to obtain the counting efficiency of the detector by calibration. The virtual calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation usually uses the reference human computational phantom, and the morphological difference between the monitored personnel with the calibrated phantom may lead to the deviation of the counting efficiency. Therefore, a phantom library containing a wide range of heights and total body masses is needed. In this study, a Chinese reference adult male polygon surface (CRAM_S) phantom was constructed based on the CRAM voxel phantom, with the organ models adjusted to match the Chinese reference data. CRAMS phantom was then transformed to sitting posture for convenience in practical monitoring. Referring to the mass and height distribution of the Chinese adult male, a phantom library containing 84 phantoms was constructed by deforming the reference surface phantom. Phantoms in the library have 7 different heights ranging from 155 cm to 185 cm, and there are 12 phantoms with different total body masses in each height. As an example of application, organ specific and total counting efficiencies of Ba-133 were calculated using the MCNPX code, with two series of phantoms selected from the library. The influence of morphological variation on the counting efficiency was analyzed. The results show only using the reference phantom in virtual calibration may lead to an error of 68.9% for total counting efficiency. Thus the influence of morphological difference on virtual calibration can be greatly reduced using the phantom library with a wide range of masses and heights instead of a single reference phantom.

  16. Mathematical human phantoms and their application to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    This review described the characteristics of mathematical phantoms, their history over 30 years and their application. Mathematical phantoms are classified into two models of formula and voxel types. In the former, human body and organs are described by 2- and/or 3-D mathematical formula and can be seen as a combination of solid bodies like spheres, cubes and ovals. The phantom is composed from three tissue components (bone, lung and soft tissue) and made on data on Reference Man in ICRP Publ. 23. The latter voxel (volume pixel) phantom consists from a number of small cubes based on CT and MRI images of a certain man. For instance, the phantom CHILD, 1.54 x 1.54 x 8.00 mm 3 in size, is based on a 7-year old child, which consisting from about one million voxels. The mathematical phantom was first made in Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the middle of the nineteen-sixties, which have undergone various improvements to reach MIRD-5 phantom. Thereafter, many similitude phantoms have been made as a variation of MIRD-5, depending on age and sex (e.g., ADAM and EVA). Voxel phantom was made in the middle of nineteen-eighties and have undergone improvements which are continued even currently in Japan, U.S. etc. The mathematical phantoms are used for calculation of radiation transport program by Monte Carlo method in the field of radiation protection. Also in the field of medicine, the phantom is used for calculation of internal and external exposure doses, of correction constants of externally measuring instruments, of doses for neutron capture therapy and of A-bomb exposure doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for reevaluation. Recently, the development of phantom is in the current from formula phantom to voxel one due to the purpose of precision and standardization. (K.H.)

  17. Mathematical phantom of Indian adult for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, S.C.; Tyagi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Various countries have either developed or are in process of developing their own reference man for radiation protection purposes. Efforts are made to develop Indian Reference Man, especially by scientific groups at DRDO and BARC. The proposed mathematical phantom of Indian adult will be useful for estimation of radiation dose to various organs from radiation sources from external as well as internal, and compute the effective dose

  18. All about FAX: a Female Adult voXel phantom for Monte Carlo calculation in radiation protection dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R; Khoury, H J; Vieira, J W; Loureiro, E C M; Lima, V J M; Lima, F R A; Hoff, G

    2004-12-07

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has created a task group on dose calculations, which, among other objectives, should replace the currently used mathematical MIRD phantoms by voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms are based on digital images recorded from scanning of real persons by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared to the mathematical MIRD phantoms, voxel phantoms are true to the natural representations of a human body. Connected to a radiation transport code, voxel phantoms serve as virtual humans for which equivalent dose to organs and tissues from exposure to ionizing radiation can be calculated. The principal database for the construction of the FAX (Female Adult voXel) phantom consisted of 151 CT images recorded from scanning of trunk and head of a female patient, whose body weight and height were close to the corresponding data recommended by the ICRP in Publication 89. All 22 organs and tissues at risk, except for the red bone marrow and the osteogenic cells on the endosteal surface of bone ('bone surface'), have been segmented manually with a technique recently developed at the Departamento de Energia Nuclear of the UFPE in Recife, Brazil. After segmentation the volumes of the organs and tissues have been adjusted to agree with the organ and tissue masses recommended by ICRP for the Reference Adult Female in Publication 89. Comparisons have been made with the organ and tissue masses of the mathematical EVA phantom, as well as with the corresponding data for other female voxel phantoms. The three-dimensional matrix of the segmented images has eventually been connected to the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for exposures to photons, and compared to data determined for the mathematical MIRD-type phantoms, as well as for other voxel phantoms.

  19. Chinese reference human voxel phantoms for radiation protection: development, application and recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yuxi; Qiu Rui; Ren Li; Zhu Huanjun; Li Junli; Liu Liye

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the work of constructing Chinese reference human voxel phantoms, taking Chinese reference adult female voxel model for example. In this study, a site-specific skeleton structure was built, some radiation sensitive organs were supplemented. Organ sub-segmentation was taken into account. The constructed phantoms include almost all radiation sensitive organs required by ICRP new recommendation. Masses of the organs are almost consistent with the Chinese reference data within 5%. The Chinese reference human phantoms have been applied both in internal dosimetry and external dosimetry. The results provide fundamental data for Chinese radiation dosimetry. In addition, the newly established detailed breast model and micro-bone model were introduced. (authors)

  20. Specific absorbed fractions of electrons and photons for Rad-HUMAN phantom using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wen; Hu Liqin; Cheng Mengyun; Long Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    The specific absorbed fractions (SAF) for self- and cross-irradiation are effective tools for the internal dose estimation of inhalation and ingestion intakes of radionuclides. A set of SAFs of photons and electrons were calculated using the Rad-HUMAN phantom, which is a computational voxel phantom of a Chinese adult female that was created using the color photographic image of the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) data set by the FDS Team. The model can represent most Chinese adult female anatomical characteristics and can be taken as an individual phantom to investigate the difference of internal dose with Caucasians. In this study, the emission of mono-energetic photons and electrons of 10 keV to 4 MeV energy were calculated using the Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code MCNP. Results were compared with the values from ICRP reference and ORNL models. The results showed that SAF from the Rad-HUMAN have similar trends but are larger than those from the other two models. The differences were due to the racial and anatomical differences in organ mass and inter-organ distance. The SAFs based on the Rad-HUMAN phantom provide an accurate and reliable data for internal radiation dose calculations for Chinese females. (authors)

  1. Adult phantoms as function of body mass, height and posture by using caucasian anthropomorphic statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil; Milian, Felix Mas

    2011-01-01

    The CALLDose X 4.0 computer program uses conversion coefficients for the MASH and FASH adult phantoms on the vertical and supine postures, representing the standard man and woman according to ICRP 90 and are called 'basic phantoms'. For improving the representation of real patients in the CALLDose X , this paper developed adults phantoms as function of mass and height by using anthropometric data from nine of them prevailing caucasian countries

  2. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  3. Hybrid pregnant reference phantom series based on adult female ICRP reference phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafat-Motavalli, Laleh; Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Hoseinian-Azghadi, Elie

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents boundary representation (BREP) models of pregnant female and her fetus at the end of each trimester. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) female reference voxel phantom was used as a base template in development process of the pregnant hybrid phantom series. The differences in shape and location of the displaced maternal organs caused by enlarging uterus were also taken into account. The CT and MR images of fetus specimens and pregnant patients of various ages were used to replace the maternal abdominal pelvic organs of template phantom and insert the fetus inside the gravid uterus. Each fetal model contains 21 different organs and tissues. The skeletal model of the fetus also includes age-dependent cartilaginous and ossified skeletal components. The replaced maternal organ models were converted to NURBS surfaces and then modified to conform to reference values of ICRP Publication 89. The particular feature of current series compared to the previously developed pregnant phantoms is being constructed upon the basis of ICRP reference phantom. The maternal replaced organ models are NURBS surfaces. With this great potential, they might have the feasibility of being converted to high quality polygon mesh phantoms.

  4. Comparison of internal dosimetry factors for three classes of adult computational phantoms with emphasis on I-131 in the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Simon, Steven L; Lee, Choonsik; Bouville, Andre; Eckerman, Keith F; Melo, Dunstana

    2011-01-01

    The S values for 11 major target organs for I-131 in the thyroid were compared for three classes of adult computational human phantoms: stylized, voxel and hybrid phantoms. In addition, we compared specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) with the thyroid as a source region over a broader photon energy range than the x- and gamma-rays of I-131. The S and SAF values were calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms and the University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms by using the Monte Carlo transport method, while the S and SAF values for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) stylized phantoms were obtained from earlier publications. Phantoms in our calculations were for adults of both genders. The 11 target organs and tissues that were selected for the comparison of S values are brain, breast, stomach wall, small intestine wall, colon wall, heart wall, pancreas, salivary glands, thyroid, lungs and active marrow for I-131 and thyroid as a source region. The comparisons showed, in general, an underestimation of S values reported for the stylized phantoms compared to the values based on the ICRP voxel and UF hybrid phantoms and relatively good agreement between the S values obtained for the ICRP and UF phantoms. Substantial differences were observed for some organs between the three types of phantoms. For example, the small intestine wall of ICRP male phantom and heart wall of ICRP female phantom showed up to eightfold and fourfold greater S values, respectively, compared to the reported values for the ORNL phantoms. UF male and female phantoms also showed significant differences compared to the ORNL phantom, 4.0-fold greater for the small intestine wall and 3.3-fold greater for the heart wall. In our method, we directly calculated the S values without using the SAFs as commonly done. Hence, we sought to confirm the differences observed in our S values by comparing the SAFs among the phantoms with the thyroid as a

  5. Comparison of internal dosimetry factors for three classes of adult computational phantoms with emphasis on I-131 in the thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Bouville, Andre; Simon, Steven L.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Melo, Dunstana; Lee, Choonsik

    2011-11-01

    The S values for 11 major target organs for I-131 in the thyroid were compared for three classes of adult computational human phantoms: stylized, voxel and hybrid phantoms. In addition, we compared specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) with the thyroid as a source region over a broader photon energy range than the x- and gamma-rays of I-131. The S and SAF values were calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms and the University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms by using the Monte Carlo transport method, while the S and SAF values for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) stylized phantoms were obtained from earlier publications. Phantoms in our calculations were for adults of both genders. The 11 target organs and tissues that were selected for the comparison of S values are brain, breast, stomach wall, small intestine wall, colon wall, heart wall, pancreas, salivary glands, thyroid, lungs and active marrow for I-131 and thyroid as a source region. The comparisons showed, in general, an underestimation of S values reported for the stylized phantoms compared to the values based on the ICRP voxel and UF hybrid phantoms and relatively good agreement between the S values obtained for the ICRP and UF phantoms. Substantial differences were observed for some organs between the three types of phantoms. For example, the small intestine wall of ICRP male phantom and heart wall of ICRP female phantom showed up to eightfold and fourfold greater S values, respectively, compared to the reported values for the ORNL phantoms. UF male and female phantoms also showed significant differences compared to the ORNL phantom, 4.0-fold greater for the small intestine wall and 3.3-fold greater for the heart wall. In our method, we directly calculated the S values without using the SAFs as commonly done. Hence, we sought to confirm the differences observed in our S values by comparing the SAFs among the phantoms with the thyroid as a

  6. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. The XCAT consisted of highly detailed whole-body models for the standard male and female adult, including the cardiac and respiratory motions. In this work, the authors extend the XCAT beyond these reference anatomies by developing a series of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research, the first library of 4D computational phantoms. Methods: The initial anatomy of each phantom was based on chest-abdomen-pelvis computed tomography data from normal patients obtained from the Duke University database. The major organs and structures for each phantom were segmented from the corresponding data and defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the head, arms, and legs using the original XCAT adult male and female anatomies. The structures were scaled to best match the age and anatomy of the patient. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from the template XCAT phantom (male or female) to the target patient model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. Each new phantom was refined by checking for anatomical accuracy via inspection of the models. Results: Using these methods, the authors created a series of computerized phantoms with thousands of anatomical structures and modeling cardiac and respiratory motions. The database consists of 58 (35 male and 23 female) anatomically variable phantoms in total. Like the original XCAT, these phantoms can be combined with existing simulation packages to simulate realistic imaging data. Each new phantom contains parameterized models for the anatomy and the cardiac and respiratory motions and can, therefore, serve

  7. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E.; Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D.; Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously developed the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. The XCAT consisted of highly detailed whole-body models for the standard male and female adult, including the cardiac and respiratory motions. In this work, the authors extend the XCAT beyond these reference anatomies by developing a series of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research, the first library of 4D computational phantoms. Methods: The initial anatomy of each phantom was based on chest–abdomen–pelvis computed tomography data from normal patients obtained from the Duke University database. The major organs and structures for each phantom were segmented from the corresponding data and defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the head, arms, and legs using the original XCAT adult male and female anatomies. The structures were scaled to best match the age and anatomy of the patient. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from the template XCAT phantom (male or female) to the target patient model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. Each new phantom was refined by checking for anatomical accuracy via inspection of the models. Results: Using these methods, the authors created a series of computerized phantoms with thousands of anatomical structures and modeling cardiac and respiratory motions. The database consists of 58 (35 male and 23 female) anatomically variable phantoms in total. Like the original XCAT, these phantoms can be combined with existing simulation packages to simulate realistic imaging data. Each new phantom contains parameterized models for the anatomy and the cardiac and respiratory motions and can, therefore

  8. The UF family of hybrid phantoms of the developing human fetus for computational radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Matthew R; Geyer, John W; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Aris, John P [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shifrin, Roger Y, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2011-08-07

    Historically, the development of computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry has primarily been directed at capturing and representing adult and pediatric anatomy, with less emphasis devoted to models of the human fetus. As concern grows over possible radiation-induced cancers from medical and non-medical exposures of the pregnant female, the need to better quantify fetal radiation doses, particularly at the organ-level, also increases. Studies such as the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) hope to improve our understanding of cancer risks following chronic in utero radiation exposure. For projects such as SOLO, currently available fetal anatomic models do not provide sufficient anatomical detail for organ-level dose assessment. To address this need, two fetal hybrid computational phantoms were constructed using high-quality magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography image sets obtained for two well-preserved fetal specimens aged 11.5 and 21 weeks post-conception. Individual soft tissue organs, bone sites and outer body contours were segmented from these images using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported to the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for further modeling and conversion of soft tissue organs, certain bone sites and outer body contours to deformable non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces. The two specimen-specific phantoms, along with a modified version of the 38 week UF hybrid newborn phantom, comprised a set of base phantoms from which a series of hybrid computational phantoms was derived for fetal ages 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks post-conception. The methodology used to construct the series of phantoms accounted for the following age-dependent parameters: (1) variations in skeletal size and proportion, (2) bone-dependent variations in relative levels of bone growth, (3) variations in individual organ masses and total fetal masses and (4) statistical percentile variations

  9. The UF family of hybrid phantoms of the developing human fetus for computational radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, Matthew R; Geyer, John W; Bolch, Wesley; Aris, John P; Shifrin, Roger Y

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the development of computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry has primarily been directed at capturing and representing adult and pediatric anatomy, with less emphasis devoted to models of the human fetus. As concern grows over possible radiation-induced cancers from medical and non-medical exposures of the pregnant female, the need to better quantify fetal radiation doses, particularly at the organ-level, also increases. Studies such as the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) hope to improve our understanding of cancer risks following chronic in utero radiation exposure. For projects such as SOLO, currently available fetal anatomic models do not provide sufficient anatomical detail for organ-level dose assessment. To address this need, two fetal hybrid computational phantoms were constructed using high-quality magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography image sets obtained for two well-preserved fetal specimens aged 11.5 and 21 weeks post-conception. Individual soft tissue organs, bone sites and outer body contours were segmented from these images using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported to the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for further modeling and conversion of soft tissue organs, certain bone sites and outer body contours to deformable non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces. The two specimen-specific phantoms, along with a modified version of the 38 week UF hybrid newborn phantom, comprised a set of base phantoms from which a series of hybrid computational phantoms was derived for fetal ages 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks post-conception. The methodology used to construct the series of phantoms accounted for the following age-dependent parameters: (1) variations in skeletal size and proportion, (2) bone-dependent variations in relative levels of bone growth, (3) variations in individual organ masses and total fetal masses and (4) statistical percentile variations in

  10. Development of skeletal system for mesh-type ICRP reference adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Wang, Zhao Jun; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Beom Sun; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-10-01

    The reference adult computational phantoms of the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) described in Publication 110 are voxel-type computational phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of adult male and female patients. The voxel resolutions of these phantoms are in the order of a few millimeters and smaller tissues such as the eye lens, the skin, and the walls of some organs cannot be properly defined in the phantoms, resulting in limitations in dose coefficient calculations for weakly penetrating radiations. In order to address the limitations of the ICRP-110 phantoms, an ICRP Task Group has been recently formulated and the voxel phantoms are now being converted to a high-quality mesh format. As a part of the conversion project, in the present study, the skeleton models, one of the most important and complex organs of the body, were constructed. The constructed skeleton models were then tested by calculating red bone marrow (RBM) and endosteum dose coefficients (DCs) for broad parallel beams of photons and electrons and comparing the calculated values with those of the original ICRP-110 phantoms. The results show that for the photon exposures, there is a generally good agreement in the DCs between the mesh-type phantoms and the original voxel-type ICRP-110 phantoms; that is, the dose discrepancies were less than 7% in all cases except for the 0.03 MeV cases, for which the maximum difference was 14%. On the other hand, for the electron exposures (⩽4 MeV), the DCs of the mesh-type phantoms deviate from those of the ICRP-110 phantoms by up to ~1600 times at 0.03 MeV, which is indeed due to the improvement of the skeletal anatomy of the developed skeleton mesh models.

  11. Averaged head phantoms from magnetic resonance images of Korean children and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Miran; Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Choi, Hyung-Do; Jung, Yong Wook; Park, Jin Seo

    2018-02-01

    Increased use of mobile phones raises concerns about the health risks of electromagnetic radiation. Phantom heads are routinely used for radiofrequency dosimetry simulations, and the purpose of this study was to construct averaged phantom heads for children and young adults. Using magnetic resonance images (MRI), sectioned cadaver images, and a hybrid approach, we initially built template phantoms representing 6-, 9-, 12-, 15-year-old children and young adults. Our subsequent approach revised the template phantoms using 29 averaged items that were identified by averaging the MRI data from 500 children and young adults. In females, the brain size and cranium thickness peaked in the early teens and then decreased. This is contrary to what was observed in males, where brain size and cranium thicknesses either plateaued or grew continuously. The overall shape of brains was spherical in children and became ellipsoidal by adulthood. In this study, we devised a method to build averaged phantom heads by constructing surface and voxel models. The surface model could be used for phantom manipulation, whereas the voxel model could be used for compliance test of specific absorption rate (SAR) for users of mobile phones or other electronic devices.

  12. Dosimetric study on head CT scans using adult and newborn phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva de O, G. A.; Prata M, A., E-mail: giovanni_paiva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography is the radiodiagnostic method that most contributes to the dose deposition in population. Therefore, the dose reductions used in these tests are very important, especially for pediatric patients who have a life expectancy greater than the rest of the population. This study purpose to compare the doses generated from newborns compared to adult patients in head computed tomography scans. Two head phantoms in a cylindrical shape made in PMMA were used, one to adult and another to newborn patient dimensions. The pediatric routine scan protocol from a radiological service was used for the computed tomography scans. They were performed in General Electric Computed Tomography scanner, Bright Speed model with 4 channels. The absorbed dose measurements were performed with a pencil chamber placed into both phantoms. The newborn head phantom was developed in order to compare the amount of absorbed dose by the phantoms when it is used the same acquisition protocol. The dose found for newborn phantom was 29.9% higher than the adult phantom. (Author)

  13. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  14. Dosimetric study on head CT scans using adult and newborn phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva de O, G. A.; Prata M, A.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography is the radiodiagnostic method that most contributes to the dose deposition in population. Therefore, the dose reductions used in these tests are very important, especially for pediatric patients who have a life expectancy greater than the rest of the population. This study purpose to compare the doses generated from newborns compared to adult patients in head computed tomography scans. Two head phantoms in a cylindrical shape made in PMMA were used, one to adult and another to newborn patient dimensions. The pediatric routine scan protocol from a radiological service was used for the computed tomography scans. They were performed in General Electric Computed Tomography scanner, Bright Speed model with 4 channels. The absorbed dose measurements were performed with a pencil chamber placed into both phantoms. The newborn head phantom was developed in order to compare the amount of absorbed dose by the phantoms when it is used the same acquisition protocol. The dose found for newborn phantom was 29.9% higher than the adult phantom. (Author)

  15. Application of average adult Japanese voxel phantoms to evaluation of photon specific absorbed fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Manabe, Kentaro; Endo, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Average adult Japanese male (JM-103) and female (JF-103) voxel (volume pixel) phantoms newly constructed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have average characteristics of body sizes and organ masses in adult Japanese. In JM-103 and JF-103, several organs and tissues were newly modeled for dose assessments based on tissue weighting factors of the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP). In this study, SAFs for thyroid, stomach, lungs and lymphatic nodes of JM-103 and JF-103 phantoms were calculated, and were compared with those of other adult Japanese phantoms based on individual medical images. In most cases, differences in SAFs between JM-103, JF-103 and other phantoms were about several tens percent, and was mainly attributed to mass differences of organs, tissues and contents. Therefore, it was concluded that SAFs of JM-103 and JF-103 represent those of average adult Japanese and that the two phantoms are applied to dose assessment for average adult Japanese on the basis of the 2007 Recommendations. (author)

  16. Symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hongo, Syozo; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures for computation of organ doses exposed to internal and/or external radiation sources. One method is to make mathematical phantoms on the basis of ORNL mathematical phantoms. Parameters to specify organs of Japanese mathematical phantom are determined by interpolations of the ORNL data, which define the organs of Caucasian males and females of various ages, i.e. new born, 1, 5, 10, 15 years and adult, with survey data for Japanese physiques. Another procedure is to build 'symbol phantoms' for the Japanese public. The concept and its method of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for an individual when we have all of his transversal section images obtained by a medical imaging device like MRI, and thus we may achieve more realistic phantoms for Japanese public than the mathematical phantoms. Both studies are in progress in NIRS. (author)

  17. Dose conversion coefficients calculated using a series of adult Japanese voxel phantoms against external photon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a complete set of conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses calculated for external photon exposure using five Japanese adult voxel phantoms developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). At the JAEA, high-resolution Japanese voxel phantoms have been developed to clarify the variation of organ doses due to the anatomical characteristics of Japanese, and three male phantoms (JM, JM2 and Otoko) and two female phantoms (JF and Onago) have been constructed up to now. The conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses for the five voxel phantoms have been calculated for six kinds of idealized irradiation geometries from monoenergetic photons ranging from 0.01 to 10 MeV using EGS4, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport. The dose conversion coefficients are given as absorbed dose and effective dose per unit air-kerma free-in-air, and are presented in tables and figures. The calculated dose conversion coefficients are compared with those of voxel phantoms based on the Caucasian and the recommended values in ICRP74 in order to discuss (1) variation of organ dose due to the body size and individual anatomy, such as position and shape of organs, and (2) effect of posture on organ doses. The present report provides valuable data to study the influence of the body characteristics of Japanese upon the organ doses and to discuss developing reference Japanese and Asian phantoms. (author)

  18. Calculation of conversion coefficients using Chinese adult reference phantoms for air submersion and ground contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Ren, Li; Li, Junli

    2017-03-21

    The effective and organ equivalent dose coefficients have been widely used to provide assessment of doses received by adult members of the public and by workers exposed to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities under normal or accidental situations. Advancements in phantom types, weighting factors, decay data, etc, have led to the publication of newer results in this regard. This paper presents a new set of conversion coefficients for air submersion and ground contamination (with the use of Geant4) for photons from 15 keV to 10 MeV using the Chinese and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adult reference male and female phantoms. The radiation fields, except for energy spectrum at low energies, were validated by the data obtained from the Monte Carlo code YURI. The effective dose coefficients of monoenergetic photons, obtained for the ICRP adult reference phantoms, agree well with recently published data for air submersion and ground contamination with a plane source at a depth of 0.5 g cm -2 in soil, but an average difference of 36.5% is observed for ground surface contamination with the abovementioned radiation field. The average differences in organ equivalent dose coefficients between the Chinese and the ICRP adult reference phantoms are within 6% for most organs, but noticeable differences of up to 70% or even higher are found at photon energies below 30 keV under air submersion. The effective dose coefficients obtained with the Chinese adult reference phantoms are greater than those of the ICRP adult reference phantoms above 30 keV and 0.5 MeV for ground contamination and air submersion, respectively; the average differences from the Chinese adult reference phantoms are about 3.6% and 0.4% in the whole energy range with maximum differences of 31.8% and 27.6% at 15 keV for air submersion and ground contamination respectively. These differences are attributed to anatomical discrepancies in overlying tissue mass of an

  19. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark I; Mulvey, Matthew R; Bagnall, Anne-Marie

    2015-08-18

    This is the first update of a Cochrane review published in Issue 5, 2010 on transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults. Pain may present in a body part that has been amputated (phantom pain) or at the site of amputation (stump pain), or both. Phantom pain and stump pain are complex and multidimensional and the underlying pathophysiology remains unclear. The condition remains a severe burden for those who are affected by it. The mainstay treatments are predominately pharmacological, with increasing acknowledgement of the need for non-drug interventions. TENS has been recommended as a treatment option but there has been no systematic review of available evidence. Hence, the effectiveness of TENS for phantom pain and stump pain is currently unknown. To assess the analgesic effectiveness of TENS for the treatment of phantom pain and stump pain following amputation in adults. For the original version of the review we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED, CINAHL, PEDRO and SPORTDiscus (February 2010). For this update, we searched the same databases for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 2010 to 25 March 2015. We only included RCTs investigating the use of TENS for the management of phantom pain and stump pain following an amputation in adults. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We planned that where available and appropriate, data from outcome measures were to be pooled and presented as an overall estimate of the effectiveness of TENS. In the original review there were no RCTs that examined the effectiveness of TENS for the treatment of phantom pain and stump pain in adults. For this update, we did not identify any additional RCTs for inclusion. There were no RCTs to judge the effectiveness of TENS for the management of phantom pain and stump pain. The published literature on TENS

  20. Assessment of specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons using average adult Japanese female phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Kentaro; Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2016-12-01

    In the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the procedure for calculating effective doses was modified as follows. Equivalent doses are evaluated using the male and female voxel phantoms on the basis of reference anatomical data of Caucasians, and effective doses are calculated using sex-averaged equivalent doses in applying tissue weighting factors. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs), which are essential data for calculating internal doses, depend on the body weights, organ masses, and positional relations of organs of the phantoms. Then, the dose coefficients, which are committed effective doses per unit intake of radionuclides, developed by ICRP on the basis of the 2007 Recommendations reflect the physical characteristics of Caucasians and are averaged over the sexes. Meanwhile, the physiques of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasians, and organ masses are also different from each other. Therefore, dose coefficients reflecting Japanese physical characteristics are different from those of ICRP. Knowledge of the influence of race differences on dose coefficients is important to apply the sex averaged dose coefficients of ICRP to the Japanese system of radiation protection. SAF data based on phantoms which have Japanese physical characteristics is essential for assessment of the dose coefficients reflecting Japanese physical characteristics. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency constructed average adult Japanese phantoms, JM-103 (male) and JF-103 (female), and is developing a dose estimation method for internal exposure using these phantoms. This report provides photon and electron SAFs of JF-103. The data of this report and the previously published data of JM-103 are applicable to evaluate sex-specific and sex-averaged dose coefficients reflecting the physical characteristics of the average adult Japanese for intakes of radionuclides emitting photons and electrons. Appendix as CD-ROM. (J.P.N.)

  1. Comparison of organ doses in human phantoms: variations due to body size and posture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xu; Xiang-Hong, Jia; Xue-Jun, Yu; Zhan-Chun, Pan; Qian, Liu; Chun-Xin, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Organ dose calculations performed using human phantoms can provide estimates of astronauts' health risks due to cosmic radiation. However, the characteristics of such phantoms strongly affect the estimation precision. To investigate organ dose variations with body size and posture in human phantoms, a non-uniform rational B-spline boundary surfaces model was constructed based on cryo-section images. This model was used to establish four phantoms with different body size and posture parameters, whose organs parameters were changed simultaneously and which were voxelised with 4x4x4 mm"3 resolution. Then, using Monte Carlo transport code, the organ doses caused by ≤500 MeV isotropic incident protons were calculated. The dose variations due to body size differences within a certain range were negligible, and the doses received in crouching and standing-up postures were similar. Therefore, a standard Chinese phantom could be established, and posture changes cannot effectively protect astronauts during solar particle events. (authors)

  2. Construction of Korean adult voxel phantoms for radiation dosimetry and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Sik

    2002-08-15

    Although contribution of the MIRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms to computational radiation dosimetry, especially in determining the effective dose to the exposed personnel, is very significant, there remain some questions on possible deviation in the resulting dosimetric quantities from the true values. This is particularly the case for those organ or tissues having complicated geometry difficult to model with simple geometrical body elements. As an alternative approach to resolve the problem, there have been efforts to use voxel phantoms, which can very precisely describe both the external shape and the internal organs by virtue of fast advances in medical imaging technology as well as in computing power. In this study, Korean adult male and female voxel phantoms were constructed by processing whole-body MR images of healthy volunteers who belong to middle group of Korean in height and weight. Organs and tissues on tomographic images were manually segmented and indexed using the graphic software PL-400 . Due to limited resolution of the raw MR images, voxels of rather large size, 2 mmx2 mmx8 mm for the woman and 2mmx2mmx10mm for the man, were used. The resulting male and female voxel phantoms were named KRMAN and KRWOMAN, respectively. To assess utility of the voxel phatoms, calculations were carried out with the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for two illustrative problems. A program VOXELMAKER1.0 was developed to convert the voxel phantom data into MCNP geometry input format. In the first example, organ equivalent doses and effective doses were evaluated for phantoms in broad parallel photon fields of different energies and directions and were compared to corresponding values given in ICRP 74 which were derived with the MIRD-type phantoms. No significant deviations between MIRD and voxel phantoms were found in the effective doses. Significant differences up to around factor of 2, however, were observed in organ equivalent doses for some organs including

  3. Modelling of UWB Antenna Perturbed by Human Phantom in Spherical Harmonics Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mhedhbi, Meriem; Avrillon, Stephane; Pedersen, Troels

    2014-01-01

    is attractive for simulation purposes. We propose a simple model for the spherical harmonics coefficients allowing to predict the antenna behavior perturbed by a human phantom. The model is based on knowledge of the spherical harmonic coefficients of antenna in free space and the antenna-phantom distance.......In this paper we study how the antenna radiation pattern is perturbed in the presence of a human phantom in terms of changes in the coefficients of the spherical harmonic antenna representation. The spherical harmonic basis allows for a compact representation of the antenna pattern which...

  4. Development of the two Korean adult tomographic computational phantoms for organ dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Following the previously developed Korean tomographic phantom, KORMAN, two additional whole-body tomographic phantoms of Korean adult males were developed from magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, respectively. Two healthy male volunteers, whose body dimensions were fairly representative of the average Korean adult male, were recruited and scanned for phantom development. Contiguous whole body MR images were obtained from one subject exclusive of the arms, while whole-body CT images were acquired from the second individual. A total of 29 organs and tissues and 19 skeletal sites were segmented via image manipulation techniques such as gray-level thresholding, region growing, and manual drawing, in which each of segmented image slice was subsequently reviewed by an experienced radiologist for anatomical accuracy. The resulting phantoms, the MR-based KTMAN-1 (Korean Typical MAN-1) and the CT-based KTMAN-2 (Korean Typical MAN-2), consist of 300x150x344 voxels with a voxel resolution of 2x2x5 mm 3 for both phantoms. Masses of segmented organs and tissues were calculated as the product of a nominal reference density, the prevoxel volume, and the cumulative number of voxels defining each organs or tissue. These organs masses were then compared with those of both the Asian and the ICRP reference adult male. Organ masses within both KTMAN-1 and KTMAN-2 showed differences within 40% of Asian and ICRP reference values, with the exception of the skin, gall bladder, and pancreas which displayed larger differences. The resulting three-dimensional binary file was ported to the Monte Carlo code MCNPX2.4 to calculate organ doses following external irradiation for illustrative purposes. Colon, lung, liver, and stomach absorbed doses, as well as the effective dose, for idealized photon irradiation geometries (anterior-posterior and right lateral) were determined, and then compared with data from two other tomographic phantoms (Asian and Caucasian), and

  5. Posture-specific phantoms representing female and male adults in Monte Carlo-based simulations for radiological protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, V. F.; Kramer, R.; Brayner, C.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-08-01

    Does the posture of a patient have an effect on the organ and tissue absorbed doses caused by x-ray examinations? This study aims to find the answer to this question, based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of commonly performed x-ray examinations using adult phantoms modelled to represent humans in standing as well as in the supine posture. The recently published FASH (female adult mesh) and MASH (male adult mesh) phantoms have the standing posture. In a first step, both phantoms were updated with respect to their anatomy: glandular tissue was separated from adipose tissue in the breasts, visceral fat was separated from subcutaneous fat, cartilage was segmented in ears, nose and around the thyroid, and the mass of the right lung is now 15% greater than the left lung. The updated versions are called FASH2_sta and MASH2_sta (sta = standing). Taking into account the gravitational effects on organ position and fat distribution, supine versions of the FASH2 and the MASH2 phantoms have been developed in this study and called FASH2_sup and MASH2_sup. MC simulations of external whole-body exposure to monoenergetic photons and partial-body exposure to x-rays have been made with the standing and supine FASH2 and MASH2 phantoms. For external whole-body exposure for AP and PA projection with photon energies above 30 keV, the effective dose did not change by more than 5% when the posture changed from standing to supine or vice versa. Apart from that, the supine posture is quite rare in occupational radiation protection from whole-body exposure. However, in the x-ray diagnosis supine posture is frequently used for patients submitted to examinations. Changes of organ absorbed doses up to 60% were found for simulations of chest and abdomen radiographs if the posture changed from standing to supine or vice versa. A further increase of differences between posture-specific organ and tissue absorbed doses with increasing whole-body mass is to be expected.

  6. A heterogeneous human tissue mimicking phantom for RF heating and MRI thermal monitoring verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu; Wyatt, Cory; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul; Craciunescu, Oana; Macfall, James; Dewhirst, Mark; Das, Shiva K

    2012-04-07

    This paper describes a heterogeneous phantom that mimics a human thigh with a deep-seated tumor, for the purpose of studying the performance of radiofrequency (RF) heating equipment and non-invasive temperature monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The heterogeneous cylindrical phantom was constructed with an outer fat layer surrounding an inner core of phantom material mimicking muscle, tumor and marrow-filled bone. The component materials were formulated to have dielectric and thermal properties similar to human tissues. The dielectric properties of the tissue mimicking phantom materials were measured with a microwave vector network analyzer and impedance probe over the frequency range of 80-500 MHz and at temperatures of 24, 37 and 45 °C. The specific heat values of the component materials were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter over the temperature range of 15-55 °C. The thermal conductivity value was obtained from fitting the curves obtained from one-dimensional heat transfer measurement. The phantom was used to verify the operation of a cylindrical four-antenna annular phased array extremity applicator (140 MHz) by examining the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal imaging patterns for various magnitude/phase settings (including settings to focus heating in tumors). For muscle and tumor materials, MRI was also used to measure T1/T2* values (1.5 T) and to obtain the slope of the PRFS phase change versus temperature change curve. The dielectric and thermal properties of the phantom materials were in close agreement to well-accepted published results for human tissues. The phantom was able to successfully demonstrate satisfactory operation of the tested heating equipment. The MRI-measured thermal distributions matched the expected patterns for various magnitude/phase settings of the applicator, allowing the phantom to be used as a quality assurance tool. Importantly, the material formulations for the various tissue types

  7. SU-F-J-174: A Series of Computational Human Phantoms in DICOM-RT Format for Normal Tissue Dose Reconstruction in Epidemiological Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyakuryal, A; Moroz, B; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Lee, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients often require individualized dose estimates of normal tissues. Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D radiological images or not even available. Generic patient CT images are often used in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) to reconstruct normal tissue doses. The objective of the current work was to develop a series of reference size computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format for direct use in dose reconstruction in TPS. Methods: Contours of 93 organs and tissues were extracted from a series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational human phantoms (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old, and adult males and females) using Rhinoceros software. A MATLAB script was created to convert the contours into the DICOM-RT structure format. The simulated CT images with the resolution of 1×1×3 mm3 were also generated from the binary phantom format and coupled with the DICOM-structure files. Accurate volumes of the organs were drawn in the format using precise delineation of the contours in converted format. Due to complex geometry of organs, higher resolution (1×1×1 mm3) was found to be more efficient in the conversion of newborn and 1-year-old phantoms. Results: Contour sets were efficiently converted into DICOM-RT structures in relatively short time (about 30 minutes for each phantom). A good agreement was observed in the volumes between the original phantoms and the converted contours for large organs (NRMSD<1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD<7.7%). Conclusion: A comprehensive series of computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format was created to support epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in radiotherapy patients. We confirmed the DICOM-RT phantoms were successfully imported into the TPS programs of major vendors.

  8. SU-F-J-174: A Series of Computational Human Phantoms in DICOM-RT Format for Normal Tissue Dose Reconstruction in Epidemiological Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyakuryal, A; Moroz, B [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients often require individualized dose estimates of normal tissues. Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D radiological images or not even available. Generic patient CT images are often used in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) to reconstruct normal tissue doses. The objective of the current work was to develop a series of reference size computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format for direct use in dose reconstruction in TPS. Methods: Contours of 93 organs and tissues were extracted from a series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational human phantoms (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old, and adult males and females) using Rhinoceros software. A MATLAB script was created to convert the contours into the DICOM-RT structure format. The simulated CT images with the resolution of 1×1×3 mm3 were also generated from the binary phantom format and coupled with the DICOM-structure files. Accurate volumes of the organs were drawn in the format using precise delineation of the contours in converted format. Due to complex geometry of organs, higher resolution (1×1×1 mm3) was found to be more efficient in the conversion of newborn and 1-year-old phantoms. Results: Contour sets were efficiently converted into DICOM-RT structures in relatively short time (about 30 minutes for each phantom). A good agreement was observed in the volumes between the original phantoms and the converted contours for large organs (NRMSD<1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD<7.7%). Conclusion: A comprehensive series of computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format was created to support epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in radiotherapy patients. We confirmed the DICOM-RT phantoms were successfully imported into the TPS programs of major vendors.

  9. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation dose in organs of female and male adult phantoms due to FDG-F18 absorbed in the lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinato Walmir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of dose conversion factors (S values for the radionuclide fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG absorbed in the lungs during a positron emission tomography (PET procedure was calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNPX version 2.7.0. For the obtained dose conversion factors of interest, it was considered a uniform absorption of radiopharmaceutical by the lung of a healthy adult human. The spectrum of fluorine was introduced in the input data file for the simulation. The simulation took place in two adult phantoms of both sexes, based on polygon mesh surfaces called FASH and MASH with anatomy and posture according to ICRP 89. The S values for the 22 internal organs/tissues, chosen from ICRP No. 110, for the FASH and MASH phantoms were compared with the results obtained from a MIRD V phantoms called ADAM and EVA used by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD. We observed variation of more than 100% in S values due to structural anatomical differences in the internal organs of the MASH and FASH phantoms compared to the mathematical phantom.

  10. Reconstruction of segmented human voxel phantoms for skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Reis, Gabriela; Furnari, Laura

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution medical images along with methods that simulate the interaction of radiation with matter, as the Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, have been widely used in medical physics procedures. These images provide the construction of realistic anatomical models, which after being coupled to these codes, may drive to better assessments of dose distributions on the patient. These anatomical models constructed from medical images are known as voxel phantoms (voxel - volume element of an image). Present day regular images are unsuitable to correctly perform skin dose distribution evaluations. This inability is due to improper skin discrimination in most of the current medical images, once its thickness stands below the resolution of the pixels that form the image. This paper proposes the voxel phantom reconstruction by subdividing and segmenting the elements that form the phantom. It is done in order to better discriminate the skin by assigning it more adequate thickness and actual location, allowing a better dosimetric evaluation of the skin. This task is an important issue in many radiotherapy procedures. Particular interest lays in Total Skin Irradiation (TSI) with electron beams, where skin dose evaluation stands as the treatment key point of the whole body irradiation. This radiotherapy procedure is under implementation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-USP). (author)

  11. Computational voxel phantom, associated to anthropometric and anthropomorphic real phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cleuza Helena Teixeira; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a computational model of voxels through MCNP5 Code and the experimental development of an anthropometric and anthropomorphic phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis brachytherapy focusing prostatic tumors. For elaboration of the computational model of the human male pelvis, anatomical section images from the Visible Man Project were applied. Such selected and digital images were associated to a numeric representation, one for each section. Such computational representation of the anatomical sections was transformed into a bi-dimensional mesh of equivalent tissue. The group of bidimensional meshes was concatenated forming the three-dimensional model of voxels to be used by the MCNP5 code. In association to the anatomical information, data from the density and chemical composition of the basic elements, representatives of the organs and involved tissues, were setup in a material database for the MCNP-5. The model will be applied for dosimetric evaluations in situations of irradiation of the human masculine pelvis. Such 3D model of voxel is associated to the code of transport of particles MCNP5, allowing future simulations. It was also developed the construction of human masculine pelvis phantom, based on anthropometric and anthropomorphic dates and in the use of representative equivalent tissues of the skin, fatty, muscular and glandular tissue, as well as the bony structure.This part of work was developed in stages, being built the bony cast first, later the muscular structures and internal organs. They were then jointly mounted and inserted in the skin cast. The representative component of the fatty tissue was incorporate and accomplished the final retouchings in the skin. The final result represents the development of two important essential tools for elaboration of computational and experimental dosimetry. Thus, it is possible its use in calibrations of pre-existent protocols in radiotherapy, as well as for tests of new protocols, besides

  12. Diffusion Capillary Phantom vs. Human Data: Outcomes for Reconstruction Methods Depend on Evaluation Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah D. Lichenstein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Diffusion MRI provides a non-invasive way of estimating structural connectivity in the brain. Many studies have used diffusion phantoms as benchmarks to assess the performance of different tractography reconstruction algorithms and assumed that the results can be applied to in vivo studies. Here we examined whether quality metrics derived from a common, publically available, diffusion phantom can reliably predict tractography performance in human white matter tissue. Material and Methods: We compared estimates of fiber length and fiber crossing among a simple tensor model (diffusion tensor imaging, a more complicated model (ball-and-sticks and model-free (diffusion spectrum imaging, generalized q-sampling imaging reconstruction methods using a capillary phantom and in vivo human data (N=14. Results: Our analysis showed that evaluation outcomes differ depending on whether they were obtained from phantom or human data. Specifically, the diffusion phantom favored a more complicated model over a simple tensor model or model-free methods for resolving crossing fibers. On the other hand, the human studies showed the opposite pattern of results, with the model-free methods being more advantageous than model-based methods or simple tensor models. This performance difference was consistent across several metrics, including estimating fiber length and resolving fiber crossings in established white matter pathways. Conclusions: These findings indicate that the construction of current capillary diffusion phantoms tends to favor complicated reconstruction models over a simple tensor model or model-free methods, whereas the in vivo data tends to produce opposite results. This brings into question the previous phantom-based evaluation approaches and suggests that a more realistic phantom or simulation is necessary to accurately predict the relative performance of different tractography reconstruction methods. Acronyms: BSM: ball-and-sticks model; d

  13. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  14. Assessment of specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons using average adult Japanese male phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, Kentaro; Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2014-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is revising dose coefficients, which are effective and equivalent doses per unit intake of radionuclides, based on the 2007 Recommendations. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of voxel phantoms having standard physiques and organ masses (physical characteristics) of Caucasian are used for calculation of the new dose coefficients. SAFs depend on physical characteristics of a phantom used for assessment of the SAFs. Therefore, the SAFs and the dose coefficients developed by ICRP reflect physical characteristics of Caucasian. On the other hand, physiques of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasian, and organ masses are also different from each other. Consequently, it is expected that SAFs and dose coefficients with physical characteristics of adult Japanese are different from those of ICRP. It is important to understand the influence of the differences in physical characteristics between both races on SAFs and dose coefficients when using the SAFs and dose coefficients of ICRP for radiation protection for Japanese. In order to evaluate internal doses considering the physical characteristics of adult Japanese, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency plans to develop a comprehensive data set of SAFs for photons, electrons, alpha particles and neutrons using average adult Japanese male and female phantoms (male: JM-103, female: JF-103). This report presents a data set of photon and electron SAFs for JM-103. JM-103 was incorporated into the general purpose radiation transport code, MCNPX 2.6.0, and the SAFs were calculated by the MCNPX 2.6.0 for 25 energies from 10 keV to 10 MeV and for combinations of 67 source regions and 41 target organs. Influences of differences in physical characteristics between adult Japanese and Caucasian on SAFs was also examined by comparison between the calculated SAFs in this study and the SAFs of the reference adult male phantom of ICRP. The photon and electron

  15. A Chinese Visible Human-based computational female pelvic phantom for radiation dosimetry simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, H.; Jinlu, S.; Shaoxiang, Z.; Qing, H.; Li-wen, T.; Chengjun, G.; Tang, X.; Jiang, S. B.; Xiano-lin, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate voxel phantom is needed for dosimetric simulation in radiation therapy for malignant tumors in female pelvic region. However, most of the existing voxel phantoms are constructed on the basis of Caucasian or non-Chinese population. Materials and Methods: A computational framework for constructing female pelvic voxel phantom for radiation dosimetry was performed based on Chinese Visible Human datasets. First, several organs within pelvic region were segmented from Chinese Visible Human datasets. Then, polygonization and voxelization were performed based on the segmented organs and a 3D computational phantom is built in the form of a set of voxel arrays. Results: The generated phantom can be converted and loaded into treatment planning system for radiation dosimetry calculation. From the observed dosimetric results of those organs and structures, we can evaluate their absorbed dose and implement some simulation studies. Conclusion: A voxel female pelvic phantom was developed from Chinese Visible Human datasets. It can be utilized for dosimetry evaluation and planning simulation, which would be very helpful to improve the clinical performance and reduce the radiation toxicity on organ at risk.

  16. Computational lymphatic node models in pediatric and adult hybrid phantoms for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lamart, Stephanie; Moroz, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    We developed models of lymphatic nodes for six pediatric and two adult hybrid computational phantoms to calculate the lymphatic node dose estimates from external and internal radiation exposures. We derived the number of lymphatic nodes from the recommendations in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 23 and 89 at 16 cluster locations for the lymphatic nodes: extrathoracic, cervical, thoracic (upper and lower), breast (left and right), mesentery (left and right), axillary (left and right), cubital (left and right), inguinal (left and right) and popliteal (left and right), for different ages (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old and adult). We modeled each lymphatic node within the voxel format of the hybrid phantoms by assuming that all nodes have identical size derived from published data except narrow cluster sites. The lymph nodes were generated by the following algorithm: (1) selection of the lymph node site among the 16 cluster sites; (2) random sampling of the location of the lymph node within a spherical space centered at the chosen cluster site; (3) creation of the sphere or ovoid of tissue representing the node based on lymphatic node characteristics defined in ICRP Publications 23 and 89. We created lymph nodes until the pre-defined number of lymphatic nodes at the selected cluster site was reached. This algorithm was applied to pediatric (newborn, 1-, 5-and 10-year-old male, and 15-year-old males) and adult male and female ICRP-compliant hybrid phantoms after voxelization. To assess the performance of our models for internal dosimetry, we calculated dose conversion coefficients, called S values, for selected organs and tissues with Iodine-131 distributed in six lymphatic node cluster sites using MCNPX2.6, a well validated Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Our analysis of the calculations indicates that the S values were significantly affected by the location of the lymph node clusters and that the values increased for

  17. Experimental Determination of the Neutron Radiation-Dose Distribution in the Human Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipcic, Neda [Institute Rudjer Bogkovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1967-01-15

    The quality of the radiation delivering the radiation dose to the human phantom is quite different from that of the incident neutron beam. This paper describes the experimental investigation of the variation of neutron dose related to the variation of neutron fluence with depth in the human phantom. The distribution of neutron radiation was determined in the human phantom - a cube of paraffin wax 25 cm x 25 cm x 50 cm with a density of 0.92 cm{sup -3}. Po-Be and Ra-Be point sources were used as neutron sources. Neutron fluences were measured using different types of detector: scintillation detector, BF{sub 3} counter, and nuclear-track emulsions. Since the fluence measurements with these three types of detectors were carried out under the same experimental conditions, it was possible to separate and analyse each part of the radiation dose in the paraffin. From the investigations, the distribution of the total radiation dose was obtained as a function of the paraffin depth. The maximum value of this dose distribution is constant with respect to the distance between the source and the paraffin phantom. From the results obtained, some conclusions may be drawn concerning the amount of absorbed radiation dose in the human phantom. (author)

  18. Adaptation of a homogeneous phantom, equivalent to the adult patient, for evaluation of pediatric radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Silvana Carvalho de

    1996-01-01

    Based upon the ALARA principle (As Low As Reasonably Achievable), the pediatric diagnostic radiology deserves special attention by the importance in maintaining the doses at the lowest possible levels, due to the higher life expectancy of these age groups, that increases the probabilities of occurring the deleterious effects due to radiation exposures. An effective quality control program produces a large potential of dose reduction in diagnostic radiology, by the establishment of radiographic techniques to the production of abetter radiographic image, with less radiation doses to the patient. The principal aim of the present work, was the adaptation of an homogeneous phantom equivalent to a standard adult patient, to the determination and optimization of radiographic techniques in pediatric examinations. The phantom enables the simulation of the chest, skull or pelvis and the extremities. After the obtention of several techniques for each examination evaluated, the utilization of a phantom with common structures in radiology, enabled the standardization of the technique to provide a better contrast between different structures, for each examination. At another stage of this work, the sensitometric characteristics of a rare-earth screen-film system were evaluated and compared to those of a conventional calcium tungstate system. The results indicated that the rare-earth systems offer significant dose reduction and images of good quality. (author)

  19. Impact on Dose Coefficients Calculated with ICRP Adult Mesh-type Reference Computational Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chan Soo; Lee, Han Jin; Han, Hae Gin; Han, Min Cheol; Shin, Bang Ho; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In 2016, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) formulated a new Task Group (TG) (i.e., TG 103) within Committee 2. The ultimate aim of the TG 103 is to develop the mesh-type reference computational phantoms (MRCPs) that can address dosimetric limitations of the currently used voxel-type reference computational phantoms (VRCPs) due to their limited voxel resolutions. The objective of the present study is to investigate dosimetric impact of the adult MRCPs by comparing dose coefficients (DCs) calculated with the MRCPs for some external and internal exposure cases and the reference DCs in ICRP Publications 116 and 133 that were produced with the adult VRCPs. In the present study, the DCs calculated with the adult MRCPs for some exposure cases were compared with the values in ICRP Publications 116 and 133. This comparison shows that in general the MRCPs provide very similar DCs for uncharged particles, but for charged particles provide significantly different DCs due to the improvement of the MRCPs.

  20. Computational anthropomorphic phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: evolution and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Jaiki

    2006-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models of human anatomy used in the calculation of radiation dose distribution in the human body upon exposure to a radiation source. Depending on the manner to represent human anatomy, they are categorized into two classes: stylized and tomographic phantoms. Stylized phantoms, which have mainly been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), describe human anatomy by using simple mathematical equations of analytical geometry. Several improved stylized phantoms such as male and female adults, pediatric series, and enhanced organ models have been developed following the first hermaphrodite adult stylized phantom, Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD)-5 phantom. Although stylized phantoms have significantly contributed to dosimetry calculation, they provide only approximations of the true anatomical features of the human body and the resulting organ dose distribution. An alternative class of computational phantom, the tomographic phantom, is based upon three-dimensional imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). The tomographic phantoms represent the human anatomy with a large number of voxels that are assigned tissue type and organ identity. To date, a total of around 30 tomographic phantoms including male and female adults, pediatric phantoms, and even a pregnant female, have been developed and utilized for realistic radiation dosimetry calculation. They are based on MRI/CT images or sectional color photos from patients, volunteers or cadavers. Several investigators have compared tomographic phantoms with stylized phantoms, and demonstrated the superiority of tomographic phantoms in terms of realistic anatomy and dosimetry calculation. This paper summarizes the history and current status of both stylized and tomographic phantoms, including Korean computational phantoms. Advantages, limitations, and future prospects are also discussed

  1. Dosimetric study in chest computed tomography scans of adult and pediatric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namen A, W.; Prata M, A.; Guedes, G.

    2016-10-01

    The computed tomography scan is a radiological technique that permits an evaluation of the patient internal structures. In the last ten years, this technique has had a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, cancer and pediatric trauma. Widespread of this technique has a significant increase in the patient dose. The risk associated with the radiological examination can be considered very low compared to the natural risk. However, any additional risk, no matter how small, is unacceptable if it does not benefit the patient. To be aware of the dose distribution is important when the objective is to vary the acquisition parameters aiming a dose reduction. The aim os this study is develop a pediatric chest phantom to evaluate the dose variation in CT scans. In this work, a cylindrical adult chest phantom made in polymethyl methacrylate was used and a second chest phantom was developed, based on dimensions of in eight year old patient in oblong shape. The two simulators have 5 openings, one is central and four are peripheral lagged by 90 degrees Celsius, which allow positioning a pencil chamber aiming and observation of the dose in 5 regions. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model and 64 channels, the central slice of both simulators were irradiated successively to obtain dose measurements using a pencil chamber. The irradiation of the central slice was conducted using the service protocol. The registered dose values showed that the pediatric phantom had higher doses especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. The results also enabled a comparison among the index dose values obtained from the measurements with the pencil chamber. (Author)

  2. Dosimetric study in chest computed tomography scans of adult and pediatric phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namen A, W.; Prata M, A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Guedes, G., E-mail: wadia.namen@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    The computed tomography scan is a radiological technique that permits an evaluation of the patient internal structures. In the last ten years, this technique has had a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, cancer and pediatric trauma. Widespread of this technique has a significant increase in the patient dose. The risk associated with the radiological examination can be considered very low compared to the natural risk. However, any additional risk, no matter how small, is unacceptable if it does not benefit the patient. To be aware of the dose distribution is important when the objective is to vary the acquisition parameters aiming a dose reduction. The aim os this study is develop a pediatric chest phantom to evaluate the dose variation in CT scans. In this work, a cylindrical adult chest phantom made in polymethyl methacrylate was used and a second chest phantom was developed, based on dimensions of in eight year old patient in oblong shape. The two simulators have 5 openings, one is central and four are peripheral lagged by 90 degrees Celsius, which allow positioning a pencil chamber aiming and observation of the dose in 5 regions. In a GE CT scanner, Discovery model and 64 channels, the central slice of both simulators were irradiated successively to obtain dose measurements using a pencil chamber. The irradiation of the central slice was conducted using the service protocol. The registered dose values showed that the pediatric phantom had higher doses especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. The results also enabled a comparison among the index dose values obtained from the measurements with the pencil chamber. (Author)

  3. 3D dose distribution calculation in a voxelized human phantom by means of Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the reconstruction of a real human voxelized phantom by means of a MatLab program and the simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized antropomorphic head phantom. The program provides the voxelization by first processing the CT slices; the process follows a two-dimensional pixel and material identification algorithm on each slice and three-dimensional interpolation in order to describe the phantom geometry via small cubic cells, resulting in an MCNP input deck format output. Dose rates are calculated by using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which gives the track length estimation of the particle flux in units of particles/cm 2 . Furthermore, the particle flux is converted into dose by using the conversion coefficients extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. The voxelization using a three-dimensional interpolation technique in combination with the use of the FMESH tool of the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation which results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside anthropomorphic phantoms. This tool is very useful in radiation treatment assessments, in which voxelized phantoms are widely utilized.

  4. [The model of geometrical human body phantom for calculating tissue doses in the service module of the International Space Station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V A; Mitrikas, V G

    2007-01-01

    The model of a geometrical human body phantom developed for calculating the shielding functions of representative points of the body organs and systems is similar to the anthropomorphic phantom. This form of phantom can be integrated with the shielding model of the ISS Russian orbital segment to make analysis of radiation loading of crewmembers in different compartments of the vehicle. Calculation of doses absorbed by the body systems in terms of the representative points makes it clear that doses essentially depend on the phantom spatial orientation (eye direction). It also enables the absorbed dose evaluation from the shielding functions as the mean of the representative points and phantom orientation.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of adult and pediatric computed tomography exams: Validation studies of organ doses with physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Daniel J.; Lee, Choonsik; Tien, Christopher; Fisher, Ryan; Hoerner, Matthew R.; Hintenlang, David; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and a 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT

  6. Optimising radiographic bitewing examination to adult and juvenile patients through the use of anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauer, L. T.; Branets, I.; Stabulas-Savage, J.; Quinn, B.; Miodownik, D.; Dauer, Z. L.; Colosi, D.; Hershkowitz, D.; Goren, A.

    2014-01-01

    Four anthropomorphic phantoms (an adult male, an adult female, a 10-y-old child and a 5-y-old child) were exposed to bitewing radiographs at film and digital settings using both rectangular and round collimation. Optically stimulated dosemeters were used. For children, average organ doses were <40 μGy and the organs with the highest doses were the salivary glands, parotid, oral mucosa, skin and extrathoracic airway. For adults, average organ doses were <200 μGy. Highest adult doses were to the salivary glands, oral mucosa and skin. Effective doses ranged from 1.5 to 1.8 μSv for children and from 2.6 to 3.6 μSv for adults when optimised technique factors were employed, including digital receptors, rectangular collimation, size-appropriate exposure times and proper clinical judgment. Optimised doses were a fraction of the natural daily background exposure. Therefore, predictions of hypothetical cancer incidence or detriment in patient populations exposed to such low doses are highly speculative and should be discouraged. (authors)

  7. Calculation of local skin doses with ICRP adult mesh-type reference computational phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Haegin; Choi, Chansoo; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Lee, Hanjin; Shin, Bangho; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol

    2018-01-01

    Recently, Task Group 103 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed new mesh-type reference computational phantoms (MRCPs) for adult males and females in order to address the limitations of the current voxel-type reference phantoms described in ICRP Publication 110 due to their limited voxel resolutions and the nature of the voxel geometry. One of the substantial advantages of the MRCPs over the ICRP-110 reference phantoms is the inclusion of a 50-μm-thick radiosensitive skin basal-cell layer; however, a methodology for calculating the local skin dose (LSD), i.e., the maximum dose to the basal layer averaged over a 1-cm2 area, has yet to be developed. In the present study, a dedicated program for the LSD calculation with the MRCPs was developed based on the mean shift algorithm and the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. The developed program was used to calculate local skin dose coefficients (LSDCs) for electrons and alpha particles, which were then compared with the values given in ICRP Publication 116 that were produced with a simple tissue-equivalent cube model. The results of the present study show that the LSDCs of the MRCPs are generally in good agreement with the ICRP-116 values for alpha particles, but for electrons, significant differences are found at energies higher than 0.15 MeV. The LSDCs of the MRCPs are greater than the ICRP-116 values by as much as 2.7 times at 10 MeV, which is due mainly to the different curvature between realistic MRCPs ( i.e., curved) and the simple cube model ( i.e., flat).

  8. Dosimetry and verification of 60Co total body irradiation with human phantom and semiconductor diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahverdi Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Total Body Irradiation (TBI is a form of radiotherapy used for patients prior to bone marrow or stem cell transplant to destroy any undetectable cancer cells. The dosimetry characteristics of a 60 Co unit for TBI were studied and a simple method for the calculation of the prescribed dose for TBI is presented. Dose homogeneity was verified in a human phantom. Dose measurements were made in water phantom (30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 , using farmer ionization chamber (0.6 cc, TM30010, PTW and a parallel plate ionization chamber (TM23343, PTW. Point dose measurements for AP/PA irradiation were measured in a human phantom using silicon diodes (T60010L, PTW. The lung dose was measured with an ionization chamber (0.3 cc, TM31013. The validity of the proposed algorithm was checked at TBI distance using the human phantom. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm was within 3.5%. The dose delivered to the mid-lobe of the lung was 14.14 Gy and it has been reduced to 8.16 Gy by applying the proper shield. Dose homogeneity was within ±7% for all measured points. The results indicate that a good agreement between the total prescribed and calculated midplane doses can be achieved using this method. Therefore, it could be possible to use calculated data for TBI treatments.

  9. Calculation of organ doses from environmental gamma rays using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1990-01-01

    Organ doses from environmental γ-rays (U-238, Th-232, K-40) were calculated using Monte Carlo methods for three typical sources of a semi-infinite volume source in the air, an infinite plane source in the ground and a volume source in the ground. γ-ray fields in the natural environment were simulated rigourously without approximations or simplifications in the intermediate steps except for the disturbance of the radiation field by the human body which was neglected. Organ doses were calculated for four anthropomorphic phantoms representing a baby, a child, a female and a male adult. The dose of a fetus is given by the dose to the uterus of the adult female. Air kerma and dose conversion factors normalised to air kerma and to source intensity are given for monoenergetic sources and for the natural radionuclides. (orig./HP)

  10. Population of 224 realistic human subject-based computational breast phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, David W. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Wells, Jered R., E-mail: jered.wells@duke.edu [Clinical Imaging Physics Group and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Physics, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Dobbins, James T. [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Department of Radiology and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To create a database of highly realistic and anatomically variable 3D virtual breast phantoms based on dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) data. Methods: A tissue classification and segmentation algorithm was used to create realistic and detailed 3D computational breast phantoms based on 230 + dedicated bCT datasets from normal human subjects. The breast volume was identified using a coarse three-class fuzzy C-means segmentation algorithm which accounted for and removed motion blur at the breast periphery. Noise in the bCT data was reduced through application of a postreconstruction 3D bilateral filter. A 3D adipose nonuniformity (bias field) correction was then applied followed by glandular segmentation using a 3D bias-corrected fuzzy C-means algorithm. Multiple tissue classes were defined including skin, adipose, and several fractional glandular densities. Following segmentation, a skin mask was produced which preserved the interdigitated skin, adipose, and glandular boundaries of the skin interior. Finally, surface modeling was used to produce digital phantoms with methods complementary to the XCAT suite of digital human phantoms. Results: After rejecting some datasets due to artifacts, 224 virtual breast phantoms were created which emulate the complex breast parenchyma of actual human subjects. The volume breast density (with skin) ranged from 5.5% to 66.3% with a mean value of 25.3% ± 13.2%. Breast volumes ranged from 25.0 to 2099.6 ml with a mean value of 716.3 ± 386.5 ml. Three breast phantoms were selected for imaging with digital compression (using finite element modeling) and simple ray-tracing, and the results show promise in their potential to produce realistic simulated mammograms. Conclusions: This work provides a new population of 224 breast phantoms based on in vivo bCT data for imaging research. Compared to previous studies based on only a few prototype cases, this dataset provides a rich source of new cases spanning a wide range

  11. Food source provisioning and susceptibility of immature and adult Tribolium castaneum on concrete partially treated with chlorfenapyr (Phantom®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of experiments were conducted in which adults, pupae, and 4-week-old larvae of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour beetle, were exposed separately on concrete arenas partially treated (14.4 % of the total area) with the insecticide chlorfenapyr (Phantom®) at 1.1 g active ingredient/...

  12. Calculation of normalised organ and effective doses to adult reference computational phantoms from contemporary computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Jan T.M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX has been used to simulate photon transport and energy deposition in anthropomorphic phantoms due to the x-ray exposure from the Philips iCT 256 and Siemens Definition CT scanners, together with the previously studied General Electric 9800. The MCNPX code was compiled with the Intel FORTRAN compiler and run on a Linux PC cluster. A patch has been successfully applied to reduce computing times by about 4%. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently published the Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference computational voxel phantoms as successors to the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) stylised hermaphrodite mathematical phantoms that form the basis for the widely-used ImPACT CT dosimetry tool. Comparisons of normalised organ and effective doses calculated for a range of scanner operating conditions have demonstrated significant differences in results (in excess of 30%) between the voxel and mathematical phantoms as a result of variations in anatomy. These analyses illustrate the significant influence of choice of phantom on normalised organ doses and the need for standardisation to facilitate comparisons of dose. Further such dose simulations are needed in order to update the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry spreadsheet for contemporary CT practice. (author)

  13. A digital phantom of the axilla based on the Visible Human Project data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, S. J.; Welch, A. E.; Baker, L.

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a new digital phantom designed for Monte Carlo simulations of breast cancer and particularly positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the axillary lymph nodes. The phantom was based on data from the Visible Human Project female data set. The phantom covers the head-to-diaphragm regions; 17 major tissue types were segmented and 66 individual lymph nodes were identified. The authors have used the phantom in Monte Carlo simulations to model a reduced field-of-view PET imager based on two flat plate arrays placed on either side of the shoulder. Images used a simple single angle set of projections. The authors have conducted two preliminary studies: one modeling a single-frame PET acquisition 60 min after FDG injection and the other modeling a dynamic PET acquisition simulating four time frames after FDG injection. The dynamic results were processed into parametric images using the Patlak method and show the advantage to be gained by including the temporal information for legion detection. The authors' preliminary results indicate that the performance of such an imager forming projection images is not sufficient for axillary node PET imaging.

  14. Internal strain estimation for quantification of human heel pad elastic modulus: A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Karen; Liebgott, Hervé; Wilhjelm, Jens E.

    2013-01-01

    Shock absorption is the most important function of the human heel pad. However, changes in heel pad elasticity, as seen in e.g. long-distance runners, diabetes patients, and victims of Falanga torture are affecting this function, often in a painful manner. Assessment of heel pad elasticity...... is usually based on one or a few strain measurements obtained by an external load-deformation system. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for quantitative measurements of heel pad elastic modulus based on several internal strain measures from within the heel pad by use of ultrasound images. Nine...... heel phantoms were manufactured featuring a combination of three heel pad stiffnesses and three heel pad thicknesses to model the normal human variation. Each phantom was tested in an indentation system comprising a 7MHz linear array ultrasound transducer, working as the indentor, and a connected load...

  15. Fabrication of a compliant phantom of the human aortic arch for use in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hütter Larissa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Compliant phantoms of the human aortic arch can mimic patient specific cardiovascular dysfunctions in vitro. Hence, phantoms may enable elucidation of haemodynamic disturbances caused by aortic dysfunction. This paper describes the fabrication of a thin-walled silicone phantom of the human ascending aorta and brachiocephalic artery. The model geometry was determined via a meta-analysis and modelled in SolidWorks before 3D printing. The solid model surface was smoothed and scanned with a 3D scanner. An offset outer mould was milled from Ebalta S-Model board. The final phantom indicated that ABS was a suitable material for the internal model, the Ebalta S-Model board yielded a rough external surface. Co-location of the moulds during silicone pour was insufficient to enable consistent wall thickness. The resulting phantom was free of air bubbles but did not have the desired wall thickness consistency.

  16. Overview of the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external idealised exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Zankl, M; Bolch, W E; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E; Hunt, J G; Pelliccioni, M; Schlattl, H; Menzel, H-G

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the ICRP Publications 110 and 116 describing the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its 2007 Recommendations made several revisions to the methods of calculation of the protection quantities. In order to implement these recommendations, the DOCAL task group of the ICRP developed computational phantoms representing the reference adult male and female and then calculated a set of dose conversion coefficients for various types of idealised external exposures. This paper focuses on the dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and investigates their relationship with the conversion coefficients of the protection and operational quantities of ICRP Publication 74. Contributing factors to the differences between these sets of conversion coefficients are discussed in terms of the changes in phantoms employed and the radiation and tissue weighting factors.

  17. Impact of patient weight on tumor visibility based on human-shaped phantom simulation study in PET imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarudin, M.; Saripan, M. I.; Mashohor, S.; Saad, W. H. M.; Nordin, A. J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-10-01

    Energy window technique has been implemented in all positron emission tomography (PET) imaging protocol, with the aim to remove the unwanted low energy photons. Current practices in our institution however are performed by using default energy threshold level regardless of the weight of the patient. Phantom size, which represents the size of the patient's body, is the factor that determined the level of scatter fraction during PET imaging. Thus, the motivation of this study is to determine the optimum energy threshold level for different sizes of human-shaped phantom, to represent underweight, normal, overweight and obese patients. In this study, the scanner was modeled by using Monte Carlo code, version MCNP5. Five different sizes of elliptical-cylinder shaped of human-sized phantoms with diameter ranged from 15 to 30 cm were modeled. The tumor was modeled by a cylindrical line source filled with 1.02 MeV positron emitters at the center of the phantom. Various energy window widths, in the ranged of 10-50% were implemented to the data. In conclusion, the phantom mass volume did influence the scatter fraction within the volume. Bigger phantom caused more scattering events and thus led to coincidence counts lost. We evaluated the impact of phantom sizes on the sensitivity and visibility of the simulated models. Implementation of wider energy window improved the sensitivity of the system and retained the coincidence photons lost. Visibility of the tumor improved as an appropriate energy window implemented for the different sizes of phantom.

  18. ICRU activity in the field of phantoms in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRU Report on 'Phantoms and Computational Models in Radiation Therapy, Diagnosis and Protection' is presented. Different types of phantoms may be defined. They may be broadly categorized according to their primary function: dosimetry, calibration and imaging. Within each functional category, there are 3 types or designs of phantoms: body phantoms (anthropomorphic), standard phantoms and reference phantoms (used in the definition and specification of certain radiation quantities). In radiological imaging, anthropomorphic body phantoms are used for measuring the absorbed dose distribution resulting from imaging procedures. Standard phantoms have simple reproducible geometry and are used for comparing measurements under standard conditions of exposure. Imaging phantoms are useful for evaluating a given imaging system; they contain different types of test pieces. The report contains a major section on human anatomy, from fetus to adult with the variations due to ethnic origin. Tolerance levels for the phantoms (composition, dimensions) are proposed and quality assurance programs are outlined. The report contains extensive appendices; human anatomical data and full specification of over 80 phantoms and computational models. ICRU Report 46 on 'Photon, electron, proton and neutron interaction data for body tissues' is closely related to the field of phantoms. It is a logical continuation on ICRU Report 44 (1989) on 'Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurements' and contains the interaction data for more than 100 tissues, from fetal to adult, including some diseased tissues

  19. Application of the mathematical modelling and human phantoms for calculation of the organ doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Cechak, T.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing power of the computers hardware and new versions of the software for the radiation transport simulation and modelling of the complex experimental setups and geometrical arrangement enable to dramatically improve calculation of organ or target volume doses ( dose distributions) in the wide field of medical physics and radiation protection applications. Increase of computers memory and new software features makes it possible to use not only analytical (mathematical) phantoms but also allow constructing the voxel models of human or phantoms with voxels fine enough (e.g. 1·1·1 mm) to represent all required details. CT data can be used for the description of such voxel model geometry .Advanced scoring methods are available in the new software versions. Contribution gives the overview of such new possibilities in the modelling and doses calculations, discusses the simulation/approximation of the dosimetric quantities ( especially dose ) and calculated data interpretation. Some examples of application and demonstrations will be shown, compared and discussed. Present computational tools enables to calculate organ or target volumes doses with new quality of large voxel models/phantoms (including CT based patient specific model ), approximating the human body with high precision. Due to these features has more and more importance and use in the fields of medical and radiological physics, radiation protection, etc. (authors)

  20. Can fruits and vegetables be used as substitute phantoms for normal human brain tissues in magnetic resonance imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Daisuke; Ushioda, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ayaka; Sakurai Yuki; Nagahama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Manami; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Sakata, Motomichi

    2013-01-01

    Various custom-made phantoms designed to optimize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences have been created and subsequently reported in Japanese Society of Radiological Technology (JSRT). However, custom-made phantoms that correctly match the T 1 -value and T 2 -values of human brain tissue (gray matter and white matter) cannot be made easily or quickly. The aim of this project was to search for alternative materials, such as fruits and vegetables, for optimizing MRI sequences. The following eight fruits and vegetables were investigated: apple, tomato, melon, apple mango (Mangifera indica), banana, avocado, peach, and eggplant. Their potential was studied for use in modeling phantoms of normal human brain tissues. MRI (T 1 - and T 2 -weighted sequences) was performed on the human brain and the fruits and vegetables using various concentrations of contrast medium (gadolinium) in the same size tubes as the custom-made phantom. The authors compared the signal intensity (SI) in human brain tissue (gray matter and white matter) with that of the fruits and the custom-made phantom. The T 1 and T 2 values were measured for banana tissue and compared with those for human brain tissue in the literature. Our results indicated that banana tissue is similar to human brain tissue (both gray matter and white matter). Banana tissue can thus be employed as an alternative phantom for the human brain for the purpose of MRI. (author)

  1. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.; Panzer, W.; Drexler, G.

    1991-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique which offers a high diagnostic capability; however, the dose to the patient is high compared to conventional radiography. This report provides a catalogue of organ doses resulting from CT examinations. The organ doses were calculated for the type of CT scanners most commonly used in the FRG and for three different radiation qualities. For the dose calculations, the patients were represented by the adult mathematical phantoms Adam and Eva. The radiation transport in the body was simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The doses were calculated as conversion factors of mean organ doses per air kerma free in air on the axis of rotation. Mean organ dose conversion factors are given per organ and per single CT slice of 1 cm width. The mean dose to an organ resulting from a particular CT examination can be estimated by summing up the contribution to the organ dose from each relevant slice. In order to facilitate the selection of the appropriate slices, a table is given which relates the mathematical phantoms' coordinates to certain anatomical landmarks in the human body. (orig.)

  2. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Panzer, W.; Widenmann, L.; Williams, G.; Zankl, M.

    1984-03-01

    This report gives tables of conversion factors for the calculation of organ doses from technical parameters of typical radiographic techniques. These conversion factors were calculated using a male and a female mathematical human phantom and an efficient Monte Carlo programme that determines the mean organ doses from the energy deposited in each organ. Each diagnostic X-ray examination is studied using three X-ray spectra resulting from three different high tension values. The conversion factors per unit entrance air dose in free air are given for sixteen organs and for the entrance and exit surface skin doses. The tables are actually valid only for the given parameters such as phantom dimensions, source-to-skin distance, projection and X-ray quality. This, of course, gives rise to some uncertainty when dealing with the individual technique and patient. The uncertainty in organ dose of adult patients, however, should not be very large, if the calculation is based on a similar geometry, and before all, on the actually administered entrance air dose in the selected high tension range according to the patient parameters. (orig.)

  3. Internal strain estimation for quantification of human heel pad elastic modulus: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Karen; Liebgott, Hervé; Wilhjelm, Jens E; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Torp-Pedersen, Søren T; Delachartre, Philippe; Jensen, Jørgen A

    2013-02-01

    Shock absorption is the most important function of the human heel pad. However, changes in heel pad elasticity, as seen in e.g. long-distance runners, diabetes patients, and victims of Falanga torture are affecting this function, often in a painful manner. Assessment of heel pad elasticity is usually based on one or a few strain measurements obtained by an external load-deformation system. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for quantitative measurements of heel pad elastic modulus based on several internal strain measures from within the heel pad by use of ultrasound images. Nine heel phantoms were manufactured featuring a combination of three heel pad stiffnesses and three heel pad thicknesses to model the normal human variation. Each phantom was tested in an indentation system comprising a 7MHz linear array ultrasound transducer, working as the indentor, and a connected load cell. Load-compression data and ultrasound B-mode images were simultaneously acquired in 19 compression steps of 0.1mm each. The internal tissue displacement was for each step calculated by a phase-based cross-correlation technique and internal strain maps were derived from these displacement maps. Elastic moduli were found from the resulting stress-strain curves. The elastic moduli made it possible to distinguish eight of nine phantoms from each other according to the manufactured stiffness and showed very little dependence of the thickness. Mean elastic moduli for the three soft, the three medium, and the three hard phantoms were 89kPa, 153kPa, and 168kPa, respectively. The combination of ultrasound images and force measurements provided an effective way of assessing the elastic properties of the heel pad due to the internal strain estimation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations: Construction of a heterogeneous phantom based on human organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauridsen, B.; Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1987-01-01

    The basic dosimetric quantity in ICRP-publication no. 30 is the aborbed fraction AF(T<-S). This parameter is the fraction of energy absorbed in a target organ T per emission of radiation from activity deposited in the source organ S. Based upon this fraction it is possible to calculate the Specific Effective Energy SEE(T<-S). From this, the committed effective dose equivalent from an intake of radioactive material can be found, and thus the annual limit of intake for given radionuclides can be determined. A male phantom has been constructed with the aim of measuring the Specific Effective Energy SEE(T<-S) in various target organs. Impressions-of real human organs have been used to produce vacuum forms. Tissue equivalent plastic sheets were sucked into the vacuum forms producing a shell with a shape identical to the original organ. Each organ has been made of two shells. The same procedure has been used for the body. Thin tubes through the organs make it possible to place TL dose meters in a matrix so the dose distribution can be measured. The phantom has been supplied with lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen, stomach, bladder, pancreas, and thyroid gland. To select a suitable body liquid for the phantom, laboratory experiments have been made with different liquids and different radionuclides. In these experiments the change in dose rate due to changes in density and composition of the liquid was determined. Preliminary results of the experiments are presented. (orig.)

  5. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p < 0.001). Effective dose and 10% MTF were 0.92 mSv and 360 μ m at 120 kV/10 mA. Various intracranial structures were clearly visible in the brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  6. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1991-01-01

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  7. Impact of patient weight on tumor visibility based on human-shaped phantom simulation study in PET imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musarudin, M.; Saripan, M.I.; Mashohor, S.; Saad, W.H.M.; Nordin, A.J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy window technique has been implemented in all positron emission tomography (PET) imaging protocol, with the aim to remove the unwanted low energy photons. Current practices in our institution however are performed by using default energy threshold level regardless of the weight of the patient. Phantom size, which represents the size of the patient's body, is the factor that determined the level of scatter fraction during PET imaging. Thus, the motivation of this study is to determine the optimum energy threshold level for different sizes of human-shaped phantom, to represent underweight, normal, overweight and obese patients. In this study, the scanner was modeled by using Monte Carlo code, version MCNP5. Five different sizes of elliptical-cylinder shaped of human-sized phantoms with diameter ranged from 15 to 30 cm were modeled. The tumor was modeled by a cylindrical line source filled with 1.02 MeV positron emitters at the center of the phantom. Various energy window widths, in the ranged of 10–50% were implemented to the data. In conclusion, the phantom mass volume did influence the scatter fraction within the volume. Bigger phantom caused more scattering events and thus led to coincidence counts lost. We evaluated the impact of phantom sizes on the sensitivity and visibility of the simulated models. Implementation of wider energy window improved the sensitivity of the system and retained the coincidence photons lost. Visibility of the tumor improved as an appropriate energy window implemented for the different sizes of phantom. - Highlights: • Optimizing the energy window improved the sensitivity of the PET system. • Improving the visibility of the tumors using the optimized energy window. • Recommendations on the optimized energy windows for different body sizes. • Using simulated phantom using MCNP to determine various body sizes

  8. Overview of the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external idealised exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Akira; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Zankl, Maria; Schlattl, Helmut; Bolch, Wesley E.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Hunt, John G.; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Menzel, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the ICRP Publications 110 and 116 describing the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its 2007 Recommendations made several revisions to the methods of calculation of the protection quantities. In order to implement these recommendations, the DOCAL task group of the ICRP developed computational phantoms representing the reference adult male and female and then calculated a set of dose conversion coefficients for various types of idealised external exposures. This paper focuses on the dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and investigates their relationship with the conversion coefficients of the protection and operational quantities of ICRP Publication 74. Contributing factors to the differences between these sets of conversion coefficients are discussed in terms of the changes in phantoms employed and the radiation and tissue weighting factors. This paper briefly reviews the reference computational phantoms and dose conversion coefficients for external exposures that were published jointly by ICRP and ICRU. Both these publications appeared as a consequence of the ICRP 2007 Recommendations; to implement these recommendations, the ICRP has developed reference computational phantoms representing the adult male and female. These phantoms are used to calculate reference dose conversion coefficients for external and internal sources. Using the reference phantoms and methodology consistent with the 2007 Recommendations, dose conversion coefficients for both effective doses and organ-absorbed doses for various types of idealised external exposures have been calculated. These data sets supersede the existing ICRP/ICRU data sets and expand the particle types and energy ranges. For neutrons, the new effective dose conversion coefficients become smaller compared with those in ICRP74, for energies below hundreds of keV. This is mainly

  9. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head and brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshvari, J; Kivento, M; Christ, A; Bit-Babik, G

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases. (paper)

  10. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head & brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.; Christ, A.; Bit-Babik, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases.

  11. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the posture modification of Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference phantoms of ICRP 110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeano, D.C.; Santos, W.S.; Alves, M.C.; Souza, D.N.; Carvalho, A.B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to modify the standing posture of the anthropomorphic reference phantoms of ICRP publication 110, AM (Adult Male) and AF (Adult Female), to the sitting posture. The change of posture was performed using the Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the phantoms and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. Scion Image software was used to reconstruct and smooth the knee and hip contours of the phantoms in a sitting posture. For 3D visualization of phantoms, the VolView software was used. In the change of postures, the organ and tissue masses were preserved. The MCNPX was used to calculate the equivalent and effective dose conversion coefficients (CCs) per fluence for photons for six irradiation geometries suggested by ICRP publication 110 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO) and energy range 0.010–10 MeV. The results were compared between the standing and sitting postures, for both sexes, in order to evaluate the differences of scattering and absorption of radiation for different postures. Significant differences in the CCs for equivalent dose were observed in the gonads, colon, prostate, urinary bladder and uterus, which are present in the pelvic region, and in organs distributed throughout the body, such as the lymphatic nodes, muscle, skeleton and skin, for the phantoms of both sexes. CCs for effective dose showed significant differences of up to 16% in the AP irradiation geometry, 27% in the PA irradiation geometry and 13% in the ROT irradiation geometry. These results demonstrate the importance of using phantoms in different postures in order to obtain more precise conversion coefficients for a given exposure scenario. - Highlights: • The reference phantoms AM and AF had modified its posture. • The AM and AF phantoms were irradiated in standing and sitting postures. • The irradiation geometry used were the AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO. • The CCs for standing and sitting postures were compared

  12. Computer tomographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonn, A.H.R.; Jacobsen, D.R.; Zech, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A reference phantom for computer tomography employs a flexible member with means for urging the flexible member into contact along the curved surface of the lumbar region of a human patient. In one embodiment, the reference phantom is pre-curved in an arc greater than required. Pressure from the weight of a patient laying upon the reference phantom is effective for straightening out the curvature sufficiently to achieve substantial contact along the lumbar region. The curvature of the reference phantom may be additionally distorted by a resilient pad between the resilient phantom and a table for urging it into contact with the lumbar region. In a second embodiment of the invention, a flexible reference phantom is disposed in a slot in the top of a resilient cushion. The resilient cushion and reference phantom may be enclosed in a flexible container. A partially curved reference phantom in a slot in a resilient cushion is also contemplated. (author)

  13. Ion therapy for uveal melanoma in new human eye phantom based on GEANT4 toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdipour, Seyed Ali [Physics Department, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mowlavi, Ali Asghar, E-mail: amowlavi@hsu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); ICTP, Associate Federation Scheme, Medical Physics Field, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy with ion beams like proton and carbon has been used for treatment of eye uveal melanoma for many years. In this research, we have developed a new phantom of human eye for Monte Carlo simulation of tumors treatment to use in GEANT4 toolkit. Total depth−dose profiles for the proton, alpha, and carbon incident beams with the same ranges have been calculated in the phantom. Moreover, the deposited energy of the secondary particles for each of the primary beams is calculated. The dose curves are compared for 47.8 MeV proton, 190.1 MeV alpha, and 1060 MeV carbon ions that have the same range in the target region reaching to the center of tumor. The passively scattered spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) for each incident beam as well as the flux curves of the secondary particles including neutron, gamma, and positron has been calculated and compared for the primary beams. The high sharpness of carbon beam's Bragg peak with low lateral broadening is the benefit of this beam in hadrontherapy but it has disadvantages of dose leakage in the tail after its Bragg peak and high intensity of neutron production. However, proton beam, which has a good conformation with tumor shape owing to the beam broadening caused by scattering, can be a good choice for the large-size tumors.

  14. Ion therapy for uveal melanoma in new human eye phantom based on GEANT4 toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdipour, Seyed Ali; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy with ion beams like proton and carbon has been used for treatment of eye uveal melanoma for many years. In this research, we have developed a new phantom of human eye for Monte Carlo simulation of tumors treatment to use in GEANT4 toolkit. Total depth−dose profiles for the proton, alpha, and carbon incident beams with the same ranges have been calculated in the phantom. Moreover, the deposited energy of the secondary particles for each of the primary beams is calculated. The dose curves are compared for 47.8 MeV proton, 190.1 MeV alpha, and 1060 MeV carbon ions that have the same range in the target region reaching to the center of tumor. The passively scattered spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) for each incident beam as well as the flux curves of the secondary particles including neutron, gamma, and positron has been calculated and compared for the primary beams. The high sharpness of carbon beam's Bragg peak with low lateral broadening is the benefit of this beam in hadrontherapy but it has disadvantages of dose leakage in the tail after its Bragg peak and high intensity of neutron production. However, proton beam, which has a good conformation with tumor shape owing to the beam broadening caused by scattering, can be a good choice for the large-size tumors.

  15. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Könik, Arda; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Pretorius, P H; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A; Connolly, Caitlin M; Segars, Paul W; Lindsay, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  16. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M.; Johnson, Karen L.; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W.; Pretorius, P. H.; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  17. A DXA Whole Body Composition Cross-Calibration Experience: Evaluation With Humans, Spine, and Whole Body Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Diane; Libber, Jessie; Sanfilippo, Jennifer; Yu, Hui Jing; Horvath, Blaine; Miller, Colin G; Binkley, Neil

    2016-01-01

    New densitometer installation requires cross-calibration for accurate longitudinal assessment. When replacing a unit with the same model, the International Society for Clinical Densitometry recommends cross-calibrating by scanning phantoms 10 times on each instrument and states that spine bone mineral density (BMD) should be within 1%, whereas total body lean, fat, and %fat mass should be within 2% of the prior instrument. However, there is limited validation that these recommendations provide adequate total body cross-calibration. Here, we report a total body cross-calibration experience with phantoms and humans. Cross-calibration between an existing and new Lunar iDXA was performed using 3 encapsulated spine phantoms (GE [GE Lunar, Madison, WI], BioClinica [BioClinica Inc, Princeton, NJ], and Hologic [Hologic Inc, Bedford, MA]), 1 total body composition phantom (BioClinica), and 30 human volunteers. Thirty scans of each phantom and a total body scan of human volunteers were obtained on each instrument. All spine phantom BMD means were similar (within 1%; g/cm2 bias) between the existing and new dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry unit. The BioClinica body composition phantom (BBCP) BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) values were within 2% with biases of 0.005 g/cm2 and -3.4 g. However, lean and fat mass and %fat differed by 4.6%-7.7% with biases of +463 g, -496 g, and -2.8%, respectively. In vivo comparison supported BBCP data; BMD and BMC were within ∼2%, but lean and fat mass and %fat differed from 1.6% to 4.9% with biases of +833 g, -860 g, and -1.1%. As all body composition comparisons exceeded the recommended 2%, the new densitometer was recalibrated. After recalibration, in vivo bias was lower (g, respectively. Similarly, BBCP lean and fat agreement improved. In conclusion, the BBCP behaves similarly, but not identical, to human in vivo measurements for densitometer cross-calibration. Spine phantoms, despite good BMD and BMC agreement, did not detect

  18. Wireless Performance of a Fully Passive Neurorecording Microsystem Embedded in Dispersive Human Head Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdt, Helen N.; Chae, Junseok; Miranda, Felix A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the wireless performance of a biocompatible fully passive microsystem implanted in phantom media simulating the dispersive dielectric properties of the human head, for potential application in recording cortical neuropotentials. Fully passive wireless operation is achieved by means of backscattering electromagnetic (EM) waves carrying 3rd order harmonic mixing products (2f(sub 0) plus or minus f(sub m)=4.4-4.9 GHZ) containing targeted neuropotential signals (fm approximately equal to 1-1000 Hz). The microsystem is enclosed in 4 micrometer thick parylene-C for biocompatibility and has a footprint of 4 millimeters x 12 millimeters x 500 micrometers. Preliminary testing of the microsystem implanted in the lossy biological simulating media results in signal-to-noise ratio's (SNR) near 22 (SNR approximately equal to 38 in free space) for millivolt level neuropotentials, demonstrating the potential for fully passive wireless microsystems in implantable medical applications.

  19. Mathematical model of a phantom developed for use in calculations of radiation dose to the body and major internal organs of a Japanese adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Hwang, J.M.; Jones, R.M.

    1976-05-01

    A mathematical model of a phantom simulating the body and major internal organs of a Japanese adult has been developed for use in computer calculations of radiation dose. The total body height of the mathematical phantom is 162 cm, and the total body mass is 55 kg based on densities of 0.3, 1.4, and 1.0 g/cm 3 for the lung, skeleton, and bulk tissues of the body, respectively

  20. Generation of a suite of 3D computer-generated breast phantoms from a limited set of human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Christina M. L.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously reported on a three-dimensional computer-generated breast phantom, based on empirical human image data, including a realistic finite-element based compression model that was capable of simulating multimodality imaging data. The computerized breast phantoms are a hybrid of two phantom generation techniques, combining empirical breast CT (bCT) data with flexible computer graphics techniques. However, to date, these phantoms have been based on single human subjects. In this paper, the authors report on a new method to generate multiple phantoms, simulating additional subjects from the limited set of original dedicated breast CT data. The authors developed an image morphing technique to construct new phantoms by gradually transitioning between two human subject datasets, with the potential to generate hundreds of additional pseudoindependent phantoms from the limited bCT cases. The authors conducted a preliminary subjective assessment with a limited number of observers (n= 4) to illustrate how realistic the simulated images generated with the pseudoindependent phantoms appeared. Methods: Several mesh-based geometric transformations were developed to generate distorted breast datasets from the original human subject data. Segmented bCT data from two different human subjects were used as the “base” and “target” for morphing. Several combinations of transformations were applied to morph between the “base’ and “target” datasets such as changing the breast shape, rotating the glandular data, and changing the distribution of the glandular tissue. Following the morphing, regions of skin and fat were assigned to the morphed dataset in order to appropriately assign mechanical properties during the compression simulation. The resulting morphed breast was compressed using a finite element algorithm and simulated mammograms were generated using techniques described previously. Sixty-two simulated mammograms, generated from morphing

  1. Measuring ventricular width on cranial computed tomography. Feasibility of dose reduction in a custom-made adult phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daubner, D.; Cerhova, J.; Linn, J. [Dresden Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Spieth, S. [Dresden Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kirchhof, K. [Chemnitz Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuradiology

    2016-01-15

    To estimate feasible dose reduction to reliably measure ventricular width in adults with hydrocephalus in follow-up cranial computed tomography (CCT) using a custom-made phantom. A gelatine-filled adult calvarium with embedded central fibers of two carrots representing the lateral ventricles was used as a phantom. The phantom was scanned 11 times with two CT scanners (LightSpeed Ultra, GE and Somatom Sensation, Siemens), using tube currents of 380/400, 350, 300, 250, 200, 150 and 100 mA, and tube voltages of 140, 120, 100 and 80 kV. The width of the carrots was measured at four sites in consensus decision of two principle investigators blinded to the scan parameters. Values measured at 380/400 mA and 140 kV served as a reference for the width of the ventricles. Measurements received 1 point if they did not differ more than 0.5 mm from the reference values. A maximum score of 4 could be achieved. The relationship between the correct width measurement of the carrots (lateral ventricles) and the radiation dose can be described by a quadratic regression function. Pixel noise increases and accuracy of measurements decreases with a lower radiation dose. Starting from a tube current of 380/400 mA and a tube voltage of 140 kV, the dose can be reduced by 76 % for LightSpeed Ultra and by 80 % for Somatom Sensation provided that a margin of error of 37.5 % (score = 2.5) for correct width measurement of the carrots is accepted. Lowering the radiation dose by up to 48 % for LightSpeed Ultra and by 52 % for Somatom Sensation, compared to the standard protocol (120 kV and 400 mA) still allowed reliable measurements of ventricular widths in this model.

  2. Measuring ventricular width on cranial computed tomography. Feasibility of dose reduction in a custom-made adult phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubner, D.; Cerhova, J.; Linn, J.; Spieth, S.; Kirchhof, K.

    2016-01-01

    To estimate feasible dose reduction to reliably measure ventricular width in adults with hydrocephalus in follow-up cranial computed tomography (CCT) using a custom-made phantom. A gelatine-filled adult calvarium with embedded central fibers of two carrots representing the lateral ventricles was used as a phantom. The phantom was scanned 11 times with two CT scanners (LightSpeed Ultra, GE and Somatom Sensation, Siemens), using tube currents of 380/400, 350, 300, 250, 200, 150 and 100 mA, and tube voltages of 140, 120, 100 and 80 kV. The width of the carrots was measured at four sites in consensus decision of two principle investigators blinded to the scan parameters. Values measured at 380/400 mA and 140 kV served as a reference for the width of the ventricles. Measurements received 1 point if they did not differ more than 0.5 mm from the reference values. A maximum score of 4 could be achieved. The relationship between the correct width measurement of the carrots (lateral ventricles) and the radiation dose can be described by a quadratic regression function. Pixel noise increases and accuracy of measurements decreases with a lower radiation dose. Starting from a tube current of 380/400 mA and a tube voltage of 140 kV, the dose can be reduced by 76 % for LightSpeed Ultra and by 80 % for Somatom Sensation provided that a margin of error of 37.5 % (score = 2.5) for correct width measurement of the carrots is accepted. Lowering the radiation dose by up to 48 % for LightSpeed Ultra and by 52 % for Somatom Sensation, compared to the standard protocol (120 kV and 400 mA) still allowed reliable measurements of ventricular widths in this model.

  3. Outdoor Urban Propagation Experiment of a Handset MIMO Antenna with a Human Phantom located in a Browsing Stance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Hayashi, Toshiteru; Ogawa, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Outdoor radio propagation experiments are presented at 2.4 GHz, using a handset MIMO antenna with two monopoles and two planar inverted-F antennas (PIFAs), adjacent to a human phantom in browsing stance. The propagation test was performed in an urban area of a city, which resulted in non lineof...

  4. Automatic exposure control in pediatric and adult multidetector CT examinations: A phantom study on dose reduction and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1352, Iraklion 71110, Crete (Greece)

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of a modern x,y,z modulation-based automatic exposure control system (AEC) for dose reduction in pediatric and adult multidetector CT (MDCT) imaging and evaluate the quality of the images obtained. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-, 5-, 10-year old child, and adult were scanned with a MDCT scanner, equipped with a modern AEC system. Dose reduction (%DR) was calculated as the percentage difference of the mean modulated and the preset tube current-time product that is prescribed for standard head and body scan protocols. The effect of the tube potential and the orientation of the topogram acquisition on dose reduction were assessed. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise and signal to noise ratio (SNR). The dose reduction values achieved in pediatric phantoms were remarkably lower than those achieved for the adult. The efficiency of the AEC is decreased at 80 kVp compared to higher tube potentials and for helical scans following an anterior posterior (AP-AEC) compared to a lateral (LAT-AEC) topogram acquisition. In AP-AEC scans, the dose reduction ranged between 4.7 and 34.7% for neonate, 15.4 and 30.9% for 1 year old, 3.1 and 26.7% for 5 years old, 1.2 and 58.7% for 10 years old, and 15.5 and 57.4% for adult. In LAT-AEC scans, the corresponding dose reduction ranged between 11.0 and 36.5%, 27.2 and 35.7%, 11.3 and 35.6%, 0.3 and 67.0%, and 15.0 and 61.7%, respectively. AP-AEC scans resulted in a 17.1% and 19.7% dose increase in the thorax of neonate and the pelvis of the 10-year old phantom, respectively. The variation in the measured noise among images obtained along the scanning z axis was lower in AEC activated compared to fixed milliamperes scans. However, image noise was significantly increased (P<.001) and SNR significantly decreased (P<.001) in most AEC activated compared to fixed milliamperes scans. In conclusion, AEC resulted in a (i

  5. ICRP Publication 116—the first ICRP/ICRU application of the male and female adult reference computational phantoms

    CERN Document Server

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Eckerman, Keith F; Endo, Akira; Hertel, Nolan; Hunt, John; Menzel, Hans G; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Schlattl, Helmut; Zankl, Maria

    2014-01-01

    ICRP Publication 116 on `Conversion coefficients for radiological protection quantities for external radiation exposures', provides fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for organ-absorbed doses and effective dose for various types of external exposures (ICRP 2010 ICRP Publication 116). The publication supersedes the ICRP Publication 74 (ICRP 1996 ICRP Publication 74, ICRU 1998 ICRU Report 57), including new particle types and expanding the energy ranges considered. The coefficients were calculated using the ICRP/ICRU computational phantoms (ICRP 2009 ICRP Publication 110) representing the reference adult male and reference adult female (ICRP 2002 ICRP Publication 89), together with a variety of Monte Carlo codes simulating the radiation transport in the body. Idealized whole-body irradiation from unidirectional and rotational parallel beams as well as isotropic irradiation was considered for a large variety of incident radiations and energy ranges. Comparison of the effective doses with operational quantit...

  6. Electromagnetic field effect simulation over a realistic pixel ed phantom human's brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, R.; Calderon, J. A.; Rivera, T.; Azorin, J.

    2012-10-01

    The exposition to different types of electromagnetic radiations can produce damages and injures on the people's tissues. The scientist, spend time and resources studying the effects of electromagnetic fields over the organs. Particularly in medical areas, the specialist in imaging methodologies and radiological treatment, are very worried about no injure there patient. Determination of matter radiation interaction, can be experimental or theoretical is not an easy task anyway. At first case, is not possible make measures inside the patient, then the experimental procedure consist in make measures in human's dummy, however, is not possible see deformations of electromagnetic fields due the organs presence. In the second case, is necessary solve, the Maxwell's equations with the electromagnetic field, crossing a lot of organs and tissues with different electric and magnetic properties each one. One alternative for theoretical solution, is make a computational simulation, however, this option, require an enormous quantity of memory and large computational times. Then, the most simulations are making in 2 dimensional or in 3 dimensional although using human models approximations, build ed with basic geometrical figures, like spheres, cylinders, ellipsoids, etc. Obviously this models just lets obtain a coarse solution of the actually situation. In this work, we propose a novel methodology to build a realistic pixel ed phantom of human's organs, and solve the Maxwell's equations over this models, evidently, the solutions are more approximated to the real behaviour. Additionally, there models results optimized when they are discretized and the finite element method is used to calculate the electromagnetic field and the induced currents. (Author)

  7. Electromagnetic field effect simulation over a realistic pixel ed phantom human's brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, R.; Calderon, J. A.; Rivera, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J., E-mail: rafaelturing@prodigy.net.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The exposition to different types of electromagnetic radiations can produce damages and injures on the people's tissues. The scientist, spend time and resources studying the effects of electromagnetic fields over the organs. Particularly in medical areas, the specialist in imaging methodologies and radiological treatment, are very worried about no injure there patient. Determination of matter radiation interaction, can be experimental or theoretical is not an easy task anyway. At first case, is not possible make measures inside the patient, then the experimental procedure consist in make measures in human's dummy, however, is not possible see deformations of electromagnetic fields due the organs presence. In the second case, is necessary solve, the Maxwell's equations with the electromagnetic field, crossing a lot of organs and tissues with different electric and magnetic properties each one. One alternative for theoretical solution, is make a computational simulation, however, this option, require an enormous quantity of memory and large computational times. Then, the most simulations are making in 2 dimensional or in 3 dimensional although using human models approximations, build ed with basic geometrical figures, like spheres, cylinders, ellipsoids, etc. Obviously this models just lets obtain a coarse solution of the actually situation. In this work, we propose a novel methodology to build a realistic pixel ed phantom of human's organs, and solve the Maxwell's equations over this models, evidently, the solutions are more approximated to the real behaviour. Additionally, there models results optimized when they are discretized and the finite element method is used to calculate the electromagnetic field and the induced currents. (Author)

  8. Dosimetric Comparison of Simulated Human Eye And Water Phantom in Investigation of Iodine Source Effects on Tumour And Healthy Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadi, A.S.; Masoudi, F.S. K.N.Toosi University of Technology

    2011-01-01

    For better clinical analysis in ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry, there is a need for the dose determination in different parts of the eye, so simulating the eye and defining the material of any parts of that, is helpful for better investigating dosimetry in human eye. However in brachytherapy dosimetry, it is common to consider the water phantom as human eye globe. In this work, a full human eye is simulated with MCNP-4C code by considering all parts of the eye like; lens, cornea, retina, choroid, sclera, anterior chamber, optic nerve, bulk of the eye comprising vitreous body and tumour. The average dose in different parts of this full model of human eye is determined and the results are compared with the dose calculated in water phantom. The central axes depth dose and the dose in whole of the tumour for these two simulated eye model are calculated too, and the results are compared. At long last, as the aim of this work is comparing the result of investigating dosimetry between two water phantom as human eye and simulated eye globe, the ratios of the absorbed dose by the healthy tissues to the absorbed dose by the tumour are calculated in these simulations and the comparison between results is done eventually.

  9. Adult phantoms as function of body mass, height and posture by using caucasian anthropomorphic statistics; Fantomas adultos em funcao da massa corporal, da altura e da postura usando estatisticas antropometricas caucasianas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil, E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.b, E-mail: vagner.cassola@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Milian, Felix Mas, E-mail: felix_mas_milian@yahoo.co [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia

    2011-10-26

    The CALLDose{sub X} 4.0 computer program uses conversion coefficients for the MASH and FASH adult phantoms on the vertical and supine postures, representing the standard man and woman according to ICRP 90 and are called 'basic phantoms'. For improving the representation of real patients in the CALLDose{sub X}, this paper developed adults phantoms as function of mass and height by using anthropometric data from nine of them prevailing caucasian countries

  10. PID - 3D: a software to develop mathematical human phantoms for use in computational dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Filho, Jose de Melo; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The PID-3D software, written in Visual C++, contains tools developed for building and editing of three-dimensional geometric figures formed of voxels (volume pixels). These tools were projected to be used, together with those already developed by the Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq), such as the FANTOMAS and DIP software, in computational dosimetry of ionizing radiation. The main objective of this paper is to develop various voxel-based geometric solids to build voxel phantoms (meaning models), anthropomorphic or not. The domain of this technique of development of geometric solids is important for the GDN/CNPq, because it allows the use of just one Monte Carlo code to simulate the transportation, interaction and deposition of radiation in tomographic and mathematical phantoms. Building a particular geometric solid the user needs to inform to the PID-3D software, the location and the size of the parallelepiped that involves it. Each built solid can be saved in a binary file of the type SGI (file containing the size and the numeric values that constitutes the 3D matrix that represents the solid, commonly used by GDN/CNPq). The final mathematical phantom is built starting from these SGI files and the SGI file resulting constitutes a voxel phantom. With this approach the software's user does not have to manipulate the equations and inequalities of the solids that represent the organs and tissues of the phantom. The 3D-PID software, associated with the FANTOMAS and DIP software are tools produced by GDN/CNPq, providing a new technique for building of 3D scenes in dosimetric evaluations using voxel phantoms. To validate the PID-3D software one built, step by step, a phantom similar to the MIRD-5 stylized phantom. (author)

  11. Determination of the distal dose edge in a human phantom by measuring the prompt gamma distribution: a Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Chul Hee; Lee, Han Rim; Yeom, Yeon Su; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The close relationship between the proton dose distribution and the distribution of prompt gammas generated by proton-induced nuclear interactions along the path of protons in a water phantom was demonstrated by means of both Monte Carlo simulations and limited experiments. In order to test the clinical applicability of the method for determining the distal dose edge in a human body, a human voxel model, constructed based on a body-composition-approximated physical phantom, was used, after which the MCNPX code was used to analyze the energy spectra and the prompt gamma yields from the major elements composing the human voxel model; finally, the prompt gamma distribution, generated from the voxel model and measured by using an array-type prompt gamma detection system, was calculated and compared with the proton dose distribution. According to the results, effective prompt gammas were produced mainly by oxygen, and the specific energy of the prompt gammas, allowing for selective measurement, was found to be 4.44 MeV. The results also show that the distal dose edge in the human phantom, despite the heterogeneous composition and the complicated shape, can be determined by measuring the prompt gamma distribution with an array-type detection system.

  12. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.; Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E.; Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R.; Birk, E.; Atar, E.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  13. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A. [Soreq NRC, Radiation Protection Domain (Israel); Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel); Birk, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Atar, E., E-mail: elia@clalit.org.il [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  14. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Cohen, D; Bruckheimer, E; Bachar, G N; Konstantinovsky, R; Birk, E; Atar, E

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT. Effective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms. The effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590% for upper lung, 639 and 525% for mid-lung, and 461 and 251% for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762% for liver and 513 and 608% for kidney biopsies. Based on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  15. WE-D-303-01: Development and Application of Digital Human Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, P. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Modern medical physics deals with complex problems such as 4D radiation therapy and imaging quality optimization. Such problems involve a large number of radiological parameters, and anatomical and physiological breathing patterns. A major challenge is how to develop, test, evaluate and compare various new imaging and treatment techniques, which often involves testing over a large range of radiological parameters as well as varying patient anatomies and motions. It would be extremely challenging, if not impossible, both ethically and practically, to test every combination of parameters and every task on every type of patient under clinical conditions. Computer-based simulation using computational phantoms offers a practical technique with which to evaluate, optimize, and compare imaging technologies and methods. Within simulation, the computerized phantom provides a virtual model of the patient’s anatomy and physiology. Imaging data can be generated from it as if it was a live patient using accurate models of the physics of the imaging and treatment process. With sophisticated simulation algorithms, it is possible to perform virtual experiments entirely on the computer. By serving as virtual patients, computational phantoms hold great promise in solving some of the most complex problems in modern medical physics. In this proposed symposium, we will present the history and recent developments of computational phantom models, share experiences in their application to advanced imaging and radiation applications, and discuss their promises and limitations. Learning Objectives: Understand the need and requirements of computational phantoms in medical physics research Discuss the developments and applications of computational phantoms Know the promises and limitations of computational phantoms in solving complex problems.

  16. WE-D-303-01: Development and Application of Digital Human Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segars, P.

    2015-01-01

    Modern medical physics deals with complex problems such as 4D radiation therapy and imaging quality optimization. Such problems involve a large number of radiological parameters, and anatomical and physiological breathing patterns. A major challenge is how to develop, test, evaluate and compare various new imaging and treatment techniques, which often involves testing over a large range of radiological parameters as well as varying patient anatomies and motions. It would be extremely challenging, if not impossible, both ethically and practically, to test every combination of parameters and every task on every type of patient under clinical conditions. Computer-based simulation using computational phantoms offers a practical technique with which to evaluate, optimize, and compare imaging technologies and methods. Within simulation, the computerized phantom provides a virtual model of the patient’s anatomy and physiology. Imaging data can be generated from it as if it was a live patient using accurate models of the physics of the imaging and treatment process. With sophisticated simulation algorithms, it is possible to perform virtual experiments entirely on the computer. By serving as virtual patients, computational phantoms hold great promise in solving some of the most complex problems in modern medical physics. In this proposed symposium, we will present the history and recent developments of computational phantom models, share experiences in their application to advanced imaging and radiation applications, and discuss their promises and limitations. Learning Objectives: Understand the need and requirements of computational phantoms in medical physics research Discuss the developments and applications of computational phantoms Know the promises and limitations of computational phantoms in solving complex problems

  17. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  18. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94 Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ( 94 Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K 1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K 1 . For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94 Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal

  19. Experience of development and testing of a new model of an anthropomorphic radiodosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 'Roman'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhov, R.E.; Finkel, F.V.

    2013-01-01

    In 2006-2010 by the commission of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland applied scientific research and development of a new model of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body (the Phantom) were performed, after the development of the production technology and initial testing in 2010-2012 the first serial copy of the Phantom under the name ARDF-10 ROMAN was produced. The main application of the new model of the Phantom ARDF-10 ROMAN: - increase of the precision of calibration and implementation of the periodic monitoring of Whole body counters (WBC) equipment, standardization of measurement procedure for inter-laboratory comparisons of the incorporated activity. - metrological support of the development and implementation of new methods for human radiation spectrometry: identification of radionuclide content of incorporated activity in the human body; measurements of the activity of incorporated technogenic and natural radionuclides in the whole body and in the lungs; measurements of 90 Sr content in the bone tissue. Study of the mechanisms of the intake, distribution, accumulation and excretion of the radionuclides in the human body, such as: daughter products of 222 Rn decay in the respiratory tract, 241 Am, other transuranic elements; isotopes of iodine in the thyroid gland; radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients for diagnostic and medicinal purposes. Obtaining estimates of spatial-temporal distribution of individual internal exposure dose of a human. The result of the work of recent years has been the creation of hygienic safe standard sample of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 ROMAN, consisting of 4 anthropometric models of body parts, which are independent assembly units (head phantom, neck phantom, torso phantom, knee phantom). Phantom models are made from simulators of bone, soft (muscle) and lungs biological tissue. The Phantom contains 28 separate elements. To the first

  20. ICRU activity in the field of phantoms in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; White, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRU Report on 'Phantoms and Computational Models in Radiation Therapy, Diagnosis and Protection' is presented. The Report contains a major section on human anatomy, from fetus to adult with the variations due to ethnic origin. Tolerance levels for the phantoms (composition, dimensions) are proposed and quality assurance programs are outlined. The report contains extensive appendices: human anatomical data and full specification of over 80 phantoms and computational models. ICRU Report 46 on 'Photon, electron, proton and neutron interaction data for body tissues' is closely related to the field of phantoms. It is a logical continuation on ICRU Report 44 (1989) on 'Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurements' and contains the interaction data for more than 100 tissues, from fetal to adult, including some diseased tissues. (author)

  1. Application of phantoms of the human body for solving radiation protection problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulheim, K.F.; Steuer, J.; Fasten, C.

    1977-01-01

    In order to assess the usefulness of various materials (such as polystyrene, crystal sugar and ethanol) as phantom materials for the mean soft tissue, the lung and the skeleton of the ICRP Reference Man, the linear attenuation coefficients for 20, 60, 100 and 134 keV photons have been calculated using an empirical formula. Furthermore, the design and properties of the phantoms used in the Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz der DDR (SAAS) for calibration and training purposes have been described including some examples of application. (author)

  2. Effective dose evaluation of NORM-added consumer products using Monte Carlo simulations and the ICRP computational human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Cheol; Yoo, Do Hyeon; Testa, Mauro; Shin, Wook-Geun; Choi, Hyun Joon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. Using the Monte Carlo method, the radioactive products were simulated with ICRP reference phantom and the organ doses were calculated with the usage scenario. Finally, the annual effective doses were evaluated as lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y"−"1 for 44 products. It was demonstrated that NORM-added consumer products could be quantitatively assessed for the safety regulation. - Highlights: • Consumer products considered that NORM would be included should be regulated. • 44 products were collected and its gamma activities were measured with HPGe detector. • Through Monte Carlo simulation, organ equivalent doses and effective doses on human phantom were calculated. • All annual effective doses for the products were evaluated as lower than dose limit for the public.

  3. The UF family of reference hybrid phantoms for computational radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hurtado, Jorge; Pafundi, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2010-01-01

    Computational human phantoms are computer models used to obtain dose distributions within the human body exposed to internal or external radiation sources. In addition, they are increasingly used to develop detector efficiencies for in vivo whole-body counters. Two classes of computational human phantoms have been widely utilized for dosimetry calculation: stylized and voxel phantoms that describe human anatomy through mathematical surface equations and 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Stylized phantoms are flexible in that changes to organ position and shape are possible given avoidance of region overlap, while voxel phantoms are typically fixed to a given patient anatomy, yet can be proportionally scaled to match individuals of larger or smaller stature, but of equivalent organ anatomy. Voxel phantoms provide much better anatomical realism as compared to stylized phantoms which are intrinsically limited by mathematical surface equations. To address the drawbacks of these phantoms, hybrid phantoms based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces have been introduced wherein anthropomorphic flexibility and anatomic realism are both preserved. Researchers at the University of Florida have introduced a series of hybrid phantoms representing the ICRP Publication 89 reference newborn, 15 year, and adult male and female. In this study, six additional phantoms are added to the UF family of hybrid phantoms-those of the reference 1 year, 5 year and 10 year child. Head and torso CT images of patients whose ages were close to the targeted ages were obtained under approved protocols. Major organs and tissues were segmented from these images using an image processing software, 3D-DOCTOR(TM). NURBS and polygon mesh surfaces were then used to model individual organs and tissues after importing the segmented organ models to the 3D NURBS modeling software, Rhinoceros(TM). The phantoms were matched to four reference datasets: (1) standard anthropometric data, (2) reference

  4. Low tube voltage dual source computed tomography to reduce contrast media doses in adult abdomen examinations: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thor, Daniel [Department of Diagnostic Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm 14186 (Sweden); Brismar, Torkel B., E-mail: torkel.brismar@gmail.com; Fischer, Michael A. [Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology at Karolinska Institutet and Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Stockholm 14186 (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of low tube voltage dual source (DS) single energy (SE) and dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) to reduce contrast media (CM) dose in adult abdominal examinations of various sizes while maintaining soft tissue and iodine contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Methods: Four abdominal phantoms simulating a body mass index of 16 to 35 kg/m{sup 2} with four inserted syringes of 0, 2, 4, and 8 mgI/ml CM were scanned using a 64-slice DS-CT scanner. Six imaging protocols were used; one single source (SS) reference protocol (120 kV, 180 reference mAs), four low kV SE protocols (70 and 80 kV using both SS and DS), and one DE protocol at 80/140 kV. Potential CM reduction with unchanged CNRs relative to the 120 kV protocol was calculated along with the corresponding increase in radiation dose. Results: The potential contrast media reductions were determined to be approximately 53% for DS 70 kV, 51% for SS 70 kV, 44% for DS 80 kV, 40% for SS 80 kV, and 20% for DE (all differences were significant, P < 0.05). Constant CNR could be achieved by using DS 70 kV for small to medium phantom sizes (16–26 kg/m{sup 2}) and for all sizes (16–35 kg/m{sup 2}) when using DS 80 kV and DE. Corresponding radiation doses increased by 60%–107%, 23%–83%, and 6%–12%, respectively. Conclusions: DS single energy CT can be used to reduce CM dose by 44%–53% with maintained CNR in adult abdominal examinations at the cost of an increased radiation dose. DS dual-energy CT allows reduction of CM dose by 20% at similar radiation dose as compared to a standard 120 kV single source.

  5. Experimental study on tissue phantoms to understand the effect of injury and suturing on human skin mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Arnab; Unnikrishnan, Vinu; Flynn, Zachary; Lackey, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Skin injuries are the most common type of injuries occurring in day-to-day life. A skin injury usually manifests itself in the form of a wound or a cut. While a shallow wound may heal by itself within a short time, deep wounds require surgical interventions such as suturing for timely healing. To date, suturing practices are based on a surgeon's experience and may vary widely from one situation to another. Understanding the mechanics of wound closure and suturing of the skin is crucial to improve clinical suturing practices and also to plan automated robotic surgeries. In the literature, phenomenological two-dimensional computational skin models have been developed to study the mechanics of wound closure. Additionally, the effect of skin pre-stress (due to the natural tension of the skin) on wound closure mechanics has been studied. However, in most of these analyses, idealistic two-dimensional skin geometries, materials and loads have been assumed, which are far from reality, and would clearly generate inaccurate quantitative results. In this work, for the first time, a biofidelic human skin tissue phantom was developed using a two-part silicone material. A wound was created on the phantom material and sutures were placed to close the wound. Uniaxial mechanical tests were carried out on the phantom specimens to study the effect of varying wound size, quantity, suture and pre-stress on the mechanical behavior of human skin. Also, the average mechanical behavior of the human skin surrogate was characterized using hyperelastic material models, in the presence of a wound and sutures. To date, such a robust experimental study on the effect of injury and sutures on human skin mechanics has not been attempted. The results of this novel investigation will provide important guidelines for surgical planning and validation of results from computational models in the future.

  6. Antenna modeling considerations for accurate SAR calculations in human phantoms in close proximity to GSM cellular base station antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Marnus J; Bingle, Marianne; Meyer, Frans J C

    2005-09-01

    International bodies such as International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE) make provision for human exposure assessment based on SAR calculations (or measurements) and basic restrictions. In the case of base station exposure this is mostly applicable to occupational exposure scenarios in the very near field of these antennas where the conservative reference level criteria could be unnecessarily restrictive. This study presents a variety of critical aspects that need to be considered when calculating SAR in a human body close to a mobile phone base station antenna. A hybrid FEM/MoM technique is proposed as a suitable numerical method to obtain accurate results. The verification of the FEM/MoM implementation has been presented in a previous publication; the focus of this study is an investigation into the detail that must be included in a numerical model of the antenna, to accurately represent the real-world scenario. This is accomplished by comparing numerical results to measurements for a generic GSM base station antenna and appropriate, representative canonical and human phantoms. The results show that it is critical to take the disturbance effect of the human phantom (a large conductive body) on the base station antenna into account when the antenna-phantom spacing is less than 300 mm. For these small spacings, the antenna structure must be modeled in detail. The conclusion is that it is feasible to calculate, using the proposed techniques and methodology, accurate occupational compliance zones around base station antennas based on a SAR profile and basic restriction guidelines. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  8. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  9. Low-tube-voltage selection for non-contrast-enhanced CT: Comparison of the radiation dose in pediatric and adult phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonobo, Toshiaki; Funama, Yoshinori; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Oda, Seitaro; Kiguchi, Masao; Masuda, Takanori; Sakabe, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We used pediatric and adult anthropomorphic phantoms to compare the radiation dose of low- and standard tube voltage chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans. We also discuss the optimal low tube voltage for non-contrast-enhanced CT. Using a female adult- and three differently-sized pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms we acquired chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced scans on a 320-multidetector CT volume scanner. The tube voltage was set at 80-, 100-, and 120 kVp. The tube current was automatically assigned on the CT scanner in response to the set image noise level. On each phantom and at each tube voltage we measured the surface and center dose using high-sensitivity metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. The mean surface dose of chest and abdominal CT scans in 5-year olds was 4.4 and 5.3 mGy at 80 kVp, 4.5 and 5.4 mGy at 100 kV, and 4.0 and 5.0 mGy at 120 kVp, respectively. These values were similar in our 3-pediatric phantoms (p > 0.05). The mean surface dose in the adult phantom increased from 14.7 to 19.4 mGy for chest- and from 18.7 to 24.8 mGy for abdominal CT as the tube voltage decreased from 120 to 80 kVp (p voltage and the low tube voltage technique can be used for non-contrast-enhanced chest- and abdominal scanning. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction of Chinese reference female phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Yinxiangzi; Liu Lixing; Xia Xiaobin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a Voxel-based Chinese Reference female Phantom (VCRP-woman) is developed from an individual female phantom which was based on high resolution cross-sectional color photographs. An in-house C ++ program was developed to adjust the phantom. Finally, a reference female phantom with have the same height, weighte and similar organs masses with the Chinese reference adult female data. The adjusted phantom is then imported to MCNPX to calculate the organs absorbed dose and effective dose conversion coefficients. Results are compared between VCRP-woman and the ICRP adult reference female phantom. (authors)

  11. Utilization of MAX and FAX human phantoms for space radiation exposure calculations using HZETRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Garry; Slaba, Tony; Clowdsley, Martha; Blattnig, Steve; Walker, Steven; Simonsen, Lisa

    To estimate astronaut health risk due to space radiation, one must have the ability to calculate, for known radiation environments external to the body, particle spectra, LET spectra, dose, dose equivalent, or gray equivalent that are averaged over specific organs or tissue types. This may be accomplished using radiation transport software and computational human body tissue models. Historically, NASA scientists have used the HZETRN software to calculate radiation transport through both vehicle shielding materials and body tissue. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) and the Computerized Anatomical Female (CAF) body models, combined with the CAMERA software, have been used for body tissue self-shielding calculations. The CAM and CAF, which were developed in 1973 and 1992, respectively, model the 50th percentile U.S. Air Force male and female and are constructed using individual quadric surfaces that combine to form thousands of solid regions that represent specific tissues and structures within the body. In order to transport an external radiation environment to a point within one of the body models using HZETRN, a directional distribution of the tissues surrounding that point is needed. The CAMERA software is used to "ray trace" the CAM and CAF models, providing the thickness of each tissue type traversed along each of a large number of rays originating at a dose point. More recently, R. Kramer of the Departmento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco in Brazil and his co-workers developed the Male Adult voXel (MAX) model and the Female Adult voXel (FAX). These voxel-based body models were developed using segmented Computed Tomography (CT) scans of adult cadavers, and the quantities and distributions of various body tissues have been adjusted to match those specified in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference adult male and female. A new set of tools has been developed to facilitate space radiation exposure

  12. Lesion detection and quantification performance of the Tachyon-I time-of-flight PET scanner: phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Peng, Qiyu; Zhou, Jian; Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2018-03-01

    The first generation Tachyon PET (Tachyon-I) is a demonstration single-ring PET scanner that reaches a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps using LSO scintillator crystals coupled to conventional photomultiplier tubes. The objective of this study was to quantify the improvement in both lesion detection and quantification performance resulting from the improved time-of-flight (TOF) capability of the Tachyon-I scanner. We developed a quantitative TOF image reconstruction method for the Tachyon-I and evaluated its TOF gain for lesion detection and quantification. Scans of either a standard NEMA torso phantom or healthy volunteers were used as the normal background data. Separately scanned point source and sphere data were superimposed onto the phantom or human data after accounting for the object attenuation. We used the bootstrap method to generate multiple independent noisy datasets with and without a lesion present. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a channelized hotelling observer (CHO) was calculated for each lesion size and location combination to evaluate the lesion detection performance. The bias versus standard deviation trade-off of each lesion uptake was also calculated to evaluate the quantification performance. The resulting CHO-SNR measurements showed improved performance in lesion detection with better timing resolution. The detection performance was also dependent on the lesion size and location, in addition to the background object size and shape. The results of bias versus noise trade-off showed that the noise (standard deviation) reduction ratio was about 1.1–1.3 over the TOF 500 ps and 1.5–1.9 over the non-TOF modes, similar to the SNR gains for lesion detection. In conclusion, this Tachyon-I PET study demonstrated the benefit of improved time-of-flight capability on lesion detection and ROI quantification for both phantom and human subjects.

  13. The properties of human body phantoms used in calculations of electromagnetic fields exposure by wireless communication handsets or hand-operated industrial devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zradziński, Patryk

    2013-06-01

    According to international guidelines, the assessment of biophysical effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) generated by hand-operated sources needs the evaluation of induced electric field (E(in)) or specific energy absorption rate (SAR) caused by EMF inside a worker's body and is usually done by the numerical simulations with different protocols applied to these two exposure cases. The crucial element of these simulations is the numerical phantom of the human body. Procedures of E(in) and SAR evaluation due to compliance analysis with exposure limits have been defined in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers standards and International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines, but a detailed specification of human body phantoms has not been described. An analysis of the properties of over 30 human body numerical phantoms was performed which has been used in recently published investigations related to the assessment of EMF exposure by various sources. The differences in applicability of these phantoms in the evaluation of E(in) and SAR while operating industrial devices and SAR while using mobile communication handsets are discussed. The whole human body numerical phantom dimensions, posture, spatial resolution and electric contact with the ground constitute the key parameters in modeling the exposure related to industrial devices, while modeling the exposure from mobile communication handsets, which needs only to represent the exposed part of the human body nearest to the handset, mainly depends on spatial resolution of the phantom. The specification and standardization of these parameters of numerical human body phantoms are key requirements to achieve comparable and reliable results from numerical simulations carried out for compliance analysis against exposure limits or within the exposure assessment in EMF-related epidemiological studies.

  14. TH-AB-209-12: Tissue Equivalent Phantom with Excised Human Tissue for Assessing Clinical Capabilities of Coherent Scatter Imaging Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, K; Morris, R; Spencer, J [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Greenberg, J [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kapadia, A [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Previously we reported the development of anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent scatter phantoms of the human breast. Here we present the first results from the scatter imaging of the tissue equivalent breast phantoms for breast cancer diagnosis. Methods: A breast phantom was designed to assess the capability of coded aperture coherent x-ray scatter imaging to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, tumor). The phantom geometry was obtained from a prone breast geometry scanned on a dedicated breast CT system. The phantom was 3D printed using the segmented DICOM breast CT data. The 3D breast phantom was filled with lard (as a surrogate for adipose tissue) and scanned in different geometries alongside excised human breast tissues (obtained from lumpectomy and mastectomy procedures). The raw data were reconstructed using a model-based reconstruction algorithm and yielded the location and form factor (i.e., momentum transfer (q) spectrum) of the materials that were imaged. The measured material form factors were then compared to the ground truth measurements acquired by x-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging. Results: Our scatter imaging system was able to define the location and composition of the various materials and tissues within the phantom. Cancerous breast tissue was detected and classified through automated spectral matching and an 86% correlation threshold. The total scan time for the sample was approximately 10 minutes and approaches workflow times for clinical use in intra-operative or other diagnostic tasks. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the first results from an anthropomorphic tissue equivalent scatter phantom to characterize a coherent scatter imaging system. The functionality of the system shows promise in applications such as intra-operative margin detection or virtual biopsy in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work includes using additional patient-derived tissues (e.g., human fat), and modeling additional organs

  15. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, P-H; Lee, C-L; Kim, D-H; Lee, Y-J; Kim, H-J; Jeon, S-S

    2014-01-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  16. A new anthropometric phantom of the human leg for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in bone using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, Henry; Jenkins, Mark; Lodwick, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    Full text. A new anthropometric phantom of the human leg has been developed for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in the bone using x-ray fluorescence. The phantom reproduces the shape and radiological characteristics of the midshaft of the human leg and includes tissue substitutes for cortical bone, bone marrow, and muscle which have been formulated using polyurethanes and calcium carbonate to provide the desired characteristics of density x-ray attenuation, and calcium content. The phantom includes a set of simulated tibia bones, each containing a precisely known concentration of stable lead, that can be easily inserted into the leg. Formerly, of a set of plexiglas cylinders filled with plaster of-paris, each containing a known lead content, was the consensus standard calibration phantom. Tissue substitute materials used in the new anthropometric calibration phantom are much more uniform in density and composition than the plaster-of-paris phantoms and its realistic appearance provides a practical means of evaluating the variability in measurements results due to the changes in subject-detector positioning. Use of the new anthropometric calibration phantom results in a energy spectrum that closely resembles the spectrum observed when measuring a human subject. The energy spectrum produced by the plaster-of-paris phantom lacks the substantial Compton Scattering component produced by the leg muscle mass which leads to unrealistic estimates of in vivo measurement sensitivity. The minimum detection limit (MDL) for in vivo measurement of stable lead in bone, using an efficiency derived from the new anthropometric phantom, ranges from 18,6 parts per million (ppm) to 26,3 ppm using the K β1,3 /Elastic ratio or the K 1 /Elastic ratio, respectively. These values are significantly greater than the MDL cited in the literature obtained using a efficiency derived the conventional cylindrical plaster-of-paris phantom. Likewise, the realistic shape of the new

  17. The influence of tube voltage and phantom size in computed tomography on the dose-response relationship of dicentrics in human blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, G; Pietsch, H; Lengsfeld, P; Voth, M; Schmid, E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dose response relationship of dicentrics in human lymphocytes after CT scans at tube voltages of 80 and 140 kV. Blood samples from a healthy donor placed in tissue equivalent abdomen phantoms of standard, pediatric and adipose sizes were exposed at dose levels up to 0.1 Gy using a 64-slice CT scanner. It was found that both the tube voltage and the phantom size significantly influenced the CT scan-induced linear dose-response relationship of dicentrics in human lymphocytes. Using the same phantom (standard abdomen), 80 kV CT x-rays were biologically more effective than 140 kV CT x-rays. However, it could also be determined that the applied phantom size had much more influence on the biological effectiveness. Obviously, the increasing slopes of the CT scan-induced dose response relationships of dicentrics in human lymphocytes obtained in a pediatric, a standard and an adipose abdomen have been induced by scattering effects of photons, which strongly increase with increasing phantom size.

  18. The influence of tube voltage and phantom size in computed tomography on the dose-response relationship of dicentrics in human blood samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, G; Pietsch, H [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Lengsfeld, P; Voth, M [Global Medical Affairs Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Schmid, E, E-mail: Ernst.Schmid@lrz.uni-muenchen.d [Institute for Cell Biology, Center for Integrated Protein Science, University of Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dose response relationship of dicentrics in human lymphocytes after CT scans at tube voltages of 80 and 140 kV. Blood samples from a healthy donor placed in tissue equivalent abdomen phantoms of standard, pediatric and adipose sizes were exposed at dose levels up to 0.1 Gy using a 64-slice CT scanner. It was found that both the tube voltage and the phantom size significantly influenced the CT scan-induced linear dose-response relationship of dicentrics in human lymphocytes. Using the same phantom (standard abdomen), 80 kV CT x-rays were biologically more effective than 140 kV CT x-rays. However, it could also be determined that the applied phantom size had much more influence on the biological effectiveness. Obviously, the increasing slopes of the CT scan-induced dose response relationships of dicentrics in human lymphocytes obtained in a pediatric, a standard and an adipose abdomen have been induced by scattering effects of photons, which strongly increase with increasing phantom size.

  19. Development of mathematical pediatric phantoms for internal dose calculations: designs, limitations, and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical phantoms of the human body at various ages are employed with Monte Carlo radiation transport codes for calculation of photon specific absorbed fractions. The author has developed a pediatric phantom series based on the design of the adult phantom, but with explicit equations for each organ so that organ sizes and marrow distributions could be assigned properly. Since the phantoms comprise simple geometric shapes, predictive dose capability is limited when geometry is critical to the calculation. Hence, there is a demand for better phantom design in situations where geometry is critical, such as for external irradiation or for internal emitters with low energy photons. Recent advances in computerized axial tomography (CAT) present the potential for derivation of anatomical information, which is so critical to development of phantoms, and ongoing developmental work on compuer architecture to handle large arrays for Monte Carlo calculations should make complex-geometry dose calculations economically feasible within this decade

  20. Effect of x-ray tube parameters and iodine concentration on image quality and radiation dose in cerebral pediatric and adult CT angiography: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Antonios E; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present phantom study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube parameters and iodine concentration on image quality and radiation dose in cerebral computed tomographic (CT) angiographic examinations of pediatric and adult individuals. Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms that represent the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, and 10-year-old children and the RANDO phantom that simulates the average adult individual were used. Cylindrical vessels were bored along the brain-equivalent plugs of each physical phantom. To simulate the brain vasculature, vessels of 0.6, 1, 2, and 3 mm in diameter were created. These vessels were filled with contrast medium (CM) solutions at different iodine concentrations, that is, 5.6, 4.2, 2.7, and 1.4 mg I/mL. The phantom heads were scanned at 120, 100, and 80 kV. The applied quality reference tube current-time product values ranged from a minimum of 45 to a maximum of 680. The CT acquisitions were performed on a 16-slice CT scanner using the automatic exposure control system. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the contrast-enhanced iodinated vessels and the unenhanced regions of interest. Dose reduction was calculated as the percentage difference of the CT dose index value at the quality reference tube current-time product and the CT dose index at the mean modulated tube current-time product. Image noise that was measured using the preset tube current-time product settings varied significantly among the different phantoms (P Hounsfield unit number of iodinated vessels was linearly related to CM concentration (r² = 0.907) and vessel diameter (r² = 0.918). The Hounsfield unit number of iodinated vessels followed a decreasing trend from the neonate phantom to the adult phantom at all kilovoltage settings. For the same image noise level, a CNR improvement of up to 69% and a dose reduction of up to 61% may be achieved when CT acquisition

  1. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0

  2. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0.

  3. Design of a phantom equivalent to measure bone-fluorine in a human's hand via delayed neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Prestwich, W V; Inskip, M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an element that can be either beneficial or harmful, depending on the total amount accumulated in the teeth or bones. In our laboratory, we have developed a non-invasive technique for the in vivo measurement of fluoride in bone using neutron activation analysis and performed the first pilot human study. Fluoride in humans is quantified by comparing the γ-ray signal from a person to the γ-ray signal obtained from appropriate anthropomorphic calibration phantoms. An identified problem with existing fluoride phantoms is contamination with aluminum. Aluminum creates an interfering γ-ray signal which, although it can be subtracted out, increases the uncertainty in the measurement and worsens the detection limit. This paper outlines a series of studies undertaken to develop a better calibration phantom for fluorine measurement, which does not have aluminum contamination. (paper)

  4. Comparison between the calculated and measured dose distributions for four beams of 6 MeV linac in a human-equivalent phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Sonia M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose distributions in various parts of the body are of importance in radiotherapy. Also, the percent depth dose at different body depths is an important parameter in radiation therapy applications. Monte Carlo simulation techniques are the most accurate methods for such purposes. Monte Carlo computer calculations of photon spectra and the dose ratios at surfaces and in some internal organs of a human equivalent phantom were performed. In the present paper, dose distributions in different organs during bladder radiotherapy by 6 MeV X-rays were measured using thermoluminescence dosimetry placed at different points in the human-phantom. The phantom was irradiated in exactly the same manner as in actual bladder radiotherapy. Four treatment fields were considered to maximize the dose at the center of the target and minimize it at non-target healthy organs. All experimental setup information was fed to the MCNP-4b code to calculate dose distributions at selected points inside the proposed phantom. Percent depth dose distribution was performed. Also, the absorbed dose as ratios relative to the original beam in the surrounding organs was calculated by MCNP-4b and measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. Both measured and calculated data were compared. Results indicate good agreement between calculated and measured data inside the phantom. Comparison between MCNP-4b calculations and measurements of depth dose distribution indicated good agreement between both.

  5. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  6. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  7. Analysis of mobile phone design features affecting radiofrequency power absorbed in a human head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Sven; Kelsh, Michael A; Kuster, Niels; Sheppard, Asher R; Shum, Mona

    2013-09-01

    The US FCC mandates the testing of all mobile phones to demonstrate compliance with the rule requiring that the peak spatial SAR does not exceed the limit of 1.6 W/kg averaged over any 1 g of tissue. These test data, measured in phantoms with mobile phones operating at maximum antenna input power, permitted us to evaluate the variation in SARs across mobile phone design factors such as shape and antenna design, communication technology, and test date (over a 7-year period). Descriptive statistical summaries calculated for 850 MHz and 1900 MHz phones and ANOVA were used to evaluate the influence of the foregoing factors on SARs. Service technology accounted for the greatest variability in compliance test SARs that ranged from AMPS (highest) to CDMA, iDEN, TDMA, and GSM (lowest). However, the dominant factor for SARs during use is the time-averaged antenna input power, which may be much less than the maximum power used in testing. This factor is largely defined by the communication system; e.g., the GSM phone average output can be higher than CDMA by a factor of 100. Phone shape, antenna type, and orientation of a phone were found to be significant but only on the order of up to a factor of 2 (3 dB). The SAR in the tilt position was significantly smaller than for touch. The side of the head did not affect SAR levels significantly. Among the remaining factors, external antennae produced greater SARs than internal ones, and brick and clamshell phones produced greater SARs than slide phones. Assuming phone design and usage patterns do not change significantly over time, we have developed a normalization procedure and formula that permits reliable prediction of the relative SAR between various communication systems. This approach can be applied to improve exposure assessment in epidemiological research. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Study Of EMR And SAR Distribution In Human Head Phantom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    power of 0.32W for both simulations were well below the limit of 1.6 W/kg of ICNIRP standard and FCC/IEEE standard of 2W/kg. Keywords: Electromagnetic radiation (EMR), Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), Electromagnetic simulation software (FEKO emss), Radio frequency field, human head, mobile phone, mobile phone ...

  9. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  10. NOTE: On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-11-01

    Distributions of radiation absorbed dose within human anatomy have been estimated through Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques implemented for two different classes of computational anthropomorphic phantoms: (1) mathematical equation-based stylized phantoms and (2) tomographic image-based voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms constructed from tomographic images of real human anatomy have been actively developed since the late 1980s to overcome the anatomical approximations necessary with stylized phantoms, which themselves have been utilized since the mid 1960s. However, revisions of stylized phantoms have also been pursued in parallel to the development of voxel phantoms since voxel phantoms (1) are initially restricted to the individual-specific anatomy of the person originally imaged, (2) must be restructured on an organ-by-organ basis to conform to reference individual anatomy and (3) cannot easily represent very fine anatomical structures and tissue layers that are thinner than the voxel dimensions of the overall phantom. Although efforts have been made to improve the anatomic realism of stylized phantoms, most of these efforts have been limited to attempts to alter internal organ structures. Aside from the internal organs, the exterior shapes, and especially the arm structures, of stylized phantoms are also far from realistic descriptions of human anatomy, and may cause dosimetry errors in the calculation of organ-absorbed doses for external irradiation scenarios. The present study was intended to highlight the need to revise the existing arm structure within stylized phantoms by comparing organ doses of stylized adult phantoms with those from three adult voxel phantoms in the lateral photon irradiation geometry. The representative stylized phantom, the adult phantom of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) series and two adult male voxel phantoms, KTMAN-2 and VOXTISS8, were employed for Monte Carlo dose calculation, and data from another voxel phantom, VIP

  11. On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Distributions of radiation absorbed dose within human anatomy have been estimated through Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques implemented for two different classes of computational anthropomorphic phantoms: (1) mathematical equation-based stylized phantoms and (2) tomographic image-based voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms constructed from tomographic images of real human anatomy have been actively developed since the late 1980s to overcome the anatomical approximations necessary with stylized phantoms, which themselves have been utilized since the mid 1960s. However, revisions of stylized phantoms have also been pursued in parallel to the development of voxel phantoms since voxel phantoms (1) are initially restricted to the individual-specific anatomy of the person originally imaged, (2) must be restructured on an organ-by-organ basis to conform to reference individual anatomy and (3) cannot easily represent very fine anatomical structures and tissue layers that are thinner than the voxel dimensions of the overall phantom. Although efforts have been made to improve the anatomic realism of stylized phantoms, most of these efforts have been limited to attempts to alter internal organ structures. Aside from the internal organs, the exterior shapes, and especially the arm structures, of stylized phantoms are also far from realistic descriptions of human anatomy, and may cause dosimetry errors in the calculation of organ-absorbed doses for external irradiation scenarios. The present study was intended to highlight the need to revise the existing arm structure within stylized phantoms by comparing organ doses of stylized adult phantoms with those from three adult voxel phantoms in the lateral photon irradiation geometry. The representative stylized phantom, the adult phantom of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) series and two adult male voxel phantoms, KTMAN-2 and VOXTISS8, were employed for Monte Carlo dose calculation, and data from another voxel phantom, VIP

  12. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kumada, Hiroaki; Kishi, Toshiaki; Torii, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Junzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Endo, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient. (author)

  13. Production of a faithful realistic phantom to human head and thermal neutron flux measurement on the brain surface. Cooperative research

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, K; Kishi, T; Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Nose, T; Torii, Y; Uchiyama, J; Yamamoto, T

    2002-01-01

    Thermal neutron flux is determined using the gold wires in current BNCT irradiation, so evaluation of arbitrary points after the irradiation is limited in the quantity of these detectors. In order to make up for the weakness, dose estimation of a patient is simulated by a computational dose calculation supporting system. In another way without computer simulation, a medical irradiation condition can be replicate experimentally using of realistic phantom which was produced from CT images by rapid prototyping technique. This phantom was irradiated at a same JRR-4 neutron beam as clinical irradiation condition of the patient and the thermal neutron distribution on the brain surface was measured in detail. This experimental evaluation technique using a realistic phantom is applicable to in vitro cell irradiation experiments for radiation biological effects as well as in-phantom experiments for dosimetry under the nearly medical irradiation condition of patient.

  14. Realistic torso phantom for calibration of in-vivo transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirotani, Takashi

    1988-11-01

    A realistic torso phantom with average body size of Japanese adult males has been developed for the calibration of counting systems used for in-vivo measurements of plutonium and other actinides. The phantom contains removable model organs (lungs, liver, kidneys and heart), model trachea and artificial rib cage, and also includes chest plates that can be placed over the chest to simulate wide range adipose/muscle ratio in the human chest. Tissue substitutes used in the phantom were made of polyurethane with different concentrations of ester of phosphoric acid. Model lungs were made of foamed polyurethane with small quantities of the additive, and the artificial rib cage was made of epoxy resin with calcium carbonate. The experimental data have shown that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration.

  15. Computational voxel phantom, associated to anthropometric and anthropomorphic real phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis radiotherapy; Fantoma computacional de voxel, associado a fantoma real antropomorfico antropometrico, para dosimetria em radioterapia de pelve masculina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cleuza Helena Teixeira; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2005-07-01

    This paper addresses a computational model of voxels through MCNP5 Code and the experimental development of an anthropometric and anthropomorphic phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis brachytherapy focusing prostatic tumors. For elaboration of the computational model of the human male pelvis, anatomical section images from the Visible Man Project were applied. Such selected and digital images were associated to a numeric representation, one for each section. Such computational representation of the anatomical sections was transformed into a bi-dimensional mesh of equivalent tissue. The group of bidimensional meshes was concatenated forming the three-dimensional model of voxels to be used by the MCNP5 code. In association to the anatomical information, data from the density and chemical composition of the basic elements, representatives of the organs and involved tissues, were setup in a material database for the MCNP-5. The model will be applied for dosimetric evaluations in situations of irradiation of the human masculine pelvis. Such 3D model of voxel is associated to the code of transport of particles MCNP5, allowing future simulations. It was also developed the construction of human masculine pelvis phantom, based on anthropometric and anthropomorphic dates and in the use of representative equivalent tissues of the skin, fatty, muscular and glandular tissue, as well as the bony structure.This part of work was developed in stages, being built the bony cast first, later the muscular structures and internal organs. They were then jointly mounted and inserted in the skin cast. The representative component of the fatty tissue was incorporate and accomplished the final retouchings in the skin. The final result represents the development of two important essential tools for elaboration of computational and experimental dosimetry. Thus, it is possible its use in calibrations of pre-existent protocols in radiotherapy, as well as for tests of new protocols, besides

  16. Spectra from 2.5-15 μm of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viator, John A; Choi, Bernard; Peavy, George M; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 μm, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, Topicare TM ), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 μm. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 μm. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 μm range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 μm range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant μ ir is used. In such cases, overestimating μ ir will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth. (note)

  17. Evaluation of sub-zero and residence times after continuous versus multiple intermittent cryogen spray cooling exposure on human skin phantom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez-San-Juan, JC; Tuqan, AT; Kelly, KM; Nelson, JS; Aguilar, G

    2004-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to minimize the risk of epidermal damage during various laser dermatologic surgeries. However, as the application of single or multiple cryogen spurts becomes available on some commercial lasers devices, it is necessary to determine the optimal CSC parameters for different laser surgeries. The objective of this study was to measure the time the sprayed surface of a human skin phantom (HSP) remains below water freezing temperature 0°C, referred to as subzero...

  18. Activin receptor subunits in normal and dysfunctional adult human testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, V; Meachem, S; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2008-01-01

    The cellular sites of activin action and its regulation in the normal and dysfunctional adult human testis are unknown.......The cellular sites of activin action and its regulation in the normal and dysfunctional adult human testis are unknown....

  19. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (original ICRP reference phantoms, it is believed that the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms properly developed will not only provide the same or similar dose values (say, difference <5 or 10%) for highly penetrating radiations, but also provide correct dose values for the weakly penetrating

  20. Comparison of the local dose of scattered radiation of a special dental - phantom and a real human head by using a Digital Volume Tomography (DVT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuwirth, J.; Hefner, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dental Radiography Digital Volume Tomography (DVT) gains more and more importance due to its possibility of three-dimensional imaging of teeth, jaw and visercoranium and the reduced radiation dose in comparison to conventional Computer Tomography (CT). Contrary to other, well documented radiographic procedures like dental panorama X-ray imaging there are no national or international guidelines or recommendations relating to DVT which regulate the designation of areas and standardize risk assessment. This study aims to assess the parameters necessary for local radiation protection in dental practices. Measurements were carried out in dental practices in order to evaluate the local dose resulting from different DVT devices. A special dental-phantom and a real human head were used in the irradiations in order to define the local dose of scattered radiation by nominal voltage. The dental-phantom was created for conventional dental panorama X-ray devices which make use of lower nominal voltages. This poses the question if the scatter performance of the special dental-phantom is comparable to a real human head and therefore applicable to the estimation of the radiation quality of a DVT when using 120 kV. The existing guidelines for dental panorama xray are analyzed and suggestions for future recommendations concerning the designation of areas and risk assessment for DVT are then deducted by comparing both sets of measurements. The results show that the special dental-phantom is absolutely suitable for the definition of the local dose resulting from the scattered radiation of a DVT. (author)

  1. A comparative study on patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the results of patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom. Methods: Fifteen intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans already planned on treatment planning system (TPS for head-and-neck cancer patients were exported on all three kinds of phantoms viz. slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom, and dose was calculated using anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA. All the gantry angles were set to zero in case of slab phantom while set to as it is in actual plan in case of other two phantoms. All the plans were delivered by linear accelerator (LA and dose for each plan was measured by 0.13 cc ion chamber. The percentage (% variations between planned and measured doses were calculated and analyzed. Results: The mean % variations between planned and measured doses of all IMRT quality assurance (QA plans were as 0.65 (Standard deviation (SD: 0.38 with confidence limit (CL 1.39, 1.16 (SD: 0.61 with CL 2.36 and 2.40 (SD: 0.86 with CL 4.09 for slab phantom, acrylic head phantom and goat head phantom respectively. Conclusion: Higher dose variations found in case of real tissue phantom compare to results in case of slab and acrylic body phantoms. The algorithm AAA does not calculate doses in heterogeneous medium as accurate as it calculates in homogeneous medium. Therefore the patient specific absolute dosimetry should be done using heterogeneous phantom mimicking density wise as well as design wise to the actual human body.  

  2. An effective dose assessment technique with NORM added consumer products using skin-point source on computational human phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Choi, Hyun Joon; Testa, Mauro; Lee, Jae Kook; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop the assessment technique of the effective dose by calculating the organ equivalent dose with a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and a computational human phantom for the naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. In this study, we suggests the method determining the MC source term based on the skin-point source enabling the convenient and conservative modeling of the various type of the products. To validate the skin-point source method, the organ equivalent doses were compared with that by the product modeling source of the realistic shape for the pillow, waist supporter, sleeping mattress etc. Our results show that according to the source location, the organ equivalent doses were observed as the similar tendency for both source determining methods, however, it was observed that the annual effective dose with the skin-point source was conservative than that with the modeling source with the maximum 3.3 times higher dose. With the assumption of the gamma energy of 1 MeV and product activity of 1 Bq g"−"1, the annual effective doses of the pillow, waist supporter and sleeping mattress with skin-point source was 3.09E-16 Sv Bq"−"1 year"−"1, 1.45E-15 Sv Bq"−"1 year"−"1, and 2,82E-16 Sv Bq"−"1 year"−"1, respectively, while the product modeling source showed 9.22E-17 Sv Bq"−"1 year"−"1, 9.29E-16 Sv Bq"−"1 year"−"1, and 8.83E-17 Sv Bq"−"1 year"−"1, respectively. In conclusion, it was demonstrated in this study that the skin-point source method could be employed to efficiently evaluate the annual effective dose due to the usage of the NORM added consumer products. - Highlights: • We evaluate the exposure dose from the usage of NORM added consumer products. • We suggest the method determining the MC source term based on the skin-point source. • To validate the skin-point source, the organ equivalent doses were compared with that the modeling source. • The skin-point source could

  3. Calibration Human Voxel Phantoms for In Vivo Measurement of ''2 sup 4 sup 1 Am in Bone at the Whole Body Counter Facility of CIEMAT

    CERN Document Server

    Moraleda, M; Navarro, J F; Navarro, T

    2002-01-01

    The Whole Body Counting facility of CIEMAT is capable of carrying out In-Vivo measurements of radionuclides emitting X-rays and low energy gamma radiation internally deposited in the body. The system to use for this purpose consists of flour Low energy Germanium (LeGe) Camberra detectors working in the energy range from 10 to 1000 keV. Physical phantoms with a known contamination in the organ of interest are normally used for the calibration of the LEGe detection system. In this document we present a calibration method using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP4C) over a voxel phantom obtained from a computerized tomography of a real human head. The phantom consists of 104017 (43x59x41) cubic voxels, 4 mn on each side, os specific tissues, but for this simulation only two types are taken into account: adipose tissue and hard bone. The skull is supposed to be contaminated with ''241 Am and the trajectories of the photons are simulated till they reach the germanium detectors. The detectors were also simulated in det...

  4. Calibration Human Voxel Phantoms for In Vivo Measurement of ''241 Am in Bone at the Whole Body Counter Facility of CIEMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraleda, M.; Lopez, M. A.; Gomez Ros, J. M.; Navarro, T.; Navarro, J. F.

    2002-01-01

    The Whole Body Counting facility of CIEMAT is capable of carrying out In-Vivo measurements of radionuclides emitting X-rays and low energy gamma radiation internally deposited in the body. The system to use for this purpose consists of flour Low energy Germanium (LeGe) Camberra detectors working in the energy range from 10 to 1000 keV. Physical phantoms with a known contamination in the organ of interest are normally used for the calibration of the LEGe detection system. In this document we present a calibration method using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP4C) over a voxel phantom obtained from a computerized tomography of a real human head. The phantom consists of 104017 (43x59x41) cubic voxels, 4 mn on each side, os specific tissues, but for this simulation only two types are taken into account: adipose tissue and hard bone. The skull is supposed to be contaminated with ''241 Am and the trajectories of the photons are simulated till they reach the germanium detectors. The detectors were also simulated in detail to obtain a good agreement with the reality. In order to verify the accuracy of this procedure to reproduce the experiments, the MCNP results are compared with laboratory measurements of a head phantom simulating an internal contamination of 1000 Bq of ''241 Am deposited in bone. Different relative positions source-detector were tried to look for the best counting geometry for measurement of a contaminated skull. Efficiency values are obtained and compared, resulting in the validation of the mathematical method for the assessment of internal contamination of American deposited in skeleton. (Author) 16 refs

  5. Calibration Human Voxel Phantoms for In Vivo Measurement of ''241 Am in Bone at the Whole Body Counter Facility of CIEMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraleda, M.; Lopez, M. A.; Gomez Ros, J. M.; Navarro, T.; Navarro, J. F.

    2002-07-01

    The Whole Body Counting facility of CIEMAT is capable of carrying out In-Vivo measurements of radionuclides emitting X-rays and low energy gamma radiation internally deposited in the body. The system to use for this purpose consists of flour Low energy Germanium (LeGe) Camberra detectors working in the energy range from 10 to 1000 keV. Physical phantoms with a known contamination in the organ of interest are normally used for the calibration of the LEGe detection system. In this document we present a calibration method using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP4C) over a voxel phantom obtained from a computerized tomography of a real human head. The phantom consists of 104017 (43x59x41) cubic voxels, 4 mn on each side, os specific tissues, but for this simulation only two types are taken into account: adipose tissue and hard bone. The skull is supposed to be contaminated with ''241 Am and the trajectories of the photons are simulated till they reach the germanium detectors. The detectors were also simulated in detail to obtain a good agreement with the reality. In order to verify the accuracy of this procedure to reproduce the experiments, the MCNP results are compared with laboratory measurements of a head phantom simulating an internal contamination of 1000 Bq of ''241 Am deposited in bone. Different relative positions source-detector were tried to look for the best countring geometry for measurement of a contaminated skull. Efficiency values are obtained and compared, resulting in the validation of the mathematical method for the assessment of internal contamination of American deposited in skeleton. (Author) 16 refs.

  6. Phantom position dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity of the Hanford dosimeter response to its position relative to the phantom and the neutron source has always been recognized. A thorough investigation was performed to quantify dosimeter response according to: (a) dosimeter position on phantom, (b) dosimeter distance from phantom, and (c) angular relationship of dosimeter relative to neutron source and phantom. Results were obtained for neutron irradiation at several different energies

  7. Computerized Virtual Reality Simulation in Preclinical Dentistry: Can a Computerized Simulator Replace the Conventional Phantom Heads and Human Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, Anastasios

    2017-10-01

    In preclinical dental education, the acquisition of clinical, technical skills, and the transfer of these skills to the clinic are paramount. Phantom heads provide an efficient way to teach preclinical students dental procedures safely while increasing their dexterity skills considerably. Modern computerized phantom head training units incorporate features of virtual reality technology and the ability to offer concurrent augmented feedback. The aims of this review were to examine and evaluate the dental literature for evidence supporting their use and to discuss the role of augmented feedback versus the facilitator's instruction. Adjunctive training in these units seems to enhance student's learning and skill acquisition and reduce the required faculty supervision time. However, the virtual augmented feedback cannot be used as the sole method of feedback, and the facilitator's input is still critical. Well-powered longitudinal randomized trials exploring the impact of these units on student's clinical performance and issues of cost-effectiveness are warranted.

  8. SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, G; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent advances in cancer treatments have greatly increased the likelihood of post-treatment patient survival. Secondary malignancies, however, have become a growing concern. Epidemiological studies determining secondary effects in radiotherapy patients require assessment of organ-specific dose both inside and outside the treatment field. An essential input for Monte Carlo modeling of particle transport is radiological images showing full patient anatomy. However, in retrospective studies it is typical to only have partial anatomy from CT scans used during treatment planning. In this study, we developed a multi-step method to extend such limited patient anatomy to full body anatomy for estimating dose to normal tissues located outside the CT scan coverage. Methods: The first step identified a phantom from a library of body size-dependent computational human phantoms by matching the height and weight of patients. Second, a Python algorithm matched the patient CT coverage location in relation to the whole body phantom. Third, an algorithm cut the whole body phantom and scaled them to match the size of the patient. Then, merged the two anatomies into one whole body. We entitled this new approach, Anatomically Predictive Extension (APE). Results: The APE method was examined by comparing the original chest-abdomen-pelvis CT images of the five patients with the APE phantoms developed from only the chest part of the CAP images and whole body phantoms. We achieved average percent differences of tissue volumes of 25.7%, 34.2%, 16.5%, 26.8%, and 31.6% with an average of 27% across all patients. Conclusion: Our APE method extends the limited CT patient anatomy to whole body anatomy by using image processing and computational human phantoms. Our ongoing work includes evaluating the accuracy of these APE phantoms by comparing normal tissue doses in the APE phantoms and doses calculated for the original full CAP images under generic radiotherapy simulations. This

  9. SU-F-T-114: A Novel Anatomically Predictive Extension Model of Computational Human Phantoms for Dose Reconstruction in Retrospective Epidemiological Studies of Second Cancer Risks in Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, G; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent advances in cancer treatments have greatly increased the likelihood of post-treatment patient survival. Secondary malignancies, however, have become a growing concern. Epidemiological studies determining secondary effects in radiotherapy patients require assessment of organ-specific dose both inside and outside the treatment field. An essential input for Monte Carlo modeling of particle transport is radiological images showing full patient anatomy. However, in retrospective studies it is typical to only have partial anatomy from CT scans used during treatment planning. In this study, we developed a multi-step method to extend such limited patient anatomy to full body anatomy for estimating dose to normal tissues located outside the CT scan coverage. Methods: The first step identified a phantom from a library of body size-dependent computational human phantoms by matching the height and weight of patients. Second, a Python algorithm matched the patient CT coverage location in relation to the whole body phantom. Third, an algorithm cut the whole body phantom and scaled them to match the size of the patient. Then, merged the two anatomies into one whole body. We entitled this new approach, Anatomically Predictive Extension (APE). Results: The APE method was examined by comparing the original chest-abdomen-pelvis CT images of the five patients with the APE phantoms developed from only the chest part of the CAP images and whole body phantoms. We achieved average percent differences of tissue volumes of 25.7%, 34.2%, 16.5%, 26.8%, and 31.6% with an average of 27% across all patients. Conclusion: Our APE method extends the limited CT patient anatomy to whole body anatomy by using image processing and computational human phantoms. Our ongoing work includes evaluating the accuracy of these APE phantoms by comparing normal tissue doses in the APE phantoms and doses calculated for the original full CAP images under generic radiotherapy simulations. This

  10. Cell pattern in adult human corneal endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Wörner

    Full Text Available A review of the current data on the cell density of normal adult human endothelial cells was carried out in order to establish some common parameters appearing in the different considered populations. From the analysis of cell growth patterns, it is inferred that the cell aging rate is similar for each of the different considered populations. Also, the morphology, the cell distribution and the tendency to hexagonallity are studied. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that this phenomenon is analogous with cell behavior in other structures such as dry foams and grains in polycrystalline materials. Therefore, its driving force may be controlled by the surface tension and the mobility of the boundaries.

  11. Effective dose evaluation of NORM-added consumer products using Monte Carlo simulations and the ICRP computational human phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Cheol; Yoo, Do Hyeon; Testa, Mauro; Shin, Wook-Geun; Choi, Hyun Joon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. Using the Monte Carlo method, the radioactive products were simulated with ICRP reference phantom and the organ doses were calculated with the usage scenario. Finally, the annual effective doses were evaluated as lower than the public dose limit of 1mSv y(-1) for 44 products. It was demonstrated that NORM-added consumer products could be quantitatively assessed for the safety regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte-Carlo methods. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zankl, M.; Williams, G.; Drexler, G.

    1982-12-01

    By the help of a Monte-Carlo program the dose that single organs, organ groups and bigger or smaller parts of body would receive on an average, caused by an irradiation definitely fixed by the geometry of irradiation and photon energy, can be determined. Thus the phantom in connection with the Monte-Carlo program can be used for several considerations as for example - calculation of dose from occupational exposures - calculation of dose from diagnostic procedures - calculation of dose from radiotherapy procedures. (orig.)

  13. The response of some health physics instruments to sodium-24 and chlorine-38 activities in polythene man-phantoms and the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peabody, C.O.

    1963-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the response of five commonly used Health Physics instruments when held near polythene man-phantoms filled with aqueous solutions containing sodium-24 and chlorine-38 activities. The instruments discussed are the Type 1413A, 1597A and 1368A ratemeters, the E.M.I. PCM1 contamination monitor and the Type 1021C beta-gamma probe. The ratios of the whole-body chlorine-38 and sodium-24 activities are calculated for various periods of accidental human irradiation by neutrons. These ratios and the phantom results are used to estimate the response of the five instruments when held near the human body at various times after irradiation. The relative contributions of the chlorine-38 and sodium-24 to the instrument indications are listed. The tabulated data enable the instrument readings to be converted to whole-body sodium-24 activity at the time of irradiation. This may be used as a quick estimate of the degree of neutron irradiation. (author)

  14. Everyman's prostate phantom: kiwi-fruit substitute for human prostates at magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G.; Murer, Sophie; Kuhn, Marissa [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L. [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Oncology Centre Munich (IOZ), Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Scheidler, Juergen [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Radiology Centre Munich (RZM), Muenchen (Germany); Scherr, Michael [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); BG Unfallklinik Murnau, Department of Radiology, Murnau am Staffelsee (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    To apply an easy-to-assemble phantom substitute for human prostates in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and 3D magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Kiwi fruit were fixed with gel hot and cold compress packs on two plastic nursery pots, separated by a plastic plate, and submerged in tap water inside a 1-L open-spout plastic watering can for T2WI (TR/TE 7500/101 ms), DWI (5500/61 ms, ADC b50-800 s/mm{sup 2} map) and MRS (940/145 ms) at 3.0 T, with phased array surface coils. One green kiwi fruit was additionally examined with an endorectal coil. Retrospective comparison with benign peripheral zone (PZ) and transitional zone (TZ) of prostate (n = 5), Gleason 6-7a prostate cancer (n = 8) and Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (n = 7) validated the phantom. Mean contrast between central placenta (CP) and outer pericarp (OP, 0.346-0.349) or peripheral placenta (PP, 0.364-0.393) of kiwi fruit was similar to Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer and PZ (0.308) in T2WI. ADC values of OP and PP (1.27 ± 0.07-1.37 ± 0.08 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}) resembled PZ and TZ (1.39 ± 0.17-1.60 ± 0.24 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}), while CP (0.91 ± 0.14-0.99 ± 0.10 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}) resembled Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (1.00 ± 0.25 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}). MR spectra showed peaks of citrate and myo-inositol in kiwi fruit, and citrate and ''choline+creatine'' in prostates. The phantom worked with an endorectal coil, too. The kiwi fruit phantom reproducibly showed zones similar to PZ, TZ and cancer in human prostates in T2WI and DWI and two metabolite peaks in MRS and appears suitable to compare different MR protocols, coil systems and scanners. (orig.)

  15. Astrocitary niches in human adult medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Dermengiu, Dan; Loreto, Carla; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Pop, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Astrocytes are considered as neuromodulators of the CNS. Whereas experimental studies on astrocitary functions are gaining importance, the anatomy of the astrocitary niches in the human CNS has been overlooked. The study was performed on the brainstem of 10 adult cadavers. We aimed to determine astrocitary niches in the human medulla oblongata using immunohistochemical labeling with vimentin and also CD34 immunostaining to accurately diagnose associated microvessels. Niches rich in astrocytes were identified as follows: (a) the superficial layer of astrocytes, ventral and ventrolateral, in the rostral medulla oblongata; (b) the median raphe; (c) medullary nuclei: arcuate nucleus, area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract; (d) the subependymal zone (SEZ, caudal medulla) and subventricular zone (SVZ, rostral medulla). Astrocytes were scarce in the ventrolateral medulla, and mostly present within the pyramidal tract and the olivary nucleus. Apart from the SEZ and SVZ, the brainstem niches of astrocytes mostly overlap those regions known to perform roles as central respiratory chemoreceptors. The astrocytes of the SEZ and SVZ, which are known as stem cell niches, are related to an increased microvascular density. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Phantom atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.; Voigt, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Society for People Living under Threat has been supporting those affected by radiation (Uranium decay), nuclear weapons testing, nuclear power stations and waste disposal since the mid-sixties. Through a great number of meetings, press releases and campaigns, it has succeeded in bringing the theme into the public spotlight in Germany, particularly within the ecology movement. The initial hesitation in supporting the indigenous peoples threatened by radiation contamination has given way to broad consensus and support. The ecology and human rights movement have united the need to listen to and give support to those of whom no-one speaks. (orig./DG) [de

  17. Evolution of dosimetric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this oration evolution of the dosimetric phantoms for radiation protection and for medical use is briefly reviewed. Some details of the development of Indian Reference Phantom for internal dose estimation are also presented

  18. An improved Virtual Torso phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Gary H; Crowley, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The virtual phantom that was previously designed by the Human Monitoring Laboratory had some limitations. It contained no sternum and the ribs extended all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with a mixture of cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). The ribs were located below the chest wall which added to the thickness of the chest wall. The lungs did not touch the inner surface of the chest wall along their length due to the differences in curvature between the ellipsoidal lungs and the ellipsoidal cylinder that defined the torso. As a result there was extra intervening tissue between the lungs and the chest wall. This was shown to have a noticeable effect on the simulation of low energy photons. The virtual phantom has been redesigned and comparison of measured and calculated counting efficiencies shows that it is a good representation of both of LLNL or JAERI at all photon energies measured. The redesigned virtual phantom agrees to within 11% of the torsos' counting efficiency over the energy range 17 - 240 keV. Before modification, the virtual phantom's counting efficiency was a of factor three lower at 17 keV and a factor of two lower at 20 keV; now it is within 5% at 17 keV and within 10% at 20 keV. This phantom can now be reliably used to simulate lung counting. The virtual phantom still contains no sternum and the ribs extend all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). However, the above results indicate that this is not a major flaw in the design of the virtual phantom, as agreement between the Monte Carlo results and experimental data is good. (author)

  19. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  20. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  1. Influence of dentures on SAR in the visible Chinese human head voxel phantom exposed to a mobile phone at 900 and 1800 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong; Zhang, Ruoyu; Liu, Qian

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the influence of dentures on electromagnetic energy absorption during the daily use of a mobile phone, a high-resolution head phantom based on the Visible Chinese Human dataset was reconstructed. Simulations on phantoms with various dentures were performed by using the finite-difference time-domain method with a 0.47 wavelength dipole antenna and a mobile phone model as radiation sources at 900 and 1800 MHz. The Specific energy Absorption Rate (SAR) values including 1 and 10 g average SAR values were assessed. When the metallic dental crowns with resonance lengths of approximately one-third to one-half wavelength in the tissue nearby are parallel to the radiation source, up to 121.6% relative enhancement for 1 g average SAR and 17.1% relative enhancement for 10 g average SAR are observed due to the resonance effect in energy absorption. When the radiation sources operate in the normal configuration, the 10 g average SAR values are still in compliance with the basic restrictions established by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), indicating that the safety limits will not be challenged by the usage of dentures. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. WE-EF-303-06: Feasibility of PET Image-Based On-Line Proton Beam-Range Verification with Simulated Uniform Phantom and Human Brain Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, K; Sun, X; Zhu, X; Grosshans, D; Clark, J; Shao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of clinical on-line proton beam range verification with PET imaging Methods: We simulated a 179.2-MeV proton beam with 5-mm diameter irradiating a PMMA phantom of human brain size, which was then imaged by a brain PET with 300*300*100-mm 3 FOV and different system sensitivities and spatial resolutions. We calculated the mean and standard deviation of positron activity range (AR) from reconstructed PET images, with respect to different data acquisition times (from 5 sec to 300 sec with 5-sec step). We also developed a technique, “Smoothed Maximum Value (SMV)”, to improve AR measurement under a given dose. Furthermore, we simulated a human brain irradiated by a 110-MeV proton beam of 50-mm diameter with 0.3-Gy dose at Bragg peak and imaged by the above PET system with 40% system sensitivity at the center of FOV and 1.7-mm spatial resolution. Results: MC Simulations on the PMMA phantom showed that, regardless of PET system sensitivities and spatial resolutions, the accuracy and precision of AR were proportional to the reciprocal of the square root of image count if image smoothing was not applied. With image smoothing or SMV method, the accuracy and precision could be substantially improved. For a cylindrical PMMA phantom (200 mm diameter and 290 mm long), the accuracy and precision of AR measurement could reach 1.0 and 1.7 mm, with 100-sec data acquired by the brain PET. The study with a human brain showed it was feasible to achieve sub-millimeter accuracy and precision of AR measurement with acquisition time within 60 sec. Conclusion: This study established the relationship between count statistics and the accuracy and precision of activity-range verification. It showed the feasibility of clinical on-line BR verification with high-performance PET systems and improved AR measurement techniques. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas grant RP120326, NIH grant R21CA187717, The Cancer Center Support (Core) Grant CA016672

  3. Wavelet-based resolution recovery using an anatomical prior provides quantitative recovery for human population phantom PET [11C]raclopride data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shidahara, M; Tamura, H; Tsoumpas, C; McGinnity, C J; Hammers, A; Turkheimer, F E; Kato, T; Watabe, H

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a resolution recovery (RR) method using a variety of simulated human brain [ 11 C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) images. Simulated datasets of 15 numerical human phantoms were processed by a wavelet-based RR method using an anatomical prior. The anatomical prior was in the form of a hybrid segmented atlas, which combined an atlas for anatomical labelling and a PET image for functional labelling of each anatomical structure. We applied RR to both 60 min static and dynamic PET images. Recovery was quantified in 84 regions, comparing the typical ‘true’ value for the simulation, as obtained in normal subjects, simulated and RR PET images. The radioactivity concentration in the white matter, striatum and other cortical regions was successfully recovered for the 60 min static image of all 15 human phantoms; the dependence of the solution on accurate anatomical information was demonstrated by the difficulty of the technique to retrieve the subthalamic nuclei due to mismatch between the two atlases used for data simulation and recovery. Structural and functional synergy for resolution recovery (SFS-RR) improved quantification in the caudate and putamen, the main regions of interest, from −30.1% and −26.2% to −17.6% and −15.1%, respectively, for the 60 min static image and from −51.4% and −38.3% to −27.6% and −20.3% for the binding potential (BP ND ) image, respectively. The proposed methodology proved effective in the RR of small structures from brain [ 11 C]raclopride PET images. The improvement is consistent across the anatomical variability of a simulated population as long as accurate anatomical segmentations are provided. (paper)

  4. Construction of Korean female voxel phantom and its application to dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Ik

    2001-08-15

    A Korean female voxel phantom was constructed to overcome the limitations of anatomical description of the existing MRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and the example dose calculations were carried out for the radiation protection by using it. This whole body voxel phantom was based on the MRIs of the Korean adult female who falls into the reference Korean female group. The cross sectional human pictures from VHP of NLM was adopted for the modification and compensation of the missing MRIs of Korean adult female that include legs below upper thighs. From the gastrointestinal and respiratory organ which make obscure organ edges because of their continuing motion, the general anatomical knowledge were applied for the segmentation process. The Korean female whole body voxel phantom named in HYWOMAN is composed of 1,392,400 voxels that have width x length x height of 4mm x 4mm x 8mm for each with the total of 20 organs identified. With MDNP4B code the tissue equivalent doses were calculated for the four different energies of 0.4, 0.8, 2 and 8 MeV broad parallel gamma beam in AP, PA, LLAT and RLAT directions. The tissue equivalent doses were compared with those of ORNL adult female phantom under the same irradiation conditions. Despite of the small organ differences there could be found the considerable differences in tissue equivalent doses for some organs including thyroid, esophagus, kidneys and spleen. The cause of these discrepancies were proved to be the position of the organs in the phantom and the consequent shielding effects. With the methodology of this study, Korean reference male and female age-grouped voxel phantoms can be constructed and consequently the dosimetry system for typical Korean people is to be established.

  5. Construction of Korean female voxel phantom and its application to dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Ik

    2001-08-01

    A Korean female voxel phantom was constructed to overcome the limitations of anatomical description of the existing MRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and the example dose calculations were carried out for the radiation protection by using it. This whole body voxel phantom was based on the MRIs of the Korean adult female who falls into the reference Korean female group. The cross sectional human pictures from VHP of NLM was adopted for the modification and compensation of the missing MRIs of Korean adult female that include legs below upper thighs. From the gastrointestinal and respiratory organ which make obscure organ edges because of their continuing motion, the general anatomical knowledge were applied for the segmentation process. The Korean female whole body voxel phantom named in HYWOMAN is composed of 1,392,400 voxels that have width x length x height of 4mm x 4mm x 8mm for each with the total of 20 organs identified. With MDNP4B code the tissue equivalent doses were calculated for the four different energies of 0.4, 0.8, 2 and 8 MeV broad parallel gamma beam in AP, PA, LLAT and RLAT directions. The tissue equivalent doses were compared with those of ORNL adult female phantom under the same irradiation conditions. Despite of the small organ differences there could be found the considerable differences in tissue equivalent doses for some organs including thyroid, esophagus, kidneys and spleen. The cause of these discrepancies were proved to be the position of the organs in the phantom and the consequent shielding effects. With the methodology of this study, Korean reference male and female age-grouped voxel phantoms can be constructed and consequently the dosimetry system for typical Korean people is to be established

  6. Image based Monte Carlo modeling for computational phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M.; Wang, W.; Zhao, K.; Fan, Y.; Long, P.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Full text of the publication follows. The evaluation on the effects of ionizing radiation and the risk of radiation exposure on human body has been becoming one of the most important issues for radiation protection and radiotherapy fields, which is helpful to avoid unnecessary radiation and decrease harm to human body. In order to accurately evaluate the dose on human body, it is necessary to construct more realistic computational phantom. However, manual description and verification of the models for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation are very tedious, error-prone and time-consuming. In addition, it is difficult to locate and fix the geometry error, and difficult to describe material information and assign it to cells. MCAM (CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport Simulation) was developed as an interface program to achieve both CAD- and image-based automatic modeling. The advanced version (Version 6) of MCAM can achieve automatic conversion from CT/segmented sectioned images to computational phantoms such as MCNP models. Imaged-based automatic modeling program(MCAM6.0) has been tested by several medical images and sectioned images. And it has been applied in the construction of Rad-HUMAN. Following manual segmentation and 3D reconstruction, a whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female called Rad-HUMAN was created by using MCAM6.0 from sectioned images of a Chinese visible human dataset. Rad-HUMAN contains 46 organs/tissues, which faithfully represented the average anatomical characteristics of the Chinese female. The dose conversion coefficients (Dt/Ka) from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose of Rad-HUMAN were calculated. Rad-HUMAN can be applied to predict and evaluate dose distributions in the Treatment Plan System (TPS), as well as radiation exposure for human body in radiation protection. (authors)

  7. Mathematical phantoms for evaluation of age-specific internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    A series of mathematical phantoms representing children has been developed for use with photon transport codes. These phantoms, patterned after the Fisher-Snyder adult phantom, consist of simple mathematical expressions for the boundaries of the major organs and body sections. The location and shape of the organs are consistent with drawings depicting developmental anatomy, with the organ volumes assigned such that the masses at the various ages conform closely with the data presented in Reference Man. The explicit mathematical expressions for the various ages overcome the potential misrepresentation of organ sizes that occurred in phantoms derived from simple mathematical transformations of the adult phantom. Female breast tissue has been added to the phantoms, including the adult, now allowing assessment of doses to this organ

  8. Design construction and testing of a human abdomen phantom (anthropomorphic) for in-vivo dosimetry in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, E.C.K.; Andam, A.B.; Nani, E.K.; Dogbe, R.

    2007-01-01

    Using direct measurement, we investigated entrance surface doses of patients for routine radiographs in attempt to develop evaluation methods of patient dose in order to establish the guidance level in Ghana. To date, patient doses have been evaluated by calculation based on radiographic conditions, or model experiments using phantoms, also based on several assumptions. Direct measurement of patient dose is difficult to perform in many patients due to its time requirement, level of expertise required and difficulty in providing an explanation of the procedure to the patient. However, such direct measurement is essential since it incorporates all aspects of radiography from the radiographic equipment used, to the actual conditions of each patient without assumption. In this study, we examined the need for introducing the guidance level, controversial points in the calculation method for patient dose evaluation, evaluation accuracy required for introducing the guidance level, and necessity for a standardized method. The variation between measured and calculated doses range between -4.8 to +29.3 per cent. Computational technique is a wide ranging and cost effective method od conducting representative patient dose estimations in plain radiography. (au)

  9. Construction of boundary-surface-based Chinese female astronaut computational phantom and proton dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenjuan; Xie Tianwu; Liu Qian; Jia Xianghong; Xu Feng

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of China's space industry, the importance of radiation protection is increasingly prominent. To provide relevant dose data, we first developed the Visible Chinese Human adult Female (VCH-F) phantom, and performed further modifications to generate the VCH-F Astronaut (VCH-FA) phantom, incorporating statistical body characteristics data from the first batch of Chinese female astronauts as well as reference organ mass data from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP; both within 1% relative error). Based on cryosection images, the original phantom was constructed via Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) boundary surfaces to strengthen the deformability for fitting the body parameters of Chinese female astronauts. The VCH-FA phantom was voxelized at a resolution of 2 x 2 x 4 mm 3 for radioactive particle transport simulations from isotropic protons with energies of 5000 - 10 000 MeV in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. To investigate discrepancies caused by anatomical variations and other factors, the obtained doses were compared with corresponding values from other phantoms and sex-averaged doses. Dose differences were observed among phantom calculation results, especially for effective dose with low-energy protons. Local skin thickness shifts the breast dose curve toward high energy, but has little impact on inner organs. Under a shielding layer, organ dose reduction is greater for skin than for other organs. The calculated skin dose per day closely approximates measurement data obtained in low-Earth orbit (LEO). (author)

  10. Mapping the nanostructures in human adult and baby tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, I.M.; Mahmood, U.; Duraman, N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates and compares the variations in crystal structure, composition, and nanostructures within the human adult and deciduous teeth. The similarities and differences in the nanostructure of both types of teeth are highlighted and discussed. (author)

  11. Adult Functional Literacy Curriculum: Effective Strategy for Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adult functional literacy curriculum no doubt, is a panacea to human resource development in Nigeria. Government and non-government organizations have roles to play in providing functional education to adults who drop out of school or have no opportunity of attending the formal school system for all round development.

  12. Thoraco-abdominal high-pitch dual-source CT angiography: Experimental evaluation of injection protocols with an anatomical human vascular phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puippe, Gilbert D., E-mail: gilbert.puippe@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Winklehner, Anna [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Hasenclever, Peter; Plass, André [Division of Cardiac and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Frauenfelder, Thomas; Baumueller, Stephan [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To experimentally evaluate three different contrast injection protocols at thoraco-abdominal high-pitch dual-source computed tomography angiography (CTA), with regard to level and homogeneity of vascular enhancement at different cardiac outputs. Materials and methods: A uniphasic, a biphasic as well as an individually tailored contrast protocol were tested using a human vascular phantom. Each protocol was scanned at 5 different cardiac outputs (3–5 L/min, steps of 0.5 L/min) using an extracorporeal cardiac pump. Vascular enhancement of the thoraco-abdominal aorta was measured every 5 cm. Overall mean enhancement of each protocol and mean enhancement for each cardiac output within each protocol were calculated. Enhancement homogeneity along the z-axis was evaluated for each cardiac output and protocol. Results: Overall mean enhancement was significantly higher in the uniphasic than in the other two protocols (all p < .05), whereas the difference between the biphasic and tailored protocol was not significant (p = .76). Mean enhancement among each of the 5 cardiac outputs within each protocol was significantly different (all p < .05). Only within the tailored protocol mean enhancement differed not significantly at cardiac outputs of 3.5 L/min vs. 5 L/min (484 ± 25 HU vs. 476 ± 19 HU, p = .14) and 4 vs. 5 L/min (443 ± 49 HU vs. 476 ± 19 HU, p = .05). Both, uniphasic and tailored protocol yielded homogenous enhancement at all cardiac outputs, whereas the biphasic protocol failed to achieve homogenous enhancement. Conclusion: This phantom study suggests that diagnostic and homogenous enhancement at thoraco-abdominal high-pitch dual-source CTA is feasible with either a uniphasic or an individually tailored contrast protocol.

  13. Editorial: Technology for higher education, adult learning and human performance

    OpenAIRE

    Minhong Wang; Chi-Cheng Chang; Feng Wu

    2013-01-01

    This special issue is dedicated to technology-enabled approaches for improving higher education, adult learning, and human performance. Improvement of learning and human development for sustainable development has been recognized as a key strategy for individuals, institutions, and organizations to strengthen their competitive advantages. It becomes crucial to help adult learners and knowledge workers to improve their self-directed and life-long learning capabilities. Meanwhile, advances in t...

  14. Changes in radiation dose with variations in human anatomy: moderately and severely obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Landon D; Stabin, Michael G; Fernald, Michael J; Brill, Aaron B

    2010-06-01

    The phantoms used in standardized dose assessment are based on a median (i.e., 50th percentile) individual of a large population, for example, adult males or females or children of a particular age. Here we describe phantoms that model instead the influence of obesity on specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and dose factors in adults. The literature was reviewed to evaluate how individual organ sizes change with variations in body weight in mildly and severely obese adult men and women. On the basis of the literature evaluation, changes were made to our deformable reference adult male and female total-body models. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed. SAFs for photons were generated for mildly and severely obese adults, and comparisons were made to the reference (50th) percentile SAF values. SAFs studied between the obese phantoms and the 50th percentile reference phantoms were not significantly different from the reference 50th percentile individual, with the exception of intestines irradiating some abdominal organs, because of an increase in separation between folds caused by an increase in mesenteric adipose deposits. Some low-energy values for certain organ pairs were different, possibly due only to the statistical variability of the data at these low energies. The effect of obesity on dose calculations for internal emitters is minor and may be neglected in the routine use of standardized dose estimates.

  15. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S K; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Frey, Eric; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the three-dimensional XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included three variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET MC code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48–184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as

  16. Phantom cosmologies and fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimento, Luis P; Forte, Monica; Devecchi, Fernando P; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2008-01-01

    Form invariance transformations can be used for constructing phantom cosmologies starting with conventional cosmological models. In this work we reconsider the scalar field case and extend the discussion to fermionic fields, where the 'phantomization' process exhibits a new class of possible accelerated regimes. As an application we analyze the cosmological constant group for a fermionic seed fluid

  17. 21. Phantom pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.P.; Vanduynhoven, E.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.; Pope, J.E.; Mekhail, N.

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the

  18. Development and liver of phantom anthropomorphic application for use in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, M.G.; Silva, L.F.; Ferreira, F. C.L.; Cunha, C.J.; Paschoal, C.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of artificial ionizing radiation has also been employed in several areas, namely: medicine, agriculture, industry, ink curing etc. However, the use of radiation for medical purposes of diagnosis or therapy is being treated with more attention due to its increased use and the use of simulators object for quality control and training of professionals. The phantoms and are used to aid radiographic procedures, they may simulate a part of the body, both in its form as mass, density, and attenuation. The objective of this work was the development and application of liver anthropomorphic phantom for use in diagnostic radiology and training professionals. The construction of the liver anthropomorphic phantom was through literature and it was noticed that the use of phantoms are relatively low. For the construction of the mold of the phantom was used an adult human liver with early cirrhosis that was preserved in formalin for teaching demonstrations in Prof. Human Anatomy Museum collection Osvaldo Cruz of milk from the Federal University of Sergipe. With this work, we emphasize the need for the control program and quality assurance in radiology doctor to ensure image quality and low exposure of patients and professionals, since the radiological examinations are extremely important, because its contribution decisively in medical diagnosis. (authors)

  19. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  20. A software to edit voxel phantoms and to calculate conversion coefficients for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, J.W.; Stosic, B.; Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Santos, A.M.; Lima, V.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The MAX and FAX phantoms have been developed based on a male and female, respectively, adult body from ICRP and coupled to the Monte Carlo code (EGS4). These phantoms permit the calculating of the equivalent dose in organs and tissues of the human body for the radiation protection purposes . In the constructing of these anthropomorphic models, the software developed called FANTOMAS, which performs tasks as file format conversion, filtering 2D and 3D images, exchange of identifying numbers of organs, body mass adjustments based in volume, resampling of 2D and 3D images, resize images, preview consecutive slices of the phantom, running computational models of exposure FANTOMA/EGS4 and viewing graphics of conversion factors between equivalent dose and a measurable dosimetric quantity. This paper presents the main abilities of FANTOMAS and uses the MAX and/or FAX to exemplify some procedures

  1. Hybrid computational phantoms of the 15-year male and female adolescent: Applications to CT organ dosimetry for patients of variable morphometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, two classes of the computational phantoms have been developed for dosimetry calculation: (1) stylized (or mathematical) and (2) voxel (or tomographic) phantoms describing human anatomy through mathematical surface equations and three-dimensional labeled voxel matrices, respectively. Mathematical surface equations in stylized phantoms provide flexibility in phantom design and alteration, but the resulting anatomical description is, in many cases, not very realistic. Voxel phantoms display far better anatomical realism, but they are limited in terms of their ability to alter organ shape, position, and depth, as well as body posture. A new class of computational phantoms - called hybrid phantoms - takes advantage of the best features of stylized and voxel phantoms - flexibility and anatomical realism, respectively. In the current study, hybrid computational phantoms representing reference 15-year male and female body anatomy and anthropometry are presented. For the male phantom, organ contours were extracted from the University of Florida (UF) 14-year series B male voxel phantom, while for the female phantom, original computed tomography (CT) data from two 14-year female patients were used. Polygon mesh models for the major organs and tissues were reconstructed for nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surface modeling. The resulting NURBS/polygon mesh models representing body contour and internal anatomy were matched to anthropometric data and reference organ mass data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP), respectively. Finally, two hybrid 15-year male and female phantoms were completed where a total of eight anthropometric data categories were matched to standard values within 4% and organ masses matched to ICRP data within 1% with the exception of total skin. To highlight the flexibility of the hybrid phantoms, 10th and 90th weight percentile 15-year male and

  2. Usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Kim, Jeong Koo

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate usefulness of a functional tracheobronchial phantom for interventional procedure. The functional phantom was made as a actual size with human normal anatomy used silicone and a paper clay mold. A tracheobronchial-shape clay mold was placed inside a square box and liquid silicone was poured. After the silicone was formed, the clay was removed. We measured film density and tracheobronchial angle at the human, animal and phantom respectively. The film density of trachea part were 0.76 (± 0.011) in human, 0.97 (± 0.015) in animal, 0.45 (± 0.016) in phantom. The tracheobronchial bifurcation part measured 0.51 (± 0.006) in human, 0.65 (± 0.005) in animal, 0.65 (± 0.008) in phantom. The right bronchus part measured 0.14 (± 0.008) in human, 0.59 (± 0.014) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom. The left bronchus were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.54 (± 0.008) in animal and 0.08 (± 0.008) in phantom. At the stent part were 0.54 (± 0.004) in human, 0.59 (± 0.011) in animal and 0.04 (± 0.007) in phantom, respectively. The tracheobronchial angle of the left bronchus site were 42.6 (± 2.07).deg. in human, 43.4 (± 2.40).deg. in animal and 35 (± 2.00).deg. in phantom, respectively. The right bronchus site were 32.8 (± 2.77).deg. in human, 34.6 (± 1.94).deg. in animal and 50.2 (± 1.30).deg. in phantom, respectively. The phantom was useful for in-vitro testing of tracheobronchial interventional procedure, since it was easy to reproduce

  3. Dosimetric characterization of model Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 brachytherapy source in water phantoms and human tissues with MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianhua; Zhang Hualin

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed alternative brachytherapy seed, Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131, has begun to be used in clinical practice. The dosimetric characteristics of this source in various media, particularly in human tissues, have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to calculate the dosimetric parameters for the Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 seed following the recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report [Rivard et al., Med. Phys. 31, 633-674 (2004)] for new sources in brachytherapy applications. Dose rate constants, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions of the source in water, Virtual Water, and relevant human soft tissues were calculated using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results yielded dose rate constants of 1.048, 1.024, 1.041, and 1.044 cGy h -1 U -1 in water, Virtual Water, muscle, and prostate tissue, respectively. The conversion factor for this new source between water and Virtual Water was 1.02, between muscle and water was 1.006, and between prostate and water was 1.004. The authors' calculation of anisotropy functions in a Virtual Water phantom agreed closely with Murphy's measurements [Murphy et al., Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)]. Our calculations of the radial dose function in water and Virtual Water have good agreement with those in previous experimental and Monte Carlo studies. The TG-43U1 parameters for clinical applications in water, muscle, and prostate tissue are presented in this work

  4. The weight of nations: an estimation of adult human biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walpole Sarah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The energy requirement of species at each trophic level in an ecological pyramid is a function of the number of organisms and their average mass. Regarding human populations, although considerable attention is given to estimating the number of people, much less is given to estimating average mass, despite evidence that average body mass is increasing. We estimate global human biomass, its distribution by region and the proportion of biomass due to overweight and obesity. Methods For each country we used data on body mass index (BMI and height distribution to estimate average adult body mass. We calculated total biomass as the product of population size and average body mass. We estimated the percentage of the population that is overweight (BMI > 25 and obese (BMI > 30 and the biomass due to overweight and obesity. Results In 2005, global adult human biomass was approximately 287 million tonnes, of which 15 million tonnes were due to overweight (BMI > 25, a mass equivalent to that of 242 million people of average body mass (5% of global human biomass. Biomass due to obesity was 3.5 million tonnes, the mass equivalent of 56 million people of average body mass (1.2% of human biomass. North America has 6% of the world population but 34% of biomass due to obesity. Asia has 61% of the world population but 13% of biomass due to obesity. One tonne of human biomass corresponds to approximately 12 adults in North America and 17 adults in Asia. If all countries had the BMI distribution of the USA, the increase in human biomass of 58 million tonnes would be equivalent in mass to an extra 935 million people of average body mass, and have energy requirements equivalent to that of 473 million adults. Conclusions Increasing population fatness could have the same implications for world food energy demands as an extra half a billion people living on the earth.

  5. Development of an Arm Phantom for Testing Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia D.

    Approximately one in every three adults age 20 older are diagnosed with high blood pressure or hypertension. It is estimated that hypertension affects 78 million people in the United States, is equally prevalent in both men and woman (Crabtree, Stuart-Shor, & McAllister, 2013). In the United States, around 78% of people suffering from hypertension are aware of their condition, with only 68% using hypertensive medications to control their blood pressure (Writing Group et al., 2010). Clinically, blood pressure measurements may lack accuracy, which can be attributed to various factors, including device limitations, cuff mis-sizing and misplacement, white-coat effect, masked hypertension, and lifestyle factors. The development of an arm phantom to simulate physiologic properties of a human arm and arterial BP waveforms may allow us to better assess the accuracy of non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitors. The objective of this study are to: (1) Develop an arm phantom to replicate physiological properties of the human arm, and (2) Incorporate the arm phantom into a mock circulatory flow loop to simulate different physiological blood pressure readings on the bench. A tissue mimicking material, styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene (SEBS), a co-block polymer was used to develop the arm phantom for in-vitro testing. To determine the optimal mechanical properties for the arm phantom, individual arm components were isolated and tested. A protocol was developed to evaluate various components for optimal arm phantom development. Mechanical testing was conducted on 10%, 15%, and 20% SEBS gel samples for modulus of elasticity measurements in order to simulate physiological properties of the human arm. As a result of the SEBS polymer being a new material for this application, this investigation will contribute to resolving the limitations that occurred during experimentation. In this study, we demonstrated that although SEBS polymer may be an ideal material to use for simulating

  6. Development and application of a pediatric head phantom for dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Elaine Wirney

    2016-01-01

    To determine the exposure levels and the absorbed dose in patients undergoing CT scans, is necessary to calculate the CT dose index in measurements with a PMMA or water phantom. The phantom must be enough to simulate the attenuation and scattering characteristics of a human body or parts in a radiation field. The CT specific quantities : CT air kerma index (Ca,100) , weighted CT air kerma index (CW ), a total volume CT air kerma index (Cvol) and the CT air kerma-length product (PKL) must be determined and compared to literature reference levels. In this work a head pediatric phantom was developed, considering that the Brazilian published Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) are based on adult phantom measurements. This developed phantom shows a construction innovation using materials to simulate the skullcap, cortical bone (aluminum) and cancellous bone (PVC), and it was filled with distilled water. The phantom dimension follows the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the International Commission on Radiation Units for children from 0 to 5 years old head size: diameter of 160 mm and height of 155 mm. The skullcap has 4 mm of thickness and 111.9 mm of internal diameter. In order to evaluate its behavior, tests were carried out in calibration laboratories and in clinical beams. The results showed attenuation up to 23% when different materials are used as skullcap, demonstrating that the DRLs adopted could be overestimating the dose received by pediatric patients. It is observed that the dose received by CT skull scans presents different distribution, due to the skullcap partially attenuation and/or backscattering which is not considered when the PMMA phantom is used.

  7. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W., E-mail: wbfisica@gmail.com [Bahia Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology – IFBA, Vitória da Conquista, 45.100-000 (Brazil); Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Santos, W.S. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Paschoal, C.M.M., E-mail: cinthiam.paschoal@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Vale do Acarau State University – UVA, Sobral 62.040-730 (Brazil); Souza, D.N. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current–time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  9. Qualitative analysis neurons in the adult human dentate nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Dušica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many relevant findings regarding to the morphology and cytoarchitectural development of the dentate nucleus have been presented so far, very little qualitative information has been collected on neuronal morphology in the adult human dentate nucleus. The neurons were labelled by Golgi staining from thirty human cerebella, obtained from medico-legal forensic autopsies of adult human bodies and free of significant brain pathology. The human dentate neurons were qualitatively analyzed and these cells were classified into two main classes: the small and the large multipolar neurons. Considering the shape of the cell body, number of the primary dendrites, shape of the dendritic tree and their position within the dentate nucleus, three subclasses of the large multipolar neurons have been recognized. The classification of neurons from the human dentate nucleus has been qualitatively confirmed in fetuses and premature infants. This study represents the first qualitative analysis and classification of the large multipolar neurons in the dentate nucleus of the adult human.

  10. Implementation of Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms to multi-particle Monte Carlo code for ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms, which have been developed for radio-frequency electromagnetic-field dosimetry, were implemented into multi-particle Monte Carlo transport code to evaluate realistic dose distribution in human body exposed to radiation field. Japanese tomographic phantoms, which were developed from the whole body magnetic resonance images of Japanese average adult male and female, were processed as follows to be implemented into general purpose multi-particle Monte Carlo code, MCNPX2.5. Original array size of Japanese male and female phantoms, 320 x 160 x 866 voxels and 320 x 160 x 804 voxels, respectively, were reduced into 320 x 160 x 433 voxels and 320 x 160 x 402 voxels due to the limitation of memory use in MCNPX2.5. The 3D voxel array of the phantoms were processed by using the built-in repeated structure algorithm, where the human anatomy was described by the repeated lattice of tiny cube containing the information of material composition and organ index number. Original phantom data were converted into ASCII file, which can be directly ported into the lattice card of MCNPX2.5 input deck by using in-house code. A total of 30 material compositions obtained from International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) report 46 were assigned to 54 and 55 organs and tissues in the male and female phantoms, respectively, and imported into the material card of MCNPX2.5 along with the corresponding cross section data. Illustrative calculation of absorbed doses for 26 internal organs and effective dose were performed for idealized broad parallel photon and neutron beams in anterior-posterior irradiation geometry, which is typical for workers at nuclear power plant. The results were compared with the data from other Japanese and Caucasian tomographic phantom, and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report 74. The further investigation of the difference in organ dose and effective dose among tomographic

  11. Monocular Visual Deprivation Suppresses Excitability in Adult Human Visual Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Astrid Rosenstand; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The adult visual cortex maintains a substantial potential for plasticity in response to a change in visual input. For instance, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have shown that binocular deprivation (BD) increases the cortical excitability for inducing phosphenes with TMS. Here, we...... of visual deprivation has a substantial impact on experience-dependent plasticity of the human visual cortex.......The adult visual cortex maintains a substantial potential for plasticity in response to a change in visual input. For instance, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have shown that binocular deprivation (BD) increases the cortical excitability for inducing phosphenes with TMS. Here, we...... employed TMS to trace plastic changes in adult visual cortex before, during, and after 48 h of monocular deprivation (MD) of the right dominant eye. In healthy adult volunteers, MD-induced changes in visual cortex excitability were probed with paired-pulse TMS applied to the left and right occipital cortex...

  12. Creativity, Social Justice and Human Rights within Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susannah

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author describes philosophical concepts of adult learning and their application as integrated with creative problem solving within the context of social justice and human rights. The context is framed by the work of the United Nations (1992) which emphasizes importance of women's roles and creativity in the process of forming a…

  13. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissner, Michelle M; Thomas, Brandon J; Wee, Kathleen; Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R; Smale, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development.

  14. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  15. New format for storage of voxel phantom, and exposure computer model EGS4/MAX to EGSnrc/MASH update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Lima, Lindeval F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to estimate the dosage absorbed by those subjected to ionizing radiation, it is necessary to perform simulations using the exposure computational model (ECM). Such models are consists essentially of an anthropomorphic phantom and a Monte Carlo code (MC). The conjunction of a voxel phantom of the MC code is a complex process and often results in solving a specific problem. This is partly due to the way the phantom voxel is stored on a computer. It is usually required a substantial amount of space to store a static representation of the human body and also a significant amount of memory for reading and processing a given simulation. This paper presents a new way to store data concerning the geometry irradiated (similar to the technique of repeated structures used in the geometry of MCNP code), reducing by 52% the disk space required for storage when compared to the previous format applied by Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq). On the other hand, research in numerical dosimetry leads to a constant improvement on the resolution of voxel phantoms leading thus to a new requirement, namely, to develop new estimates of dose. Therefore, this work also performs an update of the MAX (Male Adult voXel)/EGS4 ECM for the MASH (Adult MaleMeSH)/EGSnrc ECM and presents instances of dosimetric evaluations using the new ECM. Besides the update of the phantom and the MC code, the algorithm of the source used has also been improved in contrast to previous publications. (author)

  16. Design, fabrication and evaluation of a new calibration phantom for in vivo measurement of bone-seeking radionuclides (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, H.B.; Lodwick, J.

    2000-01-01

    A new anthropometric phantom has been developed for use in calibrating in vivo measurements of bone-seeking radionuclides. The phantom has the external shape and appearance of the human adult knee and contains a realistic femur, patella, tibia, and fibula. Unique formulations of polyurethanes, CaCo 3 , and other trace materials are used in construction of the phantom to produce substitutes for human tissue having the same density, attenuation coefficient, and effective Z as that of human muscle and trabecular bone. The formulation for trabecular bone includes provision for a precisely known quantity of radioactive material that is either uniformly distributed throughout the bone matrix or deposited on the exterior surface. The knee phantom is assembled in three interlocking sections that simplify inserting the skeletal structures and prevent streaming. One or more detectors can easily be positioned on the top or sides of the phantom. Intercomparison measurements of 241 Am in bone using separate arrays of phoswich and germanium detectors demonstrate that a single knee phantom exhibits the same detection efficiency as that using the skull. In vivo measurement of the knee is a desirable alternative to the head if facial contamination is present or when evaluating recent exposure to bone seeking radionuclides, since bones of the knee exhibit more rapid uptake than the skull. In practice, greater measurement efficiency can be obtained by placing detectors over both knees since a larger fraction of the total body activity is observed. Calibration measurements using the new anthropometric knee phantom demonstrate that it is durable, easy to use, and provides consistent results over repeated measurements. (author)

  17. Does Acute Normobaric Hypoxia Induce Anapyrexia in Adult Humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; Gerhart, Hayden D; Vaughan, Jeremiah; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Glickman, Ellen L

    2017-06-01

    Seo, Yongsuk, Hayden D. Gerhart, Jeremiah Vaughan, Jung-Hyun Kim, and Ellen L. Glickman. Does acute normobaric hypoxia induce anapyrexia in adult humans? High Alt Med Biol. 18:185-190, 2017.-Exposure to hypoxia is known to induce a reduction in core body temperature as a protective mechanism, which has been shown in both animals and humans. The purpose of this study was to test if acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia (NH) induces anapyrexia in adult humans in association with decreased peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ). Ten healthy male subjects were seated in atmospheres of normobaric normoxia 21% (NN21), NH 17% (NH17), and 13% (NH13) O 2 for 60 minutes in a counterbalanced manner. Rectal temperature (Tre) was continuously monitored together with the quantification of metabolic heat production (MHP) and body heat storage (S). Baseline physiological measurements showed no differences between the three conditions. SpO 2 was significantly decreased in NH17 and NH13 compared with NN21 (p ≤ 0.001). Tre decreased following 60 minutes of resting in all conditions, but, independent of the conditions, showed no association between Tre and levels of hypoxic SpO 2 . There was also no significant difference in either MHP or S between conditions. The present results showed no evidence of hypoxia-induced anapyrexia in adult humans during 1 hour of resting after exposure to NH either at 13% or 17% O 2 .

  18. Development and use of a fifteen year-old equivalent mathematical phantom for internal dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.; Poston, J.W.; Hwang, J.L.; Jones, T.D.; Warner, G.G.

    1976-06-01

    The existence of a phantom based on anatomical data for the average fifteen-year-old provides for a proficient means of obtaining estimates of absorbed dose for children of that age. Dimensions representative of an average fifteen-year-old human, obtained from various biological and medical research, were transformed into a mathematical construct of idealized shapes of the exterior, skeletal system, and internal organs of a human. The idealization for an average adult presently in use by the International Commission on Radiological Protection was used as a basis for design. The mathematical equations describing the phantom were developed to be readily adaptable to present-day methods of dose estimation. Typical exposure situations in nuclear medicine have previously been modeled for existing phantoms. With no further development of the exposure model necessary, adaptation to the fifteen-year-old phantom demonstrated the utility of the design. Estimates of absorbed dose were obtained for the administration of two radiopharmaceuticals, /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA

  19. Breast phantom for mammary tissue characterization by near infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, D A; Cristiano, K L; Gutiérrez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated to a high morbidity and mortality in the entire world. In the study of early detection of breast cancer the development of phantom is so important. In this research we fabricate a breast phantom using a ballistic gel with special modifications to simulate a normal and abnormal human breast. Optical properties of woman breast in the near infrared region were modelled with the phantom we developed. The developed phantom was evaluated with near infrared spectroscopy in order to study its relation with breast tissue. A good optical behaviour was achieved with the model fabricated

  20. Influence of Manufacturing Processes on the Performance of Phantom Lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Chest counting is an important tool for estimating the radiation dose to individuals who have inhaled radioactive materials. Chest counting systems are calibrated by counting the activity in the lungs of phantoms where the activity in the phantom lungs is known. In the United States a commonly used calibration phantom was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is referred to as the Livermore Torso Phantom. An important feature of this phantom is that the phantom lungs can be interchanged so that the counting system can be challenged by different combinations of radionuclides and activity. Phantom lungs are made from lung tissue substitutes whose constituents are foaming plastics and various adjuvants selected to make the lung tissue substitute similar to normal healthy lung tissue. Some of the properties of phantom lungs cannot be readily controlled by phantom lung manufacturers. Some, such as density, are a complex function of the manufacturing process, while others, such as elemental composition of the bulk plastic are controlled by the plastics manufacturer without input, or knowledge of the phantom manufacturer. Despite the fact that some of these items cannot be controlled, they can be measured and accounted for. This report describes how manufacturing processes can influence the performance of phantom lungs. It is proposed that a metric that describes the brightness of the lung be employed by the phantom lung manufacturer to determine how well the phantom lung approximates the characteristics of a human lung. For many purposes, the linear attenuation of the lung tissue substitute is an appropriate surrogate for the brightness

  1. The Phantom Menace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vium, Christian

    2013-01-01

    as a phantom menace, which asserts itself through a form of omnipresent fear, nurtured by an inherent opaqueness. As this fundamental fear progressively permeates the nomadic landscape, it engenders a recasting of mobile strategies among the nomadic pastoralist groups who inhabit the interstitial desert spaces....

  2. Phantom crash confirms models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    To test computer models of how a nuclear reactor's containment building would fare if an airplane crashed into it, the Muto Institute in Tokyo sponsored a 3.2 million dollar project at Sandia National Laboratory to slam an F-4 Phantom jet into a 500 ton concrete wall. The results showed that the computer calculations were accurate

  3. Fabrication of subcutaneous veins phantom for vessel visualization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai; Narita, Kazuyuki; Morita, Yusuke; Nakamachi, Eiji; Honda, Norihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-09-01

    The technique of subcutaneous veins imaging by using NIR (Near Infrared Radiation) is widely used in medical applications, such as the intravenous injection and the blood sampling. In the previous study, an automatic 3D blood vessel search and automatic blood sampling system was newly developed. In order to validate this NIR imaging system, we adopted the subcutaneous vein in the human arm and its artificial phantom, which imitate the human fat and blood vessel. The human skin and subcutaneous vein is characterized as the uncertainty object, which has the individual specificity, non-accurate depth information, non-steady state and hardly to be fixed in the examination apparatus. On the other hand, the conventional phantom was quite distinct from the human's characteristics, such as the non-multilayer structure, disagreement of optical property. In this study, we develop a multilayer phantom, which is quite similar with human skin, for improvement of NIR detection system evaluation. The phantom consists of three layers, such as the epidermis layer, the dermis layer and the subcutaneous fat layer. In subcutaneous fat layer, we built a blood vessel. We use the intralipid to imitate the optical scattering characteristics of human skin, and the hemoglobin and melanin for the optical absorption characteristics. In this study, we did two subjects. First, we decide the fabrication process of the phantom. Second, we compared newly developed phantoms with human skin by using our NIR detecting system, and confirm the availability of these phantoms.

  4. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zankl, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Drexler, G. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Petoussi-Henss, N. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Saito, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body`s longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called `remainder`. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  5. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body's longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called 'remainder'. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  6. Covert spatial attention is functionally intact in amblyopic human adults

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Mariel; Cymerman, Rachel; Smith, R. Theodore; Kiorpes, Lynne; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Certain abnormalities in behavioral performance and neural signaling have been attributed to a deficit of visual attention in amblyopia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a diverse array of visual deficits following abnormal binocular childhood experience. Critically, most have inferred attention's role in their task without explicitly manipulating and measuring its effects against a baseline condition. Here, we directly investigate whether human amblyopic adults benefit from cov...

  7. The mandibular angles of dry adult human mandibles from north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mandibular angles of dry adult human mandibles from north-eastern arid zone of Nigeria. EF Mbajiorgu, AU Ekanem. Abstract. (Central African Journal of Medicine: 2002 48 (1-2): 9-13). http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/cajm.v48i1.8417 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  8. Can sleep deprivation studies explain why human adults sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee K

    2012-11-01

    This review will concentrate on the consequences of sleep deprivation in adult humans. These findings form a paradigm that serves to demonstrate many of the critical functions of the sleep states. The drive to obtain food, water, and sleep constitutes important vegetative appetites throughout the animal kingdom. Unlike nutrition and hydration, the reasons for sleep have largely remained speculative. When adult humans are nonspecifically sleep-deprived, systemic effects may include defects in cognition, vigilance, emotional stability, risk-taking, and, possibly, moral reasoning. Appetite (for foodstuffs) increases and glucose intolerance may ensue. Procedural, declarative, and emotional memory are affected. Widespread alterations of immune function and inflammatory regulators can be observed, and functional MRI reveals profound changes in regional cerebral activity related to attention and memory. Selective deprivation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, on the contrary, appears to be more activating and to have lesser effects on immunity and inflammation. The findings support a critical need for sleep due to the widespread effects on the adult human that result from nonselective sleep deprivation. The effects of selective REM deprivation appear to be different and possibly less profound, and the functions of this sleep state remain enigmatic.

  9. Homemade ultrasound phantom for simulation of hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karine Brandao Novaes

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we describe the development of a simple and inexpensive simulation phantom as a surrogate of human hydronephrosis for the identification of urinary tract obstruction at bedside to be used in undergraduate training of medical students.

  10. Construction of boundary-surface-based Chinese female astronaut computational phantom and proton dose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjuan; JIA, Xianghong; XIE, Tianwu; XU, Feng; LIU, Qian

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of China's space industry, the importance of radiation protection is increasingly prominent. To provide relevant dose data, we first developed the Visible Chinese Human adult Female (VCH-F) phantom, and performed further modifications to generate the VCH-F Astronaut (VCH-FA) phantom, incorporating statistical body characteristics data from the first batch of Chinese female astronauts as well as reference organ mass data from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP; both within 1% relative error). Based on cryosection images, the original phantom was constructed via Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) boundary surfaces to strengthen the deformability for fitting the body parameters of Chinese female astronauts. The VCH-FA phantom was voxelized at a resolution of 2 × 2 × 4 mm3for radioactive particle transport simulations from isotropic protons with energies of 5000–10 000 MeV in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. To investigate discrepancies caused by anatomical variations and other factors, the obtained doses were compared with corresponding values from other phantoms and sex-averaged doses. Dose differences were observed among phantom calculation results, especially for effective dose with low-energy protons. Local skin thickness shifts the breast dose curve toward high energy, but has little impact on inner organs. Under a shielding layer, organ dose reduction is greater for skin than for other organs. The calculated skin dose per day closely approximates measurement data obtained in low-Earth orbit (LEO). PMID:23135158

  11. Assembling of a phantom for quality control in pediatric radiodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Silvana Carvalho de; Ghilardi Netto, Thomaz; Trad, Clovis Simao; Brochi, Marco Aurelio Corte; Rocha, Sergio Luis

    1996-01-01

    The adaptation of an homogeneous phantom equivalent to an adult patient is presented for the valuation of pediatric radiologic images. The phantom consists basically of two plastic (methyl methacrylate) slabs, each 2.5 cm tick and two aluminium slabs, 0.5 and 1.0 mm thick. The system can simulate the chest, the skull or pelvis, and the extremities. The phantom also enables the equipment calibration, in order to reach the best radiographic image. After calibration of the equipment for several kVp and m As combinations, a phantom with known details and equivalent thickness was used to produce images. These radiographs allowed the choice of the best combination to be used. The entrance surface doses are presented for several combinations used with the pelvis and chest phantoms

  12. Oogenesis in cultures derived from adult human ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudle Michael R

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten years ago, we reported that in adult human females the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE is a source of germ cells. Recently, we also demonstrated that new primary follicles are formed by assembly of oocytes with nests of primitive granulosa cells in the ovarian cortex. The components of the new primary follicles, primitive granulosa and germ cells, differentiated sequentially from the OSE, which arises from cytokeratin positive mesenchymal progenitor cells residing in the ovarian tunica albuginea. In the present study, we investigated the possibility that the oocytes and granulosa cells may differentiate in cultures derived from adult human ovaries. Cells were scrapped from the surface of ovaries and cultured for 5 to 6 days, in the presence or absence of estrogenic stimuli [phenol red (PhR]. The OSE cells cultured in the medium without PhR differentiated into small (15 micron cells of granulosa phenotype, and epithelial, neural, and mesenchymal type cells. In contrast, OSE cells cultured in the presence of PhR differentiated directly into large (180 micron cells of the oocyte phenotype. Such cells exhibited germinal vesicle breakdown, expulsion of the polar body, and surface expression of zona pellucida proteins, i.e. characteristics of secondary oocytes. These in vitro studies confirm our in vivo observations that in adult human ovaries, the OSE is a bipotent source of oocytes and granulosa cells. Development of numerous mature oocytes from adult ovarian stem cells in vitro offers new strategies for the egg preservation, IVF utilization, and treatment of female infertility. In addition, other clinical applications aiming to utilize stem cells, and basic stem cell research as well, may employ totipotent embryonic stem cells developing from fertilized oocytes.

  13. Construction of a computational exposure model for dosimetric calculations using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code and voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose Wilson

    2004-07-01

    The MAX phantom has been developed from existing segmented images of a male adult body, in order to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties of the reference adult male specified by the ICRP. In computational dosimetry, MAX can simulate the geometry of a human body under exposure to ionizing radiations, internal or external, with the objective of calculating the equivalent dose in organs and tissues for occupational, medical or environmental purposes of the radiation protection. This study presents a methodology used to build a new computational exposure model MAX/EGS4: the geometric construction of the phantom; the development of the algorithm of one-directional, divergent, and isotropic radioactive sources; new methods for calculating the equivalent dose in the red bone marrow and in the skin, and the coupling of the MAX phantom with the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Finally, some results of radiation protection, in the form of conversion coefficients between equivalent dose (or effective dose) and free air-kerma for external photon irradiation are presented and discussed. Comparing the results presented with similar data from other human phantoms it is possible to conclude that the coupling MAX/EGS4 is satisfactory for the calculation of the equivalent dose in radiation protection. (author)

  14. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  15. Do you believe in phantoms?

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    “Phantoms” are tools that simulate a therapy’s response by mimicking the conditions of the human body. They are required in hadron therapy in order to optimise and verify the therapy before performing it on the patient. The better the phantom, the more accurate the treatment plan and the more effective the therapy. In the framework of the EU-funded project ENTERVISION*, a team of CERN researchers has designed an innovative piece of equipment able to evaluate radiobiology-related parameters in a very accurate way.   The ENTERVISION phantom being tested at HIT. A key challenge in hadron therapy – i.e. the medical use of hadrons to treat cancer – is to evaluate the biological effect of the delivered radiation. This can be achieved by using accurate dosimetry techniques to study the biological response in terms of the dose deposited and other physical parameters of the beam, such as the Linear Energy Transfer (LET). The job of the “phan...

  16. The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Reynaldo; Melgar, Paul; Maluccio, John A; Stein, Aryeh D; Rivera, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews key findings about the long-term impact of a nutrition intervention carried out by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama from 1969 to 1977. Results from follow-up studies in 1988-89 and 2002-04 show substantial impact on adult human capital and economic productivity. The 1988-89 study showed that adult body size and work capacity increased for those provided improved nutrition through age 3 y, whereas the 2002-04 follow-up showed that schooling was increased for women and reading comprehension and intelligence increased in both men and women. Participants were 26-42 y of age at the time of the 2002-04 follow-up, facilitating the assessment of economic productivity. Wages of men increased by 46% in those provided with improved nutrition through age 2 y. Findings for cardiovascular disease risk factors were heterogeneous; however, they suggest that improved nutrition in early life is unlikely to increase cardiovascular disease risk later in life and may indeed lower risk. In conclusion, the substantial improvement in adult human capital and economic productivity resulting from the nutrition intervention provides a powerful argument for promoting improvements in nutrition in pregnant women and young children.

  17. Anthropomorphic phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.R.; Constantinou, C.

    1982-01-01

    The need, terminology and history of tissue substitutes are outlined. Radiation properties of real tissues are described and simulation procedures are outlined. Recent tissue substitutes are described and charted, as are calculated radiation classifications. Manufacturing procedures and quality control are presented. Recent phantom studies are reviewed and a discussion recorded. Elemental compositions of the recommended tissue substitutes are charted with elemental composition given for each tissue substitute

  18. Solid water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguiropulo, M.Y.; Ghilardi Neto, T.; Pela, C.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A phantom were developed for simulating water, based in plastics. The material was evaluated for different energies, and the measures of relative transmission showed that the transmission and the water were inside of 0,6% for gamma rays. The results of this new material were presented, showing that it could be used in photon beam calibration with energies on radiotherapy range. (C.G.C.)

  19. Development of the Reference Korean Female Voxel Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Bo Kyoung; Cho, Kun Woo; Yeom, Yoen Soo; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is for development of the reference Korean female phantom, HDRK-Woman. The phantom was constructed by adjusting a Korean woman voxel phantom to the Reference Korean data. The Korean woman phantom had been developed based on the high-resolution color slice images obtained from an adult Korean female cadaver. There were a total of 39 organs including the 27 organs specified in ICRP 103 for effective dose calculation. The voxel resolution of the phantom was 1.967 X 1.967 X X 2.0619 mm 3 and the voxel array size is 261 X 109 X 825 in the x, y and z directions. Then, the voxel resolution was changed to 2.0351 X 2.0351 X 2.0747 mm 3 for adjustment of the height and total bone mass of the phantom to the Reference Korean data. Finally, the internal organs and tissue were adjusted using in-house software program developed for 3D volume adjustment of the organs and tissue. The effective dose values of HDRK phantoms were calculated for broad parallel photon beams using MCNPX Monte Carlo code and compared with those of ICRP phantoms.

  20. Development of the Reference Korean Female Voxel Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Bo Kyoung; Cho, Kun Woo [University of Science and Technology, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Yoen Soo; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The objective of this study is for development of the reference Korean female phantom, HDRK-Woman. The phantom was constructed by adjusting a Korean woman voxel phantom to the Reference Korean data. The Korean woman phantom had been developed based on the high-resolution color slice images obtained from an adult Korean female cadaver. There were a total of 39 organs including the 27 organs specified in ICRP 103 for effective dose calculation. The voxel resolution of the phantom was 1.967 X 1.967 X X 2.0619 mm{sup 3} and the voxel array size is 261 X 109 X 825 in the x, y and z directions. Then, the voxel resolution was changed to 2.0351 X 2.0351 X 2.0747 mm{sup 3} for adjustment of the height and total bone mass of the phantom to the Reference Korean data. Finally, the internal organs and tissue were adjusted using in-house software program developed for 3D volume adjustment of the organs and tissue. The effective dose values of HDRK phantoms were calculated for broad parallel photon beams using MCNPX Monte Carlo code and compared with those of ICRP phantoms.

  1. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...... scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1–89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain. Conclusions: Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain...

  2. A computer-simulated liver phantom (virtual liver phantom) for multidetector computed tomography evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Awai, Kazuo; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Liu, Da; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Miyazaki, Osamu; Goto, Taiga [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Hori, Shinichi [Gate Tower Institute of Image Guided Therapy, Osaka (Japan)

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of study was to develop a computer-simulated liver phantom for hepatic CT studies. A computer-simulated liver phantom was mathematically constructed on a computer workstation. The computer-simulated phantom was calibrated using real CT images acquired by an actual four-detector CT. We added an inhomogeneous texture to the simulated liver by referring to CT images of chronically damaged human livers. The mean CT number of the simulated liver was 60 HU and we added numerous 5-to 10-mm structures with 60{+-}10 HU/mm. To mimic liver tumors we added nodules measuring 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter with CT numbers of 60{+-}10, 60{+-}15, and 60{+-}20 HU. Five radiologists visually evaluated similarity of the texture of the computer-simulated liver phantom and a real human liver to confirm the appropriateness of the virtual liver images using a five-point scale. The total score was 44 in two radiologists, and 42, 41, and 39 in one radiologist each. They evaluated that the textures of virtual liver were comparable to those of human liver. Our computer-simulated liver phantom is a promising tool for the evaluation of the image quality and diagnostic performance of hepatic CT imaging. (orig.)

  3. Neurons in the white matter of the adult human neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Luisa Suarez-Sola

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The white matter (WM of the adult human neocortex contains the so-called “interstitial neurons”. They are most numerous in the superficial WM underlying the cortical gyri, and decrease in density toward the deep WM. They are morphologically heterogeneous. A subgroup of interstitial neurons display pyramidal-cell like morphologies, characterized by a polarized dendritic tree with a dominant apical dendrite, and covered with a variable number of dendritic spines. In addition, a large contingent of interstitial neurons can be classified as interneurons based on their neurochemical profile as well as on morphological criteria. WM- interneurons have multipolar or bipolar shapes and express GABA and a variety of other neuronal markers, such as calbindin and calretinin, the extracellular matrix protein reelin, or neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, and nitric oxide synthase. The heterogeneity of interstitial neurons may be relevant for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia. Interstitial neurons are most prominent in human brain, and only rudimentary in the brain of non-primate mammals. These evolutionary differences have precluded adequate experimental work on this cell population, which is usually considered as a relict of the subplate, a transient compartment proper of development and without a known function in the adult brain. The primate-specific prominence of the subplate in late fetal stages points to an important role in the establishment of interstitial neurons. Neurons in the adult WM may be actively involved in coordinating inter-areal connectivity and regulation of blood flow. Further studies in primates will be needed to elucidate the developmental history, adult components and activities of this large neuronal system.

  4. Periodontitis and oral human papillomavirus infection among Hispanic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patricia Ortiz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research on the association between periodontitis and oral human papilloma virus (HPV infection is inconsistent. The cross-sectional association of severe periodontitis with oral HPV infection was investigated in a sample of Hispanic adults. Methods: Data from the 2014–2016 San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study (n = 740 was analyzed. Periodontitis assessment and self-collection of oral HPV samples followed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey methodology. Periodontitis was defined using the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology definition. HPV typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: 5.7% of participants had oral HPV infection and 20.3% had severe periodontitis. Adults with severe periodontitis had higher odds of oral HPV infection than those with none/mild disease (OR=2.9, 95% CI: 1.0–8.4, p < 0.05 in multivariable analysis. Adults with clinical attachment loss≥ 7 mm and pocket depth PD≥ 6 mm had 2- to 3-fold higher odds of HPV infection. Conclusions: Severe periodontitis was positively associated to oral HPV infection. Longitudinal evaluation of periodontal inflammation's role in acquisition and persistence of oral HPV infection is needed, as periodontitis screening could identify individuals at increased risk of HPV-related oral malignancies. Keywords: Periodontitis, Oral HPV, Hispanics, Adults, Oral health, Puerto Rico

  5. Tissue quantification for development of pediatric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.F.F.; Miranda, J.R.A.; Pina, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of the risk- benefit ratio is a major concern in the pediatric radiology, due to the greater vulnerability of children to the late somatic effects and genetic effects of exposure to radiation compared to adults. In Brazil, it is estimated that the causes of death from head trauma are 18 % for the age group between 1-5 years and the radiograph is the primary diagnostic test for the detection of skull fracture . Knowing that the image quality is essential to ensure the identification of structures anatomical and minimizing errors diagnostic interpretation, this paper proposed the development and construction of homogeneous phantoms skull, for the age group 1-5 years. The construction of the phantoms homogeneous was performed using the classification and quantification of tissue present in the skull of pediatric patients. In this procedure computational algorithms were used, using Matlab, to quantify distinct biological tissues present in the anatomical regions studied , using pictures retrospective CT scans. Preliminary data obtained from measurements show that between the ages of 1-5 years, assuming an average anteroposterior diameter of the pediatric skull region of the 145.73 ± 2.97 mm, can be represented by 92.34 mm ± 5.22 of lucite and 1.75 ± 0:21 mm of aluminum plates of a provision of PEP (Pacient equivalent phantom). After its construction, the phantoms will be used for image and dose optimization in pediatric protocols process to examinations of computerized radiography

  6. Comparison of the ANSI, RSD, KKH, and BRMD thyroid-neck phantoms for 125I thyroid monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G H; Olender, G; Vlahovich, S; Hauck, B M; Meyerhof, D P

    1996-03-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory, which acts as the Canadian National Calibration Reference Centre for In Vivo Monitoring, has determined the performance characteristics of four thyroid phantoms for 125I thyroid monitoring. The phantoms were a phantom built to the specifications of the American National Standards Institute Standard N44.3; the phantom available from Radiology Support Devices; the phantom available from Kyoto Kagaku Hyohon; the phantom manufactured by the Human Monitoring Laboratory and known as the BRMD phantom. The counting efficiencies of the phantoms for 125I were measured at different phantom-to-detector distances. The anthropomorphic characteristics of the phantoms have been compared with the average man parameters. It was concluded that the BRMD, American National Standards Institute, and Radiology Support Devices phantoms have the same performance characteristics when the neck-to-detector distances are greater than 12 cm and all phantoms are essentially equivalent at 30 cm or more. The Kyoto Kagaku Hyohon phantom showed lower counting efficiencies at phantom-to-detector distances less than 30 cm. This was attributed to the design of the phantom. This study has also shown that the phantom need not be highly anthropomorphic provided the calibration is not performed at short neck-detector distances. Indeed, it might be possible to use t simple point source of 125I placed behind a 1.5 cm block of lucite at neck detector distances of 12 cm or more.

  7. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2007-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population

  8. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter...... of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts....... Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone...

  9. Construction of cardiac anthropomorphic phantom for simulation of radiological exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandeira, C.K.; Vieira Neto, H.; Vieira, M.P.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms are simulating objects of structures of the human body and can be applied in the quality control and calibration of radiological equipment. The aim of the work is the development of a cardiac anthropomorphic phantom to assist in the elaboration of protocols of dynamic studies that demonstrate the blood circulation inside the cardiac chambers. For the construction of the phantom was used latex, applied in layers on an anatomical model of heart, having been constructed the cardiac chambers and atrioventricular valves. Cardiac chambers were connected to the cannulas for fluid injection and simulation of the circulatory system. The constructed phantom presents anthropomorphic characteristics and allows the circulation of the fluid without reflux, but the thickness of the catheters used does not yet allow flows of greater order of magnitude. This phantom has the potential to be used in the dynamic simulation of cardiac exams, contributing to the elaboration and adequacy of computed tomography protocols

  10. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  11. Reconstruction of voxel phantoms for skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula Cristina Guimaraes

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality that utilizes ionizing radiation for the destruction of neoplastic human cells. One of the requirements for this treatment methodology success lays on the appropriate use of planning systems, which performs, among other information, the patient's dose distribution estimate. Nowadays, transport codes have been providing huge subsidies to these planning systems, once it enables specific and accurate patient organ and tissue dosimetry. The model utilized by these codes to describe the human anatomy in a realistic way is known as voxel phantoms, which are represented by discrete volume elements (voxels) directly associated to tomographic data. Nowadays, voxel phantoms doable of being inserted and processed by the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) presents a 3-4 mm image resolution; however, such resolution limits some thin body structure discrimination, such as skin. In this context, this work proposes a calculus routine that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real, leading to an accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code. Moreover, this methodology consists in manipulating the voxel phantoms volume elements by segmenting and subdividing it in different skin thickness. In addition to validate the skin dose calculated data, a set of experimental evaluations with thermoluminescent dosimeters were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Due to significant differences observed on the dose distribution of several skin representations, it was found that is important to discriminate the skin thickness similar to the real. The presented methodology is useful to obtain an accurate skin dosimetric evaluation for several radiotherapy procedures, with particular interest on the electron beam radiotherapy, in which highlights the whole body irradiation therapy (TSET), a procedure under implementation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da

  12. Influence of different types of phantoms on the calibration of dosemeters for eye lens dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitomi, H.; Kowatari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Both a cylinder and a slab phantom have been recommended to be used as calibration phantoms for eye lens dosimetry in the International Atomic Energy Agency TECDOC. This study describes investigations on the influence of the type of phantom on the calibration of dosemeters. In order to fulfil the purpose, backscatter radiation from practically used water-filled phantoms was evaluated by calculations and experiments. For photons, the calculations showed that the cylinder phantom had 10 % lower backscattered effect at maximum than a slab phantom, and simulated well the backscattered effect of the human head or neck to within ±10 %. The irradiation results of non-filtered optically stimulated luminescence and radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeters indicated that the differences of the calibration factors between the two types of phantoms were up to 20 and 10 %, respectively, reflecting the response to backscattered photons. For electrons, no difference was found between the two types of phantoms. (authors)

  13. Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2010-01-01

    . Methods and Findings The study included 36 male adults with a broad range of age and body-mass indices (BMIs), among which 18 subjects were diagnosed with diabetes type 2. The fecal bacterial composition was investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and in a subgroup of subjects (N = 20) by tag...... = 0.04). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that type 2 diabetes in humans is associated with compositional changes in intestinal microbiota. The level of glucose tolerance should be considered when linking microbiota with metabolic diseases such as obesity and developing strategies......Background Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between metabolic diseases and bacterial populations in the gut. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in humans with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic persons as control...

  14. Preliminary Study on Hybrid Computational Phantom for Radiation Dosimetry Based on Subdivision Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Hwi; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2007-01-01

    The anthropomorphic computational phantoms are classified into two groups. One group is the stylized phantoms, or MIRD phantoms, which are based on mathematical representations of the anatomical structures. The shapes and positions of the organs and tissues in these phantoms can be adjusted by changing the coefficients of the equations in use. The other group is the voxel phantoms, which are based on tomographic images of a real person such as CT, MR and serially sectioned color slice images from a cadaver. Obviously, the voxel phantoms represent the anatomical structures of a human body much more realistically than the stylized phantoms. A realistic representation of anatomical structure is very important for an accurate calculation of radiation dose in the human body. Consequently, the ICRP recently has decided to use the voxel phantoms for the forthcoming update of the dose conversion coefficients. However, the voxel phantoms also have some limitations: (1) The topology and dimensions of the organs and tissues in a voxel model are extremely difficult to change, and (2) The thin organs, such as oral mucosa and skin, cannot be realistically modeled unless the voxel resolution is prohibitively high. Recently, a new approach has been implemented by several investigators. The investigators converted their voxel phantoms to hybrid computational phantoms based on NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surface, which is smooth and deformable. It is claimed that these new phantoms have the flexibility of the stylized phantom along with the realistic representations of the anatomical structures. The topology and dimensions of the anatomical structures can be easily changed as necessary. Thin organs can be modeled without affecting computational speed or memory requirement. The hybrid phantoms can be also used for 4-D Monte Carlo simulations. In this preliminary study, the external shape of a voxel phantom (i.e., skin), HDRK-Man, was converted to a hybrid computational

  15. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshu Zhang

    Full Text Available Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting.

  16. Phantoms for Radiation Measurements of Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radiation efficiency for a handheld phone equipped with a patch and a helical antenna operated near the human user have been performed. Both measurements include a simple head plus hand phantom and live persons are considered. The position of the hand on the phone is found...... to be the main reason for the large variation in radiation efficiency among persons. The tilt angle of the phone and the distance between the head and phone only play a minor role...

  17. Calculation of conversion coefficients for effective dose by using voxel phantoms with defined genus for radiodiagnostic common examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Vieira, J.W.; Loureiro, E.C.M.; Hoff, G.

    2004-01-01

    Patient exposure from radiological examinations is usually quantified in terms of average absorbed dose or equivalent dose to certain radiosensitive organs of the human body. As these quantities cannot be measured in vivo, it is common practice to use physical or computational exposure models, which simulate the exposure to the patient in order to determine not only the quantities of interest (absorbed or equivalent dose), but also at the same time measurable quantities for the exposure conditions given. The ratio between a quantity of interest and a measurable quantity is called a conversion coefficient (CC), which is a function of the source and field parameters (tube voltage, filtration, field size, field position, focus-to-skin distance, etc.), the anatomical properties of the phantom, the elemental composition of relevant body tissues, and the radiation transport method applied. As the effective dose represents a sum over 23 risk-weighted organ and tissue equivalent doses, its determination practically implies the measurement or calculation of a complete distribution of equivalent doses throughout the human body. This task can be resolved most efficiently by means of computational exposure models, which consist of a virtual representation of the human body, also called phantom, connected to a Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code. The recently introduced MAX (Male Adult voXel) and FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head+trunk phantoms have been chosen for this task. With respect to their anatomical properties these phantoms correspond fairly well to the data recommended by the ICRP for the Reference Adult Male and Female. (author)

  18. Neutron production in a spherical phantom aboard ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasbaz, A.; Machrafi, R.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research program on radiation monitoring on International Space Station (ISS) that was established to analyze the radiation exposure levels onboard the ISS using different radiation instruments and a spherical phantom to simulate human body. Monte Carlo transport code was used to simulate the interaction of high energy protons and neutrons with the spherical phantom currently onboard ISS. The phantom has been exposed to individual proton energies and to a spectrum of neutrons. The internal to external neutron flux ratio was calculated and compared to the experimental data, recently, measured on the ISS. (author)

  19. Voxel anthropomorphic phantoms: review of models used for ionising radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemosquet, A.; Carlan, L. de; Clairand, I.

    2003-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have been used since the 1970's for dosimetric calculations. Realistic geometries are required for this operation, resulting in the development of ever more accurate phantoms. Voxel phantoms, consisting of a set of small-volume elements, appeared towards the end of the 1980's, and significantly improved on the original mathematical models. Voxel phantoms are models of the human body, obtained using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images (MRI). These phantoms are an extremely accurate representation of the human anatomy. This article provides a review of the literature available on the development of these phantoms and their applications in ionising radiation dosimetry. The bibliographical study has shown that there is a wide range of phantoms, covering various characteristics of the general population in terms of sex, age or morphology, and that they are used in applications relating to all aspects of ionising radiation. (author)

  20. Radiation dose verification using real tissue phantom in modern radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Mishra, S.P.; Bhandari, Virendra; Pathak, Pankaj; Patel, Prapti; Shrivastav, Garima

    2014-01-01

    In vitro dosimetric verification prior to patient treatment has a key role in accurate and precision radiotherapy treatment delivery. Most of commercially available dosimetric phantoms have almost homogeneous density throughout their volume, while real interior of patient body has variable and varying densities inside. In this study an attempt has been made to verify the physical dosimetry in actual human body scenario by using goat head as 'head phantom' and goat meat as 'tissue phantom'. The mean percentage variation between planned and measured doses was found to be 2.48 (standard deviation (SD): 0.74), 2.36 (SD: 0.77), 3.62 (SD: 1.05), and 3.31 (SD: 0.78) for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) (head phantom), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT; head phantom), 3DCRT (tissue phantom), and IMRT (tissue phantom), respectively. Although percentage variations in case of head phantom were within tolerance limit (< ± 3%), but still it is higher than the results obtained by using commercially available phantoms. And the percentage variations in most of cases of tissue phantom were out of tolerance limit. On the basis of these preliminary results it is logical and rational to develop radiation dosimetry methods based on real human body and also to develop an artificial phantom which should truly represent the interior of human body. (author)

  1. Radiation dose verification using real tissue phantom in modern radiotherapy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro dosimetric verification prior to patient treatment has a key role in accurate and precision radiotherapy treatment delivery. Most of commercially available dosimetric phantoms have almost homogeneous density throughout their volume, while real interior of patient body has variable and varying densities inside. In this study an attempt has been made to verify the physical dosimetry in actual human body scenario by using goat head as "head phantom" and goat meat as "tissue phantom". The mean percentage variation between planned and measured doses was found to be 2.48 (standard deviation (SD: 0.74, 2.36 (SD: 0.77, 3.62 (SD: 1.05, and 3.31 (SD: 0.78 for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT (head phantom, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT; head phantom, 3DCRT (tissue phantom, and IMRT (tissue phantom, respectively. Although percentage variations in case of head phantom were within tolerance limit (< ± 3%, but still it is higher than the results obtained by using commercially available phantoms. And the percentage variations in most of cases of tissue phantom were out of tolerance limit. On the basis of these preliminary results it is logical and rational to develop radiation dosimetry methods based on real human body and also to develop an artificial phantom which should truly represent the interior of human body.

  2. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X. Geroge

    2011-01-01

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  3. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-09-01

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Standardization of calibration method of whole-body counter. 1. Calibration by using anthropometric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Masaki; Uchiyama, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi; Mizushita, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    To standardize the calibration methods of whole-body counters, three anthropometric phantoms were manufactured based on dozens of Japanese average value of body size data. Using these phantoms, the calibrations of some whole-body counters were carried out and the comparison of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantoms and block phantoms, which used to be used for the calibration of whole-body counters generally, was implemented. Five whole-body counters, one scanning system, two stationary systems and two chair systems, were used for this study. The following results were derived: As an example, in NIRS scanning system, the counting efficiency of anthropometric phantom of 162cm height was 12.7% greater than that of block phantom of the same height. This means 137 Cs body burdens in adult men used to be estimated with the excess of about 10%. Body burdens tended to be estimated excessively in adult because the difference of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantom and block phantom increases with increase of height. To standardize body burden data measured with various whole-body counters, the calibration of each whole-body counter should be conducted using anthropometric phantoms and phantoms which used to be used for the calibration of that whole-body counter. (author)

  5. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  6. Histomorphometry and cortical robusticity of the adult human femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszkiewicz, Justyna Jolanta; Mahoney, Patrick

    2018-01-13

    Recent quantitative analyses of human bone microanatomy, as well as theoretical models that propose bone microstructure and gross anatomical associations, have started to reveal insights into biological links that may facilitate remodeling processes. However, relationships between bone size and the underlying cortical bone histology remain largely unexplored. The goal of this study is to determine the extent to which static indicators of bone remodeling and vascularity, measured using histomorphometric techniques, relate to femoral midshaft cortical width and robusticity. Using previously published and new quantitative data from 450 adult human male (n = 233) and female (n = 217) femora, we determine if these aspects of femoral size relate to bone microanatomy. Scaling relationships are explored and interpreted within the context of tissue form and function. Analyses revealed that the area and diameter of Haversian canals and secondary osteons, and densities of secondary osteons and osteocyte lacunae from the sub-periosteal region of the posterior midshaft femur cortex were significantly, but not consistently, associated with femoral size. Cortical width and bone robusticity were correlated with osteocyte lacunae density and scaled with positive allometry. Diameter and area of osteons and Haversian canals decreased as the width of cortex and bone robusticity increased, revealing a negative allometric relationship. These results indicate that microscopic products of cortical bone remodeling and vascularity are linked to femur size. Allometric relationships between more robust human femora with thicker cortical bone and histological products of bone remodeling correspond with principles of bone functional adaptation. Future studies may benefit from exploring scaling relationships between bone histomorphometric data and measurements of bone macrostructure.

  7. Phantoms and computational models in therapy, diagnosis and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The development of realistic body phantoms and computational models is strongly dependent on the availability of comprehensive human anatomical data. This information is often missing, incomplete or not easily available. Therefore, emphasis is given in the Report to organ and body masses and geometries. The influence of age, sex and ethnic origins in human anatomy is considered. Suggestions are given on how suitable anatomical data can be either extracted from published information or obtained from measurements on the local population. Existing types of phantoms and computational models used with photons, electrons, protons and neutrons are reviewed in this Report. Specifications of those considered important to the maintenance and development of reliable radiation dosimetry and measurement are given. The information provided includes a description of the phantom or model, together with diagrams or photographs and physical dimensions. The tissues within body sections are identified and the tissue substitutes used or recommended are listed. The uses of the phantom or model in radiation dosimetry and measurement are outlined. The Report deals predominantly with phantom and computational models representing the human anatomy, with a short Section devoted to animal phantoms in radiobiology

  8. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W. [Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The authors develop the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. Methods: Highly detailed whole-body anatomies for the adult male and female were defined in the XCAT using nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and subdivision surfaces based on segmentation of the Visible Male and Female anatomical datasets from the National Library of Medicine as well as patient datasets. Using the flexibility of these surfaces, the Visible Human anatomies were transformed to match body measurements and organ volumes for a 50th percentile (height and weight) male and female. The desired body measurements for the models were obtained using the PEOPLESIZE program that contains anthropometric dimensions categorized from 1st to the 99th percentile for US adults. The desired organ volumes were determined from ICRP Publication 89 [ICRP, ''Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values,'' ICRP Publication 89 (International Commission on Radiological Protection, New York, NY, 2002)]. The male and female anatomies serve as standard templates upon which anatomical variations may be modeled in the XCAT through user-defined parameters. Parametrized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions were also incorporated into the XCAT based on high-resolution cardiac- and respiratory-gated multislice CT data. To demonstrate the usefulness of the phantom, the authors show example simulation studies in PET, SPECT, and CT using publicly available simulation packages. Results: As demonstrated in the pilot studies, the 4D XCAT (which includes thousands of anatomical structures) can produce realistic imaging data when combined with accurate models of the imaging process. With the flexibility of the NURBS surface primitives, any number of different anatomies, cardiac or respiratory motions or patterns, and spatial resolutions can be simulated to perform imaging research. Conclusions: With the

  9. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. Methods: Highly detailed whole-body anatomies for the adult male and female were defined in the XCAT using nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and subdivision surfaces based on segmentation of the Visible Male and Female anatomical datasets from the National Library of Medicine as well as patient datasets. Using the flexibility of these surfaces, the Visible Human anatomies were transformed to match body measurements and organ volumes for a 50th percentile (height and weight) male and female. The desired body measurements for the models were obtained using the PEOPLESIZE program that contains anthropometric dimensions categorized from 1st to the 99th percentile for US adults. The desired organ volumes were determined from ICRP Publication 89 [ICRP, ''Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values,'' ICRP Publication 89 (International Commission on Radiological Protection, New York, NY, 2002)]. The male and female anatomies serve as standard templates upon which anatomical variations may be modeled in the XCAT through user-defined parameters. Parametrized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions were also incorporated into the XCAT based on high-resolution cardiac- and respiratory-gated multislice CT data. To demonstrate the usefulness of the phantom, the authors show example simulation studies in PET, SPECT, and CT using publicly available simulation packages. Results: As demonstrated in the pilot studies, the 4D XCAT (which includes thousands of anatomical structures) can produce realistic imaging data when combined with accurate models of the imaging process. With the flexibility of the NURBS surface primitives, any number of different anatomies, cardiac or respiratory motions or patterns, and spatial resolutions can be simulated to perform imaging research. Conclusions: With the ability to produce

  10. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Coburn, James C.; Sorg, Brian S.; Chen, Yu; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2015-12-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements-including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth-were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light-tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance.

  11. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Coburn, James C.; Sorg, Brian S.; Chen, Yu; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements—including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth—were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light–tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance. PMID:26662064

  12. Optical and Biometric Characteristics of Anisomyopia in Human Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yibin; Tarrant, Janice; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of higher order optical aberrations and thus retinal image degradation in the development of myopia, through the characterization of anisomyopia in human adults in terms of their optical and biometric characteristics. Methods The following data were collected from both eyes of fifteen young adult anisometropic myopes and sixteen isometropic myopes: subjective and objective refractive errors, corneal power and shape, monochromatic optical aberrations, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, vitreous chamber depth, and best corrected visual acuity. Monochromatic aberrations were analyzed in terms of their higher order components, and further analyzed in terms of 31 optical quality metrics. Interocular differences for the two groups (anisomyopes vs. isomyopes) were compared and the relationship between measured ocular parameters and refractive errors also analyzed across all eyes. Results As expected, anisomyopes and isomyopes differed significantly in terms of interocular differences in vitreous chamber depth, axial length and refractive error. However, interocular differences in other optical properties showed no significant intergroup differences. Overall, higher myopia was associated with deeper anterior and vitreous chambers, higher astigmatism, more prolate corneas, and more positive spherical aberration. Other measured optical and biometric parameters were not significantly correlated with spherical refractive error, although some optical quality metrics and corneal astigmatism were significantly correlated with refractive astigmatism. Conclusions An optical cause for anisomyopia related to increased higher order aberrations is not supported by our data. Corneal shape changes and increased astigmatism in more myopic eyes may be a by-product of the increased anterior chamber growth in these eyes; likewise, the increased positive spherical aberration in more myopic eyes may be a product of myopic eye growth. PMID:21797915

  13. Vortex-ring mixing as a measure of diastolic function of the human heart: Phantom validation and initial observations in healthy volunteers and patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töger, Johannes; Kanski, Mikael; Arvidsson, Per M; Carlsson, Marcus; Kovács, Sándor J; Borgquist, Rasmus; Revstedt, Johan; Söderlind, Gustaf; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2016-06-01

    To present and validate a new method for 4D flow quantification of vortex-ring mixing during early, rapid filling of the left ventricle (LV) as a potential index of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure. 4D flow mixing measurements were validated using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in a phantom setup. Controls (n = 23) and heart failure patients (n = 23) were studied using 4D flow at 1.5T (26 subjects) or 3T (20 subjects) to determine vortex volume (VV) and inflowing volume (VVinflow ). The volume mixed into the vortex-ring was quantified as VVmix-in = VV-VVinflow . The mixing ratio was defined as MXR = VVmix-in /VV. Furthermore, we quantified the fraction of the end-systolic volume (ESV) mixed into the vortex-ring (VVmix-in /ESV) and the fraction of the LV volume at diastasis (DV) occupied by the vortex-ring (VV/DV). PLIF validation of MXR showed fair agreement (R(2) = 0.45, mean ± SD 1 ± 6%). MXR was higher in patients compared to controls (28 ± 11% vs. 16 ± 10%, P Vortex-ring mixing can be quantified using 4D flow. The differences in mixing parameters observed between controls and patients motivate further investigation as indices of diastolic dysfunction. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:1386-1397. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  15. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil); Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do, E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  16. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256×256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  17. Development of realistic chest phantom for calibration of in-vivo plutonium counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Takashi

    1987-06-01

    We have developed realistic chest phantom with removable model organs. The phantom is a torso and is terminated just above the femoral region. Tissue equivalent materials used in the phantom have been made of polyurethane with different amounts of ester of phosphoric acid, in order to simulate human soft tissues such as muscle, muscle-adipose mixtures and cartilage. Lung simulant has been made of foamed polyurethane. Capsulized small sources can be inserted into the holes, drilled in each sliced section of the model organ. Counting efficiencies, obtained with a pair of 12 cm diameter phoswich detectors set above the phantom chest, are 0.195 cpm/nCi for Pu-239 and 44.07 cpm/nCi for Am-241, respectively. The results agree well with efficiencies obtained with IAEA-Phantom. We conclude that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration of Pu chest counting equipment. (author)

  18. Absorbed fractions in a voxel-based phantom calculated with the MCNP-4B code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoriyaz, H; dos Santos, A; Stabin, M G; Cabezas, R

    2000-07-01

    A new approach for calculating internal dose estimates was developed through the use of a more realistic computational model of the human body. The present technique shows the capability to build a patient-specific phantom with tomography data (a voxel-based phantom) for the simulation of radiation transport and energy deposition using Monte Carlo methods such as in the MCNP-4B code. MCNP-4B absorbed fractions for photons in the mathematical phantom of Snyder et al. agreed well with reference values. Results obtained through radiation transport simulation in the voxel-based phantom, in general, agreed well with reference values. Considerable discrepancies, however, were found in some cases due to two major causes: differences in the organ masses between the phantoms and the occurrence of organ overlap in the voxel-based phantom, which is not considered in the mathematical phantom.

  19. Design and fabrication of a realistic anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom for MR purposes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sossena Wood

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to design an anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom that can be used for MRI and other electromagnetic applications.An eight compartment, physical anthropomorphic head phantom was developed from a 3T MRI dataset of a healthy male. The designed phantom was successfully built and preliminarily evaluated through an application that involves electromagnetic-tissue interactions: MRI (due to it being an available resource. The developed phantom was filled with media possessing electromagnetic constitutive parameters that correspond to biological tissues at ~297 MHz. A preliminary comparison between an in-vivo human volunteer (based on whom the anthropomorphic head phantom was created and various phantoms types, one being the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom, were performed using a 7 Tesla human MRI scanner.Echo planar imaging was performed and minimal ghosting and fluctuations were observed using the proposed anthropomorphic phantom. The magnetic field distributions (during MRI experiments at 7 Tesla and the scattering parameter (measured using a network analyzer were most comparable between the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom and an in-vivo human volunteer.The developed anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom can be used as a resource to various researchers in applications that involve electromagnetic-biological tissue interactions such as MRI.

  20. Development of polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms: Preliminary study for posture change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Tat Thang; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2013-01-01

    Even though International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) officially adopted a set of adult male and female voxel phantoms as the ICRP reference phantoms, there are several critical limitations due to the nature of voxel geometry and their low voxel resolutions. In order to overcome these limitations of the ICRP phantoms, we are currently developing polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP voxel phantoms to polygonal surface geometries. Among the many advantages of the ICRP polygonal surface phantom, especially, it is flexible and deformable. In principle, it is, therefore, possible to make the posture-changed ICRP phantoms which can provide more accurate dose values for exposure situations strongly relevant to worker's postures. As a preliminary study for developing the posture-changed ICRP phantoms, in this work we changed the posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom constructed in the previous study. Organ doses were then compared between original and posture-changed phantoms. In the present study, we successfully changed a posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom to the walking posture. From this results, it was explicitly shown that the polygon-surface version of the ICRP phantoms can be sufficiently modified to be various postures with the posture-changing method used in this study. In addition, it was demonstrated that phantom's posture must be considered in certain exposure situations, which can differ dose values from the conventional standing-posture phantom

  1. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is for ...

  2. Development and application of a pediatric head phantom for dosimetry in computed tomography; Desenvolvimento e aplicacao de um simulador pediatrico craniano para dosimetria em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Elaine Wirney

    2016-11-01

    To determine the exposure levels and the absorbed dose in patients undergoing CT scans, is necessary to calculate the CT dose index in measurements with a PMMA or water phantom. The phantom must be enough to simulate the attenuation and scattering characteristics of a human body or parts in a radiation field. The CT specific quantities : CT air kerma index (Ca,100) , weighted CT air kerma index (CW ), a total volume CT air kerma index (Cvol) and the CT air kerma-length product (PKL) must be determined and compared to literature reference levels. In this work a head pediatric phantom was developed, considering that the Brazilian published Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) are based on adult phantom measurements. This developed phantom shows a construction innovation using materials to simulate the skullcap, cortical bone (aluminum) and cancellous bone (PVC), and it was filled with distilled water. The phantom dimension follows the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the International Commission on Radiation Units for children from 0 to 5 years old head size: diameter of 160 mm and height of 155 mm. The skullcap has 4 mm of thickness and 111.9 mm of internal diameter. In order to evaluate its behavior, tests were carried out in calibration laboratories and in clinical beams. The results showed attenuation up to 23% when different materials are used as skullcap, demonstrating that the DRLs adopted could be overestimating the dose received by pediatric patients. It is observed that the dose received by CT skull scans presents different distribution, due to the skullcap partially attenuation and/or backscattering which is not considered when the PMMA phantom is used.

  3. A methodology to develop computational phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Fonseca, T. C.; Bogaerts, R.; Hunt, John; Vanhavere, F.

    2014-11-01

    A Whole Body Counter (WBC) is a facility to routinely assess the internal contamination of exposed workers, especially in the case of radiation release accidents. The calibration of the counting device is usually done by using anthropomorphic physical phantoms representing the human body. Due to such a challenge of constructing representative physical phantoms a virtual calibration has been introduced. The use of computational phantoms and the Monte Carlo method to simulate radiation transport have been demonstrated to be a worthy alternative. In this study we introduce a methodology developed for the creation of realistic computational voxel phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration. The methodology makes use of different software packages to enable the creation and modification of computational voxel phantoms. This allows voxel phantoms to be developed on demand for the calibration of different WBC configurations. This in turn helps to study the major source of uncertainty associated with the in vivo measurement routine which is the difference between the calibration phantoms and the real persons being counted. The use of realistic computational phantoms also helps the optimization of the counting measurement. Open source codes such as MakeHuman and Blender software packages have been used for the creation and modelling of 3D humanoid characters based on polygonal mesh surfaces. Also, a home-made software was developed whose goal is to convert the binary 3D voxel grid into a MCNPX input file. This paper summarizes the development of a library of phantoms of the human body that uses two basic phantoms called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms) to create a set of male and female phantoms that vary both in height and in weight. Two sets of MaMP and FeMP phantoms were developed and used for efficiency calibration of two different WBC set-ups: the Doel NPP WBC laboratory and AGM laboratory of SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium.

  4. A methodology to develop computational phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, T C Ferreira; Vanhavere, F; Bogaerts, R; Hunt, John

    2014-01-01

    A Whole Body Counter (WBC) is a facility to routinely assess the internal contamination of exposed workers, especially in the case of radiation release accidents. The calibration of the counting device is usually done by using anthropomorphic physical phantoms representing the human body. Due to such a challenge of constructing representative physical phantoms a virtual calibration has been introduced. The use of computational phantoms and the Monte Carlo method to simulate radiation transport have been demonstrated to be a worthy alternative. In this study we introduce a methodology developed for the creation of realistic computational voxel phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration. The methodology makes use of different software packages to enable the creation and modification of computational voxel phantoms. This allows voxel phantoms to be developed on demand for the calibration of different WBC configurations. This in turn helps to study the major source of uncertainty associated with the in vivo measurement routine which is the difference between the calibration phantoms and the real persons being counted. The use of realistic computational phantoms also helps the optimization of the counting measurement. Open source codes such as MakeHuman and Blender software packages have been used for the creation and modelling of 3D humanoid characters based on polygonal mesh surfaces. Also, a home-made software was developed whose goal is to convert the binary 3D voxel grid into a MCNPX input file. This paper summarizes the development of a library of phantoms of the human body that uses two basic phantoms called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms) to create a set of male and female phantoms that vary both in height and in weight. Two sets of MaMP and FeMP phantoms were developed and used for efficiency calibration of two different WBC set-ups: the Doel NPP WBC laboratory and AGM laboratory of SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. (paper)

  5. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  6. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de

    2009-01-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  7. Nanosized fibers' effect on adult human articular chondrocytes behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenhamre, Hanna; Thorvaldsson, Anna; Enochson, Lars; Walkenström, Pernilla; Lindahl, Anders; Brittberg, Mats; Gatenholm, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering with chondrogenic cell based therapies is an expanding field with the intention of treating cartilage defects. It has been suggested that scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering influence cellular behavior and thus the long-term clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to assess whether chondrocyte attachment, proliferation and post-expansion re-differentiation could be influenced by the size of the fibers presented to the cells in a scaffold. Polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds with different fiber morphologies were produced, i.e. microfiber (MS) scaffolds as well as nanofiber-coated microfiber scaffold (NMS). Adult human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the scaffolds in vitro up to 28 days, and the resulting constructs were assessed histologically, immunohistochemically, and biochemically. Attachment of cells and serum proteins to the scaffolds was affected by the architecture. The results point toward nano-patterning onto the microfibers influencing proliferation of the chondrocytes, and the overall 3D environment having a greater influence on the re-differentiation. In the efforts of finding the optimal scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, studies as the current contribute to the knowledge of how to affect and control chondrocytes behavior. - Highlights: ► Chondrocyte behavior in nanofiber-coated microfiber versus microfiber scaffolds ► High porosity (> 90%) and large pore sizes (a few hundred μm) of nanofibrous scaffolds ► Proliferation enhanced by presence of nanofibers ► Differentiation not significantly affected ► Cell attachment improved in presence of both nanofibers and serum

  8. Understanding Older Adult's Perceptions of Factors that Support Trust in Human and Robot Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Rachel E; Rogers, Wendy A

    2017-06-01

    As the population of older adults increase so will the need for care providers, both human and robot. Trust is a key aspect to establish and maintain a successful older adult-care provider relationship. However, due to trust volatility it is essential to understand it within specific contexts. This proposed mixed methods study will explore what dimensions of trust emerge as important within the human-human and human-robot dyads in older adults and care providers. First, this study will help identify key qualities that support trust in a care provider relationship. By understanding what older adults perceive as needing to trust humans and robots for various care tasks, we can begin to provide recommendations based on user expectations for design to support trust.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of adult neural stem-like cells from the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Jonsgar Sandberg

    Full Text Available There is a great potential for the development of new cell replacement strategies based on adult human neural stem-like cells. However, little is known about the hierarchy of cells and the unique molecular properties of stem- and progenitor cells of the nervous system. Stem cells from the adult human brain can be propagated and expanded in vitro as free floating neurospheres that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all three cell types of the central nervous system. Here we report the first global gene expression study of adult human neural stem-like cells originating from five human subventricular zone biopsies (mean age 42, range 33-60. Compared to adult human brain tissue, we identified 1,189 genes that were significantly up- and down-regulated in adult human neural stem-like cells (1% false discovery rate. We found that adult human neural stem-like cells express stem cell markers and have reduced levels of markers that are typical of the mature cells in the nervous system. We report that the genes being highly expressed in adult human neural stem-like cells are associated with developmental processes and the extracellular region of the cell. The calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions are enriched among the most differentially regulated genes between adult human neural stem-like cells and adult human brain tissue. We confirmed the expression of 10 of the most up-regulated genes in adult human neural stem-like cells in an additional sample set that included adult human neural stem-like cells (n = 6, foetal human neural stem cells (n = 1 and human brain tissues (n = 12. The NGFR, SLITRK6 and KCNS3 receptors were further investigated by immunofluorescence and shown to be heterogeneously expressed in spheres. These receptors could potentially serve as new markers for the identification and characterisation of neural stem- and progenitor cells or as targets for manipulation of cellular

  10. Measurement of TLD Albedo response on various calibration phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, T.; Tsujimura, N.; Shinohara, K.; Ishiguro, H.; Nakamura, T.

    1996-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) has recommended that individual dosemeter should be calibrated on a suitable phantom and has pointed out that the calibration factor of a neutron dosemeter is strongly influenced by the the exact size and shape of the body and the phantom to which the dosemeter is attached. As the principle of an albedo type thermoluminescent personal dosemeter (albedo TLD) is essentially based on a detection of scattered and moderated neutron from a human body, the sensitivity of albedo TLD is strongly influenced by the incident neutron energy and the calibration phantom. (1) Therefore for albedo type thermoluminescent personal dosemeter (albedo TLD), the information of neutron albedo response on the calibration phantom is important for appropriate dose estimation. In order to investigate the effect of phantom type on the reading of the albedo TLD, measurement of the TLD energy response and angular response on some typical calibration phantoms was performed using dynamitron accelerator and 252 Cf neutron source. (author)

  11. Heterogeneous Breast Phantom Development for Microwave Imaging Using Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camerin Hahn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As new algorithms for microwave imaging emerge, it is important to have standard accurate benchmarking tests. Currently, most researchers use homogeneous phantoms for testing new algorithms. These simple structures lack the heterogeneity of the dielectric properties of human tissue and are inadequate for testing these algorithms for medical imaging. To adequately test breast microwave imaging algorithms, the phantom has to resemble different breast tissues physically and in terms of dielectric properties. We propose a systematic approach in designing phantoms that not only have dielectric properties close to breast tissues but also can be easily shaped to realistic physical models. The approach is based on regression model to match phantom's dielectric properties with the breast tissue dielectric properties found in Lazebnik et al. (2007. However, the methodology proposed here can be used to create phantoms for any tissue type as long as ex vivo, in vitro, or in vivo tissue dielectric properties are measured and available. Therefore, using this method, accurate benchmarking phantoms for testing emerging microwave imaging algorithms can be developed.

  12. Influence of variation in eumelanin content on absorbance spectra of liquid skin-like phantoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available are often always limited. Hence the use of skin-like phantoms. Bashkatov et al. (25) measured the optical properties of gelatin skin-like phantoms prepared from different concentrations of synthetic and natural (from Sepia officianalis) melanin. Fat... emulsions like Intralipid are commonly used to mimic light propagation in turbit media (26) and hence Shimada et al. (27) used similar gelatin and Sepia melanin phantoms and added Intralipid to mimic the scattering properties of human skin. The purpose...

  13. Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator-Based Small Animal Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, Julian R; Lucero, Steven; Monjazeb, Arta M; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) scanning and printing technology is utilized to create phantom models of mice in order to assess the accuracy of ionizing radiation dosing from a clinical, human-based linear accelerator. Phantoms are designed to simulate a range of research questions, including irradiation of lung tumors and primary subcutaneous or orthotopic tumors for immunotherapy experimentation. The phantoms are used to measure the accuracy of dose delivery and then refine it to within 1% of the prescribed dose.

  14. Germline stem cells and neo-oogenesis in the adult human ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifei; Wu, Chao; Lyu, Qifeng; Yang, Dongzi; Albertini, David F; Keefe, David L; Liu, Lin

    2007-06-01

    It remains unclear whether neo-oogenesis occurs in postnatal ovaries of mammals, based on studies in mice. We thought to test whether adult human ovaries contain germline stem cells (GSCs) and undergo neo-oogenesis. Rather than using genetic manipulation which is unethical in humans, we took the approach of analyzing the expression of meiotic marker genes and genes for germ cell proliferation, which are required for neo-oogenesis, in adult human ovaries covering an age range from 28 to 53 years old, compared to testis and fetal ovaries served as positive controls. We show that active meiosis, neo-oogenesis and GSCs are unlikely to exist in normal, adult, human ovaries. No early meiotic-specific or oogenesis-associated mRNAs for SPO11, PRDM9, SCP1, TERT and NOBOX were detectable in adult human ovaries using RT-PCR, compared to fetal ovary and adult testis controls. These findings are further corroborated by the absence of early meiocytes and proliferating germ cells in adult human ovarian cortex probed with markers for meiosis (SCP3), oogonium (OCT3/4, c-KIT), and cell cycle progression (Ki-67, PCNA), in contrast to fetal ovary controls. If postnatal oogenesis is confirmed in mice, then this species would represent an exception to the rule that neo-oogenesis does not occur in adults.

  15. Whole-body detector calibrating with a modular phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minev, L.; Boshkova, T.; Uzunov, P.

    1995-01-01

    Human body models (phantoms) of various size and weight are produced in order to calibrate gamma spectrometers for accurate activity measurement. The phantoms are built of separate modules with mass of 0.5 kg and size 20 x 14 x 2 cm. There are modules with standard Eu-152 and Am-241 radioactivity designed for homogenous radioactivity imitating and critical organs moulding, as well as 'zero' -phantom modules without activity imitating a standard human body. Human organs are modelled by 11 x 9 x 0.5 cm modules with 0.16 kg mass. The phantoms have been used to obtain calibration curves and absolute efficiencies for selected energies of radionuclides expected to be found in the Kozloduy NPP staff. It is shown that the efficiency depends not only on the mass but on the geometric size of the measured object. Scanning of phantoms has been carried out and a profile of activity obtained. The profile consists of an abrupt rising of the sum of pulses (measuring time - 20 s) when the detector passes from neck to chest, a plateau when it moves over the head or the trunk and gradual decrease over the legs. Profiles of activity in organs are best obtained with a lead collimator. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Whole-body detector calibrating with a modular phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minev, L; Boshkova, T; Uzunov, P [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-12-31

    Human body models (phantoms) of various size and weight are produced in order to calibrate gamma spectrometers for accurate activity measurement. The phantoms are built of separate modules with mass of 0.5 kg and size 20 x 14 x 2 cm. There are modules with standard Eu-152 and Am-241 radioactivity designed for homogenous radioactivity imitating and critical organs moulding, as well as `zero` -phantom modules without activity imitating a standard human body. Human organs are modelled by 11 x 9 x 0.5 cm modules with 0.16 kg mass. The phantoms have been used to obtain calibration curves and absolute efficiencies for selected energies of radionuclides expected to be found in the Kozloduy NPP staff. It is shown that the efficiency depends not only on the mass but on the geometric size of the measured object. Scanning of phantoms has been carried out and a profile of activity obtained. The profile consists of an abrupt rising of the sum of pulses (measuring time - 20 s) when the detector passes from neck to chest, a plateau when it moves over the head or the trunk and gradual decrease over the legs. Profiles of activity in organs are best obtained with a lead collimator. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wydra, A; Maev, R Gr

    2013-01-01

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us. (note)

  18. NURBS-based 3-d anthropomorphic computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models used in the evaluation of absorbed dose distributions within the human body. Currently, two classes of the computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilised for dosimetry calculation: (1) stylized (equation-based) and (2) voxel (image-based) phantoms describing human anatomy through the use of mathematical surface equations and 3-D voxel matrices, respectively. However, stylized phantoms have limitations in defining realistic organ contours and positioning as compared to voxel phantoms, which are themselves based on medical images of human subjects. In turn, voxel phantoms that have been developed through medical image segmentation have limitations in describing organs that are presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography image. The present paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of these existing classes of computational phantoms and introduces a hybrid approach to a computational phantom construction based on non-uniform rational B-Spline (NURBS) surface animation technology that takes advantage of the most desirable features of the former two phantom types. (authors)

  19. A Cell Model to Evaluate Chemical Effects on Adult Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Differentiation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult cardiac stem cells (CSC) and progenitor cells (CPC) represent a population of cells in the heart critical for its regeneration and function over a lifetime. The impact of chemicals on adult human CSC/CPC differentiation and function is unknown. Research was conducted to dev...

  20. The potential pitfalls of studying adult sex ratios at aggregate levels in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollet, Thomas V.; Stoevenbelt, Andrea H.; Kuppens, Toon

    2017-01-01

    Human adult sex ratios have been studied extensively across the biological and social sciences. While several studies have examined adult sex ratio effects in a multilevel perspective, many studies have focused on effects at an aggregated level only. In this paper, we review some key issues relating

  1. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom

  2. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  3. A feasiblity study of an ultrasonic test phantom arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philip

    This thesis is a feasibility study for the creation of a test phantom that replicates the physiological features, from an acoustic and mechanical standpoint, of that of a human arm. Physiological feature set includes; Heart, Arteries, Veins, Bone, Muscle, Fat, Skin, and Dermotographic Features (finger prints). Mechanical Aspects include, vascular compression and distention, elasticity of tissue layers, mechanics of human heart. The end goal of which to have a working understanding of each component in order to create a controllable, real time, physiologically accurate, test phantom for a wide range of ultrasonic based applications. These applications can range from devices like wearable technologies to medical training, to biometric "Liveness" detection methods. The proposed phantom would allow for a number of natural bodily functions to be measured including but not limited to vascular mapping, blood pressure, heart rate, subdermal imaging, and general ultrasonic imaging.

  4. Comparison of methods for individualized astronaut organ dosimetry: Morphometry-based phantom library versus body contour autoscaling of a reference phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Michelle M.; Borrego, David; Maynard, Matthew R.; Bahadori, Amir A.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2017-11-01

    One of the hazards faced by space crew members in low-Earth orbit or in deep space is exposure to ionizing radiation. It has been shown previously that while differences in organ-specific and whole-body risk estimates due to body size variations are small for highly-penetrating galactic cosmic rays, large differences in these quantities can result from exposure to shorter-range trapped proton or solar particle event radiations. For this reason, it is desirable to use morphometrically accurate computational phantoms representing each astronaut for a risk analysis, especially in the case of a solar particle event. An algorithm was developed to automatically sculpt and scale the UF adult male and adult female hybrid reference phantom to the individual outer body contour of a given astronaut. This process begins with the creation of a laser-measured polygon mesh model of the astronaut's body contour. Using the auto-scaling program and selecting several anatomical landmarks, the UF adult male or female phantom is adjusted to match the laser-measured outer body contour of the astronaut. A dosimetry comparison study was conducted to compare the organ dose accuracy of both the autoscaled phantom and that based upon a height-weight matched phantom from the UF/NCI Computational Phantom Library. Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate the environment of the August 1972 and February 1956 solar particle events. Using a series of individual-specific voxel phantoms as a local benchmark standard, autoscaled phantom organ dose estimates were shown to provide a 1% and 10% improvement in organ dose accuracy for a population of females and males, respectively, as compared to organ doses derived from height-weight matched phantoms from the UF/NCI Computational Phantom Library. In addition, this slight improvement in organ dose accuracy from the autoscaled phantoms is accompanied by reduced computer storage requirements and a more rapid method for individualized phantom generation

  5. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.; Minhas, Anum; Frush, D.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  6. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Hannah, E-mail: Hannah.norris@duke.edu; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Minhas, Anum; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  7. Development and use of a fifteen year-old equivalent mathematical phantom for internal dose calculations. [Radiation dose distributions from /sup 99m/Tc-labeled compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.M.; Poston, J.W.; Hwang, J.L.; Jones, T.D.; Warner, G.G.

    1976-06-01

    The existence of a phantom based on anatomical data for the average fifteen-year-old provides for a proficient means of obtaining estimates of absorbed dose for children of that age. Dimensions representative of an average fifteen-year-old human, obtained from various biological and medical research, were transformed into a mathematical construct of idealized shapes of the exterior, skeletal system, and internal organs of a human. The idealization for an average adult presently in use by the International Commission on Radiological Protection was used as a basis for design. The mathematical equations describing the phantom were developed to be readily adaptable to present-day methods of dose estimation. Typical exposure situations in nuclear medicine have previously been modeled for existing phantoms. With no further development of the exposure model necessary, adaptation to the fifteen-year-old phantom demonstrated the utility of the design. Estimates of absorbed dose were obtained for the administration of two radiopharmaceuticals, /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid and /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA. (auth)

  8. Construction tool and suitability of voxel phantom for skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new software tool called 'SkinVop' which was developed to enable accurate voxel phantom skin dosimetry. A voxel phantom is a model used to describe human anatomy in a realistic way in radiation transport codes. This model is a three-dimensional representation of the human body in the form of an array of identification numbers that are arranged in a 3D matrix. Each entry in this array represents a voxel (volume element) directly associated to the units of picture resolution (pixel) of medical images. Currently, these voxel phantoms, in association with the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), have provided subsidies to the planning systems used on the hospital routine, once they afford accurate and personalized estimative of dose distribution. However, these assessments are limited to geometric representations of organs and tissues in the voxel phantom, which do not discriminates some thin body structure, such as the skin. In this context, to enable accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code, it was developed this new software tool that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real. This methodology consists in manipulating the skin volume elements by segmenting and subdividing them in different thicknesses. A graphical user interface was designed to fulfill display the modified voxel model. This methodology is extremely useful once the skin dose is inaccurately assessed of current hospital system planning, justified justly by its small thickness. (author)

  9. Construction tool and suitability of voxel phantom for skin dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.b, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a new software tool called 'SkinVop' which was developed to enable accurate voxel phantom skin dosimetry. A voxel phantom is a model used to describe human anatomy in a realistic way in radiation transport codes. This model is a three-dimensional representation of the human body in the form of an array of identification numbers that are arranged in a 3D matrix. Each entry in this array represents a voxel (volume element) directly associated to the units of picture resolution (pixel) of medical images. Currently, these voxel phantoms, in association with the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), have provided subsidies to the planning systems used on the hospital routine, once they afford accurate and personalized estimative of dose distribution. However, these assessments are limited to geometric representations of organs and tissues in the voxel phantom, which do not discriminates some thin body structure, such as the skin. In this context, to enable accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code, it was developed this new software tool that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real. This methodology consists in manipulating the skin volume elements by segmenting and subdividing them in different thicknesses. A graphical user interface was designed to fulfill display the modified voxel model. This methodology is extremely useful once the skin dose is inaccurately assessed of current hospital system planning, justified justly by its small thickness. (author)

  10. Comparison of internal radiation doses estimated by MIRD and voxel techniques for a ''family'' of phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a new system of realistic voxel phantoms, based on computed tomography scanning of humans, to assess its ability to specify the internal dosimetry of selected human examples in comparison with the well-established MIRD system of mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. Differences in specific absorbed fractions between the two systems were inferred by using organ dose estimates as the end point for comparison. A ''family'' of voxel phantoms, comprising an 8-week-old baby, a 7-year-old child and a 38-year-old adult, was used and a close match to these was made by interpolating between organ doses estimated for pairs of the series of six MIRD phantoms. Using both systems, doses were calculated for up to 22 organs for four radiopharmaceuticals with widely differing biodistribution and emission characteristics (technetium-99m pertechnetate, administered without thyroid blocking; iodine-123 iodide; indium-111 antimyosin; oxygen-15 water). Organ dose estimates under the MIRD system were derived using the software MIRDOSE 3, which incorporates specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for the MIRD phantom series. The voxel system uses software based on the same dose calculation formula in conjunction with SAF values determined by Monte Carlo analysis at the GSF of the three voxel phantoms. Effective doses were also compared. Substantial differences in organ weights were observed between the two systems, 18% differing by more than a factor of 2. Out of a total of 238 organ dose comparisons, 5% differed by more than a factor of 2 between the systems; these included some doses to walls of the GI tract, a significant result in relation to their high tissue weighting factors. Some of the largest differences in dose were associated with organs of lower significance in terms of radiosensitivity (e.g. thymus). In this small series, voxel organ doses tended to exceed MIRD values, on average, and a 10% difference was significant when all 238 organ doses

  11. Development of an effective dose coefficient database using a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate exposure dose for the usage of NORM-added consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Jaekook; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Chang, Byung-Uck; Min, Chul Hee

    2017-11-01

    After the Fukushima accident in Japan, the Korean Government implemented the "Act on Protective Action Guidelines Against Radiation in the Natural Environment" to regulate unnecessary radiation exposure to the public. However, despite the law which came into effect in July 2012, an appropriate method to evaluate the equivalent and effective doses from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in consumer products is not available. The aim of the present study is to develop and validate an effective dose coefficient database enabling the simple and correct evaluation of the effective dose due to the usage of NORM-added consumer products. To construct the database, we used a skin source method with a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For the validation, the effective dose was compared between the database using interpolation method and the original MC method. Our result showed a similar equivalent dose across the 26 organs and a corresponding average dose between the database and the MC calculations of database with sufficient accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The potential pitfalls of studying adult sex ratios at aggregate levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Thomas V; Stoevenbelt, Andrea H; Kuppens, Toon

    2017-09-19

    Human adult sex ratios have been studied extensively across the biological and social sciences. While several studies have examined adult sex ratio effects in a multilevel perspective, many studies have focused on effects at an aggregated level only. In this paper, we review some key issues relating to such analyses. We address not only nation-level analyses, but also aggregation at lower levels, to investigate whether these issues extend to lower levels of aggregation. We illustrate these issues with novel databases covering a broad range of variables. Specifically, we discuss distributional issues with aggregated measures of adult sex ratio, significance testing, and statistical non-independence when using aggregate data. Firstly, we show that there are severe distributional issues with national adult sex ratio, such as extreme cases. Secondly, we demonstrate that many 'meaningless' variables are significantly correlated with adult sex ratio (e.g. the max. elevation level correlates with sex ratio at US state level). Finally, we re-examine associations between adult sex ratios and teenage fertility and find no robust evidence for an association at the aggregate level. Our review highlights the potential issues of using aggregate data on adult sex ratios to test hypotheses from an evolutionary perspective in humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Adult sex ratios and reproductive decisions: a critical re-examination of sex differences in human and animal societies'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Hybrid computational phantoms of the male and female newborn patient: NURBS-based whole-body models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hasenauer, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E

    2007-01-01

    Anthropomorphic computational phantoms are computer models of the human body for use in the evaluation of dose distributions resulting from either internal or external radiation sources. Currently, two classes of computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilized for organ dose assessment: (1) stylized phantoms and (2) voxel phantoms which describe the human anatomy via mathematical surface equations or 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Although stylized phantoms based on mathematical equations can be very flexible in regard to making changes in organ position and geometrical shape, they are limited in their ability to fully capture the anatomic complexities of human internal anatomy. In turn, voxel phantoms have been developed through image-based segmentation and correspondingly provide much better anatomical realism in comparison to simpler stylized phantoms. However, they themselves are limited in defining organs presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography images-the two major sources in voxel phantom construction. By definition, voxel phantoms are typically constructed via segmentation of transaxial images, and thus while fine anatomic features are seen in this viewing plane, slice-to-slice discontinuities become apparent in viewing the anatomy of voxel phantoms in the sagittal or coronal planes. This study introduces the concept of a hybrid computational newborn phantom that takes full advantage of the best features of both its stylized and voxel counterparts: flexibility in phantom alterations and anatomic realism. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces, a mathematical modeling tool traditionally applied to graphical animation studies, was adopted to replace the limited mathematical surface equations of stylized phantoms. A previously developed whole-body voxel phantom of the newborn female was utilized as a realistic anatomical framework for hybrid phantom construction. The construction of a hybrid

  14. Contrast detail phantom for SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, M.L. de; Arashiro, J G; Giannone, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camuyrano, M; Nohara, G [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad Ciencias Exactas

    1996-06-01

    A new low variable contrast phantom for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was constructed, tested and compared with other existing phantoms. It contains simulated cylindrical lesions of four different diameters (D{sub i}), embedded in a cylindrical scattering medium and a uniform section to evaluate tomographic uniformity. The concentration of tracer in the simulated lesions and the scattering medium (background) can be varied to simulate hot and cold lesions. Different applications of the phantom were tested, including determination of the minimum object contrast (OCm) necessary to detect lesions as a function of lesion size, lesion type (hot or cold) and acquisition and processing protocols by visual inspection. This parameter allows categorization of instruments comparing an `image quality index` (IQI). Preliminary comparison with the Britten contrast processing method showed that the detectable OCm was of the same order of magnitude, but the presented device seems more suitable for training and intercomparison purposes. The constructed phantom, of simple design, has proved to be useful for acquisition and processing condition evaluation, OCm estimation and external quality control. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  15. Optimisation of radioprotection of patients in nuclear medicine: assessment of doses for the new ICRP's reference voxelized phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadid, L.; Blanchardon, E.; Desbree, A.; Makovicka, L.; Zankl, M.

    2010-01-01

    As the ICPR (International Commission on Radiological Protection) decided to adopt voxelized phantoms to emulate a reference adult, the authors report the validation of calculations of the SFAs (specific absorbed fractions) for the new ICPR's reference phantoms. After a presentation of these phantoms, the authors briefly present the OEDIPE software which is used to compute the SAFs and notably the absorbed doses. They discuss the results obtained for the SAFs (for photons and for electrons) and for the doses

  16. Human Capital Development: Reforms for Adult and Community Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Sarojni; Haukka, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The adult and community education (ACE) sector is consistently responsive to changing community needs and government priorities. It is this particular function that has drawn ACE into the lifelong learning debate as one model for sustaining communities. The responsiveness of ACE means that the sector and its programs continue to make valuable…

  17. Phantom Limb Pain in Pediatric Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DeMoss

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phantom limb pain (PLP is a prevalent problem for children and adolescents undergoing amputation due to cancer treatment. The symptoms are wide ranging from sharp to tingling. PLP in children typically lasts for a few minutes but can be almost constant and can be highly distressing. This focused review describes the characteristics, epidemiology, mechanisms, and evidence-based treatment of PLP in pediatric populations, focusing on pediatric cancer. In pediatric oncology, the administration of chemotherapy is a risk factor that potentially sensitizes the nervous system and predisposes pediatric cancer patients to develop PLP after amputation. Gabapentin, tricyclic antidepressants, opiates, nerve blocks, and epidural catheters have shown mixed success in adults and case reports document potential utility in pediatric patients. Non-pharmacologic treatments, such as mirror therapy, psychotherapy, and acupuncture have also been used in pediatric PLP with success. Prospective controlled trials are necessary to advance care for pediatric patients with PLP.

  18. Molecular identification of Giardia lamblia isolates from adult human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARL

    2013-02-27

    Feb 27, 2013 ... Giardia lamblia is a flagellated protozoa that infects the intestinal tract of a wide range of mammalian hosts, including both wild and domestic animals as well as humans. Two genotypes A and B are commonly reported among humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genotypes of G.

  19. Adult Education and Human Capital: Leadership from the Fortune 500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Teresa M.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 333 Fortune 500 firms received 81 replies indicating that (1) two-thirds formally recognized the value of human resources; (2) most had changed corporate policy regarding human capital; and (3) most training was provided in the ares of new employee orientation, current job needs, customer relations, personal development, and…

  20. Alternative Sources of Adult Stem Cells: Human Amniotic Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbank, Susanne; van Griensven, Martijn; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Peterbauer-Scherb, Anja

    Human amniotic membrane is a highly promising cell source for tissue engineering. The cells thereof, human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSC), may be immunoprivileged, they represent an early developmental status, and their application is ethically uncontroversial. Cell banking strategies may use freshly isolated cells or involve in vitro expansion to increase cell numbers. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the effect of in vitro cultivation on both phenotype and differentiation potential of hAEC. Moreover, we present different strategies to improve expansion including replacement of animal-derived supplements by human platelet products or the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase to extend the in vitro lifespan of amniotic cells. Characterization of the resulting cultures includes phenotype, growth characteristics, and differentiation potential, as well as immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties.

  1. A century of trends in adult human height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Molbo, Drude

    2016-01-01

    in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5-22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3-19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over...... the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8-144.8). The height differential between the tallest...... and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries....

  2. Fetal hyperglycemia changes human preadipocyte function in adult life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ninna Schiøler; Strasko, Klaudia Stanislawa; Hjort, Line

    2017-01-01

    Context: Offspring of women with gestational diabetes (O-GDM) or type 1 diabetes mellitus (O-T1DM) have been exposed to hyperglycemia in utero and have an increased risk of developing metabolic disease in adulthood. Design: In total, we recruited 206 adult offspring comprising the two fetal...... acid supply. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings show that intrinsic epigenetic and functional changes exist in preadipocyte cultures from individuals exposed to fetal hyperglycemia who are at increased risk of developing metabolic disease....

  3. A methodology for developing anisotropic AAA phantoms via additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Galarreta, Sergio; Antón, Raúl; Cazón, Aitor; Finol, Ender A

    2017-05-24

    An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent focal dilatation of the abdominal aorta at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. The criterion of maximum diameter is still used in clinical practice, although numerical studies have demonstrated the importance of biomechanical factors for rupture risk assessment. AAA phantoms could be used for experimental validation of the numerical studies and for pre-intervention testing of endovascular grafts. We have applied multi-material 3D printing technology to manufacture idealized AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Different composites were fabricated and the phantom specimens were characterized by biaxial tensile tests while using a constitutive model to fit the experimental data. One composite was chosen to manufacture the phantom based on having the same mechanical properties as those reported in the literature for human AAA tissue; the strain energy and anisotropic index were compared to make this choice. The materials for the matrix and fibers of the selected composite are, respectively, the digital materials FLX9940 and FLX9960 developed by Stratasys. The fiber proportion for the composite is equal to 0.15. The differences between the composite behavior and the AAA tissue are small, with a small difference in the strain energy (0.4%) and a maximum difference of 12.4% in the peak Green strain ratio. This work represents a step forward in the application of 3D printing technology for the manufacturing of AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetry using radiochromic film and planning algorithms in heterogeneous phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Vinicius Freitas

    2012-01-01

    This work analyzes, through the study of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter, two schemes of heterogeneous phantoms schematised to simulate real cases of planning with different electronic densities through the Pencil Beam, Collapsed Cone and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm algorithms and compare with measurements Of relative absorbed dose in an IBA CC13 ionization chamber and Gafchromic® EBT2 radiochromic film. Epichlorohydrin rubber and its compatibility in comparison with human bone has also been evaluated. The assembly of the heterogeneous phantoms was feasible and the results regarding the density and attenuation of the rubber presented consistent values. However, the study of PDPs in constructed phantoms showed a considerable percentage discrepancy between measurements and planning

  5. Construction of a computational exposure model for dosimetric calculations using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code and voxel phantoms; Construcao de um modelo computacional de exposicao para calculos dosimetricos utilizando o codigo Monte Carlo EGS4 e fantomas de voxels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose Wilson

    2004-07-15

    The MAX phantom has been developed from existing segmented images of a male adult body, in order to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties of the reference adult male specified by the ICRP. In computational dosimetry, MAX can simulate the geometry of a human body under exposure to ionizing radiations, internal or external, with the objective of calculating the equivalent dose in organs and tissues for occupational, medical or environmental purposes of the radiation protection. This study presents a methodology used to build a new computational exposure model MAX/EGS4: the geometric construction of the phantom; the development of the algorithm of one-directional, divergent, and isotropic radioactive sources; new methods for calculating the equivalent dose in the red bone marrow and in the skin, and the coupling of the MAX phantom with the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Finally, some results of radiation protection, in the form of conversion coefficients between equivalent dose (or effective dose) and free air-kerma for external photon irradiation are presented and discussed. Comparing the results presented with similar data from other human phantoms it is possible to conclude that the coupling MAX/EGS4 is satisfactory for the calculation of the equivalent dose in radiation protection. (author)

  6. The measurement of organic radiation dose of multi-slice CT scanning by using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Gang; Zeng Yongming; Luo Tianyou; Zhao Feng; Zhang Zhiwei; Yu Renqiang; Peng Shengkun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to measure the absorbed dose of various tissues and organs under different noise index, and to assess the radiation dose of MSCT chest scanning with the effective dose (ED). Methods: The equivalence of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom (CDP-1 C) and the adult chest on CT sectional anatomy and X-ray attenuation was demonstrated. The absorbed doses of various tissues and organs under different noise index were measured by laying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) inside the phantom, and the corresponding dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. Both of them were later converted into ED and comparison was conducted to analyze the dose levels of chest CT scanning with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) under different noise index. Student t-test was applied using SPSS 12.0 statistical software. Results: The Phantom was similar to the human body on CT sectional anatomy. The average CT value of phantom are - 788.04 HU in lung, 45.64 HU in heart, 65.84 HU in liver, 254.32 HU in spine and the deviations are 0.10%, 3.04%, 4.49% and 4.36% respectively compared to humans. The difference of average CT value of liver was statistically significant (t=-8.705, P 0.05). As the noise index increased from 8.5 to 22.5, the DLP decreased from 393.57 mGy · cm to 78.75 mGy · cm and the organs dose declined. For example, the average absorbed dose decreased from 22.38 mGy to 3.66 mGy in lung. Compared to ED calculating by absorbed dose, the ED calculating by DLP was lower. The ED values of the two methods were 6.69 mSv and 8.77 mSv when the noise index was set at 8.5. Conclusions: Application of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to carry out CT dose assessment is more accurate. The noise index should be set more than 8.5 during the chest CT scanning based on ATCM technique. (authors)

  7. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. NMR-CT image and symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Syozo; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures. One is described as a mathematical expression. Another is 'symbol phantoms' in 3 dimensional picture-elements, each of which symbolize an organ name. The concept and the algorithm of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for a individual in terms of all his transversal section images. We got 85 transversal section images of head and trunk parts, and those of 40 legs parts by using NMR-CT. We have made the individual phantom for computation of organ doses. The transversal section images were not so clear to identify all organs needed to dose estimation that we had to do hand-editing the shapes of organs with viewing a typical section images: we could not yet make symbol phantom in a automatic editing. Symbols were coded to be visual cords as ASCII characters. After we got the symbol phantom of the first stage, we can edit it easily using a word-processor. Symbol phantom could describe more freely the shape of organs than mathematical phantom. Symbol phantom has several advantages to be an individual phantom, but the only difficult point is how to determine its end-point as a reference man when we apply the method to build the reference man. (author)

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors.

  10. 3D Printing Openable Imaging Phantom Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung Keun; Won, Jun Hyeok; Lee, Seung Wook

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design an openable phantom that can replace the internal measurement bar used for contrast comparison in order to increase the efficiency of manufacturing imaging phantom used in the medical industry and to improve convenience using 3D printer. Phantom concept design, 3D printing, and Image reconstruction were defined as the scope of the thesis. Also, we study metal artifact reduction with openable phantom. We have designed a Openable phantom using 3D printing, and have investigated metal artifact reduction after inserting a metallic material inside the phantom. The openable phantom can be adjusted at any time to suit the user's experiment and can be easily replaced and useful.

  11. Development of 5 and 10 years old infant phantoms based on polygonal meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo; Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Universidade de Pernambuco

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses the development of reference infant phantoms of 5 and 10 years old to be used in calculation of equivalent doses in the area of radiological protection. The method uses tools developed for the modelling of 3D objects. The forms and positions are available in the literature. The mass values of each organ and tissue were adjusted according to the reference data published by the International Commission Radiological Protection. The results are presented in image of organs and tissues, and in tables. Dosimetric calculations show concordance with adult and infant phantoms, considering the differences among phantoms

  12. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, TT; Kirkeby Nielsen, LP; Poulsen, Knud

    2000-01-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine...... the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively...... reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal...

  13. An Alternative Method of Evaluating 1540NM Exposure Laser Damage using an Optical Tissue Phantom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jindra, Nichole M; Figueroa, Manuel A; Rockwell, Benjamin A; Chavey, Lucas J; Zohner, Justin J

    2006-01-01

    An optical phantom was designed to physically and optically resemble human tissue, in an effort to provide an alternative for detecting visual damage resulting from inadvertent exposure to infrared lasers...

  14. Expansion of Adult Human Pancreatic Tissue Yields Organoids Harboring Progenitor Cells with Endocrine Differentiation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy J.M. Loomans

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Generating an unlimited source of human insulin-producing cells is a prerequisite to advance β cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Here, we describe a 3D culture system that supports the expansion of adult human pancreatic tissue and the generation of a cell subpopulation with progenitor characteristics. These cells display high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDHhi, express pancreatic progenitors markers (PDX1, PTF1A, CPA1, and MYC, and can form new organoids in contrast to ALDHlo cells. Interestingly, gene expression profiling revealed that ALDHhi cells are closer to human fetal pancreatic tissue compared with adult pancreatic tissue. Endocrine lineage markers were detected upon in vitro differentiation. Engrafted organoids differentiated toward insulin-positive (INS+ cells, and circulating human C-peptide was detected upon glucose challenge 1 month after transplantation. Engrafted ALDHhi cells formed INS+ cells. We conclude that adult human pancreatic tissue has potential for expansion into 3D structures harboring progenitor cells with endocrine differentiation potential. : In the context of β cell replacement therapy for diabetes, de Koning and colleagues describe a 3D culture platform that supports ex vivo expansion of human pancreatic tissue as organoids. These organoids harbor a subpopulation of ALDHhi cells that display proliferative capacity and can differentiate to an endocrine fate. Keywords: pancreas, organoid, human, ALDH, endocrine differentiation, beta cells, insulin, progenitor, fetal, diabetes

  15. Mathematical phantoms for use in reassessment of radiation doses to Japanese atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1985-07-01

    In 1972 committees of the United Nations and the US National Academy of Sciencs emphasized the need for organ dose estimates on the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. These estimates were then supplied by workers in Japan and the US, and they were used with the so-called T65D estimates of a survivor's radiation exposure to assess risk from radiation. Recently the T65D estimates have been questioned, and programs for reassessment of atomic-bomb radiation dosimetry have been started in Japan and the US. As a part of this new effort a mathematical analogue of the human body (or ''mathematical phantom''), to be used in estimating organ doses in adult survivors, is presented here. Recommendations on organ dosimetry for juvenile survivors are also presented and discussed. 57 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Effect of phantom voxelization in CT simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Beekman, Freek J.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2002-01-01

    In computer simulations of x-ray CT systems one can either use continuous geometrical descriptions for phantoms or a voxelized representation. The voxelized approach allows arbitrary phantoms to be defined without being confined to geometrical shapes. The disadvantage of the voxelized approach is that inherent errors are introduced due to the phantom voxelization. To study effects of phantom discretization, analytical CT simulations were run for a fan-beam geometry with phantom voxel sizes ranging from 0.0625 to 2 times the reconstructed pixel size and noise levels corresponding to 10 3 -10 7 photons per detector pixel prior to attenuation. The number of rays traced per detector element was varied from 1 to 16. Differences in the filtered backprojection images caused by changing the phantom matrix sizes and number of rays traced were assessed by calculating the difference between reconstructions based on the finest matrix and coarser matrix simulations. In noise free simulations, all phantom matrix sizes produced a measurable difference in comparison with the finest phantom matrix used. When even a small amount of noise was added to the projection data, the differences due to the phantom discretization were masked by the noise, and in all cases there was almost no improvement by using a phantom matrix that was more than twice as fine as the reconstruction matrix. No substantial improvement was achieved by tracing more than 4 rays per detector pixel

  17. Contact and perspective taking improve humanness standards and perceptions of humanness of older adults and people with dementia: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Anca M; McFadden, Susan H; Hermus, Nathan J; Buelow, Jennifer; Nazario, Amanda S; Seelman, Katarena

    2017-10-01

    No empirical work has systematically explored perceptions of humanness of people with dementia and of older adults and the variables that could improve these perceptions. We thus investigated the role of contact and perspective taking in improving perceptions of humanness of these social groups. To do so, we developed a new concept, humanness standards, defined as the amount of evidence of ability impairment needed to conclude that elderly people and those with dementia have lost personhood. We used a cross-sectional survey design (n = 619) to assess participants' humanness standards and perceptions of uniquely human characteristics and human nature characteristics of two social groups (people with dementia and older adults). Half the participants (n = 311) completed a survey about people with dementia and half (n = 308) assessed older adults. People with dementia were perceived as possessing humanness characteristics to a lesser extent than were older adults. For both groups, contact predicted enhanced perceptions of humanness characteristics. Participants' degree of contact with individuals with dementia also predicted humanness standards, but only under low perspective-taking conditions. As predicted, for older adults, participants set the highest humanness impairment thresholds in the high contact/high perspective-taking condition. We conclude that while social programs that bring persons with dementia and other individuals in contact could change humanness standards and perceptions of humanness characteristics of people with dementia, in the case of elderly adults, the contact must be supplemented by variables that facilitate taking the perspective of the person.

  18. Development of PIMAL: Mathematical Phantom with Moving Arms and Legs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, Hatice [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, Keith F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The computational model of the human anatomy (phantom) has gone through many revisions since its initial development in the 1970s. The computational phantom model currently used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is based on a model published in 1974. Hence, the phantom model used by the NRC staff was missing some organs (e.g., neck, esophagus) and tissues. Further, locations of some organs were inappropriate (e.g., thyroid).Moreover, all the computational phantoms were assumed to be in the vertical-upright position. However, many occupational radiation exposures occur with the worker in other positions. In the first phase of this work, updates on the computational phantom models were reviewed and a revised phantom model, which includes the updates for the relevant organs and compositions, was identified. This revised model was adopted as the starting point for this development work, and hence a series of radiation transport computations, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5, was performed. The computational results were compared against values reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) in Publication 74. For some of the organs (e.g., thyroid), there were discrepancies between the computed values and the results reported in ICRP-74. The reasons behind these discrepancies have been investigated and are discussed in this report.Additionally, sensitivity computations were performed to determine the sensitivity of the organ doses for certain parameters, including composition and cross sections used in the simulations. To assess the dose for more realistic exposure configurations, the phantom model was revised to enable flexible positioning of the arms and legs. Furthermore, to reduce the user time for analyses, a graphical user interface (GUI) was developed. The GUI can be used to visualize the positioning of the arms and legs as desired posture is achieved to generate the input file, invoke the computations, and extract the organ dose

  19. A Software Phantom : Application in Digital Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazos, D; Kolitsi, Z; Badea, C; Pallikarakis, N [Medical Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Univercity of Patras (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    A software phantom intended to be used in radiographic applications has been developed. The application was used for research in the field of Digital Tomosynthesis and specifically for studying tomographic noise removal methods. The application consists of a phantom design and a phantom imaging module. The radiation-matter interaction is based on the exponential relation of attenuation. Projections are formed by simulated irradiation with selectable geometrical parameters, source spectrum and detector response. Phantoms are defined either as sets containing certain geometrical objects or as groups of voxels. Comparison with real projections taken from a physical phantom with identical geometry and composition with the simulated one, showed good approximation with improved contrast due to the absence of scatter in the simulated projections. The software phantom proved to be a very useful tool for DTS investigations. Further development to include scatter is expected to expand the use of the application to more areas in radiological imaging research. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs

  20. A Software Phantom : Application in Digital Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazos, D.; Kolitsi, Z.; Badea, C.; Pallikarakis, N.

    1998-01-01

    A software phantom intended to be used in radiographic applications has been developed. The application was used for research in the field of Digital Tomosynthesis and specifically for studying tomographic noise removal methods. The application consists of a phantom design and a phantom imaging module. The radiation-matter interaction is based on the exponential relation of attenuation. Projections are formed by simulated irradiation with selectable geometrical parameters, source spectrum and detector response. Phantoms are defined either as sets containing certain geometrical objects or as groups of voxels. Comparison with real projections taken from a physical phantom with identical geometry and composition with the simulated one, showed good approximation with improved contrast due to the absence of scatter in the simulated projections. The software phantom proved to be a very useful tool for DTS investigations. Further development to include scatter is expected to expand the use of the application to more areas in radiological imaging research. (author)

  1. Estimation of internal dose from radiocesium and phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yuji

    1994-01-01

    A complicated model describing the movement of a radionuclide in both the natural environment and socioeconomical systems is usually used to estimate the internal dose to the public in terms of collective dose, taking demographic data into account. The result can be certified for reliability in some compartments of the model. One of the compartments is the body content. In the case of radiocesium, the individual body burden can be measured using a whole-body counter. The measurement must be calibrated with a phantom. The public is composed of individuals of various ages. Accordingly, the whole-body counter should be calibrated with a set of phantoms approximating individuals of different body sizes. Relationships between counting efficiency and body size were analyzed on 137 Cs 134 Cs or 40 K incorporated into the whole-body using a set of phantoms. Four sizes covering average Japanese physiques from infant to adult male, were chosen to prepare an anthropomorphic phantom system. The distribution of 137 Cs in aquatic solution was homogeneous through the phantom. A whole-body counter at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, was used at a rate of 5 cm per minute in a scanning mode. The measurements were carried out in an iron room. Relations were analyzed between counting efficiency and some anthropometric parameters. The best fit was given by a linear equation of both reciprocals of height in cm and weight in kg, with a correlation coefficient of 1.00 for 137 Cs. The result indicates that radioactivity of 137 Cs can be determined for individuals with different anthropometric parameters using the whole-body counter system. This means that effective equivalent doses for individuals can be computed accurately from the measurements. Further, an estimate on the body content from an dose estimation model using measurements of radioactivity in environmental substances can be evaluated by comparing the body burden measured. (J.P.N.)

  2. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part Two, the Critical Turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2014-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995). The…

  3. Perspectives on Adult Education, Human Resource Development, and the Emergence of Workforce Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a perspective on the relationship between adult education and human resource development of the past two decades and the subsequent emergence of workforce development. The lesson taken from the article should be more than simply a recounting of events related to these fields of study. Instead, the more general lesson may be…

  4. Bridging the Gap between Human Resource Development and Adult Education: Part One, Assumptions, Definitions, and Critiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Tim; Bowles, Tuere

    2013-01-01

    Human resource development (HRD) as a scholarly endeavor and as a practice is often criticized in the adult education (AE) literature and by AE scholars as manipulative and oppressive and, through training and other interventions, controlling workers for strictly economic ends (Baptiste, 2001; Cunningham, 2004; Schied, 2001; Welton, 1995).…

  5. Embryonic stem cell-like cells derived from adult human testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizrak, S. C.; Chikhovskaya, J. V.; Sadri-Ardekani, H.; van Daalen, S.; Korver, C. M.; Hovingh, S. E.; Roepers-Gajadien, H. L.; Raya, A.; Fluiter, K.; de Reijke, Th M.; de la Rosette, J. J. M. C. H.; Knegt, A. C.; Belmonte, J. C.; van der Veen, F.; de rooij, D. G.; Repping, S.; van Pelt, A. M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Given the significant drawbacks of using human embryonic stem (hES) cells for regenerative medicine, the search for alternative sources of multipotent cells is ongoing. Studies in mice have shown that multipotent ES-like cells can be derived from neonatal and adult testis. Here we report the

  6. Equality and Human Capital: Conflicting Concepts within State-Funded Adult Education in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the concept of equality as it informs the White Paper on Adult Education: Learning for Life (2000). It also outlines the extent to which human capital theory can be seen to have effectively colonised lifelong learning from the outset of its adoption by the European Union with highly constraining implications for…

  7. CD4+ T-Lymphocytes cell counts in adults with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the CD4+ cell counts in adults with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections presenting at the medical department of the Federal Medical Centre, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria. Methods: This study was carried out at the medical department of the Federal Medical Centre (FMC), Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria, in the ...

  8. ABSORPTION-SPECTRA OF HUMAN FETAL AND ADULT OXYHEMOGLOBIN, DE-OXYHEMOGLOBIN, CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN, AND METHEMOGLOBIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJLSTRA, WG; MEEUWSENVANDERROEST, WP

    We determined the millimolar absorptivities of the four clinically relevant derivatives of fetal and adult human hemoglobin in the visible and near-infrared spectral range (450-1000 nm). As expected, spectral absorption curves of similar shape were found, but the small differences between fetal and

  9. Design, development, and implementation of the Radiological Physics Center's pelvis and thorax anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, David S.; Radford Evans, DeeAnn; Cherry, Christopher; Molineu, Andrea; Fisher, Gary; Hanson, William F.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) developed two heterogeneous anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms for use in verifying the accuracy of radiation delivery: one for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the pelvis and the other for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the thorax. The purpose of this study was to describe the design and development of these two phantoms and to demonstrate the reproducibility of measurements generated with them. The phantoms were built to simulate actual patient anatomy. They are lightweight and water-fillable, and they contain imageable targets and organs at risk of radiation exposure that are of similar densities to their human counterparts. Dosimetry inserts accommodate radiochromic film for relative dosimetry and thermoluminesent dosimetry capsules for absolute dosimetry. As a part of the commissioning process, each phantom was imaged, treatment plans were developed, and radiation was delivered at least three times. Under these controlled irradiation conditions, the reproducibility of dose delivery to the target TLD in the pelvis and thorax phantoms was 3% and 0.5%, respectively. The reproducibility of radiation-field localization was less than 2.5 mm for both phantoms. Using these anthropomorphic phantoms, pelvic IMRT and thoracic SBRT radiation treatments can be verified with a high level of precision. These phantoms can be used to effectively credential institutions for participation in specific NCI-sponsored clinical trials

  10. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunker, Bryan E., E-mail: bryan.yunker@ucdenver.edu; Lanning, Craig J.; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado – Denver/Anschutz, 12700 East 19th Avenue, MS 8607, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Dodd, Gerald D., E-mail: gerald.dodd@ucdenver.edu; Chang, Samuel; Scherzinger, Ann L. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop L954, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Chen, S. James, E-mail: james.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Colorado 80045 and Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop B132, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Feng, Yusheng, E-mail: yusheng.feng@utsa.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas – San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, Mail Stop: AET 2.332, San Antonio, Texas 78249–0670 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms.

  11. Transorbital therapy delivery: phantom testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Martha-Conley; Atuegwu, Nkiruka; Mawn, Louise; Galloway, Robert L.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a combined image-guided and minimally invasive system for the delivery of therapy to the back of the eye. It is composed of a short 4.5 mm diameter endoscope with a magnetic tracker embedded in the tip. In previous work we have defined an optimized fiducial placement for accurate guidance to the back of the eye and are now moving to system testing. The fundamental difficulty in testing performance is establishing a target in a manner which closely mimics the physiological task. We have to have a penetrable material which obscures line of sight, similar to the orbital fat. In addition we need to have some independent measure of knowing when a target has been reached to compare to the ideal performance. Lastly, the target cannot be rigidly attached to the skull phantom since the optic nerve lies buried in the orbital fat. We have developed a skull phantom with white cloth stellate balls supporting a correctly sized globe. Placed in the white balls are red, blue, orange and yellow balls. One of the colored balls has been soaked in barium to make it bright on CT. The user guides the tracked endoscope to the target as defined by the images and tells us its color. We record task accuracy and time to target. We have tested this with 28 residents, fellows and attending physicians. Each physician performs the task twice guided and twice unguided. Results will be presented.

  12. Self-Control and Impulsiveness in Nondieting Adult Human Females: Effects of Visual Food Cues and Food Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzano, Lori-Ann B.; Chelonis, John J.; Casey, Caitlin; Forward, Marion; Stachowiak, Jacqueline A.; Wood, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Self-control can be defined as the choice of a larger, more delayed reinforcer over a smaller, less delayed reinforcer, and impulsiveness as the opposite. Previous research suggests that exposure to visual food cues affects adult humans' self-control. Previous research also suggests that food deprivation decreases adult humans' self-control. The…

  13. Control volume based hydrocephalus research; a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Madsen, Joseph; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a complex spectrum of neurophysiological disorders involving perturbation of the intracranial contents; primarily increased intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume and intracranial pressure are observed. CSF dynamics are highly coupled to the cerebral blood flows and pressures as well as the mechanical properties of the brain. Hydrocephalus, as such, is a very complex biological problem. We propose integral control volume analysis as a method of tracking these important interactions using mass and momentum conservation principles. As a first step in applying this methodology in humans, an in vitro phantom is used as a simplified model of the intracranial space. The phantom's design consists of a rigid container filled with a compressible gel. Within the gel a hollow spherical cavity represents the ventricular system and a cylindrical passage represents the spinal canal. A computer controlled piston pump supplies sinusoidal volume fluctuations into and out of the flow phantom. MRI is used to measure fluid velocity and volume change as functions of time. Independent pressure measurements and momentum flow rate measurements are used to calibrate the MRI data. These data are used as a framework for future work with live patients and normal individuals. Flow and pressure measurements on the flow phantom will be presented through the control volume framework.

  14. Development of a phantom for quality control of radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidegger Soboll, D.; Reuters Schelin, H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to build a phantom for quality control of stereotactic radiosurgery on linear accelerators. The outward appearance is a translucent human head filled with water and enclosing an insert with test objects of known shapes. The phantom was submitted to computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography exams, in order to perform a radiosurgery planning. Contours of the internal structures on the therapy planning system were drawn over the MRI images. Through the image fusion of CT and MRI, the contour data was transferred to CT images. Stereotactic registration of CT and angiography was made. One isocenter treatment was created, and using the stereotactic coordinates given by the therapy planning system, the phantom was placed on a linac. X-ray images were performed in order to verify the final positioning of the planned isocenter. In the whole process the phantom showed usefulness and adequacy for the positioning quality control of stereotactic radiosurgery with linacs, according to the main documents concerning the issue. (author)

  15. Neuroscience of Human Social Interactions and Adult Attachment Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eVrticka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description four decades ago, attachment theory has become one of the principal developmental psychological frameworks for describing the role of individual differences in the establishment and maintenance of social bonds between people. Yet, still little is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of attachment orientations and their well-established impact on a range of social and affective behaviors. In the present review, we summarize data from recent studies using cognitive and imaging approaches to characterize attachment styles and their effect on emotion and social cognition. We propose a functional neuroanatomical framework to integrate the key brain mechanisms involved in the perception and regulation of social emotional information, and their modulation by individual differences in terms of secure versus insecure (more specifically avoidant, anxious, or resolved vs. unresolved attachment traits. This framework describes how each individual’s attachment style (built through interactions between personal relationship history and predispositions may influence the encoding of approach versus aversion tendencies (safety versus threat in social encounters, implicating the activation of a network of subcortical (amygdala, hippocampus, striatum and cortical (insula, cingulate limbic areas. These basic and automatic affective mentalization mechanisms are in turn modulated by more elaborate and voluntary cognitive mentalization processes, subserving theory of mind, cognitive control, and emotion regulation capacities, implicating a distinct network (in medial prefrontal cortex, superior temporal sulcus, and temporo-parietal junction, among others. Such research does not only help better understand the neural underpinnings of human social behavior, but also provides important insights on psychopathological conditions where attachment dysregulations is likely to play an important (causal role.

  16. Induction of GLUT-1 protein in adult human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Franch, J; Staehr, P

    2000-01-01

    Prompted by our recent observations that GLUT-1 is expressed in fetal muscles, but not in adult muscle fibers, we decided to investigate whether GLUT-1 expression could be reactivated. We studied different stimuli concerning their ability to induce GLUT-1 expression in mature human skeletal muscle...... fibers. Metabolic stress (obesity, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), contractile activity (training), and conditions of de- and reinnervation (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) could not induce GLUT-1 expression in human muscle fibers. However, regenerating muscle fibers in polymyositis expressed...... GLUT-1. In contrast to GLUT-1, GLUT-4 was expressed in all investigated muscle fibers. Although the significance of GLUT-1 in adult human muscle fibers appears limited, GLUT-1 may be of importance for the glucose supplies in immature and regenerating muscle....

  17. Radiographic test phantom for computed tomographic lung nodule analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerhouni, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a method for evaluating a computed tomograph scan of a nodule in a lung of a human or non-human animal. The method comprises generating a computer tomograph of a transverse section of the animal containing lung and nodule tissue, and generating a second computer tomograph of a test phantom comprising a device which simulates the transverse section of the animal. The tissue simulating portions of the device are constructed of materials having radiographic densities substantially identical to those of the corresponding tissue in the simulated transverse section of the animal and have voids therein which simulate, in size and shape, the lung cavities in the transverse section and which contain a test reference nodule constructed of a material of predetermined radiographic density which simulates in size, shape and position within a lung cavity void of the test phantom the nodule in the transverse section of the animal and comparing the respective tomographs

  18. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time

  19. Advanced Radiation DOSimetry phantom (ARDOS): a versatile breathing phantom for 4D radiation therapy and medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiukhina, Natalia; Georg, Dietmar; Rollet, Sofia; Kuess, Peter; Sipaj, Andrej; Andrzejewski, Piotr; Furtado, Hugo; Rausch, Ivo; Lechner, Wolfgang; Steiner, Elisabeth; Kertész, Hunor; Knäusl, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    A novel breathing phantom was designed for being used in conventional and ion-beam radiotherapy as well as for medical imaging. Accurate dose delivery and patient safety are aimed to be verified for four-dimensional (4D) treatment techniques compensating for breathing-induced tumor motion. The phantom includes anthropomorphic components representing an average human thorax. It consists of real tissue equivalent materials to fulfill the requirements for dosimetric experiments and imaging purposes. The different parts of the torso (lungs, chest wall, and ribs) and the tumor can move independently. Simple regular movements, as well as more advanced patient-specific breathing cycles are feasible while a reproducible setup can be guaranteed. The phantom provides the flexibility to use different types of dosimetric devices and was designed in a way that it is robust, transportable and easy to handle. Tolerance levels and the reliability of the phantom setup were determined in combination with tests on motion accuracy and reproducibility by using infrared optical tracking technology. Different imaging was performed including positron emission tomography imaging, 4D computed tomography as well as real-time in-room imaging. The initial dosimetric benchmarking studies were performed in a photon beam where dose parameters are predictable and the dosimetric procedures well established.

  20. Advanced Radiation DOSimetry phantom (ARDOS): a versatile breathing phantom for 4D radiation therapy and medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiukhina, Natalia; Georg, Dietmar; Rollet, Sofia; Kuess, Peter; Sipaj, Andrej; Andrzejewski, Piotr; Furtado, Hugo; Rausch, Ivo; Lechner, Wolfgang; Steiner, Elisabeth; Kertész, Hunor; Knäusl, Barbara

    2017-10-04

    A novel breathing phantom was designed for being used in conventional and ion-beam radiotherapy as well as for medical imaging. Accurate dose delivery and patient safety are aimed to be verified for four-dimensional (4D) treatment techniques compensating for breathing-induced tumor motion. The phantom includes anthropomorphic components representing an average human thorax. It consists of real tissue equivalent materials to fulfill the requirements for dosimetric experiments and imaging purposes. The different parts of the torso (lungs, chest wall, and ribs) and the tumor can move independently. Simple regular movements, as well as more advanced patient-specific breathing cycles are feasible while a reproducible setup can be guaranteed. The phantom provides the flexibility to use different types of dosimetric devices and was designed in a way that it is robust, transportable and easy to handle. Tolerance levels and the reliability of the phantom setup were determined in combination with tests on motion accuracy and reproducibility by using infrared optical tracking technology. Different imaging was performed including positron emission tomography imaging, 4D computed tomography as well as real-time in-room imaging. The initial dosimetric benchmarking studies were performed in a photon beam where dose parameters are predictable and the dosimetric procedures well established.

  1. Mental rotation and the human body: Children's inflexible use of embodiment mirrors that of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Markus; Ebersbach, Mirjam

    2017-12-25

    Adults' mental rotation performance with body-like stimuli is enhanced if these stimuli are anatomically compatible with a human body, but decreased by anatomically incompatible stimuli. In this study, we investigated these effects for kindergartners and first-graders: When asked to mentally rotate cube configurations attached with human body parts in an anatomically compatible way, allowing for the projection of a human body, children performed better than with pure cube combinations. By contrast, when body parts were attached in an anatomically incompatible way, disallowing the projection of a human body, children performed worse than with pure combinations. This experiment is of specific interest against the background of two different theoretical approaches concerning imagery and the motor system in development: One approach assumes an increasing integration of motor processes and imagery over time that enables older children and adults to requisition motor resources for imagery processes, while the other postulates that imagery stems from early sensorimotor processes in the first place, and is disentangled from it over time. The finding that children of the two age groups tested show exactly the same effects as adults when mentally rotating anatomically compatible and incompatible stimuli is interpreted in favour of the latter approach. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? In mental rotation, adults perform better when rotating anatomically possible stimuli as compared to rotating standard cube combinations. Performance is worse when rotating anatomically impossible stimuli. What does this study add? The present study shows that children's mental transformations mirror those of adults in these respects. In case of the anatomically impossible stimuli, this highlights an inflexible use of embodiment in both age groups. This is in line with the Piagetian assumption of imagery being based on sensorimotor processes. © 2017 The British

  2. Human Centred Design Considerations for Connected Health Devices for the Older Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Harte

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Connected health devices are generally designed for unsupervised use, by non-healthcare professionals, facilitating independent control of the individuals own healthcare. Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size. This group presents challenges due to the wide spectrum of capabilities and attitudes towards technology. The fit between capabilities of the user and demands of the device can be optimised in a process called Human Centred Design. Here we review examples of some connected health devices chosen by random selection, assess older adult known capabilities and attitudes and finally make analytical recommendations for design approaches and design specifications.

  3. Calibration of lung counter using a CT model of Torso phantom and Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Binquan; Ma Jizeng; Yang Duanjie; Liu Liye; Cheng Jianping

    2006-01-01

    Tomography image of a Torso phantom was obtained from CT-Scan. The Torso phantom represents the trunk of an adult man that is 170 cm high and weight of 65 kg. After these images were segmented, cropped, and resized, a 3-dimension voxel phantom was created. The voxel phantom includes more than 2 million voxels, which size was 2.73 mm x 2.73 mm x 3 mm. This model could be used for the calibration of lung counter with Monte Carlo method. On the assumption that radioactive material was homogeneously distributed throughout the lung, counting efficiencies of a HPGe detector in different positions were calculated as Adipose Mass fraction (AMF) was different in the soft tissue in chest. The results showed that counting efficiencies of the lung counter changed up to 67% for 17.5 keV γ ray and 20% for 25 keV γ ray when AMF changed from 0 to 40%. (authors)

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of dose calculation in voxel and geometric phantoms using GEANT4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maximiano C.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Silva, Rosana de S. e; Begalli, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation techniques have become a valuable tool for scientific purposes. In radiation protection many quantities are obtained by means of the simulation of particles passing through human body models, also known as phantoms, allowing the calculation of doses deposited in an individual's organs exposed to ionizing radiation. These information are very useful from the medical viewpoint, as they are used in the planning of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments. The goal of this work is the implementation of a voxel phantom and a geometrical phantom in the framework of the Geant4 tool kit, aiming at a future use of this code by professionals in the medical area. (author)

  5. 3D printed optical phantoms and deep tissue imaging for in vivo applications including oral surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Brian Z.; Costas, Alfonso; Gaind, Vaibhav; Garcia, Jose M.; Webb, Kevin J.

    2017-03-01

    Progress in developing optical imaging for biomedical applications requires customizable and often complex objects known as "phantoms" for testing, evaluation, and calibration. This work demonstrates that 3D printing is an ideal method for fabricating such objects, allowing intricate inhomogeneities to be placed at exact locations in complex or anatomically realistic geometries, a process that is difficult or impossible using molds. We show printed mouse phantoms we have fabricated for developing deep tissue fluorescence imaging methods, and measurements of both their optical and mechanical properties. Additionally, we present a printed phantom of the human mouth that we use to develop an artery localization method to assist in oral surgery.

  6. Calibration of a prototype NIRS oximeter against two commercial devices on a blood-lipid phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Kleiser, Stefan; Wolf, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In a blood-lipid liquid phantom the prototype near-infrared spectroscopy oximeter OxyPrem was calibrated against the INVOS® 5100c adult sensor in respect to values of regional tissue oxygen haemoglobin saturation (rStO2) for possible inclusion in the randomised clinical trial - SafeBoosC. In addi......In a blood-lipid liquid phantom the prototype near-infrared spectroscopy oximeter OxyPrem was calibrated against the INVOS® 5100c adult sensor in respect to values of regional tissue oxygen haemoglobin saturation (rStO2) for possible inclusion in the randomised clinical trial - Safe...

  7. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647

  8. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647.

  9. Estimation of computed tomography dose in various phantom shapes and compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Lae [Dept. of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate CTDI (computed tomography dose index at center) for various phantom shapes, sizes, and compositions by using GATE (geant4 application for tomographic emission) simulations. GATE simulations were performed for various phantom shapes (cylinder, elliptical, and hexagonal prism PMMA phantoms) and phantom compositions (water, PMMA, polyethylene, polyoxymethylene) with various diameters (1-50 cm) at various kVp and mAs levels. The CTDI100center values of cylinder, elliptical, and hexagonal prism phantom at 120 kVp, 200 mAs resulted in 11.1, 13.4, and 12.2 mGy, respectively. The volume is the same, but CTDI{sub 100center} values are different depending on the type of phantom. The water, PMMA, and polyoxymethylene phantom CTDI{sub 100center} values were relatively low as the material density increased. However, in the case of Polyethylene, the CTDI{sub 100center} value was higher than that of PMMA at diameters exceeding 15 cm (CTDI{sub 100center} : 35.0 mGy). And a diameter greater than 30 cm (CTDI{sub 100center} : 17.7 mGy) showed more CTDI{sub 100center} than Water. We have used limited phantoms to evaluate CT doses. In this study, CTDI{sub 100center} values were estimated and simulated by GATE simulation according to the material and shape of the phantom. CT dosimetry can be estimated more accurately by using various materials and phantom shapes close to human body.

  10. Topographic variation in redifferentiation capacity of chondrocytes in the adult human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhamre, H; Slynarski, K; Petrén, C; Tallheden, T; Lindahl, A

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the topographic variation in matrix production and cell density in the adult human knee joint. Additionally, we have examined the redifferentiation potential of chondrocytes expanded in vitro from the different locations. Full thickness cartilage-bone biopsies were harvested from seven separate anatomical locations of healthy knee joints from deceased adult human donors. Chondrocytes were isolated, expanded in vitro and redifferentiated in a pellet mass culture. Biochemical analysis of total collagen, proteoglycans and cellular content as well as histology and immunohistochemistry were performed on biopsies and pellets. In the biochemical analysis of the biopsies, we found lower proteoglycan to collagen (GAG/HP) ratio in the non-weight bearing (NWB) areas compared to the weight bearing (WB) areas. The chondrocytes harvested from different locations in femur showed a significantly better attachment and proliferation ability as well as good post-expansion chondrogenic capacity in pellet mass culture compared with the cells harvested from tibia. These results demonstrate that there are differences in extra cellular content within the adult human knee in respect to GAG/HP ratio. Additionally, the data show that clear differences between chondrocytes harvested from femur and tibia from healthy human knee joints exist and that the differences are not completely abolished during the process of de- and redifferentiation. These findings emphasize the importance of the understanding of topographic variation in articular cartilage biology when approaching new cartilage repair strategies.

  11. SU-E-J-07: IGRT Gently: Evaluating Imaging Dose in Phantoms of Different Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, B; Duggar, W; Stanford, J; Yang, C [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IGRT imaging procedures have emerged as a common method of patient position verification in radiotherapy, though imaging dose is generally neglected in the treatment plan. Consequently, evaluating and optimizing the dose from these procedures is worthwhile. This process is especially important for children, who are more radiosensitive than adults. The aim of this work was to gain some understanding of the relative doses involved with various XVI-preset parameters for an “adult” and “child” phantom set, with the hopes that imaging dose for a child can be reduced. Methods: 32 and 16cm CTDI-phantoms were used as surrogates for adult and child torsos, respectively. Dose was measured in the central and peripheral chamber positions of the phantoms. CBCT scans were made for both phantoms using Elekta’s Chest-preset to establish a dose baseline. The child-phantom was then scanned using the Elekta Head and Neck (HN) preset. A modified HN-preset (named Peds Abd-pelvis) was also created with a doubled mAs to maintain a reduction in dose to the child-phantom (relative to the baseline), while providing clinically-usable image quality. Results: The baseline dose to the child-phantom from the Chest-preset was 310% that of the adult-phantom for the center chamber position and 150% at the periphery. An average dose reduction of 97% was obtained in the childphantom by switching from the Chest-preset to the HN-preset, while the Peds Abd-pelvis-preset similarly reduced the dose by an average of 92%. Conclusion: XVI-preset parameters significantly affect dose, and should be optimized to reduce dose, while ensuring clinically-usable image quality. Using a modified imaging preset (Peds Abd-pelvis-preset) greatly reduced the dose to the child-phantom compared to the dose for the Chest-preset for both the child and adult-phantoms. This outcome provides support for the development of child-specific protocols for IGRT imaging in pediatric patients.

  12. SU-E-J-07: IGRT Gently: Evaluating Imaging Dose in Phantoms of Different Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, B; Duggar, W; Stanford, J; Yang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: IGRT imaging procedures have emerged as a common method of patient position verification in radiotherapy, though imaging dose is generally neglected in the treatment plan. Consequently, evaluating and optimizing the dose from these procedures is worthwhile. This process is especially important for children, who are more radiosensitive than adults. The aim of this work was to gain some understanding of the relative doses involved with various XVI-preset parameters for an “adult” and “child” phantom set, with the hopes that imaging dose for a child can be reduced. Methods: 32 and 16cm CTDI-phantoms were used as surrogates for adult and child torsos, respectively. Dose was measured in the central and peripheral chamber positions of the phantoms. CBCT scans were made for both phantoms using Elekta’s Chest-preset to establish a dose baseline. The child-phantom was then scanned using the Elekta Head and Neck (HN) preset. A modified HN-preset (named Peds Abd-pelvis) was also created with a doubled mAs to maintain a reduction in dose to the child-phantom (relative to the baseline), while providing clinically-usable image quality. Results: The baseline dose to the child-phantom from the Chest-preset was 310% that of the adult-phantom for the center chamber position and 150% at the periphery. An average dose reduction of 97% was obtained in the childphantom by switching from the Chest-preset to the HN-preset, while the Peds Abd-pelvis-preset similarly reduced the dose by an average of 92%. Conclusion: XVI-preset parameters significantly affect dose, and should be optimized to reduce dose, while ensuring clinically-usable image quality. Using a modified imaging preset (Peds Abd-pelvis-preset) greatly reduced the dose to the child-phantom compared to the dose for the Chest-preset for both the child and adult-phantoms. This outcome provides support for the development of child-specific protocols for IGRT imaging in pediatric patients

  13. Enceladus' 101 Geysers: Phantoms? Hardly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, C.; Nimmo, F.; DiNino, D.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery by the Cassini mission of present-day geysering activity capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus (eg, Porco, C. C. et al. Science 311, 1393, 2006) and sourced within a subsurface body of liquid water (eg, Postberg, F. et al. Nature 459, 1098, 2009; Porco, C.C. et al. AJ 148, 45, 2014, hereafter PEA], laced with organic compounds (eg, Waite, J.H. et al. Science 311, 1419, 2006), has been a significant one, with far-reaching astrobiological implications. In an extensive Cassini imaging survey of the moon's south polar terrain (SPT), PEA identified 101 distinct, narrow jets of small icy particles erupting, with varying strengths, from the four major fractures crossing the SPT. A sufficient spread in stereo angles of the 107 images used in that work allowed (in some cases, many) pair-wise triangulations to be computed; precise surface locations were derived for 98 jets. Recently, it has been claimed (Spitale, J.N. et al. Nature 521, 57, 2015) that the majority of the geysers are not true discrete jets, but are "phantoms" that appear in shallow-angle views of a dense continuous curtain of material with acute bends in it. These authors also concluded that the majority of the eruptive material is not in the form of jets but in the form of fissure-style 'curtain' eruptions. We argue below the contrary, that because almost all the moon's geysers were identified by PEA using multiple images with favorable viewing geometries, the vast majority of them, and likely all, are discrete jets. Specifically, out of 98 jets, no fewer than 90 to 95 were identified with viewing geometries that preclude the appearance of phantoms. How the erupting solids (i.e., icy particles) that are seen in Cassini images are partitioned between jets and inter-jet curtains is still an open question.

  14. Influence of the phantom shape (slab, cylinder or Alderson) on the performance of an Hp(3) eye dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R.; Hupe, O.

    2016-01-01

    In the past, the operational quantity H p (3) was defined for calibration purposes in a slab phantom. Recently, an additional phantom in the form of a cylinder has been suggested for eye lens dosimetry, as a cylinder much better approximates the shape of a human head. Therefore, this work investigates which of the two phantoms, slab or cylinder, is more suitable for calibrations and type tests of eye dosemeters. For that purpose, a typical H p (3) eye dosemeter was irradiated on a slab, a cylinder and on a human-like Alderson phantom. It turned out that the response on the three phantoms is nearly equal for angles of radiation incidence up to 45 deg. and deviates only at larger angles of incidence. Thus, calibrations (usually performed at 0 deg. radiation incidence) are practically equivalent on both the slab and the cylinder phantoms. However, type tests (up to 75 deg. or even 90 deg. radiation incidence) should be carried out on a cylinder phantom, as also for large angles of incidence the response on the cylinder and the Alderson phantoms is rather similar, whereas the response on the slab significantly deviates from the one on the Alderson phantom. (authors)

  15. Whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients—UF Series B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-01

    Following the previous development of the head and torso voxel phantoms of paediatric patients for use in medical radiation protection (UF Series A), a set of whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male and 14-year male) has been developed through the attachment of arms and legs from segmented CT images of a healthy Korean adult (UF Series B). Even though partial-body phantoms (head-torso) may be used in a variety of medical dose reconstruction studies where the extremities are out-of-field or receive only very low levels of scatter radiation, whole-body phantoms play important roles in general radiation protection and in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Inclusion of the arms and legs is critical for dosimetry studies of paediatric patients due to the presence of active bone marrow within the extremities of children. While the UF Series A phantoms preserved the body dimensions and organ masses as seen in the original patients who were scanned, comprehensive adjustments were made for the Series B phantoms to better match International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) age-interpolated reference body masses, body heights, sitting heights and internal organ masses. The CT images of arms and legs of a Korean adult were digitally rescaled and attached to each phantom of the UF series. After completion, the resolutions of the phantoms for the 9-month, 4-year, 8-year, 11-year and 14-year were set at 0.86 mm × 0.86 mm × 3.0 mm, 0.90 mm × 0.90 mm × 5.0 mm, 1.16 mm × 1.16 mm × 6.0 mm, 0.94 mm × 0.94 mm × 6.00 mm and 1.18 mm × 1.18 mm × 6.72 mm, respectively.

  16. Mathematical development of a 10 years old child phantom for use in internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deus, S.F.; Poston, J.W.; Watanabe, S.

    1989-08-01

    The main objectives of this work are: 1) to develop a project of a mathematical phantom representing as far as possible a child of 10 years old and 2)to use this phantom as a base for the specific absorbed fractions (SAF) calculations in the internal organs and skeleton due to the radioisotopes most used in nuclear medicine. This phantom was similar in shape to the Fisher and Snyder one, but several changes were introduced to make the phantom more realistic. Those changes included the addition of a neck region, puting the arms outside the trunk region, changes in the trunk, head and genitalia regions shapes. Several modifications were also done in the skeleton. For instance, the head bones, rib cage, pelvis, vertebral column, scapula, clavicles and the arms and legs bones were made very close to the real anatomic shapes. Some internal organs as the brain, lungs, liver, small and large intestines were also changed as a consenquence of the above modifications. In all those cases, the changes were made not only in the shapes but also in the organs and bones position in such a way to be more representative of the 10 years old anatomic age. Estimates of the SAF obtained by the use of this phantom, resulted, as expected, significantly different from those obtained by the use of a simpler model. In other words, the ratio between the SAF in the organs of the phantom developed in this project and the SAF in the organs of the phantom similar to the adult (obtained by reducing each region of the adult phantom by the use of appropriate factor) vary from 0.37 to 5. Those differences and their meaning are also discussed. (author) [pt

  17. A phantom for quality control in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambaccini, M.; Rimondi, O.; Marziani, M.; Toti, A.

    1989-01-01

    A phantom for evaluating image quality in mammography has been designed and will be used in the Italian national programme ''Dose and Quality in Mammography''. The characteristics of the phantom are (a) about the same X-ray transmission as a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast for energies between 15 and 50 keV and (b) optimum energies for imaging of the test objects (included in the phantom) in very close agreement with the optimum energies for imaging of calcifications and tumours in a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast. An experimental comparison between the prototype and some commercial phantoms was carried out. Measurements are in progress to test the phantom's ability to evaluate the performances of mammographic systems quantitatively. (author)

  18. The Longitudinal Study of Aging in Human Young Adults: Knowledge Gaps and Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Danese, Andrea; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2017-02-01

    To prevent onset of age-related diseases and physical and cognitive decline, interventions to slow human aging and extend health span must eventually be applied to people while they are still young and healthy. Yet most human aging research examines older adults, many with chronic disease, and little is known about aging in healthy young humans. This article explains how this knowledge gap is a barrier to extending health span and puts forward the case that geroscience should invest in researching the pace of aging in young adults. As one illustrative example, we describe an initial effort to study the pace of aging in a young-adult birth cohort by using repeated waves of biomarkers collected across the third and fourth decades to quantify the pace of coordinated physiological deterioration across multiple organ systems (eg, pulmonary, periodontal, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, metabolic, and immune function). Findings provided proof of principle that it is possible to quantify individual variation in the pace of aging in young adults still free of age-related diseases. This article articulates research needs to improve longitudinal measurement of the pace of aging in young people, to pinpoint factors that slow or speed the pace of aging, to compare pace of aging against genomic clocks, to explain slow-aging young adults, and to apply pace of aging in preventive clinical trials of antiaging therapies. This article puts forward a research agenda to fill the knowledge gap concerning lifelong causes of aging. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, J; Lecoq, P; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allo...

  20. Comparison of Kaposi Sarcoma risk in human immunodeficiency virus-positive adults across 5 continents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohner, Eliane; Bütikofer, Lukas; Schmidlin, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Background: We compared Kaposi sarcoma (KS) risk in adults who started antiretroviral therapy (ART) across the Asia-Pacific, South Africa, Europe, Latin, and North America. Methods: We included cohort data of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adults who started ART after 1995 within...... KS risk was 6 times higher in men who have sex with men (aHR, 5.95; 95% CI, 5.09-6.96) than in women. Comparing patients with current CD4 cell counts ≥700 cells/μL with those whose counts were ...% in other regions. Conclusions. Despite important ART-related declines in KS incidence, men and women in South Africa and men who have sex with men remain at increased KS risk, likely due to high human herpesvirus 8 coinfection rates. Early ART initiation and maintenance of high CD4 cell counts...

  1. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Philip L.; Lee, Jae W.; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R.; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W.; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at ∼95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days...

  2. A statistically defined anthropomorphic software breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Beverly A.; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms have emerged in the past decade because of recent advances in 3D breast x-ray imaging techniques. Computer phantoms in the literature have incorporated power-law noise to represent glandular tissue and branching structures to represent linear components such as ducts. When power-law noise is added to those phantoms in one piece, the simulated fibroglandular tissue is distributed randomly throughout the breast, resulting in dense tissue placement that may not be observed in a real breast. The authors describe a method for enhancing an existing digital anthropomorphic breast phantom by adding binarized power-law noise to a limited area of the breast. Methods: Phantoms with (0.5 mm) 3 voxel size were generated using software developed by Bakic et al. Between 0% and 40% of adipose compartments in each phantom were replaced with binarized power-law noise (β = 3.0) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 volumetric glandular fraction. The phantoms were compressed to 7.5 cm thickness, then blurred using a 3 × 3 boxcar kernel and up-sampled to (0.1 mm) 3 voxel size using trilinear interpolation. Following interpolation, the phantoms were adjusted for volumetric glandular fraction using global thresholding. Monoenergetic phantom projections were created, including quantum noise and simulated detector blur. Texture was quantified in the simulated projections using power-spectrum analysis to estimate the power-law exponent β from 25.6 × 25.6 mm 2 regions of interest. Results: Phantoms were generated with total volumetric glandular fraction ranging from 3% to 24%. Values for β (averaged per projection view) were found to be between 2.67 and 3.73. Thus, the range of textures of the simulated breasts covers the textures observed in clinical images. Conclusions: Using these new techniques, digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms can be generated with a variety of glandular fractions and patterns. β values for this new phantom are comparable

  3. Attitudes of Korean adults towards human dignity: a Q methodology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kae Hwa; An, Gyeong-Ju; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the perceived attitudes of Korean adults towards human dignity in order to determine the relationship of human dignity to its social and cultural background. The Q methodology research technique was used to explore perceived attitude typology on the basis of the respondents' ranking order for different statements. A convenience sampling method was used to select 40 Korean adults who were interested in human dignity to create statements. From the questionnaires, in-depth interviews, and a literature review, a total of 158 statements was obtained. The final 34 Q samples were selected from a review by two nursing professors and a Q methodology expert. Moreover, 38 respondents participated as P samples by sorting 34 Q statements on a nine-point normal distribution scale. The data were analyzed by using the QUANL software package. The following four types of attitudes about human dignity were identified in Korea: a happiness-oriented-self-pursuit type, relationship-oriented-self-recognition type, reflection-oriented-self-unification type, and discrimination-oriented-self-maintenance type. The results indicate that approaches to developing human dignity education need to take this typology into account and the characteristics of the participants who fall into each category. These results provide general guidelines to understand Korean values for professional practice in various healthcare settings. © 2011 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2011 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  4. Application of the method of phantom experimental simulation for evaluation of tissue doses for the Ukrytie object personnel at the Chernobyl' NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbina, V.G.; Kochetkov, O.A.; Sokolova, I.K.; Timofeev, L.B.; Ponomarev, V.N.; Drabkin, Yu.A.; Tsov'yanov, A.G.; Panfilenko, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    It is suggested to use the method of experimental phantom simulation when solving the problem of minimization of personnel external irradiation dose loading. The method discussed gives an opportunity to obtain information on dose distributions on surface, inside human body and data on dose loading for individual organs of a human organism. The phantoms, which are used for determination of the laws of external irradiation dose distribution of several positions of the machine room of the fourth unit Ukrytie object, are described. The scheme of the phantom arrangement and the values of does in organism of the human head phantom are given. 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  5. A review of the benefits and pitfalls of phantoms in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Graham; Hebard, Simon; Mitchell, Christopher H

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, so has the requirement for training tools to practice needle guidance skills and evaluate echogenic needles. Ethically, skills in ultrasound-guided needle placement should be gained in a phantom before performance of nerve blocks on patients in clinical practice. However, phantom technology is varied, and critical evaluation of the images is needed to understand their application to clinical use. Needle visibility depends on the echogenicity of the needle relative to the echogenicity of the tissue adjacent the needle. We demonstrate this point using images of echogenic and nonechogenic needles in 5 different phantoms at both shallow angles (20 degrees) and steep angles (45 degrees). The echogenicity of phantoms varies enormously, and this impacts on how needles are visualized. Water is anechoic, making all needles highly visible, but does not fix the needle to allow practice placement. Gelatin phantoms and Blue Phantoms provide tactile feedback but have very low background echogenicity, which greatly exaggerates needle visibility. This makes skill acquisition easier but can lead to false confidence in regard to clinical ability. Fresh-frozen cadavers retain much of the textural feel of live human tissue and are nearly as echogenic. Similar to clinical practice, this makes needles inserted at steep angles practically invisible, unless they are highly echogenic. This review describes the uses and pitfalls of phantoms that have been described or commercially produced. Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

  6. Skin and cutaneous melanocytic lesion simulation in biomedical optics with multilayered phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urso, P [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Hospital L. Sacco Unit, University of Milan, Via G B Grassi, 74-20157 Milan (Italy); Lualdi, M [Medical Physics Unit, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1-20133 Milan (Italy); Colombo, A [Medical Physics Unit, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1-20133 Milan (Italy); Carrara, M [Medical Physics Unit, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1-20133 Milan (Italy); Tomatis, S [Medical Physics Unit, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1-20133 Milan (Italy); Marchesini, R [Medical Physics Unit, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1-20133 Milan (Italy)

    2007-05-21

    The complex inner layered structure of skin influences the photon diffusion inside the cutaneous tissues and determines the reflectance spectra formation. Phantoms are very useful tools to understand the biophysical meaning of parameters involved in light propagation through the skin. To simulate the skin reflectance spectrum, we realized a multilayered skin-like phantom and a multilayered skin phantom with a melanoma-like phantom embedded inside. Materials used were Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles, melanin of sepia officinalis and a calibrator for haematology systems dispersed in transparent silicon. Components were optically characterized with indirect techniques. Reflectance phantom spectra were compared with average values of in vivo spectra acquired on a sample of 573 voluntary subjects and 132 pigmented lesions. The phantoms' reflectance spectra agreed with those measured in vivo, mimicking the optical behaviour of the human skin. Further, the phantoms were optically stable and easily manageable, and represented a valid resource in spectra formation comprehension, in diagnostic laser applications and simulation model implementation, such as the Monte Carlo code for non-homogeneous media. (note)

  7. Skin and cutaneous melanocytic lesion simulation in biomedical optics with multilayered phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urso, P; Lualdi, M; Colombo, A; Carrara, M; Tomatis, S; Marchesini, R

    2007-01-01

    The complex inner layered structure of skin influences the photon diffusion inside the cutaneous tissues and determines the reflectance spectra formation. Phantoms are very useful tools to understand the biophysical meaning of parameters involved in light propagation through the skin. To simulate the skin reflectance spectrum, we realized a multilayered skin-like phantom and a multilayered skin phantom with a melanoma-like phantom embedded inside. Materials used were Al 2 O 3 particles, melanin of sepia officinalis and a calibrator for haematology systems dispersed in transparent silicon. Components were optically characterized with indirect techniques. Reflectance phantom spectra were compared with average values of in vivo spectra acquired on a sample of 573 voluntary subjects and 132 pigmented lesions. The phantoms' reflectance spectra agreed with those measured in vivo, mimicking the optical behaviour of the human skin. Further, the phantoms were optically stable and easily manageable, and represented a valid resource in spectra formation comprehension, in diagnostic laser applications and simulation model implementation, such as the Monte Carlo code for non-homogeneous media. (note)

  8. Development of digital phantom for DRR evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Katsuta, Shoichi; Oyama, Masaya; Ogino, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Generally, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is evaluated by physical phantom. The CT image is camouflaged by the performance of the radiation treatment planning system and contains a variety of error factors. The CT image (as follows the digital phantom), where an arbitrary CT value is arranged in the matrix, is necessary to evaluate the pure performance of the radiation treatment planning system. In this study, the development of a digital phantom is described, and the utility is discussed. CTport and the radiation treatment planning system are evaluated with the use of a digital phantom as follows: geometrical accuracy evaluation of DRR, consisting of the center position, size of irradiation field, distortion, extension of X-ray, and beam axis, and the image quality evaluation of DRR, which consists of the contrast resolution. As for DRR made with CTport and the treatment planning system, the part that shifted geometrically was confirmed. In the image quality evaluation, there was a remarkable difference. Because the making accuracy and the installation accuracy of the phantom do not influence the digital phantom, the geometrical accuracy of the DRR is reliable. Because the CT conditions and the phantom factor have no influence, the peculiar DRR image quality can be evaluated and used to evaluate the best image processing parameters. (author)

  9. Application of a sitting MIRD phantom for effective dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R. H.; Van Riper, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    In typical realistic scenarios, dose factors due to 60 Co contaminated steel, used in consumer products, cannot be approximated by standard exposure geometries. It is then necessary to calculate the effective dose using an appropriate anthropomorphic phantom. MCNP calculations were performed using a MIRD human model in two settings. In the first, a male office worker is sitting in a chair containing contaminated steel, surrounded by contaminated furniture. In the second, a male driver is seated inside an automobile, the steel of which is uniformly contaminated. To accurately calculate the dose to lower body organs, especially the gonads, it was essential to modify the MIRD model to simulate two sitting postures: chair and driving position. The phantom modifications are described, and the results of the calculations are presented. In the case of the automobile scenarios, results are compared to those obtained using an isotropic fluence-to-dose conversion function. (authors)

  10. Oral Human Papillomavirus Detection in Older Adults Who Have Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Chen, Zigui; Bottalico, Danielle; McKinney, Sharod; Ostoloza, Janae; Dunne, Anne; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate reproducibility of oral rinse self-collection for HPV detection and investigate associations between oral HPV, oral lesions, immune and sociodemographic factors, we performed a cross-sectional study of older adults with HIV infection. Study Design We collected oral rinse samples from 52 subjects at two different times of day followed by an oral examination and interview. We identified HPV using PCR platforms optimized for detection of mucosal and cutaneous types. Results Eighty seven percent of individuals had oral HPV, of which 23% had oncogenic alpha, 40% had non-oncogenic alpha, and 46% had beta or gamma HPV. Paired oral specimens were concordant in all parameters tested. Significant associations observed for oral HPV with increased HIV viral load, hepatitis-C seropositivity, history of sexually transmitted diseases and lifetime number of sexual partners. Conclusions Oral cavity may be a reservoir of subclinical HPV in older adults who have HIV infection. Understanding natural history, transmission and potential implications of oral HPV warrants further investigations. PMID:23375488

  11. Populations of subplate and interstitial neurons in fetal and adult human telencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judaš, Miloš; Sedmak, Goran; Pletikos, Mihovil; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša

    2010-10-01

    In the adult human telencephalon, subcortical (gyral) white matter contains a special population of interstitial neurons considered to be surviving descendants of fetal subplate neurons [Kostovic & Rakic (1980) Cytology and the time of origin of interstitial neurons in the white matter in infant and adult human and monkey telencephalon. J Neurocytol9, 219]. We designate this population of cells as superficial (gyral) interstitial neurons and describe their morphology and distribution in the postnatal and adult human cerebrum. Human fetal subplate neurons cannot be regarded as interstitial, because the subplate zone is an essential part of the fetal cortex, the major site of synaptogenesis and the 'waiting' compartment for growing cortical afferents, and contains both projection neurons and interneurons with distinct input-output connectivity. However, although the subplate zone is a transient fetal structure, many subplate neurons survive postnatally as superficial (gyral) interstitial neurons. The fetal white matter is represented by the intermediate zone and well-defined deep periventricular tracts of growing axons, such as the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, internal and external capsule, and the fountainhead of the corona radiata. These tracts gradually occupy the territory of transient fetal subventricular and ventricular zones.The human fetal white matter also contains distinct populations of deep fetal interstitial neurons, which, by virtue of their location, morphology, molecular phenotypes and advanced level of dendritic maturation, remain distinct from subplate neurons and neurons in adjacent structures (e.g. basal ganglia, basal forebrain). We describe the morphological, histochemical (nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase) and immunocytochemical (neuron-specific nuclear protein, microtubule-associated protein-2, calbindin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y) features of both deep fetal interstitial neurons and deep (periventricular

  12. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Ge, Chaoyong; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli; Gao, Linfeng; Zheng, Junzheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations. (paper)

  13. Preparing a voxel-simulator of Alderson Rando physical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Martins, Maximiano C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Salmon Junior, Helio A.; Soares, Alessandro F.N.S.

    2011-01-01

    There are, nowadays, sorts of anthropomorphycal phantoms which are used for simulation of radiation transport by the matter and also the deposition of energy in such radiation in human tissues and organs, because an in-vitro dosimetry becomes very either complicated or even impossible in some cases. In the present work we prepared a computational phantom in voxels based on computational tomography of Rando-Alderson. This phantom is one of the most known human body simulators on the scope of ionizing radiation dosimetry, and it is used for radioprotection issues and dosimetry from radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments as well. The preparation of a voxel simulator starts with the image acquisition by a tomograph found at COI/RJ (Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas). The images were generated with 1mm cuts and collected for analysis. After that step the images were processed in SAPDI (Sistema Automatizado de Processamento Digital de Imagem) in order to amplify the images regions intending to facilitate the task in their segmentation. SAPDI is based on parameters described by Hounsfield scale. After that, it has begun discretization of elements in IDs voxels using Scan2MCNP software - which converts images to a sequential text file containing the voxels' IDs ready to be introduced into MCNPX input; however, this set can be turned to a voxel's IDs matrix and used in other Monte Carlo codes, such as Geant4, PENELOPE and EGSnrc. Finished this step, the simulator is able to simulate with accurate geometry the physical phantom. It's possible to study a large number of cases by computational techniques of geometry's insertions of tumors and TLDs, which makes this simulator a research material useful for a lot of subjects. (author)

  14. Preparing a voxel-simulator of Alderson Rando physical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Martins, Maximiano C.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: lboia@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ). Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salmon Junior, Helio A., E-mail: heliosalmon@coinet.com.br [COI - Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas, MD.X Barra Medical Center, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Soares, Alessandro F.N.S., E-mail: afacure@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    There are, nowadays, sorts of anthropomorphycal phantoms which are used for simulation of radiation transport by the matter and also the deposition of energy in such radiation in human tissues and organs, because an in-vitro dosimetry becomes very either complicated or even impossible in some cases. In the present work we prepared a computational phantom in voxels based on computational tomography of Rando-Alderson. This phantom is one of the most known human body simulators on the scope of ionizing radiation dosimetry, and it is used for radioprotection issues and dosimetry from radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments as well. The preparation of a voxel simulator starts with the image acquisition by a tomograph found at COI/RJ (Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas). The images were generated with 1mm cuts and collected for analysis. After that step the images were processed in SAPDI (Sistema Automatizado de Processamento Digital de Imagem) in order to amplify the images regions intending to facilitate the task in their segmentation. SAPDI is based on parameters described by Hounsfield scale. After that, it has begun discretization of elements in IDs voxels using Scan2MCNP software - which converts images to a sequential text file containing the voxels' IDs ready to be introduced into MCNPX input; however, this set can be turned to a voxel's IDs matrix and used in other Monte Carlo codes, such as Geant4, PENELOPE and EGSnrc. Finished this step, the simulator is able to simulate with accurate geometry the physical phantom. It's possible to study a large number of cases by computational techniques of geometry's insertions of tumors and TLDs, which makes this simulator a research material useful for a lot of subjects. (author)

  15. Charged black holes in phantom cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Qadir, Asghar; Rashid, Muneer Ahmad [National University of Sciences and Technology, Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    2008-11-15

    In the classical relativistic regime, the accretion of phantom-like dark energy onto a stationary black hole reduces the mass of the black hole. We have investigated the accretion of phantom energy onto a stationary charged black hole and have determined the condition under which this accretion is possible. This condition restricts the mass-to-charge ratio in a narrow range. This condition also challenges the validity of the cosmic-censorship conjecture since a naked singularity is eventually produced due to accretion of phantom energy onto black hole. (orig.)

  16. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Philip L; Lee, Jae W; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at approximately 95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days on collagen-coated dishes with or without DCI for the final 3 days. In freshly isolated cells, highly expressed genes included SFTPA/B/C, SCGB1A, IL8, CXCL2, and SFN in addition to ubiquitously expressed genes. Transcript abundance was correlated between fetal and adult cells (r = 0.88), with a subset of 187 genes primarily related to inflammation and immunity that were expressed >10-fold higher in adult cells. During control culture, expression increased for 8.1% of expressed genes and decreased for approximately 4% including 118 immune response and 10 surfactant-related genes. DCI treatment promoted lamellar body production and increased expression of approximately 3% of probed genes by > or =1.5-fold; 40% of these were also induced in fetal cells. Highly induced genes (> or =10-fold) included PGC, ZBTB16, DUOX1, PLUNC, CIT, and CRTAC1. Twenty-five induced genes, including six genes related to surfactant (SFTPA/B/C, PGC, CEBPD, and ADFP), also had decreased expression during control culture and thus are candidates for hormonal regulation in vivo. Our results further define the adult human type II cell molecular phenotype and demonstrate that a subset of genes remains hormone responsive in cultured adult cells.

  17. Wormholes supported by phantom energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Guzman, F. S.; Montelongo-Garcia, N.; Zannias, T.

    2009-01-01

    By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we demonstrate the existence of spherical, asymptotically flat traversable wormholes supported by exotic matter whose stress tensor relative to the orthonormal frame of Killing observers takes the form of a perfect fluid possessing anisotropic pressures and subject to linear equations of state: τ=λρc 2 , P=μρc 2 . We show that there exists a four parameter family of asymptotically flat spherical wormholes parametrized by the area of the throat A(0), the gradient Λ(0) of the red shift factor evaluated on the throat as well as the values of (λ,μ). The latter are subject to restrictions: λ>1 and 2μ>λ or λ<0 and 2μ<-|λ|. For particular values of (λ,μ), the stress tensor may be interpreted as representing a phantom configuration, while for other values represents exotic matter. All solutions have the property that the two asymptotically flat ends possess finite Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass.

  18. Synthetic digital radiographs using exposure computer models of Voxels / EGS4 Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenned, Roberto; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Loureiro, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to produce synthetic digital radiographs from synthetic phantoms with the use of a Computational Model of Exposition (MCE). The literature explains a model consisted on a phantom, a Monte Carlo code and an algorithm of a radioactive source. In this work it was used the FAX phantom (Female Adult voXel), besides the EGS4 system code Eletron Shower-range version 4) and an external source, similar to that used in diagnostic radiology. The implementation of MCE creates files with information on external energy deposited in the voxels of fantoma used, here called EnergiaPorVoxel.dat. These files along with the targeted phantom (fax.sgi) worked as data entry for the DIP software (Digital Imaging Processing) to build the synthetic phantoms based on energy and the effective dose. This way you can save each slice that is the stack of pictures of these phantoms synthetics, which have been called synthetic digital radiography. Using this, it is possible to use techniques of emphasis in space to increase the contrast or elineate contours between organs and tissues. The practical use of these images is not only to allow a planning of examinations performed in clinics and hospitals and reducing unnecessary exposure to patients by error of radiographic techniques. (author)

  19. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, J; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lucero, S [UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  20. Estimated Human and Economic Burden of Four Major Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases in the United States, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, John M.; McGinnis, Justin J.; Tan, Litjen; Mercatante, Annette; Fortuna, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Low uptake of routinely recommended adult immunizations is a public health concern. Using data from the peer-reviewed literature, government disease-surveillance programs, and the US Census, we developed a customizable model to estimate human and economic burden caused by four major adult vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) in 2013 in the United States, and for each US state individually. To estimate the number of cases for each adult VPD for a given population, we multiplied age-specific inci...

  1. A Transcriptomic and Epigenomic Comparison of Fetal and Adult Human Cardiac Fibroblasts Reveals Novel Key Transcription Factors in Adult Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin K.B. Jonsson, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease remains the number one global cause of death and presents as multiple phenotypes in which the interplay between cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts (CFs has become increasingly highlighted. Fetal and adult CFs influence neighboring cardiomyocytes in different ways. Thus far, a detailed comparison between the two is lacking. Using a genome-wide approach, we identified and validated 2 crucial players for maintaining the adult primary human CF phenotype. Knockdown of these factors induced significant phenotypical changes, including senescence and reduced collagen gene expression. These may now represent novel therapeutic targets against deleterious functions of CFs in adult cardiovascular disease.

  2. Dosimetric study for the development of heterogeneous chest phantom for the purpose of patient-specific quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Mishra, Praveen Kumar; Mishra, Surendra Prasad; Singh, Navin; Bagdare, Priyusha

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the dose absorption patterns of 6 Megavoltage (MV) photon beam using computed tomography (CT) slices of thorax of patient, slab phantom, and slab-kailwood-slab phantom. Single beam of 6 MV with field size of 10 X 10 cm 2 was put on CT images of chest wall, slab phantom, and slab-kailwood-slab phantom perpendicular to the surface. Dose was calculated using anisotropic analytical algorithm. Densities of each medium were calculated by Hounsfield units measured from CT images of each medium. The depths of isodose curves of 100%, 95%, 90%, 85%, 80%, 70%, 60%, and 50% were measured in all the three mediums. The densities measured for chest wall, lung, Soft tissue behind lung, slab phantom, and slab-kailwood-slab phantom were 0.89, 0.301, 1.002, 0.998, and 0.379 g/cc, respectively. The isodose depth (100%, 95%, 90%, 85%, 80%, and 50%) for patient (1.5, 2.76, 3.97, 5.33, 7.01, and 20.01 cm), slab phantom (1.5, 2.74, 3.92, 5.06, 6.32, and 15.18 cm), and slab-kailwood-slab phantom (1.5, 2.65, 3.86, 4.98, 5.95, and 20 cm) is approximately same for 100%, 95%, 90%, and 85% isodose curves. The isodose depth pattern in the chest is equivalent to that in slab-kailwood-slab phantom. The radiation properties of the slab-kailwood-slab phantom are equivalent to that of chest wall, lung, and soft tissue in actual human. The chest phantom mimicking the actual thoracic region of human can be manufactured using polystyrene and the kailwood. (author)

  3. Evaluating human papillomavirus vaccination programs in Canada: should provincial healthcare pay for voluntary adult vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith? Robert J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, provincial health programs in Canada and elsewhere have begun rolling out vaccination against human papillomavirus for girls aged 9–13. While vaccination is voluntary, the cost of vaccination is waived, to encourage parents to have their daughters vaccinated. Adult women who are eligible for the vaccine may still receive it, but at a cost of approximately CAN$400. Given the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the vaccine, the possibility of eradicating targeted types of the virus may be feasible, assuming the vaccination programs are undertaken strategically. Methods We develop a mathematical model to describe the epidemiology of vaccination against human papillomavirus, accounting for a widespread childhood vaccination program that may be supplemented by voluntary adult vaccination. A stability analysis is performed to determine the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The critical vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity thresholds are derived, and the minimum level of adult vaccination required for eradication of targeted types is determined. Results We demonstrate that eradication of targeted types is indeed feasible, although the burden of coverage for a childhood-only vaccination program may be high. However, if a small, but non-negligible, proportion of eligible adults can be vaccinated, then the possibility of eradication of targeted types becomes much more favourable. We provide a threshold for eradication in general communities and illustrate the results with numerical simulations. We also investigate the effects of suboptimal efficacy and immunogenicity and show that there is a critical efficacy below which eradication of targeted types is not possible. If eradication is possible, then there is a critical immunogenicity such that even 100% childhood vaccination will not eradicate the targeted types of the virus and must be supplemented with voluntary adult vaccination. However, the level of adult

  4. Identification of distinct layers within the stratified squamous epithelium of the adult human true vocal fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdall, Jayme R; Sadow, Peter M; Hartnick, Christopher; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Song, Phillip C; Franco, Ramon A; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-09-01

    A precise molecular schema for classifying the different cell types of the normal human vocal fold epithelium is lacking. We hypothesize that the true vocal fold epithelium has a cellular architecture and organization similar to that of other stratified squamous epithelia including the skin, cornea, oral mucosa, and esophagus. In analogy to disorders of the skin and gastrointestinal tract, a molecular definition of the normal cell types within the human vocal fold epithelium and a description of their geometric relationships should serve as a foundation for characterizing cellular changes associated with metaplasia, dysplasia, and cancer. Qualitative study with adult human larynges. Histologic sections of normal human laryngeal tissue were analyzed for morphology (hematoxylin and eosin) and immunohistochemical protein expression profile, including cytokeratins (CK13 and CK14), cornified envelope proteins (involucrin), basal cells (NGFR/p75), and proliferation markers (Ki67). We demonstrated that three distinct cell strata with unique marker profiles are present within the stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. We used these definitions to establish that cell proliferation is restricted to certain cell types and layers within the epithelium. These distinct cell types are reproducible across five normal adult larynges. We have established that three layers of cells are present within the normal adult stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. Furthermore, replicating cell populations are largely restricted to the parabasal strata within the epithelium. This delineation of distinct cell populations will facilitate future studies of vocal fold regeneration and cancer. N/A. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Immunohistochemical Study of Expression of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in Normal Adult Human Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhang

    Full Text Available The expression pattern of Sohlh1 (spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loop-helix 1 and Sohlh2 in mice has been reported in previous studies. Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 are specifically expressed in spermatogonia, prespermatogonia in male mice and oocytes of primordial and primary follicles in female mice. In this report, we studied the expression pattern of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in human adult tissues. Immunohistochemical staining of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 was performed in 5 samples of normal ovaries and testes, respectively. The results revealed that Sohlh genes are not only expressed in oocytes and spermatogonia, but also in granular cells, theca cells, Sertoli cells and Leydig cells, and in smooth muscles of blood vessel walls. To further investigate the expression of Sohlh genes in other adult human tissues, we collected representative normal adult tissues developed from three embryonic germ layers. Compared with the expression in mice, Sohlhs exhibited a much more extensive expression pattern in human tissues. Sohlhs were detected in testis, ovary and epithelia developed from embryonic endoderm, ectoderm and tissues developed from embryonic mesoderm. Sohlh signals were found in spermatogonia, Sertoli cells and also Leydig cells in testis, while in ovary, the expression was mainly in oocytes of primordial and primary follicles, granular cells and theca cells of secondary follicles. Compared with Sohlh2, the expression of Sohlh1 was stronger and more extensive. Our study explored the expression of Sohlh genes in human tissues and might provide insights for functional studies of Sohlh genes.

  6. Acceptance and Attitudes Toward a Human-like Socially Assistive Robot by Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Wing-Yue Geoffrey; McColl, Derek; Nejat, Goldie

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cognitive and social interventions are crucial to the overall health of older adults including their psychological, cognitive, and physical well-being. However, due to the rapidly growing elderly population of the world, the resources and people to provide these interventions is lacking. Our work focuses on the use of social robotic technologies to provide person-centered cognitive interventions. In this article, we investigate the acceptance and attitudes of older adults toward the human-like expressive socially assistive robot Brian 2.1 in order to determine if the robot's human-like assistive and social characteristics would promote the use of the robot as a cognitive and social interaction tool to aid with activities of daily living. The results of a robot acceptance questionnaire administered during a robot demonstration session with a group of 46 elderly adults showed that the majority of the individuals had positive attitudes toward the socially assistive robot and its intended applications.

  7. Isolation and characterization of multipotent progenitor cells from the Bowman's capsule of adult human kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagrinati, Costanza; Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Lazzeri, Elena; Liotta, Francesco; Frosali, Francesca; Ronconi, Elisa; Meini, Claudia; Gacci, Mauro; Squecco, Roberta; Carini, Marco; Gesualdo, Loreto; Francini, Fabio; Maggi, Enrico; Annunziato, Francesco; Lasagni, Laura; Serio, Mario; Romagnani, Sergio; Romagnani, Paola

    2006-09-01

    Regenerative medicine represents a critical clinical goal for patients with ESRD, but the identification of renal adult multipotent progenitor cells has remained elusive. It is demonstrated that in human adult kidneys, a subset of parietal epithelial cells (PEC) in the Bowman's capsule exhibit coexpression of the stem cell markers CD24 and CD133 and of the stem cell-specific transcription factors Oct-4 and BmI-1, in the absence of lineage-specific markers. This CD24+CD133+ PEC population, which could be purified from cultured capsulated glomeruli, revealed self-renewal potential and a high cloning efficiency. Under appropriate culture conditions, individual clones of CD24+CD133+ PEC could be induced to generate mature, functional, tubular cells with phenotypic features of proximal and/or distal tubules, osteogenic cells, adipocytes, and cells that exhibited phenotypic and functional features of neuronal cells. The injection of CD24+CD133+ PEC but not of CD24-CD133- renal cells into SCID mice that had acute renal failure resulted in the regeneration of tubular structures of different portions of the nephron. More important, treatment of acute renal failure with CD24+CD133+ PEC significantly ameliorated the morphologic and functional kidney damage. This study demonstrates the existence and provides the characterization of a population of resident multipotent progenitor cells in adult human glomeruli, potentially opening new avenues for the development of regenerative medicine in patients who have renal diseases.

  8. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats - ICREA and Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurov, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-23

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time ('phantom energy' without 'Big Rip' singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time ('cosmological constant' with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  9. Phantom inflation and the 'Big Trip'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Jimenez-Madrid, Jose A.

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inflation is regarded to be driven by a phantom field which is here implemented as a scalar field satisfying an equation of state p=ωρ, with ω-1. Being even aggravated by the weird properties of phantom energy, this will pose a serious problem with the exit from the inflationary phase. We argue, however, in favor of the speculation that a smooth exit from the phantom inflationary phase can still be tentatively recovered by considering a multiverse scenario where the primordial phantom universe would travel in time toward a future universe filled with usual radiation, before reaching the big rip. We call this transition the 'Big Trip' and assume it to take place with the help of some form of anthropic principle which chooses our current universe as being the final destination of the time transition

  10. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Yurov, Artyom V.

    2012-01-01

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time (“phantom energy” without “Big Rip” singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time (“cosmological constant” with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  11. Pediatric phantoms for use in dosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Hwang, J.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1976-01-01

    Estimating absorbed doses to children from external and internal radiation sources has become important to the nuclear industry and pediatric nuclear medicine. The Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section at ORNL has recently completed the design of mathematical representations of children of ages newborn, 1 year, and 5 years old. These mathematical representations will be referred to as pediatric phantoms. Using these phantoms, relevant energy deposition data have been developed which establish a meaningful model for use in estimating radiation dose to children

  12. Deficient retinoid-driven angiogenesis may contribute to failure of adult human lung regeneration in emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng-Blichfeldt, John-Poul; Alçada, Joana; Montero, M Angeles; Dean, Charlotte H; Griesenbach, Uta; Griffiths, Mark J; Hind, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Molecular pathways that regulate alveolar development and adult repair represent potential therapeutic targets for emphysema. Signalling via retinoic acid (RA), derived from vitamin A, is required for mammalian alveologenesis, and exogenous RA can induce alveolar regeneration in rodents. Little is known about RA signalling in the human lung and its potential role in lung disease. To examine regulation of human alveolar epithelial and endothelial repair by RA, and characterise RA signalling in human emphysema. The role of RA signalling in alveolar epithelial repair was investigated with a scratch assay using an alveolar cell line (A549) and primary human alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells from resected lung, and the role in angiogenesis using a tube formation assay with human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC). Localisation of RA synthetic (RALDH-1) and degrading (cytochrome P450 subfamily 26 A1 (CYP26A1)) enzymes in human lung was determined by immunofluorescence. Regulation of RA pathway components was investigated in emphysematous and control human lung tissue by quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis. RA stimulated HLMVEC angiogenesis in vitro; this was partially reproduced with a RAR-α agonist. RA induced mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and VEGFR2. RA did not modulate AT2 repair. CYP26A1 protein was identified in human lung microvasculature, whereas RALDH-1 partially co-localised with vimentin-positive fibroblasts. CYP26A1 mRNA and protein were increased in emphysema. RA regulates lung microvascular angiogenesis; the endothelium produces CYP26A1 which is increased in emphysema, possibly leading to reduced RA availability. These data highlight a role for RA in maintenance of the human pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Reassembly of adult human testicular cells: can testis cord-like structures be created in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincheva, M; Sandhowe-Klaverkamp, R; Wistuba, J; Redmann, K; Stukenborg, J-B; Kliesch, S; Schlatt, S

    2018-02-01

    Can enzymatically dispersed testicular cells from adult men reassemble into seminiferous cord-like structures in vitro? Adult human testicular somatic cells reassembled into testicular cord-like structures via dynamic interactions of Sertoli and peritubular cells. In vitro approaches using dispersed single cell suspensions of human testes to generate seminiferous tubule structures and to initiate their functionality have as yet shown only limited success. Testes from 15 adult gender dysphoria patients (mean ± standard deviation age 35 ± 9.3 years) showing spermatogonial arrest became available for this study after sex-reassignment surgery. In vitro primary testicular somatic cell cultures were generated to explore the self-organizing ability of testicular somatic cells to form testis cords over a 2-week period. Morphological phenotype, protein marker expression and temporal dynamics of cell reassembly were analyzed. Cell suspensions obtained by two-step enzymatic digestion were plated onto glass coverslips in 24-well plates. To obtain adherent somatic cells, the supernatant was discarded on Day 2. The culture of the attached cell population was continued. Reassembly into cord-like structures was analyzed daily by microscopic observations. Endpoints were qualitative changes in morphology. Cell types were characterized by phase-contrast microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Dynamics of cord formation were recorded by time-lapse microscopy. Primary adult human testicular cells underwent sequential morphological changes including compaction and reaggregation resulting in round or elongated cord-like structures. Time-lapse video recordings within the first 4 days of culture revealed highly dynamic processes of migration and coalescence of reaggregated cells. The cellular movements were mediated by peritubular cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both SRY-related high mobility box 9-positive Sertoli and α-smooth muscle actin-positive peritubular myoid cells

  14. Development of a phantom to evaluate the positioning accuracy of patient immobilization systems using thermoplastic mask and polyurethane cradle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inata, Hiroki; Semba, Takatoshi; Itoh, Yoshihiro; Kuribayashi, Yuta; Murayama, Suetoshi; Nishizaki, Osamu; Araki, Fujio

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new phantom to evaluate the positioning accuracy of patient immobilization systems. The phantom was made of papers formed into a human shape, paper clay, and filling rigid polyester. Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pipes were inserted at anterior-posterior (A-P) and right-left (R-L) directions in the phantom to give static load by pulling ropes through the pipes. First, the positioning precision of the phantom utilizing a target locating system (TLS) was evaluated by moving the phantom on a couch along inferior-superior (I-S), A-P, and R-L directions in a range from -5 mm to +5 mm. The phantom's positions detected with the TLS were compared with values measured by a vernier caliper. Second, the phantom movements in a tensile test were chosen from patient movements determined from 15 patients treated for intracranial lesions and immobilized with a thermoplastic mask and polyurethane cradle. The phantom movement was given by minimum or maximum values of patient movements in each direction. Finally, the relationship between phantom movements and the static load in the tensile test was characterized from measurements using the new phantom and the TLS. The differences in all positions between the vernier caliper measurement and the TLS detected values were within 0.2 mm with frequencies of 100%, 95%, and 90% in I-S, A-P, and R-L directions, respectively. The phantom movements according to patient movements in clinical application in I-S, A-P, and R-L directions were within 0.58 mm, 0.94 mm, and 0.93 mm from the mean value plus standard deviation, respectively. The regression lines between the phantom movements and static load were given by y = 0.359x, y = 0.241x, and y = 0.451x in I-S, A-P, and R-L directions, respectively, where x is the phantom movement (mm) and y is the static load (kgf). The relationship between the phantom movements and static load may represent the performance of inhibiting patient movements, so the

  15. Limits on efficient human mindreading: convergence across Chinese adults and Semai children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Hadi, Nur Shafiqah Abdul; Low, Jason

    2015-11-01

    We tested Apperly and Butterfill's (2009, Psychological Review, 116, 753) theory that humans have two mindreading systems whereby the efficient-system guiding anticipatory glances displays signature limits that do not apply to the flexible system guiding verbal predictions. Experiments 1 and 2 tested urban Mainland-Chinese adults (n = 64) and Experiment 3 tested Semai children living in the rainforests of Peninsular Malaysia (3- to 4-year-olds, n = 60). Participants - across different ages, groups and methods - anticipated others' false-beliefs about object-location but not object-identity. Convergence in signature limits signalled that the early-developing efficient system involved minimal theory-of-mind. Chinese adults and older Semai children showed flexibility in their direct predictions. The flexible mindreading system in ascribing others' beliefs as such was task-sensitive and implicated maturational and cultural contributions. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Physical Exercise Habits Correlate with Gray Matter Volume of the Hippocampus in Healthy Adult Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Mareen

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity facilitates neurogenesis of dentate cells in the rodent hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory formation and spatial representation. Recent findings in humans also suggest that aerobic exercise can lead to increased hippocampal volume and enhanced cognitive functioning in children and elderly adults. However, the association between physical activity and hippocampal volume during the period from early adulthood through middle age has not been effectively explored. Here, we correlated the number of minutes of self-reported exercise per week with gray matter volume of the hippocampus using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 61 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 45 years of age. After controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume, total minutes of weekly exercise correlated significantly with volume of the right hippocampus. Findings highlight the relationship between regular physical exercise and brain structure during early to middle adulthood.

  17. Verification of gamma knife based fractionated radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Singh, Manmohan Jit; Agarwal, Deepak; Garg, Ajay; Rath, Goura Kishore; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Pratik; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of the study is to verify the Gamma Knife Extend™ system (ES) based fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom. Methods: Phantoms are extensively used to measure radiation dose and verify treatment plan in radiotherapy. A human upper body shaped phantom with thorax was designed to simulate fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery using Extend™ system of Gamma Knife. The central component of the phantom aids in performing radiological precision test, dosimetric evaluation and treatment verification. A hollow right circular cylindrical space of diameter 7.0 cm was created at the centre of this component to place various dosimetric devices using suitable adaptors. The phantom is made of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), a transparent thermoplastic material. Two sets of disk assemblies were designed to place dosimetric films in (1) horizontal (xy) and (2) vertical (xz) planes. Specific cylindrical adaptors were designed to place thimble ionization chamber inside phantom for point dose recording along xz axis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were used to analyze and map radiation field. The focal precision test was performed using 4 mm collimator shot in phantom to check radiological accuracy of treatment. The phantom head position within the Extend™ frame was estimated using encoded aperture measurement of repositioning check tool (RCT). For treatment verification, the phantom with inserts for film and ion chamber was scanned in reference treatment position using X-ray computed tomography (CT) machine and acquired stereotactic images were transferred into Leksell Gammaplan (LGP). A patient treatment plan with hypo-fractionated regimen was delivered and identical fractions were compared using EBT3 films and in-house MATLAB codes. Results: RCT measurement showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.265 mm (range 0.223 mm–0.343 mm). Gamma index analysis across fractions exhibited close agreement between LGP and film

  18. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  19. Development of the voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients and their application to organ dose assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik

    A series of realistic voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients were developed and then used for the radiation risk assessment for various exposure scenarios. The high-resolution computed tomographic images of live patients were utilized for the development of the five voxel phantoms of pediatric patients, 9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male. The phantoms were first developed as head and torso phantoms and then extended into whole body phantoms by utilizing computed tomographic images of a healthy adult volunteer. The whole body phantom series was modified to have the same anthropometrics with the most recent reference data reported by the international commission on radiological protection. The phantoms, named as the University of Florida series B, are the first complete set of the pediatric voxel phantoms having reference organ masses and total heights. As part of the dosimetry study, the investigation on skeletal tissue dosimetry methods was performed for better understanding of the radiation dose to the active bone marrow and bone endosteum. All of the currently available methodologies were inter-compared and benchmarked with the paired-image radiation transport model. The dosimetric characteristics of the phantoms were investigated by using Monte Carlo simulation of the broad parallel beams of external phantom in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral, rotational, and isotropic angles. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated for extensive photon energies and compared with the conventional stylized pediatric phantoms of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The multi-slice helical computed tomography exams were simulated using Monte Carlo simulation code for various exams protocols, head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis studies. Results have found realistic estimates of the effective doses for frequently used protocols in pediatric radiology. The results were very

  20. Dose calculation on voxels phantoms using the GEANT4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maximiano C.; Santos, Denison S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P.; Begalli, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    This work implemented an anthropomorphic phantom of voxels on the structure of Monte Carlo GEANT4, for utilization by professionals from the radioprotection, external dosimetry and medical physics. This phantom allows the source displacement that can be isotropic punctual, plain beam, linear or radioactive gas, in order to obtain diverse irradiation geometries. In them, the radioactive sources exposure is simulated viewing the determination of effective dose or the dose in each organ of the human body. The Zubal head and body trunk phantom was used, and we can differentiate the organs and tissues by the chemical constitution in soft tissue, lung tissue, bone tissue, water and air. The calculation method was validated through the comparison with other well established method, the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC). Besides, a comparison was done with the international recommendation for the evaluation of dose by exposure to punctual sources, described in the document TECDOC - 1162- Generic Procedures for Assessment and Response During a Radiological Emergency, where analytical expressions for this calculation are given. Considerations are made on the validity limits of these expressions for various irradiation geometries, including linear sources, immersion into clouds and contaminated soils

  1. Plasticity of adult human pancreatic duct cells by neurogenin3-mediated reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Swales

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3. In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it. METHODS: The extent of the Ngn3-mediated duct-to-endocrine cell reprogramming was measured employing genome wide mRNA profiling. By modulation of the Delta-Notch signaling or addition of pancreatic endocrine transcription factors Myt1, MafA and Pdx1 we intended to improve the reprogramming. RESULTS: Ngn3 stimulates duct cells to express a focused set of genes that are characteristic for islet endocrine cells and/or neural tissues. This neuro-endocrine shift however, is incomplete with less than 10% of full duct-to-endocrine reprogramming achieved. Transduction of exogenous Ngn3 activates endogenous Ngn3 suggesting auto-activation of this gene. Furthermore, pancreatic endocrine reprogramming of human duct cells can be moderately enhanced by inhibition of Delta-Notch signaling as well as by co-expressing the transcription factor Myt1, but not MafA and Pdx1. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The results provide further insight into the plasticity of adult human duct cells and suggest measurable routes to enhance Ngn3-mediated in vitro reprogramming protocols for regenerative beta cell therapy in diabetes.

  2. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone immunoreactivity in the adult and fetal human olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K H; Patel, L; Tobet, S A; King, J C; Rubin, B S; Stopa, E G

    1999-05-01

    Studies in fetal brain tissue of rodents, nonhuman primates and birds have demonstrated that cells containing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) migrate from the olfactory placode across the nasal septum into the forebrain. The purpose of this study was to examine GnRH neurons in components of the adult and fetal human olfactory system. In the adult human brain (n=4), immunoreactive GnRH was evident within diffusely scattered cell bodies and processes in the olfactory bulb, olfactory nerve, olfactory cortex, and nervus terminalis located on the anterior surface of the gyrus rectus. GnRH-immunoreactive structures showed a similar distribution in 20-week human fetal brains (n=2), indicating that the migration of GnRH neurons is complete at this time. In 10-11-week fetal brains (n=2), more cells were noted in the nasal cavity than in the brain. Our data are consistent with observations made in other species, confirming olfactory derivation and migration of GnRH neurons into the brain from the olfactory placode. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. The language of geometry: Fast comprehension of geometrical primitives and rules in human adults and preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalric, Marie; Wang, Liping; Figueira, Santiago; Sigman, Mariano; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    During language processing, humans form complex embedded representations from sequential inputs. Here, we ask whether a “geometrical language” with recursive embedding also underlies the human ability to encode sequences of spatial locations. We introduce a novel paradigm in which subjects are exposed to a sequence of spatial locations on an octagon, and are asked to predict future locations. The sequences vary in complexity according to a well-defined language comprising elementary primitives and recursive rules. A detailed analysis of error patterns indicates that primitives of symmetry and rotation are spontaneously detected and used by adults, preschoolers, and adult members of an indigene group in the Amazon, the Munduruku, who have a restricted numerical and geometrical lexicon and limited access to schooling. Furthermore, subjects readily combine these geometrical primitives into hierarchically organized expressions. By evaluating a large set of such combinations, we obtained a first view of the language needed to account for the representation of visuospatial sequences in humans, and conclude that they encode visuospatial sequences by minimizing the complexity of the structured expressions that capture them. PMID:28125595

  4. A pneumatic phantom for mimicking respiration-induced artifacts in spinal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tillieux, Philippe; Topfer, Ryan; Foias, Alexandru; Leroux, Iris; El Maâchi, Imanne; Leblond, Hugues; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2018-01-01

    To design a phantom capable of mimicking human respiration to serve as a testing platform for correction of the static and time-evolving magnetic field distortions typically encountered in MRI of the spinal cord. An inflation system to mimic the air variation of the human lungs was constructed. The inflation system was linked to a phantom containing synthetic lungs and an ex vivo human spine. The relationship between air pressure and phantom lung volume was evaluated via imaging experiment. The geometric distortion (pseudo-displacement) caused by the B0 inhomogeneities was measured on echo planar imaging slices for different air volumes. Linear and quadratic relations linking air pressure to phantom lung volume were observed with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99. Air distribution was uneven across the synthetic lungs, exhibiting a left-to-right lung volume ratio of up to 5/4. The pseudo-displacement artifact of the spine caused by the air-filled lungs was observed. The proposed phantom can reproduce the lung volume variation of human respiration and thus can serve as a reliable testing platform for the correction of the associated time-varying B 0 field distortions. Details of the construction and code for the inflation system microcontroller are available for download as open source. Magn Reson Med 79:600-605, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations in CT for the study of the surface air kerma and energy imparted to phantoms of varying size and position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés Lucas, P.; Dance, D. R.; Castellano, I. A.; Vañó, E.

    2004-04-01

    A Monte Carlo computational model of CT has been developed and used to investigate the effect of various physical factors on the surface air kerma length product, the peak surface air kerma, the air kerma length product within a phantom and the energy imparted. The factors investigated were the bow-tie filter and the size, shape and position of a phantom which simulates the patient. The calculations show that the surface air kerma length product and the maximum surface air kerma are mainly dependent on phantom position and decrease along the vertical axis of the CT plane as the phantom surface moves away from the isocentre along this axis. As a result, measurements using standard body dosimetry phantoms may underestimate the skin dose for real patients. This result is specially important for CT fluoroscopic procedures: for an adult patient the peak skin dose can be 37% higher than that estimated with a standard measurement on the body AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) phantom. The results also show that the energy imparted to a phantom is mainly influenced by phantom size and is nearly independent of phantom position (within 3%) and shape (up to 5% variation). However, variations of up to 30% were found for the air kerma to regions within the AAPM body phantom when it is moved vertically. This highlights the importance of calculating doses to organs taking into account their size and position within the gantry.

  6. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nemolato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1. At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4.

  7. Cortical surface area and cortical thickness in the precuneus of adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, E; Román, F J; de la Cuétara, J M; Martin-Loeches, M; Colom, R

    2015-02-12

    The precuneus has received considerable attention in the last decade, because of its cognitive functions, its role as a central node of the brain networks, and its involvement in neurodegenerative processes. Paleoneurological studies suggested that form changes in the deep parietal areas represent a major character associated with the origin of the modern human brain morphology. A recent neuroanatomical survey based on shape analysis suggests that the proportions of the precuneus are also a determinant source of overall brain geometrical differences among adult individuals, influencing the brain spatial organization. Here, we evaluate the variation of cortical thickness and cortical surface area of the precuneus in a sample of adult humans, and their relation with geometry and cognition. Precuneal thickness and surface area are not correlated. There is a marked individual variation. The right precuneus is thinner and larger than the left one, but there are relevant fluctuating asymmetries, with only a modest correlation between the hemispheres. Males have a thicker cortex but differences in cortical area are not significant between sexes. The surface area of the precuneus shows a positive allometry with the brain surface area, although the correlation is modest. The dilation/contraction of the precuneus, described as a major factor of variability within adult humans, is associated with absolute increase/decrease of its surface, but not with variation in thickness. Precuneal thickness, precuneal surface area and precuneal morphology are not correlated with psychological factors such as intelligence, working memory, attention control, and processing speed, stressing further possible roles of this area in supporting default mode functions. Beyond gross morphology, the processes underlying the large phenotypic variation of the precuneus must be further investigated through specific cellular analyses, aimed at considering differences in cellular size, density

  8. Evidence for a stem cell hierarchy in the adult human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, René; Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2007-01-01

    Cellular pathways that contribute to adult human mammary gland architecture and lineages have not been previously described. In this study, we identify a candidate stem cell niche in ducts and zones containing progenitor cells in lobules. Putative stem cells residing in ducts were essentially...... in laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels. Staining for the lineage markers keratins K14 and K19 further revealed multipotent cells in the stem cell zone and three lineage-restricted cell types outside this zone. Multiparameter cell sorting and functional characterization with reference to anatomical sites...

  9. Annihilation photon acollinearity in PET: volunteer and phantom FDG studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Kengo [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Toshikazu [Department of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuda, Tomoaki [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Inadama, Naoko [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2007-09-07

    Annihilation photon acollinearity is a fundamental but little investigated problem in positron emission tomography (PET). In this paper, the cause of the angular deviation from 180.00{sup 0} is described as well as how to evaluate it under conditions of a spatially distributed radiation source and a limited acquisition time for the human body. A relationship between the shape of the photopeak spectrum and the angular distribution is formulated using conservation laws of momentum and energy over the pair annihilation. Then the formula is used to evaluate the acollinearity for a pool phantom and the human body with FDG injected. The angular distribution for the pool phantom agrees well with that for pure water which had been directly measured by Colombino et al in 1965 (Nuovo Cimento 38 707-23), and also with that for the human body determined in this study. Pure water can be considered as a good approximation of the human body regarding the angular deviation. The blurring coefficient to be multiplied by the ring diameter in calculations of the PET spatial resolution is experimentally determined for the first time as 0.00243 {+-} 0.00014; this is 10% larger than the value widely used by investigators.

  10. Development of an improved approach to radiation treatment therapy using high-definition patient-specific voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, R.C.; Ryman, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Stallings, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Through an internally funded project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a high-resolution phantom was developed based on the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Data. Special software was written using the interactive data language (IDL) visualization language to automatically segment and classify some of the organs and the skeleton of the Visible Male. A high definition phantom consisting of nine hundred 512 x 512 slices was constructed of the entire torso. Computed tomography (CT) images of a patient's tumor near the spine were scaled and morphed into the phantom model to create a patient-specific phantom. Calculations of dose to the tumor and surrounding tissue were then performed using the patient-specific phantom

  11. A dynamic phantom for radionuclide renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test a dynamic phantom simulating radionuclide renography. The phantom consisted of five partly lead covered plastic containers simulating kidneys, heart, bladder and background (soft tissues, liver and spleen). Dynamics were performed with multiple movable steel plates between containers and a gamma camera. Control of the plates is performed manually with a stopwatch following exact time schedules. The containers were filled with activities ( 99m Tc) which produce count rates close to clinical situations. Count rates produced by the phantom were compared with ten clinical renography cases: five 99m Tc MAG3 and five 99m Tc DTPA examinations. Two phantom simulations were repeated three times with separate fillings, acquisitions and analyses. Precision errors as a coefficient of variation (CV) of repeated measurements were calculated and theoretical values were compared with the corresponding measured ones. A multicentre comparison was made between 19 nuclear medicine laboratories and three clinical cases were simulated with the phantom. Correlations between count rates produced by the phantom and clinical studies were r=0.964 for 99m Tc MAG3 (p 99m Tc DTPA (p max was 4.0±1.6%. Images and curves of the scanned phantom were close to a real patient in all 19 laboratories but calculated parameters varied: the difference between theoretical and measured values for T max was 6.8±6.2%. The difference between laboratories is most probably due to variations in acquisition protocols and analysis programs: 19 laboratories with 18 different protocols and 8 different programs. The dynamics were found to be repeatable and suitable for calibration purposes for radionuclide renography programs and protocols as well as for multicentre comparisons. (author)

  12. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, Anne; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-01-01

    to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers......, highlighting the importance of selecting appropriate normalizing genes as comparative measurements can yield variable results when different normalizing genes are employed. Based on our results, we recommend using RPS20, RPS29 or SRSF4 when analysing relative gene expression levels in human testis...... and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further...

  13. Radiological response and dosimetry in physical phantom of head and neck for 3D conformational radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larissa

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are tools for simulation of organs and tissues of the human body in radiology and radiotherapy. This thesis describes the development, validation and, most importantly, the use of a physical head and neck phantom in radiology and radiotherapy, with the purpose of evaluating dose distribution using Gafchromic EBT2 film in 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy. The work was divided in two stages, (1) development of new equivalent tissues and improvement of the physical phantom, and (2) use of the physical phantom in experimental dosimetry studies. In phase (1) parameters such as mass density, chemical composition of tissues, anatomical and biometric measurements were considered, as well as aspects of imaging by computed tomography (CT) and radiological response representation in Hounsfield Units (HU), which were compared with human data. Radiological experiments of in-phantom simulated brain pathologies were also conducted. All those results matched human-sourced data, therefore the physical phantom is a suitable simulator that may be used to enhance radiological protocols and education in medical imaging. The main objective in phase (2) was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution in a brain tumor simulator inserted inside the head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI), exposed to 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy, for internal dose assessment. Radiation planning was based on CT images of the physical phantom with a brain tumor simulator made with equivalent material. The treatment planning system (TPS), CAT3D software, used CT images and prescribed a dose of 200 cGy, distributed in three fields of radiation, in a T-shaped pattern. The TPS covered the planning treatment volume (PTV) with 97% of the prescribed dose. A solid water phantom and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for calibration procedures, generating a dose response curve as a function of optical density (OD). After calibration and irradiation, the film

  14. 40 CFR 26.1704 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted before April 7, 2006. 26.1704 Section 26.1704 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS...

  15. 40 CFR 26.1705 - Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of reliance on unethical human research with non-pregnant, non-nursing adults conducted after April 7, 2006. 26.1705 Section 26.1705 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS...

  16. Individual virtual phantom reconstruction for organ dosimetry based on standard available phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babapour Mofrad, F.; Aghaeizadeh Zoroofi, R.; Abbaspour Tehran Fard, A.; Akhlaghpoor, Sh.; Chen, Y. W.; Sato, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear medicine application often it is required to use computational methods for evaluation of organ absorbed dose. Monte Carlo Simulation and phantoms have been used in many works before. The shape, size and volume In organs are varied, and this variation will produce error in dose calculation if no correction is applied. Materials and Methods: A computational framework for constructing individual phantom for dosimetry was performed on five liver CT scan data sets of Japanese normal individuals. The Zubal phantom was used as an original phantom to be adjusted by each individual data set. This registration was done by Spherical Harmonics and Thin-Plate Spline methods. Hausdorff distance was calculated for each case. Results: Result of Hausdorff distance for five lndividual phantoms showed that before registration ranged from 140.9 to 192.1, and after registration it changed to 52.5 to 76.7. This was caused by Index similarity ranged from %56.4 to %70.3. Conclusion: A new and automatic three-dimensional (3D) phantom construction approach was-suggested for individual internal dosimetry simulation via Spherical Harmonics and Thin-Plate Spline methods. The results showed that the Individual comparable phantom can be calculated with acceptable accuracy using geometric registration. This method could be used for race-specific statistical phantom modeling with major application in nuclear medicine for absorbed dose calculation.

  17. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, I.V.B., E-mail: isabelle.lacerda@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J.W. [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife (Brazil); Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  18. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, I.V.B.; Vieira, J.W.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was