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Sample records for adult human mesenchymal

  1. Differentiation of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into Schwann-like cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-ye; ZHENG Jia-kun; WANG Chao-yang; LI Wen-yu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differentiative capability of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into Schwann-like cells. Methods: Bone marrows were aspirated from healthy donors and mononuclear cells were separated by Percoll lymphocytes separation liquid (1.073 g/ml) with centrifugation, cells were cultured in DMEM/F12 (1:1) medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 20 ng/ml epidermal growth factor (EGF) and 20 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cells of passage 1 were identified with immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: Bone marrow contains the stem cells with the ability of differentiating into Schwann-like cells, which may represent an alternative stem cell sources for neural transplantation.

  2. Adult human nasal mesenchymal-like stem cells restore cochlear spiral ganglion neurons after experimental lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas R; Lumbreras, Vicente; Rajguru, Suhrud; Goss, Garrett; Hare, Joshua M; Goldstein, Bradley J

    2014-03-01

    A loss of sensory hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons from the inner ear causes deafness, affecting millions of people. Currently, there is no effective therapy to repair the inner ear sensory structures in humans. Cochlear implantation can restore input, but only if auditory neurons remain intact. Efforts to develop stem cell-based treatments for deafness have demonstrated progress, most notably utilizing embryonic-derived cells. In an effort to bypass limitations of embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells that may impede the translation to clinical applications, we sought to utilize an alternative cell source. Here, we show that adult human mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) obtained from nasal tissue can repair spiral ganglion loss in experimentally lesioned cochlear cultures from neonatal rats. Stem cells engraft into gentamicin-lesioned organotypic cultures and orchestrate the restoration of the spiral ganglion neuronal population, involving both direct neuronal differentiation and secondary effects on endogenous cells. As a physiologic assay, nasal MSC-derived cells engrafted into lesioned spiral ganglia demonstrate responses to infrared laser stimulus that are consistent with those typical of excitable cells. The addition of a pharmacologic activator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway concurrent with stem cell treatment promoted robust neuronal differentiation. The availability of an effective adult autologous cell source for inner ear tissue repair should contribute to efforts to translate cell-based strategies to the clinic. PMID:24172073

  3. Low/Negative Expression of PDGFR-α Identifies the Candidate Primary Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Adult Human Bone Marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongzhe; Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Zacharaki, Dimitra;

    2014-01-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) contains a rare population of nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which are of central importance for the hematopoietic microenvironment. However, the precise phenotypic definition of these cells in adult BM has not yet been reported. In this study, we show...... cells exhibited high levels of genes associated with mesenchymal lineages and HSC supportive function. Moreover, lin(-)/CD45(-)/CD271(+)/CD140a(low/-) cells effectively mediated the ex vivo expansion of transplantable CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these data indicate that CD140a is a...

  4. Immunomodulatory properties of human adult and fetal multipotent mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytwu Huey-Kang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, a large number of studies have contributed to our understanding of the immunomodulatory mechanisms used by multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Initially isolated from the bone marrow (BM, MSCs have been found in many tissues but the strong immunomodulatory properties are best studied in BM MSCs. The immunomodulatory effects of BM MSCs are wide, extending to T lymphocytes and dendritic cells, and are therapeutically useful for treatment of immune-related diseases including graft-versus-host disease as well as possibly autoimmune diseases. However, BM MSCs are very rare cells and require an invasive procedure for procurement. Recently, MSCs have also been found in fetal-stage embryo-proper and extra-embryonic tissues, and these human fetal MSCs (F-MSCs have a higher proliferative profile, and are capable of multilineage differentiation as well as exert strong immunomodulatory effects. As such, these F-MSCs can be viewed as alternative sources of MSCs. We review here the current understanding of the mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory properties of BM MSCs and F-MSCs. An increase in our understanding of MSC suppressor mechanisms will offer insights for prevalent clinical use of these versatile adult stem cells in the near future.

  5. Chondrogenic potential of human adult mesenchymal stem cells is independent of age or osteoarthritis etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharstuhl, A.; Schewe, B.; Benz, K.; Gaissmaier, C.; Bühring, H.J.; Stoop, R.

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease strongly correlated with history of joint trauma, joint dysplasia, and advanced age. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cells for biological cartilage regeneration. Conflicting data have been published concerning the availability of MSCs from

  6. Preliminary Study on Biological Properties of Adult Human Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tao; BAI Hai; WANG Jingchang; SHI Jingyun; WANG Cunbang; LU Jihong; OU Jianfeng; WANG Qian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method of culture and expansion of adult human bone marrow-derived MSCs in vitro and to explore their biological properties. Methods: Mononuclear cells were obtained from 5 mL adult human bone marrow by density gradient centrifugation with Percoll solution. Adult human MSCs were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium with low glucose (LG-DMEM) containing 10% fetal calf serum at a density of 2× 105 cell/cm2. The morphocytology was observed under phase-contrast microscope. The cell growth was measured by MTT method. The flow cytometer was performed to examine the expression of cell surface molecules and cell cycle. The ultrastructure of MSCs was observed under transmission electron microscope. The immunomodulatory functions of MSCs were measured by MTT method. The effects of MSCs on the growth of K562 cells and the dynamic change of HA, Ⅳ-C, LN concentration in the culture supernatant of MSCs was also observed. Results: The MSCs harvested in this study were homogenous population and exhibited a spindle-shaped fibroblastic morphology. The cell growth curve showed that MSCs had a strong ability of proliferation. The cells were positive for CD44,while negative for hematopoietic cell surface marker such as CD3, CD4, CD7, CD13, CD14, CD15, CD19,CD22, CD33, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR, which was closely related to graft versus host disease. Above 90% cells of MSCs were found at G0/G1 phase. The ultrastructure of MSCs indicated that there were plenty of cytoplasmic organelles. Allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes proliferation was suppressed by MSCs and the inhibition ratio was 60.68% (P<0.01). The suppressive effect was also existed in the culture supernatant of MSCs and the inhibition ratio was 9.00% (P<0.05). When lymphocytes were stimulated by PHA, the suppression effects of the culture supernatant were even stronger and the inhibition ratio was 20.91%(P<0.01). Compared with the cell growth curve of the K562 cells alone, the K562

  7. Establishment of human-rhesus chimeric liver using adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells%应用成人骨髓间充质干细胞建立人-猴肝脏嵌合体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何保丽; 马丽花; 陈丽玲; 刘汝文; 杨仁华

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Human-mammal chimeric liver chimera has been a vital significance for the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. OBJECTIVE:To establish an animal model of human-rhesus chimeric liver using adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. METHODS:Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, purified and cultured for the sixth generation. The number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was no less than 5×108. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells labeled with green fluorescent protein were transplanted into the liver of the embryo rhesus with pregnancy of 10 weeks under guided by type-B ultrasound. At the 1st and 3rd months of birth, the liver tissue of the infant rhesus was taken for biopsy. After routine pathological section, histological specimens were observed under fluorescence microscope to confirm if there were adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells positive for green fluorescent protein and their distribution, and detected by immunohistochemical staining to identify if human albumin expressed in the liver of infant rhesus. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Fluorescence microscope observation indicated that at the 1st and 3rd months after birth, there were surviving bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells derived from human with green fluorescence in the liver of infant rhesus, and these cells migrated to form more concentrated distribution. The immunohistochemical results demonstrated that functional liver cells expressing human albumin were observed in the liver of infant rhesus at the 1st and 3rd months after birth, and their distribution was in accordance with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with green fluorescence. Human-rhesus chimeric liver can be established using adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which can generate functional liver cells in the liver of infant rhesus.%BACKGROUND:Human-mammal chimeric liver chimera has been a vital significance for the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow

  8. Adult Human Nasal Mesenchymal-Like Stem Cells Restore Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons After Experimental Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas R.; Lumbreras, Vicente; Rajguru, Suhrud; Goss, Garrett; Hare, Joshua M.; Goldstein, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    A loss of sensory hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons from the inner ear causes deafness, affecting millions of people. Currently, there is no effective therapy to repair the inner ear sensory structures in humans. Cochlear implantation can restore input, but only if auditory neurons remain intact. Efforts to develop stem cell-based treatments for deafness have demonstrated progress, most notably utilizing embryonic-derived cells. In an effort to bypass limitations of embryonic or induced p...

  9. Isolation of adult human pluripotent stem cells from mesenchymal cell populations and their application to liver damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2012-01-01

    We have found a novel type of pluripotent stem cells, Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells that can be isolated from mesenchymal cell populations. Muse cells are characterized by stress tolerance, expression of pluripotency markers, self-renewal, and the ability to differentiate into endodermal-, mesodermal-, and ectodermal-lineage cells from a single cell, demonstrating that they are pluripotent stem cells. They can be isolated as cells positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, a human pluripotent stem cell marker. Here, we introduce the isolation method for Muse cells and the effect of transplantation of these cells on chronic liver diseases. PMID:22167642

  10. Chromatin remodeling agent trichostatin A: a key-factor in the hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived of adult bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinken Mathieu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC derived of adult bone marrow to undergo in vitro hepatic differentiation was investigated. Results Exposure of hMSC to a cocktail of hepatogenic factors [(fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, insulin-transferrin-sodium-selenite (ITS and dexamethasone] failed to induce hepatic differentiation. Sequential exposure to these factors (FGF-4, followed by HGF, followed by HGF+ITS+dexamethasone, however, resembling the order of secretion during liver embryogenesis, induced both glycogen-storage and cytokeratin (CK18 expression. Additional exposure of the cells to trichostatin A (TSA considerably improved endodermal differentiation, as evidenced by acquisition of an epithelial morphology, chronological expression of hepatic proteins, including hepatocyte-nuclear factor (HNF-3β, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, CK18, albumin (ALB, HNF1α, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα, and functional maturation, i.e. upregulated ALB secretion, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP-dependent activity. Conclusion hMSC are able to undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. TSA is hereby essential to promote differentiation of hMSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells.

  11. Ectopically hTERT expressing adult human mesenchymal stem cells are less radiosensitive than their telomerase negative counterpart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past several years increasing evidence indicating that the proliferation capacity of mammalian cells is highly radiosensitive, regardless of the species and the tissue of origin of the cells, has accumulated. It has also been shown that normal bone marrow cells of mice have a similar radiosensitivity to other mammalian cells so far tested. In this study, we investigated the genetic effects of ionizing radiation (2.5-15 Gy) on normal human mesenchymal stem cells and their telomerised counterpart hMSC-telo1. We evaluated overall genomic integrity, DNA damage/repair by applying a fluorescence-detected alkaline DNA unwinding assay together with Western blot analyses for phosphorylated H2AX and Q-FISH was applied for investigation of telomeric damage. Our results indicate that hMSC and TERT-immortalized hMSCs can cope with relatively high doses of γ-rays and that overall DNA repair is similar in the two cell lines. The telomeres were extensively destroyed after irradiation in both cell types suggesting that telomere caps are especially sensitive to radiation. The TERT-immortalized hMSCs showed higher stability at telomeric regions than primary hMSCs indicating that cells with long telomeres and high telomerase activity have the advantage of re-establishing the telomeric caps

  12. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May;

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  13. Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Radiation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Juliann G

    2016-08-01

    Recent understanding of the cellular and molecular signaling activations in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has provided new insights into their potential clinical applications, particularly for tissue repair and regeneration. This review focuses on these advances, specifically in the context of self-renewal for tissue repair and recovery after radiation injury. Thus far, MSCs have been characterized extensively and shown to be useful in mitigation and therapy for acute radiation syndrome and cognitive dysfunction. Use of MSCs for treating radiation injury alone or in combination with additional trauma is foreseeable. PMID:27356065

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Fetal (Wharton's Jelly and Adult (Adipose Tissue Origin during Prolonged In Vitro Expansion: Considerations for Cytotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Christodoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are somatic cells with a dual capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, and diverse therapeutic applicability, both experimentally and in the clinic. These cells can be isolated from various human tissues that may differ anatomically or developmentally with relative ease. Heterogeneity due to biological origin or in vitro manipulation is, nevertheless, considerable and may equate to differences in qualitative and quantitative characteristics which can prove crucial for successful therapeutic use. With this in mind, in the present study we have evaluated the proliferation kinetics and phenotypic characteristics of MSCs derived from two abundant sources, that is, fetal umbilical cord matrix (Wharton's jelly and adult adipose tissue (termed WJSC and ADSC, resp. during prolonged in vitro expansion, a process necessary for obtaining cell numbers sufficient for clinical application. Our results show that WJSC are derived with relatively high efficiency and bear a substantially increased proliferation capacity whilst largely sustaining the expression of typical immunophenotypic markers, whereas ADSC exhibit a reduced proliferation potential showing typical signs of senescence at an early stage. By combining kinetic with phenotypic data we identify culture thresholds up to which both cell types maintain their stem properties, and we discuss the practical implications of their differences.

  15. In-vivo generation of bone via endochondral ossification by in-vitro chondrogenic priming of adult human and rat mesenchymal stem cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farrell, Eric

    2011-01-31

    Abstract Background Bone grafts are required to repair large bone defects after tumour resection or large trauma. The availability of patients\\' own bone tissue that can be used for these procedures is limited. Thus far bone tissue engineering has not lead to an implant which could be used as alternative in bone replacement surgery. This is mainly due to problems of vascularisation of the implanted tissues leading to core necrosis and implant failure. Recently it was discovered that embryonic stem cells can form bone via the endochondral pathway, thereby turning in-vitro created cartilage into bone in-vivo. In this study we investigated the potential of human adult mesenchymal stem cells to form bone via the endochondral pathway. Methods MSCs were cultured for 28 days in chondrogenic, osteogenic or control medium prior to implantation. To further optimise this process we induced mineralisation in the chondrogenic constructs before implantation by changing to osteogenic medium during the last 7 days of culture. Results After 8 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in mice, bone and bone marrow formation was observed in 8 of 9 constructs cultured in chondrogenic medium. No bone was observed in any samples cultured in osteogenic medium. Switch to osteogenic medium for 7 days prevented formation of bone in-vivo. Addition of β-glycerophosphate to chondrogenic medium during the last 7 days in culture induced mineralisation of the matrix and still enabled formation of bone and marrow in both human and rat MSC cultures. To determine whether bone was formed by the host or by the implanted tissue we used an immunocompetent transgenic rat model. Thereby we found that osteoblasts in the bone were almost entirely of host origin but the osteocytes are of both host and donor origin. Conclusions The preliminary data presented in this manuscript demonstrates that chondrogenic priming of MSCs leads to bone formation in vivo using both human and rat cells. Furthermore, addition of

  16. Viscoelastic behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells

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    Leong Kam W

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we have investigated the viscoelastic behaviour of individual human adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs and the role of F-actin filaments in maintaining these properties, using micropipette aspiration technique together with a standard linear viscoelastic solid model. Results Under a room temperature of 20°C, the instantaneous and equilibrium Young's modulus, E0 and E∞, were found to be 886 ± 289 Pa and 372 ± 125 Pa, respectively, while the apparent viscosity, μ, was 2710 ± 1630 Pa·s. hMSCs treated with cytochalasin D up to 20 μM at 20°C registered significant drop of up to 84% in stiffness and increase of up to 255% in viscosity. At the physiological temperature of 37°C, E0 and E∞ have decreased by 42–66% whereas μ has increased by 95%, compared to the control. Majority of the hMSCs behave as viscoelastic solid with a rapid initial increase in aspiration length and it gradually levels out with time. Three other types of non-typical viscoelastic behavior of hMSCs were also seen. Conclusion hMSCs behave as viscoelastic solid. Its viscoelstic behaviour are dependent on the structural integrity of the F-actin filaments and temperature.

  17. Induction of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells into functional astrocyte-like cells: potential for restorative treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahat-Stroomza, Merav; Barhum, Yael; Levy, Yossef S; Karpov, Olga; Bulvik, Shlomo; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with its motor phenomena due mostly to loss of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra. Pharmacological treatments aimed to increase the deficient dopaminergic neurotransmission are effective in ameliorating the cardinal symptoms, but none of these therapies is curative. It has been suggested that treatment with neurotrophic factors (NTFs) might protect and prevent death of the surviving dopaminergic neurons and induce proliferation of their axonal nerve terminals with reinnervations of the deafferented striatum. However, long-term delivery of such proteins into the CNS is problematic. We therefore aimed to differentiate ex vivo human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into astrocyte-like cells, capable of generating NTFs for future transplantation into basal ganglia of PD patients. Indeed, mesenchymal stromal cells treated with our novel astrocyte differentiation medium, present astrocyte-like morphology and express the astrocyte markers S100beta, glutamine synthetase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Moreover, these astrocyte-like cells produce and secrete significant amounts of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor as indicated by messenger RNA, real-time polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and Western blot analyses. Such NTF-producing cells transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, a model of PD, produced a progressive reduction in the apomorphine-induced contralateral rotations as well as behavioral improvement in rotor-rod and the "sunflower seeds" eating motor tests. Histological assessments revealed that the engrafted cells survived and expressed astrocyte and human markers and acted to regenerate the damaged dopaminergic nerve terminal system. Findings indicate that our novel procedure to induce NTF-producing astrocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow stromal cells

  18. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived From Limb Bud Can Differentiate into All Three Embryonic Germ Layers Lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Fei; Wang, Juan; Dong, Zhao-lun; Wu, Min-juan; Zhao, Ting-bao; Li, Dan-Dan; Xin WANG

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from many sources, including adults and fetuses. Previous studies have demonstrated that, compared with their adult counterpart, fetal MSCs with several remarkable advantages may be a better resource for clinical applications. In this study, we successfully isolated a rapidly proliferating cell population from limb bud of aborted fetus and termed them “human limb bud–derived mesenchymal stem cells” (hLB-MSCs). Characteristics of their morpholog...

  19. Stemness Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Placentas According to Developmental Stage: Comparison to Those from Adult Bone Marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Hwa Jung; Hong, Soon Cheol; Yoo, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jee Hyun; Shin, Hye Jin; Choi, In Young; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Kim, Sun Haeng; Park, Yong; Kim, Byung Soo

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate the stemness of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from placenta according to the development stage and to compare the results to those from adult bone marrow (BM). Based on the source of hMSCs, three groups were defined: group I included term placentas, group II included first-trimester placentas, and group III included adult BM samples. The stemness was evaluated by the proliferation capacity, immunophenotypic expression, mesoderm differentiation, e...

  20. Transcriptomic portrait of human Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem cells isolated from bone marrow and placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Roson-Burgo, Beatriz; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; del Cañizo, Consuelo; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent cells that behave in a highly plastic manner, inhabiting the stroma of several tissues. The potential utility of MSCs is nowadays strongly investigated in the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy, although many questions about their molecular identity remain uncertain. Results MSC primary cultures from human bone marrow (BM) and placenta (PL) were derived and verified by their immunophenotype standard patt...

  1. The mesenchymal transcription factor SNAI-1 instructs human liver specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Orit; Valdes, Victor Julian; Ezhkova, Elena; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are processes required for embryo organogenesis. Liver develops from the epithelial foregut endoderm from which the liver progenitors, hepatoblasts, are specified. The migrating hepatoblasts acquire a mesenchymal phenotype to form the liver bud. In mid-gestation, hepatoblasts mature into epithelial structures: the hepatocyte cords and biliary ducts. While EMT has been associated with liver bud formation, nothing is known about its contribution to hepatic specification. We previously established an efficient protocol from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to generate hepatic cells (Hep cells) resembling the hepatoblasts expressing alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin (ALB). Here we show that Hep cells express both epithelial (EpCAM and E-cadherin) and mesenchymal (vimentin and SNAI-1) markers. Similar epithelial and mesenchymal hepatoblasts were identified in human and mouse fetal livers, suggesting a conserved interspecies phenotype. Knock-down experiments demonstrated the importance of SNAI-1 in Hep cell hepatic specification. Moreover, ChIP assays revealed direct binding of SNAI-1 in the promoters of AFP and ALB genes consistent with its transcriptional activator function in hepatic specification. Altogether, our hESC-derived Hep cell cultures reveal the dual mesenchymal and epithelial phenotype of hepatoblast-like cells and support the unexpected transcriptional activator role of SNAI-1 in hepatic specification. PMID:27240252

  2. Heterogeneous Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Response to Extended Culture in Extracellular Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Jose A Santiago; Pogemiller, Ryan; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins (ECMs) guide differentiation of adult stem cells, but the temporal distribution of differentiation (i.e., heterogeneity) in a given population has not been investigated. We tested the effect of individual ECM proteins on lineage commitment of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) over time. We exposed stem cell populations to ECM proteins representing the primary tissue structures of the body (i.e., collagens type I, III, IV; laminin; and fibron...

  3. Human mesenchymal stem cells - current trends and future prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Imran; Subbarao, Raghavendra Baregundi; Rho, Gyu Jin

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are cells specialized cell, capable of renewing themselves through cell division and can differentiate into multi-lineage cells. These cells are categorized as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and adult stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which can be isolated from human and animal sources. Human MSCs (hMSCs) are the non-haematopoietic, multipotent stem cells with the capacity to differentiate into mesodermal lineage such as osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes as well ectodermal (neurocytes) and endodermal lineages (hepatocytes). MSCs express cell surface markers like cluster of differentiation (CD)29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105 and lack the expression of CD14, CD34, CD45 and HLA (human leucocyte antigen)-DR. hMSCs for the first time were reported in the bone marrow and till now they have been isolated from various tissues, including adipose tissue, amniotic fluid, endometrium, dental tissues, umbilical cord and Wharton's jelly which harbours potential MSCs. hMSCs have been cultured long-term in specific media without any severe abnormalities. Furthermore, MSCs have immunomodulatory features, secrete cytokines and immune-receptors which regulate the microenvironment in the host tissue. Multilineage potential, immunomodulation and secretion of anti-inflammatory molecules makes MSCs an effective tool in the treatment of chronic diseases. In the present review, we have highlighted recent research findings in the area of hMSCs sources, expression of cell surface markers, long-term in vitro culturing, in vitro differentiation potential, immunomodulatory features, its homing capacity, banking and cryopreservation, its application in the treatment of chronic diseases and its use in clinical trials. PMID:25797907

  4. Migration capacity of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells towards glioma in vivo*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cungang Fan; Dongliang Wang; Qingjun Zhang; Jingru Zhou

    2013-01-01

    High-grade glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. The poor prognosis of glioma, combined with a resistance to currently available treatments, necessitates the ment of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem cel-based therapies are emerging as novel cel-based delivery vehicle for therapeutic agents. In the present study, we successful y isolated human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s by explant culture. The human umbilical cord senchymal stem cel s were adherent to plastic surfaces, expressed specific surface phenotypes of mesenchymal stem cel s as demonstrated by flow cytometry, and possessed multi-differentiation potentials in permissive induction media in vitro. Furthermore, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s demonstrated excel ent glioma-specific targeting capacity in established rat glioma models after intratumoral injection or contralateral ventricular administration in vivo. The excellent glioma-specific targeting ability and extensive intratumoral distribution of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s indicate that they may serve as a novel cel ular vehicle for delivering the-rapeutic molecules in glioma therapy.

  5. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Steven F. T. Thijsen; Leontine van Elden; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children ...

  6. Nanoscale Mechanical Stimulation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nikukar

    2014-05-01

    We observed significant responses after 1 and 2-week stimulations in cell number, cell shapes and phenotypical markers. Microarray was performed for all groups. Cell count showed normal cell growth with stimulation. However, cell surface area, cell perimeter, and arboration after 1-week stimulation showed significant increases. Immunofluorescent studies have showed significant increase in osteocalcin production after stimulation. Conclusions: Nanoscale mechanical vibration showed significant changes in human mesenchymal stem cell behaviours. Cell morphology changed to become more polygonal and increased expression of the osteoblast markers were noted. These findings with gene regulation changes suggesting nanoscale mechanostimulation has stimulated osteoblastogenesis.  Keywords:  Mesenchymal, Nanoscale, Stem Cells.

  7. Human mesenchymal stem cells: from basic biology to clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, B M; Kassem, M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  8. The effects of Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}–Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} ceramics on adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Aza, Piedad N., E-mail: piedad@umh.es [Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Avda. Universidad s/n, 03202 Elche, Alicante (Spain); García-Bernal, David, E-mail: redond@gmail.com [Centro Integrado de Investigación Biomédica (CEIB), Universidad de Murcia, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Cragnolini, Francesca, E-mail: dott.ssa_franci@hotmail.it [Centro Integrado de Investigación Biomédica (CEIB), Universidad de Murcia, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Velasquez, Pablo, E-mail: pvlasquez@umh.es [Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Avda. Universidad s/n, 03202 Elche, Alicante (Spain); Meseguer-Olmo, Luis, E-mail: lmeseguer.doc@gmail.com [Centro Integrado de Investigación Biomédica (CEIB), Universidad de Murcia, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Unidad de Bioingeniería ósea, Servicio de Cirugía Ortopédica, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Universidad de Murcia, 30120 Murcia (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Bioceramic samples with osteogenic properties, suitable for use in the regeneration of hard tissue, were synthesized. The materials consisting of α-tricalcium phosphate (αTCP) and also αTCP doped with either 1.5 wt.% or 3.0 wt.% of dicalcium silicate (C{sub 2}S) in the system Dicalcium Silicate–Tricalcium Phosphate (C{sub 2}S–TCP) were obtained by solid state reaction. All materials were composed of a single phase, αTCP in the case of a pure material, or solid solution of C{sub 2}S in αTCP (αTCPss) for the doped αTCP. Viability, proliferation and in vitro osteoinductive capacity were investigated by seeding, adult mesenchymal stem cells of human origin (ahMSCs) which were CD73{sup +}, CD90{sup +}, CD105{sup +}, CD34{sup −} and CD45{sup −} onto the 3 substrates for 30 days. Results show a non-cytotoxic effect after applying an indirect apoptosis test (Annexin V/7-AAD staining), so ahMSCs adhered, spread, proliferated and produced extracellular matrix (Heparan-sulfate proteoglycan (HS) and osteopontin (OP)) on all the ceramics studied. Finally, the cells lost the cluster differentiation marker expression CD73, CD90 y CD105 characteristic of ahMSCs and they showed an osteoblastic phenotype (Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), Osteocalcin production (OC), Collagen type I expression (Col-I), and production of mineralization nodules on the extracellular matrix). These observations were more evident in the αTCP ceramic doped with 1.5 wt.% C{sub 2}S, indicating osteoblastic differentiation as a result of the increased concentration of solid solution of C{sub 2}S in αTCP (αTCPss). Overall, these results suggest that the ceramics studied are cytocompatible and they are able to induce osteoblastic differentiation of undifferentiated ahMSCs. - Highlights: • The ceramics studied are cytocompatible and show osteoinductive properties. • Results show a non-cytotoxic effect after applying an indirect apoptosis test. • ahMSCs adhered, spread, proliferated

  9. Derivation of multipotent mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells provide access to the earliest stages of human development and may serve as a source of specialized cells for regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes crucial to develop protocols for the directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells into tissue-restricted precursors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we present culture conditions for the derivation of unlimited numbers of pure mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells and demonstrate multilineage differentiation into fat, cartilage, bone, and skeletal muscle cells. CONCLUSION: Our findings will help to elucidate the mechanism of mesoderm specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation and provide a platform to efficiently generate specialized human mesenchymal cell types for future clinical applications.

  10. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.;

    2008-01-01

    used for MSC cultivation in animal studies simulating clinical stem cell therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Human mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from BM aspirates by density gradient centrifugation and cultivated in a GMP-accepted medium (EMEA medium) or in one of four other media. RESULTS: FACS...... compliant medium for MSC cultivation, expansion and differentiation. The expanded and differentiated MSCs can be used in autologous mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008......OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...

  11. Human Liver Cells Expressing Albumin and Mesenchymal Characteristics Give Rise to Insulin-Producing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Meivar-Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the pancreatic lineage in the liver has been suggested as a potential autologous cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients. Transcription factors-induced liver-to-pancreas reprogramming has been demonstrated in numerous species both in vivo and in vitro. However, human-derived liver cells capable of acquiring the alternate pancreatic repertoire have never been characterized. It is yet unknown whether hepatic-like stem cells or rather adult liver cells give rise to insulin-producing cells. Using an in vitro experimental system, we demonstrate that proliferating adherent human liver cells acquire mesenchymal-like characteristics and a considerable level of cellular plasticity. However, using a lineage-tracing approach, we demonstrate that insulin-producing cells are primarily generated in cells enriched for adult hepatic markers that coexpress both albumin and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, our data suggest that adult human hepatic tissue retains a substantial level of developmental plasticity, which could be exploited in regenerative medicine approaches.

  12. Hepatocytic Differentiation Potential of Human Fetal Liver Mesenchymal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Sokal, Etienne; Charbord, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In line with the search of effective stem cell population that would progress liver cell therapy and because the rate and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) decreases with age, the current study investigates the hepatogenic differentiation potential of human fetal liver MSCs (FL-MSCs). After isolation from 11-12 gestational weeks' human fetal livers, FL-MSCs were shown to express characteristic markers such as CD73, CD90, and CD146 and to display adipocytic and osteoblastic differentiation potential. Thereafter, we explored their hepatocytic differentiation potential using the hepatogenic protocol applied for adult human liver mesenchymal cells. FL-MSCs differentiated in this way displayed significant features of hepatocyte-like cells as demonstrated in vitro by the upregulated expression of specific hepatocytic markers and the induction of metabolic functions including CYP3A4 activity, indocyanine green uptake/release, and glucose 6-phosphatase activity. Following transplantation, naive and differentiated FL-MSC were engrafted into the hepatic parenchyma of newborn immunodeficient mice and differentiated in situ. Hence, FL-MSCs appeared to be interesting candidates to investigate the liver development at the mesenchymal compartment level. Standardization of their isolation, expansion, and differentiation may also support their use for liver cell-based therapy development. PMID:27057173

  13. Collagen scaffold remodeling by human mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, SJ; Chan, BP

    2011-01-01

    Type I collagen has been widely used as scaffold for tissue engineering because of its excellent biocompatibility and negligible immunogenicity. We previously have developed a collagen microencapsulation technology entrapping many cells including human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in microspheres made of nanofibrous collagen meshwork. Nevertheless, little is understood about how stem cells interact with and remodel the collagen meshwork. This study aims to investigate collagen remodeling by...

  14. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenneke E. M. Haas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination.

  15. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  16. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can...... modulators, makes them promising targets for immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment....... spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found that...

  17. Induction of adipocyte-like phenotype in human mesenchymal stem cells by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Trine; Abildtrup, Lisbeth Ann; Fogd, Kirsten;

    2004-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have the capacity to differentiate along several pathways to form bone, cartilage, tendon, muscle, and adipose tissues. The adult hMSCs reside in vivo in the bone marrow in niches where oxygen concentration is far below the ambient air, which is the most...... inclusions was observed. The effect of hypoxia on the expression of adipocyte-specific genes was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, neither of the two central regulators of adipogenesis--the transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor...

  18. Toll-Like Receptors on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Drive their Migration and Immunomodulating Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Coffelt, Seth B.; Waterman, Ruth S.; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2007-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are under study as therapeutic delivery agents that assist in the repair of damaged tissues. To achieve the desired clinical outcomes for this strategy requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that drive the recruitment, migration and engraftment of hMSCs to the targeted tissues. It is known that hMSCs are recruited to sites of stress or inflammation to fulfill their repair function. It is recognized that toll-like recept...

  19. Telomerase promoter reprogramming and interaction with general transcription factors in the human mesenchymal stem cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Hoare, Stacey F.; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2006-01-01

    The human adult mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) does not express telomerase and has been shown to be the target for neoplastic transformation after transduction with hTERT. These findings lend support to the stem cell hypothesis of cancer development but by supplying hTERT, the molecular events...... modifications of the chromatin environment lead to reactivation of telomerase gene expression. It is shown that repression of hTERT expression in hMSCs is due to promoter-specific histone hypoacetylation coupled with low Pol II and TFIIB trafficking. This repression is overcome by treatment with Trichostatin A...

  20. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhenhua [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Department of Anatomy, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhiguo, E-mail: chenzhiguo@gmail.com [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Zhang, Y. Alex, E-mail: yaz@bjsap.org [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  1. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: ► Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. ► Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. ► Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. ► Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  2. Stiffening of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroid Microenvironments Induced by Incorporation of Gelatin Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Cooke, Marissa T.; Saeed, Rabbia; Kinney, Melissa A.; Fridley, Krista M.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    Culturing multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells as 3D aggregates augments their differentiation potential and paracrine activity. One caveat of stem cell spheroids, though, can be the limited diffusional transport barriers posed by the inherent 3D structure of the multicellular aggregates. In order to circumvent such limitations, polymeric microparticles have been incorporated into stem cell aggregates as a means to locally control the biochemical and physical properties of the 3D microenvironment. However, the introduction of biomaterials to the 3D stem cell microenvironment could alter the mechanical forces sensed by cells within aggregates, which in turn could impact various cell behaviors and overall spheroid mechanics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of biomaterial incorporation within mesenchymal stem cell spheroids on aggregate structure and mechanical properties. The results of this study demonstrate that although gelatin microparticle incorporation results in similar multi-cellular organization within human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids, the introduction of gelatin materials significantly impacts spheroid mechanical properties. The marked differences in spheroid mechanics induced by microparticle incorporation may hold major implications for in vitro directed differentiation strategies and offer a novel route to engineer the mechanical properties of tissue constructs ex vivo. PMID:22658155

  3. Sequential cultivation of human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal mesenchymal like stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabal, Shyam; Konala, Vijay Bhaskar Reddy; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Kanafi, Mohammad Mahboob; Mishra, Suniti; Shankar, Krupa; Pal, Rajarshi; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Human skin has continuous self-renewal potential throughout adult life and serves as first line of defence. Its cellular components such as human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) and dermal mesenchymal stromal cells (DMSCs) are valuable resources for wound healing applications and cell based therapies. Here we show a simple, scalable and cost-effective method for sequential isolation and propagation of HEKs and DMSCs under defined culture conditions. Human skin biopsy samples obtained surgically were cut into fine pieces and cultured employing explant technique. Plated skin samples attached and showed outgrowth of HEKs. Gross microscopic examination displayed polygonal cells with a granular cytoplasm and H&E staining revealed archetypal HEK morphology. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry authenticated the presence of key HEK markers including trans-membrane protein epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), keratins and cytokeratin. After collection of HEKs by trypsin-EDTA treatment, mother explants were left intact and cultured further. Interestingly, we observed the appearance of another cell type with fibroblastic or stromal morphology which were able to grow up to 15 passages in vitro. Growth pattern, expression of cytoskeletal protein vimentin, surface proteins such as CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166 and mesodermal differentiation potential into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes confirmed their bonafide mesenchymal stem cell like status. These findings albeit preliminary may open up significant opportunities for novel applications in wound healing. PMID:25698160

  4. A genetic platform to model sarcomagenesis from primary adult mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnerio, Jlenia; Riccardi, Luisa; Taulli, Riccardo; Maeda, Takahiro; Wang, Guocan; Hobbs, Robin M.; Song, Min Sup; Sportoletti, Paolo; Bernardi, Rosa; Bronson, Roderick T.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory factors governing adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) physiology and their tumorigenic potential are still largely unknown, which substantially delays the identification of effective therapeutic approaches for the treatment of aggressive and lethal form of MSC-derived mesenchymal tumors, such as undifferentiated sarcomas. Here we have developed a novel platform to screen and quickly identify genes and pathways responsible for adult MSCs transformation, modeled undifferentiated sarcoma in vivo, and, ultimately, tested the efficacy of targeting the identified oncopathways. Importantly, by taking advantage of this new platform, we demonstrate the key role of an aberrant LRF-DLK1-SOX9 pathway in the pathogenesis of undifferentiated sarcoma with important therapeutic implications. PMID:25614485

  5. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole; Kassem, Moustapha; Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-07-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found that tumorigenic transformation of hMSC-TERT20 cells induced the expression of members of several cancer-germline antigen gene families (ie, GAGE, MAGE-A, and XAGE-1), with promoter hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the corresponding genes. Both in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts derived from tumorigenic hMSC-TERT20 single cell subclones exhibited heterogeneous expression of both GAGE and MAGE-A proteins, and similar patterns of expression were observed in clinical sarcomas. Importantly, histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors were able to induce more ubiquitous expression levels of cancer-germline antigens in hMSC-TERT20 cells, while their expression levels in primary human mesenchymal stem cells remained unaffected. The expression pattern of cancer-germline antigens in tumorigenic mesenchymal stem cells and sarcomas, plus their susceptibility to enhancement by epigenetic modulators, makes them promising targets for immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment. PMID:19498007

  6. Tissue distribution and engraftment of human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, J.F.; Stenderup, K.; Hansen, F.D.;

    2005-01-01

    Engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in peripheral tissues for replenishing of local stem cell function has been proposed as a therapeutic approach to degenerative diseases. We have previously reported the development of an immortalized human telomerase reverse transcriptase transduced MSC...

  7. Susceptibility of human placenta derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells to human herpesviruses infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Avanzi

    Full Text Available Fetal membranes (FM derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs are higher in number, expansion and differentiation abilities compared with those obtained from adult tissues, including bone marrow. Upon systemic administration, ex vivo expanded FM-MSCs preferentially home to damaged tissues promoting regenerative processes through their unique biological properties. These characteristics together with their immune-privileged nature and immune suppressive activity, a low infection rate and young age of placenta compared to other sources of SCs make FM-MSCs an attractive target for cell-based therapy and a valuable tool in regenerative medicine, currently being evaluated in clinical trials. In the present study we investigated the permissivity of FM-MSCs to all members of the human Herpesviridae family, an issue which is relevant to their purification, propagation, conservation and therapeutic use, as well as to their potential role in the vertical transmission of viral agents to the fetus and to their potential viral vector-mediated genetic modification. We present here evidence that FM-MSCs are fully permissive to infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, Varicella zoster virus (VZV, and Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV, but not with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Human Herpesvirus-6, 7 and 8 (HHV-6, 7, 8 although these viruses are capable of entering FM-MSCs and transient, limited viral gene expression occurs. Our findings therefore strongly suggest that FM-MSCs should be screened for the presence of herpesviruses before xenotransplantation. In addition, they suggest that herpesviruses may be indicated as viral vectors for gene expression in MSCs both in gene therapy applications and in the selective induction of differentiation.

  8. Osteogenic differentiation of human dental papilla mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We isolated dental papilla from impacted human molar and proliferated adherent fibroblastic cells after collagenase treatment of the papilla. The cells were negative for hematopoietic markers but positive for CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD166. When the cells were further cultured in the presence of β-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone for 14 days, mineralized areas together with osteogenic differentiation evidenced by high alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin contents were observed. The differentiation was confirmed at both protein and gene expression levels. The cells can also be cryopreserved and, after thawing, could show in vivo bone-forming capability. These results indicate that mesenchymal type cells localize in dental papilla and that the cells can be culture expanded/utilized for bone tissue engineering

  9. Role of Wnt-5a in the Determination of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Preadipocytes*

    OpenAIRE

    Bilkovski, Roman; Schulte, Dominik M.; Oberhauser, Frank; Gomolka, Matthias; Udelhoven, Michael; Hettich, Moritz M.; Roth, Bernhard; Heidenreich, Axel; Gutschow, Christian; Krone, Wilhelm; Laudes, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Increasing adipocyte size as well as numbers is important in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, with adipocytes being generated from mesenchymal precursor cells. This process includes the determination of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into preadipocytes (PA) and the differentiation of PA into mature fat cells. Although the process of differentiation has been highly investigated, the determination in humans is poorly understood. In this study, we compared human MSC and human commit...

  10. Transdifferentiation of Human Hair Follicle Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Red Blood Cells by OCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shortage of red blood cells (RBCs, erythrocytes can have potentially life-threatening consequences for rare or unusual blood type patients with massive blood loss resulting from various conditions. Erythrocytes have been derived from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, but the risk of potential tumorigenicity cannot be ignored, and a majority of these cells produced from PSCs express embryonic ε- and fetal γ-globins with little or no adult β-globin and remain nucleated. Here we report a method to generate erythrocytes from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs by enforcing OCT4 gene expression and cytokine stimulation. Cells generated from hHFMSCs expressed mainly the adult β-globin chain with minimum level of the fetal γ-globin chain. Furthermore, these cells also underwent multiple maturation events and formed enucleated erythrocytes with a biconcave disc shape. Gene expression analyses showed that OCT4 regulated the expression of genes associated with both pluripotency and erythroid development during hHFMSC transdifferentiation toward erythroid cells. These findings show that mature erythrocytes can be generated from adult somatic cells, which may serve as an alternative source of RBCs for potential autologous transfusion.

  11. The histopathology of a human mesenchymal stem cell experimental tumor model: support for an hMSC origin for Ewing's sarcoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, J S; Abdallah, B M; Schrøder, Henrik Daa;

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas display varied degrees of karyotypic abnormality, vascularity and mesenchymal differentiation. We have reported that a strain of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20) spontaneously evolved a tumorigenic phenotype after long-term continuous culture. We...... asked to what extent our hMSC-TERT20 derived tumors reflected events found in human sarcomas using routine histopathological procedures. Early versus late passage hMSC-TERT20 cultures persistently expressed mesenchymal lineage proteins e.g. CD105, CD44, CD99 and vimentin. However, late passage cultures...... hypothesis that sarcomas may arise from hMSC, providing a unique diploid model for exploring human sarcoma biology....

  12. Comparison of Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells, hESC-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Romain Barbet; Isabelle Peiffer; Antoinette Hatzfeld; Pierre Charbord; Hatzfeld, Jacques A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a strategy to identify developmental/differentiation and plasma membrane marker genes of the most primitive human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs). Using sensitive and quantitative TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) methodology, we compared the expression of 381 genes in human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs), hESC-derived MSCs ...

  13. Neural Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin FARIVAR*

    2015-01-01

    cerebrospinal fluid promotes the expression of Nestin, MAP2, and GFAP mRNA in a dose-dependent manner, especially at a concentration of 200 μl/ml. In summary, CSF induces neurogenesis of WJ stem cells that encourages tissue engineering applications with these cells for treatments of neurodegenerative defects and traumatic brain injury.References Gage, F. H. Mammalian neural stem cells. Science 2000 Feb 25;287(5457:1433-8.Da Silva Meirelles L, Chagastelles PC, Nardi NB. Mesenchymal stem cells reside in virtually all postnatal organs and tissues. J Cell Sci 2006 Jun 1;119(Pt 11:2204- 13. Epub 2006 May 9.Pittenger MF, Mackay AM, Beck SC, Jaiswal RK, Douglas R, Mosca JD, Moorman MA, Simonetti DW, Craig S, Marshak DR. Multilineage potential of adult human mesenchymal stem cells Science 1999 Apr 2;284(5411:143-7.Tse WT, Pendleton JD, Beyer WM, Egalka MC, Guinan EC. Suppression of allogeneic T-cell proliferation by human marrow stromal cells: implications in transplantation. Transplantation 2003 Feb 15;75(3:389- 97.Le Blanc K. Immuno-modulatory effects of fetal and adult mesenchymal stem cells. Cytotherapy 2003;5(6:485-9.Stenderup K, Justesen J, Clausen C, Kassem M. Aging is associated with decreased maximal life span and accelerated senescence of bone marrow stromal cells. Bone 2003 Dec;33(6:919-26.Bongso A, Fong CY, Gauthaman K. Taking stem cells to the clinic: major challenges. J Cell Biochem 2008 Dec 15;105(6:1352-60. doi: 10.1002/jcb.21957.Fong CY, Chak LL, Biswas A. Human Wharton’s jelly stem cells have unique transcriptome profiles compared to human embryonic stem cells and other mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cell Rev 2011 Mar;7(1:1-16. doi: 10.1007/s12015-010-9166-x.Troyer DL, Weiss ML. Wharton’s jelly-derived cells are a primitive stromal cell population. Stem Cells 2008 Mar; 26(3:591-9. Epub 2007 Dec 6.Yuan X, Desiderio DM. Proteomics analysis of human cerebrospinal fluid. J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2005 Feb 5;815(1-2:179-89.Thompson, EJ. Cerebrospinal

  14. Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin;

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning....

  15. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental ...

  16. The sensitivity of human mesenchymal stem cells to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from bone marrow transplantation patients originate from the host. This clinical observation suggests that MSCs in their niches could be resistant to irradiation. However, the biologic responses of bone marrow MSCs to irradiation have rarely been described in the literature. Methods and Materials: In this study, human bone marrow-derived, clonally expanded MSCs were used to investigate their sensitivity to irradiation in vitro, and the cellular mechanisms that may facilitate resistance to irradiation. The human lung cancer cell line A549 and the breast cancer cell line HCC1937 were used as controls for radiosensitivity; the former line has been shown to be radioresistant and the latter radiosensitive. We then examined their in vitro biologic changes and sensitivities to radiation therapy. Results: Our results suggest that MSCs are characterized as resistant to irradiation. Several cellular mechanisms were demonstrated that may facilitate resistance to irradiation: ATM protein phosphorylation, activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, double-strand break repair by homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and the antioxidant capacity for scavenging reactive oxygen species. Conclusions: As demonstrated, MSCs possess a better antioxidant reactive oxygen species-scavenging capacity and active double-strand break repair to facilitate their radioresistance. These findings provide a better understanding of radiation-induced biologic responses in MSCs and may lead to the development of better strategies for stem cell treatment and cancer therapy

  17. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid;

    2014-01-01

    are under intensive investigation worldwide. Several challenges with regard to the proper source of clinical-grade MSC and the efficacy of MSC-based treatment strategies need to be addressed before MSC can be routinely used in the clinic. Here, we discuss three areas that can potentially facilitate...... the translation of MSC into clinic: Generation of MSC-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells, strategies to enhance homing of MSC to injured tissues, and targeting of MSC in vivo....

  18. Long-term In vitro Expansion Alters the Biology of Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Izadpanah, Reza; Kaushal, Deepak; Kriedt, Christopher; Tsien, Fern; Patel, Bindiya; Dufour, Jason; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) derived from bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) and adipose tissue stem cells (ASC) of humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their cell cycle properties during protracted culture in vitro. Human ASCs (hASC) and rhesus BMSCs (rBMSC) underwent significantly more total population doublings than human BMSCs (hBMSC) and rhesus ASCs (rASC). The cell cycle profile of all MSCs was altered as cultures aged. hMSCs underwent an increase in the frequency of cells in the S ...

  19. A comparative study on the transplantation of different concentrations of human umbilical mesenchymal cells into diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Hui; Kong; Dan; Zheng; Song; Chen; Hong-Tao; Duan; Yue-Xin; Wang; Meng; Dong; Jian; Song

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of intravitreal injections of different concentrations of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells on retinopathy in rats with diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Healthy and adult male Sprague-Dawley(SD) rats were randomly assigned to a normal control group(group A), a diabetic retinopathy(DR) blank control group(group B), a high-concentration transplantation group(group C), a low-concentration transplantation group(group D) and a placebo transplantation group(group E). The expression of nerve growth factor(NGF)protein in the retinal layers was detected by immunohistochemical staining at 2, 4, 6 and 8wk.RESULTS: The expression of NGF was positive in group A and most positive in the retinal ganglion cell layer. In groups B and E, the expression of NGF was positive 2wk after transplantation and showed an increase in all layers. However, the level of expression had decreased in all layers at 4wk and was significantly reduced at 8wk. In groups C and D, the expression of NGF had increased at 2wk and continued to increase up to 8wk. The level of expression in group C was much higher than that in group D.CONCLUSION: DR can be improved by intravitreal injection of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells.High concentrations of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells confer a better protective effect on DR than low concentrations.

  20. Chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danisovic, L.; Lesný, Petr; Jendelová, Pavla; Teyssler, P.; Havlas, V.; Fujeriková, G.; Syková, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, Supplement 1 (2006), s. 191-191. ISSN 1465-3249. [ ISCT 2006. 04.05.2006-07.05.2006, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0021620803; GA MZd(CZ) NR8121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Mesenchymal Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: adjuvants for human cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Robb; Betancur, Monica; Boissel, Laurent; Tuncer, Hande; Cetrulo, Curtis; Klingemann, Hans

    2007-12-01

    The Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord is rich in mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) that fulfill the criteria for MSCs. Here we describe a novel, simple method of obtaining and cryopreserving UC-MSCs by extracting the Wharton's jelly from a small piece of cord, followed by mincing the tissue and cryopreserving it in autologous cord plasma to prevent exposure to allogeneic or animal serum. This direct freezing of cord microparticles without previous culture expansion allows the processing and freezing of umbilical cord blood (UCB) and UC-MSCs from the same individual on the same day on arrival in the laboratory. UC-MSCs produce significant concentrations of hematopoietic growth factors in culture and augment hematopoietic colony formation when co-cultured with UCB mononuclear cells. Mice undergoing transplantation with limited numbers of human UCB cells or CD34(+) selected cells demonstrated augmented engraftment when UC-MSCs were co-transplanted. We also explored whether UC-MSCs could be further manipulated by transfection with plasmid-based vectors. Electroporation was used to introduce cDNA and mRNA constructs for GFP into the UC-MSCs. Transfection efficiency was 31% for cDNA and 90% for mRNA. These data show that UC-MSCs represent a reliable, easily accessible, noncontroversial source of MSCs. They can be prepared and cryopreserved under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions and are able to enhance human hematopoietic engraftment in SCID mice. Considering their cytokine production and their ability to be easily transfected with plasmid-based vectors, these cells should have broad applicability in human cell-based therapies. PMID:18022578

  2. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the sand rat: transforming growth factor beta and 3D co-culture with human disc cells stimulate proteoglycan and collagen type I rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Tapp, Hazel; Deepe, Ray; Ingram, Jane A; Kuremsky, Marshall; Hanley, Edward N; Gruber, Helen E.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Adult mesenchymal stem cell therapy has a potential application in the biological treatment of disc degeneration. Our objectives were: to direct adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSC) from the sand rat to produce a proteoglycan and collagen type I extracellular matrix (ECM) rich in known ECM components of the annulus fibrosis of disc; and to stimulate proteoglycan production by co-culture of human annulus cells with AD-MSC. Methods AD-MSC were isolated and characterised ...

  3. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. → The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. → Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  4. Effects of substrate stiffness on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2014-07-01

    Substrate mechanical properties, in addition to biochemical signals, have been shown to modulate cell phenotype. In this study, we inspected the effects of substrate stiffness on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from adult human bone marrow differentiation into adipogenic and osteogenic cells. A chemically modified extracellular matrix derived and highly biocompatible hydrogel, based on thiol functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-SH) and thiol functionalized recombinant human gelatin (Gtn-SH), which can be crosslinked by poly (ethylene glycol) tetra-acrylate (PEGTA), was used as a model system. The stiffness of the hydrogel was controlled by adjusting the crosslinking density. Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured on the hydrogels with different stiffness under adipogenic and osteogenic conditions. Oil Red O staining and F-actin staining were applied to assess the change of cell morphologies under adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation, respectively. Gene expression of cells was determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as a function of hydrogel stiffness. Results support the hypothesis that adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs are inclined to occur on substrate with stiffness similar to their in vivo microenvironments. PMID:24857499

  5. Triclosan Potentiates Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Anoikis-Resistant Human Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Winitthana, Thidarat; Lawanprasert, Somsong; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of cancer cell toward mesenchymal phenotype has been shown to potentiate tumor aggressiveness by increasing cancer cell metastasis. Herein, we report the effect of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial agent found in many daily products, in enhancing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in aggressive anoikis resistant human H460 lung cancer cells. EMT has been long known to increase abilities of the cells to increase migration, invasion, and survival in circulating syste...

  6. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfield, Tracey L; Nolan Koloze, Mary T; Lennon, Donald P; Caplan, Arnold I

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD) and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma. PMID:20974000

  7. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennon Donald P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma.

  8. Comparison of biological characteristics of marrow mesenchymal stem cells in hepatitis B patients and normal adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Peng; Hua Li; Lin Gu; Xiao-Mou Peng; Yang-Su Huang; Zhi-Liang Gao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish a culture system of marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from hepatitis B patients and normal adults and to compare their biological characteristics.METHODS: MSCs were isolated from bone marrow in 34 male hepatitis B patients and 15 male normal adults and cultivated in vitro. Their biological characteristics including surface markers, shapes and appearances, growth curves, first passage time and passage generations were compared.RESULTS: Cultivation achievement ratio of hepatitis B patients was lower than that of normal adults, no statistical significance (82.35% vs 100%, P >0.05). Compared with MSCs of normal adults, MSCs of hepatitis B patients presented a statistical lower growth curve, longer first passage time (13.0 ± 1.6 d vs 11.4 ± 1.5 d, P < 0.05), fewer passaging generation numbers (10.5 ± 1.4 generations vs 12.3±1.7 generations, P < 0.05), though both shared same appearances, shapes and surface markers. MSCs in hepatitis B patients would expand, spread out and age more easily and there were more refractive particles in the cytoplasm.CONCLUSION: MSCs from hepatitis B patients can be cultured in vitro. Although their appearance, shape and surface marker are similar to those of MSCs from normal adults, there are differences in their biological characteristics.

  9. In vitro cardiomyogenic potential of human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiomyocyte loss in the ischemically injured human heart often leads to irreversible defects in cardiac function. Recently, cellular cardiomyoplasty with mesenchymal stem cells, which are multipotent cells with the ability to differentiate into specialized cells under appropriate stimuli, has emerged as a new approach for repairing damaged myocardium. In the present study, the potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into cells with characteristics of cardiomyocyte was investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from endothelial/subendothelial layers of the human umbilical cords using a method similar to that of human umbilical vein endothelial cell isolation. Isolated cells were characterized by transdifferentiation ability to adipocytes and osteoblasts, and also with flow cytometry analysis. After treatment with 5-azacytidine, the human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells were morphologically transformed into cardiomyocyte-like cells and expressed cardiac differentiation markers. During the differentiation, cells were monitored by a phase contrast microscope and their morphological changes were demonstrated. Immunostaining of the differentiated cells for sarcomeric myosin (MF20), desmin, cardiac troponin I, and sarcomeric α-actinin was positive. RT-PCR analysis showed that these differentiated cells express cardiac-specific genes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a cardiomyocyte-like ultrastructure and typical sarcomers. These observations confirm that human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells can be chemically transformed into cardiomyocytes and can be considered as a source of cells for cellular cardiomyoplasty

  10. Irradiation sensitivity of human and porcine mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical resection, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and combinations thereof are a plethora of possible treatment modalities of head and neck malignancies. Treatment regimens including radiotherapy however put jaws at risk of subsequent osteoradionecrosis. Besides cancer cells, irradiation impacts on all tissue-inherent cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Since it is the bone and bone marrow MSC, which contributes to bone regeneration through proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of its progeny, the influence of irradiation on MSC viability and the respective differentiation capacity appears to be critical. However to date, only a few reports picked MSCs role out as a pivotal topic. As a first attempt, we irradiated human bone derived MSC in vitro. With increasing doses the cells self-renewal capabilities were greatly reduced. Notably however, the mitotically stalled cells were still capable of differentiating into osteoblasts and preadipocytes. Next, the mandibles of Sus scrofa domestica were irradiated with a total dose of 18 Gy. At different time points post radiatio, MSCs were isolated from bone autopsies. In comparison between irradiated and non- irradiated samples, no significant differences regarding the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of tissue specific MSC became apparent Therefore, pig mandibles were irradiated with doses of 9 and 18 Gy, and MSCs were isolated immediately afterwards. No significant differences between the untreated and bone irradiated with 9 Gy with respect of proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were observed. Cells isolated from 18 Gy irradiated specimens exhibited a greatly reduced osteogenic differentiation capacity, and during the first two weeks proliferation rates of explanted cells were greatly diminished. Thereafter, cells recovered and showed proliferation behaviour comparable to control samples. These results imply that MSCs can cope with irradiation up to relatively high doses

  11. Use of hybrid chitosan membranes and human mesenchymal stem cells from the Wharton jelly of umbilical cord for promoting nerve regeneration in an axonotmesis rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea G(a)rtner; Yuri Nakamura; Satoshi Hayakawa; Akiyoshi Osakah; Beatriz Porto; Ana Lúcia Luís; Artur SP Varej(a)o; Ana Colette Maurício; Tiago Pereira; Maria Jo(a)o Sim(o)es; Paulo AS Armada-da-Silva; Miguel L Fran(c)a; Rosa Sousa; Simone Bompasso; Stefania Raimondo; Yuki Shirosaki

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been dedicated to the development of scaffolds for improving post-traumatic nerve regeneration.The goal of this study was to assess the effect on nerve regeneration,associating a hybrid chitosan membrane with non-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord,in peripheral nerve reconstruction after crush injury.Chromosome analysis on human mesenchymal stem cell line from Wharton's jelly was carried out and no structural alterations were found in metaphase.Chitosan membranes were previously tested in vitro,to assess their ability in supporting human mesenchymal stem cell survival,expansion,and differentiation.For the in vivo testing,Sasco Sprague adult rats were divided in 4 groups of 6 or 7 animals each:Group 1,sciatic axonotmesis injury without any other intervention (Group 1-Crush); Group 2,the axonotmesis lesion of 3 mm was infiltrated with a suspension of 1 250- 1 500 human mesenchymal stem cells (total volume of 50 μL) (Group 2-CrushCell); Group 3,axonotmesis lesion of 3 mm was enwrapped with a chitosan type Ⅲ membrane covered with a monolayer of non-differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (Group 3-CrushChitlllCell) and Group 4,axonotmesis lesion of 3 mm was enwrapped with a chitosan type Ⅲ membrane (Group 4-CrushChitlll).Motor and sensory functional recovery was evaluated throughout a healing period of 12 weeks using sciatic functional index,static sciatic index,extensor postural thrust,and withdrawal reflex latency.Stereological analysis was carried out on regenerated nerve fibers.Results showed that infiltration of human mesenchymal stem cells,or the combination of chitosan membrane enwrapment and human mesenchymal stem cell enrichment after nerve crush injury provide a slight advantage to post-traumatic nerve regeneration.Results obtained with chitosan type Ⅲ membrane alone confirmed that they significantly improve post-traumatic axonal regrowth and may represent a very promising

  12. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: a systematic reappraisal via the genostem experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbord, Pierre; Livne, Erella; Gross, Gerhard; Häupl, Thomas; Neves, Nuno M.; Marie, Pierre; Bianco, Paolo; Jorgensen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Genostem (acronym for “Adult mesenchymal stem cells engineering for connective tissue disorders. From the bench to the bed side”) has been an European consortium of 30 teams working together on human bone marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) biological properties and repair capacity. Part of Genostem activity has been dedicated to the study of basic issues on undifferentiated MSCs properties and on signalling pathways leading to the differentiation into 3 of the connective tissue lineages, osteoblastic, chondrocytic and tenocytic. We have evidenced that native bone marrow MSCs and stromal cells, forming the niche of hematopoietic stem cells, were the same cellular entity located abluminally from marrow sinus endothelial cells. We have also shown that culture-amplified, clonogenic and highly-proliferative MSCs were bona fide stem cells, sharing with other stem cell types the major attributes of self-renewal and of multipotential priming to the lineages to which they can differentiate (osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells/pericytes). Extensive transcription profiling and in vitro and in vivo assays were applied to identify genes involved in differentiation. Thus we have described novel factors implicated in osteogenesis (FHL2, ITGA5, Fgf18), chondrogenesis (FOXO1A) and tenogenesis (Smad8). Another part of Genostem activity has been devoted to studies of the repair capacity of MSCs in animal models, a prerequisite for future clinical trials. We have developed novel scaffolds (chitosan, pharmacologically active microcarriers) useful for the repair of both bone and cartilage. Finally and most importantly, we have shown that locally implanted MSCs effectively repair bone, cartilage and tendon. PMID:20198518

  13. Effect of silver nanoparticles on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sengstock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP are one of the fastest growing products in nano-medicine due to their enhanced antibacterial activity at the nanoscale level. In biomedicine, hundreds of products have been coated with Ag-NP. For example, various medical devices include silver, such as surgical instruments, bone implants and wound dressings. After the degradation of these materials, or depending on the coating technique, silver in nanoparticle or ion form can be released and may come into close contact with tissues and cells. Despite incorporation of Ag-NP as an antibacterial agent in different products, the toxicological and biological effects of silver in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are not well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of both ionic and nanoparticulate silver on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and on the secretion of the respective differentiation markers adiponectin, osteocalcin and aggrecan.Results: As shown through laser scanning microscopy, Ag-NP with a size of 80 nm (hydrodynamic diameter were taken up into hMSCs as nanoparticulate material. After 24 h of incubation, these Ag-NP were mainly found in the endo-lysosomal cell compartment as agglomerated material. Cytotoxicity was observed for differentiated or undifferentiated hMSCs treated with high silver concentrations (≥20 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≥1.5 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions but not with low-concentration treatments (≤10 µg·mL−1 Ag-NP; ≤1.0 µg·mL−1 Ag+ ions. Subtoxic concentrations of Ag-NP and Ag+ ions impaired the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas chondrogenic differentiation was unaffected after 21 d of incubation. In contrast to aggrecan, the inhibitory effect of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by a decrease in the secretion of

  14. Characterization of lipid metabolism in insulin-sensitive adipocytes differentiated from immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prawitt, Janne; Niemeier, Andreas; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2008-01-01

    There is a great demand for cell models to study human adipocyte function. Here we describe the adipogenic differentiation of a telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-Tert) that maintains numerous features of terminally differentiated adipocytes even after prolonged...

  15. Decellularized matrix from tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells promotes neovascularization with galectin-1 dependent endothelial interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Kristiansen, Malthe; Kristensen, Lars P;

    2011-01-01

    Acquisition of a blood supply is fundamental for extensive tumor growth. We recently described vascular heterogeneity in tumours derived from cell clones of a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) strain (hMSC-TERT20) immortalized by retroviral vector mediated human telomerase (hTERT) gene expression...

  16. Cardiac Repair With a Novel Population of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resident in the Human Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Sivakumaran, Priyadharshini; Newcomb, Andrew E; Hernandez, Damián; Harris, Nicole; Khanabdali, Ramin; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Kelly, Darren J; Pébay, Alice; Hewitt, Alex W; Boyle, Andrew; Harvey, Richard; Morrison, Wayne A; Elliott, David A; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac resident stem cells (CRSCs) hold much promise to treat heart disease but this remains a controversial field. Here, we describe a novel population of CRSCs, which are positive for W8B2 antigen and were obtained from adult human atrial appendages. W8B2(+) CRSCs exhibit a spindle-shaped morphology, are clonogenic and capable of self-renewal. W8B2(+) CRSCs show high expression of mesenchymal but not hematopoietic nor endothelial markers. W8B2(+) CRSCs expressed GATA4, HAND2, and TBX5, but not C-KIT, SCA-1, NKX2.5, PDGFRα, ISL1, or WT1. W8B2(+) CRSCs can differentiate into cardiovascular lineages and secrete a range of cytokines implicated in angiogenesis, chemotaxis, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, cell growth, and survival. In vitro, conditioned medium collected from W8B2(+) CRSCs displayed prosurvival, proangiogenic, and promigratory effects on endothelial cells, superior to that of other adult stem cells tested, and additionally promoted survival and proliferation of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Intramyocardial transplantation of human W8B2(+) CRSCs into immunocompromised rats 1 week after myocardial infarction markedly improved cardiac function (∼40% improvement in ejection fraction) and reduced fibrotic scar tissue 4 weeks after infarction. Hearts treated with W8B2(+) CRSCs showed less adverse remodeling of the left ventricle, a greater number of proliferating cardiomyocytes (Ki67(+) cTnT(+) cells) in the remote region, higher myocardial vascular density, and greater infiltration of CD163(+) cells (a marker for M2 macrophages) into the border zone and scar regions. In summary, W8B2(+) CRSCs are distinct from currently known CRSCs found in human hearts, and as such may be an ideal cell source to repair myocardial damage after infarction. PMID:26184084

  17. Epicardial Origin of Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naisana S. Asli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian heart has added a vital dimension to the field of cardiac regeneration. Cardiac-resident stem cells are likely sequestered as reserve cells within myocardial niches during the course of embryonic cardiogenesis, although they may also be recruited from external sources, such as bone marrow. As we begin to understand the nature of cardiac-resident stem and progenitor cells using a variety of approaches, it is evident that they possess an identity embedded within their gene regulatory networks that favours cardiovascular lineage potential. In addition to contributing lineage descendants, cardiac stem cells may also be stress sensors, offering trophic cues to other cell types, including cardiomyocytes and vasculature cells, and likely other stem cells and immune cells, during adaptation and repair. This presents numerous possibilities for endogenous cardiac stem and progenitor cells to be used in cell therapies or as targets in heart rejuvenation. In this review, we focus on the epicardium as an endogenous source of multi-potential mesenchymal progenitor cells in development and as a latent source of such progenitors in the adult. We track the origin and plasticity of the epicardium in embryos and adults in both homeostasis and disease. In this context, we ask whether directed activation of epicardium-derived progenitor cells might have therapeutic application.

  18. Generation of Insulin-Producing Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Park, Si-Nae; Suh, Hwal

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of current experiment is the generation of insulin-producing human mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic source for the cure of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is generally caused by insulin deficiency accompanied by the destruction of islet β-cells. In various trials for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, cell-based gene therapy using stem cells is considered as one of the most useful candidate for the treatment. In this experiment, human mesenchymal stem cells were transduced wi...

  19. The Origin of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Dictates Their Reparative Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naftali-Shani, Nili; Itzhaki-Alfia, Ayelet; Landa-Rouben, Natalie;

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) from adipose cardiac tissue have attracted considerable interest in regard to cell-based therapies. We aimed to test the hypothesis that hMSCs from the heart and epicardial fat would be better cells for infarct repair.......Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) from adipose cardiac tissue have attracted considerable interest in regard to cell-based therapies. We aimed to test the hypothesis that hMSCs from the heart and epicardial fat would be better cells for infarct repair....

  20. Mesenchymal markers on human adipose stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Rubin, J. Peter; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    The stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue is a rich source of multipotent stem cells. We and others have described 3 major populations of stem/progenitor cells in this fraction, all closely associated with small blood vessels: endothelial progenitor cells (EPC, CD45−/CD31+/CD34+), pericytes (CD45−/CD31−/CD146+) and supra-adventitial adipose stromal cells (SA-ASC, CD45−/CD31−/CD146−/CD34+). EPC are luminal, pericytes are adventitial and SA-ASC surround the vessel like a sheath. The multipotency of the pericytes and SA-ASC compartments is strikingly similar to that of CD45−/CD34−/CD73+/CD105+/CD90+ bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC). Here we determine the extent to which this mesenchymal expression pattern is expressed on the 3 adipose stem/progenitor populations. Eight independent adipose tissue samples were analyzed in a single tube (CD105-FITC/CD73-PE/CD146-PETXR/CD14-PECY5/CD33-PECY5/CD235A-PECY5/CD31-PECY7/CD90-APC/CD34-A700/CD45-APCCY7/DAPI). Adipose EPC were highly proliferative with 14.3±2.8% (mean ± SEM) having >2N DNA. About half (53.1±7.6%) coexpressed CD73 and CD105, and 71.9±7.4% expressed CD90. Pericytes were less proliferative (8.2±3.4% >2N DNA) with a smaller proportion (29.6±6.9% CD73+/CD105+, 60.5±10.2% CD90+) expressing mesenchymal associated markers. However, the CD34+ subset of CD146+ pericytes, were both highly proliferative (15.1±3.6% with >2N DNA) and of uniform mesenchymal phenotype (93.3±3.7% CD73+/CD105+, 97.8±0.7% CD90+), suggesting transit amplifying progenitor cells. SA-ASC were the least proliferative (3.7 ± 0.8%>2N DNA) but were also highly mesenchymal in phenotype (94.4±3.2% CD73+/CD105+, 95.5±1.2% CD90+). These data imply a progenitor/progeny relationship between pericytes and SA-ASC, the most mesenchymal of SVF cells. Despite phenotypic and functional similarities to BM-MSC, SA-ASC are distinguished by CD34 expression. PMID:23184564

  1. Gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡庆柳; 朴英杰; 邹飞

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells.Methods Total RNA extracted from human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells underwent reverse transcription, and the products were labeled with α-32P dCTP. The cDNA probes of total RNA were hybridized to cDNA microarray with 1176 genes, and then the signals were analyzed by AtlasImage analysis software Version 1.01a.Results Fifteen genes associated with cell proliferation and signal transduction were up-regulated, and one gene that takes part in cell-to-cell adhesion was down-regulated in tendon cells.Conclusion The 15 up-regulated and one down-regulated genes may be beneficial to the orientational differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into tendon cells.

  2. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression

  3. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, Ren& #233; ; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-05-12

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

  4. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have elicited a great clinical interest, particularly in the areas of regenerative medicine and induction of tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. Previous reports demonstrated the feasibility of transplanting MSCs, which generates new prospects in cellular therapy. Recently, injection of MSCs induced remission of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. This review summarizes the knowledge and possible future clinical uses of MSCs.

  5. HNF-4α determines hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mong-Liang; Chen; Kuan-Der; Lee; Huei-Chun; Huang; Yue-Lin; Tsai; Yi-Chieh; Wu; Tzer-Min; Kuo; Cheng-Po; Hu; Chungming; Chang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differentiation status and key factors to facilitate hepatic differentiation of human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). METHODS: Human MSCs derived from bone marrow were induced into hepatocyte-like cells following a previously published protocol. The differentiation status of the hepatocyte-like cells was compared with various human hepatoma cell lines. Overexpression of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α was mediated by adenovirus infection of these hepatocyte-like...

  6. Stiffening of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroid Microenvironments Induced by Incorporation of Gelatin Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Cooke, Marissa T; Saeed, Rabbia; Kinney, Melissa A.; Krista M Fridley; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    Culturing multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells as 3D aggregates augments their differentiation potential and paracrine activity. One caveat of stem cell spheroids, though, can be the limited diffusional transport barriers posed by the inherent 3D structure of the multicellular aggregates. In order to circumvent such limitations, polymeric microparticles have been incorporated into stem cell aggregates as a means to locally control the biochemical and physical properties of the 3D microenv...

  7. Differentiation of adipocytes and osteocytes from human adipose and placental mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Zahra; Afshari, Jalil Tavakkol; Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Alamdari, Daryoush Hamidi; Ganjibakhsh, Meysam; Zarmehri, Azam Moradi; Jangjoo, Ali; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Ameri, Masoumeh Arab; Moinzadeh, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can be isolated from adult tissues such as adipose tissue and other sources. Among these sources, adipose tissue (because of easy access) and placenta (due to its immunomodulatory properties, in addition to other useful properties), have attracted more attention in terms of research. The isolation and comparison of MSC from these two sources provides a proper source for clinical experimentation. The aim of this study was to compare the characteristic...

  8. Forskolin enhances in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, J.; Siddappa, R.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Boer, de J.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) was recently shown to enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in vitro and bone formation in vivo. The major drawback of this compound is its inhibitory effe

  9. Transformation of human mesenchymal stem cells in radiation carcinogenesis: long-term effect of ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rikke; Alsner, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence on cancer stem cells suggest that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and consequently can be the origin of many cancers. We have recently established a telomerase-transduced human mesenchymal stem cell line and subsequently irradiated this in order to achieve malignant...

  10. Patterns of amino acid metabolism by proliferating human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, G.A.; Schop, D.; Spitters, T.W.; Dijkhuizen, R.; Bracke, M.; Bruijn, J.D.; Martens, D.E.; Karperien, M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of stem cells have not been determined; in particular, the amino acid metabolism of stem cells is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the amino acid metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with focus on two questions: Which amino acids are consume

  11. Quantifying in vitro growth and metabolism kinetics of human mesenchymal stem cells using a mathematical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera-Sierra, G.; Schop, D.; Janssen, F.; Dijkhuizen-Radersma, R.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Better quantitative understanding of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) metabolism is needed to identify, understand, and subsequently optimize the processes in expansion of hMSCs in vitro. For this purpose, we analyzed growth of hMSCs in vitro with a mathematical model based on the mass balances

  12. Quantifying In Vitro Growth and Metabolism Kinetics of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using a Mathematical Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, Gustavo; Schop, Deborah; Janssen, Frank; Dijkhuizen-Radersma, van Riemke; Boxtel, van Ton; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.

    2009-01-01

    Better quantitative understanding of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) metabolism is needed to identify, understand, and subsequently optimize the processes in expansion of hMSCs in vitro. For this purpose, we analyzed growth of hMSCs in vitro with a mathematical model based on the mass balances

  13. Flow perfusion culture of human mesenchymal stem cells on silicate-substituted tricalcium phosphate scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Lea; Bünger, Cody E; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2008-01-01

    -substituted tricalcium phosphate (Si-TCP) scaffolds seeded with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). The cells were seeded onto the scaffolds and cultured either statically or in a perfusion bioreactor for up to 21 days and assessed for osteogenic differentiation by alkaline phosphatase activity...

  14. The cultivation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in clinical grade medium for bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pytlík, R.; Stehlík, D.; Soukup, T.; Kalbáčová, M.; Rypáček, František; Trč, T.; Mulinková, Katarína; Michnová, P.; Kideryová, L.; Živný, J.; Klener, P.Jr.; Veselá, R.; Trněný, M.; Klener, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 20 (2009), s. 3415-3427. ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MZd ND7448 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : tissue engineering * multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells * human serum Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.365, year: 2009

  15. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injur y in stroke rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xu; Shiwei Du; Xinguang Yu; Xiao Han; Jincai Hou; Hao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that in-travenous transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the femoral vein could exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia via a mechanism associated with the ability to attenuate axonal injury. The results of behavioral tests, infarction volume analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that cerebral ischemia caused severe damage to the myelin sheath and axons. After rats were intravenously transplanted with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the levels of axon and myelin sheath-related proteins, including mi-crotubule-associated protein 2, myelin basic protein, and growth-associated protein 43, were elevated, infarct volume was decreased and neural function was improved in cerebral ischemic rats. These ifndings suggest that intravenously transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote neural function. Possible mechanisms underlying these beneifcial effects in-clude resistance to demyelination after cerebral ischemia, prevention of axonal degeneration, and promotion of axonal regeneration.

  16. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevent allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue-Qi; Deng, Meng-Xia; He, Jia; Zeng, Qing-Xiang; Wen, Weiping; Wong, David S H; Tse, Hung-Fat; Xu, Geng; Lian, Qizhou; Shi, Jianbo; Fu, Qing-Ling

    2012-12-01

    We previously found that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exerted immunomodulatory effects on Th2-mediated allergic rhinitis in vitro. However, their contribution to the asthma and allergic rhinitis in animal models remains unclear. In this study, we developed a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in both the upper and lower airways and evaluated the effects of the systemic administration of human iPSC-MSCs and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) on allergic inflammation. Our results showed that treatments with both the iPSC-MSCs and BM-MSCs before the challenge phase protected the animals from the majority of allergy-specific pathological changes. This protection included an inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus production in the lung, a reduction in eosinophil infiltration in the nose, and a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration in both the bronchoalveolar and nasal lavage fluids. In addition, treatment with iPSC-MSCs or BM-MSCs before the challenge phase resulted in reduced serum levels of Th2 immunoglobulins (e.g., IgE) and decreased levels of Th2 cytokines including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, or IL-13 in the bronchoalveolar and/or nasal lavage fluids. Similar therapeutic effects were observed when the animals were pretreated with human iPSC-MSCs before the sensitization phase. These data suggest that iPSC-MSCs may be used as an alternative strategy to adult MSCs in the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. PMID:22987325

  17. Hepatogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raquel Taléns-Visconti; Ana Bonora; Ramiro Jover; Vicente Mirabet; Francisco Carbonell; José Vicente Castell; María José Gómez-Lechón

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and compare the hepatogenic transdifferentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSC) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) in vitro. Transdifferentiation of BMSC into hepatic cells in vivo has been described. Adipose tissue represents an accessible source of ADSC, with similar characteristics to BMSC.METHODS: BMSCs were obtained from patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty and ADSC from human adipose tissue obtained from lipectomy. Cells were grown in medium containing 15% human serum. Cultures were serum deprived for 2 d before cultivating under similar pro-hepatogenic conditions to those of liver development using a 2-step protocol with sequential addition of growth factors, cytokines and hormones. Hepatic differentiation was RT-PCR-assessed and liver-marker genes were immunohistochemically analysed.RESULTS: BMSC and ADSC exhibited a fibroblastic morphology that changed to a polygonal shape when cells differentiated. Expression of stem cell marker Thy1 decreased in differentiated ADSC and BMSC. However, the expression of the hepatic markers, albumin and CYPs increased to a similar extent in differentiated BMSC and ADSC. Hepatic gene activation could be attributed to increased liver-enriched transcription factors (C/EBPβ and HNF4α), as demonstrated by adenoviral expression vectors.CONCLUSION: Mesenchymal stem cells can be induced to hepatogenic transdifferentiation in vitro. ADSCs have a similar hepatogenic differentiation potential to BMSC,but a longer culture period and higher proliferation capacity. Therefore, adipose tissue may be an ideal source of large amounts of autologous stem cells, and may become an alternative for hepatocyte regeneration, liver cell transplantation or preclinical drug testing.

  18. Human Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells plasticity augments scar-free skin wound healing with hair growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sabapathy

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising candidate for cell-based transplantation and regenerative medicine therapies. Thus in the present study Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells (WJ-MSCs have been derived from extra embryonic umbilical cord matrix following removal of both arteries and vein. Also, to overcome the clinical limitations posed by fetal bovine serum (FBS supplementation because of xenogeneic origin of FBS, usual FBS cell culture supplement has been replaced with human platelet lysate (HPL. Apart from general characteristic features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, wharton jelly-derived MSCs have the ability to maintain phenotypic attributes, cell growth kinetics, cell cycle pattern, in vitro multilineage differentiation plasticity, apoptotic pattern, normal karyotype-like intrinsic mesenchymal stem cell properties in long-term in vitro cultures. Moreover, the WJ-MSCs exhibited the in vitro multilineage differentiation capacity by giving rise to differentiated cells of not only mesodermal lineage but also to the cells of ectodermal and endodermal lineage. Also, WJ-MSC did not present any aberrant cell state upon in vivo transplantation in SCID mice and in vitro soft agar assays. The immunomodulatory potential assessed by gene expression levels of immunomodulatory factors upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines in the fetal WJ-MSCs was relatively higher compared to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs. WJ-MSCs seeded on decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold transplantation on the skin injury of SCID mice model demonstrates that combination of WJ-MSCs and decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold exhibited significantly better wound-healing capabilities, having reduced scar formation with hair growth and improved biomechanical properties of regenerated skin compared to WJ-MSCs alone. Further, our experimental data indicate that indocyanin green (ICG at optimal concentration can be resourcefully used for labeling of stem cells

  19. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of cells present in bone-marrow stroma and the stroma of various organs with the capacity for mesoderm-like cell differentiation into, for example, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSC are being introduced in the clinic for the treatment...... of a variety of clinical conditions. The aim of this review is to provide an update regarding the biology of MSC, their identification and culture, and mechanisms controlling their proliferation and differentiation. We also review the current status of their clinical use. Areas in which research is needed...

  20. Persistent circulating human insulin in sheep transplanted in utero with human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Adel; Pixley, John S.; Goodrich, A. Daisy; Porada, Christopher D.; Almeida-Porada, Graca; Thain, David S.; Zanjani, Esmail D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) derived from human fetal pancreatic tissue (pMSC) would engraft and differentiate in sheep pancreas following transplantation in utero. Methods A three-step culture system was established for generating human fetal pMSC. Sheep fetuses were transplanted during the fetal transplant receptivity period with human pMSC and evaluated for in situ and functional engraftment in their pancreas, liver and bone marrow. Results Isolation and expansion of adherent cells from the human fetal pancreas yielded a cell population with morphologic and phenotypic characteristics similar to MSC derived from bone marrow. This putative stem cell population could undergo multilineage differentiation in vitro. Three to 27 months after fetal transplantation, the pancreatic engraftment frequency (chimeric index) was 79% while functional engraftment was noted in 50% of transplanted sheep. Hepatic and marrow engraftment and expression was noted as well. Conclusion We have established a procedure for isolation of human fetal pMSC that display characteristics similar to bone marrow derived MSC. In vivo results suggest the pMSC engraft, differentiate and secrete human insulin from the sheep pancreas. PMID:20170708

  1. Characteristics of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells and their tropism to human ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liru Li

    Full Text Available The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs derived from amniotic fluid (AF have become an attractive stem cells source for cell-based therapy because they can be harvested at low cost and avoid ethical disputes. In human research, stem cells derived from AF gradually became a hot research direction for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity and their tumor tropism regardless of the tumor size, location and source. Our work aimed to obtain and characterize human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs and detect their ovarian cancer tropsim in nude mice model. Ten milliliters of twenty independent amniotic fluid samples were collected from 16-20 week pregnant women who underwent amniocentesis for fetal genetic determination in routine prenatal diagnosis in the first affiliated hospital of Harbin medical university. We successfully isolated the AFMSCs from thirteen of twenty amniotic fluid samples. AFMSCs presented a fibroblastic-like morphology during the culture. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the cells were positive for specific stem cell markers CD73,CD90, CD105, CD166 and HLA-ABC (MHC class I, but negative for CD 45,CD40, CD34, CD14 and HLA-DR (MHC class II. RT-PCR results showed that the AFMSCs expressed stem cell marker OCT4. AFMSCs could differentiate into bone cells, fat cells and chondrocytes under certain conditions. AFMSCs had the high motility to migrate to ovarian cancer site but didn't have the tumorigenicity. This study enhances the possibility of AFMSCs as drug carrier in human cell-based therapy. Meanwhile, the research emphasis in the future can also put in targeting therapy of ovarian cancer.

  2. Data on isolating mesenchymal stromal cells from human adipose tissue using a collagenase-free method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim Shebaby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present dataset describes a detailed protocol to isolate mesenchymal cells from human fat without the use of collagenase. Human fat specimen, surgically cleaned from non-fat tissues (e.g., blood vessels and reduced into smaller fat pieces of around 1–3 mm size, is incubated in complete culture media for five to seven days. Then, cells started to spread out from the fat explants and to grow in cultures according to an exponential pattern. Our data showed that primary mesenchymal cells presenting heterogeneous morphology start to acquire more homogenous fibroblastic-like shape when cultured for longer duration or when subcultured into new flasks. Cell isolation efficiency as well as cell doubling time were also calculated throughout the culturing experimentations and illustrated in a separate figure thereafter. This paper contains data previously considered as an alternative protocol to isolate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell published in “Proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs into osteoblastic lineage are passage dependent” [1].

  3. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles label human bone marrow and umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yan; Zhang De-qing; Chen Le; Wang Jian; Zhang Xue; Hou Yan; Bi Xiao-juan; Yang Rong; Hu An-hua

    2012-01-01

      BACKGROUND: Nowadays, it is becoming more and more important to optimize safety of human derived cel s, label cel s efficiently and track cel s after cel s transplantation both in basic research and clinic application. OBJECTIVE: To compare the cel viability, labeling efficiency and imaging effect of the T2* weight image (WI) magnetic resonance (MR) between the human bone marrow and umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s labeled with the superparamaganetic iron oxide nanoparticles, as wel as to optimize their treatment efficiency. METHODS: The third generation of human bone marrow and umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s were cultured, and labeled with 5-30 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ and protamine sulfate. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The viability of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cel s was similar with human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s (P >0.05). There was no significant difference of labeling rate between the bone marrow msenchymal stem cel s labeled with 5-30 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ(P >0.05); while there was significant difference of labeling rate between the umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s labeled with 5 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ and 20 and 30 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ(P <0.05); the positive labeling rate of umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cel s was lower than that of bone marrow msenchymal stem cel s after labeled with 10 mg/L FeridexⅣ(P <0.05). When two sources of cel s were labeled with Feridex Ⅳ more than 2 mg/L, the iron oxide particles were found in the cel suspension and could not be removed by elution and filtration. The signal intensity from 3.0T MR GRE T2*WI scan was decreased with the increasing of Feridex Ⅳ concentration in both cel types. It is safe and effective to label the two tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cel s with 10 mg/L Feridex Ⅳ-protamine sulfate complex, and can be observed with T2*WI MR.

  4. Osteogenic induction of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells in novel synthetic polymer-hydrogel matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Endres, M; Hutmacher, D.W.; Salgado, A. J.; Kaps, C; RINGE, J; Reis, R. L.; Sittinger, M; Brandwood, A.; Schantz, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the in vitro osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal progenitor cells in novel matrix architectures built by means of a three-dimensional bioresorbable synthetic framework in combination with a hydrogel. Human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPCs) were isolated from a human bone marrow aspirate by gradient centrifugation. Before in vitro engineering of scaffold-hMPC constructs, the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential was demonstrated...

  5. The effect of temperature on the viability of human mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reissis, Yannis; García-Gareta, Elena; Korda, Michelle; Blunn, Gordon W.; Hua, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Impaction allograft with cement is a common technique used in revision hip surgeries for the last 20 years. However, its clinical results are inconsistent. Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded onto allograft can enhance bone formation. This in vitro study investigates whether the increase in temperature related to the polymerisation of bone cement will affect the viability of human MSCs. Methods The viability of human MSCs was measured after incubat...

  6. Neural-Induced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Cochlear Cell Regeneration in Deaf Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Sujeong; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Kim, Song-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Jun, Jae Yeoul; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong; Cho, Yong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In mammals, cochlear hair cell loss is irreversible and may result in a permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Secondary to this hair cell loss, a progressive loss of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is presented. In this study, we have investigated the effects of neural-induced human mesenchymal stem cells (NI-hMSCs) from human bone marrow on sensory neuronal regeneration from neomycin treated deafened guinea pig cochleae. Methods HMSCs were isolated from the bone marrow which was ob...

  7. Differential gene expression profiling of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during adipogenic development.

    OpenAIRE

    Menssen Adriane; Häupl Thomas; Sittinger Michael; Delorme Bruno; Charbord Pierre; Ringe Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Adipogenesis is the developmental process by which mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) differentiate into pre-adipocytes and adipocytes. The aim of the study was to analyze the developmental strategies of human bone marrow MSC developing into adipocytes over a defined time scale. Here we were particularly interested in differentially expressed transcription factors and biochemical pathways. We studied genome-wide gene expression profiling of human MSC based on an adipogenic diffe...

  8. Karyotype stability of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells during in vitro culture

    OpenAIRE

    RUAN, ZHONG-BAO; Zhu, Li; YIN, YI-GANG; Chen, Ge-cai

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the chromosomes of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) change following in vitro culture for several generations. In the present study, umbilical cords from two healthy infants following cesarean delivery were collected aseptically and hUCMSCs were isolated by digestion with collagenase and trypsin, and then cultured in vitro. hUCMSCs with fibroblastic morphology were presented from the human umbilical cord tissue afte...

  9. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injury in stroke rats

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei; Yu, Xinguang; HAN, XIAO; Hou, Jincai; Guo, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that intravenous transplantation of human ...

  10. Targeting and treatment of glioblastomas with human mesenchymal stem cells carrying ferrociphenol lipid nanocapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavreul A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Anne Clavreul,1 Angélique Montagu,2 Anne-Laure Lainé,2 Clément Tétaud,2 Nolwenn Lautram,2 Florence Franconi,3 Catherine Passirani,2 Anne Vessières,4 Claudia N Montero-Menei,2 Philippe Menei1 1Département de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Angers, France; 2INSERM UMR-S 1066, Université d’Angers, LUNAM Université, Angers, France; 3CIFAB-PRIMEX, Université d’Angers, LUNAM Université, Angers, France; 4CNRS-UMR 7223, ENSCP, Paris, France Abstract: Recently developed drug delivery nanosystems, such as lipid nanocapsules (LNCs, hold great promise for the treatment of glioblastomas (GBs. In this study, we used a subpopulation of human mesenchymal stem cells, “marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible” (MIAMI cells, which have endogenous tumor-homing activity, to deliver LNCs containing an organometallic complex (ferrociphenol or Fc-diOH, in the orthotopic U87MG GB model. We determined the optimal dose of Fc-diOH-LNCs that can be carried by MIAMI cells and compared the efficacy of Fc-diOH-LNC-loaded MIAMI cells with that of the free-standing Fc-diOH-LNC system. We showed that MIAMI cells entrapped an optimal dose of about 20 pg Fc-diOH per cell, with no effect on cell viability or migration capacity. The survival of U87MG-bearing mice was longer after the intratumoral injection of Fc-diOH-LNC-loaded MIAMI cells than after the injection of Fc-diOH-LNCs alone. The greater effect of the Fc-diOH-LNC-loaded MIAMI cells may be accounted for by their peritumoral distribution and a longer residence time of the drug within the tumor. These results confirm the potential of combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology to improve the local tissue distribution of anticancer drugs in GB.Keywords: glioblastoma, mesenchymal stem cells, nanoparticle, drug delivery, targeting 

  11. Human mesenchymal stem cells suppress chronic airway inflammation in the murine ovalbumin asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfield, Tracey L; Koloze, Mary; Lennon, Donald P; Zuchowski, Brandon; Yang, Sung Eun; Caplan, Arnold I

    2010-12-01

    Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) introduced intravenously can have profound anti-inflammatory activity resulting in suppression of graft vs. host disease as well as regenerative events in the case of stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of these diseases. hMSCs produce bioactive factors that provide molecular cuing for: 1) immunosuppression of T cells; 2) antiscarring; 3) angiogenesis; 4) antiapoptosis; and 5) regeneration (i.e., mitotic for host-derived progenitor cells). Studies have shown that hMSCs have profound effects on the immune system and are well-tolerated and therapeutically active in immunocompetent rodent models of multiple sclerosis and stroke. Furthermore, intravenous administration of MSCs results in pulmonary localization. Asthma is a major debilitating pulmonary disease that impacts in excess of 150 million people in the world with uncontrolled asthma potentially leading to death. In addition, the socioeconomic impact of asthma-associated illnesses at the pediatric and adult level are in the millions of dollars in healthcare costs and lost days of work. hMSCs may provide a viable multiaction therapeutic for this inflammatory lung disease by secreting bioactive factors or directing cellular activity. Our studies show the effectiveness and specificity of the hMSCs on decreasing chronic airway inflammation associated with the murine ovalbumin model of asthma. In addition, the results from these studies verify the in vivo immunoeffectiveness of hMSCs in rodents and support the potential therapeutic use of hMSCs for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with chronic asthma. PMID:20817776

  12. Expression of Odontogenic Genes in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Sara Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth loss is a common problem and since current tooth replacement methods cannot counter balance with biological tooth structures, regenerating natural tooth structures has become an ideal goal. A challenging problem in tooth regeneration is to find a proper clinically feasible cell to seed.This study was designed to investigate the odontogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs for seeding in tooth regeneration.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, three pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD rats were used at the eleventh embryonic day and rat fetuses were removed surgically using semilunar flap under general anesthesia. The primary mandible was cut using a stereomicroscope. The epithelial and mesenchymal components were separated and the dissected oral epithelium was cultured for 3 days. We used flow cytometry analysis to confirm presence of mesenchymal stem cells and not hematopoietic cells and to demonstrate the presence of oral epithelium. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and cultured oral epithelium were then co-cultured for 14 days. BMSCs cultured alone were used as controls. Expression of two odontogenic genes Pax9 and DMP1 was assessed using quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.Results: Expression of two odontogenic genes, Pax9 and DMP1, were detected in BMSCs co-cultured with oral epithelium but not in the control group.Conclusion: Expression of Pax9 and DMP1 by human BMSCs in the proximity of odontogenic epithelium indicates odontogenic potential of these cells.

  13. Clinical trial perspective for adult and juvenile Huntington's disease using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peter; Torrest, Audrey; Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Annett, Geralyn; Nolta, Jan A; Fink, Kyle D

    2016-05-01

    Progress to date from our group and others indicate that using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports our plan to submit an Investigational New Drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for the future planned Phase 1 safety and tolerability trial of MSC/BDNF in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). There are also potential applications of this approach beyond HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. The MSC/BDNF product could also be considered for studies of regeneration in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. This work also provides a platform for our future gene editing studies, since we will again use MSCs to deliver the needed molecules into the central nervous system. PMID:27335539

  14. Clinical trial perspective for adult and juvenile Huntington's disease using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peter; Torrest, Audrey; Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Annett, Geralyn; Nolta, Jan A.; Fink, Kyle D.

    2016-01-01

    Progress to date from our group and others indicate that using genetically-engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports our plan to submit an Investigational New Drug application to the Food and Drug Administration for the future planned Phase 1 safety and tolerability trial of MSC/BDNF in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). There are also potential applications of this approach beyond HD. Our biological delivery system for BDNF sets the precedent for adult stem cell therapy in the brain and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. The MSC/BDNF product could also be considered for studies of regeneration in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. This work also provides a platform for our future gene editing studies, since we will again use MSCs to deliver the needed molecules into the central nervous system. PMID:27335539

  15. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia;

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marrow...... human skin (human adult skin stromal cells, (hASSCs) and human new-born skin stromal cells (hNSSCs)) grew readily in culture and the growth rate was highest in hNSSCs and lowest in hATSCs. Compared with phenotype of hBM-MSC, all cell populations were CD34(-), CD45(-), CD14(-), CD31(-), HLA-DR(-), CD13......, but the number of cells obtained is limited. Here, we compared the MSC-like cell populations, obtained from alternative sources for MSC: adipose tissue and skin, with the standard phenotype of human bone marrow MSC (BM-MSCs). MSC from human adipose tissue (human adipose stromal cells (hATSCs)) and...

  16. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montzka Katrin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as

  17. Neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on aligned electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofibers with electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junfeng; Cheng, Liang; Sun, Xiaodan; Wang, Xiumei; Jin, Shouhong; Li, Junxiang; Wu, Qiong

    2016-09-01

    Adult central nervous system (CNS) tissue has a limited capacity to recover after trauma or disease. Recent medical cell therapy using polymeric biomaterialloaded stem cells with the capability of differentiation to specific neural population has directed focuses toward the recovery of CNS. Fibers that can provide topographical, biochemical and electrical cues would be attractive for directing the differentiation of stem cells into electro-responsive cells such as neuronal cells. Here we report on the fabrication of an electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofiber film that direct or determine the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), via combination of aligned surface topography, and electrical stimulation (ES). The surface morphology, mechanical properties and electric properties of the film were characterized. Comparing with that on random surface film, expression of neurofilament-lowest and nestin of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stemcells (huMSCs) cultured on film with aligned surface topography and ES were obviously enhanced. These results suggest that aligned topography combining with ES facilitates the neurogenic differentiation of huMSCs and the aligned conductive film can act as a potential nerve scaffold.

  18. Neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on aligned electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofibers with electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junfeng; Cheng, Liang; Sun, Xiaodan; Wang, Xiumei; Jin, Shouhong; Li, Junxiang; Wu, Qiong

    2016-07-01

    Adult central nervous system (CNS) tissue has a limited capacity to recover after trauma or disease. Recent medical cell therapy using polymeric biomaterialloaded stem cells with the capability of differentiation to specific neural population has directed focuses toward the recovery of CNS. Fibers that can provide topographical, biochemical and electrical cues would be attractive for directing the differentiation of stem cells into electro-responsive cells such as neuronal cells. Here we report on the fabrication of an electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofiber film that direct or determine the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), via combination of aligned surface topography, and electrical stimulation (ES). The surface morphology, mechanical properties and electric properties of the film were characterized. Comparing with that on random surface film, expression of neurofilament-lowest and nestin of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stemcells (huMSCs) cultured on film with aligned surface topography and ES were obviously enhanced. These results suggest that aligned topography combining with ES facilitates the neurogenic differentiation of huMSCs and the aligned conductive film can act as a potential nerve scaffold.

  19. Expression of the Argonaute protein PiwiL2 and piRNAs in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiuling; Ma, Qi; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Wilson, Amber; Xia, Linghui; Yu, Hong [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Vascular Biology Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Webster, Keith A., E-mail: kwebster@med.miami.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Vascular Biology Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Piwi (P-element-induced wimpy testis) first discovered in Drosophila is a member of the Argonaute family of micro-RNA binding proteins with essential roles in germ-cell development. The murine homologue of PiwiL2, also known as Mili is selectively expressed in the testes, and mice bearing targeted mutations of the PiwiL2 gene are male-sterile. PiwiL2 proteins are thought to protect the germ line genome by suppressing retrotransposons, stabilizing heterochromatin structure, and regulating target genes during meiosis and mitosis. Here, we report that PiwiL2 and associated piRNAs (piRs) may play similar roles in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells. We found that PiwiL2 is expressed in the cytoplasm of metaphase mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow of adult and aged mice. Knockdown of PiwiL2 with a specific siRNA enhanced cell proliferation, significantly increased the number of cells in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phases and was associated with increased expression of cell cycle genes CCND1, CDK8, microtubule regulation genes, and decreased expression of tumor suppressors Cables 1, LATS, and Cxxc4. The results suggest broader roles for Piwi in genome surveillance beyond the germ line and a possible role in regulating the cell cycle of mesenchymal stem cells.

  20. Expression of the Argonaute protein PiwiL2 and piRNAs in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwi (P-element-induced wimpy testis) first discovered in Drosophila is a member of the Argonaute family of micro-RNA binding proteins with essential roles in germ-cell development. The murine homologue of PiwiL2, also known as Mili is selectively expressed in the testes, and mice bearing targeted mutations of the PiwiL2 gene are male-sterile. PiwiL2 proteins are thought to protect the germ line genome by suppressing retrotransposons, stabilizing heterochromatin structure, and regulating target genes during meiosis and mitosis. Here, we report that PiwiL2 and associated piRNAs (piRs) may play similar roles in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells. We found that PiwiL2 is expressed in the cytoplasm of metaphase mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow of adult and aged mice. Knockdown of PiwiL2 with a specific siRNA enhanced cell proliferation, significantly increased the number of cells in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phases and was associated with increased expression of cell cycle genes CCND1, CDK8, microtubule regulation genes, and decreased expression of tumor suppressors Cables 1, LATS, and Cxxc4. The results suggest broader roles for Piwi in genome surveillance beyond the germ line and a possible role in regulating the cell cycle of mesenchymal stem cells.

  1. Human embryonic stem cell derived mesenchymal progenitors express cardiac markers but do not form contractile cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe M Raynaud

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal progenitors or stromal cells have shown promise as a therapeutic strategy for a range of diseases including heart failure. In this context, we explored the growth and differentiation potential of mesenchymal progenitors (MPs derived in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Similar to MPs isolated from bone marrow, hESC derived MPs (hESC-MPs efficiently differentiated into archetypical mesenchymal derivatives such as chondrocytes and adipocytes. Upon treatment with 5-Azacytidine or TGF-β1, hESC-MPs modified their morphology and up-regulated expression of key cardiac transcription factors such as NKX2-5, MEF2C, HAND2 and MYOCD. Nevertheless, NKX2-5+ hESC-MP derivatives did not form contractile cardiomyocytes, raising questions concerning the suitability of these cells as a platform for cardiomyocyte replacement therapy. Gene profiling experiments revealed that, although hESC-MP derived cells expressed a suite of cardiac related genes, they lacked the complete repertoire of genes associated with bona fide cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that whilst agents such as TGF-β1 and 5-Azacytidine can induce expression of cardiac related genes, but treated cells retain a mesenchymal like phenotype.

  2. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells: a better cell source for nervous system regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Chao; Zhang Liang; Song Lin; Liu Yang; Zou Wei; Piao Hua; Liu Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background In order to suggest an ideal source of adult stem cells for the treatment of nervous system diseases,MSCs from human adipose tissue and bone marrow were isolated and studied to explore the differences with regard to cell morphology,surface markers,neuronal differentiation capacity,especially the synapse structure formation and the secretion of neurotrophic factors.Methods The neuronal differentiation capacity of human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (hADSCs) and bone marrow (hBMSCs) was determined based on nissl body and synapse structure formation,and neural factor secretion function.hADSCs and hBMSCs were isolated and differentiated into neuron-like cells with rat brain-conditioned medium,a potentially rich source of neuronal differentiation promoting signals.Specific neuronal proteins and neural factors were detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis,respectively.Results Flow cytometric analysis showed that both cell types had similar phenotypes.Cell growth curves showed that hADSCs proliferated more quickly than hBMSCs.Both kinds of cells were capable of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation.The morphology of hADSCs and hBMSCs changed during neuronal differentiation and displayed neuronlike cell appearance after 14 days' differentiation.Both hADSCs and hBMSCs were able to differentiate into neuron-like cells based on their production of neuron specific proteins including β-tubulin-Ⅲ,neuron-specific enolase (NSE),nissl bodies,and their ability to secrete brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF).Assessment of synaptop hysin and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) suggested synapse structure formation in differentiated hADSCs and hBMSCs.Conclusions Our results demonstrate that hADSCs have neuronal differentiation potential similar to hBMSC,but with a higher proliferation capacity than hBMSC.Adipose tissue is abundant,easily available and would be a potential ideal

  3. Effect of chondroitin sulfate on osteogenetic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneiders, Wolfgang, E-mail: schneidersw@gmx.de; Rentsch, Claudia; Rehberg, Sebastian; Rein, Susanne; Zwipp, Hans; Rammelt, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has anti-inflammatory properties and increases the regeneration ability of injured bone. In different in vivo investigations on bone defects the addition of CS to calcium phosphate bone cement has lead to an enhanced bone remodeling and increased new bone formation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of CS on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In cell culture experiments hMSCs were incubated on calcium phosphate bone cements with and without CS and cultivated in a proliferation and an osteogenetic differentiation media. Alkaline phosphatase and the proliferation rate were determined on days 1, 7 and 14. Concerning the proliferation rates, no significant differences were detected. On days 1, 7 and 14 a significantly higher activity of alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of osteogenesis, was detected around CS modified cements in both types of media. The addition of CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. To evaluate the influence of the osteoconductive potency of CS in twelve adult male Wistar rats, the interface reaction of cancellous bone to a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite cement containing type I collagen (CDHA/Coll) without and with CS (CDHA/Coll/CS) was evaluated. Cylindrical implants were inserted press-fit into a defect of the tibial head. 28 days after the operation the direct bone contact and the percentage of newly formed bone were significantly higher on CDHA/Coll/CS-implants (p < 0.05). The addition of CS appears to enhance new bone formation on CDHA/Coll-composites in the early stages of bone healing. Possible mechanisms are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of chondroitin sulfate (CS) on bone metabolism was evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In small animal investigation CS seems to enhance osteogenesis in bone healing.

  4. Transplantation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells promotes neurological recovery in an intracerebral hemorrhage rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Honglong; Zhang, Hongri; Yan, Zhongjie; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-06-24

    Human amniotic membrane mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) have recently been suggested as ideal candidate stem cells for cell-based therapy. Many studies have reported the therapeutic effects of hAMSCs in numerous disease models. However, no studies have used hAMSCs to treat intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In the present study, we examined the therapeutic potential of hAMSCs in a rat model of ICH, and characterized the possible mechanisms of action. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to ICH by intrastriatal injection of VII collagenase, and then were intracerebrally administered hAMSCs, fibroblasts, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 24 h after ICH. Compared with the fibroblasts and the PBS control, hAMSCs treatment significantly promoted neurological recovery, and reduced the numbers of ED1(+) activated microglia, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO(+)), and caspase-3(+) cells in the brain injury model. In addition, hAMSCs treatment significantly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the injured brain, and promoted neurogenesis and angiogenesis, compared with the fibroblasts and the PBS control. The transplanted hAMSCs survived for at least 27 days and were negative for β-tubulin III and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Taken together, the results suggest that hAMSCs treatment significantly promotes neurological recovery in rats after ICH. The mechanism of action could be mediated by inhibition of inflammation and apoptosis, increasing neurotrophic factor expression, and promotion of neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Thus, hAMSCs are candidate stem cells for the treatment of ICH. PMID:27188654

  5. Toll-like receptors on human mesenchymal stem cells drive their migration and immunomodulating responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Coffelt, Seth B; Waterman, Ruth S; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2008-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are under study as therapeutic delivery agents that assist in the repair of damaged tissues. To achieve the desired clinical outcomes for this strategy requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that drive the recruitment, migration, and engraftment of hMSCs to the targeted tissues. It is known that hMSCs are recruited to sites of stress or inflammation to fulfill their repair function. It is recognized that toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate stress responses of other bone marrow-derived cells. This study explored the role of TLRs in mediating stress responses of hMSCs. Accordingly, the presence of TLRs in hMSCs was initially established by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. Flow cytometry and fluorescence immunocytochemical analyses confirmed these findings. The stimulation of hMSCs with TLR agonists led to the activation of downstream signaling pathways, including nuclear factor kappaB, AKT, and MAPK. Consequently, activation of these pathways triggered the induction and secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and related TLR gene products as established from cDNA array, immunoassay, and cytokine antibody array analyses. Interestingly, the unique patterns of affected genes, cytokines, and chemokines measured identify these receptors as critical players in the clinically established immunomodulation observed for hMSCs. Lastly, hMSC migration was promoted by TLR ligand exposure as demonstrated by transwell migration assays. Conversely, disruption of TLRs by neutralizing TLR antibodies compromised hMSC migration. This study defines a novel TLR-driven stress and immune modulating response for hMSCs that is critical to consider in the design of stem cell-based therapies. PMID:17916800

  6. Effect of chondroitin sulfate on osteogenetic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has anti-inflammatory properties and increases the regeneration ability of injured bone. In different in vivo investigations on bone defects the addition of CS to calcium phosphate bone cement has lead to an enhanced bone remodeling and increased new bone formation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of CS on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In cell culture experiments hMSCs were incubated on calcium phosphate bone cements with and without CS and cultivated in a proliferation and an osteogenetic differentiation media. Alkaline phosphatase and the proliferation rate were determined on days 1, 7 and 14. Concerning the proliferation rates, no significant differences were detected. On days 1, 7 and 14 a significantly higher activity of alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of osteogenesis, was detected around CS modified cements in both types of media. The addition of CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. To evaluate the influence of the osteoconductive potency of CS in twelve adult male Wistar rats, the interface reaction of cancellous bone to a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite cement containing type I collagen (CDHA/Coll) without and with CS (CDHA/Coll/CS) was evaluated. Cylindrical implants were inserted press-fit into a defect of the tibial head. 28 days after the operation the direct bone contact and the percentage of newly formed bone were significantly higher on CDHA/Coll/CS-implants (p < 0.05). The addition of CS appears to enhance new bone formation on CDHA/Coll-composites in the early stages of bone healing. Possible mechanisms are discussed. - Highlights: ► The influence of chondroitin sulfate (CS) on bone metabolism was evaluated. ► CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. ► In small animal investigation CS seems to enhance osteogenesis in bone healing.

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Fu-jiang; FENG Shi-qing

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review the recent studies about human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) and advances in the treatment of spinal cord injury, Data sources Published articles (1983-2007) about hUCMSCs and spinal cord injury were selected using Medline. Study selection Articles selected were relevant to development of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for transplantation in spinal cord injury therapy. Of 258 originally identifiied arises 51 were selected that specifically addressed the stated purpose. Results Recent work has revealed that hUCMSCs share most of the characteristics with MSCs derived from bone marrow and are more appropriate to transplantation for cell based therapies. Conclusions Human umbilical cord could be regarded as a source of MSCs for experimental and clinical needs. In addition, as a peculiar source of stem cells, hUCMSCs may play an important role in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  8. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts.

  9. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  10. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Mateos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  11. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  12. Conditioned Medium From Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Limits Infarct Size and Enhances Angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Cervio, Elisabetta; Calvillo, Laura; Copes, Francesco; Pisano, Federica; Mura, Manuela; Kleijn, Lennaert; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Viarengo, Gianluca; Rosti, Vittorio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Roccio, Marianna; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate whether human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMCs) can exert beneficial paracrine effects on infarcted rat hearts. In particular, the administration of hAMC-conditioned medium repaired ischemic damage through cardioprotection and angiogenesis. Finally, several putative active paracrine mediators that might account for the effects observed were identified by gene and protein arrays.

  13. Exosomes Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Relieve Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanyuan Zhao; Xiaoxian Sun; Wenming Cao; Jie Ma; Li Sun; Hui Qian; Wei Zhu; Wenrong Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating whether human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell- (hucMSC-) derived exosomes (hucMSC-exosomes) have a protective effect on acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Exosomes were characterized under transmission electron microscopy and the particles of exosomes were further examined through nanoparticle tracking analysis. Exosomes (400 μg protein) were intravenously administrated immediately following ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary arte...

  14. Suspension Culture Alters Insulin Secretion in Induced Human Umbilical Cord Matrix-Derived Mesenchymal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Seyedi; Alireza Farsinejad; Seyed Amirmahdi Nematollahi-Mahani; Touba Eslaminejad; Seyed Noureddin Nematollahi-Mahani

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Worldwide, diabetes mellitus (DM) is an ever-increasing metabolic disorder. A promising approach to the treatment of DM is the implantation of insulin producing cells (IPC) that have been derived from various stem cells. Culture conditions play a pivotal role in the quality and quantity of the differentiated cells. In this experimental study, we have applied various culture conditions to differentiate human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal cells (hUCMs) into...

  15. Environmental parameters influence non-viral transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    King, William J.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Choi, Siyoung; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Non-viral transfection is a promising technique which could be used to increase the therapeutic potential of stem cells. The purpose of this study was to explore practical culture parameters of relevance in potential human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) clinical and tissue engineering applications, including type of polycationic transfection reagent, N/P ratio and dose of polycation/pDNA polyplexes, cell passage number, cell density, and cell proliferation. The non-viral transfection efficiency...

  16. Micropatterned 3-Dimensional Hydrogel System to Study Human Endothelial-Mesenchymal Stem Cell Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Trkov, Sasa; Eng, George; Di Liddo, Rosa; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    The creation of vascularized engineered tissues of clinically relevant size is a major challenge of tissue engineering. While it is known that endothelial and mural vascular cells are integral to the formation of stable blood vessels, the specific cell type and optimal conditions for engineered vascular networks are poorly understood. To this end, we investigated the vasculogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) populations derived from three different sources: (i) bone marrow a...

  17. Mechanical fibrinogen-depletion supports heparin-free mesenchymal stem cell propagation in human platelet lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Lener, Thomas; Schmid, Doris; Streif, Doris A.; Salzer, Tina; Öller, Michaela; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Fischer, Thorsten; Jacobs, Volker R.; Schallmoser, Katharina; Gimona, Mario; Rohde, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background Pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) is an efficient alternative to xenogenic supplements for ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in clinical studies. Currently, porcine heparin is used in pHPL-supplemented medium to prevent clotting due to plasmatic coagulation factors. We therefore searched for an efficient and reproducible medium preparation method that avoids clot formation while omitting animal-derived heparin. Methods We established a protocol to deplete fibrino...

  18. MT1-MMP controls human mesenchymal stem cell trafficking and differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Changlian; Li, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Yuexian; Rowe, R. Grant; Weiss, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) localized to bone marrow, nonhematopoietic organs, as well as perivascular niches are postulated to traffic through type I collagen-rich stromal tissues to first infiltrate sites of tissue damage, inflammation, or neoplasia and then differentiate. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms supporting the ability of hMSCs to remodel 3-dimensional (3D) collagenous barriers during trafficking or differentiation remain undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that hMSCs ...

  19. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in mineralized alginate matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Marita Westhrin; Minli Xie; Olderøy, Magnus Ø.; Pawel Sikorski; Strand, Berit L; Therese Standal

    2015-01-01

    Mineralized biomaterials are promising for use in bone tissue engineering. Culturing osteogenic cells in such materials will potentially generate biological bone grafts that may even further augment bone healing. Here, we studied osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in an alginate hydrogel system where the cells were co-immobilized with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) for gradual mineralization of the microenvironment. MSC were embedded in unmodified alginate beads and ...

  20. Human Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell: A Source for Cell-Based Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ayatollahi, M.; Geramizadeh, B; Zakerinia, M; M Ramzi; Yaghobi, R.; Hadadi, P.; Rezvani, A. R.; Aghdai, M.; N Azarpira; Karimi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into many cell types, and modulate immune responses, makes them an attractive therapeutic tool for cell transplantation and tissue engineering. Objective: This project was designed for isolation, culture, and characterization of human marrow-derived MSCs based on the immunophenotypic markers and the differentiation potential. Methods: Bone marrow of healthy donors was aspirated from the iliac crest. Mononuclear cells we...

  1. Isolation, culture and characterization of postnatal human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Kadivar; Shohreh Khatami; Yousef Mortazavi; Masoud Soleimani; Mohammad Taghikhani; Mohammad Ali Shokrgozar

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of reports that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the placenta/umbilical cord stroma, the present study was undertaken to isolate and characterize MSCs from the human umbilical cord veins. In this investigation, a cell population was isolated which was derived from the endothelium/subendothelium layers of 20 umbilical cord veins obtained from term deliveries using a solution of 0.1% collagenase type IV. Results suggest that these cells possess morphological, immu...

  2. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human mesenchymal stem cells of parotid gland origin

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xing; Xu, Nuo; Meng, Cen; Wang, Bianhong; Yuan, Jinghong; Wang, Caiyun; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The technology to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent state allows the generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and holds a great promise for regenerative medicine and autologous transplantation. Here we, for the first time, identified mesenchymal stem cells isolated from parotid gland (hPMSCs) as a suitable candidate for iPSC production. In the present study, hPMSCs were isolated from parotid gland specimens in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of th...

  3. Different Balance of Wnt Signaling in Adult and Fetal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciejewska, Maja M; Maijenburg, Marijke W; Gilissen, Christian; Kleijer, Marion; Vermeul, Kim; Weijer, Kees; Veltman, Joris A; von Lindern, Marieke; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Voermans, Carlijn

    2016-06-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are applied as novel therapeutics for their regenerative and immune-suppressive capacities. Clinical applications, however, require extensive expansion of MSCs. Fetal bone marrow-derived MSCs (FBMSCs) proliferate faster than adult bone marrow-derived MSC (ABMSCs). To optimize expansion and function of MSC in general, we explored the differences between ABMSC and FBMSC. Gene expression profiling implicated differential expression of genes encoding proteins in the Wnt signaling pathway, including excreted inhibitors of Wnt signaling, particularly by ABMSC. Both MSC types had a similar basal level of canonical Wnt signaling. Abrogation of autocrine Wnt production by inhibitor of Wnt production-2 (IWP2) reduced canonical Wnt signaling and cell proliferation of FBMSCs, but hardly affected ABMSC. Addition of exogenous Wnt3a, however, induced expression of the target genes lymphocyte enhancer-binding factor (LEF) and T-cell factor (TCF) faster and at lower Wnt3a levels in ABMSC compared to FBMSC. Medium replacement experiments indicated that ABMSC produce an inhibitor of Wnt signaling that is effective on ABMSC itself but not on FBMSC, whereas FBMSC excrete (Wnt) factors that stimulate proliferation of ABMSC. In contrast, FBMSC were not able to support hematopoiesis, whereas ABMSC displayed hematopoietic support sensitive to IWP2, the inhibitor of Wnt factor excretion. In conclusion, ABMSC and FBMSC differ in their Wnt signature. While FBMSC produced factors, including Wnt signals, that enhanced MSC proliferation, ABMSC produced Wnt factors in a setting that enhanced hematopoietic support. Thus, further unraveling the molecular basis of this phenomenon may lead to improvement of clinical expansion protocols of ABMSCs. PMID:27154244

  4. Establishing criteria for human mesenchymal stem cell potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Rai, Bina; Sathiyanathan, Padmapriya; Puan, Kia Joo; Rötzschke, Olaf; Hui, James H; Raghunath, Michael; Stanton, Lawrence W; Nurcombe, Victor; Cool, Simon M

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to identify critical determinants of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) potency using in vitro and in vivo attributes of cells isolated from the bone marrow of age- and sex-matched donors. Adherence to plastic was not indicative of potency, yet capacity for long-term expansion in vitro varied considerably between donors, allowing the grouping of MSCs from the donors into either those with high-growth capacity or low-growth capacity. Using this grouping strategy, high-growth capacity MSCs were smaller in size, had greater colony-forming efficiency, and had longer telomeres. Cell-surface biomarker analysis revealed that the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) criteria did not distinguish between high-growth capacity and low-growth capacity MSCs, whereas STRO-1 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha were preferentially expressed on high-growth capacity MSCs. These cells also had the highest mean expression of the mRNA transcripts TWIST-1 and DERMO-1. Irrespective of these differences, both groups of donor MSCs produced similar levels of key growth factors and cytokines involved in tissue regeneration and were capable of multilineage differentiation. However, high-growth capacity MSCs produced approximately double the volume of mineralized tissue compared to low-growth capacity MSCs when assessed for ectopic bone-forming ability. The additional phenotypic criteria presented in this study when combined with the existing ISCT minimum criteria and working proposal will permit an improved assessment of MSC potency and provide a basis for establishing the quality of MSCs prior to their therapeutic application. PMID:25752682

  5. Comparison between human fetal and adult skin

    OpenAIRE

    Coolen, N.A.; Schouten, K.C.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2009-01-01

    Healing of early-gestation fetal wounds results in scarless healing. Since the capacity for regeneration is probably inherent to the fetal skin itself, knowledge of the fetal skin composition may contribute to the understanding of fetal wound healing. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression profiles of different epidermal and dermal components in the human fetal and adult skin. In the human fetal skin (ranging from 13 to 22 weeks’ gestation) and adult skin biopsies, the expression...

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation, gene expression and protein production in human platelet-rich plasma-supplemented media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Romina Amable

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is increasingly used as a cell culture supplement, in order to reduce the contact of human cells with animal-derived products during in vitro expansion. The effect of supplementation changes on cell growth and protein production is not fully characterized. METHODS: Human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue and Wharton's Jelly were isolated and cultured in PRP-supplemented media. Proliferation, in vitro differentiation, expression of cell surface markers, mRNA expression of key genes and protein secretion were quantified. RESULTS: 10% PRP sustained five to tenfold increased cell proliferation as compared to 10% fetal bovine serum. Regarding cell differentiation, PRP reduced adipogenic differentiation and increased calcium deposits in bone marrow and adipose tissue-mesenchymal stromal cells. Wharton's Jelly derived mesenchymal stromal cells secreted higher concentrations of chemokines and growth factors than other mesenchymal stromal cells when cultured in PRP-supplemented media. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells secreted higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic proteins. Mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue secreted higher amounts of extracellular matrix components. CONCLUSIONS: Mesenchymal stromal cells purified from different tissues have distinct properties regarding differentiation, angiogenic, inflammatory and matrix remodeling potential when cultured in PRP supplemented media. These abilities should be further characterized in order to choose the best protocols for their therapeutic use.

  7. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAMα cells and induced to osteogenic status—their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAMα cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAMα cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAMα cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAMα cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: ► Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAMα cells) that have the properties of MSCs. ► HAMα cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. ► Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAMα was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. ► HAMα cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  8. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  9. Stromal mesenchyme cell genes of the human prostate and bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Laura E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal mesenchyme cells play an important role in epithelial differentiation and likely in cancer as well. Induction of epithelial differentiation is organ-specific, and the genes responsible could be identified through a comparative genomic analysis of the stromal cells from two different organs. These genes might be aberrantly expressed in cancer since cancer could be viewed as due to a defect in stromal signaling. We propose to identify the prostate stromal genes by analysis of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells, and to examine their expression in prostate cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to cluster designation (CD cell surface antigens was first used to characterize the stromas of the prostate and bladder. Stromal cells were prepared from either prostate or bladder tissue for cell culture. RNA was isolated from the cultured cells and analyzed by DNA microarrays. Expression of candidate genes in normal prostate and prostate cancer was examined by RT-PCR. Results The bladder stroma was phenotypically different from that of the prostate. Most notable was the presence of a layer of CD13+ cells adjacent to the urothelium. This structural feature was also seen in the mouse bladder. The prostate stroma was uniformly CD13-. A number of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells were identified. One prostate gene, proenkephalin (PENK, was of interest because it encodes a hormone. Secreted proteins such as hormones and bioactive peptides are known to mediate cell-cell signaling. Prostate stromal expression of PENK was verified by an antibody raised against a PENK peptide, by RT-PCR analysis of laser-capture microdissected stromal cells, and by database analysis. Gene expression analysis showed that PENK expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Conclusion Our findings show that the histologically similar stromas of the prostate and

  10. Transcriptomic comparisons between cultured human adipose tissue-derived pericytes and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, sometimes called mesenchymal stem cells, are cultured cells able to give rise to mature mesenchymal cells such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and to secrete a wide range of trophic and immunomodulatory molecules. Evidence indicates that pericytes, cells that surround and maintain physical connections with endothelial cells in blood vessels, can give rise to MSCs (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2008 [1]; Caplan and Correa, 2011 [2]. We have compared the transcriptomes of highly purified, human adipose tissue pericytes subjected to culture-expansion in pericyte medium or MSC medium, with that of human adipose tissue MSCs isolated with traditional methods to test the hypothesis that their transcriptomes are similar (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2015 [3]. Here, we provide further information and analyses of microarray data from three pericyte populations cultured in pericyte medium, three pericyte populations cultured in MSC medium, and three adipose tissue MSC populations deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE67747.

  11. The effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Foroutan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been introduced as appropriate cells for tissue engineering and medical applications. Some studies have shown that topography of materials especially physical surface characteristics and particles size could enhance adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts. In the present research, we studied the distinction effect of 30 and 60 μg/ml of zinc oxide (ZnO on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast. Materials and Methods: After the third passage, human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to 30 and 60 μg/ml of ZnO nanoparticles having a size of 30 nm. The control group has received no ZnO nanoparticles. On day 15 of incubation for monitoring the cellular differentiation, alizarin red staining and RT-PCR assays were performed to evaluate the level of osteopontin, osteocalsin and alkaline phosphatase genes expression. Results:In the group receiving 30 μg/ml of ZnO nanoparticles, the expression of osteogenic markers such as alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and osteopontin genes were significantly higher than both control and the group receiving 60 μg/ml ZnO nanoparticle. These data also confirmed by alizarin red staining. Conclusion: It seems the process of differentiation of MSCs affected by ZnO nanoparticles is dependent on dose as well as on the size of ZnO.

  12. Adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on titanium nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Lavenus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium implants are widely used in orthopaedic and dental surgery. Surface properties play a major role in cell and tissue interactions. The adhesion and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were studied as a function of nanostructures. Titanium surfaces with nanopores 30, 150 and 300 nm in diameter were prepared by physical vapour deposition. PCR arrays indicated that the expression of integrins was modulated by the nanopore size. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs exhibited more branched cell morphology on Ti30 than on other surfaces. Ti30 and Ti150 induced osteoblastic differentiation while Ti300 had a limited effect. Overall, nanopores of 30 nm may promote early osteoblastic differentiation and, consequently, rapid osseointegration of titanium implants.

  13. Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Human Trophoblast Cell Functions In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trophoblast cell dysfunction is involved in many disorders during pregnancy such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. Few treatments exist, however, that target improving trophoblast cell function. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are capable of self-renewing, can undergo multilineage differentiation, and have homing abilities; in addition, they have immunomodulatory effects and paracrine properties and thus are a prospective source for cell therapy. To identify whether hUCMSCs can regulate trophoblast cell functions, we treated trophoblast cells with hUCMSC supernatant or cocultured them with hUCMSCs. Both treatments remarkably enhanced the migration and invasion abilities of trophoblast cells and upregulated their proliferation ability. At a certain concentration, hUCMSCs also modulated hCG, PIGF, and sEndoglin levels in the trophoblast culture medium. Thus, hUCMSCs have a positive effect on trophoblast cellular functions, which may provide a new avenue for treatment of placenta-related diseases during pregnancy.

  14. Isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp and follicle tissue of human third molar tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Yadegary Z; Mojarrad S; Mashadi Abbas F; Sharifi B

    2011-01-01

    "nBackground and Aims: In the last decade, several studies have reported the isolation of stem cell population from different dental sources, while their mesenchymal nature is still controversial. The aim of this study was to isolate stem cells from mature human dental pulp and follicle and to determine their mesenchymal nature before differentiation based on the ISCT (International Society for Cellular Therapy) criteria."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, intact hu...

  15. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce systemic inflammation and attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jianjun; Li Dong; Liu Xiaomei; Tang Shuhai; Wei Fengcai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties and simultaneously lack the ability to illicit immune responses. Hence, MSCs have emerged as a promising candidate for cellular therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. Within the context of this study, we investigated whether human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) in a rat model. Methods ALI was induced ...

  16. The use of small interfering RNAs to inhibit adipocyte differentiation in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in functional genomics and offers innovative approaches in the development of novel therapeutics. Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a unique cell source for tissue engineering/regeneration strategies. The current study examined the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) against human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) to suppress adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis) in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells. Adipogenesis was investigated using cellular and biochemical analysis. Transient transfection with PPARγ-siRNA using a liposomal-based strategy resulted in a significant inhibition of adipogenesis in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells, compared to controls (cell, liposomal and negative siRNA). The inhibitory effect of PPARγ-siRNA was supported by testing human PPARγ mRNA and adipogenic associated genes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 as well as examination of fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) expression, an adipocyte-specific marker. The current studies indicate that PPARγ-siRNA is a useful tool to study adipogenesis in human cells, with potential applications both therapeutic and in the elucidation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in the modulation of cell differentiation in human mesenchymal cells

  17. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cryopreservation and Thawing Decrease α4-Integrin Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irioda, Ana Carolina; Cassilha, Rafael; Zocche, Larissa; Francisco, Julio Cesar; Cunha, Ricardo Correa; Ferreira, Priscila Elias; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Ferreira, Reginaldo Justino; Mogharbel, Bassam Felipe; Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Souza, Daiany; Beltrame, Mirian Perlingeiro; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The effects of cryopreservation on adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are not clearly documented, as there is a growing body of evidence about the importance of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative therapies. The aim of this study was to analyze human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells phenotypic expression (CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD49d), colony forming unit ability, viability, and differentiation potential before and after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods. 12 samples of the adipose tissue were collected from a healthy donor using the liposuction technique. The cell isolation was performed by enzymatic digestion and then the cells were cultured up to passage 2. Before and after cryopreservation the immunophenotype, cellular viability analysis by flow cytometer, colony forming units ability, differentiation potential into adipocytes and osteoblasts as demonstrated by Oil Red O and Alizarin Red staining, respectively. Results. The immunophenotypic markers expression was largely preserved, and their multipotency was maintained. However, after cryopreservation, the cells decreased α4-integrin expression (CD49d), cell viability, and number of colony forming units. Conclusions. These findings suggest that ADMSC transplanted after cryopreservation might compromise the retention of transplanted cells in the host tissue. Therefore, further studies are warranted to standardize protocols related to cryopreservation to attain full benefits of stem cell therapy. PMID:26981129

  18. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cryopreservation and Thawing Decrease α4-Integrin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Irioda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The effects of cryopreservation on adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are not clearly documented, as there is a growing body of evidence about the importance of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative therapies. The aim of this study was to analyze human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells phenotypic expression (CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD49d, colony forming unit ability, viability, and differentiation potential before and after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods. 12 samples of the adipose tissue were collected from a healthy donor using the liposuction technique. The cell isolation was performed by enzymatic digestion and then the cells were cultured up to passage 2. Before and after cryopreservation the immunophenotype, cellular viability analysis by flow cytometer, colony forming units ability, differentiation potential into adipocytes and osteoblasts as demonstrated by Oil Red O and Alizarin Red staining, respectively. Results. The immunophenotypic markers expression was largely preserved, and their multipotency was maintained. However, after cryopreservation, the cells decreased α4-integrin expression (CD49d, cell viability, and number of colony forming units. Conclusions. These findings suggest that ADMSC transplanted after cryopreservation might compromise the retention of transplanted cells in the host tissue. Therefore, further studies are warranted to standardize protocols related to cryopreservation to attain full benefits of stem cell therapy.

  19. Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells by Using A Lentiviral Vector Carrying PDX1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Allahverdi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Type I diabetes is an immunologically-mediated devastation of insulin producing cells (IPCs in the pancreatic islet. Stem cells that produce β-cells are a new promising tool. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are self renewing multi potent cells showing capabilities to differentiate into ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal tissues. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor 1 (PDX1 is a master regulator gene required for embryonic development of the pancreas and is crucial for normal pancreatic islets activities in adults. Materials and Methods: We induced the over-expression of the PDX1 gene in human bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs by Lenti-PDX1 in order to generate IPCs. Next, we examine the ability of the cells by measuring insulin/c-peptide production and INSULIN and PDX1 gene expressions. Results: After transduction, MSCs changed their morphology at day 5 and gradually differentiated into IPCs. INSULIN and PDX1 expressions were confirmed by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and immunostaining. IPC secreted insulin and C-peptide in the media that contained different glucose concentrations. Conclusion: MSCs differentiated into IPCs by genetic manipulation. Our result showed that lentiviral vectors could deliver PDX1 gene to MSCs and induce pancreatic differentiation.

  20. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote regeneration of crush-injured rat sciatic nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi-Ae Sung; Jong-Ho Lee; Hun Jong Jung; Jung-Woo Lee; Jin-Yong Lee; Kang-Mi Pang; Sang Bae Yoo; Mohammad S. Alrashdan; Soung-Min Kim; Jeong Won Jahng

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells can promote neural regeneration following brain injury. However, the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in guiding peripheral nerve regeneration remain poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the effects of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells on neural regeneration using a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106) or a PBS control were injected into the crush-injured segment of the sciatic nerve. Four weeks after cell injection, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase receptor B mRNA expression at the lesion site was increased in comparison to control. Furthermore, sciatic function index, Fluoro Gold-labeled neuron counts and axon density were also significantly increased when compared with control. Our results indicate that human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote the functional recovery of crush-injured sciatic nerves.

  1. In vitro epigenetic reprogramming of human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vecellio

    Full Text Available Adult human cardiac mesenchymal-like stromal cells (CStC represent a relatively accessible cell type useful for therapy. In this light, their conversion into cardiovascular precursors represents a potential successful strategy for cardiac repair. The aim of the present work was to reprogram CStC into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors using epigenetically active small molecules. CStC were exposed to low serum (5% FBS in the presence of 5 µM all-trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA, 5 µM Phenyl Butyrate (PB, and 200 µM diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETA/NO, to create a novel epigenetically active cocktail (EpiC. Upon treatment the expression of markers typical of cardiac resident stem cells such as c-Kit and MDR-1 were up-regulated, together with the expression of a number of cardiovascular-associated genes including KDR, GATA6, Nkx2.5, GATA4, HCN4, NaV1.5, and α-MHC. In addition, profiling analysis revealed that a significant number of microRNA involved in cardiomyocyte biology and cell differentiation/proliferation, including miR 133a, 210 and 34a, were up-regulated. Remarkably, almost 45% of EpiC-treated cells exhibited a TTX-sensitive sodium current and, to a lower extent in a few cells, also the pacemaker I(f current. Mechanistically, the exposure to EpiC treatment introduced global histone modifications, characterized by increased levels of H3K4Me3 and H4K16Ac, as well as reduced H4K20Me3 and H3s10P, a pattern compatible with reduced proliferation and chromatin relaxation. Consistently, ChIP experiments performed with H3K4me3 or H3s10P histone modifications revealed the presence of a specific EpiC-dependent pattern in c-Kit, MDR-1, and Nkx2.5 promoter regions, possibly contributing to their modified expression. Taken together, these data indicate that CStC may be epigenetically reprogrammed to acquire molecular and biological properties associated with competent cardiovascular precursors.

  2. Modulation of human mesenchymal stem cell immunogenicity through forced expression of human cytomegalovirus us proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa A Soland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are promising candidates for cell therapy, as they migrate to areas of injury, differentiate into a broad range of specialized cells, and have immunomodulatory properties. However, MSC are not invisible to the recipient's immune system, and upon in vivo administration, allogeneic MSC are able to trigger immune responses, resulting in rejection of the transplanted cells, precluding their full therapeutic potential. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV has developed several strategies to evade cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL and Natural Killer (NK cell recognition. Our goal is to exploit HCMV immunological evasion strategies to reduce MSC immunogenicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genetically engineered human MSC to express HCMV proteins known to downregulate HLA-I expression, and investigated whether modified MSC were protected from CTL and NK attack. Flow cytometric analysis showed that amongst the US proteins tested, US6 and US11 efficiently reduced MSC HLA-I expression, and mixed lymphocyte reaction demonstrated a corresponding decrease in human and sheep mononuclear cell proliferation. NK killing assays showed that the decrease in HLA-I expression did not result in increased NK cytotoxicity, and that at certain NK∶MSC ratios, US11 conferred protection from NK cytotoxic effects. Transplantation of MSC-US6 or MSC-US11 into pre-immune fetal sheep resulted in increased liver engraftment when compared to control MSC, as demonstrated by qPCR and immunofluorescence analyses. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that engineering MSC to express US6 and US11 can be used as a means of decreasing recognition of MSC by the immune system, allowing higher levels of engraftment in an allogeneic transplantation setting. Since one of the major factors responsible for the failure of allogeneic-donor MSC to engraft is the mismatch of HLA-I molecules between the donor and the recipient, MSC-US6 and MSC-US11

  3. DAPT inhibits the chondrogenesis of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hu Xiaoke; Zhang Jiawen; Shao Xinxin; Luo Ermei; Yu Li

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling plays a key role in cell proliferation and differentiation, and is important in several biological processes, but its role in the chondrogenesis of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) is still unknown. N-[N-(3,5- difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl)]-(S)-phenylglycinet-butyl ester (DAPT) is the inhibitor of Notch pathway. The aim of this study is to investgate the influence of DAPT on the chondrogenesis of UC-MSCs. In our study, UC-MSCs wer...

  4. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  5. Preliminary study on the freeze-drying of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shao-zhi; Qian, Huan; Wang, Zhen; Fan, Ju-li; Zhou, Qian; Guang-ming CHEN; Li, Rui; Fu, Shan; Sun, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Long-term preservation and easy transportation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) will facilitate their application in medical treatment and bioengineering. A pilot study on the freeze-drying of hBM-MSCs was carried out. hBM-MSCs were loaded with trehalose. The glass transition temperature of the freeze-drying suspension was measured to provide information for the cooling and primary drying experiment. After freeze-drying, various rehydration processes were tested....

  6. Fasting inhibits human cancer progression via the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process: Important evidence unraveled

    OpenAIRE

    Ala-Eddin Al Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic cancer disease is responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths in human cancer patients. In parallel, recently it was pointed-out that fasting could play an important role during cancer treatment and progression via the deregulation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) as well as others growth factors and genes. Meanwhile, it is established that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a major process for the progression of cancer cells from non-invasive to invasi...

  7. MIR146A inhibits JMJD3 expression and osteogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huszar, Jessica M.; Payne, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling is important for cell differentiation. Histone methyltransferase EZH2 and histone demethylase JMJD3 (KDM6B) modulate levels of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). Interplay between the two modulators influence lineage specification in stem cells. Here, we identified microRNA MIR146A to be a negative regulator of JMJD3. In the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), we observed an upregulation of JMJD3 and a downregulation of MIR146A...

  8. Biomimetic alginate/polyacrylamide porous scaffold supports human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the development of alginate/polyacrylamide (ALG/PAAm) porous hydrogels based on interpenetrating polymer network structure for human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis. Three ALG/PAAm hydrogels at molar ratios of 10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 were prepared and characterized with enhanced elastic and rubbery mechanical properties, which are similar to native human cartilage tissues. Their elasticity and swelling properties were also studied under different physiological pH conditions. Finally, in vitro tests demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells could proliferate on the as-synthesized hydrogels with improved alkaline phosphatase activities. These results suggest that ALG/PAAm hydrogels may be a promising biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • ALG/PAAm hydrogels were prepared at different molar ratios for cartilage tissue engineering. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels feature an interpenetrating polymer network structure. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels demonstrate strengthened elastic and rubbery mechanical properties. • hMSCs could be cultured on the ALG/PAAm hydrogels for proliferation and chondrogenesis

  9. Biomimetic alginate/polyacrylamide porous scaffold supports human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China); Yuan, Yasheng, E-mail: yuanyasheng@163.com [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China); Eaton-Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Chi, Fanglu [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China)

    2014-09-01

    We describe the development of alginate/polyacrylamide (ALG/PAAm) porous hydrogels based on interpenetrating polymer network structure for human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis. Three ALG/PAAm hydrogels at molar ratios of 10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 were prepared and characterized with enhanced elastic and rubbery mechanical properties, which are similar to native human cartilage tissues. Their elasticity and swelling properties were also studied under different physiological pH conditions. Finally, in vitro tests demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells could proliferate on the as-synthesized hydrogels with improved alkaline phosphatase activities. These results suggest that ALG/PAAm hydrogels may be a promising biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • ALG/PAAm hydrogels were prepared at different molar ratios for cartilage tissue engineering. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels feature an interpenetrating polymer network structure. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels demonstrate strengthened elastic and rubbery mechanical properties. • hMSCs could be cultured on the ALG/PAAm hydrogels for proliferation and chondrogenesis.

  10. In Vitro Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Cardiomyocyte-like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihaneh Motamedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been recognized as potentialcandidates for cell therapy. In the present study, the ability of human bone marrow mesenchymalstem cells (hBMSCs to differentiate into cells with characteristics of cardiomyocytesin vitro was investigated.Materials and Methods: hBMSCs cultured in enriched medium were treated with oxytocinand 5-azacytidin. The differentiation of hBMSCs into cells that expressed cardiacspecificgenes such as α3-actinin, alpha - myosin heavy chain (α-MHC, beta - myosinheavy chain (β-MHC, myosin light chain isoform 2a (MLC2a, myosin light chain isoform2v (MLC2v, artial natriuretic factor (ANF, GATA4 and oxytocin receptor (OTR was investigatedby reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Protein expressionsof β-actinin and troponin I-C in the cells were analyzed through immunofluorescencestaining.Results: MSCs are spindle-shaped with irregular processes. Cells treated with oxytocinand 5-azacytidin connected with adjoining cells to form myotube-like structures. Expressionsof a number of cardiac-specific genes were detected by RT-PCR. Immunofluorescencestaining analysis showed that the differentiated cells stained positively for β-actininand troponin I-C protein.Conclusion: These results indicate that adult hBMSCs can differentiate into cardiomyocytesin vitro by treatment with oxytocin and 5-azacytidin, and can be considered as asource of cells for cellular cardiomyoplasty.

  11. Derivation of Lung Epithelium from Human Cord Blood–derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sueblinvong, Viranuj; Loi, Roberto; Eisenhauer, Philip L.; Bernstein, Ira M.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Recent studies have suggested that both embryonic stem cells and adult bone marrow stem cells can participate in the regeneration and repair of diseased adult organs, including the lungs. However, the extent of airway epithelial remodeling with adult marrow stem cells is low, and there are no available in vivo data with embryonic stem cells. Human umbilical cord blood contains both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic stem cells, which have been used clinically as an alternative to b...

  12. Nukbone® promotes proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from human amniotic membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Nayeli; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana G. [Depto. Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Enríquez-Jiménez, Juana [Depto. Biología de la Reproducción, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ), México City 14000 (Mexico); Alcántara-Quintana, Luz E. [Subd. de Investigación, Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City 07370 (Mexico); Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth [Depto. Biología Molecular e Histocompatibilidad, Hospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, México City 4800 (Mexico); Piña-Barba, María C. [Depto. Materiales Metálicos y Cerámicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando [Depto. Biología Celular y Tisular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México City 04510 (Mexico); and others

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Nukbone showed to be a good scaffold for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. •Nukbone induced osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. •Results showed that Nukbone offer an excellent option for bone tissue regeneration due to properties. -- Abstract: Bovine bone matrix Nukbone® (NKB) is an osseous tissue-engineering biomaterial that retains its mineral and organic phases and its natural bone topography and has been used as a xenoimplant for bone regeneration in clinics. There are not studies regarding its influence of the NKB in the behavior of cells during the repairing processes. The aim of this research is to demonstrate that NKB has an osteoinductive effect in human mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs). Results indicated that NKB favors the AM-hMSCs adhesion and proliferation up to 7 days in culture as shown by the scanning electron microscopy and proliferation measures using an alamarBlue assay. Furthermore, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, it was detected that two gene expression markers of osteoblastic differentiation: the core binding factor and osteocalcin were higher for AM-hMSCs co-cultured with NKB in comparison with cultivated cells in absence of the biomaterial. As the results indicate, NKB possess the capability for inducing successfully the osteoblastic differentiation of AM-hMSC, so that, NKB is an excellent xenoimplant option for repairing bone tissue defects.

  13. Nukbone® promotes proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from human amniotic membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Nukbone showed to be a good scaffold for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. •Nukbone induced osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. •Results showed that Nukbone offer an excellent option for bone tissue regeneration due to properties. -- Abstract: Bovine bone matrix Nukbone® (NKB) is an osseous tissue-engineering biomaterial that retains its mineral and organic phases and its natural bone topography and has been used as a xenoimplant for bone regeneration in clinics. There are not studies regarding its influence of the NKB in the behavior of cells during the repairing processes. The aim of this research is to demonstrate that NKB has an osteoinductive effect in human mesenchymal stem cells from amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs). Results indicated that NKB favors the AM-hMSCs adhesion and proliferation up to 7 days in culture as shown by the scanning electron microscopy and proliferation measures using an alamarBlue assay. Furthermore, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, it was detected that two gene expression markers of osteoblastic differentiation: the core binding factor and osteocalcin were higher for AM-hMSCs co-cultured with NKB in comparison with cultivated cells in absence of the biomaterial. As the results indicate, NKB possess the capability for inducing successfully the osteoblastic differentiation of AM-hMSC, so that, NKB is an excellent xenoimplant option for repairing bone tissue defects

  14. Periodic heat shock accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in pellet culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of diseases that seriously affect elderly people's quality of life. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs offer a potential promise for the joint repair in OA patients. However, chondrogenic differentiation from hMSCs in vitro takes a long time (∼ 6 weeks and differentiated cells are still not as functionally mature as primary isolated chondrocytes, though chemical stimulations and mechanical loading have been intensively studied to enhance the hMSC differentiation. On the other hand, thermal stimulations of hMSC chondrogenesis have not been well explored. In this study, the direct effects of mild heat shock (HS on the differentiation of hMSCs into chondrocytes in 3D pellet culture were investigated. Periodic HS at 41 °C for 1 hr significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan in 3D pellet culture at Day 10 of chondrogenesis. Immunohistochemical and Western Blot analyses revealed an increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan in heat-shocked pellets than non heat-shocked pellets on Day 17 of chondrogenesis. In addition, HS also upregulated the expression of collagen type I and X as well as heat shock protein 70 on Day 17 and 24 of differentiation. These results demonstrate that HS accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs and induced an early maturation of chondrocytes differentiated from hMSCs. The results of this study will guide the design of future protocols using thermal treatments to facilitate cartilage regeneration with human mesenchymal stem cells.

  15. Methods of isolation, expansion, differentiating induction and preservation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong-rui; CAI Jian-hui

    2012-01-01

    Objective This literature review aims to summarize the methods of isolation,expansion,differentiation and preservation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs),for comprehensive understanding and practical use in preclinical research and clinical trials.Data sources All the literature reviewed was published over the last 10 years and is listed in PubMed and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI).Studies were retrieved using the key word "human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells".Results Explants culture and enzymatic digestion are two methods to isolate hUCMSCs from WJ and there are modifications to improve these methods.Culture conditions may affect the expansion and differentiating orientations of hUCMSCs.In addition,hUCMSCs can maintain their multi-potential effects after being properly frozen and thawed.Conclusion Considering their multi-potential,convenient and non-invasive accessibility,low immunogenicity and the reported therapeutic effects in several different preclinical animal models,hUCMSCs have immense scope in regeneration medicine as a substitute for MSCs derived from bone marrow or umbilical cord blood.

  16. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells promotes mineralization within a biodegradable peptide hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Diaz, Luis A; Elsawy, Mohamed; Saiani, Alberto; Gough, Julie E; Miller, Aline F

    2016-01-01

    An attractive strategy for the regeneration of tissues has been the use of extracellular matrix analogous biomaterials. Peptide-based fibrillar hydrogels have been shown to mimic the structure of extracellular matrix offering cells a niche to undertake their physiological functions. In this study, the capability of an ionic-complementary peptide FEFEFKFK (F, E, and K are phenylalanine, glutamic acid, and lysine, respectively) hydrogel to host human mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions and induce their osteogenic differentiation is demonstrated. Assays showed sustained cell viability and proliferation throughout the hydrogel over 12 days of culture and these human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into osteoblasts simply upon addition of osteogenic stimulation. Differentiated osteoblasts synthesized key bone proteins, including collagen-1 (Col-1), osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. Moreover, mineralization occurred within the hydrogel. The peptide hydrogel is a naturally biodegradable material as shown by oscillatory rheology and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, where both viscoelastic properties and the degradation of the hydrogel were monitored over time, respectively. These findings demonstrate that a biodegradable octapeptide hydrogel can host and induce the differentiation of stem cells and has the potential for the regeneration of hard tissues such as alveolar bone. PMID:27493714

  17. MicroRNA-16 suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition‑related gene expression in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Xu; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Glioma is one of the most prevalent types of brain tumor and is associated with the highest mortality rate of all CNS cancers. Epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been recognized as an important factor in tumor metastasis. Previously, it has been demonstrated that microRNA-16 (miR-16) has an important role in tumor metastasis in human cancer cell lines. However, the role of miR-16 in epithelial‑mesenchymal transition of human glioma cells remains unclear. In the present study, U87 and U251 glioma cell lines overexpressing miR-16 were established and it was identified that miR-16 suppressed invasion, adhesion, cell cycle, production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and transforming growth factor-β, and EMT-related gene expression, including vimentin, β-catenin and E-cadherin in miR-16 overexpressing U87 and U251 glioma cells. Furthermore, miR-16 suppressed EMT mainly through the downregulation of p-FAK and p-Akt expression, and nuclear factor-κB and Slug transcriptional activity. Therefore, miR-16 may be an important therapeutic target and predictor for glioma therapy. PMID:25242314

  18. Hypoxia-controlled EphA3 marks a human endometrium-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell that supports vascular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Catherine; Farnsworth, Rae H; Vail, Mary E; Chheang, Chanly; Gargett, Caroline E; Murone, Carmel; Llerena, Carmen; Major, Andrew T; Scott, Andrew M; Janes, Peter W; Lackmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Eph and ephrin proteins are essential cell guidance cues that orchestrate cell navigation and control cell-cell interactions during developmental tissue patterning, organogenesis and vasculogenesis. They have been extensively studied in animal models of embryogenesis and adult tissue regeneration, but less is known about their expression and function during human tissue and organ regeneration. We discovered the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α-controlled expression of EphA3, an Eph family member with critical functions during human tumour progression, in the vascularised tissue of regenerating human endometrium and on isolated human endometrial multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (eMSCs), but not in other highly vascularised human organs. EphA3 affinity-isolation from human biopsy tissue yielded multipotent CD29+/CD73+/CD90+/CD146+ eMSCs that can be clonally propagated and respond to EphA3 agonists with EphA3 phosphorylation, cell contraction, cell-cell segregation and directed cell migration. EphA3 silencing significantly inhibited the ability of transplanted eMSCs to support neovascularisation in immunocompromised mice. In accord with established roles of Eph receptors in mediating interactions between endothelial and perivascular stromal cells during mouse development, our findings suggest that HIF-1α-controlled expression of EphA3 on human MSCs functions during the hypoxia-initiated early stages of adult blood vessel formation. PMID:25420155

  19. Hypoxia-controlled EphA3 marks a human endometrium-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell that supports vascular growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine To

    Full Text Available Eph and ephrin proteins are essential cell guidance cues that orchestrate cell navigation and control cell-cell interactions during developmental tissue patterning, organogenesis and vasculogenesis. They have been extensively studied in animal models of embryogenesis and adult tissue regeneration, but less is known about their expression and function during human tissue and organ regeneration. We discovered the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α-controlled expression of EphA3, an Eph family member with critical functions during human tumour progression, in the vascularised tissue of regenerating human endometrium and on isolated human endometrial multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (eMSCs, but not in other highly vascularised human organs. EphA3 affinity-isolation from human biopsy tissue yielded multipotent CD29+/CD73+/CD90+/CD146+ eMSCs that can be clonally propagated and respond to EphA3 agonists with EphA3 phosphorylation, cell contraction, cell-cell segregation and directed cell migration. EphA3 silencing significantly inhibited the ability of transplanted eMSCs to support neovascularisation in immunocompromised mice. In accord with established roles of Eph receptors in mediating interactions between endothelial and perivascular stromal cells during mouse development, our findings suggest that HIF-1α-controlled expression of EphA3 on human MSCs functions during the hypoxia-initiated early stages of adult blood vessel formation.

  20. Differential gene expression profiling of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during adipogenic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menssen Adriane

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipogenesis is the developmental process by which mesenchymal stem cells (MSC differentiate into pre-adipocytes and adipocytes. The aim of the study was to analyze the developmental strategies of human bone marrow MSC developing into adipocytes over a defined time scale. Here we were particularly interested in differentially expressed transcription factors and biochemical pathways. We studied genome-wide gene expression profiling of human MSC based on an adipogenic differentiation experiment with five different time points (day 0, 1, 3, 7 and 17, which was designed and performed in reference to human fat tissue. For data processing and selection of adipogenic candidate genes, we used the online database SiPaGene for Affymetrix microarray expression data. Results The mesenchymal stem cell character of human MSC cultures was proven by cell morphology, by flow cytometry analysis and by the ability of the cells to develop into the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic lineage. Moreover we were able to detect 184 adipogenic candidate genes (85 with increased, 99 with decreased expression that were differentially expressed during adipogenic development of MSC and/or between MSC and fat tissue in a highly significant way (p PPARG, C/EBPA and RTXA. Several of the genes could be linked to corresponding biochemical pathways like the adipocyte differentiation, adipocytokine signalling, and lipogenesis pathways. We also identified new candidate genes possibly related to adipogenesis, such as SCARA5, coding for a receptor with a putative transmembrane domain and a collagen-like domain, and MRAP, encoding an endoplasmatic reticulum protein. Conclusions Comparing differential gene expression profiles of human MSC and native fat cells or tissue allowed us to establish a comprehensive differential kinetic gene expression network of adipogenesis. Based on this, we identified known and unknown genes and biochemical pathways that may be relevant for

  1. Triclosan potentiates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in anoikis-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winitthana, Thidarat; Lawanprasert, Somsong; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of cancer cell toward mesenchymal phenotype has been shown to potentiate tumor aggressiveness by increasing cancer cell metastasis. Herein, we report the effect of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial agent found in many daily products, in enhancing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in aggressive anoikis resistant human H460 lung cancer cells. EMT has been long known to increase abilities of the cells to increase migration, invasion, and survival in circulating system. The present study reveals that treatment of the cancer cells with triclosan at the physiologically related concentrations significantly increased the colony number of the cancer cells assessed by tumor formation assay. Also, the mesenchymal-like morphology and decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion were observed in triclosan-treated cells. Importantly, western blot analysis revealed that triclosan-treated cells exhibited decreased E-cadherin, while the levels of EMT markers, namely N-cadherin, vimentin, snail and slug were found to be significantly up-regulated. Furthermore, EMT induced by triclosan treatment was accompanied by the activation of focal adhesion kinase/ATP dependent tyrosine kinase (FAK/Akt) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), which enhanced the ability of the cells to migrate and invade. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that triclosan may potentiate cancer cells survival in detached condition and motility via the process of EMT. As mentioned capabilities are required for success in metastasis, the present study provides the novel toxicological information and encourages the awareness of triclosan use in cancer patients. PMID:25329306

  2. Triclosan potentiates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in anoikis-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thidarat Winitthana

    Full Text Available Alteration of cancer cell toward mesenchymal phenotype has been shown to potentiate tumor aggressiveness by increasing cancer cell metastasis. Herein, we report the effect of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial agent found in many daily products, in enhancing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT in aggressive anoikis resistant human H460 lung cancer cells. EMT has been long known to increase abilities of the cells to increase migration, invasion, and survival in circulating system. The present study reveals that treatment of the cancer cells with triclosan at the physiologically related concentrations significantly increased the colony number of the cancer cells assessed by tumor formation assay. Also, the mesenchymal-like morphology and decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion were observed in triclosan-treated cells. Importantly, western blot analysis revealed that triclosan-treated cells exhibited decreased E-cadherin, while the levels of EMT markers, namely N-cadherin, vimentin, snail and slug were found to be significantly up-regulated. Furthermore, EMT induced by triclosan treatment was accompanied by the activation of focal adhesion kinase/ATP dependent tyrosine kinase (FAK/Akt and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1, which enhanced the ability of the cells to migrate and invade. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that triclosan may potentiate cancer cells survival in detached condition and motility via the process of EMT. As mentioned capabilities are required for success in metastasis, the present study provides the novel toxicological information and encourages the awareness of triclosan use in cancer patients.

  3. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibits human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation but enhances their survival in hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Suna, E-mail: wangs3@mail.nih.gov; Zhou, Yifu; Andreyev, Oleg; Hoyt, Robert F.; Singh, Avneesh; Hunt, Timothy; Horvath, Keith A.

    2014-04-15

    Studying the proliferative ability of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxic conditions can help us achieve the effective regeneration of ischemic injured myocardium. Cardiac-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP3) is a specific biomarker of muscle and heart tissue injury. This protein is purported to be involved in early myocardial development, adult myocardial tissue repair and responsible for the modulation of cell growth and proliferation. We have investigated the role of FABP3 in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells under ischemic conditions. MSCs from 12 donors were cultured either in standard normoxic or modified hypoxic conditions, and the differential expression of FABP3 was tested by quantitative {sup RT}PCR and western blot. We also established stable FABP3 expression in MSCs and searched for variation in cellular proliferation and differentiation bioprocesses affected by hypoxic conditions. We identified: (1) the FABP3 differential expression pattern in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions; (2) over-expression of FABP3 inhibited the growth and proliferation of the MSCs; however, improved their survival in low oxygen environments; (3) the cell growth factors and positive cell cycle regulation genes, such as PCNA, APC, CCNB1, CCNB2 and CDC6 were all down-regulated; while the key negative cell cycle regulation genes TP53, BRCA1, CASP3 and CDKN1A were significantly up-regulated in the cells with FABP3 overexpression. Our data suggested that FABP3 was up-regulated under hypoxia; also negatively regulated the cell metabolic process and the mitotic cell cycle. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibited cell growth and proliferation via negative regulation of the cell cycle and down-regulation of cell growth factors, but enhances cell survival in hypoxic or ischemic conditions. - Highlights: • FABP3 expression pattern was studied in 12 human hypoxic-MSCs. • FABP3 mRNA and proteins are upregulated in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions.

  4. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibits human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation but enhances their survival in hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the proliferative ability of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxic conditions can help us achieve the effective regeneration of ischemic injured myocardium. Cardiac-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP3) is a specific biomarker of muscle and heart tissue injury. This protein is purported to be involved in early myocardial development, adult myocardial tissue repair and responsible for the modulation of cell growth and proliferation. We have investigated the role of FABP3 in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells under ischemic conditions. MSCs from 12 donors were cultured either in standard normoxic or modified hypoxic conditions, and the differential expression of FABP3 was tested by quantitative RTPCR and western blot. We also established stable FABP3 expression in MSCs and searched for variation in cellular proliferation and differentiation bioprocesses affected by hypoxic conditions. We identified: (1) the FABP3 differential expression pattern in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions; (2) over-expression of FABP3 inhibited the growth and proliferation of the MSCs; however, improved their survival in low oxygen environments; (3) the cell growth factors and positive cell cycle regulation genes, such as PCNA, APC, CCNB1, CCNB2 and CDC6 were all down-regulated; while the key negative cell cycle regulation genes TP53, BRCA1, CASP3 and CDKN1A were significantly up-regulated in the cells with FABP3 overexpression. Our data suggested that FABP3 was up-regulated under hypoxia; also negatively regulated the cell metabolic process and the mitotic cell cycle. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibited cell growth and proliferation via negative regulation of the cell cycle and down-regulation of cell growth factors, but enhances cell survival in hypoxic or ischemic conditions. - Highlights: • FABP3 expression pattern was studied in 12 human hypoxic-MSCs. • FABP3 mRNA and proteins are upregulated in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions.

  5. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  6. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin

  7. Effects of hypoxia on proliferation of human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Longying; Shu, Xiaomei; Lang, Changhui; Yu, Xiaohua

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine the influence of hypoxia on proliferation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs). The mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation from human umbilical cord blood and then, respectively, cultured under hypoxia (5 % O2) or normoxia (20 % O2). Their cell morphology, cell surface markers, β-galactosidase staining, cell growth curve, DNA cycle, and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were evaluated. We found that hypoxia, in part via HIF-1α, improved the proliferation efficiency, and prevented senescence of hUCB-MSCs without altering their morphology and surface markers. These results demonstrated that hypoxia provides a favorable culture condition to promote hUCB-MSCs proliferation in vitro, which is a better way to obtain sufficient numbers of hUCB-MSCs for research and certainly clinical application. PMID:25742732

  8. Biological Characteristics of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultured in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA Xian'en; WANG Lixia; HOU Jianfeng; ZHANG Ruicheng; WANG Haiyong; YANG Chenyuan

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Some biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in vitro were observed. hMSCs were isolated from bone marrow and purified by density gradient centrifugation method, and then cultured in vitro. The proliferation and growth characteristics of hMSCs were observed in primary and passage culture. MSCs of passage 3 were examined for the purify by positive rate of CD29 and CD44 through flow cytometry. Human bone marrow MSCs showed active proliferation capacity in vitro. The purify of MSCs separated by our method was higher than 90 %. It was concluded that hMSCs have been successfully cultured and expanded effectively. It provided a foundation for further investigation and application of MSCs.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells and neural crest stem cells from adult bone marrow: characterization of their surprising similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Alix, Philippe; Leprince, Pierre; Glejzer, Aneta; Poulet, Christophe; Hennuy, Benoit; Sommer, Lukas; Shakhova, Olga; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-08-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crest stem cells (NCSC) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), including their similarities and differences. In this paper, using transcriptomic as well as proteomic technologies, we compared NCSC to MSC and stromal nestin-positive cells, all of them isolated from adult bone marrow. We demonstrated that the nestin-positive cell population, which was the first to be described as able to differentiate into functional neurons, was a mixed population of NCSC and MSC. More interestingly, we demonstrated that MSC shared with NCSC the same ability to truly differentiate into Tuj1-positive cells when co-cultivated with paraformaldehyde-fixed cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, those results suggest that both NCSC and MSC can be considered as important tools for cellular therapies in order to replace neurons in various neurological diseases. PMID:22349262

  10. Cardiomyogenic differentiation of human sternal bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using a combination of basic fibroblast growth factor and hydrocortisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Pezhman; Jose, Shinsmon; Chowdhury, Shiplu R; Ng, Min Hwei; Ruszymah, B H I; Abdul Rahman Mohd, Ramzisham

    2016-01-01

    The alarming rate of increase in myocardial infarction and marginal success in efforts to regenerate the damaged myocardium through conventional treatments creates an exceptional avenue for cell-based therapy. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes, by treatment with 5-azacytidine, thus, have been anticipated as a therapeutic tool for myocardial infarction treatment. In this study, we investigated the ability of basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) and hydrocortisone as a combined treatment to stimulate the differentiation of MSCs into cardiomyocytes. MSCs were isolated from sternal marrow of patients undergoing heart surgery (CABG). The isolated cells were initially monitored for the growth pattern, followed by characterization using ISCT recommendations. Cells were then differentiated using a combination of bFGF and hydrocortisone and evaluated for the expression of characteristic cardiac markers such as CTnI, CTnC, and Cnx43 at protein level using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, and CTnC and CTnT at mRNA level. The expression levels and pattern of the cardiac markers upon analysis with ICC and qRT-PCR were similar to that of 5-azacytidine induced cells and cultured primary human cardiomyocytes. However, flow cytometric evaluation revealed that induction with bFGF and hydrocortisone drives MSC differentiation to cardiomyocytes with a marginally higher efficiency. These results indicate that combination treatment of bFGF and hydrocortisone can be used as an alternative induction method for cardiomyogenic differentiation of MSCs for future clinical applications. PMID:26289249

  11. Human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated into pancreatic endocrine cell by Pdx-1 electrotransfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc Thi-My Nguyen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 1 is an autoimmune disease with high incidence in adolescents and young adults. A seductive approach overcomes normally obstacles treatment is cell-replacement therapy to endogenous insulin production. At the present, to get enough pancreatic endocrine cells (PECs in cell transplantation, differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into IPCs is an interesting and promising strategy. This study aimed to orient umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (UCB-MSCs to PECs by Pdx-1 electrotransfer. UCB-MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord blood according to published protocol. Pdx-1 was isolated and cloned into a plasmid vector. Optimal voltage of an electrotransfer was investigated to improve the cell viability and gene transfection efficacy. The results showed that 200V of the electrotransfer significantly increased in the efficiency of electrotransfer and survival cells compared with other high voltages (350V and 550V. Pdx-1 successfully transfected UCB-MSCs over-expressed pancreatic related genes as Ngn3, Nkx6.1. These results suggested that Pdx-1 transfected UCB-MSCs were successfully oriented PECs. Different to lentiviral vectors, electrotransfer is a safer method to transfer Pdx-1 to UCB-MSCs and a useful tool in translational research. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(2.000: 50-56

  12. Gradients in pore size enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Luca, Andrea; Ostrowska, Barbara; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Lepedda, Antonio; Swieszkowski, Wojcech; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Small fractures in bone tissue can heal by themselves, but in case of larger defects current therapies are not completely successful due to several drawbacks. A possible strategy relies on the combination of additive manufactured polymeric scaffolds and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). The architecture of bone tissue is characterized by a structural gradient. Long bones display a structural gradient in the radial direction, while flat bones in the axial direction. Such gradient presents a variation in bone density from the cancellous bone to the cortical bone. Therefore, scaffolds presenting a gradient in porosity could be ideal candidates to improve bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we present a construct with a discrete gradient in pore size and characterize its ability to further support the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, we studied the behaviour of hMSCs within the different compartments of the gradient scaffolds, showing a correlation between osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization, and pore dimensions. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content increased with increasing pore dimensions. Our results indicate that designing structural porosity gradients may be an appealing strategy to support gradual osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells.

  13. Frequent mechanical stress suppresses proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow without loss of multipotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Viktoria; Kaufmann, Stefan; Wright, Rebecca; Horn, Patrick; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Wuchter, Patrick; Madsen, Jeppe; Lewis, Andrew L; Armes, Steven P; Ho, Anthony D; Tanaka, Motomu

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are responsive not only to biochemical but also to physical cues, such as substrate topography and stiffness. To simulate the dynamic structures of extracellular environments of the marrow in vivo, we designed a novel surrogate substrate for marrow derived hMSCs based on physically cross-linked hydrogels whose elasticity can be adopted dynamically by chemical stimuli. Under frequent mechanical stress, hMSCs grown on our hydrogel substrates maintain the expression of STRO-1 over 20 d, irrespective of the substrate elasticity. On exposure to the corresponding induction media, these cultured hMSCs can undergo adipogenesis and osteogenesis without requiring cell transfer onto other substrates. Moreover, we demonstrated that our surrogate substrate suppresses the proliferation of hMSCs by up to 90% without any loss of multiple lineage potential by changing the substrate elasticity every 2nd days. Such "dynamic in vitro niche" can be used not only for a better understanding of the role of dynamic mechanical stresses on the fate of hMSCs but also for the synchronized differentiation of adult stem cells to a specific lineage. PMID:27080570

  14. Surface-induced modulation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells. An in vitro model for early implant integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschong, Werner; Jaquiery, Claude; Martin, Ivan; Lambrecht, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    Clinical experience indicates that the surface architecture of dental implants has an important impact on their integration. This has been related to the finding that differentially treated substrates can modulate the expression of osteogenic markers in various bone-related cell lines and primary cells. Here, we investigated the influence of surface architecture on the differentiation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells (HMPC) from adult bone marrow, i. e. the cells likely involved in initial bone synthesis at the bone-implant interface. Cells were seeded on machine surfaced (MS) or sandblasted/acid etched (SE) titanium discs in agarose-coated dishes, and on polystyrene (PS) controls. On all substrates cell densities did not change between days 7 and 14. Cell numbers were higher on SE, likely due to increased attachment to the rougher material. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) was similar on all substrates, whereas mRNA expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) at day 14 was about tenfold higher on SE (p < 0.05%). The SE-related increase of BSP in progenitor cells indicates an earlier differentiation of immigrated cells and could thus explain earlier implant integration and shorter time to functional loading observed in the clinic. The in vitro model and BSP quantification could be used to screen for changes in osteogenic cell differentiation induced by specific implant surfaces, with potential relevance on the prediction of bone-implant integration. PMID:17966928

  15. Frequent mechanical stress suppresses proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow without loss of multipotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Viktoria; Kaufmann, Stefan; Wright, Rebecca; Horn, Patrick; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Wuchter, Patrick; Madsen, Jeppe; Lewis, Andrew L.; Armes, Steven P.; Ho, Anthony D.; Tanaka, Motomu

    2016-04-01

    Mounting evidence indicated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are responsive not only to biochemical but also to physical cues, such as substrate topography and stiffness. To simulate the dynamic structures of extracellular environments of the marrow in vivo, we designed a novel surrogate substrate for marrow derived hMSCs based on physically cross-linked hydrogels whose elasticity can be adopted dynamically by chemical stimuli. Under frequent mechanical stress, hMSCs grown on our hydrogel substrates maintain the expression of STRO-1 over 20 d, irrespective of the substrate elasticity. On exposure to the corresponding induction media, these cultured hMSCs can undergo adipogenesis and osteogenesis without requiring cell transfer onto other substrates. Moreover, we demonstrated that our surrogate substrate suppresses the proliferation of hMSCs by up to 90% without any loss of multiple lineage potential by changing the substrate elasticity every 2nd days. Such “dynamic in vitro niche” can be used not only for a better understanding of the role of dynamic mechanical stresses on the fate of hMSCs but also for the synchronized differentiation of adult stem cells to a specific lineage.

  16. TGF-β1 induces human alveolar epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition (EMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamimura Takashi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroblastic foci are characteristic features in lung parenchyma of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. They comprise aggregates of mesenchymal cells which underlie sites of unresolved epithelial injury and are associated with progression of fibrosis. However, the cellular origins of these mesenchymal phenotypes remain unclear. We examined whether the potent fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 could induce epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT in the human alveolar epithelial cell line, A549, and investigated the signaling pathway of TGF-β1-mediated EMT. Methods A549 cells were examined for evidence of EMT after treatment with TGF-β1. EMT was assessed by: morphology under phase-contrast microscopy; Western analysis of cell lysates for expression of mesenchymal phenotypic markers including fibronectin EDA (Fn-EDA, and expression of epithelial phenotypic markers including E-cadherin (E-cad. Markers of fibrogenesis, including collagens and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were also evaluated by measuring mRNA level using RT-PCR, and protein by immunofluorescence or Western blotting. Signaling pathways for EMT were characterized by Western analysis of cell lysates using monoclonal antibodies to detect phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Smad2 after TGF-β1 treatment in the presence or absence of MEK inhibitors. The role of Smad2 in TGF-β1-mediated EMT was investigated using siRNA. Results The data showed that TGF-β1, but not TNF-α or IL-1β, induced A549 cells with an alveolar epithelial type II cell phenotype to undergo EMT in a time-and concentration-dependent manner. The process of EMT was accompanied by morphological alteration and expression of the fibroblast phenotypic markers Fn-EDA and vimentin, concomitant with a downregulation of the epithelial phenotype marker E-cad. Furthermore, cells that had undergone EMT showed enhanced expression of markers of fibrogenesis including collagens type I and III and CTGF. MMP-2

  17. Human mesenchymal stromal cells improve scar thickness without enhancing cardiac function in a chronic ischaemic heart failure model

    OpenAIRE

    Dayan, Victor; Yannarelli, Gustavo; Filomeno, Paola; Keating, Armand

    2012-01-01

    Few data address the role of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the management of chronic ischaemic heart failure. We assessed their effect in immune-deficient animals. MSCs were cultured from bone marrow of human volunteers. Non-obese diabetes severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) gamma null mice were randomly assigned to intramyocardial injection of human MSCs or phosphate-buffered saline 4 weeks after induction of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Echocardiography was performe...

  18. Wnts enhance neurotrophin-induced neuronal differentiation in adult bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Li Tsai

    Full Text Available Wnts were previously shown to regulate the neurogenesis of neural stem or progenitor cells. Here, we explored the underlying molecular mechanisms through which Wnt signaling regulates neurotrophins (NTs in the NT-induced neuronal differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs. NTs can increase the expression of Wnt1 and Wnt7a in hMSCs. However, only Wnt7a enables the expression of synapsin-1, a synaptic marker in mature neurons, to be induced and triggers the formation of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurons. Human recombinant (hrWnt7a and general neuron makers were positively correlated in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of synaptic markers and neurites was induced by Wnt7a and lithium, a glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor, in the NT-induced hMSCs via the canonical/β-catenin pathway, but was inhibited by Wnt inhibitors and frizzled-5 (Frz5 blocking antibodies. In addition, hrWnt7a triggered the formation of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurons via the non-canonical/c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway, and the formation of these neurons was inhibited by a JNK inhibitor and Frz9 blocking antibodies. In conclusion, hrWnt7a enhances the synthesis of synapse and facilitates neuronal differentiation in hMSCS through various Frz receptors. These mechanisms may be employed widely in the transdifferentiation of other adult stem cells.

  19. Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EndoMT in the Pathogenesis of Human Fibrotic Diseases

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    Sonsoles Piera-Velazquez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic diseases encompass a wide spectrum of clinical entities including systemic fibrotic diseases such as systemic sclerosis, sclerodermatous graft versus host disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and IgG4-associated sclerosing disease, as well as numerous organ-specific disorders including radiation-induced fibrosis, and cardiac, pulmonary, liver, and kidney fibrosis. Although their causative mechanisms are quite diverse, these diseases share the common feature of an uncontrolled and progressive accumulation of fibrous tissue macromolecules in affected organs leading to their dysfunction and ultimate failure. The pathogenesis of fibrotic diseases is complex and despite extensive investigation has remained elusive. Numerous studies have identified myofibroblasts as the cells responsible for the establishment and progression of the fibrotic process. Tissue myofibroblasts in fibrotic diseases originate from several sources including quiescent tissue fibroblasts, circulating CD34+ fibrocytes, and the phenotypic conversion of various cell types including epithelial and endothelial cells into activated myofibroblasts. However, the role of the phenotypic transition of endothelial cells into mesenchymal cells (Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition or EndoMT in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disorders has not been fully elucidated. Here, we review the evidence supporting EndoMT’s contribution to human fibrotic disease pathogenesis.

  20. Acquiring Chondrocyte Phenotype from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kondo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An inflammatory milieu breaks down the cartilage matrix and induces chondrocyte apoptosis, resulting in cartilage destruction in patients with cartilage degenerative diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Because of the limited regenerative ability of chondrocytes, defects in cartilage are irreversible and difficult to repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are expected to be a new tool for cartilage repair because they are present in the cartilage and are able to differentiate into multiple lineages of cells, including chondrocytes. Although clinical trials using MSCs for patients with cartilage defects have already begun, its efficacy and repair mechanisms remain unknown. A PubMed search conducted in October 2014 using the following medical subject headings (MeSH terms: mesenchymal stromal cells, chondrogenesis, and cytokines resulted in 204 articles. The titles and abstracts were screened and nine articles relevant to “inflammatory” cytokines and “human” MSCs were identified. Herein, we review the cell biology and mechanisms of chondrocyte phenotype acquisition from human MSCs in an inflammatory milieu and discuss the clinical potential of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  1. Prospective Isolation of Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Based on Surface Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Mabuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are currently defined as multipotent stromal cells that undergo sustained in vitro growth and can give rise to cells of multiple mesenchymal lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. The regenerative and immunosuppressive properties of MSCs have led to numerous clinical trials exploring their utility for the treatment of a variety of diseases (e.g., acute graft-versus-host disease, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, conventionally cultured MSCs reflect heterogeneous populations that often contain contaminating cells due to the significant variability in isolation methods and the lack of specific MSC markers. This review article focuses on recent developments in the MSC research field, with a special emphasis on the identification of novel surface markers for the in vivo localization and prospective isolation of murine and human MSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological importance of MSC subtypes in vivo with specific reference to data supporting their contribution to HSC niche homeostasis. The isolation of MSCs using selective markers (combination of PDGFRα and Sca-1 is crucial to address the many unanswered questions pertaining to these cells and has the potential to enhance their therapeutic potential enormously.

  2. Isolation, culture and characterization of postnatal human umbilical vein-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Mehdi Kadivar

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of reports that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be isolated from the placenta/umbilical cord stroma, the present study was undertaken to isolate and characterize MSCs from the human umbilical cord veins. In this investigation, a cell population was isolated which was derived from the endothelium/subendothelium layers of 20 umbilical cord veins obtained from term deliveries using a solution of 0.1% collagenase type IV. Results suggest that these cells possess morphological, immunophenotypical and cell differentiation capacities similar to the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. The isolated cell population has fibroblastoid morphology which upon proper stimulation gives rise to adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes in culture. Immunophenotypically, this cell population is positive for CD54, CD29, CD73, CD49e, CD166, CD105, CD13, and CD44 markers and alpha-smooth muscle actin and negative for CD31, CD45, CD49d, and CD34 markers, von Willebrand factor (vWF and smooth muscle myosin (MySM. Altogether, these findings indicate that umbilical cord obtained from term deliveries is an important source of MSCs which could have an important application in cell therapy protocols.

  3. TiO2-enriched polymeric powder coatings support human mesenchymal cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel polymeric powder coatings (PPC) were prepared by ultrafine powder coating technology and shown to support human mesenchymal cell attachment and growth. PPC surfaces enriched with nano-TiO2 (nTiO2) showed enhanced cellular responses, and were compared to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). After cell attachment and growth, osteogenic differentiation and bone matrix formation ensures osseointegration for implantable biomaterials. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine if mesenchymal cells grown on PPC could undergo osteogenic differentiation by inducing Runx2 and bone matrix proteins, and then initiate mineralization. Atomic force microscopy revealed intricate three-dimensional micro-topographies, and the measures of nano-roughness and porosity were similar for all PPC surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the cells attached and spread out over all of the surfaces. After 1 week in osteogenic media, RT-PCR analysis showed the induction of Runx2, the up-regulation of type I collagen, and the initial detection of alkaline phosphatase and bone sialoprotein. After 4 weeks, Alizarin Red staining showed mineral deposition. However, cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation were significantly (P 2 additives may enhance their performance.

  4. Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells by Using A Lentiviral Vector Carrying PDX1

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Allahverdi; Saied Abroun; Arefeh Jafarian; Masoud Soleimani; Mohammad Taghikhani; Fatemeh Eskandari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Type I diabetes is an immunologically-mediated devastation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) in the pancreatic islet. Stem cells that produce β-cells are a new promising tool. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self renewing multi potent cells showing capabilities to differentiate into ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal tissues. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor 1 (PDX1) is a master regulator gene required for embryonic development of...

  5. The Response of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Osteogenic Signals and its Impact on Bone Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Fernandes, Hugo; Liu, Jun; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2007-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is a multidisciplinary field that aims to treat patients with trauma, spinal fusion and large bone defects. Cell-based bone tissue engineering encompasses the isolation of multipotent hMSCs from the bone marrow of the patient, in vit

  6. Atomized Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Direct Delivery to the Airway for Treatment of Lung Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Sally Yunsun; Burgess, Janette K; Wang, Yiwei; Kable, Eleanor P W; Weiss, Daniel J; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current treatment regimens for inhalation injury are mainly supportive and rely on self-regeneration processes for recovery. Cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is increasingly being investigated for the treatment of inhalation injury. Human amniotic MSCs (hAMSCs) were use

  7. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced thei

  8. UV-activated 7-dehydrocholesterol-coated titanium implants promote differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satué, María; Ramis, Joana M; Monjo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolites are essential for bone regeneration and mineral homeostasis. The vitamin D precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol can be used after UV irradiation to locally produce active vitamin D by osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, UV-irradiated 7-dehydrocholesterol is a biocompatible coating for titanium implants with positive effects on osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we examined the impact of titanium implants surfaces coated with UV-irradiated 7-dehydrocholesterol on the osteogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells. First, the synthesis of cholecalciferol (D3) was achieved through the incubation of the UV-activated 7-dehydrocholesterol coating for 48 h at 23℃. Further, we investigated in vitro the biocompatibility of this coating in human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and its potential to enhance their differentiation towards the osteogenic lineage. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells cultured onto UV-irradiated 7-dehydrocholesterol-coated titanium implants surfaces, combined with osteogenic supplements, upregulated the gene expression of several osteogenic markers and showed higher alkaline phosphatase activity and calcein blue staining, suggesting increased mineralization. Thus, our results show that the use of UV irradiation on 7-dehydrocholesterol -treated titanium implants surfaces generates a bioactive coating that promotes the osteogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, with regenerative potential for improving osseointegration in titanium-based bone anchored implants. PMID:25899927

  9. Ultrastructural analysis of different human mesenchymal stem cells after in vitro expansion: a technical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmission electron microscopy reveals ultrastructural details of cells, and it is a valuable method for studying cell organelles. That is why we used this method for detailed morphological description of different adult tissuederived stem cells, focusing on the morphological signs of their functions (proteosynthetic activity, exchange with external environment, etc. and their comparison. Preparing a specimen from the cell culture suitable for transmission electron microscopy is, however, much more challenging than routine tissue processing for normal histological examination. There are several issues that need to be solved while working with cell pellets instead of solid tissue. Here we describe a simple protocol for the isolation and culture of mesenchymal stem cells from different adult tissues, with applications to stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Since we are working with population of cells that was obtained after many days of passaging, very efficient and gentle procedures are highly necessary. We demonstrated that our semi-conservative approach regarding to histological techniques and processing of cells for transmission electron microscopy is a well reproducible procedure which results in quality pictures and images of cell populations with minimum distortions and artifacts. We also commented about riskiest steps and histochemical issues (e.g., precise pH, temperature while preparing the specimen. We bring full and detailed procedures of fixation, post-fixation, infiltration, embedding, polymerization and contrasting of cell obtained from in vitro cell and tissue cultures, with modifications according to our experience. All this steps are essential for us to know more about adult stem cells derived from different sources or about other random cell populations. The knowledge about detailed ultra-structure of adult stem cells cultured in vitro are also essential for their using in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  10. Experimental observation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation into rabbit intervertebral discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hao; Lin, Yazhou; Zhang, Guoqing; Gu, Rui; Chen, Bohua

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation has been investigated worldwide. However, few reports have addressed the survival status of human BMSCs in the intervertebral discs (IVDs) in vivo following transplantation. The current study aimed to observe the survival status of human BMSCs in rabbit IVDs. The IVDs of 15 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups: Punctured blank control group (L1-2); punctured physiological saline control group (L2-3); and punctured human BMSCs transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) group (L3-4, L4-5 and L5-6). One, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after transplantation the IVDs were removed and a fluorescence microscope was used to observe the density of GFP-positive human BMSCs. The results indicated that in the sections of specimens removed at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-transplantation, no GFP-positive cells were observed in the control groups, whereas GFP-positive cells were apparent in the nucleus pulposus at all periods in the GFP-labeled human BMSCs group, and the cell density at 6 and 8 weeks was significantly less than that at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-transplantation (P<0.001). Thus, it was identified that human BMSCs were able to survive in the rabbit IVDs for 8 weeks.

  11. Primary mesenchymal stem cells in human transplanted lungs are CD90/CD105 perivascularly located tissue-resident cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolandsson, Sara; Andersson Sjöland, Annika; Brune, Jan C;

    2014-01-01

    , fibroblast/100 cells. In situ staining of lung tissues revealed that CD90/CD105 MSCs were located perivascularly. MSC were tissue-resident and exclusively donor lung-derived even in biopsies obtained from patients as long as 16 years after transplantation. Culture-derived mesenchymal stromal cells showed......BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have not only been implicated in the development of lung diseases, but they have also been proposed as a future cell-based therapy for lung diseases. However, the cellular identity of the primary MSC in human lung tissues has not yet been reported. This...... and peripheral transbronchial biopsies of lung-transplanted patients and evaluated using a comprehensive panel of in vitro and in vivo assays. RESULTS: Primary MSC were enriched in the CD90/CD105 mononuclear cell fraction with mesenchymal progenitor frequencies of up to four colony-forming units...

  12. Successful immortalization of mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from human placenta and the differentiation abilities of immortalized cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported previously that mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from chorionic villi of the human placenta could differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes under proper induction conditions and that these cells should be useful for allogeneic regenerative medicine, including cartilage tissue engineering. However, similar to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), though these placental cells can be isolated easily, they are difficult to study in detail because of their limited life span in vitro. To overcome this problem, we attempted to prolong the life span of human placenta-derived mesenchymal cells (hPDMCs) by modifying hTERT and Bmi-1, and investigated whether these modified hPDMCs retained their differentiation capability and multipotency. Our results indicated that the combination of hTERT and Bmi-1 was highly efficient in prolonging the life span of hPDMCs with differentiation capability to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cells in vitro. Clonal cell lines with directional differentiation ability were established from the immortalized parental hPDMC/hTERT + Bmi-1. Interestingly, hPDMC/Bmi-1 showed extended proliferation after long-term growth arrest and telomerase was activated in the immortal hPDMC/Bmi-1 cells. However, the differentiation potential was lost in these cells. This study reports a method to extend the life span of hPDMCs with hTERT and Bmi-1 that should become a useful tool for the study of mesenchymal stem cells

  13. Dermal Substitutes Support the Growth of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Potential Tool for Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremias, Talita da Silva; Machado, Rafaela Grecco; Visoni, Silvia Beatriz Coutinho; Pereima, Maurício José; Leonardi, Dilmar Francisco; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because of their prolonged self-renewal capacity, multipotentiality, and ability to release active molecules important for tissue repair. In this paper, we show that human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SD-MSCs) display similar characteristics to the multipotent MSCs. We also evaluate their growth in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system with dermal substitutes (Integra and Pelnac). When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level. Integra and Pelnac equally supported the adhesion, spread and growth of human SD-MSCs in 3D culture, maintaining the MSC characteristics and the expression of multilineage markers. Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology. PMID:24586857

  14. Development of novel monoclonal antibodies that define differentiation stages of human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kortesidis, Angela; Zannettino, Andrew C W;

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are currently being introduced for cell therapy, yet, antibodies specific for native and differentiated MSCs are required for their identification prior to clinical use. Herein, high quality antibodies against MSC surface proteins were developed by immunizing...... differentiation. Interestingly, undifferentiated cells revealed a sole cytoplasmic distribution pattern of Collagen VI, which however changed to an extracellular matrix appearance upon osteogenic- and adipogenic differentiation. In relation to this, we found that STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(-) sorted hMSC contained...... fewer differentiated alkaline phosphatase(+) cells compared to STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(+) hMSC, suggesting that Collagen VI on the cell membrane exclusively defines differentiated MSCs. In conclusion, we have generated a panel of high quality antibodies to be used for characterization of MSCs, and in...

  15. Flow perfusion culture of human mesenchymal stem cells on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with various pore sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Lea; Bünger, Cody; Baatrup, Anette;

    2011-01-01

    study was to obtain a clinically relevant substitute size using a direct perfusion culture system. Human bone marrowderived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with 200 μm or 500 μm pores, and resulting constructs were cultured in a perfusion bioreactor or in static...... μm ones. Adhesion and proliferation of the cells was seen on both scaffold sizes, but the vitality and morphology of cells changed unfavorably during perfusion culture. In contrast to previous studies using spinner flask that show increased cellularity and osteogenic properties of cells when cultured...... scaffolds. Our conclusion is that the specific scaffold surface microstructure and culturing system flow dynamics has a great impact on cell distribution and proliferation and on osteogenic differentiation, and the data presented warrant careful selection of in vitro culture settings to meet the specific...

  16. Transplanted Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate Lesion Repair in B6.Fas Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-ping Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystem disease that is characterized by the appearance of serum autoantibodies. No effective treatment for SLE currently exists. Methods. We used human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (H-UC-MSC transplantation to treat B6.Fas mice. Results. After four rounds of cell transplantation, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the levels of mouse anti-nuclear, anti-histone, and anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in transplanted mice compared with controls. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells in mouse peripheral blood significantly increased after H-UC-MSC transplantation. Conclusions. The results showed that H-UC-MSCs could repair lesions in B6.Fas mice such that all of the relevant disease indicators in B6.Fas mice were restored to the levels observed in normal C57BL/6 mice.

  17. Liver-derived human mesenchymal stem cells: a novel therapeutic source for liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yini; Yu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanuan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell type for research and therapy due to their ability to proliferate, differentiate, modulate immune reactions, and secrete trophic factors. MSCs exist in a multitude of tissues, including bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissues. Moreover, MSCs have recently been isolated from the liver. Compared with other MSC types, liver-derived human MSCs (LHMSCs) possess general morphologies, immune functions, and differentiation capacities. Interestingly, LHMCSs produce higher levels of pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic cytokines than those of bone marrow-derived MSCs. Thus, these cells may be a promising therapeutic source for liver diseases. This paper summarizes the biological characteristics of LHMSCs and their potential benefits and risks for the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27176654

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tooth Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Ling Ye; Xue-dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss compromises human oral health. Although several prosthetic methods, such as artificial denture and dental implants, are clinical therapies to tooth loss problems, they are thought to have safety and usage time issues. Recently, tooth tissue engineering has attracted more and more attention. Stem cell based tissue engineering is thought to be a promising way to replace the missing tooth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells which can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The potential MSCs for tooth regeneration mainly include stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from the apical part of the papilla (SCAPs), stem cells from the dental follicle (DFSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review outlines the recent progress in the mesenchymal stem cells used in tooth regeneration.

  19. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu W

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhu,1 George Teel,1 Christopher M O’Brien,1 Taisen Zhuang,1 Michael Keidar,1 Lijie Grace Zhang1–3 1Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium’s osseointegration involves inducing biomimetic nanotopography to enhance cell–implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications

  20. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Dental Pulp of Exfoliated Human Deciduous Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nourbakhsh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The exfoliated human deciduous tooth (SHED contain multipotent stemcells that identified to be a population of highly proliferative and clonogenic .Thesecells are capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types including neural cells,adipocytes, and odontoblasts.Material and Methods: Normal exfoliated human deciduous incisors collected fromsix- to nine-years-old children. The pulp was separated from the crown and digestedwith collagenase .Single cell solutions were cultivated in α-MEM supplemented withES-FCS. After two to three days, the cells reached confluency and were trypsinizedand cultured for further passages. The passage-4 cells were analyzed with CD34,CD45, CD105, CD166, CD31, CD90 and CD146 markers that indicated these cellshad a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC identity. We examined the cells for AlkalinePhosphatase activity to investigate the mesenchymal (stromal nature.Finally, thecells were differentiated into the osteoblastic and adipocytic lineages in differentsubcultures and analysed by RT-PCR and different staining protocols.Results: Viable cells growing out of the explants showed elongated shapes inclusters. These cells showed alkaline phosphatase activity. Flow cytometry resultsrevealed high expression of pluripotent stem cell markers .In some area of theosteoinductive cultures nodule-like structures were observed that showed redmineralizing area upon staining with Alizarin Red.In adipogenic cultures lipid vesiclesappeared after five weeks of induction with Oil Red.Conclusion: This study show that pulp contains cells with high plasticity andproliferation capacity and can be easily isolated without any serious intervention.

  1. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harvested immediately after irradiation, and at 1 and 5 days after irradiation. Cell cycle analysis, colony forming ability (CFU-F), differentiation ability, and expression of osteogenic-specific runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), oxidative stress-specific dismutase-1 (SOD1) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) were analyzed. Irradiation arrested cell cycle progression in BMMSCs and hESMSCs. Colony formation ability of irradiated MSCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiated hESMSCs showed higher adipogenic differentiation compared with BMMSCs, together with an increase in the adipogenic PPARγ expression. PPARγ expression was upregulated as early as 4 h after irradiation, along with the expression of SOD1. More than 70% downregulation was found in Wnt3A, Wnt4, Wnt7A, Wnt10A and Wnt11 in BMMSCs, but not in hESMSCs. hESMSCs are highly proliferative but radiosensitive compared with BMMSCs. Increased PPARγ expression relative to RUNX2 and downregulation of Wnt ligands in irradiated MSCs suggest Wnt mediated the fate determination of irradiated MSCs. (author)

  2. Culture medium of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells effects lymphatic endothelial cells and tumor lymph vessel formation

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAN, JIE; Li, Yahong; Yu, Jing; ZHAO, YUANYAUN; CAO, WENMING; Ma, Jie; Sun, Xiaoxian; Sun, Li; QIAN, HUI; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) favor tumor growth and metastasis in vivo and in vitro. Neovascularization is involved in several pathological conditions, including tumor growth and metastasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that human bone marrow MSC-derived conditioned medium (hBM-MSC-CM) can promote tumor growth by inducing the expression of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells. However, the effect of BM-MSCs on tumor lymph vessel formation has yet...

  3. 5-Azacytidine Induces Cardiac Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Activating Extracellular Regulated Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Qian; QIAN, HUI; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Yongmin; Ye, Shengqin; Peng, Xiujuan; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhe; Sun, Lingyun; Xu, Wenrong

    2011-01-01

    5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) induces differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into cardiomyocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Our previous work showed that 5-Aza induces human bone marrow-derived MSCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Here, we demonstrated that 5-Aza induced cardiac differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hucMSCs) and explored the potential signaling pathway. Our results showed that hucMSCs had cardiomyocyte phenotypes after...

  4. Culture of human mesenchymal stem cells at low oxygen tension improves growth and genetic stability by activating glycolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, J C; Albo, C; Benguría, A.; Dopazo, A; López-Romero, P; Carrera-Quintanar, L; Roche, E.; Clemente, E P; J.A. Enríquez; Bernad, A; Samper, E.

    2011-01-01

    Expansion of human stem cells before cell therapy is typically performed at 20% O2. Growth in these pro-oxidative conditions can lead to oxidative stress and genetic instability. Here, we demonstrate that culture of human mesenchymal stem cells at lower, physiological O2 concentrations significantly increases lifespan, limiting oxidative stress, DNA damage, telomere shortening and chromosomal aberrations. Our gene expression and bioenergetic data strongly suggest that growth at reduced oxygen...

  5. Introducing a single-cell-derived human mesenchymal stem cell line expressing hTERT after lentiviral gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Böcker, Wolfgang; Yin, Zhanhai; Drosse, Inga; Haasters, Florian; Rossmann, Oliver; Wierer, Matthias; Popov, Cvetan; Locher, Melanie; Mutschler, Wolf; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be readily isolated from bone marrow and differentiate into multiple tissues, making them a promising target for future cell and gene therapy applications. The low frequency of hMSCs in bone marrow necessitates their isolation and expansion in vitro prior to clinical use, but due to senescence-associated growth arrest during culture, limited cell numbers can be generated. The lifespan of hMSCs has been extended by ectopic expression of human telomerase...

  6. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  7. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  8. Conditioned Media from Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Induced the Apoptosis and Differentiation in Human Glioma Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have an intrinsic property for homing towards tumor sites and can be used as tumor-tropic vectors for tumor therapy. But very limited studies investigated the antitumor properties of MSCs themselves. In this study we investigated the antiglioma properties of two easily accessible MSCs, namely, human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs. We found (1 MSC conditioned media can significantly inhibit the growth of human U251 glioma cell line; (2 MSC conditioned media can significantly induce apoptosis in human U251 cell line; (3 real-time PCR experiments showed significant upregulation of apoptotic genes of both caspase-3 and caspase-9 and significant downregulation of antiapoptotic genes such as survivin and XIAP after MSC conditioned media induction in U 251 cells; (4 furthermore, MSCs conditioned media culture induced rapid and complete differentiation in U251 cells. These results indicate MSCs can efficiently induce both apoptosis and differentiation in U251 human glioma cell line. Whereas UC-MSCs are more efficient for apoptosis induction than ASCs, their capability of differentiation induction is not distinguishable from each other. Our findings suggest MSCs themselves have favorable antitumor characteristics and should be further explored in future glioma therapy.

  9. Decreased Intracellular pH Induced by Cariporide Differentially Contributes to Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1 is an important regulator of intracellular pH (pHi. High pHi is required for cell proliferation and differentiation. Our previous study has proven that the pHi of mesenchymal stem cells is higher than that of normal differentiated cells and similar to tumor cells. NHE1 is highly expressed in both mesenchymal stem cells and tumor cells. Targeted inhibition of NHE1 could induce differentiation of K562 leukemia cells. In the present paper we explored whether inhibition of NHE1 could induce differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods: MSCs were obtained from human umbilical cord and both the surface phenotype and functional characteristics were analyzed. Selective NHE1 inhibitor cariporide was used to treat human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs. The pHi and the differentiation of hUC-MSCs were compared upon cariporide treatment. The putative signaling pathway involved was also explored. Results: The pHi of hUC-MSCs was decreased upon cariporide treatment. Cariporide up-regulated the osteogenic differentiation of hUC-MSCs while the adipogenic differentiation was not affected. For osteogenic differentiation, β-catenin expression was up-regulated upon cariporide treatment. Conclusion: Decreased pHi induced by cariporide differentially contributes to hUC-MSCs differentiation.

  10. Tracking Fusion of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transplantation to the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Brian T.; Kouris, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aid recovery of damaged myocardium caused by myocardial infarction. One possible mechanism for MSC-mediated recovery is reprogramming after cell fusion between transplanted MSCs and recipient cardiac cells. We used a Cre/LoxP-based luciferase reporter system coupled to biophotonic imaging to detect fusion of transplanted human pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs to cells of organs of living mice. Human MSCs, with transient expression of a viral fusogen, were delivered to the murine heart via a collagen patch. At 2 days and 1 week later, living mice were probed for bioluminescence indicative of cell fusion. Cell fusion was detected at the site of delivery (heart) and in distal tissues (i.e., stomach, small intestine, liver). Fusion was confirmed at the cellular scale via fluorescence in situ hybridization for human-specific and mouse-specific centromeres. Human cells in organs distal to the heart were typically located near the vasculature, suggesting MSCs and perhaps MSC fusion products have the ability to migrate via the circulatory system to distal organs and engraft with local cells. The present study reveals previously unknown migratory patterns of delivered human MSCs and associated fusion products in the healthy murine heart. The study also sets the stage for follow-on studies to determine the functional effects of cell fusion in a model of myocardial damage or disease. Significance Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are transplanted to the heart, cartilage, and other tissues to recover lost function or at least limit overactive immune responses. Analysis of tissues after MSC transplantation shows evidence of fusion between MSCs and the cells of the recipient. To date, the biologic implications of cell fusion remain unclear. A newly developed in vivo tracking system was used to identify MSC fusion products in living mice. The migratory patterns of fusion products were determined both in the

  11. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells are chemoattractive and accelerate motor recovery in a mouse model of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Neirinckx, Virginie; Agirman, Gulistan; Coste, Cécile; Marquet, Alice; Dion, Valérie; Rogister, Bernard; Franzen, Rachelle; Wislet, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stem cells from adult tissues were considered for a long time as promising tools for regenerative therapy of neurological diseases, including spinal cord injuries (SCI). Indeed, mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) together constitute the bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) that were used as therapeutic options in various models of experimental SCI. However, as clinical approaches remained disappointing, we thought that reducing BMSC heterogeneity should be a...

  12. The Cotransplantation of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exerts Antiapoptotic Effects in Adult Rats after Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shifeng Wu; Guanqun Cui; Hua Shao; Zhongjun Du; Ng, Jack C.; Cheng Peng

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the repairing effects of the cotransplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have not been fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the cotransplantation of OECs with BMSCs on antiapoptotic effects in adult rats for which the models of SCI are induced. We examined the changes in body weight, histopathological changes, apoptosis, and the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins after 14 days an...

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have two features: the ability to differentiate along different lineages and the ability of self-renewal. Two major types of stem cells have been described, namely, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are obtained from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and are associated with tumorigenesis, and the use of human ESCs involves ethical and legal considerations. The use of adult mesenchymal stem cells is less problematic with regard to these issues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation. MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues, such as umbilical cord, endometrial polyps, menses blood, bone marrow, adipose tissue, etc. This is because the ease of harvest and quantity obtained make these sources most practical for experimental and possible clinical applications. Recently, MSCs have been found in new sources, such as menstrual blood and endometrium. There are likely more sources of MSCs waiting to be discovered, and MSCs may be a good candidate for future experimental or clinical applications. One of the major challenges is to elucidate the mechanisms of differentiation, mobilization, and homing of MSCs, which are highly complex. The multipotent properties of MSCs make them an attractive choice for possible development of clinical applications. Future studies should explore the role of MSCs in differentiation, transplantation, and immune response in various diseases. PMID:21396235

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. ► Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. ► MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  15. Comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of human mesenchymal stem cells reveals source specific cellular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, Anja M; Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Dib, Shaima S; Cotton, Richard J; Bhagwat, Aditya M; Kumar, Pankaj; Hayat, Shahina; Yousri, Noha A; Goswami, Neha; Suhre, Karsten; Rafii, Arash; Graumann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent cells with great potential in therapy, reflected by more than 500 MSC-based clinical trials registered with the NIH. MSC are derived from multiple tissues but require invasive harvesting and imply donor-to-donor variability. Embryonic stem cell-derived MSC (ESC-MSC) may provide an alternative, but how similar they are to ex vivo MSC is unknown. Here we performed an in depth characterization of human ESC-MSC, comparing them to human bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) as well as human embryonic stem cells (hESC) by transcriptomics (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics (nanoLC-MS/MS using SILAC). Data integration highlighted and validated a central role of vesicle-mediated transport and exosomes in MSC biology and also demonstrated, through enrichment analysis, their versatility and broad application potential. Particular emphasis was placed on comparing profiles between ESC-MSC and BM-MSC and assessing their equivalency. Data presented here shows that differences between ESC-MSC and BM-MSC are similar in magnitude to those reported for MSC of different origin and the former may thus represent an alternative source for therapeutic applications. Finally, we report an unprecedented coverage of MSC CD markers, as well as membrane associated proteins which may benefit immunofluorescence-based applications and contribute to a refined molecular description of MSC. PMID:26857143

  16. New miRNAs network in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from skin and amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarini, R; Sorgentoni, G; Caffarini, M; Sayeed, M A; Olivieri, F; Di Primio, R; Orciani, M

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), isolated from different adult sources, have great appeal for therapeutic applications due to their simple isolation, extensive expansion potential, and high differentiative potential.In our previous studies we isolated MSCs form amniotic fluid (AF-MSCs) and skin (S-MSCs) and characterized them according to their phenotype, pluripotency, and mRNA/microRNAs (miRNAs) profiling using Card A from Life Technologies.Here, we enlarge the profiling of AF-MCSs and S-MSCs to the more recently discovered miRNAs (Card B by Life Technologies) to identify the miRNAs putative target genes and the relative signaling pathways. Card B, in fact, contains miRNAs whose role and target are not yet elucidated.The expression of the analyzed miRNAs is changing between S-MSCs and AF-MSCs, indicating that these two types of MSCs show differences potentially related to their source. Interestingly, the pathways targeted by the miRNAS deriving from Card B are the same found during the analysis of miRNAs from Card A.This result confirms the key role played by WNT and TGF-β pathways in stem cell fate, underlining as other miRNAs partially ignored up to now deserve to be reconsidered. In addition, this analysis allows including Adherens junction pathways among the mechanisms finely regulated in stem cell behavior. PMID:26684628

  17. In vivo distribution of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in novel xenotransplantation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerrose, Todd E; De Ugarte, Daniel A; Hofling, A Alex; Herrbrich, Phillip E; Cordonnier, Taylor D; Shultz, Leonard D; Eagon, J Chris; Wirthlin, Louisa; Sands, Mark S; Hedrick, Marc A; Nolta, Jan A

    2007-01-01

    The potential for human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSC) to traffic into various tissue compartments was examined using three murine xenotransplantation models: nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID), nude/NOD/SCID, and NOD/SCID/MPSVII mice. Enhanced green fluorescent protein was introduced into purified AMSC via retroviral vectors to assist in identification of cells after transplantation. Transduced cells were administered to sublethally irradiated immune-deficient mice through i.v., intraperitoneal, or subcutaneous injection. Up to 75 days after transplantation, tissues were harvested and DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for specific vector sequences as well as for human Alu repeat sequences. Duplex quantitative PCR using human beta-globin and murine rapsyn primers assessed the contribution of human cells to each tissue. The use of the novel NOD/SCID/MPSVII mouse as a recipient allowed rapid identification of human cells in the murine tissues, using an enzyme reaction that was independent of surface protein expression or transduction with an exogenous transgene. For up to 75 days after transplantation, donor-derived cells were observed in multiple tissues, consistently across the various administration routes and independent of transduction parameters. Tissue localization studies showed that the primary MSC did not proliferate extensively at the sites of lodgement. We conclude that human AMSC represent a population of stem cells with a ubiquitous pattern of tissue distribution after administration. AMSC are easily obtained and highly amenable to current transduction protocols for retroviral transduction, making them an excellent avenue for cell-based therapies that involve a wide range of end tissue targets. PMID:16960135

  18. Isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp and follicle tissue of human third molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadegary Z

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: In the last decade, several studies have reported the isolation of stem cell population from different dental sources, while their mesenchymal nature is still controversial. The aim of this study was to isolate stem cells from mature human dental pulp and follicle and to determine their mesenchymal nature before differentiation based on the ISCT (International Society for Cellular Therapy criteria."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, intact human third molars extracted due to prophylactic or orthodontic reasons were collected from patients aged 18-25. After tooth extraction, dental pulp and follicle were stored at 4°C in RPMI 1640 medium containing antibiotics. Dental pulp and follicle were prepared in a sterile condition and digested using an enzyme solution containing 4mg/ml collagenase I and dispase (ratio: 1:1. The cells were then cultivated in α-MEM medium. Passage-3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for the expression of CD34, CD45, CD 73, CD90 and CD105 surface markers."nResults: Dental pulp and follicle were observed to grow in colony forming units, mainly composed of a fibroblast-like cell population. Flow cytometry results showed that dental pulp and follicle are highly positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105 (mesenchymal stem cell markers and are negative for hematopoietic markers such as CD34 and CD 45."nConclusion: In this study we were able to successfully confirm that dental pulp and follicle stem cells isolated from permanent third molars have a mesenchymal nature before differentiation. Therefore, these two sources can be considered as an easy accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for stem cell research and tissue engineering.

  19. Decellularized matrix from tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells promotes neovascularization with galectin-1 dependent endothelial interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge S Burns

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of a blood supply is fundamental for extensive tumor growth. We recently described vascular heterogeneity in tumours derived from cell clones of a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC strain (hMSC-TERT20 immortalized by retroviral vector mediated human telomerase (hTERT gene expression. Histological analysis showed that cells of the most vascularized tumorigenic clone, -BD11 had a pericyte-like alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA+ and CD146+ positive phenotype. Upon serum withdrawal in culture, -BD11 cells formed cord-like structures mimicking capillary morphogenesis. In contrast, cells of the poorly tumorigenic clone, -BC8 did not stain for ASMA, tumours were less vascularized and serum withdrawal in culture led to cell death. By exploring the heterogeneity in hMSC-TERT20 clones we aimed to understand molecular mechanisms by which mesenchymal stem cells may promote neovascularization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Quantitative qRT-PCR analysis revealed similar mRNA levels for genes encoding the angiogenic cytokines VEGF and Angiopoietin-1 in both clones. However, clone-BD11 produced a denser extracellular matrix that supported stable ex vivo capillary morphogenesis of human endothelial cells and promoted in vivo neovascularization. Proteomic characterization of the -BD11 decellularized matrix identified 50 extracellular angiogenic proteins, including galectin-1. siRNA knock down of galectin-1 expression abrogated the ex vivo interaction between decellularized -BD11 matrix and endothelial cells. More stable shRNA knock down of galectin-1 expression did not prevent -BD11 tumorigenesis, but greatly reduced endothelial migration into -BD11 cell xenografts. CONCLUSIONS: Decellularized hMSC matrix had significant angiogenic potential with at least 50 angiogenic cell surface and extracellular proteins, implicated in attracting endothelial cells, their adhesion and activation to form tubular structures. hMSC -BD11 surface galectin-1

  20. Radiation sensitivity of adult human parenchymal hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the radiosensitivity and repair kinetics of adult human parenchymal hepatocytes. Discarded viable human liver was obtained from the surgical pathology laboratory, and the cells were enzymatically isolated via a modification of the 2-step in situ collagenase perfusion technique used for the rat. The isolated hepatocytes were cultured with MEM media (10% FCS) in collagen coated 60 mm plates. Three hr after the cells were placed in culture, the media was changed to remove any dead unattached hepatocytes. After 24hr the viable hepatocytes were removed from the plates with collagenase and irradiated (40C, 21% O/sub 2/) with /sup 60/Co (1 Gy/min). The alkaline elution technique was used to quantify the single strand breaks (SSB). A linear dose response curve was obtained when the strand scission factor was plotted versus radiation dose and the slopes for the rat (4 cases) and human hepatocytes (6 cases) were 0.0302 and 0.0221 Gy/sup -1/, respectively. Thus, human hepatocytes are approximately 25% more radioresistant than those from the rat; this correlates with the GSH levels in the human hepatocytes (15 mM) being 20% greater than that in rat hepatocytes (12 mM). In contrast, the kinetics of repair of SSB in human hepatocytes was t/sub 1/2 fast/ = 20 min. t/sub 1/2 slow/ = 267 min) approximately 3 times slower than that in rat hepatocytes (t/sub 1/2 fast/ = 6 min, t/sub 1/2 slow/ = 98 min) and after 3 hr of repair the percent of the initial damage remaining was 20% and 15%, respectively. These date imply that in comparison to rat hepatocytes, human hepatocytes would be more radioresistant to large single doses, but equal if not more sensitive to fractionated radiation treatment

  1. Atrial development in the human heart: an immunohistochemical study with emphasis on the role of mesenchymal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, A.; Anderson, R. H.; Markwald, R. R.; Webb, S.; Brown, N. A.; Viragh, S.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    The development of the atrial chambers in the human heart was investigated immunohistochemically using a set of previously described antibodies. This set included the monoclonal antibody 249-9G9, which enabled us to discriminate the endocardial cushion-derived mesenchymal tissues from those derived from extracardiac splanchnic mesoderm, and a monoclonal antibody recognizing the B isoform of creatine kinase, which allowed us to distinguish the right atrial myocardium from the left. The expression patterns obtained with these antibodies, combined with additional histological information derived from the serial sections, permitted us to describe in detail the morphogenetic events involved in the development of the primary atrial septum (septum primum) and the pulmonary vein in human embryos from Carnegie stage 14 onward. The level of expression of creatine kinase B (CK-B) was found to be consistently higher in the left atrial myocardium than in the right, with a sharp boundary between high and low expression located between the primary septum and the left venous valve indicating that the primary septum is part of the left atrial gene-expression domain. This expression pattern of CK-B is reminiscent of that of the homeobox gene Pitx2, which has recently been shown to be important for atrial septation in the mouse. This study also demonstrates a poorly appreciated role of the dorsal mesocardium in cardiac development. From the earliest stage investigated onward, the mesenchyme of the dorsal mesocardium protrudes into the dorsal wall of the primary atrial segment. This dorsal mesenchymal protrusion is continuous with a mesenchymal cap on the leading edge of the primary atrial septum. Neither the mesenchymal tissues of the dorsal protrusion nor the mesenchymal cap on the edge of the primary septum expressed the endocardial tissue antigen recognized by 249-9G9 at any of the stages investigated. The developing pulmonary vein uses the dorsal mesocardium as a conduit to reach

  2. Transplantation of Human Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Non-Immunosuppressed GRMD Dogs is a Safe Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelatti, M V; Gomes, J P A; Vieira, N M S; Cangussu, E; Landini, V; Andrade, T; Sartori, M; Petrus, L; Zatz, Mayana

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal X-linked disorder, through cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been widely investigated in different animal models. However, some crucial questions need to be addressed before starting human therapeutic trials, particularly regarding its use for genetic disorders. How safe is the procedure? Are there any side effects following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation? To address these questions for DMD the best model is the golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD), which is the closest model to the human condition displaying a much longer lifespan than other models. Here we report the follow-up of 5 GRMD dogs, which were repeatedly transplanted with human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hASC), derived from different donors. Xenogeneic cell transplantation, which was done without immunosuppression, was well tolerated in all animals with no apparent long-term adverse effect. In the present study, we show that repeated heterologous stem-cell injection is a safe procedure, which is fundamental before starting human clinical trials. PMID:27193781

  3. Cardiomyocyte-like differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to 5-azacytidine in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng CAO; Lili NIU; Ling MENG; Lianxu ZHAO; Dongmei Wang; Ming ZHENG; Cixian BAI; Guoliang JIA; Xuetao PEI

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow to undergo cardiomyogenic differentiation after exposure to 5-azacytidine (5-aza) in vitro. Methods A small bone marrow aspirate was taken from the iliac crest of human volunteers, and hMSCs were isolated by 1.073g/mL Percoll and propagated in the right cell culturing medium as previously described. The phenotypes of hMSCs were characterized with the use of flow cytometry. The hMSCs were cultured in cell culture medium (as control) and medium mixed with 5-aza for cellular differentiation. We examined by immunohistochemistry at 21 days the inducement of desmin, cardiac-specific cardiac troponin I (cTnI), GATA 4 and connexin-43 respectively. Results The hMSCs are fibroblast-like morphology and express CD44+ CD29+ CD90+ / CD34- CD45- CD31- CD11a. After 5-aza treatment, 20-30% hMSCs connected with adjoining cells and coalesced into myotube structures after 14days. Twenty-one days after 5-aza treatment, immunofluorescence showed that some cells expressed desmin,GATA4, cTnI and connexin-43 in 5,10 μmol/L 5-aza groups, but no cardiac specific protein was found in neither 3μmol/L 5-aza group nor in the control group. The ratio of cTnI positively stained cells in 10 μmol/L group was higher than that in 5 μmol/L group (65.3 ± 4.7% vs 48.2 ± 5.4%, P < 0.05). Electron microscopy revealed that myofilaments were formed. The induced cells expressed cardiac-myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Conclusions Theses findings suggest that hMSCs from adult bone marrow can be differentiated into cardiac-like muscle cells with 5-aza inducement in vitro and the differentiation is in line with the 5-aza concentration. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2004;1(2) :101-107. )

  4. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.pelz@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan, E-mail: ekamphorst@ukaachen.de [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Stock, Peggy, E-mail: peggy.stock@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Brückner, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.brueckner@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Dollinger, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.dollinger@uniklinik-ulm.de [Department for Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Weiskirchen, Ralf, E-mail: rweiskirchen@ukaachen.de [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Christ, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.christ@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM), University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  5. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH

  6. Acidic pH stimulates the production of the angiogenic CXC chemokine, CXCL8 (interleukin-8), in human adult mesenchymal stem cells via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-kappaB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2008-07-01

    Blood vessel injury results in limited oxygen tension and diffusion leading to hypoxia, increased anaerobic metabolism, and elevated production of acidic metabolites that cannot be easily removed due to the reduced blood flow. Therefore, an acidic extracellular pH occurs in the local microenvironment of disrupted bone. The potential role of acidic pH and glu-leu-arg (ELR(+)) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) treated with medium of decreasing pH (7.4, 7.0, 6.7, and 6.4). The cells showed a reciprocal increase in CXCL8 (interleukin-8, IL-8) mRNA levels as extracellular pH decreased. At pH 6.4, CXCL8 mRNA was induced >60x in comparison to levels at pH 7.4. hMSCs treated with osteogenic medium (OGM) also showed an increase in CXCL8 mRNA with decreasing pH; although, at a lower level than that seen in cells grown in non-OGM. CXCL8 protein was secreted into the medium at all pHs with maximal induction at pH 6.7. Inhibition of the G-protein-coupled receptor alpha, G(alphai), suppressed CXCL8 levels in response to acidic pH; whereas phospholipase C inhibition had no effect on CXCL8. The use of specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction inhibitors indicated that the pH-dependent increase in CXCL8 mRNA is due to activation of ERK and p38 pathways. The JNK pathway was not involved. NF-kappaB inhibition resulted in a decrease in CXCL8 levels in hMSCs grown in non-OGM. However, OGM-differentiated hMSCs showed an increase in CXCL8 levels when treated with the NF-kappaB inhibitor PDTC, a pyrrolidine derivative of dithiocarbamate. PMID:18275043

  7. Ultrastructural maturation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells-derived cardiomyocytes under alternative induction of 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryaei, Abbas; Soleimani, Masoud; Heidari, Mohammad Hassan; Saheli, Mona; Rohani, Razieh; Almasieh, Mohammadali

    2015-05-01

    Adult cardiomyocytes lack the ability to proliferate and are unable to repair damaged heart tissue, therefore differentiation of stem cells to cardiomyocytes represents an exceptional opportunity to study cardiomyocytes in vitro and potentially provides a valuable source for replacing damaged tissue. However, characteristic maturity of the in vitro differentiated cardiomyocytes and methods to achieve it are yet to be optimized. In this study, differentiation of human bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) into cardiomyocytes is accomplished and the process investigated ultrastructurally. The hBM-MSCs were alternatively treated with 5 μM of 5-azacytidine (5-aza) for 8 weeks resulting in differentiation to cardiomyocytes. Expressions of cardiomyocyte-specific genes [cardiac α-actinin, cardiac β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and connexin-43] and proteins (cardiac α-actinin, cardiac troponin and connexin-43) were confirmed in a time-dependent manner from the first to the fifth weeks post-induction. Ultrastructural maturation of hBM-MSCs-derived cardiomyocyte (MSCs-CM) corresponded with increase in number and organization of myofilaments in cells over time. Starting from week five, organized myofibrils along with developing sarcomeres were detectable. Later on, MSCs-CM were characterized by the presence of sarcoplasmic reticulum, T-tubules and diads as cardiomyocytes connected to each other by intercalated disc-like structures. Here, we showed the potential of hBM-MSCs as a source for the production of cardiomyocytes and confirmed mature ultrastructural characteristics of these cells using our alternative incubation method. PMID:25573851

  8. Derivation and characterization of human ESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ruenn Chai; Choo, Andre; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that have been isolated from numerous sources including human embryonic stem cells (hES). Derivation from hES is unique in that hES must be differentiated. In our hands, trypsinizing hES into single cells and plating them on gelatin coated plates in a DMEM medium supplemented with serum replacement media and FGF2 with either PDGF AB or EGF will induce differentiation of hES and selectively enhance the survival of MSCs over hES. Repeated passaging by trypsinization results in a highly enriched MSC culture. Enriched MSC cultures can be further purified to homogeneity by limiting dilution or FACS sorting for a CD105+ or CD73+ and CD24- cell population. The resulting hES-MSCs fulfill the ISCT minimal defining criteria for human MSCs, namely adherence to plastic, a surface antigen expression profile of CD29+, CD44+, CD49a+ CD49e+, CD73+, CD105+, CD166+, CD34-, CD45-, and a differentiation potential that includes adipogenesis, osteogenesis, and chondrogenesis. Finally, hES-MSCs can be extensively and stably propagated. This method of deriving hES-MSCs without the need for a xenogeneic feeder and use of animal serum could be used to derive clinically compliant MSCs from hESCs. PMID:21431516

  9. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Teel, George; O'Brien, Christopher M; Zhuang, Taisen; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium's osseointegration involves inducing bio-mimetic nanotopography to enhance cell-implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications. PMID:26677327

  10. Human mesenchymal stromal cells response to biomimetic octacalcium phosphate containing strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgani, Zeinab Tahmasebi; Malhotra, Angad; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of bioinorganics into synthetic biomaterials is a promising approach to improve the biological performance of bone graft substitutes, while still retaining their synthetic nature. Among these bioinorganics, strontium ions (Sr(2+) ) have reported enhanced bone formation, and a reduced risk of bone fractures. While previous results have been encouraging, more detailed studies are needed to further develop specific applications. This study demonstrates the effects of Sr(2+) on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) when introduced as either a dissolved salt, or incorporated into biomimetic calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Upon attachment, hMSCs seeded in the presence of higher Sr(2+) concentrations presented with a more elongated shape as compared to the controls without Sr(2+) . Both Sr(2+) as a dissolved salt in the medium, or incorporated into CaP coatings, positively influenced hMSC alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in a dose-dependent manner. At the mRNA level, the expression of osteogenic markers ALP, bone sialoprotein, bone morphogenetic protein 2, osteopontin, and osteoclacin were increased in the presence of Sr(2+) , independent of the delivery method. Overall, this study demonstrates the positive effects of strontium on the osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs, and supports the use of strontium-incorporated CaPs for bone regeneration applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1946-1960, 2016. PMID:27012665

  11. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repairvia paracrine mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yuan Guo; Xun Sun; Xiao-long Xu; Qing Zhao; Jiang Peng; Yu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the para-crine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These ifndings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  12. Characterization of lipid metabolism in insulin-sensitive adipocytes differentiated from immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a great demand for cell models to study human adipocyte function. Here we describe the adipogenic differentiation of a telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-Tert) that maintains numerous features of terminally differentiated adipocytes even after prolonged withdrawal of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist rosiglitazone. Differentiated hMSC-Tert developed the characteristic monolocular phenotype of mature adipocytes. The expression of adipocyte specific markers was highly increased during differentiation. Most importantly, the presence of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone was not required for the stable expression of lipoprotein lipase, adipocyte fatty acid binding protein and perilipin on mRNA and protein levels. Adiponectin expression was post-transcriptionally down-regulated in the absence of rosiglitazone. Insulin sensitivity as measured by insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein was also independent of rosiglitazone. In addition to commonly used adipogenic markers, we investigated further PPARγ-stimulated proteins with a role in lipid metabolism. We observed an increase of lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR, LRP1) and apolipoprotein E expression during differentiation. Despite this increased expression, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of lipoproteins was decreased in differentiated adipocytes, suggesting that these proteins may have an additional function in adipose tissue beyond lipoprotein uptake

  13. Characterization of Side Cell Populations Obtained from Human Amnion Mesenchymal Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; PIAO Zhengfu; Mamoru Kobayashi; Koji Sasaki; DING Shu-qin; Aiko Kikuchi; Isao Kamo; Norio Sakuragawa

    2009-01-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal cells (AMCs) contain multipotent cells. To enrich such multipotent stem cells, we applied to AMCs the new method for the isolation of side population (SP) cells used for the enrichment of multipotent stem cells from many tissues. We succeeded in obtaining SP cells from AMCs (AMC-SP cells). AMC-SP cells were found in 0.2% of AMCs, irrespective of the length of pregnant period, ranging from 37 to 40 weeks. Cell cycle analyses uggested that AMC-SP cells belonged to a cell population that proliferated very slowly and/or was in a quiescent state in the amniotic membrane. Upon culturing, they proliferated with 40 to 80 cell doublings. However, they did not form colonies in a soft agarose culture, whereas HepG2 cells, representative human hepatoma cells formed many large colonies. These results suggest that AMC-SP cells that have considerable value for the use of regenerative medicine can be managed safely in vitro.

  14. Neural differentiation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells following neural cell co-culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nailong Yang; Hongyan Zhang; Xiaojuan Sun; Lili Xu

    2011-01-01

    We induced human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs) to differentiate into neural cells by adding chemical reagents,despite the fact that toxic chemicals induce cell shrinkage or cytoskeletal formation,which does not represent a proper cell differentiation process.The present study established a co-culture system with hPMSCs and neural cells and analyzed the influence of neural cells on hPMSC differentiation in a co-culture system.hPMSCs were isolated and purified from human full-term placenta using collagenase digestion.Fetal neural cells were co-cultured with hPMSCs for 48 hours using the Transwell co-culture system.hPMSCs co-cultured with neural cells exhibited a slender morphology with a filament.After 96 hours,hPMSCs expressed neuron-specific enolase,which suggested that co-culture of hPMSCs and neural cells induced neural differentiation of hPMSCs.

  15. Octanoate in Human Albumin Preparations Is Detrimental to Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Wua Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies hold great promise as the next major advance in medical treatment. To enable safe, effective ex vivo culture whilst maintaining cell phenotype, growth media constituents must be carefully controlled. We have used a chemically defined mesenchymal stromal cell culture medium to investigate the influence of different preparations of human serum albumin. We examined two aspects of cell culture, growth rate as measured by population doubling time and colony forming ability which is a representative measure of the stemness of the cell population. Albumin preparations showed comparative differences in both of these criteria. Analysis of the albumin bound fatty acids also showed differences depending on the manufacturing procedure used. We demonstrated that octanoate, an additive used to stabilize albumin during pasteurization, slows growth and lowers colony forming ability during ex vivo culture. Further to this we also found the level of Na+/K+ ATPase, a membrane bound cation pump inhibited by octanoate, is increased in cells exposed to this compound. We conclude that the inclusion of human serum albumin in ex vivo growth media requires careful consideration of not only the source of albumin, but also the associated molecular cargo, for optimal cell growth and behavior.

  16. Exosomes Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Relieve Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at investigating whether human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell- (hucMSC- derived exosomes (hucMSC-exosomes have a protective effect on acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Exosomes were characterized under transmission electron microscopy and the particles of exosomes were further examined through nanoparticle tracking analysis. Exosomes (400 μg protein were intravenously administrated immediately following ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery in rats. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and apoptotic cells were counted using TUNEL staining. The cardiac fibrosis was assessed using Masson’s trichrome staining. The Ki67 positive cells in ischemic myocardium were determined using immunohistochemistry. The effect of hucMSC-exosomes on blood vessel formation was evaluated through tube formation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926 cells. The results indicated that ligation of the LAD coronary artery reduced cardiac function and induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Administration of hucMSC-exosomes significantly improved cardiac systolic function and reduced cardiac fibrosis. Moreover, hucMSC-exosomes protected myocardial cells from apoptosis and promoted the tube formation and migration of EA.hy926 cells. It is concluded that hucMSC-exosomes improved cardiac systolic function by protecting myocardial cells from apoptosis and promoting angiogenesis. These effects of hucMSC-exosomes might be associated with regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family.

  17. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repair via paracrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yuan Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the paracrine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These findings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  18. In vitro differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into endothelial-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Lidong; SHI Shuangshuang; PEI Xuetao; LI Shaoqing; WANG Yunfang; YUE Huimin; LIU Daqing; HE Lijuan; BAI Cixian; YAN Fang; NAN Xue

    2006-01-01

    The neovascularization of ischemic tissue is a crucial initial step for the functional rehabilitation and wound healing. However, the short of seed cell candidate for the foundation of vascular network is still a big issue. Human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADSCs), which possess multilineage potential, are capable of adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. We examined whether this kind of stem cells could differentiate into endothelial-like cells and participate in blood vessel formation, and whether they could be used as an ideal cell source for therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic diseases or vascularization of tissue constructs. The results showed that hADSCs, grown under appropriately induced conditions, displayed characteristics similar to those of vessel endothelium. The differentiated cells expressed endothelial cell markers CD34 and vWF, and had high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein and prostacyclin. In addition, the induced cells were able to form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. Our data indicated that induced hADSCs could exhibit characteristics of endothelial cells. Therefore, these cells, as a source of human endothelial cells, may find many applications in such realms as engineering blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  19. Behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells on chemically synthesized HA-PCL scaffolds for hard tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antò, Vincenzo; Raucci, Maria Grazia; Guarino, Vincenzo; Martina, Stefano; Valletta, Rosa; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Our goal was to characterize the response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to a novel composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering. The hydroxyapatite-polycaprolactone (HA-PCL) composite scaffolds were prepared by a sol-gel method at room temperature and the scaffold morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to validate the synthesis process. The response of two different lines of hMSCs, bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in terms of cell proliferation and differentiation into the osteoblastic phenotype, was evaluated using Alamar blue assay, SEM, histology and alkaline phosphatase activity. Our results indicate that tissue engineering by means of composite HA-PCL scaffolds may represent a new therapeutic strategy to repair craniofacial bone defects. PMID:23723157

  20. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resolve Airway Inflammation, Hyperreactivity, and Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Occupational Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Cruz, Maria-Jesús; Moreno, Rafael; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier; Aran, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is characterized by allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, leading to progressive airway remodeling and a concomitant decline in lung function. The management of OA remains suboptimal in clinical practice. Thus, establishing effective therapies might overcome the natural history of the disease. We evaluated the ability of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs), either unmodified or engineered to secrete the IL-33 decoy receptor sST2...

  1. Nanoclay-Enriched Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) Electrospun Scaffolds for Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Mukundan, Shilpaa; KARACA, Elif; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Patel, Alpesh; Rangarajan, Kaushik; Mihaila, Silvia M.; Iviglia, Giorgio; Zhang, Hongbin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal tissue engineering aims at repairing and regenerating damaged tissues using biological tissue substitutes. One approach to achieve this aim is to develop osteoconductive scaffolds that facilitate the formation of functional bone tissue. We have fabricated nanoclay-enriched electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds for osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A range of electrospun scaffolds is fabricated by varying the nanoclay concentrations ...

  2. TNF-α respecifies human mesenchymal stem cells to a neural fate and promotes migration toward experimental glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Ries, Christian; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Schichor, Christian; Berninger, Benedikt; Popp, Tanja; Neth, Peter; Goldbrunner, Roland; Kienast, Yvonne; Winkler, Frank; Jochum, Marianne; Egea, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have become valuable candidates for cell-based therapeutical applications including neuroregenerative and anti-tumor strategies. Yet, the molecular mechanisms that control hMSC transdifferentiation to neural cells and hMSC tropism toward glioma remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that hMSCs incubated with 50 ng/ml TNF-? acquired astroglial cell morphology without affecting proliferation which was increased at 5 ng/m...

  3. Enhanced proliferation and differentiation of Oct4- and Sox2-overexpressing human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Sei-Myoung; Han, Sang-Hun; Coh, Ye-Rin; Jang, Goo; Chan Ra, Jeong; Kang, Sung-Keun; Lee, Hee-Woo; Youn, Hwa-young

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attractive candidates for clinical repair or regeneration of damaged tissues. Oct4 and Sox2, which are essential transcription factors for pluripotency and self-renewal, are naturally expressed in MSCs at low levels in early passages, and their levels gradually decrease as the passage number increases. Therefore, to improve MSC proliferation and stemness, we introduced human Oct4 and Sox2 for conferring higher expansion and differentiation capabilities. The O...

  4. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into damaged rabbit heart to improve heart function*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jian-an; Fan, You-qi; Li, Chang-Ling; He, Hong; Sun, Yong; Lv, Bing-jian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to test whether transplantation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in New Zealand rabbits with myocardial infarction can improve heart function; and whether engrafted donor cells can survive and transdifferentiated into cardiomyocytes. Methods: Twenty milliliters bone marrow was obtained from healthy men by bone biopsy. A gradient centrifugation method was used to separate bone marrow cells (BMCs) and red blood cells. BMCs wer...

  5. Hypoxia and Amino Acid Supplementation Synergistically Promote the Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Silk Protein Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Sejuti; Park, Sang-Hyug; Patel, Atur; Carn, Julia; Lee, Kyongbum; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Tailoring tissue engineering strategies to match patient- and tissue-specific bone regeneration needs offers to improve clinical outcomes. As a step toward this goal, osteogenic outcomes and metabolic parameters were assessed when varying inputs into the bone formation process. Silk protein scaffolds seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells in osteogenic differentiation media were used to study in vitro osteogenesis under varied conditions of amino acid (lysine and proline) concentration and ...

  6. Ectopic Osteogenesis of Macroscopic Tissue Constructs Assembled from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Laden Microcarriers through In Vitro Perfusion Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Maiqin Chen; Min Zhou; Zhaoyang Ye; Yan Zhou; Wen-Song Tan

    2014-01-01

    We had previously demonstrated the feasibility of preparing a centimeter-sized bone tissue construct by following a modular approach. In the present study, the objectives were to evaluate osteogenesis and tissue formation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells-laden CultiSpher S microcarriers during in vitro perfusion culture and after subcutaneous implantation. Microtissues were prepared in dynamic culture using spinner flasks in 28 days. In comparison with 1-week perfusion culture, microt...

  7. Human Allogeneic Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cell Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E.; Franquesa, Marcella; Engela, Anja U; Korevaar, Sander S; Roelofs, Helene; Genever, Paul G; IJzermans, Jan NM; Betjes, Michiel GH; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction For clinical applications, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) can be isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue of autologous or allogeneic origin. Allogeneic cell usage has advantages but may harbor the risk of sensitization against foreign HLA. Therefore, we evaluated whether bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSC are capable of inducing HLA-specific alloreactivity. Methods MSC were isolated from healthy human Bone Marrow (BM-MSC) and adipose tissue (ASC) donors. Peripheral ...

  8. Interaction between immobilized polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles and human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woltmann B

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Woltmann,1 Bernhard Torger,2,3 Martin Müller,2,3,* Ute Hempel1,*1Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden, Germany; 2Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Department of Polyelectrolytes and Dispersions, Dresden, Germany; 3Dresden University of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Dresden, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Implant loosening or deficient osseointegration is a major problem in patients with systemic bone diseases (eg, osteoporosis. For this reason, the stimulation of the regional cell population by local and sustained drug delivery at the bone/implant interface to induce the formation of a mechanical stable bone is promising. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of polymer-based nanoparticles with human bone marrow-derived cells, considering nanoparticles’ composition and surface net charge.Materials and methods: Polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PECNPs composed of the polycations poly(ethyleneimine (PEI, poly(L-lysine (PLL, or (N,N-diethylaminoethyldextran (DEAE in combination with the polyanions dextran sulfate (DS or cellulose sulfate (CS were prepared. PECNPs’ physicochemical properties (size, net charge were characterized by dynamic light scattering and particle charge detector measurements. Biocompatibility was investigated using human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs cultured on immobilized PECNP films (5–50 nmol·cm-2 by analysis for metabolic activity of hMSCs in dependence of PECNP surface concentration by MTS (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-5-[3-carboxymethoxyphenyl]-2-[4-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt assay, as well as cell morphology (phase contrast microscopy.Results: PECNPs ranging between ~50 nm and 150 nm were prepared. By varying the ratio of polycations and polyanions, PECNPs with a slightly positive (PEC+NP or negative (PEC

  9. Reduced graphene oxide-coated hydroxyapatite composites stimulate spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Jin, Oh Seong; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Park, Jong-Chul; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-07-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have great potential as cell sources for bone tissue engineering and regeneration, but the control and induction of their specific differentiation into bone cells remain challenging. Graphene-based nanomaterials are considered attractive candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds in tissue engineering, substrates for SC differentiation and components of implantable devices, due to their biocompatible and bioactive properties. Despite the potential biomedical applications of graphene and its derivatives, only limited information is available regarding their osteogenic activity. This study concentrates upon the effects of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-coated hydroxyapatite (HAp) composites on osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The average particle sizes of HAp and rGO were 1270 +/- 476 nm and 438 +/- 180 nm, respectively. When coated on HAp particulates, rGO synergistically enhanced spontaneous osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, without hampering their proliferation. This result was confirmed by determining alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of calcium and phosphate as early and late stage markers of osteogenic differentiation. It is suggested that rGO-coated HAp composites can be effectively utilized as dental and orthopedic bone fillers since these graphene-based particulate materials have potent effects on stimulating the spontaneous differentiation of MSCs and show superior bioactivity and osteoinductive potential.Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have great potential as cell sources for bone tissue engineering and regeneration, but the control and induction of their specific differentiation into bone cells remain challenging. Graphene-based nanomaterials are considered attractive candidates for biomedical applications such as scaffolds in tissue engineering, substrates for SC differentiation and components of implantable devices, due to their biocompatible and bioactive properties. Despite

  10. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56+ cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15+ cells emerged, partly from CD56+ cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56+ and CD15+ cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56+ cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15+ cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  11. Contribution of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Adult Mouse Inner Ear: Mesenchymal Cells and Fibrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Hainan; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Schmiedt, Richard A.; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Zhou, Daohong; Smythe, Nancy; LIU, LIYA; Ogawa, Makio; Schulte, Bradley A.

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells have shown plasticity with a capacity to differentiate into a variety of specialized cells. To test the hypothesis that some cells in the inner ear are derived from BM, we transplanted either isolated whole BM cells or clonally expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) prepared from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into irradiated adult mice. Isolated GFP+ BM cells also were transplanted into conditioned newborn mice deriv...

  12. Lentiviral-transduced human mesenchymal stem cells persistently express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerrose, Todd E; Roberts, Marie; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Vogler, Carole A; Wirthlin, Louisa; Nolta, Jan A; Sands, Mark S

    2008-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising platform for cell- and gene-based treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. We recently showed that human MSCs distribute widely in a murine xenotransplantation model. In the current study, we have determined the distribution, persistence, and ability of lentivirally transduced human MSCs to express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease (nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII [NOD-SCID MPSVII]). Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase (MSCs-GUSB). Lentiviral transduction did not affect any in vitro parameters of MSC function or potency. One million cells from each population were transplanted intraperitoneally into separate groups of neonatal NOD-SCID MPSVII mice. Transduced MSCs persisted in the animals that underwent transplantation, and comparable numbers of donor MSCs were detected at 2 and 4 months after transplantation in multiple organs. MSCs-GUSB expressed therapeutic levels of protein in the recipients, raising circulating serum levels of GUSB to nearly 40% of normal. This level of circulating enzyme was sufficient to normalize the secondary elevation of other lysosomal enzymes and reduce lysosomal distention in several tissues. In addition, at least one physiologic marker of disease, retinal function, was normalized following transplantation of MSCs-GUSB. These data provide evidence that transduced human MSCs retain their normal trafficking ability in vivo and persist for at least 4 months, delivering therapeutic levels of protein in an authentic xenotransplantation model of human disease. PMID:18436861

  13. Evaluation of Sericin as a Fetal Bovine Serum-Replacing Cryoprotectant During Freezing of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Osteoblast-Like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Verdanova, Martina; Pytlik, Robert; Kalbacova, Marie Hubalek

    2014-01-01

    A reliable, cryoprotective, xeno-free medium suitable for different cell types is highly desirable in regenerative medicine. There is danger of infection or allergic reaction with the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS), making it problematic for medical applications. The aim of the present study was to develop an FBS-free cryoprotective medium for human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs; primary cells) and immortalized human osteoblasts (SAOS-2 cell line). Furthermore, we endeavored to eliminate ...

  14. Cell pattern in adult human corneal endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Wörner

    Full Text Available A review of the current data on the cell density of normal adult human endothelial cells was carried out in order to establish some common parameters appearing in the different considered populations. From the analysis of cell growth patterns, it is inferred that the cell aging rate is similar for each of the different considered populations. Also, the morphology, the cell distribution and the tendency to hexagonallity are studied. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that this phenomenon is analogous with cell behavior in other structures such as dry foams and grains in polycrystalline materials. Therefore, its driving force may be controlled by the surface tension and the mobility of the boundaries.

  15. [Therapeutic potential of human mesenchymal stromal cells secreted components: a problem with standartization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaradze, G D; Grigorieva, O A; Efimenko, A Yu; Chaplenko, A A; Suslina, S N; Sysoeva, V Yu; Kalinina, N I; Akopyan, Zh A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine approaches, such as replacement of damaged tissue by ex vivo manufactured constructions or stimulation of endogenous reparative and regenerative processes to treat different diseases, are actively developing. One of the major tools for regenerative medicine are stem and progenitor cells, including multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). Because the paracrine action of bioactive factors secreted by MSC is considered as a main mechanism underlying MSC regenerative effects, application of MSC extracellular secreted products could be a promising approach to stimulate tissue regeneration; it also has some advantages compared to the injection of the cells themselves. However, because of the complexity of composition and multiplicity of mechanisms of action distinguished the medicinal products based on bioactive factors secreted by human MSC from the most of pharmaceuticals, it is important to develop the approaches to their standardization and quality control. In the current study, based on the literature data and guidelines as well as on our own experimental results, we provided rationalization for nomenclature and methods of quality control for the complex of extracellular products secreted by human adipose-derived MSC on key indicators, such as "Identification", "Specific activity" and "Biological safety". Developed approaches were tested on the samples of conditioned media contained products secreted by MSC isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissue of 30 donors. This strategy for the standardization of innovative medicinal products and biomaterials based on the bioactive extracellular factors secreted by human MSC could be applicable for a wide range of bioactive complex products, produced using the different types of stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26716748

  16. Characterization of adipocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hai-Yan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipocyte hyperplasia is associated with obesity and arises due to adipogenic differentiation of resident multipotent stem cells in the vascular stroma of adipose tissue and remote stem cells of other organs. The mechanistic characterization of adipocyte differentiation has been researched in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e. 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A, revealing that growth-arrest pre-adipocytes undergo mitotic clonal expansion and that regulation of the differentiation process relies on the sequential expression of three key transcription factors (C/EBPβ, C/EBPα and PPARγ. However, the mechanisms underlying adipocyte differentiation from multipotent stem cells, particularly human mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs, remain poorly understood. This study investigated cell cycle regulation and the roles of C/EBPβ, C/EBPα and PPARγ during adipocyte differentiation from hBMSCs. Results Utilising a BrdU incorporation assay and manual cell counting it was demonstrated that induction of adipocyte differentiation in culture resulted in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes but not hBMSCs undergoing mitotic clonal expansion. Knock-down and over-expression assays revealed that C/EBPβ, C/EBPα and PPARγ were required for adipocyte differentiation from hBMSCs. C/EBPβ and C/EBPα individually induced adipocyte differentiation in the presence of inducers; PPARγ alone initiated adipocyte differentiation but the cells failed to differentiate fully. Therefore, the roles of these transcription factors during human adipocyte differentiation are different from their respective roles in mouse. Conclusions The characteristics of hBMSCs during adipogenic differentiation are different from those of murine cells. These findings could be important in elucidating the mechanisms underlying human obesity further.

  17. Suppression of tumorigenesis by human mesenchymal stem cells in a hepatoma model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Qiao; Zhili Xu; Tiejun Zhao; Zhigang Zhao; Mingxia Shi; Robert C Zhao; Lihong Ye; Xiaodong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can home to tumor sites and inhibit the growth of tumor cells. Little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms that link hMSCs to the targeted inhibition of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of hMSCs on two human hepatoma cell lines (H7402 and HepG2) using an animal transplantation model, a co-culture system and conditioned media from hMSCs. Animal transplantation studies showed that the latent time for tumor formation was prolonged and that the tumor size was smaller when SCID mice were injected with H7402 cells and an equal number of Z3 hMSCs. When co-cultured with Z3 cells, H7402 cell proliferation decreased, apoptosis increased, and the expression of Bcl-2, c-Myc, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and survivin was downregulated. After treatment with conditioned media derived from Z3 hMSC cultures, H4702 cells showed decreased colony-forming ability and decreased proliferation. 1m-munoblot analysis showed that β-catenin, Bcl-2, c-Myc, PCNA and survivin expression was downregulated in H7402 and HepG2 cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that hMSCs inhibit the malignant phenotypes of the H7402 and HepG2 human liver cancer cell lines, which include proliferation, colony-forming ability and oncogene expression both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, our studies provide evidence that the Wnt signaling pathway may have a role in hMSC-mediated targeting and tumor cell inhibition.

  18. β-Cell Regeneration Mediated by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Anna; Lee, Jang-Won; Li, Zhenhua; Da Sacco, Stefano; Villani, Valentina; Cervantes, Vanessa; Perin, Laura; Yu, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) to reverse diabetes and whether these cells were differentiated into β-cells or mediated recovery through alternative mechanisms. Human BMSCs expressing VEGF and PDX1 reversed hyperglycemia in more than half of the diabetic mice and induced overall improved survival and weight maintenance in all mice. Recovery was sustained only in the mice treated with hBMSCs-VEGF. However, de novo β-cell differentiation from human cells was observed in mice in both cases, treated with either hBMSCs-VEGF or hBMSCs- PDX1, confirmed by detectable level of serum human insulin. Sustained reversion of diabetes mediated by hBMSCs-VEGF was secondary to endogenous β-cell regeneration and correlated with activation of the insulin/IGF receptor signaling pathway involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Our study demonstrated the possible benefit of hBMSCs for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes and gives new insight into the mechanism of β-cell recovery after injury mediated by hBMSC therapy. PMID:22879915

  19. β-Cell regeneration mediated by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Milanesi

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1 to reverse diabetes and whether these cells were differentiated into β-cells or mediated recovery through alternative mechanisms. Human BMSCs expressing VEGF and PDX1 reversed hyperglycemia in more than half of the diabetic mice and induced overall improved survival and weight maintenance in all mice. Recovery was sustained only in the mice treated with hBMSCs-VEGF. However, de novo β-cell differentiation from human cells was observed in mice in both cases, treated with either hBMSCs-VEGF or hBMSCs- PDX1, confirmed by detectable level of serum human insulin. Sustained reversion of diabetes mediated by hBMSCs-VEGF was secondary to endogenous β-cell regeneration and correlated with activation of the insulin/IGF receptor signaling pathway involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Our study demonstrated the possible benefit of hBMSCs for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes and gives new insight into the mechanism of β-cell recovery after injury mediated by hBMSC therapy.

  20. Modeled Microgravity Disrupts Collagen I/Integrin Signaling During Osteoblastic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; Zayzafoon, Majd; Gonda, Steven R.; Gathings, William E.; McDonald, Jay M.

    2004-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to reduced bone mineral density in weight bearing bones that is primarily attributed to a reduction in bone formation. We have previously demonstrated severely reduced osteoblastogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) following seven days culture in modeled microgravity. One potential mechanism for reduced osteoblastic differentiation is disruption of type I collagen-integrin interactions and reduced integrin signaling. Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that bind extracellular matrix proteins and produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival, and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modeled microgravity on integrin expression and function in hMSC. We demonstrate that seven days of culture in modeled microgravity leads to reduced expression of the extracellular matrix protein, type I collagen (Col I). Conversely, modeled microgravity consistently increases Col I-specific alpha2 and beta1 integrin protein expression. Despite this increase in integrin sub-unit expression, autophosphorylation of adhesion-dependent kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), is significantly reduced. Activation of Akt is unaffected by the reduction in FAK activation. However, reduced downstream signaling via the Ras-MAPK pathway is evidenced by a reduction in Ras and ERK activation. Taken together, our findings indicate that modeled microgravity decreases integrin/MAPK signaling, which likely contributes to the observed reduction in osteoblastogenesis.

  1. Therapeutic use of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for the treatment of radio-induced diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionising radiation can induce toxic effects on body. They provoke physiological modifications of tissues and organs which can be lethal. Total body irradiation or local abdominal irradiation can induce serious complications. Intestine is the first tissue concerned by these side effects. Radiation induces malabsorption of the intestine and lost of it integrity. Radio-induced physiopathological effects on intestine could lead to distant effects on other tissues and organs such as liver. The actual treatments have a limited efficiency or are not adapted to gastrointestinal damages. Indeed, in this type of lesions, the heterogeneous systems which are concerned and the gravity of lesions complicates the medical care. Our purpose is to show that cell therapy using human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) constitutes resolution in this type of illness. The works which are presented in this thesis show that MSC are multi-potent and have heterogeneous expression of molecules. These cells are able to establish themselves in many organs and tissues after injection into irradiated body. Thus we have shown that MSC can prevent the small intestine from radio-induced damages. Indeed we demonstrate that through their actions on gut, MSC can indirectly restore hepatic integrity. (author)

  2. Conditioned medium from human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells limits infarct size and enhances angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Cervio, Elisabetta; Calvillo, Laura; Copes, Francesco; Pisano, Federica; Mura, Manuela; Kleijn, Lennaert; de Boer, Rudolf A; Viarengo, Gianluca; Rosti, Vittorio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Roccio, Marianna; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-05-01

    The paracrine properties of human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMCs) have not been fully elucidated. The goal of the present study was to elucidate whether hAMCs can exert beneficial paracrine effects on infarcted rat hearts, in particular through cardioprotection and angiogenesis. Moreover, we aimed to identify the putative active paracrine mediators. hAMCs were isolated, expanded, and characterized. In vitro, conditioned medium from hAMC (hAMC-CM) exhibited cytoprotective and proangiogenic properties. In vivo, injection of hAMC-CM into infarcted rat hearts limited the infarct size, reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and ventricular remodeling, and strongly promoted capillary formation at the infarct border zone. Gene array analysis led to the identification of 32 genes encoding for the secreted factors overexpressed by hAMCs. Among these, midkine and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine were also upregulated at the protein level. Furthermore, high amounts of several proangiogenic factors were detected in hAMC-CM by cytokine array. Our results strongly support the concept that the administration of hAMC-CM favors the repair process after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:25824141

  3. Gene Expression Changes During the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Ryuji Ikeda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To gain more insight into the molecular mechanisms of chondrogenic differentiation induced by transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I and insulin, we performed cDNA microarray experiments during the chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs, which provide an excellent in vitro model system for chondrogenesis. Our repeated cDNA microarray analyses identified the up regulation of 23 transcripts and the down regulation of 25 transcripts after 14 days of chondrogenic induction. We found that many of the up regulated and down regulated genes belonged to overlapping gene categories; specifically, 44 and 40% of the up regulated and down regulated genes were associated with the extracellular matrix and metabolic pathways, respectively. The expression of the identified genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. These analyses suggest that the transcriptional control induced by TGF-β1, IGF-I and insulin signaling during the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs is mainly targeted to genes belonging to specialized gene categories.

  4. Osteoinduction of human mesenchymal stem cells by bioactive composite scaffolds without supplemental osteogenic growth factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Polini

    Full Text Available The development of a new family of implantable bioinspired materials is a focal point of bone tissue engineering. Implant surfaces that better mimic the natural bone extracellular matrix, a naturally nano-composite tissue, can stimulate stem cell differentiation towards osteogenic lineages in the absence of specific chemical treatments. Herein we describe a bioactive composite nanofibrous scaffold, composed of poly-caprolactone (PCL and nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA or beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP, which was able to support the growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs and guide their osteogenic differentiation at the same time. Morphological and physical/chemical investigations were carried out by scanning, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, mechanical and wettability analysis. Upon culturing hMSCs on composite nanofibers, we found that the incorporation of either HA or TCP into the PCL nanofibers did not affect cell viability, meanwhile the presence of the mineral phase increases the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP, an early marker of bone formation, and mRNA expression levels of osteoblast-related genes, such as the Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx-2 and bone sialoprotein (BSP, in total absence of osteogenic supplements. These results suggest that both the nanofibrous structure and the chemical composition of the scaffolds play a role in regulating the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  5. Forskolin enhances in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorn, Joyce; Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Boer, Jan

    2012-03-01

    Activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) was recently shown to enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in vitro and bone formation in vivo. The major drawback of this compound is its inhibitory effect on proliferation of hMSCs. Therefore, we investigated whether fine-tuning of the dose and timing of PKA activation could enhance bone formation even further, with minimum effects on proliferation. To test this, we selected two different PKA activators (8-bromo-cAMP (8-br-cAMP) and forskolin) and compared their effects on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation with those of db-cAMP. We found that all three compounds induced alkaline phosphatase levels, bone-specific target genes, and secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1, although 8-br-cAMP induced adipogenic differentiation in long-term cultures and was thus considered unsuitable for further in vivo testing. All three compounds inhibited proliferation of hMSCs in a dose-dependent manner, with forskolin inhibiting proliferation most. The effect of forskolin on in vivo bone formation was tested by pretreating hMSCs before implantation, and we observed greater amounts of bone using forskolin than db-cAMP. Our data show forskolin to be a novel agent that can be used to increase bone formation and also suggests a role for PKA in the delicate balance between adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. PMID:21942968

  6. Isolation and Multiple Differentiation Potential Assessment of Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Yuan Gao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from the gingiva (GMSCs and confirm their multiple differentiation potentials, including the odontogenic lineage. GMSCs, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and dermal stem cells (DSCs cultures were analyzed for cell shape, cell cycle, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F and stem cell markers. Cells were then induced for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation and analyzed for differentiation markers (alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mineralization nodule formation and Runx2, ALP, osteocalcin (OCN and collagen I expressions for the osteogenic differentiation, and lipid vacuole formation and PPARγ-2 expression for the adipogenic differentiation. Besides, the odontogenic differentiation potential of GMSCs induced with embryonic tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (ETGC-CM was observed. GMSCs, PDLSCs and DSCs were all stromal origin. PDLSCs showed much higher osteogenic differentiation ability but lower adipogenic differentiation potential than DSCs. GMSCs showed the medial osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potentials between those of PDLSCs and DSCs. GMSCs were capable of expressing the odontogenic genes after ETGC-CM induction. This study provides evidence that GMSCs can be used in tissue engineering/regeneration protocols as an approachable stem cell source.

  7. Inhibition of lung cancer cell proliferation mediated by human mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Hui Tian; Zhitao Chen; Weiming Yue; Shuhai Li; Wenjun Li

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells(hMSCs)are mostly studied for their potential clinical use.Recently,much attention in the field of cancer research has been paid to hMSCs.In this study,we investigated the influence of hMSCs on the proliferation of lung cancer cell lines SK- MES-1 and A549 in vitro and in vivo by using a co-culture system and the hMSCs-conditioned medium.Our results demonstrated that hMSCs could inhibit the proliferation of SK-MES-1 and A549 cells,and induce the apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro via some soluble factors.Animal study showed that these soluble factors from hMSCs could sup- press tumorigenesis and tumor angiogenesis by treating preliminarily tumor cells with the hMSCs-conditioned medium.The downregulated expression of vascular endo- thelial growth factor in tumor cells might be the mechan- ism of interference in tumor angiogenesis,which was verified by western blot analysis and immunohistochemis- try assay.Taken together,our results suggested that the hMSCs could inhibit tumor cell growth by secreting some soluble factors.

  8. Environmental parameters influence non-viral transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J; Kouris, Nicholas A; Choi, Siyoung; Ogle, Brenda M; Murphy, William L

    2012-03-01

    Non-viral transfection is a promising technique that could be used to increase the therapeutic potential of stem cells. The purpose of this study was to explore practical culture parameters of relevance in potential human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) clinical and tissue engineering applications, including type of polycationic transfection reagent, N/P ratio and dose of polycation/pDNA polyplexes, cell passage number, cell density and cell proliferation. The non-viral transfection efficiency was significantly influenced by N/P ratio, polyplex dose, cell density and cell passage number. hMSC culture conditions that inhibited cell division also decreased transfection efficiency, suggesting that strategies to promote hMSC proliferation may be useful to enhance transfection efficiency in future tissue engineering studies. Non-viral transfection treatments influenced hMSC phenotype, including the expression level of the hMSC marker CD105 and the ability of hMSCs to differentiate down the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The parameters found here to promote hMSC transfection efficiency, minimize toxicity and influence hMSC phenotype may be instructive in future non-viral transfection studies and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22277991

  9. Diversity of ion channels in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung Sun; Choi, Mi Ran; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Kyung Suk; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Yangmi; Chai, Young Gyu

    2008-12-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) represent a potentially valuable cell type for clinical therapeutic applications. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of long-term culturing (up to 10(th) passages) of hBM-MSCs from eight individual amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, focusing on functional ion channels. All hBM-MSCs contain several MSCs markers with no significant differences, whereas the distribution of functional ion channels was shown to be different between cells. Four types of K(+) currents, including noise-like Ca(+2)-activated K(+) current (IK(Ca)), a transient outward K(+) current (I(to)), a delayed rectifier K(+) current (IK(DR)), and an inward-rectifier K(+) current (K(ir)) were heterogeneously present in these cells, and a TTX-sensitive Na(+) current (I(Na,TTX)) was also recorded. In the RT-PCR analysis, Kv1.1, heag1, Kv4.2, Kir2.1, MaxiK, and hNE-Na were detected. In particular, I(Na,TTX) showed a significant passage-dependent increase. This is the first report showing that functional ion channel profiling depend on the cellular passage of hBM-MSCs. PMID:19967076

  10. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reendothelialize Porcine Heart Valve Scaffolds: Novel Perspectives in Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuti, Paola; Serafini, Francesco; Pierdomenico, Laura; Simeone, Pasquale; Bologna, Giuseppina; Ercolino, Eva; Di Silvestre, Sara; Guarnieri, Simone; Canosa, Carlo; Impicciatore, Gianna Gabriella; Chiarini, Stella; Magnacca, Francesco; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Pandolfi, Assunta; Marchisio, Marco; Di Giammarco, Gabriele; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Heart valve diseases are usually treated by surgical intervention addressed for the replacement of the damaged valve with a biosynthetic or mechanical prosthesis. Although this approach guarantees a good quality of life for patients, it is not free from drawbacks (structural deterioration, nonstructural dysfunction, and reintervention). To overcome these limitations, the heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE) is developing new strategies to synthesize novel types of valve substitutes, by identifying efficient sources of both ideal scaffolds and cells. In particular, a natural matrix, able to interact with cellular components, appears to be a suitable solution. On the other hand, the well-known Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs) plasticity, regenerative abilities, and their immunomodulatory capacities make them highly promising for HVTE applications. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to use porcine valve matrix to regenerate in vitro the valve endothelium by WJ-MSCs differentiated along the endothelial lineage, paralleled with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), used as positive control. Here, we were able to successfully decellularize porcine heart valves, which were then recellularized with both differentiated-WJ-MSCs and HUVECs. Data demonstrated that both cell types were able to reconstitute a cellular monolayer. Cells were able to positively interact with the natural matrix and demonstrated the surface expression of typical endothelial markers. Altogether, these data suggest that the interaction between a biological scaffold and WJ-MSCs allows the regeneration of a morphologically well-structured endothelium, opening new perspectives in the field of HVTE. PMID:26309804

  11. Thiosemicarbazone-Pt(II) Complex Causes a Growth Inhibitory Effect on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Josefa Predestinacion; Matesanz Garcia, Ana Isabel; Souza, Ana Perez; Castelo, Pilar Souza

    2015-01-01

    We showed di[3,5-diacetyl-1,2,4-triazolbis(4-cyclohexylthiosemicarbazonato) platinum(II)] complex, (W8), endowed with important antitumor properties. Here, we analysed whether W8 can affect human bone marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, (hMSCs), involved in tissue repair, immunomodulatory properties and also capacity for homing to injure-tumor sites in ovarian cancer. Specifically, we analysed the effect of W8 on cell proliferation, response to scratch, and whether copper-derived cellular mechanism is used by this platinum(II) complex being studied. Results showed that W8 causes a significant inhibition of cell proliferation at µM concentration. This effect is directly related to the alteration of cytoskeletal proteins and inhibition of the response to scratch induced by the presence of foetal bovine serum. This strongly supports the notion of W8 triggers the energetic metabolism of hMSCs and adds an extra support by the results showing W8 relationship with the cellular copper ions. W8, acting in hMSCs, regulates in addition the inhibition of cell proliferation, the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:25974080

  12. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  14. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium promote primary wound healing regeneration

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    Dwi Liliek Kusindarta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This research was conducted to clarify the capability of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (HU-MSCM to promote regenerations of primary wound healing on the incision skin injury. Materials and Methods: In this study, two approaches in vitro and in vivo already done. On in vitro analysis, tube formation was performed using HU vein endothelial cells in the presence of HU-MSCM, in some experiments cells line was incubated prior the presence of lipopolysaccharide and HU-MSCM then apoptosis assay was performed. Furthermore, in vivo experiments 12 female rats (Rattus norvegicus were used after rats anesthetized, 7 mm wound was made by incision on the left side of the body. The wound was treated with HU-MSCM containing cream, povidone iodine was run as a control. Wound healing regenerations on the skin samples were visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: In vitro models elucidate HU-MSCM may decreasing inflammation at the beginning of wound healing, promote cell migration and angiogenesis. In addition in vivo models show that the incision length on the skin is decreasing and more smaller, HE staining describe decreasing of inflammation phase, increasing of angiogenesis, accelerate fibroplasia, and maturation phase. Conclusions: Taken together our observation indicates that HU-MSCM could promote the acceleration of skin tissue regenerations in primary wound healing process.

  15. miR-141-3p inhibits human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Weimin; Kassem, Moustapha

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling determines human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell (hMSC) differentiation fate into the osteoblast or adipocyte lineage. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules of 21-25 nucleotides that regulate many aspects of osteoblast biology. Thus, we examined miRNAs regulated by Wnt signaling...... in hMSC. We identified miRNA (miR)-141-3p as a Wnt target which in turn inhibited Wnt signaling. Moreover, miR-141-3p inhibited hMSC proliferation by arresting cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. miR-141-3p inhibited osteoblast differentiation of hMSC as evidenced by reduced alkaline phosphatase...... activity, gene expression and in vitro mineralized matrix formation. Bioinformatic studies, Western blot analysis and 3'UTR reporter assay demonstrated that cell division cycle 25A (CDC25A) is a direct target of miR-141-3p. siRNA-mediated knock-down of CDC25A inhibited hMSC proliferation and osteoblast...

  16. Graphene oxide nanoflakes incorporated gelatin-hydroxyapatite scaffolds enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manitha; Nancy, D.; Krishnan, Amit G.; Anjusree, G. S.; Vadukumpully, Sajini; Nair, Shantikumar V.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, graphene oxide (GO) nanoflakes (0.5 and 1 wt%) were incorporated into a gelatin-hydroxyapatite (GHA) matrix through a freeze drying technique and its effect to enhance mechanical strength and osteogenic differentiation was studied. The GHA matrix with GO demonstrated less brittleness in comparison to GHA scaffolds. There was no significant difference in mechanical strength between GOGHA0.5 and GOGHA1.0 scaffolds. When the scaffolds were immersed in phosphate buffered saline (to mimic physiologic condition) for 60 days, around 50-60% of GO was released in sustained and linear manner and the concentration was within the toxicity limit as reported earlier. Further, GOGHA0.5 scaffolds were continued for cell culture experiments, wherein the scaffold induced osteogenic differentiation of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells without providing supplements like dexamethasone, L-ascorbic acid and β glycerophosphate in the medium. The level of osteogenic differentiation of stem cells was comparable to those cultured on GHA scaffolds with osteogenic supplements. Thus biocompatible, biodegradable and porous GO reinforced gelatin-HA 3D scaffolds may serve as a suitable candidate in promoting bone regeneration in orthopaedics.

  17. Osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in hydrogel containing nacre powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flausse, Alicia; Henrionnet, Christel; Dossot, Manuel; Dumas, Dominique; Hupont, Sébastien; Pinzano, Astrid; Mainard, Didier; Galois, Laurent; Magdalou, Jacques; Lopez, Evelyne; Gillet, Pierre; Rousseau, Marthe

    2013-11-01

    Nacre (or mother of pearl) can facilitate bone cell differentiation and can speed up their mineralization. Here we report on the capability of nacre to induce differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) and the production of extracellular matrix. hBM-MSCs were encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel containing different concentrations of powdered nacre and cultured in the same environment until Day 28. Analysis of osteogenic gene expression, histochemistry, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, and Raman scattering spectroscopy were used to characterize the synthesis of the extracellular matrix. In the presence of nacre powder, a significant increase in matrix synthesis from D21 in comparison with pure alginate was observed. Histochemistry revealed the formation of a new tissue composed of collagen fibers in the presence of nacre (immunostaining and SHG), and hydroxyapatite crystals (Raman) in the alginate beads. These results suggest that nacre is efficient in hBM-MSCs differentiation, extracellular matrix production and mineralization in alginate 3D biomaterials. PMID:23554327

  18. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Mineralized Alginate Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhrin, Marita; Xie, Minli; Olderøy, Magnus Ø.; Sikorski, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Mineralized biomaterials are promising for use in bone tissue engineering. Culturing osteogenic cells in such materials will potentially generate biological bone grafts that may even further augment bone healing. Here, we studied osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in an alginate hydrogel system where the cells were co-immobilized with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) for gradual mineralization of the microenvironment. MSC were embedded in unmodified alginate beads and alginate beads mineralized with ALP to generate a polymer/hydroxyapatite scaffold mimicking the composition of bone. The initial scaffold mineralization induced further mineralization of the beads with nanosized particles, and scanning electron micrographs demonstrated presence of collagen in the mineralized and unmineralized alginate beads cultured in osteogenic medium. Cells in both types of beads sustained high viability and metabolic activity for the duration of the study (21 days) as evaluated by live/dead staining and alamar blue assay. MSC in beads induced to differentiate in osteogenic direction expressed higher mRNA levels of osteoblast-specific genes (RUNX2, COL1AI, SP7, BGLAP) than MSC in traditional cell cultures. Furthermore, cells differentiated in beads expressed both sclerostin (SOST) and dental matrix protein-1 (DMP1), markers for late osteoblasts/osteocytes. In conclusion, Both ALP-modified and unmodified alginate beads provide an environment that enhance osteogenic differentiation compared with traditional 2D culture. Also, the ALP-modified alginate beads showed profound mineralization and thus have the potential to serve as a bone substitute in tissue engineering. PMID:25769043

  19. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in mineralized alginate matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marita Westhrin

    Full Text Available Mineralized biomaterials are promising for use in bone tissue engineering. Culturing osteogenic cells in such materials will potentially generate biological bone grafts that may even further augment bone healing. Here, we studied osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an alginate hydrogel system where the cells were co-immobilized with alkaline phosphatase (ALP for gradual mineralization of the microenvironment. MSC were embedded in unmodified alginate beads and alginate beads mineralized with ALP to generate a polymer/hydroxyapatite scaffold mimicking the composition of bone. The initial scaffold mineralization induced further mineralization of the beads with nanosized particles, and scanning electron micrographs demonstrated presence of collagen in the mineralized and unmineralized alginate beads cultured in osteogenic medium. Cells in both types of beads sustained high viability and metabolic activity for the duration of the study (21 days as evaluated by live/dead staining and alamar blue assay. MSC in beads induced to differentiate in osteogenic direction expressed higher mRNA levels of osteoblast-specific genes (RUNX2, COL1AI, SP7, BGLAP than MSC in traditional cell cultures. Furthermore, cells differentiated in beads expressed both sclerostin (SOST and dental matrix protein-1 (DMP1, markers for late osteoblasts/osteocytes. In conclusion, Both ALP-modified and unmodified alginate beads provide an environment that enhance osteogenic differentiation compared with traditional 2D culture. Also, the ALP-modified alginate beads showed profound mineralization and thus have the potential to serve as a bone substitute in tissue engineering.

  20. Transcriptome sequencing wide functional analysis of human mesenchymal stem cells in response to TLR4 ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Das, Amitabh; Chai, Jin Choul; Binas, Bert; Choi, Mi Ran; Park, Kyoung Sun; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Due to their multipotentiality and immunomodulation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are widely studied for the treatment of degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Transplantation of hMSCs to damaged tissue is a promising approach for tissue regeneration. However, the physiological mechanisms and regulatory processes of MSC trafficking to injured tissue are largely unexplored. Here, we evaluated the gene expression profile and migratory potential of hMSCs upon stimulation with the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using RNA sequencing, we identified unique induction patterns of interferon stimulated genes, cytokines and chemokines involved in chemotaxis and homing. The -950 to +50 bp regions of many of these LPS-responsive genes were enriched with putative binding motifs for the transcription factors (TFs) interferon regulatory factor (IRF1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB1, REL), which were also induced by LPS along with other TFs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that IRF1 bound within their target genes promoter region. In addition, IRF1 attenuation significantly down-regulated interferon stimulated genes as well as key cytokines. Furthermore, using pharmacological inhibitors, we showed that the NF-κB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways regulate the migratory and cytokines/chemokines response to LPS. These unprecedented data suggest that IRF1 and NF-κB orchestrate the TLR4-primed immunomodulatory response of hMSCs and that this response also involves the PI3K pathway. PMID:27444640

  1. Characterization of Senescence of Culture-expanded Human Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legzdina, Diana; Romanauska, Anete; Nikulshin, Sergey; Kozlovska, Tatjana; Berzins, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) are promising candidates in regenerative medicine. The need for in vitro propagation to obtain therapeutic quantities of the cells imposes a risk of impaired functionality due to cellular senescence. The aim of the study was to analyze in vitro senescence of previously cryopreserved human ADSCs subjected to serial passages in cell culture. Methods and Results ADSC cultures from 8 donors were cultivated until proliferation arrest was reached. A gradual decline of ADSC fitness was observed by altered cell morphology, loss of proliferative, clonogenic and differentiation abilities and increased β-galactosidase expression all of which occurred in a donor-specific manner. Relative telomere length (RTL) analysis revealed that only three tested cultures encountered replicative senescence. The presence of two ADSC subsets with significantly different RTL and cell size was discovered. The heterogeneity of ADSC cultures was supported by the intermittent nature of aging seen in tested samples. Conclusions We conclude that the onset of in vitro senescence of ADSCs is a strongly donor-specific process which is complicated by the intricate dynamics of cell subsets present in ADSC population. This complexity needs to be carefully considered when elaborating protocols for personalized cellular therapy. PMID:27426094

  2. Anisotropic rigidity sensing on grating topography directs human mesenchymal stem cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sum Thai; Teo, Soo-Kng; Park, Sungsu; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2014-01-01

    Through mechanotransduction, cells can sense physical cues from the extracellular environment and convert them into internal signals that affect various cellular functions. For example, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on topographical gratings have been shown to elongate and differentiate to different extents depending on grating width. Using a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling, the physical parameters of substrate topography that direct cell elongation were determined. On a variety of topographical gratings with different grating widths, heights and rigidity, elongation of hMSCs was measured and a monotonic increase was observed for grating aspect ratio (crosssectional height to line-width ratio) between 0.035 and 2. The elongation was also dependent on the grating substrate rigidity over a range of 0.18-1.43 MPa. A mathematical model was developed to explain our observations by relating cell elongation to the anisotropic deformation of the gratings and how this anisotropy depends on the aspect ratio and rigidity of the gratings. Our model was in good agreement with the experimental data for the range of grating aspect ratio and substrate rigidity studied. In addition, we also showed that the percentage of aligned cells, which had a strong linear correlation with elongation for slightly elongated cells, saturated toward 100 % at higher level of cell elongation. Our results may be useful in designing gratings to elicit specific cellular responses that may depend on the extent of cell elongation. PMID:23529613

  3. Proliferation and harvest of human mesenchymal stem cells using new thermoresponsive nanocomposite gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotobuki, Noriko; Murata, Kazutaka; Haraguchi, Kazutoshi

    2013-02-01

    For tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, stem cells should be effectively cultured in vitro. New thermoresponsive nanocomposite gels (MD-NC gels), consisting of inorganic clay (hectorite) and copolymers composed of hydrophobic 2-methoxyethyl acrylate (MEA) and hydrophilic N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) units, could be applied in cell culture and cell harvesting without trypsinization, specifically using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The composition of the MD-NC gel (the ratio of the two monomer types and the clay content) was found to determine its swelling properties in the culture medium, thermosensitivity, protein adsorption, and cell attachment and proliferation. Various kinds of human cells, including MSCs, osteoblast (HOS) cells, fibroblast (NHDF) cells, and epithelial cells could be effectively cultured on MD-NC gels. In particular, on an MD10-NC2 gel with relatively low DMAA and clay content, the cells could be harvested by decreasing the temperature, either as a cell sheet (MSCs or NHDF cells) or as a population of suspension cells (HOS cells). Further, it was found that the MD10-NC2 gel is suitable for stem cell differentiation. Because of their thermosensitivity, controllable modulus, and surface properties, MD-NC gels are promising cell culture substrates useful for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:22926940

  4. Senescing human bone-marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells have altered lysophospholipid composition and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Ji; Yi, TacGhee; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Lim, Dong Kyu; Hong, Ji Yeon; Cho, Yun Kyoung; Lim, Johan; Song, Sun U; Kwon, Sung Won

    2014-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used in a wide range of research and clinical studies because MSCs do not have any ethical issues and have the advantage of low carcinogenicity due to their limited proliferation. However, because only a small number of MSCs can be obtained from the bone marrow, ex vivo amplification is inevitably required. For that reason, this study was conducted to acquire the metabolic information to examine and control the changes in the activities and differentiation potency of MSCs during the ex vivo culture process. Endogenous metabolites of human bone-marrow-derived clonal MSCs (hcMSCs) during cellular senescence were profiled by ultraperformance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/QTOFMS). To select significant metabolites, we used the linear mixed effects model having fixed effects for batch and time (passage) and random effects for metabolites, determining the mean using a t test and the standard deviation using an F test. We used structural analysis with representative standards and spectrum patterns with different collision energies to distinctly identify eight metabolites with altered expression during senescence as types of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), such as LPC 16:0 and LPE 22:4. The present study revealed changes in endogenous metabolites and mechanisms due to senescence. PMID:24498988

  5. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we investigate the influences of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from periodontal ligament (hPDL-MSCs). A specially redesigned plasma needle was used as the source of low-temperature plasma and its effects on different hPDL-MSC functions were investigated. Cell cultures were obtained from extracted normal impacted third molars and characterized for their phenotype and multi-potential differentiation. The hPDL-MSCs possessed all the typical MSC properties, including clonogenic ability, high proliferation rate, specific phenotype and multilineage differentiation. The data regarding the interaction of plasma with hPDL-MSCs demonstrated that plasma treatment inhibited the migration of hPDL-MSCs and induced some detachment, while not affecting their viability. Additionally, plasma significantly attenuated hPDL-MSCs' proliferation, but promoted their osteogenic differentiation. The results of this study indicated that a non-thermal plasma offers specific activity with non-destructive properties that can be advantageous for future dental applications. (paper)

  6. Osteoblastic differentiation and stress response of human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to alternating current electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electric fields are integral to many biological events, from maintaining cellular homeostasis to embryonic development to healing. The application of electric fields offers substantial therapeutic potential, while optimal dosing regimens and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the positive clinical impact are poorly understood. Methods The purpose of this study was to track the differentiation profile and stress response of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation during exposure to a 20 mV/cm, 60 kHz electric field. Morphological and biochemical changes were imaged using endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and quantitatively assessed through eccentricity calculations and extraction of the redox ratio from NADH, FAD and lipofuscin contributions. Real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR were used to track osteogenic differentiation markers, namely alkaline phosphatase (ALP and collagen type 1 (col1, and stress response markers, such as heat shock protein 27 (hsp27 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70. Comparisons of collagen deposition between the stimulated hMSCs and controls were examined through second harmonic generation (SHG imaging. Results Quantitative differences in cell morphology, as described through an eccentricity ratio, were found on days 2 and days 5 (p Conclusions Electrical stimulation is a useful tool to improve hMSC osteogenic differentiation, while heat shock proteins may reveal underlying mechanisms, and optical non-invasive imaging may be used to monitor the induced morphological and biochemical changes.

  7. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-enhanced osteogenic differentiation by contact interaction with polyethylene terephthalate nanogratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Sara; Meucci, Sandro; Parchi, Paolo; Pacini, Simone; Montali, Marina; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Among the very large number of polymeric materials that have been proposed in the field of orthopedics, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is one of the most attractive thanks to its flexibility, thermal resistance, mechanical strength and durability. Several studies have been proposed that interface nano- or micro-structured surfaces with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), demonstrating the potential of this technology for promoting osteogenesis. All these studies were carried out on biomaterials other than PET, which remains almost uninvestigated in terms of cell shaping, alignment and differentiation. Here, we study the effect of PET 350-depth nanogratings (NGs) with a ridge and lateral groove size of 500 nm (T1) or 1 μm (T2), on bone marrow-derived human MSC (hMSC) differentiation in relation to the osteogenic fate. We demonstrate that these substrates, especially T2, can promote the osteogenic phenotype more efficiently than standard flat surfaces and that this effect is more marked if cells are cultured in osteogenic medium than in basal medium. Finally, we show that the shape and disposition of calcium hydroxyapatite granules on the different substrates was influenced by the substrate symmetry, being more elongated and spatially organized on NGs than on flat surfaces. PMID:27388559

  8. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease

  9. Labeling of human mesenchymal stem cell: Comparison between paramagnetic and superparamagnetic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chung-Yi; Tai, Ming-Fong; Chen, Shin-Tai; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Liu, Hon-Man

    2009-04-01

    Paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substances are used to trace stem cell in living organisms under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substance for their labeling efficiency by using clinically widely used gadolinium chelates and iron oxide nanoparticles. Without the aid of transfection agent, human mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with each agent separately in different concentration and the optimized concentration was determined by maintaining same cell viability as unlabeled cells. Iron oxide nanoparticle labeling has a detecting threshold of 12 500 cells in vitro, while gadolinium chelates labeling could be detected for at least 50 000 cells. In life animal study, we found there is an eightfold sensitivity in cells labeled with iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles; however, the magnetic susceptibility artifact would obscure the detail of adjacent anatomical structures. We conclude that labeling stem cells with superparamagnetic substance is more efficacious. However, the cells labeled by superparamagnetic nanoparticles might interfere with the interpretation of anatomical structure. These findings would be beneficial to applications of magnetic substances toward stem cell biology and tissue engineering.

  10. Human Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell: A Source for Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ayatollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to differentiate into many cell types, and modulate immune responses, makes them an attractive therapeutic tool for cell transplantation and tissue engineering.Objective: This project was designed for isolation, culture, and characterization of human marrow-derived MSCs based on the immunophenotypic markers and the differentiation potential.Methods: Bone marrow of healthy donors was aspirated from the iliac crest. Mononuclear cells were layered over the Ficoll-Paque density-gradient and plated in tissue cultures dish. The adherent cells expanded rapidly and maintained with periodic passages until a relatively homogeneous population was established. The identification of adherent cells and the immune-surface markers was performed by flow cytometric analysis at the third passage. The in vitro differentiation of MSCs into osteoblast and adipocytes was also achieved.Results: The MSCs were CD11b (CR3, CD45, CD34, CD31 (PCAM-1, CD40, CD80 (B7-1, and HLA-class II negative because antigen expression was less than 5%, while they showed a high expression of CD90, and CD73. The differentiation of osteoblasts, is determined by deposition of a mineralized extracellular matrix in the culture plates that can be detected with Alizarin Red. Adipocytes were easily identified by their morphology and staining with Oil Red.Conclusion: MSCs can be isolated and expanded from most healthy donors, providing for a source of cell-based therapy.

  11. HOX gene analysis in the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Wha Chae

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs have the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts during osteogenesis. Several studies attempted to identify osteogenesis-related genes in hMSCs. Although HOX genes are known to play a pivotal role in skeletogenesis, their function in the osteogenesis of hMSCs has not yet been investigated in detail. Our aim was to characterize the expression of 37 HOX genes by multiplex RT-PCR to identify the ones most probably involved in osteogenic differentiation. The results showed that the expression patterns of four HOX genes were altered during this process. In particular, the expression levels of HOXC13 and HOXD13 were dramatically changed. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis were performed in order to further analyze the expression of HOXC13 and HOXD13 . The qRT-PCR results showed that transcription of HOXC13 was up-regulated by up to forty times, whereas that of HOXD13 was down-regulated by approximately five times after osteogenic differentiation. The Western blot results for the HOXC13 and HOXD13 proteins also corresponded well with the real-time PCR result. These findings suggest that HOXC13 and HOXD13 might be involved in the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  12. Identification of subpopulations in mesenchymal stem cell-like cultures from human umbilical cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majore Ingrida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of cell types can be identified in the adherent fraction of bone marrow mononuclear cells including more primitive and embryonic-like stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, lineage-committed progenitors as well as mature cells such as osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Different methods are described for the isolation of single bone marrow stem cell subpopulations – beginning from ordinary size sieving, long term cultivation under specific conditions to FACS-based approaches. Besides bone marrow-derived subpopulations, also other tissues including human umbilical cord (UC have been recently suggested to provide a potential source for MSC. Although of clinical importance, these UC-derived MSC populations remain to be characterized. It was thus the aim of the present study to identify possible subpopulations in cultures of MSC-like cells obtained from UC. We used counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE as a novel strategy to successfully address this question. Results UC-derived primary cells were separated by CCE and revealed differentially-sized populations in the fractions. Thus, a subpopulation with an average diameter of about 11 μm and a small flat cell body was compared to a large sized subpopulation of about 19 μm average diameter. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the expression of certain MSC stem cell markers including CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105, respectively, although these markers were expressed at higher levels in the small-sized population. Moreover, this small-sized subpopulation exhibited a higher proliferative capacity as compared to the total UC-derived primary cultures and the large-sized cells and demonstrated a reduced amount of aging cells. Conclusion Using the CCE technique, we were the first to demonstrate a subpopulation of small-sized UC-derived primary cells carrying MSC-like characteristics according to the presence of various mesenchymal stem cell markers. This is also supported by the

  13. Myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for muscle regeneration in urinary tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bin; ZHENG Jun-hua; ZHANG Yuan-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective This article was to review the current status of adult mesenchymal stem cells transplantation for muscle regeneration in urinary tract and propose the future prospect in this field.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed (2000-2013).The search terms were "mesenchymal stem cells","bladder","stress urinary incontinence" and "tissue engineering".Study selection Articles regarding the adult mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering of bladder and stress urinary incontinence were selected and reviewed.Results Adult mesenchymal stem cells had been identified and well characterized in human bone marrow,adipose tissue,skeletal muscle and urine,and demonstrated the capability of differentiating into smooth muscle cells and skeletal muscle cells under myogenic differentiation conditions in vitro.Multiple preclinical and clinical studies indicated that adult mesenchymal stem cells could restore and maintain the structure and function of urinary muscle tissues after transplanted,and potentially improve the quality of life in patients.Conclusions Smooth or skeletal myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells with regenerative medicine technology may provide a novel approach for muscle regeneration and tissue repair in urinary tract.The long-term effect and safety of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation should be further evaluated before this approach becomes widely used in patients.

  14. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-01-01

    has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells...... neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It......, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer...

  15. MICAL2 is a novel human cancer gene controlling mesenchymal to epithelial transition involved in cancer growth and invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindigni, Carla; Pucci, Angela; Balsamo, Michele; Libro, Rosaliana; Senchenko, Vera; Dmitriev, Alexey; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Cecchini, Marco; Roviello, Franco; Lai, Michele; Broccoli, Vania; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Angeloni, Debora

    2016-01-01

    The MICAL (Molecules Interacting with CasL) proteins catalyze actin oxidation-reduction reactions destabilizing F-actin in cytoskeletal dynamics. Here we show for the first time that MICAL2 mRNA is significantly over-expressed in aggressive, poorly differentiated/undifferentiated, primary human epithelial cancers (gastric and renal). Immunohistochemistry showed MICAL2-positive cells on the cancer invasive front and in metastasizing cancer cells inside emboli, but not at sites of metastasis, suggesting MICAL2 expression was 'on' in a subpopulation of primary cancer cells seemingly detaching from the tissue of origin, enter emboli and travel to distant sites, and was turned 'off' upon homing at metastatic sites. In vitro, MICAL2 knock-down resulted in mesenchymal to epithelial transition, reduction of viability, and loss of motility and invasion properties of human cancer cells. Moreover, expression of MICAL2 cDNA in MICAL2-depleted cells induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Altogether our data indicate that MICAL2 over-expression is associated with cancer progression and metastatic disease. MICAL2 might be an important regulator of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and therefore a promising target for anti-metastatic therapy. PMID:26689989

  16. Neuroprotection and immunomodulation by xenografted human mesenchymal stem cells following spinal cord ventral root avulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Thiago B.; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Longhini, Ana Leda F.; Fernando Pradella; Farias, Alessandro S.; Angela C. M. Luzo; Oliveira, Alexandre L. R.; Sara Teresinha Olalla Saad

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of xenotransplantation of Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) in animals after ventral root avulsion. AT-MSC has similar characteristics to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), such as immunomodulatory properties and expression of neurotrophic factors. In this study, Lewis rats were submitted to surgery for unilateral avulsion of the lumbar ventral roots and received 5 × 105 AT-MSCs via the lateral funiculus. Two weeks after cell...

  17. In vitro generation of mechanically functional cartilage grafts based on adult human stem cells and 3D-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Valonen, P.K.; Moutos, F.T.; Kusanagi, A.; Moretti, M.; Diekman, B.O.; Welter, J. F.; Caplan, A I; Guilak, F.; Freed, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensionally woven poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL) scaffolds were combined with adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to engineer mechanically functional cartilage constructs in vitro. The specific objectives were to: (i) produce PCL scaffolds with cartilage-like mechanical properties, (ii) demonstrate that hMSCs formed cartilage after 21-days of culture on PCL scaffolds, and (iii) study effects of scaffold structure (loosely vs. tightly woven), culture vessel (static dish vs. oscillatin...

  18. Human bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene transfer induces human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军; 范清宇; 钱济先; 马保安; 周勇; 张明华

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify eukaryotic expression vector of human bone morphogenetic protein 2 pcDNA3/BMP2, verify its expression in transfected human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and the effect on hMSCs differentiation.Methods: The BMP2 gene was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3. Transfected the recombinant into hMSCs by liposome. Immunnohistochemistry and in situ hybridization methods were used to identify the expression of BMP2 mRNA and protein; ALP and Von Kossa stains were performed to identify the BMP2 gene differentiated effect on the hMSCs. Results: The pcDNA3/BMP2 fragments were as large as theory. BMP2 mRNA and protein were expressed and synthesized both in 48 h and 4 weeks after transfection, the ALP and Ca deposit exhibition, which marked the osteogenic lineage of hMSCs,were enhanced and sped. Conclusion: Transfection of pcDNA3/BMP2 is able to provide transient and persistent expression in hMSCs, and promote the MSCs differentiation to osteogenic lineage.

  19. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition induces endoplasmic-reticulum-stress response in human colorectal tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Zeindl-Eberhart

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are stressed by unfavorable environmental conditions like hypoxia or starvation. Driven by the resulting cellular stress tumor cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Additionally, cellular stress is accompanied by endoplasmic reticulum-stress which induces an unfolded protein response. It is unknown if epithelial-mesenchymal transition and endoplasmic reticulum-stress are occurring as independent parallel events or if an interrelationship exists between both of them. Here, we show that in colorectal cancer cells endoplasmic reticulum-stress depends on the induction of ZEB-1, which is a main factor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In the absence of ZEB-1 colorectal cancer cells cannot mount endoplasmic reticulum-stress as a reaction on cellular stress situations like hypoxia or starvation. Thus, our data suggest that there is a hierarchy in the development of cellular stress which starts with the presence of environmental stress that induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition which allows finally endoplasmic reticulum-stress. This finding highlights the central role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition during the process of tumorigenesis as epithelial-mesenchymal transition is also associated with chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Consequently, endoplasmic reticulum-stress might be a well suited target for chemotherapy of colorectal cancers.

  20. Have you got any cholesterol? Adults' views of human nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibeci, Renato; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1994-12-01

    The general aim of our human nutrition project is to develop a health education model grounded in ‘everyday’ or ‘situated’ cognition (Hennessey, 1993). In 1993, we began pilot work to document adult understanding of human nutrition. We used a HyperCard stack as the basis for a series of interviews with 50 adults (25 university students, and 25 adults from offcampus). The interviews were transcribed and analysed using the NUDIST computer program. A summary of the views of these 50 adults on selected aspects of human nutrition is presented in this paper.

  1. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells exhibit immature nucleus pulposus cell phenotype in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system

    OpenAIRE

    Chon, Brian H; Lee, Esther J.; Jing, Liufang; Lori A Setton; Chen, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cell supplementation to the herniated or degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) is a potential strategy to promote tissue regeneration and slow disc pathology. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs) – originating from the Wharton’s jelly – remain an attractive candidate for such endeavors with their ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Previously, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been studied as a potential source for disc tissue regeneration. Howev...

  2. [Biological characteristics of exosomes secreted by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying; Lu, Shi-Hong; Wang, Xin; Cui, Jun-Jie; Li, Xue; DU, Wen-Jing; Wang, Ying; Li, Juan-Juan; Song, Bao-Quan; Chen, Fang; Ma, Feng-Xia; Chi, Ying; Yang, Shao-Guang; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the immunoregulatory function and capability supporting the angiogenesis of exosomes secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) from healthy persons. Supernatant of BMMSC (P4-P6) was collected for exosome purification. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot were used to identify the quality of isolated exosomes. The amount of exosomes was quantified through bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were isolated from healthy donor and added with isolating exosomes. After co-cultured for 72 h, IFN-γ from the co-culture system was detected by ELISA. The expression of miRNA-associated with immunity were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (Real-time RT-PCR). The interactions between exosomes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were observed with confocal microscopy. Subconfluent HUVEC were harvested and treated with the indicated concentration of exosomes. Nude mice were injected subcutaneously with exosomes or PBS as control to verify the ability of angiogenesis. The results showed that diameter range of exosomes was range from 40 to 160 nm. The isolated exosomes expressed the CD9. There was approximately linear relation between the secretion of exosomes and cell density. The exosomes suppressed the production of IFN-γ from PBMNC, and contained miRNA associated with immune regulation such as miR301, miR22 and miR-let-7a. Exosomes induced vascular tube formation in vitro and vascularization of Matrigel plugs in vivo. It is concluded that the BMMSC-derived exosomes can regulate immunity and support vascularization. PMID:24989260

  3. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  4. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  5. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanganeria, Purva; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Khanna, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml-1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained.

  6. Tuning microenvironment modulus and biochemical composition promotes human mesenchymal stem cell tenogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmann, Matthew S; Luna, Jesus I; Maverakis, Emanual; Kloxin, April M

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising for the regeneration of tendon and ligament tissues. Toward realizing this potential, microenvironment conditions are needed for promoting robust lineage-specific differentiation into tenocytes/ligament fibroblasts. Here, we utilized a statistical design of experiments approach to examine combinations of matrix modulus, composition, and soluble factors in human MSC tenogenic/ligamentogenic differentiation. Specifically, well-defined poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels were synthesized using thiol-ene chemistry providing a bioinert base for probing cell response to extracellular matrix cues. Monomer concentrations were varied to achieve a range of matrix moduli (E ∼ 10-90 kPa), and different ratios of integrin-binding peptides were incorporated (GFOGER and RGDS for collagen and fibronectin, respectively), mimicking aspects of developing tendon/ligament tissue. A face-centered central composite response surface design was utilized to understand the contributions of these cues to human MSC differentiation in the presence of soluble factors identified to promote tenogenesis/ligamentogenesis (BMP-13 and ascorbic acid). Increasing modulus and collagen mimetic peptide content increased relevant gene expression and protein production or retention (scleraxis, collagen I, tenascin-C). These findings could inform the design of materials for tendon/ligament regeneration. More broadly, the design of experiments enabled efficient data acquisition and analysis, requiring fewer replicates than if each factor had been varied one at a time. This approach can be combined with other stimuli (for example, mechanical stimulation) toward a better mechanistic understanding of differentiation down these challenging lineages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1162-1174, 2016. PMID:26748903

  7. Exploitation of herpesvirus immune evasion strategies to modify the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cell transplants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel S de la Garza-Rodea

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells residing in the connective tissue of many organs and holding great potential for tissue repair. In culture, human MSCs (hMSCs are capable of extensive proliferation without showing chromosomal aberrations. Large numbers of hMSCs can thus be acquired from small samples of easily obtainable tissues like fat and bone marrow. MSCs can contribute to regeneration indirectly by secretion of cytokines or directly by differentiation into specialized cell types. The latter mechanism requires their long-term acceptance by the recipient. Although MSCs do not elicit immune responses in vitro, animal studies have revealed that allogeneic and xenogeneic MSCs are rejected. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We aim to overcome MSC immune rejection through permanent down-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I proteins on the surface of these MHC class II-negative cells through the use of viral immune evasion proteins. Transduction of hMSCs with a retroviral vector encoding the human cytomegalovirus US11 protein resulted in strong inhibition of MHC class I surface expression. When transplanted into immunocompetent mice, persistence of the US11-expressing and HLA-ABC-negative hMSCs at levels resembling those found in immunodeficient (i.e., NOD/SCID mice could be attained provided that recipients' natural killer (NK cells were depleted prior to cell transplantation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate the potential utility of herpesviral immunoevasins to prevent rejection of xenogeneic MSCs. The observation that down-regulation of MHC class I surface expression renders hMSCs vulnerable to NK cell recognition and cytolysis implies that multiple viral immune evasion proteins are likely required to make hMSCs non-immunogenic and thereby universally transplantable.

  8. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml−1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained. (paper)

  9. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay. PMID:17583554

  10. Concise review: adult mesenchymal stromal cell therapy for inflammatory diseases: how well are we joining the dots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Matthew D; Elliman, Stephen J; Cahill, Emer; English, Karen; Ceredig, Rhodri; Ritter, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (MSCs) continue to be a strong area of focus for academic- and industry-based researchers who share the goal of expanding their therapeutic use for diverse inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases. Recently, there has been an accelerated rate of scientific publication, clinical trial activity, and commercialisation in the field. This has included the reporting of exciting new developments in four areas that will be of key importance to future successful use of MSC-based therapies in large numbers of patients: (a) fundamental biology of the primary cells in bone marrow and other tissues that give rise to MSCs in culture. (b) Mechanisms by which MSCs modulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. (c) Insights into MSC kinetics, safety, and efficacy in relevant animal disease models. (d) Isolation, definition, and clinical trial-based testing of human MSCs by biomedical companies and academic medical centers. Despite this progress, it remains unclear whether MSCs will enter mainstream therapeutic practice as a frequently used alternative to pharmacotherapy or surgical/radiological procedures in the foreseeable future. In this review, we summarize some of the most significant new developments for each of the four areas that contribute to the process of translating MSC research to the clinical arena. In the context of this recent progress, we discuss key challenges and specific knowledge gaps which, if not addressed in a coordinated fashion, may hinder the creation of robust "translational pipelines" for consolidating the status of MSC-based therapies. PMID:23766124

  11. Human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into nerve-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lian; FENG Xue-yong; CUI Bing-lin; Frieda Law; JIANG Xue-wu; YANG Li-ye; XIE Qing-dong; HUANG Tian-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background The two most basic properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the capacities to self-renew indefinitely and differentiate into multiple cells and tissue types. The cells from human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly have properties of MSCs and represent a rich source of primitive cells. This study was conducted to explore the possibility of inducing human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs to differentiate into nerve-like cells.Methods MSCs were cultured from the Wharton's Jelly taken from human umbilical cord of babies delivered after full-term normal labor. Salvia miltiorrhiza and β-mercaptoethanol were used to induce the human umbilical cord-derived MSCs to differentiate. The expression of neural protein markers was shown by immunocytochemistry. The induction process was monitored by phase contrast microscopy, electron microscopy (EM), and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) .The pleiotrophin and nestin genes were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results MSCs in the Wharton's Jelly were easily attainable and could be maintained and expanded in culture. They were positive for markers of MSCs, but negative for markers of hematopoietic cells and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related cells. Treatment with Salvia miltiorrhiza caused Wharton's Jelly cells to undergo profound morphological changes. The induced MSCs developed rounded cell bodies with multiple neurite-like extensions. Eventually they developed processes that formed networks reminiscent of primary cultures of neurons. Salvia miltiorrhiza and β-mercaptoethanol also induced MSCs to express nestin, β-tubulinⅢ, neurofilament (NF) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). It was confirmed by RT-PCR that MSCs could express pleiotrophin both before and after induction by Salvia miltiorrhiza. The expression was markedly enhanced after induction and the nestin gene was also expressed.Conclusions MSCs could be isolated from human umbilical

  12. Human Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis? Novelty Is the Best Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Macklis, Jeffrey Daniel

    2012-01-01

    There is ongoing controversy as to whether the understanding of adult mammalian neurogenesis gained from rodent studies is applicable to humans. In this issue of Neuron, Bergmann et al. (2012) propose that adult human olfactory bulb neurogenesis with long-term neuronal survival is extremely limited.

  13. Adult Education & Human Resource Development: Overlapping and Disparate Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Karen E.; Marsick, Victoria J.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education and human resource development as fields of practice and study share some roots in common but have grown in different directions in their histories. Adult education's roots focused initially on citizenship for a democratic society, whereas human resource development's roots are in performance at work. While they have…

  14. REX-1 expression and p38 MAPK activation status can determine proliferation/differentiation fates in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilli Ram Bhandari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: REX1/ZFP42 is a well-known embryonic stem cell (ESC marker. However, the role of REX1, itself, is relatively unknown because the function of REX1 has only been reported in the differentiation of ESCs via STAT signaling pathways. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs isolated from young tissues and cancer cells express REX1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hAD-MSCs strongly express REX1 and have a lower activation status of p38 MAPK, but bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs have weak REX1 expression and higher activation of p38 MAPK. These results indicated that REX1 expression in hMSCs was positively correlated with proliferation rates but inversely correlated with the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. In hUCB-MSCs, the roles of REX1 and p38 MAPK were investigated, and a knockdown study was performed using a lentiviral vector-based small hairpin RNA (shRNA. After REX1 knockdown, decreased cell proliferation was observed. In REX1 knocked-down hUCB-MSCs, the osteogenic differentiation ability deteriorated, but the adipogenic potential increased or was similar to that observed in the controls. The phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in hUCB-MSCs significantly increased after REX1 knockdown. After p38 MAPK inhibitor treatment, the cell growth in REX1 knocked-down hUCB-MSCs almost recovered, and the suppressed expression levels of CDK2 and CCND1 were also restored. The expression of MKK3, an upstream regulator of p38 MAPK, significantly increased in REX1 knocked-down hUCB-MSCs. The direct binding of REX1 to the MKK3 gene was confirmed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings showed that REX1 regulates the proliferation/differentiation of hMSCs through the suppression of p38 MAPK signaling via the direct suppression of MKK3. Therefore, p38 MAPK and REX-1 status can determine the cell fate of adult stem cells (ASCs. These

  15. The homeobox genes MSX2 and MOX2 are candidates for regulating epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions in the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, L M; Latham, S E; Kalionis, B

    2000-01-01

    Homeobox genes of the Msx and Mox families are coexpressed in the vertebrate embryo in regions of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Here we show that a member of each family is expressed in extra-embryonic structures where epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers contact. In situ hybridization studies on first trimester human placental sections reveal that MSX2 and MOX2 are expressed predominantly in the cytotrophoblast cell layer. In term placenta, MSX2 and MOX2 are expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast. This is the first study to describe the expression of MOX2 in human tissues and to show that members of the Msx and Mox families of homeobox genes are expressed where epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers contact in the human placenta. A combinatorial code of homeobox genes that includes members of the Msx, Mox and Dlx families has been predicted to regulate epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions in the vertebrate embryo. We have shown that MSX2, MOX2, DLX4 and the HB24 homeobox gene are expressed in the epithelial and mesenchymal cell types that form the placenta. We predict that this combination of homeobox genes is involved in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions in extraembryonic tissues. PMID:10831122

  16. PDX1- and NGN3-mediated in vitro reprogramming of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into pancreatic endocrine lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limbert, Catarina; Päth, Günter; Ebert, Regina;

    2011-01-01

    Reprogramming of multipotent adult bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) (BM-MSC) represents one of several strategies for cell-based therapy of diabetes. However, reprogramming primary BM-MSC into pancreatic endocrine lineages has not yet been consistently demonstrated....

  17. Genetically modified human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells for improving the outcome of human islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Mundra

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the potential of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs as gene carriers for improving the outcome of human islet transplantation. hBMSCs were characterized for the expression of phenotypic markers and transduced with Adv-hVEGF-hIL-1Ra to overexpress human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF and human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hIL-1Ra. Human islets were co-cultured with hBMSCs overexpressing hVEGF and hIL-1Ra. Islet viability was determined by membrane fluorescent method and glucose stimulation test. Transduced hBMSCs and human islets were co-transplanted under the kidney capsule of NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid Il2rg(tm1Wjl /SzJ (NSG diabetic mice and blood glucose levels were measured over time to demonstrate the efficacy of genetically modified hBMSCs. At the end of study, immunofluorescent staining of kidney section bearing islets was performed for insulin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF. hBMSCs were positive for the expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146 and Stro-1 surface markers as determined by flow cytometry. Transduction of hBMSCs with adenovirus did not affect their stemness and differentiation potential as confirmed by mRNA levels of stem cell markers and adipogenic differentiation of transduced hBMSCs. hBMSCs were efficiently transduced with Adv-hVEGF-hIL-1Ra to overexpress hVEGF and hIL-1Ra. Live dead cell staining and glucose stimulation test have shown that transduced hBMSCs improved the viability of islets against cytokine cocktail. Co-transplantation of human islets with genetically modified hBMSCs improved the glycemic control of diabetic NSG mice as determined by mean blood glucose levels and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Immunofluorescent staining of kidney sections was positive for human insulin and vWF. In conclusion, our results have demonstrated that hBMSCs may be used as gene carriers and nursing cells to improve the outcome of islet

  18. Murine mesenchymal progenitor cells from different tissues differentiated via mesenchymal microspheres into the mesodermal direction

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    Lehnert Hendrik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because specific marker molecules for phenotypical identification of mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells are missing, the assessment of the in vitro-differentiation capacity is a prerequisite to characterize these cells. However, classical differentiation protocols are often cell-consuming and time intensive. Therefore, the establishment of novel strategies for differentiation is one topic of current efforts in stem cell biology. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the practicability of a new differentiation test using plastic adherent cell isolates from different tissues. Results We introduced the mesenchymal microsphere method as a feasible time- and cell saving screening method to analyse multilineage differentiation properties of adult progenitor cells in a three-dimensional system. For this purpose we isolated, characterized and analyzed new sources of adult murine mesenchymal progenitor cells from perirenal adipose tissue and mediastinal stromal tissue in comparison to bone marrow progenitor cells. The proliferation capacity of the cells was demonstrated by determination of the daily doubling index. Although the flow cytometry analysis of undifferentiated cells revealed differences in the expression of CD marker molecules, all isolates have the capacity for multilineage differentiation following the mesenchymal microsphere protocol as well as the classical "micro mass body" protocol for chondrogenic and the monolayer cultivation protocol for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Differentiation was characterized using histochemical and immunhistochemical staining as well as RT-PCR. Conclusions We were able to show that the mesenchymal microsphere method is an efficient test system for chondro-, osteo- and adipogenic differentiation of adult progenitor cells. The advantage of this system in comparison to classical protocols is that approximately 7 times lower cell numbers are necessary. Since classical

  19. Nanomaterials enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells similar to a short peptide of BMP-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lock J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaclyn Lock, Huinan Liu Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA Background: Nanomaterials have unique advantages in controlling stem cell function due to their biomimetic characteristics and special biological and mechanical properties. Controlling adhesion and differentiation of stem cells is critical for tissue regeneration. Methods: This in vitro study investigated the effects of nano-hydroxyapatite, nano-hydroxyapatite-polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA composites, and a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-7-derived short peptide (DIF-7c on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. The peptide was chemically functionalized onto nano-hydroxyapatite, incorporated into a nanophase hydroxyapatite-PLGA composite or PLGA control, or directly injected into culture media. Results: Unlike the PLGA control, the nano-hydroxyapatite-PLGA composites promoted adhesion of human MSC. Importantly, nano-hydroxyapatite and nano-hydroxyapatite-PLGA composites promoted osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs, comparable with direct injection of the DIF-7c peptide into culture media. Conclusion: Nano-hydroxyapatite and nano-hydroxyapatite-PLGA composites provide a promising alternative in directing the adhesion and differentiation of human MSC. These nanocomposites should be studied further to clarify their effects on MSC functions and bone remodeling in vivo, eventually translating to clinical applications. Keywords: human mesenchymal stem cells, osteogenesis, stem cell differentiation, bone morphogenetic protein, peptide delivery, nanocomposites

  20. Suitability of human mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy depends on the expansion medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Great hope is set in the use of mesenchymal stem cells for gene therapy and regenerative medicine. Since the frequency of this subpopulation of stem cells in bone marrow is low, mesenchymal stem cells are expanded ex vivo and manipulated prior to experimental or clinical use. Different methods for isolation and expansion are available, but the particular effect on the stem cell character is unclear. While the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells by density centrifugation followed by selection of the plastic adherent fraction is frequently used, the composition of expansion media differs. Thus, in the present study we cultured mesenchymal stem cells isolated from five healthy young volunteers in three widely used expansion media and performed a detailed analysis of the effect on morphology, proliferation, clonogenicity, passaging, differentiation and senescence. By this way we clearly show that the type of expansion medium used determines the stem cell character and time of senescence which is critical for future gene therapeutic and regenerative approaches using mesenchymal stem cells

  1. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  2. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A. Russ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1, Neuroplastin (NPTN, and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2. Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2 increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation.

  3. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Holger A; Landsman, Limor; Moss, Christopher L; Higdon, Roger; Greer, Renee L; Kaihara, Kelly; Salamon, Randy; Kolker, Eugene; Hebrok, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1), Neuroplastin (NPTN), and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2). Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2) increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation. PMID:26681951

  4. Novel biologically-inspired rosette nanotube PLLA scaffolds for improving human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartilage defects are a persistent issue in orthopedic tissue engineering where acute and chronic tissue damage stemming from osteoarthritis, trauma, and sport injuries, present a common and serious clinical problem. Unlike bone, cartilage repair continues to be largely intractable due to the tissue's inherently poor regenerative capacity. Thus, the objective of this study is to design a novel tissue engineered nanostructured cartilage scaffold via biologically-inspired self-assembling rosette nanotubes (RNTs) and biocompatible non-woven poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) for enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) chondrogenic differentiation. Specifically, RNTs are a new class of biomimetic supramolecular nanomaterial obtained through the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight modified guanine/cytosine DNA base hybrids (the G∧C motif) in an aqueous environment. In this study, we synthesized a novel twin G∧C-based RNT (TB-RGDSK) functionalized with cell-favorable arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–serine–lysine (RGDSK) integrin binding peptide and a twin G∧C based RNT with an aminobutane linker molecule (TBL). hMSC adhesion, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation were evaluated in vitro in scaffold groups consisting of biocompatible PLLA with TBL, 1:9 TB-RGDSK:TBL, and TB-RGDSK, respectively. Our results show that RNTs can remarkably increase total glycosaminoglycan, collagen, and protein production when compared to PLLA controls without nanotubes. Furthermore, the TB-RGDSK with 100% well-organized RGDSK peptides achieved the highest chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The current in vitro study illustrated that RNT nanotopography and surface chemistry played an important role in enhancing hMSC chondrogenic differentiation thus making them promising for cartilage regeneration. (paper)

  5. Assessment of human herpesvirus-6 infection in mesenchymal stromal cells ex vivo expanded for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, A; Bonomi, A; Coccè, V; Bernardo, M E; Cometa, A M; Ferrari, M; Sisto, F; Cavicchini, L; Locatelli, F

    2009-12-01

    Infection or reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 represents a potentially serious complication (often involving the central nervous system) in patients receiving either solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The objective of this study was to assess the risk of HHV-6 infection/reactivation in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). MSCs are multipotent cells displaying immunomodulatory properties that have been already successfully used in the clinical setting to enhance hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and to treat steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease. We analyzed 20 samples of ex vivo expanded MSCs, at different passages of culture, isolated both from bone marrow and from umbilical cord blood. Through Western blotting and immunocytochemistry techniques, we investigated the presence of the HHV-6 receptor (CD46) on cell surface, whereas the presence of HHV-6 DNA was evaluated by nested polymerase chain reaction assay. All of the MSC samples tested were positive for the virus receptor (CD46), suggesting their potential susceptibility to HHV-6. However, none of the MSC samples derived from cultures, performed in the perspective of clinical use, was found to harbor HHV-6. This preliminary observation on a consistent number of MSC samples, some of them tested at late in vitro passages, indicates a good safety profile of the product in terms of HHV-6 contamination. Nevertheless, it remains important to set up in vitro experimental models to study MSCs' susceptibility to HHV-6 (and HHV-7) infection, to verify their capacity to integrate the virus into cellular DNA, and to investigate which experimental conditions are able to induce virus reactivation. PMID:19664021

  6. Senescence in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Functional Changes and Implications in Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinetto, Valentina; Vitale, Emanuela; Giachino, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is extensively interested in developing cell therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), with applications to several aging-associated diseases. For successful therapies, a substantial number of cells are needed, requiring extensive ex vivo cell expansion. However, MSC proliferation is limited and it is quite likely that long-term culture evokes continuous changes in MSCs. Therefore, a substantial proportion of cells may undergo senescence. In the present review, we will first present the phenotypic characterization of senescent human MSCs (hMSCs) and their possible consequent functional alterations. The accumulation of oxidative stress and dysregulation of key differentiation regulatory factors determine decreased differentiation potential of senescent hMSCs. Senescent hMSCs also show a marked impairment in their migratory and homing ability. Finally, many factors present in the secretome of senescent hMSCs are able to exacerbate the inflammatory response at a systemic level, decreasing the immune modulation activity of hMSCs and promoting either proliferation or migration of cancer cells. Considering the deleterious effects that these changes could evoke, it would appear of primary importance to monitor the occurrence of senescent phenotype in clinically expanded hMSCs and to evaluate possible ways to prevent in vitro MSC senescence. An updated critical presentation of the possible strategies for in vitro senescence monitoring and prevention constitutes the second part of this review. Understanding the mechanisms that drive toward hMSC growth arrest and evaluating how to counteract these for preserving a functional stem cell pool is of fundamental importance for the development of efficient cell-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:27447618

  7. Differential effect of hypoxia on human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis and hypertrophy in hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meiling; Feng, Qian; Bian, Liming

    2014-03-01

    Photocrosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels provide a conducive 3-D environment that supports the chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The HA macromer concentration in the hydrogels has a significant impact on the chondrogenesis of the encapsulated MSCs due to changes in the physical properties of the hydrogels. Meanwhile, hypoxia has been shown to promote MSC chondrogenesis and suppress subsequent hypertrophy. This study investigates the combinatorial effect of tuning HA macromer concentration (1.5-5%w/v) and hypoxia on MSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy. To decouple the effect of HA concentration from that of crosslinking density, the HA hydrogel crosslinking density was adjusted by varying the extent of the reaction through the light exposure time while keeping the HA concentration constant (5%w/v at 5 or 15 min). It was found that hypoxia had no significant effect on the chondrogenesis and cartilaginous matrix synthesis of hMSCs under all hydrogel conditions. In contrast, the hypoxia-mediated positive or negative regulation of hMSC hypertrophy in HA hydrogels is dependent on the HA concentration but independent of the crosslinking density. Specifically, hypoxia significantly suppressed hMSC hypertrophy and neocartilage calcification in low HA concentration hydrogels, whereas hypoxia substantially enhanced hMSC hypertrophy, leading to elevated tissue calcification in high HA concentration hydrogels irrespective of their crosslinking density. In addition, at a constant high HA concentration, increasing hydrogel crosslinking density promoted hMSC hypertrophy and matrix calcification. To conclude, the findings from this study demonstrate that the effect of hypoxia on hMSC chondrogenesis and hypertrophy is differentially influenced by the encapsulating HA hydrogel properties. PMID:24342044

  8. Suspension Culture Alters Insulin Secretion in Induced Human Umbilical Cord Matrix-Derived Mesenchymal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Seyedi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Worldwide, diabetes mellitus (DM is an ever-increasing metabolic disorder. A promising approach to the treatment of DM is the implantation of insulin producing cells (IPC that have been derived from various stem cells. Culture conditions play a pivotal role in the quality and quantity of the differentiated cells. In this experimental study, we have applied various culture conditions to differentiate human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal cells (hUCMs into IPCs and measured insulin production. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we exposed hUCMs cells to pancreatic medium and differentiated them into IPCs in monolayer and suspension cultures. Pancreatic medium consisted of serum-free Dulbecco’s modified eagle’s medium Nutrient mixture F12 (DMEM/F12 medium with 17.5 mM glucose supplemented by 10 mM nicotinamide, 10 nM exendin-4, 10 nM pentagastrin, 100 pM hepatocyte growth factor, and B-27 serum-free supplement. After differentiation, insulin content was analyzed by gene expression, immunocytochemistry (IHC and the chemiluminesence immunoassay (CLIA. Results: Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR showed efficient expressions of NKX2.2, PDX1 and INSULIN genes in both groups. IHC analysis showed higher expression of insulin protein in the hanging drop group, and CLIA revealed a significant higher insulin production in hanging drops compared with the monolayer group following the glucose challenge test. Conclusion: We showed by this novel, simple technique that the suspension culture played an important role in differentiation of hUCMs into IPC. This culture was more efficient than the conventional culture method commonly used in IPC differentiation and cultivation.

  9. Titania-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings support human mesenchymal stem cells osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrievska, Sashka; Bureau, Martin N; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson; Petit, Alain; Lima, Rogerio S; Marple, Basil R

    2011-09-15

    In addition to mechanical and chemical stability, the third design goal of the ideal bone-implant coating is the ability to support osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Plasma-sprayed TiO(2)-based bone-implant coatings exhibit excellent long-term mechanical properties, but their applications in bone implants are limited by their bioinertness. We have successfully produced a TiO(2) nanostructured (grain size oxy-fuel. On Ti64 substrates, the novel TiO(2)-HA coating bond 153× stronger and has a cohesive strength 4× higher than HA coatings. The HA micro- and nano-sized particles covering the TiO(2)-HA coating surface are chemically bound to the TiO(2) coating matrix, producing chemically stable coatings under high mechanical solicitations. In this study, we elucidated the TiO(2)-HA nanocomposite coating surface chemistry, and in vitro osteoinductive potential by culturing human MSCs (hMSCs) in basal and in osteogenic medium (hMSC-ob). We assessed the following hMSCs and hMSC-ob parameters over a 3-week period: (i) proliferation; (ii) cytoskeleton organization and cell-substrate adhesion; (iii) coating-cellular interaction morphology and growth; and (iv) cellular mineralization. The TiO(2) -HA nanocomposite coatings demonstrated 3× higher hydrophilicity than HA coatings, a TiO(2)-nanostructured surface in addition to the chemically bound HA micron- and nano-sized rod to the surface. hMSCs and hMSC-ob demonstrated increased proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation on the nanostructured TiO(2)-HA coatings, suggesting the TiO(2)-HA coatings nanostructure surface properties induce osteogenic differentiation of hMSC and support hMSC-ob osteogenic potential better than our current golden standard HA coating. PMID:21702080

  10. Temporally degradable collagen-mimetic hydrogels tuned to chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Paresh A; Skaalure, Stacey C; Chow, Lesley W; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Stoichevska, Violet; Peng, Yong Y; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for repairing and regenerating articular cartilage face critical challenges to recapitulate the dynamic and complex biochemical microenvironment of native tissues. One approach to mimic the biochemical complexity of articular cartilage is through the use of recombinant bacterial collagens as they provide a well-defined biological 'blank template' that can be modified to incorporate bioactive and biodegradable peptide sequences within a precisely defined three-dimensional system. We customized the backbone of a Streptococcal collagen-like 2 (Scl2) protein with heparin-binding, integrin-binding, and hyaluronic acid-binding peptide sequences previously shown to modulate chondrogenesis and then cross-linked the recombinant Scl2 protein with a combination of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7)- and aggrecanase (ADAMTS4)-cleavable peptides at varying ratios to form biodegradable hydrogels with degradation characteristics matching the temporal expression pattern of these enzymes in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis. hMSCs encapsulated within the hydrogels cross-linked with both degradable peptides exhibited enhanced chondrogenic characteristics as demonstrated by gene expression and extracellular matrix deposition compared to the hydrogels cross-linked with a single peptide. Additionally, these combined peptide hydrogels displayed increased MMP7 and ADAMTS4 activities and yet increased compression moduli after 6 weeks, suggesting a positive correlation between the degradation of the hydrogels and the accumulation of matrix by hMSCs undergoing chondrogenesis. Our results suggest that including dual degradation motifs designed to respond to enzymatic activity of hMSCs going through chondrogenic differentiation led to improvements in chondrogenesis. Our hydrogel system demonstrates a bimodal enzymatically degradable biological platform that can mimic native cellular processes in a temporal manner. As such, this novel

  11. Human mesenchymal stem cells are susceptible to lysis by CD8(+) T cells and NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop, Meindert J; Korevaar, Sander S; de Kuiper, Ronella; IJzermans, Jan N M; van Besouw, Nicole M; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve the outcome of organ transplantation. The immunogenicity of MSCs is, however, unclear and is important for the efficacy of MSC therapy and for potential sensitization against donor antigens. We investigated the susceptibility of autologous and allogeneic MSCs for lysis by CD8(+) T-lymphocytes and NK cells in a kidney transplant setting. MSCs were derived from adipose tissue of human kidney donors and were CD90(+), CD105(+), CD166(+), and HLA class I(+). They showed differentiation ability and immunosuppressive capacity. Lysis of MSCs by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), FACS-sorted CD8(+) T cells, and NK cells was measured by europium release assay. Allogeneic MSCs were susceptible for lysis by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and NK cells, while autologous MSCs were lysed by NK cells only. NK cell-mediated lysis was inversely correlated with the expression of HLA class I on MSCs. Lysis of autologous MSCs was not dependent on culturing of MSCs in FBS, and MSCs in suspension as well as adherent to plastic were lysed by NK cells. Pretransplant recipient PBMCs did not lyse donor MSCs, but PBMCs isolated 3, 6, and 12 months after transplantation showed increasing lysing ability. After 12 months, CD8(+) T-cell-mediated lysis of donor MSCs persisted, indicating there was no evidence for desensitization against donor MSCs. Lysis of MSCs is important to take into account when MSCs are considered for clinical application. Our results suggest that the HLA background of MSCs and timing of MSC administration are important for the efficacy of MSC therapy. PMID:21396164

  12. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticle injectable hydrogel scaffold to support osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A A; Creasey, S; Sammon, C; Le Maitre, C L

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss associated with degenerative disease and trauma is a clinical problem increasing with the aging population. Thus, effective bone augmentation strategies are required; however, many have the disadvantages that they require invasive surgery and often the addition of expensive growth factors to induce osteoblast differentiation. Here, we investigated a LaponiteÒ crosslinked, pNIPAM-DMAc copolymer (L-pNIPAM-co-DMAc) hydrogel with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAPna), which can be maintained as a liquid ex vivo, injected via narrow-gauge needle into affected bone, followed by in situ gelation to deliver and induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). L-pNIPAM-co-DMAc hydrogels were synthesised and HAPna added post polymerisation. Commercial hMSCs from one donor (Lonza) were incorporated in liquid hydrogel, the mixture solidified and cultured for up to 6 weeks. Viability of hMSCs was maintained within hydrogel constructs containing 0.5 mg/mL HAPna. SEM analysis demonstrated matrix deposition in cellular hydrogels which were absent in acellular controls. A significant increase in storage modulus (G') was observed in cellular hydrogels with 0.5 mg/mL HAPna. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry and histological analysis demonstrated that bone differentiation markers and collagen deposition was induced within 48 h, with increased calcium deposition with time. The thermally triggered hydrogel system, described here, was sufficient without the need of additional growth factors or osteogenic media to induce osteogenic differentiation of commercial hMSCs. Preliminary data presented here will be expanded on multiple patient samples to ensure differentiation is seen in these samples. This system could potentially reduce treatment costs and simplify the treatment strategy for orthopaedic repair and regeneration. PMID:27377664

  13. The Influence of Peptide Modifications of Bioactive Glass on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Mohamed

    2011-12-01

    Bioactive glass is known for its potential as a bone scaffold due to its ability to stimulate osteogenesis and induce bone formation. Broadening this potential to include the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to bone cells will enhance the healing process in bone defects. The surface of bioactive glass made by the sol-gel technique with the composition of 70% SiO2-30% CaO (mol %) was grafted with 3 peptides sequences in different combinations from proteins (fibronectin BMP-2 and BMP-9) that are known to promote the adhesion, differentiation and osteogenesis process. The experiment was done in two forms, a 2D non-porous thin film and a 3D nano-macroporous structure. hMSCs were grown on the materials for a total of five weeks. The 2D materials were tested for the expression of 3 osteogenic markers (osteopontin, osteocalcin and osteonectin) through immunocytochemistry. The 3D forms were monitored for cell's adhesion, morphology, spreading and proliferation by scanning electron microscopy, in addition to proliferation assay and alkaline phosphatase activity measurement. Results showed that hMSCs poorly adhered to the 2D thin films, but the few cells survived showed enhanced expression of the osteogenic markers. On the 3D form, cells showed enhanced proliferation at week one and more survival of the cells on the materials grafted with the adhesion peptide for the successive weeks in comparison to the positive control samples. Enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity was also detected compared to the negative control samples but were still below the positive control samples. In conclusion, the peptide grafting could increase the effect of bioactive glass but more peptide combinations should be examined to improve the effects on the differentiation and osteogenic activity of the hMSCs.

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cells are sensitive to abnormal gravity and exhibit classic apoptotic features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Meng; Hui-yun Xu; Sheng-meng Di; Dong-yan Shi; Ai-rong Qian; Jin-fu Wang; Peng Shang

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of abnormal gravity on human mesenchymal stem cells(hMSCs).Strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient generate a magnetic force that can add to or subtract from the gravitational force.In this study,this is defined as a high-magneto-gravitational environment(HMGE).The HMGE provides three apparent gravity levels,i.e.hypogravity(μg),hypergravity(2g)and normal gravity with strong magnetic field(1g)conditions.After hMSCs were subject to HMGE for 12 h,the proliferation,morphology,structure and apoptosis were investigated.Results showed that the proliferation of hMSCs was inhibited under μg condition The abnormal gravity induced morphologic characterishcs of apoptosis cells,such as cell shrinkage,membrane blebbing,nuclear chromatin condensation and margination,decreased cell viability,and increased caspase-3/7 activity.The rate of apoptosis underμg condition is up to 56.95%.The F-actin stress fibers and microtubules were disrupted under abnormal gravity condition.Under μg-condition,the expression of p53 at mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated more than 9-and 6 folds,respectively.The Pifithrin-a,an specific inhibitor of p53,inhibited the apoptosis and prevented the disruption of cytoskeleton induced by abnormal gravity.These results implied that hMSCs were sensitive to abnormal gravity and exhibited classic apoptotic features,which might be associated with p53 signaling.

  15. Chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on fish scale collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Han-Hsiu; Uemura, Toshimasa; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2016-08-01

    Fish collagen has recently been reported to be a novel biomaterial for cell and tissue culture as an alternative to conventional mammalian collagens such as bovine and porcine collagens. Fish collagen could overcome the risk of zoonosis, such as from bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Among fish collagens, tilapia collagen, the denaturing temperature of which is near 37°C, is appropriate for cell and tissue culture. In this study, we investigated chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on tilapia scale collagen fibrils compared with porcine collagen and non-coated dishes. The collagen fibrils were observed using a scanning electronic microscope. Safranin O staining, glycosaminoglycans (GAG) expression, and real-time PCR were examined to evaluate chondrogenesis of hMSCs on each type of collagen fibril. The results showed that hMSCs cultured on tilapia scale collagen showed stronger Safranin O staining and higher GAG expression at day 6. Results of real-time PCR indicated that hMSCs cultured on tilapia collagen showed earlier SOX9 expression on day 4 and higher AGGRECAN and COLLAGEN II expression on day 6 compared with on porcine collagen and non-coated dishes. Furthermore, low mRNA levels of bone gamma-carboxyglutamate, a specific marker of osteogenesis, showed that tilapia collagen fibrils specifically enhanced chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs in chondrogenic medium, as well as porcine collagen. Accordingly, tilapia scale collagen may provide an appropriate collagen source for hMSC chondrogenesis in vitro. PMID:26829997

  16. Partial knockdown of TRF2 increase radiosensitivity of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orun, O; Tiber, P Mega; Serakinci, N

    2016-09-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor TRF2 is a member of shelterin complex with an important role in protecting and stabilizing chromosomal ends. In the present study, we investigated the effect of partial knockdown of TRF2 on radiosensitivity of telomerase immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-telo1), which have a higher radioresistance compared to non telomerized counterpart. Partial knockdown of the protein achieved 15-20% reduction in TRF2 protein levels. The study compared the effect of 2.5Gy radiation in two-four days after irradiation for hMSC-telo1 cells and the cells transfected with siTRF2 and null control vector. Radio-response of the cells were examined using senescence associated β-Gal assay (β-Gal), colony forming assay (CFU) and γ-H2AX phosphorylation. TRF2 deficiency substantially increased radiosensitivity of cells compared to controls in both proliferation and senescence assay (2.4 fold increase in β-Gal, 1.6 fold decrease in CFU). In addition, it increased the γ-H2AX foci as revealed by both immunfluorescence and Western blot analysis. Our data suggests that partial knockdown of TRF2 in hMSC-telo1 cells cause increased γ-H2AX foci which led to fail TRF2 to protect telomeres from radiation thus TRF2 deficiency led to a 1,5-2 fold increase in the radiosensitivity of hMSC-telo1 cells through telomere destabilization. PMID:26598048

  17. Novel biologically-inspired rosette nanotube PLLA scaffolds for improving human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Allie; Hemraz, Usha D; Castro, Nathan J; Fenniri, Hicham; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage defects are a persistent issue in orthopedic tissue engineering where acute and chronic tissue damage stemming from osteoarthritis, trauma, and sport injuries, present a common and serious clinical problem. Unlike bone, cartilage repair continues to be largely intractable due to the tissue's inherently poor regenerative capacity. Thus, the objective of this study is to design a novel tissue engineered nanostructured cartilage scaffold via biologically-inspired self-assembling rosette nanotubes (RNTs) and biocompatible non-woven poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) for enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) chondrogenic differentiation. Specifically, RNTs are a new class of biomimetic supramolecular nanomaterial obtained through the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight modified guanine/cytosine DNA base hybrids (the G∧C motif) in an aqueous environment. In this study, we synthesized a novel twin G∧C-based RNT (TB-RGDSK) functionalized with cell-favorable arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine-lysine (RGDSK) integrin binding peptide and a twin G∧C based RNT with an aminobutane linker molecule (TBL). hMSC adhesion, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation were evaluated in vitro in scaffold groups consisting of biocompatible PLLA with TBL, 1:9 TB-RGDSK:TBL, and TB-RGDSK, respectively. Our results show that RNTs can remarkably increase total glycosaminoglycan, collagen, and protein production when compared to PLLA controls without nanotubes. Furthermore, the TB-RGDSK with 100% well-organized RGDSK peptides achieved the highest chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The current in vitro study illustrated that RNT nanotopography and surface chemistry played an important role in enhancing hMSC chondrogenic differentiation thus making them promising for cartilage regeneration. PMID:24225196

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy for Retinal Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Leow

    Full Text Available To investigate the safety and efficacy of subretinal injection of human Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs on retinal structure and function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats.RCS rats were divided into 2 groups: hWJ-MSCs treated group (n = 8 and placebo control group (n = 8. In the treatment group, hWJ-MSCs from healthy donors were injected into the subretinal space in one eye of each rat at day 21. Control group received saline injection of the same volume. Additional 3 animals were injected with nanogold-labelled stem cells for in vivo tracking of cells localisation using a micro-computed tomography (microCT. Retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG 3 days before the injection and repeated at days 15, 30 and 70 after the injection. Eyes were collected at day 70 for histology, cellular and molecular studies.No retinal tumor formation was detected by histology during the study period. MicroCT scans showed that hWJ-MSCs stayed localised in the eye with no systemic migration. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nanogold-labelled cells were located within the subretinal space. Histology showed preservation of the outer nuclear layer (ONL in the treated group but not in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the ERG responses between the groups. Confocal microscopy showed evidence of hWJ-MSCs expressing markers for photoreceptor, Müller cells and bipolar cells.Subretinal injection of hWJ-MSCs delay the loss of the ONL in RCS rats. hWJ-MSCs appears to be safe and has potential to differentiate into retinal-like cells. The potential of this cell-based therapy for the treatment of retinal dystrophies warrants further studies.

  19. Embedding methods for poly(L-lactic acid) microfiber mesh/human mesenchymal stem cell constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, D; Battolla, B; Trombi, L; Barachini, S; Cascone, M G; Bernardini, N; Petrini, M; Mattii, L

    2009-01-01

    Fiber mesh scaffolds were recently investigated in tissue engineering as possible support for stem cell growth and differentiation, in order to repair lesion areas in clinical practice. In particular, the literature is focused on fiber mesh scaffolds constituted of biocompatible and resorbable polymeric structures, like poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA). However, as regards the study of constructs constituted of PLLA microfibers and cells, only quantitative and SEM analyses were reported, lacking histological analysis. Histological evaluation of these constructs could give important information about cellular distribution in the scaffold, cell-scaffold interactions and extracellular matrix production. The purpose of our study was to find a valid method to analyze PLLA microfiber/cell constructs from both histological and histochemical angles. Biodegradable non-woven fiber meshes were prepared using hollow microfibers, based on PLLA. We first evaluated different embedding methods useable for histological analysis and the results showed that among the paraffin, Killik, and acrylic resin the only suitable medium was the latter. Then we employed the acrylic resin to embed the constructs made up of PLLA microfibers and bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells, which we then analyzed with Toluidine Blue, PAS and Alcian Blue staining. These constructs, previously analyzed for cell viability by MTT and CCK-8 tests, showed viable/proliferating cells until 6 weeks of culture. The stainings performed on constructs confirmed viability data obtained with SEM and MTT/CCK-8 and supplied other information on the cell behaviors such as the distribution and organization onto the scaffold and the production of extracellular matrix molecules. In conclusion, this methodological study mainly suggests a suitable method to analyze PLLA microfiber/cell constructs, at the same time confirming and enriching the literature data on the compatibility between PLLA microfibers and hMSCs. PMID

  20. Enhanced differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to mesenchymal progenitors by inhibition of TGF-beta/Activin/Nodal signaling using SB-431542

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Schrøder, Henrik Daa;

    2010-01-01

    Directing differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into specific cell types using an easy and reproducible protocol is a prerequisite for the clinical use of hESC in regenerative medicine procedures. Here, we report a protocol for directing the differentiation of hESC into mesenchymal...... vivo. Interestingly, SB-OG cells cultured in 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) developed into a homogeneous population of mesenchymal progenitors that expressed CD markers characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC): CD44(+) (100%), CD73(+) (98%), CD146(+) (96%) and CD166(+) (88%) with the ability to......-regulation of genes related to mesoderm-derived cell lineages. In conclusion, our data provides a simple and versatile protocol for directing the differentiation of hESC into a myogenic lineage and then further into mesenchymal progenitors by blocking the TGF-beta signaling pathway. (c) 2010 American Society...

  1. In Vitro Study of the Effect of Vitamin E on Viability, Morphological Changes and Induction of Osteogenic Differentiation in Adult Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soleimani Mehranjani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin E as a strong antioxidant plays an important role in inhibiting free radicals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin E on the viability, morphology and osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of an adult rat. Methods: The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were extracted using the flashing-out method. At the end of the third passage, cells were divided into groups of control and experimental. Experimental cells were treated withVitamin E (5,10,15,25,50,100,150μM for a period of 21 days in the osteogenic media containing 10% of fetal bovine serum. The cell viability, bone matrix mineralization, intercellular and extracellular calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity, expression of genes and synthesis of proteins of osteopontin and osteocalcin as well as morphological changes of the cells were investigated. The study data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and T-Test setting the significant P value at P<0.05. Results: Within vitamin- E treated cells, the mean viability, mean bone matrix mineralization, calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity, expression and synthesis of osteopontin and osteocalcin of the mesenchymal stem cells treated with vitamin E significantly increased in a dose dependent manner. Also cytoplasm extensions were observed in the cells treated with vitamin E. Conclusion: Since vitamin E caused a significant increase in cell viability and osteogenic differentiation in the mesenchymal stem cells, therefore it can be utilized in order to increase cell differentiation and cell survival.

  2. A population of human brain cells expressing phenotypic markers of more than one lineage can be induced in vitro to differentiate into mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proliferating astrocytic cells from germinal, as well as mature areas of brain parenchyma, have the characteristics of neural stem/progenitor cells and are capable of generating both neurons and glia. We previously reported that primary fetal human brain cells, designated as Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA), expressed, in addition to GFAP, Vimentin and Nestin, low levels of βIII-Tubulin, an early neuronal marker, and differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in vitro. Here, we showed that primary NHA cells co-express low levels of mesenchymal markers Fibronectin and Collagen-1 in culture. These cells transitioned into mesenchymal-like cells when cultured in adherent conditions in serum containing media. The mesenchymal-like derivatives of these cells were characterized based on their morphological changes, high expression of Vimentin and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, Collagen-1 and Fibronectin, and decline of neural markers. When incubated in osteogenic and adipogenic induction media, the mesenchymal-like cells differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Furthermore, NHA cells express markers of neural crest cells, SOX-10 and p75. These data support the idea of ectoderm-derived mesenchymal lineages. These findings suggest that a population of primitive fetal brain cells with neural/neural crest/mesenchymal phenotype, resembles the remarkable phenotypic plasticity of neural crest cells, and differentiates into adipocytes and osteocytes under the influence of environmental factors

  3. Human cancer cells express Slug-based epithelial-mesenchymal transition gene expression signature obtained in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassiou Dimitris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological mechanisms underlying cancer cell motility and invasiveness remain unclear, although it has been hypothesized that they involve some type of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Methods We used xenograft models of human cancer cells in immunocompromised mice, profiling the harvested tumors separately with species-specific probes and computationally analyzing the results. Results Here we show that human cancer cells express in vivo a precise multi-cancer invasion-associated gene expression signature that prominently includes many EMT markers, among them the transcription factor Slug, fibronectin, and α-SMA. We found that human, but not mouse, cells express the signature and Slug is the only upregulated EMT-inducing transcription factor. The signature is also present in samples from many publicly available cancer gene expression datasets, suggesting that it is produced by the cancer cells themselves in multiple cancer types, including nonepithelial cancers such as neuroblastoma. Furthermore, we found that the presence of the signature in human xenografted cells was associated with a downregulation of adipocyte markers in the mouse tissue adjacent to the invasive tumor, suggesting that the signature is triggered by contextual microenvironmental interactions when the cancer cells encounter adipocytes, as previously reported. Conclusions The known, precise and consistent gene composition of this cancer mesenchymal transition signature, particularly when combined with simultaneous analysis of the adjacent microenvironment, provides unique opportunities for shedding light on the underlying mechanisms of cancer invasiveness as well as identifying potential diagnostic markers and targets for metastasis-inhibiting therapeutics.

  4. Ectopic expression of telomerase enhances osteopontin and osteocalcin expression during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells from elder donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado CB

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. The osteoblasts are the effectors cells of bone formation and regeneration. With the aging the osteoblasts become senescent reducing their ability to produce bone. Cellular replicative senescence is triggered by telomers shortening. Telomerase elongate the telomers length and maintain the cell proliferative capacity. Here, we demonstrated that the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mediated by an adenovirus vector increases the levels of osteopontin and osteocalcin mRNA during the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of elderly human mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from old donors (>65 years and induced to differentiate into osteoblasts for 14 days. The levels of mRNA of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, osteopontin and osteocalcin during the differentiation were assessed by semi-quantitative PCR before and during the differentiation on days 7 and 14. Infected cells showed 1.5 fold increase in telomerase expression. Also telomerized cells exhibit 1.5 fold increase in osteopontin and 0.5 fold increase in osteocalcin expression compared to primary osteoblasts isolated from the same donors. The transformed cells were not able to form tumours in NUDE mice.

  5. Adult Human Neurogenesis: from Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmandaSierra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of gene-rating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases.

  6. BMP7 and EREG Contribute to the Inductive Potential of Dental Mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Xuedong; Pi, Caixia; Xu, Ruoshi; Wan, Mian; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Chengcheng; Sun, Jianxun; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenesis is accomplished by reciprocal signaling between the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments. It is generally accepted that the inductive mesenchyme is capable of inducing the odontogenic commitment of both dental and non-dental epithelial cells. However, the duration of this signal in the developing dental mesenchyme and whether adult dental pulp tissue maintains its inductive capability remain unclear. This study investigated the contribution of growth factors to regulating the inductive potential of the dental mesenchyme. Human oral epithelial cells (OEs) were co-cultured with either human dental mesenchymal/papilla cells (FDPCs) or human dental pulp cells (ADPCs) under 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional conditions. Odontogenic-associated genes and proteins were detected by qPCR and immunofluorescence, respectively, and significant differences were observed between the two co-culture systems. The BMP7 and EREG expression levels in FDPCs were significantly higher than in ADPCs, as indicated by human growth factor PCR arrays and immunofluorescence analyses. OEs co-cultured with ADPCs supplemented with BMP7 and EREG expressed ameloblastic differentiation genes. Our study suggests that BMP7 and EREG expression in late bell-stage human dental papilla contributes to the inductive potential of dental mesenchyme. Furthermore, adult dental pulp cells supplemented with these two growth factors re-established the inductive potential of postnatal dental pulp tissue. PMID:25952286

  7. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecourt, Severine, E-mail: severine.lecourt@sls.aphp.fr [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Marolleau, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: Marolleau.Jean-Pierre@chu-amiens.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); CHU Amiens Hopital Sud, Service d' Hematologie Clinique, UPJV, Amiens (France); Fromigue, Olivia, E-mail: olivia.fromigue@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vauchez, Karine, E-mail: k.vauchez@institut-myologie.org [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Genzyme S.A.S., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Andriamanalijaona, Rina, E-mail: rinandria@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Ternaux, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.ternaux@orange.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Lacassagne, Marie-Noelle, E-mail: mnlacassagne@free.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Robert, Isabelle, E-mail: isa-robert@hotmail.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Boumediene, Karim, E-mail: karim.boumediene@unicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Chereau, Frederic, E-mail: fchereau@pervasistx.com [Myosix S.A., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Marie, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.marie@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); and others

    2010-09-10

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56{sup +} cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15{sup +} cells emerged, partly from CD56{sup +} cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56{sup +} and CD15{sup +} cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56{sup +} cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15{sup +} cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  8. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yufang Yan; Tuo Ma; Kai Gong; Qiang Ao; Xiufang Zhang; Yandao Gong

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we transplanted adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the hippo-campi of APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer’s disease model mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the number of newly generated (BrdU+) cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus was signiifcantly higher in Alzheimer’s disease mice after adipose-de-rived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, and there was also a significant increase in the number of BrdU+/DCX+neuroblasts in these animals. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation enhanced neurogenic activity in the subventricular zone as well. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduced oxidative stress and alleviated cognitive impairment in the mice. Based on these ifndings, we propose that adipose-derived mes-enchymal stem cell transplantation enhances endogenous neurogenesis in both the subgranular and subventricular zones in APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mice, thereby facilitating functional recovery.

  9. Immunohistochemical localization of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase in adult Syrian hamster tissues and during kidney development.

    OpenAIRE

    Oberley, T. D.; Oberley, L. W.; Slattery, A. F.; Elwell, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Tissues from adult Syrian hamsters were studied with immunoperoxidase techniques using polyclonal antibodies to glutathione-S-transferase (rat liver and human placental enzymes) and human erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase. Most tissues immunostained similarly with these antibodies. Most notable was the cytoplasmic staining of mesenchyme tissues, especially smooth muscle, by all three antibodies. Epithelial cells stained distinctively, but usually less intensely than mesenchyme. Epithelial ce...

  10. The effects of outdated human platelet lysate on cartilage differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells and human embryonic derived mesenchymal progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kristbjörg Gunnarsdóttir 1989

    2014-01-01

    Brjósk er teygjanlegur bandvefur sem finnst á ýmsum stöðum í mannslíkamanum, til að mynda í liðum, eyrum, nefi, lungnapípum, hryggþófa og í brjóstkassa. Brjóskvefurinn er án æðakerfis og samanstendur af brjóskfrumum og utanfrumuefni, sem er ríkt af collageni, proteoglycans og elastín þráðum, meðal annars. Brjóskvefurinn er án æðakerfis, sem veldur takmarkaðri hæfni vefsins til viðgerðar. Brjóskfrumur eiga rætur sínar að rekja til mesenchymal stofnfrumna (MSCs). MSCs eru fjölhæfar frumur sem g...

  11. Whole-Genome Expression Analysis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Exposed to Ultrasmooth Tantalum vs. Titanium Oxide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, C.; Bunger, C.; Overall, R. W.;

    2013-01-01

    Durable osseointegration of metallic bone implants requires that progenitor cells attach, proliferate and differentiate on the implant surface. Previously, we demonstrated superior biocompatibility of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) cultivated on ultrasmooth tantalum (Ta) as compared to...... MSCs cultivated on plain sputter-coated surfaces of Ta or Ti for 1, 2, 4, and 8 days were hybridized to n = 16 U133 Plus 2.0 arrays (Affymetrix(A (R))). Functional annotation, cluster and pathway analyses were performed. The vast majority of genes were differentially regulated after 4 days of...

  12. Prostacyclin-producing human mesenchymal cells target H19 lncRNA to augment endogenous progenitor function in hindlimb ischaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yuxiao; Yang, Zhongwei; Terry, Toya; Pan, Su; Woodside, Darren G.; Wang, Jingxiong; Ruan, Kehe; Willerson, James T.; Dixon, Richard A. F.; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Promoting the paracrine effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) therapy may contribute to improvements in patient outcomes. Here we develop an innovative strategy to enhance the paracrine effects of hMSCs. In a mouse hindlimb ischaemia model, we examine the effects of hMSCs in which a novel triple-catalytic enzyme is introduced to stably produce prostacyclin (PGI2-hMSCs). We show that PGI2-hMSCs facilitate perfusion recovery and enhance running capability as compared with control hMSCs ...

  13. The sensitivity of human mesenchymal stem cells to vibration and cold storage conditions representative of cold transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaev, N. I.; Liu, Y.; Hussein, H; Williams, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, the mechanical and hypothermic damage induced by vibration and cold storage on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) stored at 2–8°C was quantified by measuring the total cell number and cell viability after exposure to vibration at 50 Hz (peak acceleration 140 m s−2 and peak displacement 1.4 mm), 25 Hz (peak acceleration 140 m s−2, peak displacement 5.7 mm), 10 Hz (peak acceleration 20 m s−2, peak displacement 5.1 mm) and cold storage for several durations. To quantify t...

  14. Transplantation of Neural Differentiated Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Cochlea of an Auditory-neuropathy Guinea Pig Model

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Yong-Bum; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Jang, Sujeong; Jeong, Han-Seong; Park, Jong-Seong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of transplanted neural differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in a guinea pig model of auditory neuropathy. In this study, hMSCs were pretreated with a neural-induction protocol and transplanted into the scala tympani of the guinea pig cochlea 7 days after ouabain injury. A control model was made by injection of Hanks balanced salt solution alone into the scala tympani of the guinea pig cochlea 7 days after ouabain injury. We est...

  15. Expansion, harvest and cryopreservation of human mesenchymal stem cells in a serum-free microcarrier process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathman, Thomas R J; Glyn, Veronica A M; Picken, Andrew; Rafiq, Qasim A; Coopman, Karen; Nienow, Alvin W; Kara, Bo; Hewitt, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) therapies are currently progressing through clinical development, driving the need for consistent, and cost effective manufacturing processes to meet the lot-sizes required for commercial production. The use of animal-derived serum is common in hMSC culture but has many drawbacks such as limited supply, lot-to-lot variability, increased regulatory burden, possibility of pathogen transmission, and reduced scope for process optimization. These constraints may impact the development of a consistent large-scale process and therefore must be addressed. The aim of this work was therefore to run a pilot study in the systematic development of serum-free hMSC manufacturing process. Human bone-marrow derived hMSCs were expanded on fibronectin-coated, non-porous plastic microcarriers in 100 mL stirred spinner flasks at a density of 3 × 10(5) cells.mL(-1) in serum-free medium. The hMSCs were successfully harvested by our recently-developed technique using animal-free enzymatic cell detachment accompanied by agitation followed by filtration to separate the hMSCs from microcarriers, with a post-harvest viability of 99.63 ± 0.03%. The hMSCs were found to be in accordance with the ISCT characterization criteria and maintained hMSC outgrowth and colony-forming potential. The hMSCs were held in suspension post-harvest to simulate a typical pooling time for a scaled expansion process and cryopreserved in a serum-free vehicle solution using a controlled-rate freezing process. Post-thaw viability was 75.8 ± 1.4% with a similar 3 h attachment efficiency also observed, indicating successful hMSC recovery, and attachment. This approach therefore demonstrates that once an hMSC line and appropriate medium have been selected for production, multiple unit operations can be integrated to generate an animal component-free hMSC production process from expansion through to cryopreservation. PMID:25727395

  16. New insights into BMP-7 mediated osteoblastic differentiation of primary human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Karen; Hawley, Sara; Swain, Pamela; Rooney, Robert; Falb, Dean; Alaoui-Ismaili, Moulay Hicham

    2009-07-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGF-beta superfamily of growth factors. Several BMPs exhibit osteoinductive bioactivities, and are critical for bone formation in both developing and mature skeletal systems. BMP-7 (OP-1) is currently used clinically in revision of posterolateral spine fusions and long bone non-unions. The current study characterizes BMP-7 induced gene expression during early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Primary hMSC were treated with BMP-7 for 24 or 120 h and gene expression across the entire human genome was evaluated using Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. 955 probe sets representing 655 genes and 95 ESTs were identified as differentially expressed and were organized into three major expression profiles (Profiles A, B and C) by hierarchical clustering. Genes from each profile were classified according to biochemical pathway analyses. Profile A, representing genes upregulated by BMP-7, revealed strong enrichment for established osteogenic marker genes, as well as several genes with undefined roles in osteoblast function, including MFI2, HAS3, ADAMTS9, HEY1, DIO2 and FGFR3. A functional screen using siRNA suggested roles for MFI2, HEY1 and DIO2 in osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC. Profile B contained genes transiently downregulated by BMP-7, including numerous genes associated with cell cycle regulation. Follow-up studies confirmed that BMP-7 attenuates cell cycle progression and cell proliferation during early osteoblastic differentiation. Profile C, comprised of genes continuously downregulated by BMP-7, exhibited strong enrichment for genes associated with chemokine/cytokine activity. Inhibitory effects of BMP-7 on cytokine secretion were verified by analysis of enriched culture media. Potent downregulation of CHI3L1, a potential biomarker for numerous joint diseases, was also observed in Profile C. A focused evaluation of BMP, GDF and BMP inhibitor expression elucidated feedback

  17. Mechanical and Vascular Cues Synergistically Enhance Osteogenesis in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Andrew J; Cole, Jacqueline H; Ligler, Frances S; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2016-08-01

    Development and maintenance of a vascular network are critical for bone growth and homeostasis; strategies that promote vascular function are critical for clinical success of tissue-engineered bone constructs. Co-culture of endothelial cells (ECs) with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and exposure to 10% cyclic tensile strain have both been shown to regulate osteogenesis in isolation, but potential synergistic effects have yet to be explored. The objective of this study was to expose an MSC-EC co-culture to 10% cyclic tensile strain to examine the role of this mechanical stimulus on MSC-EC behavior. We hypothesized that paracrine signaling from ECs would stimulate osteogenesis of MSCs, and exposure to 10% cyclic tensile strain would enhance this anabolic signal. Human umbilical vein ECs and human bone marrow-derived MSCs were either monocultured or co-cultured at a 1:1 ratio in a mixed osteo/angiogenic medium, exposed to 10% cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz for 4 h/day for 2 weeks, and biochemically and histologically analyzed for endothelial and osteogenic markers. While neither 10% cyclic tensile strain nor co-culture alone had a significant effect on osteogenesis, the concurrent application of strain to an MSC-EC co-culture resulted in a significant increase in calcium accretion and mineral deposition, suggesting that co-culture and strain synergistically enhance osteogenesis. Neither co-culture, 10% cyclic tensile strain, nor a combination of these stimuli affected endothelial markers, indicating that the endothelial phenotype remained stable, but unresponsive to the stimuli evaluated in this study. This study is the first to investigate the role of cyclic tensile strain on the complex interplay between ECs and MSCs in co-culture. The results of this study provide key insights into the synergistic effects of 10% cyclic tensile strain and co-culture on osteogenesis. Understanding mechanobiological factors affecting MSC-EC crosstalk will help enhance strategies for

  18. In Vitro Uptake of Silver Nanoparticles and Their Toxicity in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Liu, Xujie; Kienzle, Arne; Müller, Werner E G; Feng, Qingling

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the usage of silver nanoparticles in biomedical fields has increased rapidly, mainly due to their excellent antibacterial effects. They are used in many medical products such as wound dressings, catheters, bone cement and artificial cardiac valves. In tissue engineering, silver nanoparticles are often loaded as a filler for fabrication of nanocomposite scaffolds which subsequently are seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, possible adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on human stem cells should be investigated carefully to ensure a safe usage. In this study, silver nanoparticles with a mean diameter of ~30 nm were prepared and their toxicity in human mesenchymal stem cells was investigated. Transmission electron microscopic images reveal the uptake and localization of the silver nanoparticles in the cytoplasm. Upon internalization of Ag NPs inside the cells, an increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase and the production of reactive oxygen species was quantified. Furthermore, they caused a reduction in both cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining implied that silver nanoparticles did not only induce apoptosis but also cause necrosis. Based on cell cycle analysis, G2/M arrest was detected in cells treated with silver nanoparticles, implicating DNA damage. The high level of reactive oxygen species induced by nanoparticles is considered to be the main cause of their toxicity. PMID:27398448

  19. Three-Dimensional Polydopamine Functionalized Coiled Microfibrous Scaffolds Enhance Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Colonization and Mild Myofibroblastic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Mehmet Berat; Xu, Ruodan; Gregersen, Hans; Nygaard, Jens Vinge; Besenbacher, Flemming; Chen, Menglin

    2016-06-29

    Electrospinning has been widely applied for tissue engineering due to its versatility of fabricating extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking fibrillar scaffolds. Yet there are still challenges such as that these two-dimensional (2D) tightly packed, hydrophobic fibers often hinder cell infiltration and cell-scaffold integration. In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL) was electrospun into a grounded coagulation bath collector, resulting in 3D coiled microfibers with in situ surface functionalization with hydrophilic, catecholic polydopamine (pDA). The 3D scaffolds showed biocompatibility and were well-integrated with human bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with significantly higher cell penetration depth compared to that of the 2D PCL microfibers from traditional electrospinning. Further differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into fibroblast phenotype in vitro indicates that, compared to the stiff, tightly packed, 2D scaffolds which aggravated myofibroblasts related activities, such as upregulated gene and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), 3D scaffolds induced milder myofibroblastic differentiation. The flexible 3D fibers further allowed contraction with the well-integrated, mechanically active myofibroblasts, monitored under live-cell imaging, whereas the stiff 2D scaffolds restricted that. PMID:27265317

  20. Single-Layer Graphene Enhances the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Gu, Ming; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Jianzhang; Lv, Longwei; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, although several studies have demonstrated the potential of graphene-coated substrates in promoting attachment, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the effects of single-layer graphene on the osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs (hMSCs) remains unclear, especially in vivo. In this study, we transferred chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown single-layer graphene to glass slides and observed its effects on adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro. Then, in vivo, we incubated hASCs and hBMMSCs on single-layer graphene-coated smooth titanium (Ti) disks before implanting them into the back subcutaneous area of nude mice. We found that single-layer graphene accelerated cell adhesion to the substrate without influencing cell proliferation of hMSCs. Moreover, we present the first study that explores the epigenetic role of single-layer graphene in determining stem cell fate. By utilizing epigenetic approaches, we reveal that single-layer graphene promotes osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, potentially by upregulating methylation of H3K4 at the promoter regions of osteogenesis-associated genes. Overall, our results highlight the potential of this material in implants and injured tissues in clinical applications. PMID:27319220

  1. Human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells improve healing after collagenase tendon injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Sedláček, R.; Suchý, T.; Amemori, Takashi; Růžička, Jiří; Lesný, P.; Havlas, V.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 42 (2014). ISSN 1475-925X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/0326; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Achilles tendon * mesenchymal stromal cells * osteogenesis Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 1.427, year: 2014

  2. Adeno-associated viral vector transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Murphy, Mary; O'Brien, Tim;

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have received considerable attention in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. One aspect of MSC research focuses on genetically modifying the cells with the aim of enhancing their regenerative potential. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) holds promise as a vector for...

  3. An update of human mesenchymal stem cell biology and their clinical uses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaher, Walid; Harkness, Linda; Kermani, Abbas Jafari;

    2014-01-01

    in vivo. Consequently, stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) are being introduced into many clinical trials due to their ease of isolation and efficacy in treating a number of disease conditions in animal preclinical disease models. The aim of this review is to revise MSC biology, their potential...

  4. JNK signaling maintains the mesenchymal properties of multi-drug resistant human epidermoid carcinoma KB cells through snail and twist1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to possess cross drug resistance characteristic, emerging evidences have shown that multiple-drug resistance (MDR) cancer cells exhibit aberrant metastatic capacity when compared to parental cells. In this study, we explored the contribution of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) signaling to the mesenchymal phenotypes and the aberrant motile capacity of MDR cells utilizing a well characterized MDR cell line KB/VCR, which is established from KB human epidermoid carcinoma cells by vincristine (VCR), and its parental cell line KB. Taking advantage of experimental strategies including pharmacological tool and gene knockdown, we showed here that interference with JNK signaling pathway by targeting JNK1/2 or c-Jun reversed the mesenchymal properties of KB/VCR cells to epithelial phenotypes and suppressed the motile capacity of KB/VCR cells, such as migration and invasion. These observations support a critical role of JNK signaling in maintaining the mesenchymal properties of KB/VCR cells. Furthermore, we observed that JNK signaling may control the expression of both snail and twist1 in KB/VCR cells, indicating that both snail and twist1 are involved in controlling the mesenchymal characteristics of KB/VCR cells by JNK signaling. JNK signaling is required for maintaining the mesenchymal phenotype of KB/VCR cells; and JNK signaling may maintain the mesenchymal characteristics of KB/VCR cells potentially through snail and twist1

  5. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a new model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Dossena

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA or Kennedy's disease is an X-linked CAG/polyglutamine expansion motoneuron disease, in which an elongated polyglutamine tract (polyQ in the N-terminal androgen receptor (ARpolyQ confers toxicity to this protein. Typical markers of SBMA disease are ARpolyQ intranuclear inclusions. These are generated after the ARpolyQ binds to its endogenous ligands, which promotes AR release from chaperones, activation and nuclear translocation, but also cell toxicity. The SBMA mouse models developed so far, and used in preclinical studies, all contain an expanded CAG repeat significantly longer than that of SBMA patients. Here, we propose the use of SBMA patients adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as a new human in vitro model to study ARpolyQ toxicity. These cells have the advantage to express only ARpolyQ, and not the wild type AR allele. Therefore, we isolated and characterized adipose-derived MSCs from three SBMA patients (ADSC from Kennedy's patients, ADSCK and three control volunteers (ADSCs. We found that both ADSCs and ADSCKs express mesenchymal antigens, even if only ADSCs can differentiate into the three typical cell lineages (adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes, whereas ADSCKs, from SBMA patients, showed a lower growth potential and differentiated only into adipocyte. Moreover, analysing AR expression on our mesenchymal cultures we found lower levels in all ADSCKs than ADSCs, possibly related to negative pressures exerted by toxic ARpolyQ in ADSCKs. In addition, with proteasome inhibition the ARpolyQ levels increased specifically in ADSCKs, inducing the formation of HSP70 and ubiquitin positive nuclear ARpolyQ inclusions. Considering all of this evidence, SBMA patients adipose-derived MSCs cultures should be considered an innovative in vitro human model to understand the molecular mechanisms of ARpolyQ toxicity and to test novel therapeutic approaches in SBMA.

  6. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  7. Dopaminerge Differenzierung adulter humaner hippocampaler Stammzellen

    OpenAIRE

    Türk, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Hintergrund und Ziele: Nachdem seit der ersten Hälfte des letzten Jahrhunderts durch mehrere Experimente adulte Neurogenese schließlich nachgewiesen und somit Cajals Dogma widerlegt werden konnte, erlebten die Neurowissenschaften durch die Möglichkeit zur Isolation adulter neuraler Stammzellen ein exponentielles Wachstum. Gleichzeitig mit der basiswissenschaftlichen Aufarbeitung der adulten Neurogenese sowohl im Tier, als auch im Menschen, kam die Idee der therapeutischen Verwendung dieser, v...

  8. Study on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: The cells were the hBM-MSC. They were exposed to X rays at the dose of 50 mGy, 75 mGy, 100 mGy (dose rate 12.5 mGy/min). The growth curve, cell cycle and apoptosis of hBM-MSC treated by LDR were investigated. The content changes of stem cell factor(SCF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), macrophage colony stimulating factor(M-CSF) secreted by hBM-MSC after treated by LDR were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Results: The growth rates of hBM-MSC treated by LDR obviously increase from 72 h. The cell cycle and apoptosis were examined with FORTRAN Atomatic Checkout Systom. The results show that the G0/G1 stage cells decrease after exposure to LDR, the percent of G0/G1 stage cells of 75 mGy at 72 h is the lowest(30.86%). However, the S stage cells percentage gradually increase at 48 h and 72 h. The most one is 75 mGy group at 72 h, which reaches to 68.88%. The apoptosis percentages have increased tendency at 24 h and 48h in all dose groups, especially in 100 mGy at 24 h(25.99%), while have decreased tendency at 72 h and the most decreased group is the 50 mGy(6.8%), transient enhancement of apoptosis in the early stage and soon being decreased. The contents of SCF have increased tendency at 24 h, 48 h. As for IL-6, the contents in different dose groups at 24 h and 48 h have up-regulation. These groups, 50 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 75 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 100 mGy at 24 h have statistical difference compared with their control groups respectively. The content of IL-6 has greatest enhancement at dose of 50 mGy. The contents of M-SCF in all the groups at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h except for the 50 mGy dose at 72 h have also been found increased. The greatest increased content occur in the 75 mGy dose group at 72 h. Conclusion: This conclusion show that LDR has hormesis effect on hBM-MSC in cell growth, cell cycle and content of

  9. A chondromimetic microsphere for in situ spatially controlled chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansboro, Sharon; Hayes, Jessica S; Barron, Valerie; Browne, Shane; Howard, Linda; Greiser, Udo; Lalor, Pierce; Shannon, Fintan; Barry, Frank P; Pandit, Abhay; Murphy, J Mary

    2014-04-10

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been identified as a viable cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. However, to undergo chondrogenic differentiation hMSCs require growth factors, in particular members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) family. While in vitro differentiation is feasible through continuous supplementation of TGF-β3, mechanisms to control and drive hMSCs down the chondrogenic lineage in their native microenvironment remain a significant challenge. The release of TGF-β3 from an injectable microsphere composed of the cartilage-associated extracellular matrix molecule hyaluronan represents a readily translatable approach for in situ differentiation of hMSCs for cartilage repair. In this study, chondromimetic hyaluronan microspheres were used as a growth factor delivery source for hMSC chondrogenesis. Cellular compatibility of the microspheres (1.2 and 14.1 μm) with hMSCs was shown and release of TGF-β3 from the most promising 14.1 μm microspheres to control differentiation of hMSCs was evaluated. Enhanced accumulation of cartilage-associated glycosaminoglycans by hMSCs incubated with TGF-β3-loaded microspheres was seen and positive staining for collagen type II and proteoglycan confirmed successful in vitro chondrogenesis. Gene expression analysis showed significantly increased expression of the chondrocyte-associated genes, collagen type II and aggrecan. This delivery platform resulted in significantly less collagen type X expression, suggesting the generation of a more stable cartilage phenotype. When evaluated in an ex vivo osteoarthritic cartilage model, implanted hMSCs with TGF-β3-loaded HA microspheres were detected within cartilage fibrillations and increased proteoglycan staining was seen in the tissue. In summary, data presented here demonstrate that TGF-β3-bound hyaluronan microspheres provide a suitable delivery system for induction of hMSC chondrogenesis and their use may represent a clinically feasible

  10. The role of adhesion strength in human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblastic differentiation on biodegradable polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizan, Sylva Jana

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are promising candidates for promoting bone growth on biodegradable polymer scaffolds however little is known about early hMSC-polymer interactions. Adhesion is highly dynamic and during adhesive reinforcement, numerous proteins form adhesion plaques linking the cell's cytoskeleton with the extracellular environment. These proteins are known to affect cellular function but their role in hMSC differentiation is less clear. Adhesion plaques are associated with adhesive force, still a detachment force of hMSC on polycaprolactone (PCL), poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) or alginate has never been described or shown to affect downstream function. We demonstrate that hMSC attached to PCL, PLGA and alginate exhibit different adhesion strengths (tau50) as determined by both fluid shear and spinning disk systems, with PLGA demonstrating the greatest tau 50. Elastic modulus and hydrophobicity were characterized for these surfaces and correlated positively with tau50 to an optimum. Attachment studies of hMSC showed that adhesion plateau timespans were independent of cell line and surface but both morphology and focal adhesion expression varied by polymer type. Differentiation studies of hMSC on PLGA and PCL showed a strong association between markers of differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity and mineral content) and tau50 within polymer groups, but a poor relationship was found between tau50 and differentiation across polymer groups, suggesting that other polymer properties may be important for differentiation. Subsequently, we examined the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-GTPase (RhoA) on hMSC adhesion and differentiation when plated onto PLGA. hMSC were retrovirally transduced with mutant constructs of FAK and RhoA cDNA. Alternatively, hMSC were treated with Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y27632. Both cells transduced with mutant RhoA or FAK constructs, or those treated with Y27632 displayed aberrant cell morphology and changes

  11. Bacteriology of moderate (chronic) periodontitis in mature adult humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, W E; Holdeman, L V; Cato, E P; Smibert, R M; Burmeister, J A; Ranney, R R

    1983-01-01

    A total of 171 taxa was represented among 1,900 bacterial isolates from 60 samples of sites affected with moderate periodontitis in 22 mature adult humans. The composition of the subgingival sulcus flora was statistically significantly different from that of the adjacent supragingival flora and the subgingival flora of 14 people with healthy gingiva, but was not significantly different from that of sulci affected with severe periodontitis in 21 young human adults. The sulcus floras of moderat...

  12. Editorial: Technology for higher education, adult learning and human performance

    OpenAIRE

    Minhong Wang; Chi-Cheng Chang; Feng Wu

    2013-01-01

    This special issue is dedicated to technology-enabled approaches for improving higher education, adult learning, and human performance. Improvement of learning and human development for sustainable development has been recognized as a key strategy for individuals, institutions, and organizations to strengthen their competitive advantages. It becomes crucial to help adult learners and knowledge workers to improve their self-directed and life-long learning capabilities. Meanwhile, advances in t...

  13. Prelamin A accumulation and stress conditions induce impaired Oct-1 activity and autophagy in prematurely aged human mesenchymal stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Arantza; Gago, Andrea; de Eguino, Garbiñe Ruiz; Calvo-Fernández, Teresa; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi; Schlangen, Karin; Fullaondo, Ane; Aransay, Ana M; Martín, Abraham; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2014-04-01

    Aging, a time-dependent functional decline of biological processes, is the primary risk factor in developing diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular or degenerative diseases. There is a real need to understand the human aging process in order to increase the length of disease-free life, also known as "health span". Accumulation of progerin and prelamin A are the hallmark of a group of premature aging diseases but have also been found during normal cellular aging strongly suggesting similar mechanisms between healthy aging and LMNA-linked progeroid syndromes. How this toxic accumulation contributes to aging (physiological or pathological) remains unclear. Since affected tissues in age-associated disorders and in pathological aging are mainly of mesenchymal origin we propose a model of human aging based on mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) which accumulate prelamin A. We demonstrate that prelamin A-accumulating hMSCs have a premature aging phenotype which affects their functional competence in vivo. The combination of prelamin A accumulation and stress conditions enhance the aging phenotype by dysregulating the activity of the octamer binding protein Oct-1This experimental model has been fundamental to identify a new role for Oct-1 in hMSCs aging. PMID:24753226

  14. Development of a rapid culture method to induce adipocyte differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninomiya, Yuichi [Translational Research Center, Saitama International Medical, Saitama Medical University, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan); Sugahara-Yamashita, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Okazaki, Yasushi [Division of Functional Genomics and Systems Medicine, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Nishiyama, Masahiko, E-mail: yamacho@saitama-med.ac.jp [Translational Research Center, Saitama International Medical, Saitama Medical University, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from bone marrow are multipotent stem cells that can regenerate mesenchymal tissues such as adipose, bone or muscle. It is thought that hMSCs can be utilized as a cell resource for tissue engineering and as human models to study cell differentiation mechanisms, such as adipogenesis, osteoblastogenesis and so on. Since it takes 2-3 weeks for hMSCs to differentiate into adipocytes using conventional culture methods, the development of methods to induce faster differentiation into adipocytes is required. In this study we optimized the culture conditions for adipocyte induction to achieve a shorter cultivation time for the induction of adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow-derived hMSCs. Briefly, we used a cocktail of dexamethasone, insulin, methylisobutylxanthine (DIM) plus a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist, rosiglitazone (DIMRo) as a new adipogenic differentiation medium. We successfully shortened the period of cultivation to 7-8 days from 2-3 weeks. We also found that rosiglitazone alone was unable to induce adipocyte differentiation from hMSCs in vitro. However, rosiglitazone appears to enhance hMSC adipogenesis in the presence of other hormones and/or compounds, such as DIM. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of TGF-{beta}1 on adipogenesis could be investigated using DIMRo-treated hMSCs. We conclude that our rapid new culture method is very useful in measuring the effect of molecules that affect adipogenesis in hMSCs.

  15. Development of a rapid culture method to induce adipocyte differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from bone marrow are multipotent stem cells that can regenerate mesenchymal tissues such as adipose, bone or muscle. It is thought that hMSCs can be utilized as a cell resource for tissue engineering and as human models to study cell differentiation mechanisms, such as adipogenesis, osteoblastogenesis and so on. Since it takes 2-3 weeks for hMSCs to differentiate into adipocytes using conventional culture methods, the development of methods to induce faster differentiation into adipocytes is required. In this study we optimized the culture conditions for adipocyte induction to achieve a shorter cultivation time for the induction of adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow-derived hMSCs. Briefly, we used a cocktail of dexamethasone, insulin, methylisobutylxanthine (DIM) plus a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, rosiglitazone (DIMRo) as a new adipogenic differentiation medium. We successfully shortened the period of cultivation to 7-8 days from 2-3 weeks. We also found that rosiglitazone alone was unable to induce adipocyte differentiation from hMSCs in vitro. However, rosiglitazone appears to enhance hMSC adipogenesis in the presence of other hormones and/or compounds, such as DIM. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of TGF-β1 on adipogenesis could be investigated using DIMRo-treated hMSCs. We conclude that our rapid new culture method is very useful in measuring the effect of molecules that affect adipogenesis in hMSCs.

  16. Intrathecal injection of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of basilar artery dissection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Hoon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Basilar artery dissection is a rare occurrence, and is significantly associated with morbidity and mortality. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of basilar artery dissection treated with mesenchymal stem cells. Case presentation We present the case of a 17-year-old Korean man who was diagnosed with basilar artery dissection. Infarction of the bilateral pons, midbrain and right superior cerebellum due to his basilar artery dissection was partially recanalized by intrathecal injection of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells. No immunosuppressants were given to our patient, and human leukocyte antigen alloantibodies were not detected after cell therapy. Conclusions This case indicates that intrathecal injections of mesenchymal stem cells can be used in the treatment of basilar artery dissection.

  17. The Therapeutic Effect of Human Adult Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue in Endotoxemic Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Soyoung Shin, Yonggoo Kim, Sikyoung Jeong, Sungyoup Hong, Insoo Kim, Woonjeong Lee, Seungphil Choi

    2013-01-01

    Excessive systemic inflammation following sepsis, trauma or burn could lead to multi-organ damage and death. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), commonly referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has been studied in several immune-associated diseases in human and animal by modulating the inflammatory response. Adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (ATSCs), which can be obtained more easily, compared with BMSCs, has emerged as an attractive alternative MSCs source for cell therapy. ...

  18. The Therapeutic Effect of Human Adult Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue in Endotoxemic Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Soyoung; Kim, Yonggoo; Jeong, Sikyoung; Hong, Sungyoup; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Woonjeong; Choi, Seungphil

    2012-01-01

    Excessive systemic inflammation following sepsis, trauma or burn could lead to multi-organ damage and death. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), commonly referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has been studied in several immune-associated diseases in human and animal by modulating the inflammatory response. Adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (ATSCs), which can be obtained more easily, compared with BMSCs, has emerged as an attractive alternative MSCs source for cell therapy. ...

  19. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells From Decidua Parietalis of Human Term Placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumaree, Mohamed H; Abomaray, F M; Alshehri, N A; Almutairi, A; AlAskar, A S; Kalionis, B; Al Jumah, M A

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) from the human placenta show stem cell-like properties useful for regenerative medicine. Previously, we reported that MSCs isolated from the fetal part of human term placentae have characteristics, which make them a potential candidate for regenerative medicine. In this study, we characterized MSC isolated from the maternal part of human term placenta. The MSCs were isolated from the decidua parietalis (DPMSCs) of human placenta using a digestion method and characterized by colony-forming unit assay and the expression of MSC markers by flow cytometry technique. In addition, DPMSC differentiation into the 3 mesenchymal lineages was also performed. Moreover, the gene and protein expression profiles of DPMSCs were identified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry techniques, respectively. Furthermore, proteins secreted by DPMSCs were detected by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Finally, the proliferation and migration potentials of DPMSCs were also determined. The DPMSCs were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic and endothelial markers, as well as costimulatory molecules and HLA-DR. Functionally, DPMSCs formed colonies and differentiated into chondrocytes, osteocytes, and adipocytes. In addition, they proliferated and migrated in response to different stimuli. Finally, they expressed and secreted many biological and immunological factors with multiple functions. Here, we carry out an extensive characterization of DPMSCs of human placenta. We report that these cells express and secrete a wide range of molecules with multiple functions, and therefore, we suggest that these cells could be an attractive candidate for cell-based therapy. PMID:26902429

  20. Altered features and increased chemosensitivity of human breast cancer cells mediated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent heterogeneous cell population suitable for cell therapies in regenerative medicine. MSCs can also substantially affect tumor biology due to their ability to be recruited to the tumor stroma and interact with malignant cells via direct contacts and paracrine signaling. The aim of our study was to characterize molecular changes dictated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) and the effects on drug responses in human breast cancer cells SKBR3. The tumor cells were either directly cocultured with AT-MSCs or exposed to MSCs-conditioned medium (MSC-CM). Changes in cell biology were evaluated by kinetic live cell imaging, fluorescent microscopy, scratch wound assay, expression analysis, cytokine secretion profiling, ATP-based viability and apoptosis assays. The efficiency of cytotoxic treatment in the presence of AT-MSCs or MSCs-CM was analyzed. The AT-MSCs altered tumor cell morphology, induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, increased mammosphere formation, cell confluence and migration of SKBR3. These features were attributed to molecular changes induced by MSCs-secreted cytokines and chemokines in breast cancer cells. AT-MSCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of SKBR3 cells in direct cocultures which was shown to be dependent on the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling axis. MSC-CM-exposed SKBR3 or SKBR3 in direct coculture with AT-MSCs exhibited increased chemosensitivity and induction of apoptosis in response to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Our work further highlights the multi-level nature of tumor-stromal cell interplay and demonstrates the capability of AT-MSCs and MSC-secreted factors to alter the anti-tumor drug responses

  1. Neuronal Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Exosomes Derived from Differentiating Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Yuji S.; Qiaobing Xu

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes deliver functional proteins and genetic materials to neighboring cells, and have potential applications for tissue regeneration. One possible mechanism of exosome-promoted tissue regeneration is through the delivery of microRNA (miRNA). In this study, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from neuronal progenitor cells contain miRNAs that promote neuronal differentiation. We treated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) daily with exosomes derived from PC12 cells, a neuronal cell line, for 1...

  2. Instant stem cell therapy: Characterization and concentration of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Kasten, P; I Beyen; Egermann, M.; AJ Suda; AA Moghaddam; Zimmermann, G; R Luginbühl

    2008-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, there is an approach to avoid expansion of the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) before implantation. The aim of this study was to compare methods for instant MSC therapy by use of a portable, automatic and closed system centrifuge that allows for the concentration of MSCs. The main outcome measures were the amount of MSCs per millilitre of bone marrow (BM), clusters of differentiation (CD), proliferation and differentiation capacities of the MSC. A volume reduction protoc...

  3. β-Cell Regeneration Mediated by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Milanesi; Jang-Won Lee; Zhenhua Li; Stefano Da Sacco; Valentina Villani; Vanessa Cervantes; Laura Perin; Yu, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or pancreatic-duode...

  4. Biological Responses of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Titanium Wear Debris Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Argintar, Evan; Bush, Curtis; Hampton, Daniel; Postma, William F.; Chen, Faye H.; Rimington, Todd; Lamb, Joshua; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2011-01-01

    Wear debris-induced osteolysis is a major cause of orthopaedic implant aseptic loosening, and various cell types, including macrophages, monocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, are involved. We recently showed that mesenchymal stem/osteoprogenitor cells (MSCs) are another target, and that endocytosis of titanium (Ti) particles causes reduced MSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Here we investigated the mechanistic aspects of the endocytosis-mediated responses of MSCs to Ti parti...

  5. Neuroprotection and immunomodulation by xenografted human mesenchymal stem cells following spinal cord ventral root avulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thiago B; Duarte, Adriana S S; Longhini, Ana Leda F; Pradella, Fernando; Farias, Alessandro S; Luzo, Angela C M; Oliveira, Alexandre L R; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of xenotransplantation of Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AT-MSCs) in animals after ventral root avulsion. AT-MSC has similar characteristics to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), such as immunomodulatory properties and expression of neurotrophic factors. In this study, Lewis rats were submitted to surgery for unilateral avulsion of the lumbar ventral roots and received 5 × 10(5) AT-MSCs via the lateral funiculus. Two weeks after cell administration, the animals were sacrificed and the moto neurons, T lymphocytes and cell defense nervous system were analyzed. An increased neuronal survival and partial preservation of synaptophysin-positive nerve terminals, related to GDNF and BDNF expression of AT-MSCs, and reduction of pro-inflammatory reaction were observed. In conclusion, AT-MSCs prevent second phase neuronal injury, since they suppressed lymphocyte, astroglia and microglia effects, which finally contributed to rat motor-neuron survival and synaptic stability of the lesioned motor-neuron. Moreover, the survival of the injected AT- MSCs lasted for at least 14 days. These results indicate that neuronal survival after lesion, followed by mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration, might occur through cytokine release and immunomodulation, thus suggesting that AT-MSCs are promising cells for the therapy of neuronal lesions. PMID:26548646

  6. Clinical-Grade Manufacturing of Therapeutic Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Microcarrier-Based Culture Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Carmelo, Joana G; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) has triggered the need for high cell doses in a vast number of clinical applications. This demand requires the development of good manufacturing practices (GMP)-compliant ex vivo expansion protocols that should be effective to deliver a robust and reproducible supply of clinical-grade cells in a safe and cost-effective manner. Controlled stirred-tank bioreactor systems under xenogeneic (xeno)-free culture conditions offer ideal settings to develop and optimize cell manufacturing to meet the standards and needs of human MSC for cellular therapies. Herein we describe two microcarrier-based stirred culture systems using spinner flasks and controlled stirred-tank bioreactors under xeno-free conditions for the efficient ex vivo expansion of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSC. PMID:27236684

  7. Differential expression profiling of membrane proteins by quantitative proteomics in a human mesenchymal stem cell line undergoing osteoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Leonard J; Zeemann, Patricia A; Li, Chen; Mann, Matthias; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Kassem, Moustapha

    2005-01-01

    of another 21 decreased by at least twofold. For example, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), versican core protein, and tenascin increased 27-, 12-, and 4-fold, respectively, and fatty acid synthase decreased sixfold. The observed increases in veriscan and ALP were confirmed using immunocytochemistry and......One of the major limitations for understanding the biology of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is the absence of prospective markers needed for distinguishing them from other cells and for monitoring lineage-specific differentiation. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven extremely...... in a cell model of hMSCs established by overexpression of human telomerase reverse-transcriptase gene. We identified 463 unique proteins with extremely high confidence, including all known markers of hMSCs (e.g., SH3 [CD71], SH2 [CD105], CD166, CD44, Thy1, CD29, and HOP26 [CD63]) among 148 integral...

  8. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected 111In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbaek, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus S; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana;

    2010-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In......-tropolone. Ten female pigs were included. The labeled cells were transplanted intramyocardially using a percutaneous injection system. The (111)In activity was determined using gamma camera imaging. Excised hearts were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microscopy. Gamma camera imaging...... revealed focal cardiac (111)In accumulations up to 6 days after injection (N = 4). No MSC could be identified with FISH, and microscopy identified widespread acute inflammation. Focal (111)In accumulation, inflammation but no human MSC were similarly seen in pigs (N = 2) after immunosuppression. A...

  9. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected (111)In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana;

    2009-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In......-tropolone. Ten female pigs were included. The labeled cells were transplanted intramyocardially using a percutaneous injection system. The (111)In activity was determined using gamma camera imaging. Excised hearts were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microscopy. Gamma camera imaging...... revealed focal cardiac (111)In accumulations up to 6 days after injection (N = 4). No MSC could be identified with FISH, and microscopy identified widespread acute inflammation. Focal (111)In accumulation, inflammation but no human MSC were similarly seen in pigs (N = 2) after immunosuppression. A...

  10. Comparative Analysis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue, and Umbilical Cord Blood as Sources of Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Sun Yang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Various source-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered for cell therapeutics in incurable diseases. To characterize MSCs from different sources, we compared human bone marrow (BM, adipose tissue (AT, and umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (UCB-MSCs for surface antigen expression, differentiation ability, proliferation capacity, clonality, tolerance for aging, and paracrine activity. Although MSCs from different tissues have similar levels of surface antigen expression, immunosuppressive activity, and differentiation ability, UCB-MSCs had the highest rate of cell proliferation and clonality, and significantly lower expression of p53, p21, and p16, well known markers of senescence. Since paracrine action is the main action of MSCs, we examined the anti-inflammatory activity of each MSC under lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammation. Co-culture of UCB-MSCs with LPS-treated rat alveolar macrophage, reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1α (IL-1α, IL-6, and IL-8 via angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1. Using recombinant Ang-1 as potential soluble paracrine factor or its small interference RNA (siRNA, we found that Ang-1 secretion was responsible for this beneficial effect in part by preventing inflammation. Our results demonstrate that primitive UCB-MSCs have biological advantages in comparison to adult sources, making UCB-MSCs a useful model for clinical applications of cell therapy.

  11. Factors inducing human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nawei Zhang; Fengqing Ji

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUCB-derived MSCs)can differentiate into neuron-like cells,which can be used to treat some central nervous system(CNS)diseases.To investigate the factors,which can induce HUCB-derived MSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells,so as to find effective methods for future clinical application.DATA SOURCES:Using the key terms"human umbilical cord blood"combined with"mesenchymal stem cells,neuron-like cells,neural cells"respectively,the relevant articles in English published during the period from January 1999 to June 2006 were searched from the Medline database.Meanwhile,relevant Chinese articles published from January 1999 to June 2006 were searched Using the same key terms.STUDY SELECTION: All articles associated with the differentiation from human umbilical cord blood into neuron-like cells were selected firstly.Then the full texts were looked up by searchling Ovid medical Journals full-text database and Elsevier Electrical Journals Full-text Database.Articles with full expeiments,enrolled in inducible factors or involved inducible mechanism were retdeved.DATA EXTRACTION:Among 119 collected correlative articles,29 were involved and 90 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS:The inducible factors of HUCB-derived MSCs differentiatling into neuron-like cells included renal endothelial growth factors,fibroblasts,β-mercaptoethanol,dimethyl sulfoxide,butyl hydroxyl anisol,brain-derived neurotrophic factor,Danshen,retinoic acid,sodium ferulate and so on,but its mechanism was unclear.CONCLUSION:Human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs can differentiate into neuron-like cells,with varied inductors.

  12. The role of mesenchymal stem cells in promoting the transformation of androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cells into androgen-independent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Jiwen Cheng; Keqin Yang; Qingyun Zhang; Yang Yu; Qinggui Meng; Ning Mo; Yang Zhou; Xianlin Yi; Chengzhong Ma; Aming Lei; Yan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in the development of human prostate cancer (PCa). However, the role of MSCs in the transformation of androgen-dependent human PCa cells into androgen-independent manner has been poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of MSCs in promoting PCa cells from androgen-dependent into androgen-independent manner. Firstly, we demonstrated that MSCs could affect the transformation of androgen-dependent human PCa ce...

  13. Growth suppression effect of human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord on PBMCs

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Ayatollahi; Tahereh Talaei-Khozani; Mahboobeh Razmkhah

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s):Immunosuppressive property of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has great attraction in regenerative medicine especially when dealing with tissue damage involving immune reactions. The most attractive tissue sources of human MSCs used in clinical applications are bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), and Wharton's jelly (WJ) of human umbilical cord. The current study has compared immunomodulatory properties of human BM, AT, and WJ-MSCs. Materials and Methods: Three different types o...

  14. Development of Hydrogel with Anti-Inflammatory Properties Permissive for the Growth of Human Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sánchez-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin wound repair requires the development of different kinds of biomaterials that must be capable of restoring the damaged tissue. Type I collagen and chitosan have been widely used to develop scaffolds for skin engineering because of their cell-related signaling properties such as proliferation, migration, and survival. Collagen is the major component of the skin extracellular matrix (ECM, while chitosan mimics the structure of the native polysaccharides and glycosaminoglycans in the ECM. Chitosan and its derivatives are also widely used as drug delivery vehicles since they are biodegradable and noncytotoxic. Regulation of the inflammatory response is crucial for wound healing and tissue regeneration processes; and, consequently, the development of biomaterials such as hydrogels with anti-inflammatory properties is very important and permissive for the growth of cells. In the last years, it has been shown that mesenchymal stem cells have clinical importance in the treatment of different pathologies, for example, skin injuries. In this paper, we describe the anti-inflammatory activity of collagen type 1/chitosan/dexamethasone hydrogel, which is permissive for the culture of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSC. Our results show that hADMSC cultured in the hydrogel are viable, proliferate, and secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 but not the inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α.

  15. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Transplantation May Enhance or Inhibit 4T1 Murine Breast Adenocarcinoma through Different Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jazedje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs aiming to treat cancer has shown very contradictory results. In an attempt to clarify the contradictory results reported in the literature and the possible role of human fallopian tube Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (htMSCs against breast cancer, the aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of htMSCs in murine mammary adenocarcinoma using two different approaches: (1 coinjections of htMSCs and 4T1 murine tumor cell lineage and (2 injections of htMSCs in mice at the initial stage of mammary adenocarcinoma development. Coinjected animals had a more severe course of the disease and a reduced survival, while tumor-bearing animals treated with 2 intraperitoneal injections of 106 htMSCs showed significantly reduced tumor growth and increased lifespan as compared with control animals. Coculture of htMSCs and 4T1 tumor cells revealed an increase in IL-8 and MCP-1 and decreased VEGF production. For the first time, we show that MSCs isolated from a single source and donor when injected in the same animal model and tumor can lead to opposite results depending on the experimental protocol. Also, our results demonstrated that htMSCs can have an inhibitory effect on the development of murine mammary adenocarcinoma.

  16. Adenovector-mediated gene delivery to human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells induces inner ear cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Keerthana; Forrest, M Laird; Detamore, Michael S; Staecker, Hinrich

    2013-02-01

    Hearing is one of our main sensory systems and having a hearing disorder can have a significant impact in an individual's quality of life. Sensory neural hearing loss (SNHL) is the most common form of hearing loss; it results from the degeneration of inner ear sensory hair cells and auditory neurons in the cochlea, cells that are terminally differentiated. Stem cell-and gene delivery-based strategies provide an opportunity for the replacement of these cells. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUCMSCs) as a possible source for regenerating inner ear hair cells. The expression of Atoh1 induced the differentiation of hUCMSCs into cells that resembled inner ear hair cells morphologically and immunocytochemically, evidenced by the expression of hair cell-specific markers. The results demonstrated for the first time that hUCMSCs can differentiate into hair cell-like cells, thus introducing a new potential tissue engineering and cell transplantation approach for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:23379581

  17. The assessment of CD146-based cell sorting and telomere length analysis for establishing the identity of mesenchymal stem cells in human umbilical cord

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Kouroupis; Churchman, Sarah M.; Dennis McGonagle; Jones, Elena A

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cells are characterised by longer telomeres compared to mature cells from the same tissue. In this study, candidate CD146 + umbilical cord (UC) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were purified by cell sorting from UC tissue digests and their telomere lengths were measured in comparison to donor-matched CD146-negative fraction. UC tissue fragments were enzymatically treated with collagenase and the cells were used for cell sorting, colony-forming fibroblast (CFU-F) assay or for long-term...

  18. Human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cell secretome display antiproliferative effect on leukemia cell line and produce additive cytotoxic effect in combination with doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendijani, Fatemeh; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Sadeghi-aliabadi, Hojjat

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy moves toward clinic progressively. Recent evidences establish anticancer effect of mesenchymal stem cells. However multiple factors including type of cancer, MSC source, study design, and animal model play role in final outcome. Wharton's jelly - a newly approved source of MSCs - possesses superiorities to bone marrow as the conventional source; therefore investigation of its medical effects can produce beneficial results. In this survey we examined cytotoxic and proapoptotic effect of human Wharton's jelly MSC secretome on K562 human leukemia cells. MSCs were isolated from human Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord by explant culture method, then characterized according to ISCT criteria (morphology and plastic adherence, surface antigenicity and differentiation potential). MSC secretome was collected and its cytotoxic and proapoptotic effects on K562 cells in combination with doxorubicin were evaluated using BrdU cell proliferation assay and Annexin V-PI staining. Our results showed antiproliferative effect of mesenchymal stem cell secretome on K562 cancer cells, the effect was also added to cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin without induction of drug resistance. Human Wharton's jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells exerted cytotoxic effect on leukemia cells. Addition of that effect to anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents can leads to cytotoxic drug dose reduction and diminished side effects. PMID:25779671

  19. Uric acid promotes neuronal differentiation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nailong Yang; Lili Xu; Peng Lin; Jing Cui

    2012-01-01

    Uric acid is an important, naturally occurring serum antioxidant. The present study investigates the use of uric acid for promoting proliferation and neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human placenta tissue. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells were pre-induced in the presence of either 0, 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8 mM uric acid in combination with 1 mM β-mercaptoethanol for 24 hours, followed by exposure to identical uric acid concentrations and 5 mM β-mercaptoethanol for 6 and 10 hours. Cells developed a neuronal-like morphology, with formation of interconnected process extensions, typical of neural cells. Immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence staining showed neuron specific enolase positive cells were present in each group except the control group. A greater number of neuron specific enolase positive cells were observed in 0.8 mM uric acid in combination with 5 mM β-mercaptoethanol at 10 hours. After 24 hours of induction, Nissl bodies were detected in the cytoplasm of all differentiated cell groups except the control group and Nissl body numbers were greatest in human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in the presence of 0.8 mM uric acid and 5 mM β-mercaptoethanol. These results suggest uric acid accelerates differentiation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal-like cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner.

  20. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells derived from Wharton's jelly differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-wu; LIN Li-min; HE Hong-yan; YOU Fang; LI Wei-zhong; HUANG Tian-hua; MA Gui-xia; MA Lian

    2011-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is an effective way of reversing type Ⅰ diabetes. However, islet transplantation is hampered by issues such as immune rejection and shortage of donor islets. Mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into insulin-producing cells. However, the potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) to become insulin-producing cells remains undetermined.Methods We isolated and induced cultured huMSCs under islet cell culture conditions. The response of huMSCs were monitored under an inverted phase contrast microscope. Immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence staining methods were used to measure insulin and glucagon protein levels. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect gene expression of human insulin and PDX-1. Dithizone-staining was employed to determine the zinc contents in huMSCs. Insulin secretion was also evaluated through radioimmunoassay.Results HuMSCs induced by nicotinamide and β-mercaptoethanol or by neurogenic differentiation 1 gene (NeuroD1)transfection gradually changed morphology from typically elongated fibroblast-shaped cells to round cells. They had a tendency to form clusters. Immunocytochemical studies showed positive expression of human insulin and glucagon in these cells in response to induction. RT-PCR experiments found that huMSCs expressed insulin and PDX-1 genes following induction and dithizone stained the cytoplasm of huMSCs a brownish red color after induction. Insulin secretion in induced huMSCs was significantly elevated compared with the control group (t=6.183, P<0.05).Conclusions HuMSCs are able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro. The potential use of huMSCs in βcell replacement therapy of diabetes needs to be studied further.

  1. One-step derivation of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells on a fibrillar collagen coating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxing Liu

    Full Text Available Controlled differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into cells that resemble adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is an attractive approach to obtain a readily available source of progenitor cells for tissue engineering. The present study reports a new method to rapidly derive MSC-like cells from hESCs and hiPSCs, in one step, based on culturing the cells on thin, fibrillar, type I collagen coatings that mimic the structure of physiological collagen. Human H9 ESCs and HDFa-YK26 iPSCs were singly dissociated in the presence of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, plated onto fibrillar collagen coated plates and cultured in alpha minimum essential medium (alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 50 uM magnesium L-ascorbic acid phosphate and 100 nM dexamethasone. While fewer cells attached on the collagen surface initially than standard tissue culture plastic, after culturing for 10 days, resilient colonies of homogenous spindle-shaped cells were obtained. Flow cytometric analysis showed that a high percentage of the derived cells expressed typical MSC surface markers including CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146 and CD166 and were negative as expected for hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45. The MSC-like cells derived from pluripotent cells were successfully differentiated in vitro into three different lineages: osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic. Both H9 hES and YK26 iPS cells displayed similar morphological changes during the derivation process and yielded MSC-like cells with similar properties. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that bioimimetic, fibrillar, type I collagen coatings applied to cell culture plates can be used to guide a rapid, efficient derivation of MSC-like cells from both human ES and iPS cells.

  2. Expression of the cystic fibrosis gene in adult human lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhardt, J F; Zepeda, M; Cohn, J.A.; Yankaskas, J R; Wilson, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Critical to an understanding of the pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the development of effective gene therapies is a definition of the distribution and regulation of CF gene expression in adult human lung. Previous studies have detected the product of the CF gene, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), in submucosal glands of human bronchi. In this report, we have characterized the distribution of CFTR RNA and protein in the distal airway and alveoli of human lungs. ...

  3. Establishment and Molecular Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lines Derived From Human Visceral & Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Sutar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myocytes and adipocytes. We utilized adipose tissue as our primary source, since it is a rich source of MSCs as well as it can be harvested using a minimally invasive surgical procedure. Both visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VSAT, SCAT respectively samples were cultured using growth medium without using any substratum for their attachment. We observed growth of mesenchymal like cells within 15 days of culturing. In spite of the absence of any substratum, the cells adhered to the bottom of the petri dish, and spread out within 2 hours. Presently VSAT cells have reached at passage 10 whereas; SCAT cells have reached at passage 14. Morphologically MSCs obtained from visceral adipose tissue were larger in shape than subcutaneous adipose tissue. We checked these cells for presence or absence of specific stem cell molecular markers. We found that VSAT and SCAT cells confirmed their MSC phenotype by expression of specific MSC markers CD 105 and CD13 and absence of CD34 and CD 45 markers which are specific for haematopoietic stem cells. These cells also expressed SOX2 gene confirming their ability of self-renewal as well as expressed OCT4, LIF and NANOG for their properties for pluripotency & plasticity. Overall, it was shown that adipose tissue is a good source of mesenchymal stem cells. It was also shown that MSCs, isolated from adipose tissue are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, cardiomyocytes, adipocytes and liver cells which may open a new era for cell based regenerative therapies for bone, cardiac and liver disorders.

  4. Testing the Paracrine Properties of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Conditioned Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) produce and secrete a great variety of cytokines and chemokines that play beneficial paracrine actions when MSC are used for tissue repair. The conditioned medium (CM) derived from MSC can be used both in vitro and in vivo to test specific paracrine effects or to screen putative paracrine/autocrine mediators by proteomics.In this chapter, we describe a straightforward method to prepare MSC-derived CM. Furthermore, we summarize some in vitro assays useful for testing the cytoprotective, angiogenic, and regenerative activity of CM. These assays are very helpful when studying the role of MSC in cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:27236688

  5. Isolation and Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Bone Marrow-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renuka P; Hanley, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with both regenerative and immunomodulatory capacities. These unique properties make them appealing as a biologic, with multiple phase 1-3 clinical trials currently testing their safety and efficacy. Although expanding MSCs does not require extensive manipulation, expanding MSCs for use in clinical trials does require the knowledge and safety that are delineated in current good manufacturing practices (GMPs). Here we briefly detail the characteristics of MSCs and considerations for expanding them for clinical use. We then include a step-by-step protocol for expanding MSCs for early phase clinical trials, with important notes to consider during the expansion of these MSCs. PMID:27236680

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate inflammatory cytokines after spinal cord injury in rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Růžička, Jiří; LaBagnara, M.; Kárová, Kristýna; Kubinová, Šárka; Jiráková, Klára; Murali, R.; Syková, Eva; Jhanwar-Uniyal, M.; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2014), s. 11275-11293. E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-15031P; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00939S; GA MŠk LH12024; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0018; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant ostatní: GAUK(CZ) 521712 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * spinal cord injury * inflammatory cytokines Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2014

  7. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Mediated Immunoregulation: Mechanisms of Action and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akaitz Dorronsoro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent cells found in connective tissues that can differentiate into bone, cartilage, and adipose tissue. Interestingly, they can regulate immune responses in a paracrine way and allogeneic MSCs do not elicit immune response. These properties have encouraged a number of clinical trials in a broad range of regenerative therapies. Although these trials were first focused on their differentiation properties, in the last years, the immunosuppressive features have gained most of the attention. In this review, we will summarize the up-to-date knowledge about the immunosuppressive mechanisms of MSCs in vivo and in vitro and the most promising approaches in clinical investigation.

  8. Review on Adult Neurogenesis in Humans and Other Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfamichael Berhe

    2015-01-01

    Research in the field of adult neurogenesis has recently indicated significant progress.The objective of this paper is to review the basic concepts, new findings and clinical implications of neurogenesis making emphasis on the significance, especially in humans. Although scientists still debate the extent and purpose of neurogenesis in the adult brain, research has identified certain areas of the brain where it is most evident. These areas include the hippocampus, caudate nucleus, and olfacto...

  9. TGF-β1 induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT in human bronchial epithelial cells is enhanced by IL-1β but not abrogated by corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraw Bruce L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic persistent asthma is characterized by ongoing airway inflammation and airway remodeling. The processes leading to airway remodeling are poorly understood, and there is increasing evidence that even aggressive anti-inflammatory therapy does not completely prevent this process. We sought to investigate whether TGFβ1 stimulates bronchial epithelial cells to undergo transition to a mesenchymal phenotype, and whether this transition can be abrogated by corticosteroid treatment or enhanced by the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. Methods BEAS-2B and primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells were stimulated with TGFβ1 and expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and zymography. In some cases the epithelial cells were also incubated with corticosteroids or IL-1β. Results were analyzed using non-parametric statistical tests. Results Treatment of BEAS-2B or primary human bronchial epithelial cells with TGFβ1 significantly reduced the expression level of the epithelial adherence junction protein E-cadherin. TGFβ1 then markedly induced mesenchymal marker proteins such as collagen I, tenascin C, fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin mRNA in a dose dependant manner. The process of mesenchymal transition was accompanied by a morphological change towards a more spindle shaped fibroblast cell type with a more motile and invasive phenotype. Corticosteroid pre-treatment did not significantly alter the TGFβ1 induced transition but IL-1β enhanced the transition. Conclusion Our results indicate, that TGFβ1 can induce mesenchymal transition in the bronchial epithelial cell line and primary cells. Since asthma has been strongly associated with increased expression of TGFβ1 in the airway, epithelial to mesenchymal transition may contribute to the contractile and fibrotic remodeling process that accompanies chronic asthma.

  10. Monitoring of transplanted human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Wharton’s Jelly in xenogeneic systems in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk M. V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are ideal candidates for cell-based therapy aimed at tissue repair and immunomodulation. Aim. to study the survival of transplanted human MSCs from umbilical cord Wharton’s Jelly (hWJ-MSCs in the animal model of experimental osteoarthritis (OA in rats after injecting cells into a knee joint and to explore the effect of collagen scaffold on the cell survival in vivo. Methods. MSC isolation and cultivation in vitro. Immunological phenotyping of propagated hWJ-MSCs was performed by flow cytometry. The retention of transplanted cells was studied by the PCR revealing of human specific sequences in genomic DNA extracted from animal tissues. Results. hWJ-MSCs, both individual and grown on scaffold, were used and it was shown by PCR that human alpha-satellite DNA was detected on the first day in the immunocompetent OA animals inside the injured knee joint. In the collagen matrix (in the model of subcutaneous implantation human alpha-satellite DNA was detected on the 5th day but was not detected on the 12th day. Conclusions. According to the PCR results, hWJ-MSCs survived in the OA animal model for a short period. Collagenic scaffold increased the residence time of donor cells in the recipients. hWJ-MSCs may be considered as a perspective cell source for the treatment of OA in human.

  11. Angiogenic Potential and Secretome of Human Apical Papilla Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Various Stress Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athina; Kritis, Aristeidis; Andreadis, Dimitrios; Papachristou, Eleni; Leyhausen, Gabriele; Koidis, Petros; Geurtsen, Werner; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAP) of human adult teeth are considered an accessible source of cells with angiogenic properties. The aims of this study were to investigate the endothelial transdifferentiation of SCAP, the secretion of pro- and antiangiogenic factors from SCAP, and the paracrine effects of SCAP when exposed to environmental stress to stimulate tissue damage. SCAP were exposed to serum deprivation (SD), glucose deprivation (GD), and oxygen deprivation/hypoxia (OD) conditions, individually or in combination. Endothelial transdifferentiation was evaluated by in vitro capillary-like formation assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and flow cytometric analyses of angiogenesis-related markers; secretome by antibody arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA); and paracrine impact on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by in vitro transwell migration and capillary-like formation assays. The short-term exposure of SCAP to glucose/oxygen deprivation (GOD) in the presence, but mainly in deprivation, of serum (SGOD) elicited a proangiogenesis effect indicated by expression of angiogenesis-related genes involved in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGFR and angiopoietins/Tie pathways. This effect was unachievable under SD in normoxia, suggesting that the critical microenvironmental condition inducing rapid endothelial shift of SCAP is the combination of SGOD. Interestingly, SCAP showed high adaptability to these adverse conditions, retaining cell viability and acquiring a capillary-forming phenotype. SCAP secreted higher numbers and amounts of pro- (angiogenin, IGFBP-3, VEGF) and lower amounts of antiangiogenic factors (serpin-E1, TIMP-1, TSP-1) under SGOD compared with SOD or SD alone. Finally, secretome obtained under SGOD was most effective in inducing migration and capillary-like formation by HUVECs. These data provide new evidence on the microenvironmental factors favoring endothelial

  12. Therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells on the radiation-induced GI syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Se Hwan; Jang, Won Suk; Lee, Sun Joo; Park, Eun Young; Kim, Youn Joo; Jin, Sung Ho; Park, Sun Hoo; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the most radiosensitive organ systems in the body. Radiation-induced GI injury is described as destruction of crypt cell, decrease in villous height and number, ulceration, and necrosis of intestinal epithelium. Studies show that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) treatment may be useful in the repair or regeneration of damaged organs including bone, cartilage, or myocardium. MSCs from umbilical cord blood (UCB) have many advantages because of the immature nature of newborn cells compared to bone marrow derived MSCs. Moreover, UCB-MSCs provide no ethical barriers for basic studies and clinical applications. In this study, we explore the regeneration capability of human UCB-MSCs after radiation-induced GI injury

  13. Therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells on the radiation-induced GI syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the most radiosensitive organ systems in the body. Radiation-induced GI injury is described as destruction of crypt cell, decrease in villous height and number, ulceration, and necrosis of intestinal epithelium. Studies show that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) treatment may be useful in the repair or regeneration of damaged organs including bone, cartilage, or myocardium. MSCs from umbilical cord blood (UCB) have many advantages because of the immature nature of newborn cells compared to bone marrow derived MSCs. Moreover, UCB-MSCs provide no ethical barriers for basic studies and clinical applications. In this study, we explore the regeneration capability of human UCB-MSCs after radiation-induced GI injury

  14. Preconditioning Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with a Low Concentration of BMP2 Stimulates Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysdahl, Helle; Baatrup, Anette; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Bünger, Cody

    2014-01-01

    treatment strategy in which human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are preconditioned with low concentrations of BMP2 for a short time in vitro. hMSCs in suspension were stimulated for 15 min with 10 and 20 ng/mL of BMP2. After the BMP2 was removed, the cells were seeded and cultured in...... maturation of hMSCs. This implies that preconditioning with BMP2 might be more effective at inducing proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs than continuous stimulation. Preconditioning with BMP2 could benefit the clinical application of BMP2 since side effects from high-dose treatments could...

  15. Multifunctional nanocrystalline calcium phosphates loaded with Tetracycline antibiotic combined with human adipose derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (hASCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, K; Pazik, R; Zawisza, K; Wiglusz, K; Maredziak, M; Sobierajska, P; Wiglusz, R J

    2016-12-01

    Osteoconductive drug delivery system composed of nanocrystalline calcium phosphates (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2/β-Ca3(PO4)2) co-doped with Yb(3+)/Er(3+) ions loaded with Tetracycline antibiotic (TC) was developed. Their effect on human adipose derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (hASCs) as a potential reconstructive biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration was studied. The XRD and TEM measurements were used in order to determine the crystal structure and morphology of the final products. The characteristics of nanocomposites with the TC and hASCs as potential regenerative materials as well as the antimicrobial activity of the nanoparticles against: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 as a model of the Gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 of the Gram-negative bacteria, were shown. These combinations can be a promising material for theranostic due to its regenerative, antimicrobial and fluorescent properties. PMID:27612684

  16. Muse cells, newly found non-tumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, reside in human mesenchymal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Shohei; Akashi, Hideo; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been presumed to include a subpopulation of pluripotent-like cells as they differentiate not only into the same mesodermal-lineage cells but also into ectodermal- and endodermal-lineage cells and exert tissue regenerative effects in a wide variety of tissues. A novel type of pluripotent stem cell, Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells, was recently discovered in mesenchymal tissues such as the bone marrow, adipose tissue, dermis and connective tissue of organs, as well as in cultured fibroblasts and bone marrow-MSCs. Muse cells are able to differentiate into all three germ layers from a single cell and to self-renew, and yet exhibit non-tumorigenic and low telomerase activities. They can migrate to and target damaged sites in vivo, spontaneously differentiate into cells compatible with the targeted tissue, and contribute to tissue repair. Thus, Muse cells may account for the wide variety of differentiation abilities and tissue repair effects that have been observed in MSCs. Muse cells are unique in that they are pluripotent stem cells that belong in the living body, and are thus assumed to play an important role in 'regenerative homeostasis' in vivo. PMID:24471964

  17. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Progenitors: Perspectives on an Optimized In Vitro Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eCordeiro-Spinetti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to regenerative medicine, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are considered one of the most promising cell types for use in many cell therapies and bioengineering protocols. The International Society of Cellular Therapy recommended minimal criteria for defining multipotential MSC is based on adhesion and multipotency in vitro, and the presence or absence of select surface markers. Though these criteria help minimize discrepancies and allow some comparisons of data generated in different laboratories, the conditions in which cells are isolated and expanded are often not considered. Herein, we propose and recommend a few procedures to be followed to facilitate the establishment of quality control standards when working with mesenchymal progenitors isolation and expansion. Following these procedures, the classic Colony-Forming Unit-Fibroblast (CFU-f assay is revisited and three major topics are considered to define conditions and to assist on protocol optimization and data interpretation. We envision that the creation of a guideline will help in the identification and isolation of long-term stem cells and short-term progenitors to better explore their regenerative potential for multiple therapeutic purposes.

  18. Characterization of pancreatic stem cells derived from adult human pancreas ducts by fluorescence activated cell sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Tso Lin; Shih-Hwa Chiou; Chung-Lan Kao; Yi-Ming Shyr; Chien-Jen Hsu; Yih-Wen Tarng; Larry L-T Ho; Ching-Fai Kwok; Hung-Hai Ku

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To isolate putative pancreatic stem cells (PSCs)from human adult tissues of pancreas duct using serumfree, conditioned medium. The characterization of surface phenotype of these PSCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. The potential for pancreatic lineage and the capability of β-cell differentiation in these PSCs were evaluated as well.METHODS: By using serum-free medium supplemented with essential growth factors, we attempted to isolate the putative PSCs which has been reported to express nestin and pdx-1. The MatrigelTM was employed to evaluate the differential capacity of isolated cells. Dithizone staining, insulin content/secretion measurement, and immunohistochemistry staining were used to monitor the differentiation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)was used to detect the phenotypic markers of putative PSCs.RESULTS: A monolayer of spindle-like cells was cultivated. The putative PSCs expressed pdx-1 and nestin.They were also able to differentiate into insulin-, glucagon-, and somatostatin-positive cells. The spectrum of phenotypic markers in PSCs was investigated; a similarity was revealed when using human bone marrow-derived stem cells as the comparative experiment, such as CD29,CD44, CD49, CD50, CD51, CD62E, PDGFR-α, CD73 (SH2),CD81, CD105(SH3).CONCLUSION: In this study, we successfully isolated PSCs from adult human pancreatic duct by using serumfree medium. These PSCs not only expressed nestin and pdx-1 but also exhibited markers attributable to mesenchymal stem cells. Although work is needed to elucidate the role of these cells, the application of these PSCs might be therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus.

  19. MTA-enriched nanocomposite TiO2-polymeric powder coatings support human mesenchymal cell attachment and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study described in this paper was the development of novel polymer/ceramic nanocomposite coatings for implants through the application of ultrafine powder coating technology. Polyester resins were combined with µm-sized TiO2 (25%) as the biocompatibility agent, nTiO2 (0.5%) as the flow additive and mineral trioxide aggregates (ProRoot® MTA, 5%) as bioactive ceramics. Ultrafine powders were prepared and applied to titanium to create continuous polymeric powder coatings (PPCs) through the application of electrostatic ultrafine powder coating technology. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis confirmed that MTA had been incorporated into the PPCs, and elemental mapping showed that it had formed small clusters that were evenly distributed across the surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed continuous and smooth, but highly textured surface coatings that contrasted with the scalloped appearance of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) controls. Atomic force microscopy revealed intricate nano-topographies with an abundance of submicron-sized pits and nano-projections, evenly dispersed across their surfaces. Inverted fluorescence microscopy, SEM and cell counts showed that human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells attached and spread out onto PPC and MTA-enriched PPCs within 24 h. Mitochondrial enzyme activity measured viable and metabolically active cells on all of the surfaces. After 72 h of growth, cell counts and metabolic activity were significantly higher (P < 0.05) on the grey-MTA enriched PPC surfaces, than on unmodified PPC and cpTi. The novel polymer/ceramic nanocomposites that were created with ultrafine powder coating technology were continuous, homogenous and nano-rough coatings that enhanced human mesenchymal cell attachment and growth. (paper)

  20. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  1. Growth suppression effect of human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord on PBMCs

    OpenAIRE

    Ayatollahi, Maryam; Talaei-khozani, Tahereh; Razmkhah, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Immunosuppressive property of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has great attraction in regenerative medicine especially when dealing with tissue damage involving immune reactions. The most attractive tissue sources of MSCs used in clinical applications are bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), and Wharton’s jelly (WJ) of human umbilical cord. The current study has compared immunomodulatory properties of human BM, AT, and WJ-MSCs. Materials and Methods: Three different types of hum...

  2. The weight of nations: an estimation of adult human biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walpole Sarah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The energy requirement of species at each trophic level in an ecological pyramid is a function of the number of organisms and their average mass. Regarding human populations, although considerable attention is given to estimating the number of people, much less is given to estimating average mass, despite evidence that average body mass is increasing. We estimate global human biomass, its distribution by region and the proportion of biomass due to overweight and obesity. Methods For each country we used data on body mass index (BMI and height distribution to estimate average adult body mass. We calculated total biomass as the product of population size and average body mass. We estimated the percentage of the population that is overweight (BMI > 25 and obese (BMI > 30 and the biomass due to overweight and obesity. Results In 2005, global adult human biomass was approximately 287 million tonnes, of which 15 million tonnes were due to overweight (BMI > 25, a mass equivalent to that of 242 million people of average body mass (5% of global human biomass. Biomass due to obesity was 3.5 million tonnes, the mass equivalent of 56 million people of average body mass (1.2% of human biomass. North America has 6% of the world population but 34% of biomass due to obesity. Asia has 61% of the world population but 13% of biomass due to obesity. One tonne of human biomass corresponds to approximately 12 adults in North America and 17 adults in Asia. If all countries had the BMI distribution of the USA, the increase in human biomass of 58 million tonnes would be equivalent in mass to an extra 935 million people of average body mass, and have energy requirements equivalent to that of 473 million adults. Conclusions Increasing population fatness could have the same implications for world food energy demands as an extra half a billion people living on the earth.

  3. Two adult human voxel phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among computational models used in radiation protection, voxel phantoms based on computer tomographic (CT), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or colour photographic images, became very popular in recent years. Although being a true to nature representation of the scanned individual the scanning is usually made in supine position, which causes a shift of internal organs towards the ribcage, a compression of the lungs and a reduction of the sagittal diameter especially in the abdominal region compared to the anatomy of a person in upright standing position, which in turn can influence absorbed or equivalent dose estimates. This study proposes a method for human phantom design using tools recently developed in the areas of computer graphics and animated films and applies them to the creation and modeling of artificial 3D human organs and tissues. Two models, a male and a female adult human phantom have been developed based on anatomical atlases, observing at the same time the anatomical specifications published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the male and female reference adult. The phantoms are called FAXAA (Female Adult voXelAverage-Average) and MAXAA (Male Adult voXelAverage-Average) because they represent female and male adults with average weight and average height. (author)

  4. Low immunogenicity of allogeneic human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. • Humanized NSG mice were established using human UCB CD34+ cells. • Repeated intravenous hUCB-MSC injection into mice did not lead to immune responses and adverse events. • Allogeneic hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Evaluation of the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an allogeneic setting during therapy has been hampered by lack of suitable models due to technical and ethical limitations. Here, we show that allogeneic human umbilical cord blood derived-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. To confirm these properties in vivo, a humanized mouse model was established by injecting isolated hUCB-derived CD34+ cells intravenously into immunocompromised NOD/SCID IL2γnull (NSG) mice. After repeated intravenous injection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) or MRC5 cells into these mice, immunological alterations including T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and human IgG levels, were observed. In contrast, hUCB-MSC injection did not elicit these responses. While lymphocyte infiltration in the lung and small intestine and reduced survival rates were observed after hPBMC or MRC5 transplantation, no adverse events were observed following hUCB-MSC introduction. In conclusion, our data suggest that allogeneic hUCB-MSCs have low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo, and are therefore “immunologically safe” for use in allogeneic clinical applications

  5. Low immunogenicity of allogeneic human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Miyoung; Jeong, Sang Young; Ha, Jueun; Kim, Miyeon; Jin, Hye Jin; Kwon, Soon-Jae [Biomedical Research Institute, MEDIPOST Co., Ltd, Seoul 137-874 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Wook [Research Institute for Future Medicine Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 137-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Yoon Sun [Biomedical Research Institute, MEDIPOST Co., Ltd, Seoul 137-874 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Sung [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hong Bae, E-mail: jhb@medi-post.co.kr [Biomedical Research Institute, MEDIPOST Co., Ltd, Seoul 137-874 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. • Humanized NSG mice were established using human UCB CD34+ cells. • Repeated intravenous hUCB-MSC injection into mice did not lead to immune responses and adverse events. • Allogeneic hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Evaluation of the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an allogeneic setting during therapy has been hampered by lack of suitable models due to technical and ethical limitations. Here, we show that allogeneic human umbilical cord blood derived-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. To confirm these properties in vivo, a humanized mouse model was established by injecting isolated hUCB-derived CD34+ cells intravenously into immunocompromised NOD/SCID IL2γnull (NSG) mice. After repeated intravenous injection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) or MRC5 cells into these mice, immunological alterations including T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and human IgG levels, were observed. In contrast, hUCB-MSC injection did not elicit these responses. While lymphocyte infiltration in the lung and small intestine and reduced survival rates were observed after hPBMC or MRC5 transplantation, no adverse events were observed following hUCB-MSC introduction. In conclusion, our data suggest that allogeneic hUCB-MSCs have low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo, and are therefore “immunologically safe” for use in allogeneic clinical applications.

  6. Involvement of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human adenomyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khaleque Newaz; Kitajima, Michio; Hiraki, Koichi; Fujishita, Akira; Nakashima, Masahiro; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Adenomyosis is commonly believed to arise from the basalis endometrium. As an estromedin growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exhibits multiple functions in endometriosis, a disease commonly believed to arise from the functionalis endometrium. Here, we investigated the role of HGF in the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in adenomyosis. Full-thickness-biopsy specimens from endometrium to myometrium were collected after hysterectomy from women with and without adenomyosis. The relationship between HGF and E-cadherin (epithelial cell marker) and N-cadherin (mesenchymal cell markers) was examined at the gene and protein levels using endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) in culture and tissues by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The gene and protein expressions of two transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin, SLUG and SNAIL, were examined using Ishikawa cells and in response to HGF and estrogen (E2). HGF down-regulated E-cadherin and up-regulated N-cadherin mRNA expression in EECs, and an inverse relationship in protein expression between HGF and E-cadherin was observed in basalis endometria derived from women with diffuse and focal adenomyosis. HGF induced morphological changes of EECs from a cobblestone-like appearance to spindle-shaped cells and promoted migration of EECs. Ishikawa cells exhibited up-regulation of SLUG/SNAIL gene expression in response to both HGF and E2 with an additive effect between them. HGF- and E2-promoted SLUG/SNAIL gene expression was significantly abrogated after pretreatment of cells with anti-HGF antibody or ICI 182720, an estrogen receptor antagonist. HGF may be involved in gland invagination deep into the myometrium by inducing EMT at the endo-myometrial junction in women with adenomyosis. PMID:25505196

  7. Instant stem cell therapy: Characterization and concentration of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kasten

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In regenerative medicine, there is an approach to avoid expansion of the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC before implantation. The aim of this study was to compare methods for instant MSC therapy by use of a portable, automatic and closed system centrifuge that allows for the concentration of MSCs. The main outcome measures were the amount of MSCs per millilitre of bone marrow (BM, clusters of differentiation (CD, proliferation and differentiation capacities of the MSC. A volume reduction protocol was compared to the traditional laboratory methods of isolation using a Ficoll gradient and native BM. Fifty millilitres of BM were obtained from haematologically healthy male Caucasians (n=10, age 8 to 49 years. The number of colony forming units-fibroblast (CFU-F/ml BM was highest in the centrifuge volume reduction protocol, followed by the native BM (not significant, the centrifuge Ficoll (p=0.042 and the manual Ficoll procedure (p=0.001. The MSC of all groups could differentiate into the mesenchymal lineages without significant differences between the groups. The CD pattern was identical for all groups: CD13+; CD 44+; CD73 +; CD90+; CD105+; HLA-A,B,C+; CD14-; CD34-; CD45-; CD271-; HLA-DR-. In a further clinical pilot study (n=5 with 297 ml BM (SD 18.6, the volume reduction protocol concentrated the MSC by a factor of 14: there were 1.08 x 102 MSC/ml BM (standard deviation (SD 1.02 x 102 before concentration, 14.8 x 102 MSC/ ml BM (SD 12.4 x 102 after concentration, and on average 296 x 102 MSC (SD 248.9 x 102, range 86.4-691.5 x 102 were available for MSC therapy. The volume reduction protocol of the closed centrifuge allows for the highest concentration of the MSC, and therefore, is a promising candidate for instant stem cell therapy.

  8. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into dermal fibroblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential seed cells for tissue-engineered skin. → Tissue-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UCMSCs) can readily be isolated in vitro. → We induce UCMSCs to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts via conditioned medium. → Collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA level was higher in differentiated cells. → UCMSCs-derived fibroblast-like cells strongly express fibroblast-specific protein. -- Abstract: Tissue-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) can be readily obtained, avoid ethical or moral constraints, and show excellent pluripotency and proliferation potential. UCMSCs are considered to be a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In this study, we collected newborn umbilical cord tissue under sterile conditions and isolated UCMSCs through a tissue attachment method. UCMSC cell surface markers were examined using flow cytometry. On the third passage, UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts in conditioned induction media. The induction results were detected using immunofluorescence with a fibroblast-specific monoclonal antibody and real time PCR for type I and type III collagen. UCMSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and reached 90% confluency 14 to 18 days after primary culture. Cultured UCMSCs showed strong positive staining for CD73, CD29, CD44, CD105, and HLA-I, but not CD34, CD45, CD31, or HLA-DR. After differentiation, immunostaining for collagen type I, type III, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin, and desmin were all strongly positive in induced cells, and staining was weak or negative in non-induced cells; total transcript production of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA was higher in induced cells than in non-induced cells. These results demonstrate that UCMSCs can be induced to differentiate into fibroblasts with conditioned induction media and, in turn, could be used as seed cells for tissue-engineered dermis.

  9. Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Ewing Sarcoma Patients. Pathogenetic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Ana Teresa; Manara, Maria Cristina; Berghuis, Dagmar; Ordóñez, José Luis; Biscuola, Michele; Lopez-García, Maria Angeles; Osuna, Daniel; Lucarelli, Enrico; Alviano, Francesco; Lankester, Arjan; Scotlandi, Katia; de Álava, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Ewing Sarcoma (EWS) is a mesenchymal-derived tumor that generally arises in bone and soft tissue. Intensive research regarding the pathogenesis of EWS has been insufficient to pinpoint the early events of Ewing sarcomagenesis. However, the Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) is currently accepted as the most probable cell of origin. Materials and Methods In an initial study regarding a deep characterization of MSC obtained specifically from EWS patients (MSC-P), we compared them with MSC derived from healthy donors (MSC-HD) and EWS cell lines. We evaluated the presence of the EWS-FLI1 gene fusion and EWSR1 gene rearrangements in MSC-P. The presence of the EWS transcript was confirmed by q-RT-PCR. In order to determine early events possibly involved in malignant transformation, we used a multiparameter quantitative strategy that included both MSC immunophenotypic negative/positive markers, and EWS intrinsic phenotypical features. Markers CD105, CD90, CD34 and CD45 were confirmed in EWS samples. Results We determined that MSC-P lack the most prevalent gene fusion, EWSR1-FLI1 as well as EWSR1 gene rearrangements. Our study also revealed that MSC-P are more alike to MSC-HD than to EWS cells. Nonetheless, we also observed that EWS cells had a few overlapping features with MSC. As a relevant example, also MSC showed CD99 expression, hallmark of EWS diagnosis. However, we observed that, in contrast to EWS cells, MSC were not sensitive to the inhibition of CD99. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that MSC from EWS patients behave like MSC-HD and are phenotypically different from EWS cells, thus raising important questions regarding MSC role in sarcomagenesis. PMID:24498265

  10. HNF1α inhibition triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human liver cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1α (HNF1α) is an atypical homeodomain-containing transcription factor that transactivates liver-specific genes including albumin, α-1-antitrypsin and α- and β-fibrinogen. Biallelic inactivating mutations of HNF1A have been frequently identified in hepatocellular adenomas (HCA), rare benign liver tumors usually developed in women under oral contraceptives, and in rare cases of hepatocellular carcinomas developed in non-cirrhotic liver. HNF1α-mutated HCA (H-HCA) are characterized by a marked steatosis and show activation of glycolysis, lipogenesis, translational machinery and mTOR pathway. We studied the consequences of HNF1α silencing in hepatic cell lines, HepG2 and Hep3B and we reproduced most of the deregulations identified in H-HCA. We transfected hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B with siRNA targeting HNF1α and obtained a strong inhibition of HNF1α expression. We then looked at the phenotypic changes by microscopy and studied changes in gene expression using qRT-PCR and Western Blot. Hepatocytes transfected with HNF1α siRNA underwent severe phenotypic changes with loss of cell-cell contacts and development of migration structures. In HNF1α-inhibited cells, hepatocyte and epithelial markers were diminished and mesenchymal markers were over-expressed. This epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was related to the up regulation of several EMT transcription factors, in particular SNAIL and SLUG. We also found an overexpression of TGFβ1, an EMT initiator, in both cells transfected with HNF1α siRNA and H-HCA. Moreover, TGFβ1 expression is strongly correlated to HNF1α expression in cell models, suggesting regulation of TGFβ1 expression by HNF1α. Our results suggest that HNF1α is not only important for hepatocyte differentiation, but has also a role in the maintenance of epithelial phenotype in hepatocytes

  11. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into dermal fibroblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yanfu [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Chai, Jiake, E-mail: cjk304@126.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Sun, Tianjun; Li, Dongjie; Tao, Ran [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Burns Institute, First Hospital Affiliated to General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential seed cells for tissue-engineered skin. {yields} Tissue-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UCMSCs) can readily be isolated in vitro. {yields} We induce UCMSCs to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts via conditioned medium. {yields} Collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA level was higher in differentiated cells. {yields} UCMSCs-derived fibroblast-like cells strongly express fibroblast-specific protein. -- Abstract: Tissue-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) can be readily obtained, avoid ethical or moral constraints, and show excellent pluripotency and proliferation potential. UCMSCs are considered to be a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In this study, we collected newborn umbilical cord tissue under sterile conditions and isolated UCMSCs through a tissue attachment method. UCMSC cell surface markers were examined using flow cytometry. On the third passage, UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts in conditioned induction media. The induction results were detected using immunofluorescence with a fibroblast-specific monoclonal antibody and real time PCR for type I and type III collagen. UCMSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and reached 90% confluency 14 to 18 days after primary culture. Cultured UCMSCs showed strong positive staining for CD73, CD29, CD44, CD105, and HLA-I, but not CD34, CD45, CD31, or HLA-DR. After differentiation, immunostaining for collagen type I, type III, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin, and desmin were all strongly positive in induced cells, and staining was weak or negative in non-induced cells; total transcript production of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA was higher in induced cells than in non-induced cells. These results demonstrate that UCMSCs can be induced to differentiate into fibroblasts with conditioned induction media and, in turn, could be used as seed cells for tissue

  12. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce systemic inflammation and attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianjun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess potent immunomodulatory properties and simultaneously lack the ability to illicit immune responses. Hence, MSCs have emerged as a promising candidate for cellular therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. Within the context of this study, we investigated whether human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI in a rat model. Methods ALI was induced via injection of LPS. Rats were divided into three groups: (1 saline group(control, (2 LPS group, and (3 MSC + LPS group. The rats were sacrificed at 6, 24, and 48 hours after injection. Serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lungs were collected for cytokine concentration measurements, assessment of lung injury, and histology. Results UC-MSCs increased survival rate and suppressed LPS-induced increase of serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 without decreasing the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The MSC + LPS group exhibited significant improvements in lung inflammation, injury, edema, lung wet/dry ratio, protein concentration, and neutrophil counts in the BALF, as well as improved myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the lung tissue. Furthermore, UC-MSCs decreased malondialdehyde (MDA production and increased Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 protein production and activity in the lung tissue. Conclusion UC-MSCs noticeably increased the survival rate of rats suffering from LPS-induced lung injury and significantly reduced systemic and pulmonary inflammation. Promoting anti-inflammatory homeostasis and reducing oxidative stress might be the therapeutic basis of UC-MSCs.

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes the differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes under the designated culturing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Henggui

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is of growing interest to develop novel approaches to initiate differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into cardiomyocytes. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a native circulating bioactive lipid metabolite, plays a role in differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs into cardiomyocytes. We also developed an engineered cell sheet from these HUMSCs derived cardiomyocytes by using a temperature-responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PIPAAm cell sheet technology. Methods Cardiomyogenic differentiation of HUMSCs was performed by culturing these cells with either designated cardiomyocytes conditioned medium (CMCM alone, or with 1 μM S1P; or DMEM with 10% FBS + 1 μM S1P. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was determined by immunocytochemical analysis of expression of cardiomyocyte markers and patch clamping recording of the action potential. Results A cardiomyocyte-like morphology and the expression of α-actinin and myosin heavy chain (MHC proteins can be observed in both CMCM culturing or CMCM+S1P culturing groups after 5 days' culturing, however, only the cells in CMCM+S1P culture condition present cardiomyocyte-like action potential and voltage gated currents. A new approach was used to form PIPAAm based temperature-responsive culture surfaces and this successfully produced cell sheets from HUMSCs derived cardiomyocytes. Conclusions This study for the first time demonstrates that S1P potentiates differentiation of HUMSCs towards functional cardiomyocytes under the designated culture conditions. Our engineered cell sheets may provide a potential for clinically applicable myocardial tissues should promote cardiac tissue engineering research.

  14. Enoxaparin and rivaroxaban have different effects on human mesenchymal stromal cells in the early stages of bone healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröbel, J.; Prodinger, P. M.; Mrotzek, S. J.; Fischer, J. C.; Zilkens, C.; Bittersohl, B.; Krauspe, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major potential complication following orthopaedic surgery. Subcutaneously administered enoxaparin has been used as the benchmark to reduce the incidence of VTE. However, concerns have been raised regarding the long-term administration of enoxaparin and its possible negative effects on bone healing and bone density with an increase of the risk of osteoporotic fractures. New oral anticoagulants such as rivaroxaban have recently been introduced, however, there is a lack of information regarding how these drugs affect bone metabolism and post-operative bone healing. Methods We measured the migration and proliferation capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under enoxaparin or rivaroxaban treatment for three consecutive weeks, and evaluated effects on MSC mRNA expression of markers for stress and osteogenic differentiation. Results We demonstrate that enoxaparin, but not rivaroxaban, increases the migration potential of MSCs and increases their cell count in line with elevated mRNA expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and alpha-B-crystallin (CryaB). However, a decrease in early osteogenic markers (insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2), bone morphogenetic protein2 (BMP2)) indicated inhibitory effects on MSC differentiation into osteoblasts caused by enoxaparin, but not by rivaroxaban. Conclusions Our findings may explain the adverse effects of enoxaparin treatment on bone healing. Rivaroxaban has no significant impact on MSC metabolism or capacity for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Cite this article: Dr H. Pilge. Enoxaparin and rivaroxaban have different effects on human mesenchymal stromal cells in the early stages of bone healing. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:95–100. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.53.2000595. PMID:26989119

  15. TiO{sub 2}-enriched polymeric powder coatings support human mesenchymal cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozumder, Mohammad Sayem; Zhu, Jesse [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B9 (Canada); Perinpanayagam, Hiran, E-mail: Hiran.Perinpanayagam@schulich.uwo.ca [Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5C1 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Novel polymeric powder coatings (PPC) were prepared by ultrafine powder coating technology and shown to support human mesenchymal cell attachment and growth. PPC surfaces enriched with nano-TiO{sub 2} (nTiO{sub 2}) showed enhanced cellular responses, and were compared to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). After cell attachment and growth, osteogenic differentiation and bone matrix formation ensures osseointegration for implantable biomaterials. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine if mesenchymal cells grown on PPC could undergo osteogenic differentiation by inducing Runx2 and bone matrix proteins, and then initiate mineralization. Atomic force microscopy revealed intricate three-dimensional micro-topographies, and the measures of nano-roughness and porosity were similar for all PPC surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the cells attached and spread out over all of the surfaces. After 1 week in osteogenic media, RT-PCR analysis showed the induction of Runx2, the up-regulation of type I collagen, and the initial detection of alkaline phosphatase and bone sialoprotein. After 4 weeks, Alizarin Red staining showed mineral deposition. However, cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation were significantly (P < 0.05) higher on the cpTi controls than on the PPC surfaces. Furthermore, spreading and differentiation were consistently higher on the titanium-enriched PPC-2, -3 and -4 than on the titanium-free PPC-1. Therefore, despite the presence of complex micro-topographies and nano-features, titanium-enrichment enhanced the cellular response, and pure titanium still provided the best substrate. These findings confirm the cytocompatibility of these novel polymeric coatings and suggest that titanium-enrichment and nTiO{sub 2} additives may enhance their performance.

  16. α-Solanine Inhibits Invasion of Human Prostate Cancer Cell by Suppressing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and MMPs Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Hung Shen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available α-Solanine, a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid found in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn., was found to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism involved in suppression of cancer cell metastasis by α-solanine remains unclear. This study investigates the suppression mechanism of α-solanine on motility of the human prostate cancer cell PC-3. Results show that α-solanine reduces the viability of PC-3 cells. When treated with non-toxic doses of α-solanine, cell invasion is markedly suppressed by α-solanine. α-Solanine also significantly elevates epithelial marker E-cadherin expression, while it concomitantly decreases mesenchymal marker vimentin expression, suggesting it suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. α-Solanine reduces the mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9 and extracellular inducer of matrix metalloproteinase (EMMPRIN, but increases the expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Immunoblotting assays indicate α-solanine is effective in suppressing the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K, Akt and ERK. Moreover, α-solanine downregulates oncogenic microRNA-21 (miR-21 and upregulates tumor suppressor miR-138 expression. Taken together, the results suggest that inhibition of PC-3 cell invasion by α-solanine may be, at least in part, through blocking EMT and MMPs expression. α-Solanine also reduces ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways and regulates expression of miR-21 and miR-138. These findings suggest an attractive therapeutic potential of α-solanine for suppressing invasion of prostate cancer cell.

  17. Involvement of Notch1 inhibition in serum-stimulated glia and oligodendrocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jang Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Jang Lee1, Shih-Chieh Hung2–5, Mien-Sheng Chu41Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, 3Institute of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Medical Research and Education, 5Department of Orthopedics, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, TaiwanAbstract: The use of in vitro oligodendrocyte differentiation for transplantation of stem cells to treat demyelinating diseases is an important consideration. In this study, we investigated the effects of serum on glia and oligodendrocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells (KP-hMSCs. We found that serum deprivation resulted in a reversible downregulation of glial- and oligodendrocyte-specific markers. Serum stimulated expression of oligodendrocyte markers, such as galactocerebroside, as well as Notch1 and JAK1 transcripts. Inhibition of Notch1 activation by the Notch inhibitor, MG132, led to enhanced expression of a serum-stimulated oligodendrocyte marker. This marker was undetectable in serum-deprived KP-hMSCs treated with MG132, suggesting that inhibition of Notch1 function is additive to serum-stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation. Furthermore, a dominant-negative mutant RBP-J protein also inhibited Notch1 function and led to upregulation of oligodendrocyte-specific markers. Our results demonstrate that serum-stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation is enhanced by the inhibition of Notch1-associated functions.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, glia and oligodendrocyte differentiation, Notch1 signaling, serum deprivation

  18. HIV-1 and recombinant gp120 affect the survival and differentiation of human vessel wall-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquinelli Gianandrea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection elicits the onset of a progressive immunodeficiency and also damages several other organs and tissues such as the CNS, kidney, heart, blood vessels, adipose tissue and bone. In particular, HIV infection has been related to an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and derangement in the structure of blood vessels in the absence of classical risk factors. The recent characterization of multipotent mesenchymal cells in the vascular wall, involved in regulating cellular homeostasis, suggests that these cells may be considered a target of HIV pathogenesis. This paper investigated the interaction between HIV-1 and vascular wall resident human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Results MSCs were challenged with classical R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains demonstrating that these strains are able to enter and integrate their retro-transcribed proviral DNA in the host cell genome. Subsequent experiments indicated that HIV-1 strains and recombinant gp120 elicited a reliable increase in apoptosis in sub-confluent MSCs. Since vascular wall MSCs are multipotent cells that may be differentiated towards several cell lineages, we challenged HIV-1 strains and gp120 on MSCs differentiated to adipogenesis and endotheliogenesis. Our experiments showed that the adipogenesis is increased especially by upregulated PPARγ activity whereas the endothelial differentiation induced by VEGF treatment was impaired with a downregulation of endothelial markers such as vWF, Flt-1 and KDR expression. These viral effects in MSC survival and adipogenic or endothelial differentiation were tackled by CD4 blockade suggesting an important role of CD4/gp120 interaction in this context. Conclusions The HIV-related derangement of MSC survival and differentiation may suggest a direct role of HIV infection and gp120 in impaired vessel homeostasis and in genesis of vessel damage observed in HIV-infected patients.

  19. An anatomically comprehensive atlas of the adult human brain transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawrylycz, M.J.; Beckmann, C.F.; et al., et al.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroanatomically precise, genome-wide maps of transcript distributions are critical resources to complement genomic sequence data and to correlate functional and genetic brain architecture. Here we describe the generation and analysis of a transcriptional atlas of the adult human brain, comprising

  20. Pattern formation by vascular mesenchymal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Garfinkel, Alan; Tintut, Yin; Petrasek, Danny; Boström, Kristina; Demer, Linda L.

    2004-01-01

    In embryogenesis, immature mesenchymal cells aggregate and organize into patterned tissues. Later in life, a pathological recapitulation of this process takes place in atherosclerotic lesions, when vascular mesenchymal cells organize into trabecular bone tissue within the artery wall. Here we show that multipotential adult vascular mesenchymal cells self-organize in vitro into patterns that are predicted by a mathematical model based on molecular morphogens interacting in a reaction-diffusion...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells from the human umbilical cord ameliorate fulminant hepatic failure and increase survival in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Feng Yang; Hong-Cui Cao; Qiao-Ling Pan; Jiong Yu; Jun Li; Lan-Juan Li

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Cell therapy has been promising for various diseases. We investigated whether transplantation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) has any therapeutic effects on D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS)-induced fulminant hepatic failure in mice. METHODS:hUCMSCs isolated from human umbilical cord were cultured and transplanted via the tail vein into severe combined immune deifciency mice with GalN/LPS-induced fulminant hepatic failure. After transplantation, the localiza-tion and differentiation of hUCMSCs in the injured livers were investigated by immunohistochemical and genetic analy-ses. The recovery of the injured livers was evaluated histologi-cally. The survival rate of experimental animals was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. RESULTS:hUCMSCs expressed high levels of CD29, CD73, CD13, CD105 and CD90, but did not express CD31, CD79b, CD133, CD34, and CD45. Cultured hUCMSCs displayed adip-ogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed that transplantation of hUCMSCs reduced hepatic necrosis and promoted liver regeneration. Transplantation of hUCMSCs prolonged the survival rate of mice with fulminant hepatic failure. Polymerase chain reaction for humanalu sequences showed the presence of human cells in mouse livers. Positive staining for human albumin, human alpha-fetoprotein and human cytokeratin 18 suggested the for-mation of hUCMSCs-derived hepatocyte-like cellsin vivo. CONCLUSIONS:hUCMSC was a potential candidate for stem cell based therapies. After transplantation, hUCMSCs partially repaired hepatic damage induced by GalN/LPS in mice. hUC-MSCs engrafted into the injured liver and differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells.

  2. Telocytes of the human adult trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Cretoiu, Dragos; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Hostiuc, Sorin; Dermengiu, Dan; Manoiu, Vasile Sorin; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2016-06-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are typically defined as cells with telopodes by their ultrastructural features. Their presence was reported in various organs, however little is known about their presence in human trigeminal ganglion. To address this issue, samples of trigeminal ganglia were tested by immunocytochemistry for CD34 and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that TCs are CD34 positive and form networks within the ganglion in close vicinity to microvessels and nerve fibers around the neuronal-glial units (NGUs). TEM examination confirmed the existence of spindle-shaped and bipolar TCs with one or two telopodes measuring between 15 to 53 μm. We propose that TCs are cells with stemness capacity which might contribute in regeneration and repair processes by: modulation of the stem cell activity or by acting as progenitors of other cells present in the normal tissue. In addition, further studies are needed to establish if they might influence the neuronal circuits. PMID:27147447

  3. Human testis-derived embryonic stem cell-like cells are not pluripotent, but possess potential of mesenchymal progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.V. Chikhovskaya; M.J. Jonker; A. Meissner; T.M. Breit; S. Repping; A.M.M. van Pelt

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spontaneous in vitro transition of undifferentiated spermatogonia into the pluripotent cell state has been achieved using neonatal and adult mouse testis tissue. In an effort to establish an analogous source of human patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, several research groups have de

  4. Human mesenchymal stem cells elevate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells of asthmatic patients via heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-guo; Zhuan-sun, Yong-xun; Wen, Bing; Wu, Hao; Huang, Feng-ting; Ghimire, Hridaya bibhu; Ran, Pi-xin

    2013-09-01

    Up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a new target in the treatment of asthma. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can up-regulate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in vitro, meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the development and maintenance of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. However the mechanism has not yet been adequately understood. Hence, we wondered what effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 made on regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from asthmatic patients and healthy controls were co-cultured with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells which were pretreated with Hemin (the revulsive of Heme Oxygenase-1), Protoporphyrin Ⅸ zinc (the inhibitor of Heme Oxygenase-1) and saline. The expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in MSCs was enhanced by Hemin and inhibited by Protoporphyrin  zinc in vitro. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 elevated the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells, meanwhile, inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 decreased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells as compared with mesenchymal stem cells alone. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Heme Oxygenase-1 contributed to the up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells in asthma.  PMID:23893806

  5. Gene expression profiling and secretome analysis differentiate adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells and human hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Berardis

    Full Text Available Adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSC are obtained after primary culture of the liver parenchymal fraction. The cells are of fibroblastic morphology and exhibit a hepato-mesenchymal phenotype. Hepatic stellate cells (HSC derived from the liver non-parenchymal fraction, present a comparable morphology as ADHLSC. Because both ADHLSC and HSC are described as liver stem/progenitor cells, we strived to extensively compare both cell populations at different levels and to propose tools demonstrating their singularity. ADHLSC and HSC were isolated from the liver of four different donors, expanded in vitro and followed from passage 5 until passage 11. Cell characterization was performed using immunocytochemistry, western blotting, flow cytometry, and gene microarray analyses. The secretion profile of the cells was evaluated using Elisa and multiplex Luminex assays. Both cell types expressed α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, fibronectin, CD73 and CD90 in accordance with their mesenchymal origin. Microarray analysis revealed significant differences in gene expression profiles. HSC present high expression levels of neuronal markers as well as cytokeratins. Such differences were confirmed using immunocytochemistry and western blotting assays. Furthermore, both cell types displayed distinct secretion profiles as ADHLSC highly secreted cytokines of therapeutic and immuno-modulatory importance, like HGF, interferon-γ and IL-10. Our study demonstrates that ADHLSC and HSC are distinct liver fibroblastic cell populations exhibiting significant different expression and secretion profiles.

  6. Exosome cargo reflects TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) status in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeon; Kim, Tae Yeon; Lee, Myung Shin; Mun, Ji Young; Ihm, Chunhwa; Kim, Soon Ae

    2016-09-16

    It has been suggested that tumor cells secrete exosomes to modify the local microenvironment, which then promotes intercellular communication and metastasis. Although exosomes derived from cancer cells may contribute to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in untransformed cells, few studies have defined exosome cargo upon induction of EMT. In this study, we investigated the changes in exosomal cargo from the epithelial to mesenchymal cell phenotype by inducing EMT with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. The protein content of the exosomes reflects the change in the cell phenotype. In addition, miR-23a was significantly enriched in the exosomes after mesenchymal transition. Following treatment of exosomes from mesenchymal cells via EMT induction with TGF-β1 to the epithelial cell type, phenotypic changes in protein expression level and cell morphology were observed. Autologous treatment of exosomes enhanced the transcriptional activity and abundance of β-catenin. Our results suggest that the exosomal protein and miRNA content reflects the physiological condition of its source and that exosomes induce phenotypic changes via autocrine signaling. PMID:27492069

  7. Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (≥ 5.0 μM TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (≤ 2.5 μM TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 μM range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. -- Highlights: ► TCS is cytotoxic to un-induced hMSCs at concentrations ≥ 5.0 μM. ► TCS at concentrations ≤ 2.5 μM is not cytotoxic to induced hMSCs. ► TCS at non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits lipid formation in induced hMSCs. ► TCS decreases the expression of specific biomarkers of adipocyte differentiation. ► TCS at concentrations observed in human blood inhibits adipogenesis of hMSCs.

  8. Prospective isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple mammalian species using cross-reacting anti-human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemuller, Henk; Prins, Henk-Jan; Naaijkens, Benno; Staal, Jojet; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Martens, Anton C

    2010-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of human and nonhuman mammalian species are often studied for various applications in regenerative medicine research. These MSCs can be derived from human bone marrow (BM) and identified by their ability to form fibroblast-like colony forming units that develop into stromal like cells when expanded in culture. These cells are characterized by their spindle-shaped morphology, their characteristic phenotype (CD73(+), CD90(+), CD105(+), CD45⁻, and CD34⁻), and their ability to differentiate into cells of the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. However, the identification and purification of MSCs from nonhuman mammalian species is hampered by the lack of suitable monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In this report, primary BM and cultured BM-derived MSCs of human and monkey, goat, sheep, dog, and pig were screened for cross-reactivity using a panel of 43 mAb, of which 22 react with either human BM mononuclear cells or cultured human MSCs. We found 7 mAb with specificity for CD271, MSCA-1 (W8B2 antigen), W4A5, CD56, W3C4 (CD349), W5C4, and 58B1, which showed interspecies cross-reactivity. These mAb proved to be useful for prospective sorting of MSCs from the BM of the 6 mammalian species studied as well as for the characterization of their cultured offspring. Flow sorting with the cross-reacting mAb resulted in up to 2400-fold enrichment of the clonogenic cell fraction (fibroblast-like colony forming units). This study provides an important contribution for the comparative prospective isolation of primary BM-MSCs and the characterization of cultured MSCs from multiple mammalian species for preclinical research. PMID:20367498

  9. Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Li-Wu [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wu, Qiangen [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Green, Bridgett; Nolen, Greg [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Shi, Leming [Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); LoSurdo, Jessica [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Deng, Helen [Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Bauer, Steven [Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Fang, Jia-Long, E-mail: jia-long.fang@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Ning, Baitang, E-mail: baitang.ning@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (≥ 5.0 μM TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (≤ 2.5 μM TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 μM range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. -- Highlights: ► TCS is cytotoxic to un-induced hMSCs at concentrations ≥ 5.0 μM. ► TCS at concentrations ≤ 2.5 μM is not cytotoxic to induced hMSCs. ► TCS at non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits lipid formation in induced hMSCs. ► TCS decreases the expression of specific biomarkers of adipocyte differentiation. ► TCS at concentrations observed in human blood inhibits adipogenesis of hMSCs.

  10. Enhancement of osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in human mesenchymal stem cells by a modified low intensity ultrasound stimulation under simulated microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardar M Z Uddin

    Full Text Available Adult stem cells can differentiate into multiple lineages depending on their exposure to differing biochemical and biomechanical inductive factors. Lack of mechanical signals due to disuse can inhibit osteogenesis and induce adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Long-term bed rest due to both brain/spinal cord injury and space travel can lead to disuse osteoporosis that is in part caused by a reduced number of osteoblasts. Thus, it is essential to provide proper mechanical stimulation for cellular viability and osteogenesis, particularly under disuse conditions. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS on the osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived human stem cells (Ad-hMSC in simulated microgravity conditions. Cells were cultured in a 1D clinostat to simulate microgravity (SMG and treated with LIPUS at 30mW/cm(2 for 20 min/day. It was hypothesized that the application of LIPUS to SMG cultures would restore osteogenesis in Ad-hMSCs. The results showed significant increases in ALP, OSX, RANKL, RUNX2, and decreases in OPG in LIPUS treated SMG cultures of Ad-MSC compared to non-treated cultures. LIPUS also restored OSX, RUNX2 and RANKL expression in osteoblast cells. SMG significantly reduced ALP positive cells by 70% (p<0.01 and ALP activity by 22% (p<0.01, while LIPUS treatment restored ALP positive cell number and activity to equivalence with normal gravity controls. Extracellular matrix collagen and mineralization was assessed by Sirius red and Alizarin red staining, respectively. SMG cultures showed little or no collagen or mineralization, but LIPUS treatment restored collagen content to 50% (p<0.001 and mineralization by 45% (p<0.001 in LIPUS treated-SMG cultures relative to SMG-only cultures. The data suggest that LIPUS treatment can restore normal osteogenic differentiation of MSCs from disuse by daily short duration stimulation.

  11. AGE-RAGE interaction in the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition of human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Cibin T; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2016-08-01

    Basement membrane (BM) proteins accumulate chemical modifications with age. One such modification is glycation, which results in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). In a previous study, we reported that AGEs in the human lens capsule (BM) promote the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells, which we proposed as a mechanism for posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract formation. In this study, we investigated the role of a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT in a human lens epithelial cell line (FHL124). RAGE was present in FHL124 cells, and its levels were unaltered in cells cultured on either native or AGE-modified BM or upon treatment with TGFβ2. RAGE overexpression significantly enhanced the TGFβ2-mediated EMT responses in cells cultured on AGE-modified BM compared with the unmodified matrix. In contrast, treatment of cells with a RAGE antibody or EN-RAGE (an endogenous ligand for RAGE) resulted in a significant reduction in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT response. This was accompanied by a reduction in TGFβ2-mediated Smad signaling and ROS generation. These results imply that the interaction of matrix AGEs with RAGE plays a role in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT of lens epithelial cells and suggest that the blockade of RAGE could be a strategy to prevent PCO and other age-associated fibrosis. PMID:27263094

  12. [Differentiation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-secreting cells induced by regenerating pancreatic extract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmei; Wang, Dianliang; Zeng, Hongyan; Wang, Lieming; Sun, Jinwei; Zhang, Zhen; Dong, Shasha

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the natural biological inducer, rat regenerating pancreatic extract (RPE), was used to induce human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) into insulin-secreting cells. We excised 60% of rat pancreas in order to stimulate pancreatic regeneration. RPE was extracted and used to induce hAMSCs at a final concentration of 20 microg/mL. The experiment methods used were as follows: morphological-identification, dithizone staining, immumofluorescence analysis, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and insulin secretion stimulated by high glucose. The results show that the cell morphology of passge3 hAMSCs changed significantly after the induction of RPE, resulting in cluster shape after induction for 15 days. Dithizone staining showed that there were scarlet cell masses in RPE-treated culture. Immumofluorescence analysis indicated that induced cells were insulin-positive expression. RT-PCR showed the positive expression of human islet-related genes Pdx1 and insulin in the induced cells. The result of insulin secretion stimulated by high glucose indicated that insulin increasingly secreted and then kept stable with prolongation of high glucose stimulation. In conclusion, hAMSCs had the potential to differentiate into insulin-secreting cells induced by RPE in vitro. PMID:22667123

  13. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  14. Genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating PPARγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, LI-YAN; XUE, HAO-GANG; CHEN, JI-YING; CHAI, WEI; NI, MING

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone that exists in the form of an aglycone. It is the primary active component in soy isoflavone and has a number of biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative). However, the specific effect of genistein on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. In the present study, the mechanism underlying the effect of genistein on the suppression of BMSC adipogenic differentiation and the enhancement of osteogenic potential was investigated using an MTT assay. It was observed that genistein significantly increased BMSC cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner (Pcell proliferation, suppress the expression of Runx2, Col I and OC mRNA, and reduce ALP and promote TG activity in BMSCs. Thus, the results of the present study conclude that genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human BMSCs and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating the expression of PPARγ. In conclusion, genistein may be a promising candidate drug for treatment against osteogenesis.

  15. Hypoxia-mimetic agents inhibit proliferation and alter the morphology of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Hui-Lan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The therapeutic efficacy of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic diseases is closely related to level of hypoxia in the damaged tissues. To elucidate the potential therapeutic applications and limitations of hMSCs derived from human umbilical cords, the effects of hypoxia on the morphology and proliferation of hMSCs were analyzed. Results After treatment with DFO and CoCl2, hMSCs were elongated, and adjacent cells were no longer in close contact. In addition, vacuole-like structures were observed within the cytoplasm; the rough endoplasmic reticulum expanded, and expanded ridges were observed in mitochondria. In addition, DFO and CoCl2 treatments for 48 h significantly inhibited hMSCs proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (P Conclusions The hypoxia-mimetic agents, DFO and CoCl2, alter umbilical cord-derived hMSCs morphology and inhibit their proliferation through influencing the cell cycle.

  16. Human mesenchymal stem cells suppress the stretch-induced inflammatory miR-155 and cytokines in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Chun; Li, Yi-Shuan Julie; Zhou, Jing; Shih, Yu-Ru Vernon; Miller, Marina; Broide, David; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng; Chien, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Current research in pulmonary pathology has focused on inflammatory reactions initiated by immunological responses to allergens and irritants. In addition to these biochemical stimuli, physical forces also play an important role in regulating the structure, function, and metabolism of the lung. Hyperstretch of lung tissues can contribute to the inflammatory responses in asthma, but the mechanisms of mechanically induced inflammation in the lung remain unclear. Our results demonstrate that excessive stretch increased the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs), including IL-8. This increase of IL-8 secretion was due to an elevated microRNA-155 (miR-155) expression, which caused the suppression of Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) production and the subsequent activation of JNK signaling. In vivo studies in our asthmatic mouse model also showed such changes in miR-155, IL-8, and SHIP1 expressions that reflect inflammatory responses. Co-culture with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) reversed the stretch-induced hBEC inflammatory responses as a result of IL-10 secretion by hMSCs to down-regulate miR-155 expression in hBECs. In summary, we have demonstrated that mechanical stretch modulates the homeostasis of the hBEC secretome involving miR-155 and that hMSCs can be used as a potential therapeutic approach to reverse bronchial epithelial inflammation in asthma. PMID:23967196

  17. Comparisons of Differentiation Potential in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Wharton’s Jelly, Bone Marrow, and Pancreatic Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yi Kao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type 1 diabetes mellitus results from autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Insulin-producing cells (IPCs differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in human tissues decrease blood glucose levels and improve survival in diabetic rats. We compared the differential ability and the curative effect of IPCs from three types of human tissue to determine the ideal source of cell therapy for diabetes. Methods. We induced MSCs from Wharton’s jelly (WJ, bone marrow (BM, and surgically resected pancreatic tissue to differentiate into IPCs. The in vitro differential function of these IPCs was compared by insulin-to-DNA ratios and C-peptide levels after glucose challenge. In vivo curative effects of IPCs transplanted into diabetic rats were monitored by weekly blood glucose measurement. Results. WJ-MSCs showed better proliferation and differentiation potential than pancreatic MSCs and BM-MSCs. In vivo, WJ-IPCs significantly reduced blood glucose levels at first week after transplantation and maintained significant decrease till week 8. BM-IPCs reduced blood glucose levels at first week but gradually increased since week 3. In resected pancreas-IPCs group, blood glucose levels were significantly reduced till two weeks after transplantation and gradually increased since week 4. Conclusion. WJ-MSCs are the most promising stem cell source for β-cell regeneration in diabetes treatment.

  18. Human carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells promote ovarian cancer chemotherapy resistance via a BMP4/HH signaling loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Lan G.; Choi, Yun-Jung; McLean, Karen; Allen, Benjamin L.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is critical to cancer growth and therapy resistance. We previously characterized human ovarian carcinoma-associated mesenchymal stem cells (CA-MSCs). CA-MSCs are multi-potent cells that can differentiate into tumor microenvironment components including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and adipocytes. We previously reported CA-MSCs, compared to normal MSCs, express high levels of BMP proteins and promote tumor growth by increasing numbers of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). We demonstrate here that ovarian tumor cell-secreted Hedgehog (HH) induces CA-MSC BMP4 expression. CA-MSC-derived BMP4 reciprocally increases ovarian tumor cell HH expression indicating a positive feedback loop. Interruption of this loop with a HH pathway inhibitor or BMP4 blocking antibody decreases CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and tumor-derived HH preventing enrichment of CSCs and reversing chemotherapy resistance. The impact of HH inhibition was only seen in CA-MSC-containing tumors, indicating the importance of a humanized stroma. These results are reciprocal to findings in pancreatic and bladder cancer, suggesting HH signaling effects are tumor tissue specific warranting careful investigation in each tumor type. Collectively, we define a critical positive feedback loop between CA-MSC-derived BMP4 and ovarian tumor cell-secreted HH and present evidence for the further investigation of HH as a clinical target in ovarian cancer. PMID:26755648

  19. Human mesenchymal stem cells suppress the stretch-induced inflammatory miR-155 and cytokines in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Kuo

    Full Text Available Current research in pulmonary pathology has focused on inflammatory reactions initiated by immunological responses to allergens and irritants. In addition to these biochemical stimuli, physical forces also play an important role in regulating the structure, function, and metabolism of the lung. Hyperstretch of lung tissues can contribute to the inflammatory responses in asthma, but the mechanisms of mechanically induced inflammation in the lung remain unclear. Our results demonstrate that excessive stretch increased the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs, including IL-8. This increase of IL-8 secretion was due to an elevated microRNA-155 (miR-155 expression, which caused the suppression of Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1 production and the subsequent activation of JNK signaling. In vivo studies in our asthmatic mouse model also showed such changes in miR-155, IL-8, and SHIP1 expressions that reflect inflammatory responses. Co-culture with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs reversed the stretch-induced hBEC inflammatory responses as a result of IL-10 secretion by hMSCs to down-regulate miR-155 expression in hBECs. In summary, we have demonstrated that mechanical stretch modulates the homeostasis of the hBEC secretome involving miR-155 and that hMSCs can be used as a potential therapeutic approach to reverse bronchial epithelial inflammation in asthma.

  20. Decreased SIRT3 in aged human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells increases cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Shao, Yong; Ma, Chong-Yi; Chen, Wei; Sun, Lu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Dong-Yang; Fu, Bi-Cheng; Liu, Kai-Yu; Jia, Zhi-Bo; Xie, Bao-Dong; Jiang, Shu-Lin; Li, Ren-Ke; Tian, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized to mitochondria and linked to lifespan extension in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. As aged cells have less regenerative capacity and are more susceptible to oxidative stress, we investigated the effect of ageing on SIRT3 levels and its correlation with antioxidant enzyme activities. Here, we show that severe oxidative stress reduces SIRT3 levels in young human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Overexpression of SIRT3 improved hMSCs resistance to the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. By activating manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT), SIRT3 protects hMSCs from apoptosis under stress. SIRT3 expression, levels of MnSOD and CAT, as well as cell survival showed little difference in old versus young hMSCs under normal growth conditions, whereas older cells had a significantly reduced capacity to withstand oxidative stress compared to their younger counterparts. Expression of the short 28 kD SIRT3 isoform was higher, while the long 44 kD isoform expression was lower in young myocardial tissues compared with older ones. These results suggest that the active short isoform of SIRT3 protects hMSCs from oxidative injury by increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes. The expression of this short isoform decreases in cardiac tissue during ageing, leading to a reduced capacity for the heart to withstand oxidative stress. PMID:25210848

  1. Fibronectin-Alginate microcapsules improve cell viability and protein secretion of encapsulated Factor IX-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Continuous delivery of proteins by engineered cells encapsu-lated in biocompatible polymeric microcapsules is of considerable therapeutic potential. However, this technology has not lived up to expectations due to inadequate cell--matrix interactions and subsequent cell death. In this study we hypoth-esize that the presence of fibronectin in an alginate matrix may enhance the viability and functionality of encapsulated human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) expressing the human Factor IX (FIX) gene. MSCs were encapsulated in alginate-PLL microcapsules containing 10, 100, or 500 μg/ml fibronectin to ameliorate cell survival. MSCs in microcapsules with 100 and 500 μg/ml fibronectin demonstrated improved cell viability and proliferation and higher FIX secretion compared to MSCs in non-supplemented microcapsules. In contrast, 10 μg/ml fibronectin did not significantly affect the viability and protein secretion from the encapsulated cells. Differentiation studies demonstrated osteogenic (but not chondrogenic or adipogenic) differentiation capability and efficient FIX secretion of the enclosed MSCs in the fibronectin-alginate suspension culture. Thus, the use of recombinant MSCs encapsulated in fibronectin-alginate microcapsules in basal or osteogenic cultures may be of practical use in the treatment of hemophilia B. PMID:24564349

  2. Altered MicroRNA Expression Profile in Exosomes during Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shui-Jun; Zhao, Chen; Qiu, Bin-Song; Gu, Hai-Feng; Hong, Jian-Fei; Cao, Li; Chen, Yu; Xia, Bing; Bi, Qin; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The physiological role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in osteoblast differentiation remains elusive. Exosomal miRNAs isolated from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) culture were profiled using miRNA arrays containing probes for 894 human matured miRNAs. Seventy-nine miRNAs (∼8.84%) could be detected in exosomes isolated from BMSC culture supernatants when normalized to endogenous control genes RNU44. Among them, nine exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 4 miRNAs were under regulated significantly (Relative fold>2, p<0.05) when compared with the values at 0 day with maximum changes at 1 to 7 days. Five miRNAs (miR-199b, miR-218, miR-148a, miR-135b, and miR-221) were further validated and differentially expressed in the individual exosomal samples from hBMSCs cultured at different time points. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that RNA degradation, mRNA surveillance pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, RNA transport were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with differential exosomal miRNA patterns related to osteogenic differentiation. These data demonstrated exosomal miRNA is a regulator of osteoblast differentiation. PMID:25503309

  3. Altered microRNA expression profile in exosomes during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Feng Xu

    Full Text Available The physiological role of microRNAs (miRNAs in osteoblast differentiation remains elusive. Exosomal miRNAs isolated from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs culture were profiled using miRNA arrays containing probes for 894 human matured miRNAs. Seventy-nine miRNAs (∼8.84% could be detected in exosomes isolated from BMSC culture supernatants when normalized to endogenous control genes RNU44. Among them, nine exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 4 miRNAs were under regulated significantly (Relative fold>2, p<0.05 when compared with the values at 0 day with maximum changes at 1 to 7 days. Five miRNAs (miR-199b, miR-218, miR-148a, miR-135b, and miR-221 were further validated and differentially expressed in the individual exosomal samples from hBMSCs cultured at different time points. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that RNA degradation, mRNA surveillance pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, RNA transport were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with differential exosomal miRNA patterns related to osteogenic differentiation. These data demonstrated exosomal miRNA is a regulator of osteoblast differentiation.

  4. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  5. Parameters in three-dimensional osteospheroids of telomerized human mesenchymal (stromal) stem cells grown on osteoconductive scaffolds that predict in vivo bone-forming potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Hansen, Pernille Lund; Larsen, Kenneth H;

    2010-01-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in monolayer culture is artefactual, lacking an organized bone-like matrix. We present a highly reproducible microwell protocol generating three-dimensional ex vivo multicellular aggregates of telomerized hMSC (hMSC-telomerase re......Osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in monolayer culture is artefactual, lacking an organized bone-like matrix. We present a highly reproducible microwell protocol generating three-dimensional ex vivo multicellular aggregates of telomerized hMSC (h...... many characteristics of in vivo bone formation, providing a highly reproducible and resourceful platform for improved in vitro modeling of osteogenesis and refinement of bone tissue engineering....

  6. Differential expression of CCN-family members in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrich Christian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human cysteine rich protein 61 (CYR61, CCN1 as well as the other members of the CCN family of genes play important roles in cellular processes such as proliferation, adhesion, migration and survival. These cellular events are of special importance within the complex cellular interactions ongoing in bone remodeling. Previously, we analyzed the role of CYR61/CCN1 as an extracellular signaling molecule in human osteoblasts. Since mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow are important progenitors for various differentiation pathways in bone and possess increasing potential for regenerative medicine, here we aimed to analyze the expression of CCN family members in bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells and along the osteogenic, the adipogenic and the chondrogenic differentiation. Results Primary cultures of human mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from the femoral head of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts was done in monolayer culture, differentiation into chondrocytes was induced in high density cell pellet cultures. For either pathway, established differentiation markers and CCN-members were analyzed at the mRNA level by RT-PCR and the CYR61/CCN1 protein was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. RT-PCR and histochemical analysis revealed the appropriate phenotype of differentiated cells (Alizarin-red S, Oil Red O, Alcian blue, alkaline phosphatase; osteocalcin, collagen types I, II, IX, X, cbfa1, PPARγ, aggrecan. Mesenchymal stem cells expressed CYR61/CCN1, CTGF/CCN2, CTGF-L/WISP2/CCN5 and WISP3/CCN6. The CYR61/CCN1 expression decreased markedly during osteogenic differentiation, adipogenic differentiation and chondrogenic differentiation. These results were confirmed by immuncytochemical analyses. WISP2/CCN5 RNA expression declined during adipogenic differentiation and WISP3/CCN6 RNA expression was markedly reduced in chondrogenic differentiation. Conclusion The

  7. Protocols for in vitro Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Osteogenic, Chondrogenic and Adipogenic Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Musarò, Paola; Turco, Valentina; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) possess high plasticity and the potential to differentiate into several different cell types; this characteristic has implications for cell therapy and reparative biotechnologies. MSC have been originally isolated from the bone marrow (BM-MSC), but they have been found also in other tissues such as adipose tissue, cord blood, synovium, skeletal muscle, and lung. MSC are able to differentiate in vitro and in vivo into several cell types such as bone, osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal myocytes, just to name a few.During the last two decades, an increasing number of studies have proven the therapeutic potential of MSC for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord and brain injuries, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and diseases of the skeleton. Their immuno-privileged profile allows both autologous and allogeneic use. For all these reasons, the scientific appeal of MSC is constantly on the rise.The identity of MSC is currently based on three main criteria: plastic-adherence capacity, defined epitope profile, and capacity to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Here, we describe standard protocols for the differentiation of BM-MSC into the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. PMID:27236670

  8. A Clinical Indications Prediction Scale Based on TWIST1 for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaraju V. Boregowda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their stem/progenitor properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs also exhibit potent effector (angiogenic, antiinflammatory, immuno-modulatory functions that are largely paracrine in nature. It is widely believed that effector functions underlie most of the therapeutic potential of MSCs and are independent of their stem/progenitor properties. Here we demonstrate that stem/progenitor and effector functions are coordinately regulated at the cellular level by the transcription factor Twist1 and specified within populations according to a hierarchical model. We further show that manipulation of Twist1 levels by genetic approaches or by exposure to widely used culture supplements including fibroblast growth factor 2 (Ffg2 and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma alters MSC efficacy in cell-based and in vivo assays in a predictable manner. Thus, by mechanistically linking stem/progenitor and effector functions our studies provide a unifying framework in the form of an MSC hierarchy that models the functional complexity of populations. Using this framework, we developed a CLinical Indications Prediction (CLIP scale that predicts how donor-to-donor heterogeneity and culture conditions impact the therapeutic efficacy of MSC populations for different disease indications.

  9. A Clinical Indications Prediction Scale Based on TWIST1 for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boregowda, Siddaraju V; Krishnappa, Veena; Haga, Christopher L; Ortiz, Luis A; Phinney, Donald G

    2016-02-01

    In addition to their stem/progenitor properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) also exhibit potent effector (angiogenic, antiinflammatory, immuno-modulatory) functions that are largely paracrine in nature. It is widely believed that effector functions underlie most of the therapeutic potential of MSCs and are independent of their stem/progenitor properties. Here we demonstrate that stem/progenitor and effector functions are coordinately regulated at the cellular level by the transcription factor Twist1 and specified within populations according to a hierarchical model. We further show that manipulation of Twist1 levels by genetic approaches or by exposure to widely used culture supplements including fibroblast growth factor 2 (Ffg2) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) alters MSC efficacy in cell-based and in vivo assays in a predictable manner. Thus, by mechanistically linking stem/progenitor and effector functions our studies provide a unifying framework in the form of an MSC hierarchy that models the functional complexity of populations. Using this framework, we developed a CLinical Indications Prediction (CLIP) scale that predicts how donor-to-donor heterogeneity and culture conditions impact the therapeutic efficacy of MSC populations for different disease i