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Sample records for adult hematopoietic stem

  1. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  2. Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in Adults

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    Salem Alshemmari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Haploidentical hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is an alternative transplant strategy for patients without an HLA-matched donor. Still, only half of patients who might benefit from transplantation are able to find an HLA-matched related or unrelated donor. Haploidentical donor is readily available for many patients in need of immediate stem-cell transplantation. Historical experience with haploidentical stem-cell transplantation has been characterised by a high rejection rate, graft-versus-host disease, and transplant-related mortality. Important advances have been made in this field during the last 20 years. Many drawbacks of haploidentical transplants such as graft failure and significant GVHD have been overcome due to the development of new extensive T cell depletion methods with mega dose stem-cell administration. However, prolonged immune deficiency and an increased relapse rate remain unresolved problems of T cell depletion. New approaches such as partial ex vivo or in vivo alloreactive T cell depletion and posttransplant cell therapy will allow to improve immune reconstitution in haploidentical transplants. Results of unmanipulated stem-cell transplantation with using ATG and combined immunosuppression in mismatched/haploidentical transplant setting are promising. This paper focuses on recent advances in haploidentical hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

  3. The transcriptional coactivator Cbp regulates self-renewal and differentiation in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, W.I.; Hannah, R.L.; Dawson, M.A.; Pridans, C.; Foster, D.; Joshi, A.; Gottgens, B.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Huntly, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Cbp plays an important role in a wide range of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although studies have shown its requirement for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, its role in adult HSC maintenance, as well as the cel

  4. Human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic cells maintain core epigenetic machinery of the polycomb group/Trithorax Group complexes distinctly from functional adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerch, Angelique; Lee, Jung Bok; Graham, Monica; Guezguez, Borhane; Bhatia, Mickie

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have a number of potential utilities, including the modeling of hematological disorders in vitro, whereas the use for cell replacement therapies has proved to be a loftier goal. This is due to the failure of differentiated hematopoietic cells, derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), to functionally recapitulate the in vivo properties of bona fide adult hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). To better understand the limitations of differentiation programming at the molecular level, we have utilized differential gene expression analysis of highly purified cells that are enriched for hematopoietic repopulating activity across embryonic, fetal, and adult human samples, including in vivo explants of human HSPCs 8-weeks post-transplantation. We reveal that hESC-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells (eHPCs) fail to express critical transcription factors which are known to govern self-renewal and myeloid/lymphoid development and instead retain the expression of Polycomb Group (PcG) and Trithorax Group (TrxG) factors which are more prevalent in embryonic cell types that include EZH1 and ASH1L, respectively. These molecular profiles indicate that the differential expression of the core epigenetic machinery comprising PcGs/TrxGs in eHPCs may serve as previously unexplored molecular targets that direct hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs toward functional HSPCs in humans.

  5. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Sickle Cell Disease: Problems and Solutions

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    Hakan Özdoğu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease-related organ injuries cannot be prevented despite hydroxyurea use, infection prophylaxis, and supportive therapies. As a consequence, disease-related mortality reaches 14% in adolescents and young adults. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a unique curative therapeutic approach for sickle cell disease. Myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for children with sickle cell disease. Current data indicate that long-term disease-free survival is about 90% and overall survival about 95% after transplantation. However, it is toxic in adults due to organ injuries. In addition, this curative treatment approach has several limitations, such as difficulties to find donors, transplant-related mortality, graft loss, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, and infertility. Engraftment effectivity and toxicity for transplantations performed with nonmyeloablative reduced-intensity regimens in adults are being investigated in phase 1/2 trials at many centers. Preliminary data indicate that GVHD could be prevented with transplantations performed using reduced-intensity regimens. It is necessary to develop novel regimens to prevent graft loss and reduce the risk of GVHD.

  6. Auto-mobilized adult hematopoietic stem cells advance neovasculature in diabetic retinopathy of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Bei; LI Xiao-xin; SHEN Li; ZHAO Min; YU Wen-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be used to deliver functionally active angiostatic molecules to the retinal vasculature by targeting active astrocytes and may be useful in targeting pre-angiogenic retinal lesions. We sought to determine whether HSC mobilization can ameliorate early diabetic retinopathy in mice.Methods Mice were devided into four groups: normal mice control group, normal mice HSC-mobilized group, diabetic mice control group and diabetic mice HSC mobilized group. Murine stem cell growth factor (murine SCF) and recombined human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-csf) were administered to the mice with diabetes and without diabetes for continuous 5 days to induce autologous HSCs mobilization, and subcutaneous injection of physiological saline was used as control. Immunohistochemical double staining was conducted with anti-mouse rat CD31 monoclonal antibody and anti-BrdU rat antibody.Results Marked HSCs clearly increased after SCF plus G-csf-mobilization. Non-mobilized diabetic mice showed more HSCs than normal mice (P=0.032), and peripheral blood significantly increased in both diabetic and normal mice (P=0.000).Diabetic mice showed more CD31 positive capillary vessels (P=0.000) and accelerated endothelial cell regeneration. Only diabetic HSC-mobilized mice expressed both BrdU and CD31 antigens in the endothelial cells of new capillaries.Conclusion Auto-mobilized adult hematopoietic stem cells advance neovasculature in diabetic retinopathy of mice.

  7. The transcriptional coactivator Cbp regulates self-renewal and differentiation in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai-In; Hannah, Rebecca L; Dawson, Mark A; Pridans, Clare; Foster, Donna; Joshi, Anagha; Göttgens, Berthold; Van Deursen, Jan M; Huntly, Brian J P

    2011-12-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Cbp plays an important role in a wide range of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although studies have shown its requirement for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, its role in adult HSC maintenance, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Cbp function, is not clear. Here, we demonstrate a gradual loss of phenotypic HSCs and differentiation defects following conditional ablation of Cbp during adult homeostasis. In addition, Cbp-deficient HSCs reconstituted hematopoiesis with lower efficiency than their wild-type counterparts, and this response was readily exhausted under replicative stress. This phenotype relates to an alteration in cellular fate decisions for HSCs, with Cbp loss leading to an increase in differentiation, quiescence, and apoptosis. Genome-wide analyses of Cbp occupancy and differential gene expression upon Cbp deletion identified HSC-specific genes regulated by Cbp, providing a molecular basis for the phenotype. Finally, Cbp binding significantly overlapped at genes combinatorially bound by 7 major hematopoietic transcriptional regulators, linking Cbp to a critical HSC transcriptional regulatory network. Our data demonstrate that Cbp plays a role in adult HSC homeostasis by maintaining the balance between different HSC fate decisions, and our findings identify a putative HSC-specific transcriptional network coordinated by Cbp.

  8. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) marks hematopoietic stem cells in human embryonic, fetal, and adult hematopoietic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokubaitis, Vanta J.; Sinka, Lidia; Driessen, Rebecca; Whitty, Genevieve; Haylock, David N.; Bertoncello, Ivan; Smith, Ian; Peault, Bruno; Tavian, Manuela; Simmons, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that mAb BB9 reacts with a subset of CD34(+) human BM cells with hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) characteristics. Here we map B89 expression throughout hernatopoietic development and show that the earliest definitive HSCs that arise at the ventral wall of the aorta and surrou

  9. Fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells give rise to distinct T cell lineages in humans.

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    Mold, Jeff E; Venkatasubrahmanyam, Shivkumar; Burt, Trevor D; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Rivera, Jose M; Galkina, Sofiya A; Weinberg, Kenneth; Stoddart, Cheryl A; McCune, Joseph M

    2010-12-17

    Although the mammalian immune system is generally thought to develop in a linear fashion, findings in avian and murine species argue instead for the developmentally ordered appearance (or "layering") of distinct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that give rise to distinct lymphocyte lineages at different stages of development. Here we provide evidence of an analogous layered immune system in humans. Our results suggest that fetal and adult T cells are distinct populations that arise from different populations of HSCs that are present at different stages of development. We also provide evidence that the fetal T cell lineage is biased toward immune tolerance. These observations offer a mechanistic explanation for the tolerogenic properties of the developing fetus and for variable degrees of immune responsiveness at birth.

  10. Hematopoietic stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

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    Gazit, Roi; Weissman, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2008-10-01

    The etiology of the age-associated pathophysiological changes of the hematopoietic system including the onset of anemia, diminished adaptive immune competence, and myelogenous disease development are underwritten by the loss of normal homeostatic control. As tissue and organ homeostasis in adults is primarily mediated by the activity of stem and progenitor cells, it has been suggested that the imbalances accompanying aging of the hematopoietic system may stem from alterations in the prevalence and/or functional capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors. In this review, we examine evidence implicating a role for stem cells in the aging of the hematopoietic system, and focus on the mechanisms suggested to contribute to stem cell aging.

  11. Fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells require beta1 integrin function for colonizing fetal liver, spleen, and bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potocnik, A J; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    Homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into hematopoietic organs is a prerequisite for the establishment of hematopoiesis during embryogenesis and after bone marrow transplantation. We show that beta1 integrin-deficient HSCs from the para-aortic splanchnopleura and the fetal blood had...... hematolymphoid differentiation potential in vitro and in fetal organ cultures but were unable to seed fetal and adult hematopoietic tissues. Adult beta1 integrin null HSCs isolated from mice carrying loxP-tagged beta1 integrin alleles and ablated for beta1 integrin expression by retroviral cre transduction...... failed to engraft irradiated recipient mice. Moreover, absence of beta1 integrin resulted in sequestration of HSCs in the circulation and their reduced adhesion to endothelioma cells. These findings define beta1 integrin as an essential adhesion receptor for the homing of HSCs....

  12. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

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    Michelle Erin Miller

    Full Text Available Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERTNat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation.

  13. T-cell suicide gene therapy prompts thymic renewal in adults after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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    Vago, Luca; Oliveira, Giacomo; Bondanza, Attilio; Noviello, Maddalena; Soldati, Corrado; Ghio, Domenico; Brigida, Immacolata; Greco, Raffaella; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Peccatori, Jacopo; Fracchia, Sergio; Del Fiacco, Matteo; Traversari, Catia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2012-08-30

    The genetic modification of T cells with a suicide gene grants a mechanism of control of adverse reactions, allowing safe infusion after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the TK007 clinical trial, 22 adults with hematologic malignancies experienced a rapid and sustained immune recovery after T cell-depleted HSCT and serial infusions of purified donor T cells expressing the HSV thymidine kinase suicide gene (TK+ cells). After a first wave of circulating TK+ cells, the majority of T cells supporting long-term immune reconstitution did not carry the suicide gene and displayed high numbers of naive lymphocytes, suggesting the thymus-dependent development of T cells, occurring only upon TK+ -cell engraftment. Accordingly, after the infusions, we documented an increase in circulating TCR excision circles and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants and a substantial expansion of the active thymic tissue as shown by chest tomography scans. Interestingly, a peak in the serum level of IL-7 was observed after each infusion of TK+ cells, anticipating the appearance of newly generated T cells. The results of the present study show that the infusion of genetically modified donor T cells after HSCT can drive the recovery of thymic activity in adults, leading to immune reconstitution.

  14. Analyzing gene function in adult long-term hematopoietic stem cells using the interferon inducible Mx1-Cre mouse system.

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    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Du, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell lineages. Understanding the genetic networks that regulate LT-HSC function in the adult bone marrow requires inducible gene targeting and bone marrow transplantations. In this chapter we describe the use of the inducible Mx1-Cre mouse model to delete genes in LT-HSCs and methodologies for examining the function of LT-HSCs following deletion.

  15. Ethical issues of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult thalassemia patients

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    Piras Eugenia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta thalassemia major is a severe inherited form of hemolytic anemia that results from ineffective erythropoiesis. Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the only potentially curative therapy. Unfortunately, the subgroup of adult thalassemia patients with hepatomegaly, portal fibrosis and a history of irregular iron chelation have an elevated risk for transplantation-related mortality that is currently estimated to be about 29 percent. Discussion Thalassemia patients may be faced with a difficult choice: they can either continue conventional transfusion and iron chelation therapy or accept the high mortality risk of HSCT in the hope of obtaining complete recovery. Throughout the decision making process, every effort should be made to sustain and enhance autonomous choice. The concept of conscious consent becomes particularly important. The patient must be made fully aware of the favourable and adverse outcomes of HSCT. Although it is the physician's duty to illustrate the possibility of completely restoring health, considerable emphasis should be put on the adverse effects of the procedure. The physician also needs to decide whether the patient is eligible for HSCT according to the "rule of descending order". The patient must be given full details on self-care and fundamental lifestyle changes and be fully aware that he/she will be partly responsible for the outcome. Summary Only if all the aforesaid conditions are satisfied can it be considered reasonable to propose unrelated HSCT as a potential cure for high risk thalassemia patients.

  16. Comparison of hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

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    Liu, Meng; Yang, Shao-Guang; Xing, Wen; Lu, Shi-Hong; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Hong-Ying; Chi, Ying; Ma, Feng-Xia; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) shift from fetal liver and spleen to bone marrow at neonatal stages and this movement may be due to inductive signals from different microenvironments. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are the precursors of stromal cells in bone marrow microenvironments such as osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Some researchers speculated that fetal bone marrow before birth might be not perfectly suit HSC growth. However, it is still lack of direct evidence to prove this hypothesis. This study was aimed to compare the hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow MSC in vitro. Adult bone marrow MSC (ABM-MSC) were isolated from three healthy donors and fetal bone marrow MSC (FBM-MSC) were isolated from three fetuses between gestations of 19 to 20 weeks. After irradiation, MSC were co-cultured with CD34(+) cells isolated from umbilical cord blood in long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. The colony number of colony forming cells (CFC) was counted and the phenotypic changes of co-cultured CD34(+) cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine expressions in both kinds of MSC were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that ABM-MSC had a stronger hematopoietic supportive capacity than FBM-MSC. Both of them enhanced the differentiation of CD34(+) cells into myeloid lineages. Cytokines were expressed differently in ABM-MSC and FBM-MSC. It is concluded that ABM-MSC possess more potential application in some treatments than FBM-MSC, especially in hematopoietic reconstitution.

  17. Genomic editing of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells using zinc finger nucleases.

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    Li, Lijing; Krymskaya, Ludmila; Wang, Jianbin; Henley, Jill; Rao, Anitha; Cao, Lan-Feng; Tran, Chy-Anh; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Gardner, Agnes; Gonzalez, Nancy; Kim, Kenneth; Liu, Pei-Qi; Hofer, Ursula; Lopez, Evan; Gregory, Philip D; Liu, Qing; Holmes, Michael C; Cannon, Paula M; Zaia, John A; DiGiusto, David L

    2013-06-01

    The HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 is a validated target for HIV/AIDS therapy. The apparent elimination of HIV-1 in a patient treated with an allogeneic stem cell transplant homozygous for a naturally occurring CCR5 deletion mutation (CCR5(Δ32/Δ32)) supports the concept that a single dose of HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells can provide disease protection. Given the low frequency of naturally occurring CCR5(Δ32/Δ32) donors, we reasoned that engineered autologous CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) could be used for AIDS therapy. We evaluated disruption of CCR5 gene expression in HSPCs isolated from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-mobilized adult blood using a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding a CCR5-specific pair of zinc finger nucleases (CCR5-ZFN). Our results demonstrate that CCR5-ZFN RNA and protein expression from the adenoviral vector is enhanced by pretreatment of HSPC with protein kinase C (PKC) activators resulting in >25% CCR5 gene disruption and that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway is responsible for this activity. Importantly, using an optimized dose of PKC activator and adenoviral vector we could generate CCR5-modified HSPCs which engraft in a humanized mouse model (albeit at a reduced level) and support multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data establish the basis for improved approaches exploiting adenoviral vector delivery in the modification of HSPCs.

  18. Adult hematopoietic stem cells lacking Hif-1α self-renew normally.

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    Vukovic, Milica; Sepulveda, Catarina; Subramani, Chithra; Guitart, Amélie V; Mohr, Jasmine; Allen, Lewis; Panagopoulou, Theano I; Paris, Jasmin; Lawson, Hannah; Villacreces, Arnaud; Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro; Gezer, Deniz; Holyoake, Tessa L; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Kranc, Kamil R

    2016-06-09

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool is maintained under hypoxic conditions within the bone marrow microenvironment. Cellular responses to hypoxia are largely mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factors, Hif-1 and Hif-2. The oxygen-regulated α subunits of Hif-1 and Hif-2 (namely, Hif-1α and Hif-2α) form dimers with their stably expressed β subunits and control the transcription of downstream hypoxia-responsive genes to facilitate adaptation to low oxygen tension. An initial study concluded that Hif-1α is essential for HSC maintenance, whereby Hif-1α-deficient HSCs lost their ability to self-renew in serial transplantation assays. In another study, we demonstrated that Hif-2α is dispensable for cell-autonomous HSC maintenance, both under steady-state conditions and following transplantation. Given these unexpected findings, we set out to revisit the role of Hif-1α in cell-autonomous HSC functions. Here we demonstrate that inducible acute deletion of Hif-1α has no impact on HSC survival. Notably, unstressed HSCs lacking Hif-1α efficiently self-renew and sustain long-term multilineage hematopoiesis upon serial transplantation. Finally, Hif-1α-deficient HSCs recover normally after hematopoietic injury induced by serial administration of 5-fluorouracil. We therefore conclude that despite the hypoxic nature of the bone marrow microenvironment, Hif-1α is dispensable for cell-autonomous HSC maintenance.

  19. Hematopoietic progenitor migration to the adult thymus

    OpenAIRE

    Zlotoff, Daniel A.; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2011-01-01

    While most hematopoietic lineages develop in the bone marrow (BM), T cells uniquely complete their development in the specialized environment of the thymus. Hematopoietic stem cells with long-term self-renewal capacity are not present in the thymus. As a result, continuous T cell development requires that BM-derived progenitors be imported into the thymus throughout adult life. The process of thymic homing begins with the mobilization of progenitors out of the bone marrow, continues with thei...

  20. Genomic Editing of the HIV-1 Coreceptor CCR5 in Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 is a validated target for HIV/AIDS therapy. The apparent elimination of HIV-1 in a patient treated with an allogeneic stem cell transplant homozygous for a naturally occurring CCR5 deletion mutation (CCR5Δ32/Δ32) supports the concept that a single dose of HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells can provide disease protection. Given the low frequency of naturally occurring CCR5Δ32/Δ32 donors, we reasoned that engineered autologous CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor ce...

  1. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring trisomy 8.

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    Konuma, Takaaki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Takuya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kanamori, Heiwa; Eto, Tetsuya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Kohno, Akio; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is one of the most common cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in adult patients with AML harboring +8 remains unclear. To evaluate, the outcome and prognostic factors in patients with AML harboring +8 as the only chromosomal abnormality or in association with other abnormalities, we retrospectively analyzed the Japanese registration data of 631 adult patients with AML harboring +8 treated with allogeneic HSCT between 1990 and 2013. In total, 388 (61%) patients were not in remission at the time of HSCT. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, the probability of overall survival and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years were 40 and 34%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, two or more additional cytogenetic abnormalities and not being in remission at the time of HSCT were significantly associated with a higher overall mortality and relapse. Nevertheless, no significant impact on the outcome was observed in cases with one cytogenetic abnormality in addition to +8. Although more than 60% of the patients received HSCT when not in remission, allogeneic HSCT offered a curative option for adult patients with AML harboring +8.

  2. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

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    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell origin of connective tissues.

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    Ogawa, Makio; Larue, Amanda C; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2010-07-01

    Connective tissue consists of "connective tissue proper," which is further divided into loose and dense (fibrous) connective tissues and "specialized connective tissues." Specialized connective tissues consist of blood, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. In both loose and dense connective tissues, the principal cellular element is fibroblasts. It has been generally believed that all cellular elements of connective tissue, including fibroblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and bone cells, are generated solely by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, a number of studies, including those from our laboratory based on transplantation of single hematopoietic stem cells, strongly suggested a hematopoietic stem cell origin of these adult mesenchymal tissues. This review summarizes the experimental evidence for this new paradigm and discusses its translational implications.

  4. The Neuropsychological Course of Acute Delirium in Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients

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    Beglinger, Leigh J.; Mills, James A.; Vik, Stacie M.; Duff, Kevin; Denburg, Natalie L.; Weckmann, Michelle T.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Gingrich, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Although delirium is a common medical comorbidity with altered cognition as its defining feature, few publications have addressed the neuropsychological prodrome, profile, and recovery of patients tested during delirium. We characterize neuropsychological performance in 54 hemapoietic stem cell/bone marrow transplantation (BMT) patients shortly before, during, and after delirium and in BMT patients without delirium and 10 healthy adults. Patients were assessed prospectively before and after transplantation using a brief battery. BMT patients with delirium performed more poorly than comparisons and those without delirium on cross-sectional and trend analyses. Deficits were in expected areas of attention and memory, but also in psychomotor speed and learning. The patients with delirium did not return to normative “average” on any test during observation. Most tests showed a mild decline in the visit before delirium, a sharp decline with delirium onset, and variable performance in the following days. This study adds to the few investigations of neuropsychological performance surrounding delirium and provides targets for monitoring and early detection; Trails A and B, RBANS Coding, and List Recall may be useful for delirium assessment. PMID:21183605

  5. Male predominance among Japanese adult patients with late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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    Asano, Y; Kanda, Y; Ogawa, N; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Nakagawa, M; Kawazu, M; Goyama, S; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Imai, Y; Hangaishi, A; Kurokawa, M; Tsujino, S; Ogawa, S; Aoki, K; Chiba, S; Motokura, T; Hirai, H

    2003-12-01

    Late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis (LHC) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is mainly caused by viral infections. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 141 Japanese adult patients who underwent a first allogeneic HSCT from 1995 to 2002. In all, 19 patients developed LHC a median of 51 days after HSCT. Adenovirus (AdV) was detected in the urine of 10 LHC patients, of whom eight had AdV type 11. Five of the six available serum samples from these patients were also positive for AdV type 11, but the detection of AdV in serum was not associated with a worse outcome. Male sex and the development of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease were identified as independent significant risk factors for LHC. Male predominance was detected in LHC after HSCT, as has been previously shown in children with AdV-induced acute HC. The detection of AdV DNA in serum did not predict a poor outcome.

  6. Comparison of toxicity of benzene metabolite hydroquinone in hematopoietic stem cells derived from murine embryonic yolk sac and adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available Benzene is an occupational toxicant and an environmental pollutant that potentially causes hematotoxicity and leukemia in exposed populations. Epidemiological studies suggest an association between an increased incidence of childhood leukemia and benzene exposure during the early stages of pregnancy. However, experimental evidence supporting the association is lacking at the present time. It is believed that benzene and its metabolites target hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs to cause toxicity and cancer in the hematopoietic system. In the current study, we compared the effects of hydroquinone (HQ, a major metabolite of benzene in humans and animals, on mouse embryonic yolk sac hematopoietic stem cells (YS-HSCs and adult bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (BM-HSCs. YS-HSCs and BM-HSCs were isolated and enriched, and were exposed to HQ at increasing concentrations. HQ reduced the proliferation and the differentiation and colony formation, but increased the apoptosis of both YS-HSCs and BM-HSCs. However, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of HQ were more apparent and reduction of colony formation by HQ was more severe in YS-HSCs than in BM-HSCs. Differences in gene expression profiles were observed in HQ-treated YS-HSCs and BM-HSCs. Cyp4f18 was induced by HQ both in YS-HSCs and BM-HSCs, whereas DNA-PKcs was induced in BM-HSCs only. The results revealed differential effects of benzene metabolites on embryonic and adult HSCs. The study established an experimental system for comparison of the hematopoietic toxicity and leukemogenicity of benzene and metabolites during mouse embryonic development and adulthood.

  7. Engraftment and lineage potential of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised following short-term culture in the presence of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Angel; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Tran, Chy-Anh; Vu, Hieu; Epps, Elizabeth W; Chung, Janet; Gonzalez, Nancy; Blanchard, Suzette; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for HIV/AIDS is a promising alternative to lifelong antiretroviral therapy. One of the limitations of this approach is the number and quality of stem cells available for transplant following in vitro manipulations associated with stem cell isolation and genetic modification. The development of methods to increase the number of autologous, gene-modified stem cells available for transplantation would overcome this barrier. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) from adult growth factor-mobilized peripheral blood were cultured in the presence of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist (AhRA) previously shown to expand HSPC from umbilical cord blood. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of the hematopoietic potential of minimally cultured (MC-HSPC) or expanded HSPC (Exp-HSPC) was performed using an immunodeficient mouse model of transplantation. Our results demonstrate robust, multilineage engraftment of both MC-HSPC and Exp-HSPC although estimates of expansion based on stem cell phenotype were not supported by a corresponding increase in in vivo engrafting units. Bone marrow of animals transplanted with either MC-HSPC or Exp-HSPC contained secondary engrafting cells verifying the presence of primitive stem cells in both populations. However, the frequency of in vivo engrafting units among the more primitive CD34+/CD90+ HSPC population was significantly lower in Exp-HSPC compared with MC-HSPC. Exp-HSPC also produced fewer lymphoid progeny and more myeloid progeny than MC-HSPC. These results reveal that in vitro culture of adult HSPC in AhRA maintains but does not increase the number of in vivo engrafting cells and that HSPC expanded in vitro contain defects in lymphopoiesis as assessed in this model system. Further investigation is required before implementation of this approach in the clinical setting.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  9. Stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Isabel; Maloney, William J; Weissmann, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2010-08-01

    Advancing age is accompanied by a number of clinically significant conditions arising in the hematopoietic system that include: diminution and decreased competence of the adaptive immune system, elevated incidence of certain autoimmune diseases, increased hematological malignancies, and elevated incidence of age-associated anemia. As with most tissues, the aged hematopoietic system also exhibits a reduced capacity to regenerate and return to normal homeostasis after injury or stress. Evidence suggests age-dependent functional alterations within the hematopoietic stem cell compartment significantly contribute to many of these pathophysiologies. Recent developments have shed light on how aging of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment contributes to hematopoietic decline through diverse mechanisms.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  11. PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Jarque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However, they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients.

  12. Is there any reason to prefer cord blood instead of adult donors for hematopoietic stem cell transplants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral eBeksac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As cord blood (CB enables rapid access and tolerance to HLA mismatches, number of unrelated cord blood transplants have reached 30 000. Such transplant activity has been the result of international accreditation programs maintaining highly qualified CBUs reaching more than 600 000 CBUs stored worldwide. Efforts to increase stem cell content or engraftment rate of the graft by ex vivo expansion, modulation by molecules such as fucose, Prostaglandin E2 derivative, complement, CD26 inhibitors or CXCR4/CXCL12 axis have been able to accelerate engraftment speed and rate. Furthermore introduction of reduced intensity conditioning protocols, better HLA matching and recognition of the importance of HLA-C have improved CBT success by decreasing Transplant Related Mortality (TRM. Cord blood progenitor/stem cell content has been compared with adult stem cells revealing higher long-term repopulating capacity compared to BM-MSC and less oncogenic potential than Induced Progenitor Stem Cells. This chapter summarizes the advantage and disadvantages of CB compared to adult stem cells within the context of stem cell biology and transplantation.

  13. Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Transcriptional Regulator FUBP1 Is Essential for Fetal and Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Rabenhorst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs to self-renew is a prerequisite for the establishment of definitive hematopoiesis and life-long blood regeneration. Here, we report the single-stranded DNA-binding transcriptional regulator far upstream element (FUSE-binding protein 1 (FUBP1 as an essential factor of HSC self-renewal. Functional inactivation of FUBP1 in two different mouse models resulted in embryonic lethal anemia at around E15.5 caused by severely diminished HSCs. Fetal and adult HSCs lacking FUBP1 revealed an HSC-intrinsic defect in their maintenance, expansion, and long-term blood reconstitution, but could differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages. FUBP1-deficient adult HSCs exhibit significant transcriptional changes, including upregulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21 and the pro-apoptotic Noxa molecule. These changes caused an increase in generation time and death of HSCs as determined by video-microscopy-based tracking. Our data establish FUBP1 and its recognition of single-stranded genomic DNA as an important element in the transcriptional regulation of HSC self-renewal.

  14. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... in regulating stem cell renewal in the microenvironment, and how these molecules can be exploited in ex vivo stem cell culture, are reviewed. The importance of identification of stem cells using functional as well as phenotypic markers is discussed. The novel field of nanotechnology is then discussed...... in the context of stem cell tracking in vivo. This review concludes with a section on the unexpected potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells to contribute to the repair of damaged tissues. The contribution of cell fusion to explain the latter phenomenon is discussed. SUMMARY: Because of exciting discoveries...

  15. Autonomous behavior of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Akkerman, [No Value; Weersing, E; Ausema, A; Dontje, B; Van Zant, G; de Haan, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Mechanisms that affect the function of primitive hematopoietic stem cells with long-term proliferative potential remain largely unknown. Here we assessed whether properties of stem cells are cell-extrinsically or cell-autonomously regulated. Materials and Methods. We developed a model in

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Expansionin Rotating Wall Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionClinical trials have demonstrated that ex vivo expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors offer great promise in reconstituting in vivo hematopoiesis in patients who have undergone intensive chemotherapy. It is therefore necessary to develop a clinical-scale culture system to provide the expanded HSCs and progenitors. Static culture systems such as T-flasks and gas-permeable blood bags are the most widely used culture devices for expanding hematopoietic cells. But they reveal sev...

  17. Advance in hematopoietic stem cells transplantation for leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ During the past 50 years, intensive studies into the characteristics of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation immunology and the emergence of new immunosuppressant and anti-infective drugs have significantly improved the clinical result of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  18. Sustained PU.1 levels balance cell-cycle regulators to prevent exhaustion of adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staber, Philipp B; Zhang, Pu; Ye, Min; Welner, Robert S; Nombela-Arrieta, César; Bach, Christian; Kerenyi, Marc; Bartholdy, Boris A; Zhang, Hong; Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Lee, Sanghoon; Yang, Henry; Ng, Felicia; Zhang, Junyan; Leddin, Mathias; Silberstein, Leslie E; Hoefler, Gerald; Orkin, Stuart H; Göttgens, Berthold; Rosenbauer, Frank; Huang, Gang; Tenen, Daniel G

    2013-03-07

    To provide a lifelong supply of blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) need to carefully balance both self-renewing cell divisions and quiescence. Although several regulators that control this mechanism have been identified, we demonstrate that the transcription factor PU.1 acts upstream of these regulators. So far, attempts to uncover PU.1's role in HSC biology have failed because of the technical limitations of complete loss-of-function models. With the use of hypomorphic mice with decreased PU.1 levels specifically in phenotypic HSCs, we found reduced HSC long-term repopulation potential that could be rescued completely by restoring PU.1 levels. PU.1 prevented excessive HSC division and exhaustion by controlling the transcription of multiple cell-cycle regulators. Levels of PU.1 were sustained through autoregulatory PU.1 binding to an upstream enhancer that formed an active looped chromosome architecture in HSCs. These results establish that PU.1 mediates chromosome looping and functions as a master regulator of HSC proliferation.

  19. Hematopoietic development from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerke, Claudia; Grauer, Matthias; Niebuhr, Nina I; Riedt, Tamara; Kanz, Lothar; Park, In-Hyun; Daley, George Q

    2009-09-01

    A decade of research on human embryonic stem cells (ESC) has paved the way for the discovery of alternative approaches to generating pluripotent stem cells. Combinatorial overexpression of a limited number of proteins linked to pluripotency in ESC was recently found to reprogram differentiated somatic cells back to a pluripotent state, enabling the derivation of isogenic (patient-specific) pluripotent stem cell lines. Current research is focusing on improving reprogramming protocols (e.g., circumventing the use of retroviral technology and oncoproteins), and on methods for differentiation into transplantable tissues of interest. In mouse ESC, we have previously shown that the embryonic morphogens BMP4 and Wnt3a direct blood formation via activation of Cdx and Hox genes. Ectopic expression of Cdx4 and HoxB4 enables the generation of mouse ESC-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) capable of multilineage reconstitution of lethally irradiated adult mice. Here, we explore hematopoietic development from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated in our laboratory. Our data show robust differentiation of iPS cells to mesoderm and to blood lineages, as shown by generation of CD34(+)CD45(+) cells, hematopoietic colony activity, and gene expression data, and suggest conservation of blood patterning pathways between mouse and human hematopoietic development.

  20. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  1. Emerging uses for pediatric hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domen, Jos; Gandy, Kimberly; Dalal, Jignesh

    2012-04-01

    Many new therapies are emerging that use hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. In this review, we focus on five promising emerging trends that are altering stem cell usage in pediatrics: (i) The use of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, autologous or allogeneic, in the treatment of autoimmune disorders is one. (ii) The use of cord blood transplantation in patients with inherited metabolic disorders such as Hurler syndrome shows great benefit, even more so than replacement enzyme therapy. (iii) Experience with the delivery of gene therapy through stem cells is increasing, redefining the potential and limitations of this therapy. (iv) It has recently been shown that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can be cured by the use of selected stem cells. (v) Finally, it has long been postulated that HSC-transplantation can be used to induce tolerance in solid-organ transplant recipients. A new approach to tolerance induction using myeloid progenitor cells will be described.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...

  3. Ex vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a complex cellular differentiation process resulting in the formation of all blood cell types. In this process, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside at the top of the hematopoiesis hierarchy and have the capacity to differentiate into all blood cell lineages (multipote

  4. Short and long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells in the mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. van der Loo

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe formation and development of blood cells, or hematopoiesis, normally takes place in the bone marrow, which serves as the major hematopoietic organ during adult life. A small population of bone marrow cells (BMC), designated as hematopoietic stem cells, underlies the process of blood

  5. Reduced-intensity hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma: a retrospective survey of 112 adult patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, E; Kami, M; Kanda, Y; Murashige, N; Kishi, Y; Suzuki, R; Takeuchi, K; Tanimoto, T E; Mori, T; Muta, K; Tamaki, T; Tanaka, Y; Ogawa, H; Yamane, T; Taniguchi, S; Takaue, Y

    2005-08-01

    We conducted a nation-wide survey of 112 adult Japanese patients who underwent reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) from 1999 to 2002. Underlying diseases included indolent (n=45), aggressive (n=58) and highly aggressive lymphomas (n=9). Median age of the patients was 49 years. A total of 40 patients (36%) had relapsed diseases after autologous stem cell transplantation and 36 patients (32%) had received radiotherapy. RIST regimens were fludarabine-based (n=95), low-dose total body irradiation-based (n=6) and others (n=11). Cumulative incidences of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD were, respectively, 49 and 59%. Cumulative incidences of progression and progression-free mortality were 18 and 25%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 23.9 months, 3-year overall survival rates were 59%. A multivariate analysis identified three significant factors for progression, which are history of radiation (relative risk (RR) 3.45, confidential interval (CI) 1.12-10.0, P=0.03), central nervous system involvement (RR 6.25, CI 2.08-20.0, P=0.001) and development of GVHD (RR 0.28, CI 0.090-0.86, P=0.026). RIST may have decreased the rate of transplant-related mortality, and GVHD may have induced a graft-versus-lymphoma effect. However, whether or not these potential benefits can be directly translated into improved patient survival should be evaluated in further studies.

  6. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem....../progenitor cells (HSPCs, Lin(neg)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) or myeloid committed precursors (Lin(neg)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5,000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical...

  7. Human CD34+ CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells cultured with growth factors including Angptl5 efficiently engraft adult NOD-SCID Il2rγ-/- (NSG mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Drake

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in clinical and research applications necessitates expansion of HSCs in vitro. Before these cells can be used they must be carefully evaluated to assess their stem cell activity. Here, we expanded cord blood CD34(+ CD133(+ cells in a defined medium containing angiopoietin like 5 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and evaluated the cells for stem cell activity in NOD-SCID Il2rg(-/- (NSG mice by multi-lineage engraftment, long term reconstitution, limiting dilution and serial reconstitution. The phenotype of expanded cells was characterized by flow cytometry during the course of expansion and following engraftment in mice. We show that the SCID repopulating activity resides in the CD34(+ CD133(+ fraction of expanded cells and that CD34(+ CD133(+ cell number correlates with SCID repopulating activity before and after culture. The expanded cells mediate long-term hematopoiesis and serial reconstitution in NSG mice. Furthermore, they efficiently reconstitute not only neonate but also adult NSG recipients, generating human blood cell populations similar to those reported in mice reconstituted with uncultured human HSCs. These findings suggest an expansion of long term HSCs in our culture and show that expression of CD34 and CD133 serves as a marker for HSC activity in human cord blood cell cultures. The ability to expand human HSCs in vitro should facilitate clinical use of HSCs and large-scale construction of humanized mice from the same donor for research applications.

  8. Generation of mature hematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togarrati, Padma Priya; Suknuntha, Kran

    2012-06-01

    A number of malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders are associated with the abnormal production of mature blood cells or primitive hematopoietic precursors. Their capacity for continuous self-renewal without loss of pluripotency and the ability to differentiate into adult cell types from all three primitive germ layers make human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) attractive complementary cell sources for large-scale production of transfusable mature blood cell components in cell replacement therapies. The generation of patient-specific hematopoietic stem/precursor cells from iPSCs by the regulated manipulation of various factors involved in reprograming to ensure complete pluripotency, and developing innovative differentiation strategies for generating unlimited supply of clinically safe, transplantable, HLA-matched cells from hiPSCs to outnumber the inadequate source of hematopoietic stem cells obtained from cord blood, bone marrow and peripheral blood, would have a major impact on the field of regenerative and personalized medicine leading to translation of these results from bench to bedside.

  9. Lack of autophagy in the hematopoietic system leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell function and dysregulated myeloid proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Monika; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2011-09-01

    The regulated lysosomal degradation pathway of autophagy prevents cellular damage and thus protects from malignant transformation. Autophagy is also required for the maturation of various hematopoietic lineages, namely the erythroid and lymphoid ones, yet its role in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remained unexplored. While normal HSCs sustain life-long hematopoiesis, malignant transformation of HSCs or early progenitors leads to leukemia. Mechanisms protecting HSCs from cellular damage are therefore essential to prevent hematopoietic malignancies. By conditionally deleting the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in the hematopoietic system, we found that autophagy is required for the maintenance of true HSCs and therefore also of downstream hematopoietic progenitors. Loss of autophagy in HSCs leads to the expansion of a progenitor cell population in the bone marrow, giving rise to a severe, invasive myeloproliferation, which strongly resembles human acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  10. DNA methylation profiling of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begtrup, Amber Hogart

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mark that is essential for properly functioning hematopoietic stem cells. Determining where functionally relevant DNA methylation marks exist in the genome is crucial to understanding the role that methylation plays in hematopoiesis. This chapter describes a method to profile DNA methylation by selectively enriching methylated DNA sequences that are bound in vitro by methyl-binding domain (MBD) proteins. The MBD-pulldown approach selects for DNA sequences that have the potential to be "read" by the endogenous machinery involved in epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, this approach is feasible with very small quantities of DNA, and is compatible with the use of any downstream high-throughput sequencing approach. This technique offers a reliable, simple, and powerful tool for exploration of the role of DNA methylation in hematopoietic stem cells.

  11. Immature hematopoietic stem cells undergo maturation in the fetal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieusseian, Aurelie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are defined by their capacity to reconstitute adult conventional mice, are first found in the dorsal aorta after 10.5 days post coitus (dpc) and in the fetal liver at 11 dpc. However, lympho-myeloid hematopoietic progenitors are detected in the dorsal aorta from 9 dpc, raising the issue of their role in establishing adult hematopoiesis. Here, we show that these progenitors are endowed with long-term reconstitution capacity, but only engraft natural killer (NK)-deficient Rag2γc(-/-) mice. This novel population, called here immature HSCs, evolves in culture with thrombopoietin and stromal cells, into HSCs, defined by acquisition of CD45 and MHC-1 expression and by the capacity to reconstitute NK-competent mice. This evolution occurs during ontogeny, as early colonization of fetal liver by immature HSCs precedes that of HSCs. Moreover, organ culture experiments show that immature HSCs acquire, in this environment, the features of HSCs.

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  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Astray or on the Path?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Albrecht M.; Huppertz, Sascha; Henschler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the best characterized adult stem cells and the only stem cell type in routine clinical use. The concept of stem cell transplantation laid the foundations for the development of novel cell therapies within, and even outside, the hematopoietic system. Here, we report on the history of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and of HSC isolation, we briefly summarize the capabilities of HSCs to reconstitute the entire hemato/lymphoid cell system, and we assess current indications for HCT. We aim to draw the lines between areas where HCT has been firmly established, areas where HCT can in the future be expected to be of clinical benefit using their regenerative functions, and areas where doubts persist. We further review clinical trials for diverse approaches that are based on HCT. Finally, we highlight the advent of genome editing in HSCs and critically view the use of HSCs in non-hematopoietic tissue regeneration. PMID:27721700

  17. Prognostic implication of gene mutations on overall survival in the adult acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving or not receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sheng-Chieh; Tang, Jih-Luh; Hou, Hsin-An; Chou, Wen-Chien; Hu, Fu-Chang; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Yao, Ming; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-11-01

    Several gene mutations have been shown to provide clinical implications in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the prognostic impact of gene mutations in the context of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) remains unclear. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical implications of 8 gene mutations in 325 adult AML patients; 100 of them received allo-HSCT and 225 did not. The genetic alterations analyzed included NPM1, FLT3-ITD, FLT3-TKD, CEBPA, RUNX1, RAS, MLL-PTD, and WT1. In patients who did not receive allo-HSCT, older age, higher WBC count, higher lactate dehydrogenase level, unfavorable karyotype, and RUNX1 mutation were significantly associated with poor overall survival (OS), while CEBPA double mutation (CEBPA(double-mut)) and NPM1(mut)/FLT3-ITD(neg) were associated with good outcome. However, in patients who received allo-HSCT, only refractory disease status at the time of HSCT and unfavorable karyotype were independent poor prognostic factors. Surprisingly, RUNX1 mutation was an independent good prognostic factor for OS in multivariate analysis. The prognostic impact of FLT3-ITD or NPM1(mut)/FLT3-ITD(neg) was lost in this group of patients receiving allo-HSCT, while CEBPA(double-mut) showed a trend to be a good prognostic factor. In conclusion, allo-HSCT can ameliorate the unfavorable influence of some poor-risk gene mutations in AML patients. Unexpectedly, the RUNX1 mutation showed a favorable prognostic impact in the context of allo-HSCT. These results need to be confirmed by further studies with more AML patients.

  18. Evolving concepts on the microenvironmental niche for hematopoietic stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, M.G.P.; Scadden, D.T.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The hematopoietic stem cell niche is critical for the maintenance and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells and, as such, is not only essential for steady-state hematopoiesis but may also be relevant to hematologic disease. The present review discusses recent advances in the u

  19. Tuberculosis in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Batista, Marjorie Vieira; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    Literature on tuberculosis (TB) occurring in recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is scanty even in countries where TB is common. Most reports of TB in HSCT patients were from ASIA, in fact the TB incidence ranging from 0.0014 (USA) to 16% (Pakistan). There are few reports of TB diagnosis during the first two weeks after HSCT; most of cases described in the literature occurred after 90 days of HSCT, and the lung was the organ most involved. The mortality ranged from 0 to 50...

  20. Hematopoietic specification from human pluripotent stem cells: current advances and challenges toward de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2013-12-12

    Significant advances in cellular reprogramming technologies and hematopoietic differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have already enabled the routine production of multiple lineages of blood cells in vitro and opened novel opportunities to study hematopoietic development, model genetic blood diseases, and manufacture immunologically matched cells for transfusion and cancer immunotherapy. However, the generation of hematopoietic cells with robust and sustained multilineage engraftment has not been achieved. Here, we highlight the recent advances in understanding the molecular and cellular pathways leading to blood development from hPSCs and discuss potential approaches that can be taken to facilitate the development of technologies for de novo production of hematopoietic stem cells.

  1. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: transfusion issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkök ÇA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Çiğdem Akalın Akkök,1,21Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden Abstract: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT is an intention-to-cure treatment strategy in several malignancies and nonmalignancies. The number of patients receiving AHSCT is increasing due to new indications, and more elderly patients with comorbidities are included in the protocols. Survival of the patients undergoing AHSCT has improved owing to better patient care, including optimization of transfusion support, which has a major contribution. However, transfusion can also be hazardous. Increasing awareness about transfusion and finding the balance between avoiding unnecessary transfusions and transfusing the correct component when needed are the key issues. Myeloablative conditioning results in pancytopenia, and the patients are prone to infections, anemia, and bleeding both before and after transplantation. Until red cell and platelet engraftment, the patients are usually transfusion dependent needing red cell and/or platelet components. Physicians dealing with AHSCT patients should be well informed about the attributes of the blood components they order. Knowledge about transfusion indications, triggers, and how to prevent and manage eventual transfusion complications is also required. The clinical picture can be challenging, and transplantation/treatment-related toxicity/complications can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from a transfusion complication, especially if the latter one took place, for instance, several days or weeks ago. ABO compatibility between the patient and the donor is not a prerequisite when choosing human leukocyte antigen-matched hematopoietic stem cell donor. Consequently, ABO incompatibility exists in ~40% of the cases and brings some immunohematological issues

  2. Effect of endothelial progenitor cell on hematopoietic reconstitution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    化静

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) on hematopoietic reconsititution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) mouse model.Methods Allo-HSCT mouse model was established with condition of BU/CY,in which C57BL/6 (H-2b) and BABL/c (H-2d) mice were used

  3. Hematopoietic reconstitution on the prognosis of hematological malignancies after allogenceic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the impact of the time to hematopoietic reconstitution on the prognosis of hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT) . Methods 173 patients with hematological malignancies treated with allo-HSCT (excluding umbilical cord blood transplantation)

  4. The Neuropsychiatry of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell R. Levy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Regimens incorporating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT have become widely utilized in disease treatments, particularly for cancer. These complex treatment programs also expose patients to central nervous system (CNS toxicities from chemotherapy, irradiation, infection, metabolic effects and immunosuppression. METHODS: Relevant recent medical literature from Medline and bibliographies in pertinent publications are reviewed with a focus on those cases and studies pertaining to neuropsychiatric effects of HSCT. RESULTS: High rates of neuropsychiatric sequelae occur on a continuum from acute to chronic. Adverse outcomes include focal CNS deficits and severe global manifestations such as seizures, encephalopathy and delirium. More graduated effects on cognition, energy and mood are frequently seen, impacting patient function. CONCLUSIONS: Additional research on neuropsychiatric outcomes and treatment interventions is needed in the HSCT setting. Risks for neuropsychiatric deficits should be part of an ongoing informed consent discussion among treating physicians, patients and families.

  5. Development of hematopoietic stem cell activity in the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Müller (Albrecht); A. Medvinsky; J. Strouboulis (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe precise time of appearance of the first hematopoietic stem cell activity in the developing mouse embryo is unknown. Recently the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the developing mouse embryo has been shown to possess hematopoietic colony-forming activity (CFU-S) in irradiated recipie

  6. Outcomes of Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and the Significance of Pretransplantation Minimal Residual Disease:Analysis from a Single Center of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Ding; Ming-Zhe Han; Shu-Lian Chen; Qiao-Ling Ma; Jia-Lin Wei; Ai-Ming Pang; Xiao-Yu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:The postremission therapics for adult patients generally contain consolidation chemotherapy,allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT).Because of the various results from different centers,the optimal therapy for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients is still uncertain.This study aimed to better understand predictive factors and role of auto-HSCT in the postremission thcrapy for adult ALL patients.Methods:The outcomes of 135 adult patients with ALL,who received the first auto-HSCT in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Center of Blood Diseases Hospital,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from January 1,1994 to February 28,2014,were retrospectively analyzed.Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and simultaneous effects of multiple covariates were estimated with the Cox model.Results:Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years for the whole cohort were 59.1 ± 4.5% and 59.0 ± 4.4%,respectively.The cumulative nonrelapse mortality and relapse rate at 5 years were 4.5 ± 0.03% and 36.6 ± 0.19%.For both OS and DFS,acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia,high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at diagnosis,blast cell proportion ≥5% on the 15th day of induction therapy,and extramedullary infiltration before HSCT were the poor prognosis factors.In addition,age ≥35 years predicted poor DFS.Only T-ALL and high LDH were the independent undesirable factors associated with OS and DFS in Cox regression model.For 44 patients who had results of pretransplantation minimal residual disease (MRD),positive MRD (MRD ≥0.01%) indicated poor OS (P =0.044) and DFS (P =0.008).Furthermore,for the standard risk group,the patients with negative MRD (MRD <0.01%) had better results (OS at 18 months was 90.0 ± 9.5%,while for the patients with positive MRD OS was 50.0 ± 35.4%,P =0.003;DFS at 18 months was 90.0 ± 9.5%,while for the

  7. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    OpenAIRE

    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is know...

  8. High-grade cytomegalovirus antigenemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano-Mori, Y; Oshima, K; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Nakagawa, M; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Hangaishi, A; Motokura, T; Chiba, S; Kurokawa, M; Hirai, H; Kanda, Y

    2005-11-01

    Clinical impact of high-grade (HG) cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has not been clarified. Therefore, in order to investigate the risk factors and outcome for HG-CMV antigenemia, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 154 Japanese adult patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the first time from 1995 to 2002 at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Among 107 patients who developed positive CMV antigenemia at any level, 74 received risk-adapted preemptive therapy with ganciclovir (GCV), and 17 of these developed HG-antigenemia defined as > or = 50 positive cells per two slides. The use of systemic corticosteroids at > or = 0.5 mg/kg/day at the initiation of GCV was identified as an independent significant risk factor for HG-antigenemia. Seven of the 17 HG-antigenemia patients developed CMV disease, with a cumulative incidence of 49.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the low-grade antigenemia patients (4%, P<0.001). However, overall survival was almost equivalent in the two groups. In conclusion, the development of HG-antigenemia appeared to depend on the profound immune suppression of the recipient. Although CMV disease frequently developed in HG-antigenemia patients, antiviral therapy could prevent a fatal outcome.

  9. Signaling pathways in self-renewing hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells : do all stem cells need a niche?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizo, Aleksandra; Vellenga, Edo; de Haan, Gerald; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Many adult tissue stem cells, such as the cells of the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal epithelium, brain, epidermis, mammary gland and lung have now been identified, all of them fulfilling a crucial role in supplying organisms with mature cells during normal homeostasis as well as in times of

  10. Tracking adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snippert, Hugo J; Clevers, Hans

    2011-02-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context, rather than outside their natural environment. The mouse is an attractive model in which to study adult mammalian stem cells, as numerous experimental systems and genetic tools are available. In this review, we describe strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells in mice and discuss their potential, limitations and interpretations, as well as how they have informed our understanding of adult stem-cell biology. An accurate interpretation of physiologically relevant stem-cell assays is crucial to identify adult stem cells and elucidate how they self-renew and give rise to differentiated progeny.

  11. Dlk1 is a negative regulator of emerging hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mirshekar-Syahkal (Bahar); E. Haak (Esther); G.M. Kimber (Gillian); K. van Leusden (Kevin); K. Harvey (Kirsten); R.A. O'Rourke; J. Laborda (Jorge); S.R. Bauer (Steven); M.F.T.R. de Bruijn (Marella F.T.R); A. Ferguson-Smith (Anne); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); K. Ottersbach (Katrin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe first mouse adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region at embryonic day (E) 10.5. Their numbers in this region increase thereafter and begin to decline at E12.5, thus pointing to the possible existence of both positive and negative regula

  12. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  13. Gs signaling in osteoblasts and hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Henry M

    2010-03-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein Gs is a major mediator of the actions of several G protein-coupled receptors that target cells of the osteoblast lineage. For this reason, we generated chimeric mice with normal host cells and cells derived from embryonic stem cells missing the gene encoding the alpha subunit of Gs. While the mutant cells contributed to cortical osteoblasts and to hematopoietic cells in the liver, the marrow space contained few if any osteoblasts or hematopoietic cells missing Gs. Subsequent studies using the Cre-lox approach to delete Gsalpha from early cells of the osteoblast lineage and from hematopoietic stem cells were performed. These studies demonstrated the crucial roles of Gsalpha in osteoblastic cells in regulating the differentiation of osteoblasts and in supporting B-cell development as well as the essential role for Gsalpha in hematopoietic stem cells in allowing the homing of these cells to the marrow.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell characterization and isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Lara; Challen, Grant A; Sirin, Olga; Lin, Karen Kuan-Yin; Goodell, Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by the capabilities of multi-lineage differentiation and long-term self-renewal. Both these characteristics contribute to maintain the homeostasis of the system and allow the restoration of hematopoiesis after insults, such as infections or therapeutic ablation. Reconstitution after lethal irradiation strictly depends on a third, fundamental property of HSCs: the capability to migrate under the influence of specific chemokines. Directed by a chemotactic compass, after transplant HSCs find their way to the bone marrow, where they eventually home and engraft. HSCs represent a rare population that primarily resides in the bone marrow with an estimated frequency of 0.01% of total nucleated cells. Separating HSCs from differentiated cells that reside in the bone marrow has been the focus of intense investigation for years. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the strategy routinely used by our laboratory to purify murine HSCs, by exploiting their antigenic phenotype (KSL), combined with the physiological capability to efficiently efflux the vital dye Hoechst 33342, generating the so-called Side Population, or SP.

  15. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many age-

  16. Dynamic changes in mouse hematopoietic stem cell numbers during aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G; Van Zant, G

    1999-01-01

    To address the fundamental question of whether or not stem cell populations age, we performed quantitative measurements of the cycling status and frequency of hematopoietic stem cells in long-lived C57BL/6 (B6) and short-lived DBA/2 (DBA) mice at different developmental and aging stages. The frequen

  17. Tracking adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context,

  18. Fetal stromal niches enhance human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic differentiation and globin switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, King Yiu; Fong, Benny Shu Pan; Tsang, Kam Sze; Lau, Tze Kin; Ng, Pak Cheung; Lam, Audrey Carmen; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Wang, Chi Chiu; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Li, Chi Kong; Li, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis during mammalian embryonic development has been perceived as a migratory phenomenon, from the yolk sac blood island to the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, fetal liver (FL), and subsequently, the fetal bone marrow. In this study, we investigated the effects of primary stromal cells from fetal hematopoietic niches and their conditioned media (CM), applied singly or in sequential orders, on induction of human embryonic stem cells, H1, H9, and H14 lines, to hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrated that stromal support of FL, AGM + FL, and AGM + FL + fetal bone marrow significantly increased the proliferation of embryoid bodies (EB) at day 18 of hematopoietic induction in the presence of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, and Flt-3 ligand. AGM + FL also increased hematopoietic colony-forming unit (CFU) formation. CM did not enhance EB proliferation but CM of FL and AGM + FL significantly increased the density of total CFU and early erythroid (burst-forming unit) progenitors. Increased commitment to the hematopoietic lineage was demonstrated by enhanced expressions of CD45, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-globins in CFU at day 32, compared with EB at day 18. CM of FL significantly increased these globin expressions, indicating enhanced switches from embryonic to fetal and adult erythropoiesis. Over 50% and 10% of cells derived from CFU expressed CD45 and beta-globin proteins, respectively. Expressions of hematopoietic regulatory genes (Bmi-1, β-Catenin, Hox B4, GATA-1) were increased in EB or CFU cultures supported by FL or sequential CM. Our study has provided a strategy for derivation of hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem cells under the influence of primary hematopoietic niches and CM, particularly the FL.

  19. Induction of embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to get hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells and to study development mechanisms of hematopoietic cells, the method of inducing embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells was explored by differenciating mouse ES cells and human embryonic cells in three stages. The differentiated cells were identified by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and Wright's staining. The results showed that embryoid bodies (EBs) could form when ES cells were cultured in the medium with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). However, cytokines, such as stem cell factor (SCF), thrombopoietin (TPO), interleukin-3 (IL-3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), erythropoietin (EPO) and granular colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), were not helpful for forming EBs. SCF, TPO and embryonic cell conditional medium were useful for the differentiation of mouse EBs to hematopoietic progenitors. Eighty-six percent of these cells were CD34+ after 6-d culture. Hematopoietic progenitors differentiated to B lymphocytes when they were cocultured with primary bone marrow stroma cells in the DMEM medium with SCF and IL-6. 14 d later, most of the cells were CD34-CD38+. Wright's staining and immunohistochemistry showed that 80% of these cells were plasma-like morphologically and immunoglubolin positive. The study of hematopoietic cells from human embryonic cells showed that human embryonic cell differentiation was very similar to that of mouse ES cells. They could form EBs in the first stage and the CD34 positive cells account for about 48.5% in the second stage.

  20. Normal karyotype mosaicism in adult AML patients with adverse-risk and undefined karyotype: preliminary report of treatment outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hee-Je; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won

    2013-06-01

    Karyotype analysis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the powerful prognostic factors for complete remission (CR), relapse, and overall survival (OS). Cytogenetic mosaicism is considered to be one of the important characteristics in expression of phenotypic manifestations. However, it has not come into focus due to emerging molecular biological approaches and the results of a number of mutation studies. Clinical correlates and prognostic relevance of mosaicism were evaluated in 163 AML patients [adverse-risk karyotypes (n = 72) and undefined karyotypes (n = 91)]. All patients were treated by induction and consolidation chemotherapies and finally went on hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT). Patients were divided into two subgroups, either with or without normal karyotype (NK) mosaicism. Seventy patients exhibited NK mosaicism and 93 did not. There were no significant differences in age, gender, chemotherapy cycles to achieve CR, HSCT donor type, source or intensity properties between the two subgroups. We found that NK mosaicism remaining in adverse-risk and undefined karyotype at diagnosis significantly correlates with better OS (p = 0.001) and lower CIR (p = 0.021) rate after HSCT. Our data show that the poor prognostic properties of unfavorable risk karyotype can be overcome to a great extent by allogeneic HSCT and chronic GVHD, especially in the subgroup with NK mosaicism. Cytogenetic mosaicism at initial diagnosis can be an influential factor for survival outcomes, even after HSCT.

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: analysis of 533 adult patients who underwent transplantation at King's College Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenjia; Abeywardane, Ayesha; Adikarama, Malinthi; McLornan, Donal; Raj, Kavita; de Lavallade, Hugues; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Victoria T; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); it is often refractory to treatment and carries a high mortality. To improve understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of post-transplantation AIHA, we analyzed 533 patients who received allogeneic HSCT, and we identified 19 cases of AIHA after HSCT (overall incidence, 3.6%). The median time to onset, from HSCT to AIHA, was 202 days. AIHA was associated with HSCT from unrelated donors (hazard ratio [HR], 5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 22.9; P = .026). In the majority (14 of 19; 74%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with only 9 of 19 (47%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. Patients with post-transplantation AIHA had a higher overall mortality (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.63; P = .004), with 36% (4 of 11 cases) of deaths attributable to AIHA.

  2. The effects of proliferation and DNA damage on hematopoietic stem cell function determine aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Satish

    2016-07-01

    In most of the mammalian tissues, homeostasis as well as injury repair depend upon a small number of resident adult stem cells. The decline in tissue/organ function in aged organisms has been directly linked with poorly functioning stem cells. Altered function of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is at the center of an aging hematopoietic system, a tissue with high cellular turnover. Poorly engrafting, myeloid-biased HSCs with higher levels of DNA damage accumulation are the hallmark features of an aged hematopoietic system. These cells show a higher proliferation rate than their younger counterparts. It was proposed that quiescence of these cells over long period of time leads to accumulation of DNA damage, eventually resulting in poor function/pathological conditions in hematopoietic system. However, various mouse models with premature aging phenotype also show highly proliferative HSCs. This review examines the evidence that links proliferation of HSCs with aging, which leads to functional changes in the hematopoietic system. Developmental Dynamics 245:739-750, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. Regulation of stem cells in the zebra fish hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-T; Zon, L I

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used extensively as a model for stem cell biology. Stem cells share the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types, making them ideal candidates for tissue regeneration or replacement therapies. Current applications of stem cell technology are limited by our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control their proliferation and differentiation, and various model organisms have been used to fill these gaps. This chapter focuses on the contributions of the zebra fish model to our understanding of stem cell regulation within the hematopoietic system. Studies in zebra fish have been valuable for identifying new genetic and signaling factors that affect HSC formation and development with important implications for humans, and new advances in the zebra fish toolbox will allow other aspects of HSC behavior to be investigated as well, including migration, homing, and engraftment.

  19. Aneuploidy impairs hematopoietic stem cell fitness and is selected against in regenerating tissues in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Sarah J; Silberman, Rebecca E; Knouse, Kristin A; Amon, Angelika

    2016-06-15

    Aneuploidy, an imbalanced karyotype, is a widely observed feature of cancer cells that has long been hypothesized to promote tumorigenesis. Here we evaluate the fitness of cells with constitutional trisomy or chromosomal instability (CIN) in vivo using hematopoietic reconstitution experiments. We did not observe cancer but instead found that aneuploid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit decreased fitness. This reduced fitness is due at least in part to the decreased proliferative potential of aneuploid hematopoietic cells. Analyses of mice with CIN caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the gene Bub1b further support the finding that aneuploidy impairs cell proliferation in vivo. Whereas nonregenerating adult tissues are highly aneuploid in these mice, HSCs and other regenerative adult tissues are largely euploid. These findings indicate that, in vivo, mechanisms exist to select against aneuploid cells.

  20. Polycomb-group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell regulation and hematopoietic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radulovic, V.; de Haan, G.; Klauke, K.

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium between self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. In particular, Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins have been shown to be involved in this process by repressing genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and differentiation. PcGs are

  1. Human Placenta Is a Potent Hematopoietic Niche Containing Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells throughout Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Robin (Catherine); K. Bollerot (Karine); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E. Haak (Esther); M. Crisan (Mihaela); F. Cerisoli (Francesco); I. Lauw (Ivoune); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); M. Vermeulen (Mark); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); R. van der Linden (Reinier); P. Imanirad (Parisa); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); H. Nawaz-Yousaf (Humaira); N. Papazian (Natalie); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); T. Cupedo (Tom); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this emerg

  2. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Wang, Fen; Wu, Mengyao; Wang, Zack Z

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), provide a new cell source for regenerative medicine, disease modeling, drug discovery, and preclinical toxicity screening. Understanding of the onset and the sequential process of hematopoietic cells from differentiated hPSCs will enable the achievement of personalized medicine and provide an in vitro platform for studying of human hematopoietic development and disease. During embryogenesis, hemogenic endothelial cells, a specified subset of endothelial cells in embryonic endothelium, are the primary source of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this review, we discuss current status in the generation of multipotent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from hPSCs via hemogenic endothelial cells. We also review the achievements in direct reprogramming from non-hematopoietic cells to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Further characterization of hematopoietic differentiation in hPSCs will improve our understanding of blood development and expedite the development of hPSC-derived blood products for therapeutic purpose.

  3. The Genetic Landscape of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Frequency in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior efforts to identify regulators of hematopoietic stem cell physiology have relied mainly on candidate gene approaches with genetically modified mice. Here we used a genome-wide association study (GWAS strategy with the hybrid mouse diversity panel to identify the genetic determinants of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC frequency. Among 108 strains, we observed ∼120- to 300-fold variation in three HSPC populations. A GWAS analysis identified several loci that were significantly associated with HSPC frequency, including a locus on chromosome 5 harboring the homeodomain-only protein gene (Hopx. Hopx previously had been implicated in cardiac development but was not known to influence HSPC biology. Analysis of the HSPC pool in Hopx−/− mice demonstrated significantly reduced cell frequencies and impaired engraftment in competitive repopulation assays, thus providing functional validation of this positional candidate gene. These results demonstrate the power of GWAS in mice to identify genetic determinants of the hematopoietic system.

  4. Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Tanyeli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common hemoglobinopathies in the worldwide. Sickle cell anemia characterized by crises and organ failure develops over time. Myeloablative stem cell transplantation is curative but it has been performed in children younger than 16 years of age. Modest modifications in the conditioning regimen and supportive care have improved outcome such that the majority of children with a suitable HLA-matched sibling donor can expect a cure from this approach. But nonmyeloablative protocols are crucial for the future of Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for older sickle cell anemia patients with organ failure. A protocol for nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation that includes total-body irradiation and treatment with alemtuzumab and sirolimus can achieve stable, mixed donor–recipient chimerism. Stem cell transplantation is recommended in the presence of HLA-matched siblings in patients at risk.

  5. Longitudinal Assessment of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Hyposalivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laaksonen, Matti; Ramseier, Adrian; Rovó, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Hyposalivation is a common adverse effect of anti-neoplastic therapy of head and neck cancer, causing impaired quality of life and predisposition to oral infections. However, data on the effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on salivary secretion are scarce. The present study...

  6. Sexual function 1-year after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noerskov, K H; Schjødt, I; Syrjala, K L

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with short and long-term toxicities that can result in alterations in sexual functioning. The aims of this prospective evaluation were to determine: (1) associations between HSCT and increased sexual dysfunction...

  7. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  8. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozkan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only curative therapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases. Early diagnosis, including prenatally, and early transplantation improve HSCT outcomes. Survival rates improve with advances in the methods of preparing hosts and donor cells, and in supportive and conditioning regimes.

  9. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAfter more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme

  10. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orchard, Paul J.; Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer L.; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; OBrien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HL

  11. Symptoms after hospital discharge following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Oguz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purposes of this study were to assess the symptoms of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after hospital discharge, and to determine the needs of transplant patients for symptom management. Materials and Methods: The study adopted a descriptive design. The study sample comprised of 66 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. The study was conducted in Istanbul. Data were collected using Patient Information Form and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS. Results: The frequency of psychological symptoms in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after discharge period (PSYCH subscale score 2.11 (standard deviation (SD = 0.69, range: 0.93-3.80 was higher in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients than frequency of physical symptoms (PHYS subscale score: 1.59 (SD = 0.49, range: 1.00-3.38. Symptom distress caused by psychological and physical symptoms were at moderate level (Mean = 1.91, SD = 0.60, range: 0.95-3.63 and most distressing symptoms were problems with sexual interest or activity, difficulty sleeping, and diarrhea. Patients who did not have an additional chronic disease obtained higher MSAS scores. University graduates obtained higher Global Distress Index (GDI subscale and total MSAS scores with comparison to primary school graduates. Total MSAS, MSAS-PHYS subscale, and MSAS-PSYCH subscale scores were higher in patients with low level of income (P < 0.05. The patients (98.5% reported to receive education about symptom management after hospital discharge. Conclusions: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients continue to experience many distressing physical or psychological symptoms after discharge and need to be supported and educated for the symptom management.

  12. Reconstructing the in vivo dynamics of hematopoietic stem cells from telomere length distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Benjamin; Beier, Fabian; Hummel, Sebastian; Balabanov, Stefan; Lassay, Lisa; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Dingli, David; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the in vivo patterns of stem cell divisions in the human hematopoietic system throughout life. In particular, we analyze the shape of telomere length distributions underlying stem cell behavior within individuals. Our mathematical model shows that these distributions contain a fingerprint of the progressive telomere loss and the fraction of symmetric cell proliferations. Our predictions are tested against measured telomere length distributions in humans across all ages, collected from lymphocyte and granulocyte sorted telomere length data of 356 healthy individuals, including 47 cord blood and 28 bone marrow samples. We find an increasing stem cell pool during childhood and adolescence and an approximately maintained stem cell population in adults. Furthermore, our method is able to detect individual differences from a single tissue sample, i.e. a single snapshot. Prospectively, this allows us to compare cell proliferation between individuals and identify abnormal stem cell dynamics, which affects the risk of stem cell related diseases.

  13. Eicosanoid regulation of hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem and progenitor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, J; Pelus, L M

    2010-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for numerous hematological malignancies. The transplant procedure as performed today takes advantage of HSC trafficking; either egress of HSC from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, that is, mobilization, for acquisition of the hematopoietic graft, and/or trafficking of HSC from the peripheral blood to bone marrow niches in the recipient patient, that is HSC homing. Numerous studies, many of which are reviewed herein, have defined hematopoietic regulatory mechanisms mediated by the 20-carbon lipid family of eicosanoids, and recent evidence strongly supports a role for eicosanoids in regulation of hematopoietic trafficking, adding a new role whereby eicosanoids regulate hematopoiesis. Short-term exposure of HSC to the eicosanoid prostaglandin E(2) increases CXCR4 receptor expression, migration and in vivo homing of HSC. In contrast, cannabinoids reduce hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) CXCR4 expression and induce HPC mobilization when administered in vivo. Leukotrienes have been shown to alter CD34(+) cell adhesion, migration and regulate HSC proliferation, suggesting that eicosanoids have both opposing and complimentary roles in the regulation of hematopoiesis. As numerous FDA approved compounds regulate eicosanoid signaling or biosynthesis, the utility of eicosanoid-based therapeutic strategies to improve hematopoietic transplantation can be rapidly evaluated.

  14. TET2 deficiency inhibits mesoderm and hematopoietic differentiation in human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langlois, Thierry; da Costa Reis Monte Mor, Barbara; Lenglet, Gaëlle;

    2014-01-01

    Ten-Eleven-Translocation 2 (TET2) belongs to the TET protein family that catalyzes the conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and plays a central role in normal and malignant adult hematopoiesis. Yet, the role of TET2 in human hematopoietic development remains largely unknown....... Here, we show that TET2 expression is low in human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines and increases during hematopoietic differentiation. ShRNA-mediated TET2 knockdown had no effect on the pluripotency of various ES cells. However, it skewed their differentiation into neuroectoderm at the expense...... promoter correlated with a decreased in NANOG expression. The altered differentiation resulting from TET2 knockdown in ES cells led to a decrease in both the number and the cloning capacities of hematopoietic progenitors. These defects were due to an increased apoptosis and an altered gene expression...

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Hhex in Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ontogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portero Migueles, Rosa; Shaw, Louise; Rodrigues, Neil P

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge during development via an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition from hemogenic endothelium of the dorsal aorta (DA). Using in situ hybridization and analysis of a knock-in RedStar reporter, we show that the transcriptional regulator Hhex is expressed...... in the DA endothelium and intra-aortic hematopoietic clusters. GFP-positive AGM cells co-expressed HSC-associated markers c-Kit, CD34, VE-Cadherin, and CD45, and were capable of multipotential differentiation and long term engraftment when transplanted into myelo-ablated recipients. The Hhex ECR was also...... sufficient to drive expression at additional blood sites including the yolk sac blood islands, fetal liver, vitelline and umbilical arteries and the adult bone marrow, suggesting a common mechanism for Hhex regulation throughout ontogenesis of the blood system. To explore the physiological requirement...

  16. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

  17. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Hematopoietic S...0347,SRX038912,SRX038913,SRX658606,SRX658607 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  2. [Endothelial origin for hematopoietic stem cells: a visual proof].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisset, Jean-Charles; Robin, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are the source of all blood cell types produced during the entire life of an organism. They appear during embryonic development, where they will transit through different successive hematopoietic organs, before to finally colonize the bone marrow. Nowadays, the precise origin of HSC remains a matter of controversy. Different HSC precursor candidates, located in different anatomical sites, have been proposed. Here, we summarize and discuss the different theories in light of the recent articles, especially those using in vivo confocal microscopy technology.

  3. Inhaled corticosteroids stabilize constrictive bronchiolitis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashoura, L; Gupta, S; Jain, A; Couriel, D R; Komanduri, K V; Eapen, G A; Safdar, A; Broglio, K R; Adachi, R; Dickey, B F

    2008-01-01

    Post transplantation constrictive bronchiolitis (PTCB) is the most common pulmonary complication among long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It is a late manifestation of GVHD. Its treatment with high-dose systemic corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive regimens is associated with multiple side effects. Topical corticosteroids are used for the treatment of other manifestations of GVHD to minimize these side effects. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a series of adult patients to evaluate the efficacy of high-dose inhaled corticosteroids in the treatment of PTCB. Seventeen patients with new-onset airflow obstruction were diagnosed with PTCB. Their forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) declined from a median of 84% (range, 56-119) before HSCT to 53% (26-82) after HSCT. All patients received inhaled fluticasone propionate 500-940 microg two times daily. Symptoms of airway obstruction improved and FEV1 stabilized 3-6 months after treatment. We conclude that high-dose inhaled corticosteroids may be effective in the treatment of PTCB and propose a plausible mechanism of its action. A prospective evaluation of its efficacy is warranted.

  4. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled Receptor 5 marks short-term hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during mouse embryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Donghua; He, Xi C; Qian, Pengxu; Barker, Nick; Trainor, Paul A; Clevers, Hans; Liu, Huiwen; Li, Linheng

    2014-01-01

    Lgr5 is a marker for proliferating stem cells in adult intestine, stomach, and hair follicle. However, Lgr5 is not expressed in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Whether Lgr5 is expressed in the embryonic and fetal HSPCs that undergo rapid proliferation is unknown. Here we repor

  5. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the ba

  6. Artificial hematopoietic stem cell niche: bioscaffolds to microfluidics to mathematical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didwania, Maruti; Didwania, Anjani; Mehta, Geeta; Basak, Grzegorz W; Yasukawa, Satoshi; Takayama, Shuichi; de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Srivastava, Anand; Carrier, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Due to the recent advancements in stem cell biology and engineering, scientists have been increasingly interested in creating in vitro niches for embryonic and adult stem cells, and, following induction and differentiation with the appropriate media, the production of large scale blood production. This artificially created niche for hematopoietic cells will be composed of three materials: the stem cells themselves, the scaffold surrounding the stem cell, and the media used to expand and differentiate the stem cells. This paper will examine the recent advancements in technology for each of these relating to the development of an artificial stem cell niche. Many key aspects of the artificial niche need to be improved on before we can scale up the engineered device for large scale blood production including more efficient methods of retrieval of the embroid bodies produced from the microfluidic channels. The current state of experimental methods such as these as well as relevant discoveries in related fields that could be applied to artificial niche technology is described in this paper. Furthermore, we present a mathematical model to describe cell expansion in the artificial hematopoietic stem cell niche in order to design and optimize a scaled-up bioreactor. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of expansion, and maintenance of homeostasis in the bioreactor.

  7. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tangliang Li; Zhong-Wei Zhou; Zhenyu Ju; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employ-ing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically reg-ulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  8. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  9. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangliang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal and progenitor progenies (differentiation, which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  10. Mitophagy in hematopoietic stem cells: the case for exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aashish; Kundu, Mondira

    2013-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are inherently quiescent and self-renewing, yet can differentiate and commit to multiple blood cell types. Intracellular mitochondrial content is dynamic, and there is an increase in mitochondrial content during differentiation and lineage commitment in HSCs. HSCs reside in a hypoxic niche within the bone marrow and rely heavily on glycolysis, while differentiated and committed progenitors rely on oxidative phosphorylation. Increased oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation and commitment is not only due to increased mitochondrial content but also due to changes in mitochondrial cytosolic distribution and efficiency. These changes in the intracellular mitochondrial landscape contribute signals toward regulating differentiation and commitment. Thus, a functional relationship exists between the mitochondria in HSCs and the state of the HSCs (i.e., stemness vs. differentiated). This review focuses on how autophagy-mediated mitochondrial clearance (i.e., mitophagy) may affect HSC mitochondrial content, thereby influencing the fate of HSCs and maintenance of hematopoietic homeostasis.

  11. Expansion of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Jessica A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are rare cells that have the unique ability to self-renew and differentiate into cells of all hematopoietic lineages. The expansion of HSCs has remained an important goal to develop advanced cell therapies for bone marrow transplantation and many blood disorders. Over the last several decades, there have been numerous attempts to expand HSCs in vitro using purified growth factors that are known to regulate HSCs. However, these attempts have been met with limited success for clinical applications. New developments in the HSC expansion field coupled with gene therapy and stem cell transplant should encourage progression in attractive treatment options for many disorders including hematologic conditions, immunodeficiencies, and genetic disorders.

  12. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    2011-07-01

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many age-related HSC changes and might pave the way for HSC malignant transformation and subsequent leukemia development, the incidence of which increases exponentially with age. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are key epigenetic regulators of HSC cellular fate decisions and are often found to be misregulated in human hematopoietic malignancies. In this review, we speculate that PcG proteins balance HSC aging against the risk of developing cancer, since a disturbance in PcG genes and proteins affects several important cellular processes such as cell fate decisions, senescence, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair.

  13. Rhizomucor and Scedosporium Infection Post Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dânia Sofia Marques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing invasive fungal infections. This is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We report a case of a 17-year-old male patient diagnosed with severe idiopathic acquired aplastic anemia who developed fungal pneumonitis due to Rhizomucor sp. and rhinoencephalitis due to Scedosporium apiospermum 6 and 8 months after undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant from an HLA-matched unrelated donor. Discussion highlights risk factors for invasive fungal infections (i.e., mucormycosis and scedosporiosis, its clinical features, and the factors that must be taken into account to successfully treat them (early diagnosis, correction of predisposing factors, aggressive surgical debridement, and antifungal and adjunctive therapies.

  14. Life satisfaction in young adults 10 or more years after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for childhood malignant and nonmalignant diseases does not show significant impairment compared with healthy controls: a case-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uderzo, Cornelio; Corti, Paola; Pappalettera, Marco; Baldini, Valentina; Lucchini, Giovanna; Meani, Dario; Rovelli, Attilio

    2012-11-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may experience physical and psychological deterioration that impairs their life satisfaction (LS). This study focused on LS in long-term survivors at 10 or more years after HSCT. Fifty-five patients (39 males, median age 25 years) undergoing allogeneic HSCT for childhood malignant (n = 52) or nonmalignant diseases (n = 3) were enrolled. A control group of 98 young adults (59 males, median age 24 years) was considered. A questionnaire with a modified Satisfaction Life Domain Scale was administered. We assessed such domains as education, employment, leisure time, social relationships, and perception of physical status with a 30-item questionnaire. To investigate the association between the domains and the probability of diminished LS, we performed a logistical procedure using the maximum likelihood method. Predictive factors of LS were adjusted for sociodemographic variables. In the multivariate analysis, the participant's level of LS was not significantly correlated with sociodemographic factors or with HSCT status. The same analysis showed a slight trend in favor of the control group (P = .06) for body perception. Our data suggest that the patients who undergo HSCT in childhood have no significant difference in long-term LS compared with healthy controls.

  15. Leukemia in donor cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The development of leukemia in donor cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant is an extremely rare event. We report here the case of a patient who developed myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia, in cells of donor origin 3.5 years after related donor HSCT for refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia and therapy-induced myelodysplastic syndrome. The origin of the leukemia was determined by analysis of minisatillite polymorphism tested on CD34(+) cells.

  16. Sexual Health in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and car...

  17. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  18. Cryopreservation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells for therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Suzanne M; Austin, Eric; Armitage, Sue

    2007-01-01

    To date, more than 25,000 hematopoietic transplants have been carried out across Europe for hematological disorders, the majority being for hematological malignancies. At least 70% of these are autologous transplants, the remaining 30% being allogeneic, which are sourced from related (70% of the allogeneic) or unrelated donors. Peripheral blood mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor is the major source of stem cells for transplantation, being used in approx 95% of autologous transplants and in approx 65% of allogeneic transplants. Other cell sources used for transplantation are bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. One crucial advance in the treatment of these disorders has been the development of the ability to cryopreserve hematopoietic stem cells for future transplantation. For bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, the majority of cryopreserved harvests come from autologous collections that are stored prior to a planned infusion following further treatment of the patient or at the time of a subsequent relapse. Other autologous harvests are stored as backup or "rainy day" harvests, the former specifically being intended to rescue patients who develop graft failure following an allogeneic transplant or who may require this transplant at a later date. Allogeneic bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood are less often cryopreserved than autologous harvests. This is in contrast to umbilical cord blood that may be banked for directed or sibling (related) hematopoietic stem cell transplants, for allogeneic unrelated donations, and for autologous donations. Allogeneic unrelated donations are of particular use for providing a source of hematopoietic stem cells for ethnic minorities, patients with rare human leukocyte antigen types, or where the patient urgently requires a transplant and cannot wait for the weeks to months required to prepare a bone marrow donor. There are currently more than 200,000 banked umbilical cord blood units registered with

  19. Measuring ATP Concentration in a Small Number of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of quiescent adult stem cells differs from the metabolism of differentiated cells. The metabolic processes are tightly regulated and their alterations disturb function of stem cells. One of the indicators of metabolic status of cells is the ATP level. While the method of measuring the ATP levels has been known for many years, estimating ATP levels in small population of defined stem cells isolated directly from the tissue has remained challenging. Here, we show our method of measuring the ATP levels in hematopoietic stem cells sorted from murine bone marrow. We used magnetic sorting as well as cell sorter and adopted the commonly used bioluminescence-based detection kits in described protocol. Our strategy allows to measure ATP levels in 1000 highly purified HSC.

  20. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs.

  1. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Paul J; Fasth, Anders L; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K; Kapoor, Neena; O'Brien, Tracey A; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A; Eapen, Mary

    2015-07-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed.

  3. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid;

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...

  4. Aging, Clonality, and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts, such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as the clonal selection of HSCs upon aging, provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and, potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies.

  5. Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Can Survive In Vitro for Several Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ishigaki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis could be achieved using the cells differentiated from primate embryonic stem (ES cells. Thus, we speculated that hematopoietic stem cells differentiated from ES cells could sustain long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether human hematopoietic stem cells could similarly sustain long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis in the same culture system. Although the results varied between experiments, presumably due to differences in the quality of each hematopoietic stem cell sample, long-lasting in vitro hematopoiesis was observed to last up to nine months. Furthermore, an in vivo analysis in which cultured cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice indicated that even after several months of culture, hematopoietic stem cells were still present in the cultured cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to show that human hematopoietic stem cells can survive in vitro for several months.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Need for Research & Potential Applications. It’s status in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shripad D. Banavali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that through replications have the capabilities of both self-renewal and differentiation into mature specialized cells. Broadly, there are two types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cell biology has been associated with ethical controversy and also their growth is difficult to control. Adult stem cells are located in tissues throughout the body and function as a reservoir to replace damaged or aging cells. Embryonic stem cells are by definitions, the master cells capable of differentiating into every type of cells either in-vitro or in-vivo. Several lines of evidence suggests, however, that adult stem cells and even terminally differentiated somatic cells under appropriate micro-environmental cues are able to be reprogrammed and contribute to a much wider spectrum of differentiated progeny than previously anticipated. Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs, for example, from different sources have been shown to cross the tissue boundaries and give rise to the cells of the other germ layers.In the past few years, the plasticity of adult cells in several post-natal tissues has attracted special attention in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies represent a new field of biomedical science which could provide in the future the cure for diseases until now considered incurable. The reconstitution of adult stem cells may be promising source for the regeneration of damaged tissues and for the resolution of organ dysfunction. However, there are two major limitations to the use of such cells:- (i They are rare and (ii Only a few types exist that can be isolated without harming the patient.Due to the inability to efficiently and safely harvest or expand stem cells from most adult organs (e.g. liver, gastrointestinal tract, heart, brain, the majority of human stem cell trials have focused on clinical applications for HSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, or both, which can be easily

  7. CMV IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de la Camara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its negative impact in the outcome of stem cell transplant (SCT and solid organ transplant patients (SOT CMV has been called “the troll of transplantation”. One of the greatest advances in the management of SCT has been the introduction of the preemptive strategy. Since its introduction, the incidence of the viremia, as expected, remains unchanged but there has been a marked decline in the incidence of early CMV disease. But in spite of the advances in prevention of CMV disease, CMV is still today an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Late CMV disease is still occurring in a significant proportion of patients and the so-called indirect effects of CMV are causing significant morbidity and mortality. Fortunately, there have been several advances in the development of new antivirals, adoptive immunotherapy and DNA-CMV vaccines that might transform the management of CMV in the near future.

  8. ROLE OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Michele Carella

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most curable human tumors. Despite this, about 30% of these patients relapsed or are primary refractory to the first line treatment. Autografting is generally considered the standard of care for these patients. Alternative salvage strategies have been evaluated such as high dose sequential and tandem autografting strategies. In younger patients,  refractory or early relapsed after autografting, allogeneic stem cell transplantation has been employed but this approach has been followed by significant concerns since the treatment related mortality often exceeded 40-50%, and relapses were not uncommon. It is clear that patient selection remains an issue in all allografting reports. At the end, new drugs and novel treatment strategies, that are based on our understanding of the disease biology and signaling pathways, are needed to improve treatment outcome for these patients. The two leading compounds Brentuximab Vedotin and Panobinostat, are currently under evaluation  in several clinical trials.

  9. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollini, Pierre; Faes-Van't Hull, Eveline; Kaiser, Stefan; Kapp, Ursula; Leyvraz, Serge

    2007-04-01

    Steady-state hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transplantation rely on the unique potential of stem cells to undergo both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Fetal liver (FL) represents a promising alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but limited by the total cell number obtained in a typical harvest. We reported that human FL nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) repopulating cells (SRCs) could be expanded under simple stroma-free culture conditions. Here, we sought to further characterize FL HSC/SRCs phenotypically and functionally before and following culture. Unexpanded or cultured FL cell suspensions were separated into various subpopulations. These were tested for long-term culture potential and for in vivo repopulating function following transplantation into NOD/SCID mice. We found that upon culture of human FL cells, a tight association between classical stem cell phenotypes, such as CD34(+) /CD38(-) and/or side population, and NOD/SCID repopulating function was lost, as observed with other sources. Although SRC activity before and following culture consistently correlated with the presence of a CD34(+) cell population, we provide evidence that, contrary to umbilical cord blood and adult sources, stem cells present in both CD34(+) and CD34(-) FL populations can sustain long-term hematopoietic cultures. Furthermore, upon additional culture, CD34-depleted cell suspensions, devoid of SRCs, regenerated a population of CD34(+) cells possessing SRC function. Our studies suggest that compared to neonatal and adult sources, the phenotypical characteristics of putative human FL HSCs may be less strictly defined, and reinforce the accumulated evidence that human FL represents a unique, valuable alternative and highly proliferative source of HSCs for clinical applications.

  10. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Haddad Barrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression.OBJECTIVE: To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS: A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged > 18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients; B (autologous transplant, 31 patients. A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1, one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2, and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3. In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks.RESULTS: The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression.CONCLUSION: Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications.

  11. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  12. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Afonso José Pereira; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Saboya, Rosaura; Mendrone Júnior, Alfredo; Amigo Filho, Ulisses; Coracin, Fabio Luiz; Buccheri, Valéria; Linardi, Camila da Cruz Gouveia; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Background Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. Objectives To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. Methods A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. Results The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. Conclusion Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not been previously reported

  13. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso José Pereira Cortez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. RESULTS: The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. CONCLUSION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not

  14. Estradiol increases hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells independent of its actions on bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illing, Anett; Liu, Peng; Ostermay, Susanne; Schilling, Arndt; de Haan, Gerald; Krust, Andree; Amling, Michael; Chambon, Pierre; Schinke, Thorsten; Tuckermann, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells reside in vascular and endosteal niches in the bone marrow. Factors affecting bone remodeling were reported to influence numbers and mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. We therefore analyzed the effects of estradiol acting anabolic on bone integrity. Her

  15. Fine-tuning Hematopoiesis: Microenvironmental factors regulating self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Luis (Tiago)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the ability to self renew and generate all lineages of blood cells. Although it is currently well established that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) regenerate the blood compartment, it was only in the 1960s that was introduced the not

  16. Pharmacoeconomics of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization : An Overview of Current Evidence and Gaps in the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaughnessy, Paul; Chao, Nelson; Shapiro, Jamie; Walters, Kent; McCarty, John; Abhyankar, Sunil; Shayani, Sepideh; Helmons, Pieter; Leather, Helen; Pazzalia, Amy; Pickard, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Adequate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization and collection is required prior to proceeding with high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Cytokines such as G-CSF, GM-CSF, and peg-filgrastim, alone or in combination with plerixafor, and after chemotherapy have

  17. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom, Justin T.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective approach for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, SCID is not a homogeneous disease, and the treatment required for successful transplantation varies significantly between SCID subtypes and the degree of HLA mismatch between the best available donor and the patient. Recent studies are beginning to more clearly define this heterogeneity and how outcomes may vary. With a more detailed understanding of SCID, new approaches can be developed to maximize immune reconstitution, while minimizing acute and long-term toxicities associated with chemotherapy conditioning. PMID:25821657

  18. Lung function after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Larsen Bang, Cæcilie; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    Reduction in pulmonary function (PF) has been reported in up to 85% of pediatric patients during the first year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our understanding of the etiology for this decrease in lung function is, however, sparse. The aim of this study was to describe PF...... experienced a decline in lung function of more than 10% during the first 3 to 9 months after HSCT. The decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide were strongly associated with acute graft...

  19. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  20. Gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Sarah; De Oliveira, Satiro N

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available cancer immunotherapies has resulted in favorable early outcomes. Specifically the use of gene therapy to introduce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) in T cells creates new immunotherapy options for patients. While showing early success with these approaches, limitations remain that can be overcome by the use of modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express CARs and TCRs. With modern gene therapy technologies, increased safety and control of the modification of the HSCs can be achieved through the use of a suicide gene.

  1. CD34 expression on long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells changes during developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, S; Ebihara, Y; Xu, M; Ishii, T; Sugiyama, D; Yoshino, H; Ueda, T; Manabe, A; Tanaka, R; Ikeda, Y; Nakahata, T; Tsuji, K

    2001-01-15

    The CD34 antigen serves as an important marker for primitive hematopoietic cells in therapeutic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and gene therapy, but it has remained an open question as to whether or not most HSC express CD34. Using a competitive long-term reconstitution assay, the results of this study confirm developmental changes in CD34 expression on murine HSC. In fetuses and neonates, CD34 was expressed on Lin(-)c-Kit(+) long-term repopulating HSC of bone marrow (BM), liver, and spleen. However, CD34 expression on HSC decreased with aging, and in mice older than 10 weeks, HSC were most enriched in the Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) marrow cell fraction. A second transplantation was performed from primary recipients who were transplanted with neonatal Lin(-)c-Kit(+) CD34(high) HSC marrow. Although donor-type HSC resided in CD34-expressing cell fraction in BM cells of the first recipients 4 weeks after the first transplantation, the stem cell activity had shifted to Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) cells after 16 weeks, indicating that adult Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) HSC are the progeny of neonatal CD34-expresssing HSC. Assays for colony-forming cells showed that hematopoietic progenitor cells, unlike HSC, continue to express CD34 throughout murine development. The present findings are important because the clinical application of HSC can be extended, in particular as related to CD34-enriched HSC and umbilical cord blood HSC.

  2. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Expansion in Rotating Wall Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang LIU; Tian-Qing LIU; Xiu-Bo FAN; Dan GE; Zhan-Feng CUI; Xue-Hu MA

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Clinical trials have demonstrated that ex vivo expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors offer great promise in reconstituting in vivo hematopoiesis in patients who have undergone intensive chemotherapy.It is therefore necessary to develop a clinical-scale culture system to provide the expanded HSCs and progenitors.Static culture systems such as T-flasks and gas-permeable blood bags are the most widely used culture devices for expanding hematopoietic cells. But they reveal several inherent limitations: ineffective mixing, lack of control options for dissolved oxygen and pH and difficulty in continuous feeding, which restricts the usefulness of static systems. Several advanced bioreactors have been used in the field of HSCs expansion. But hematopoietic cells are extremely sensitive to shear, so cells in bioreactors such as stirred and perfusion culture systems may suffer physical damage. This problem will be improved by applying the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor in clinic because of its low shear and unique structure. In this research, cord blood (CB) HSCs were expanded by means of a cell-dilution feeding protocol in RWV.

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  13. Oncogenic Kras initiates leukemia in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit J Sabnis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available How oncogenes modulate the self-renewal properties of cancer-initiating cells is incompletely understood. Activating KRAS and NRAS mutations are among the most common oncogenic lesions detected in human cancer, and occur in myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs and leukemias. We investigated the effects of expressing oncogenic Kras(G12D from its endogenous locus on the proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. MPD could be initiated by Kras(G12D expression in a highly restricted population enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, but not in common myeloid progenitors. Kras(G12D HSCs demonstrated a marked in vivo competitive advantage over wild-type cells. Kras(G12D expression also increased the fraction of proliferating HSCs and reduced the overall size of this compartment. Transplanted Kras(G12D HSCs efficiently initiated acute T-lineage leukemia/lymphoma, which was associated with secondary Notch1 mutations in thymocytes. We conclude that MPD-initiating activity is restricted to the HSC compartment in Kras(G12D mice, and that distinct self-renewing populations with cooperating mutations emerge during cancer progression.

  14. Dynamic equilibrium of reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Quigley, John

    2010-12-01

    Clonal dominance in hematopoietic stem cell populations is an important question of interest but not one we can directly answer. Any estimates are based on indirect measurement. For marked populations, we can equate empirical and theoretical moments for binomial sampling, in particular we can use the well-known formula for the sampling variation of a binomial proportion. The empirical variance itself cannot always be reliably estimated and some caution is needed. We describe the difficulties here and identify ready solutions which only require appropriate use of variance-stabilizing transformations. From these we obtain estimators for the steady state, or dynamic equilibrium, of the number of hematopoietic stem cells involved in repopulating the marrow. The calculations themselves are not too involved. We give the distribution theory for the estimator as well as simple approximations for practical application. As an illustration, we rework on data recently gathered to address the question as to whether or not reconstitution of marrow grafts in the clinical setting might be considered to be oligoclonal.

  15. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis.

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Fibbe, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of multipotent cells that can be isolated from various human tissues and culture-expanded ex vivo for clinical use. Due to their immunoregulatory properties and their ability to secrete growth factors, MSCs play a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and in the modulation of immune responses against allo- and autoantigens. In light of these properties, MSCs have been employed in clinical trials in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and to prevent graft failure, as well as to treat steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The available clinical evidence derived from these studies indicates that MSC administration is safe. Moreover, promising preliminary results in terms of efficacy have been reported in some clinical trials, especially in the treatment of acute GvHD. In this review we critically discuss recent advances in MSC therapy by reporting on the most relevant studies in the field of HSCT.

  17. Erythropoietic Potential of CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Human Cord Blood and G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglian Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell (RBC supply for transfusion has been severely constrained by the limited availability of donor blood and the emergence of infection and contamination issues. Alternatively, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human organs have been increasingly considered as safe and effective blood source. Several methods have been studied to obtain mature RBCs from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells via in vitro culture. Among them, human cord blood (CB and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult peripheral blood (mPB are common adult stem cells used for allogeneic transplantation. Our present study focuses on comparing CB- and mPB-derived stem cells in differentiation from CD34+ cells into mature RBCs. By using CD34+ cells from cord blood and G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, we showed in vitro RBC generation of artificial red blood cells. Our results demonstrate that CB- and mPB-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells have similar characteristics when cultured under the same conditions, but differ considerably with respect to expression levels of various genes and hemoglobin development. This study is the first to compare the characteristics of CB- and mPB-derived erythrocytes. The results support the idea that CB and mPB, despite some similarities, possess different erythropoietic potentials in in vitro culture systems.

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kosan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function.

  19. Polycomb-group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell regulation and hematopoietic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, V; de Haan, G; Klauke, K

    2013-03-01

    The equilibrium between self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. In particular, Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins have been shown to be involved in this process by repressing genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and differentiation. PcGs are histone modifiers that reside in two multi-protein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2). The existence of multiple orthologs for each Polycomb gene allows the formation of a multitude of distinct PRC1 and PRC2 sub-complexes. Changes in the expression of individual PcG genes are likely to cause perturbations in the composition of the PRC, which affect PRC enzymatic activity and target selectivity. An interesting recent development is that aberrant expression of, and mutations in, PcG genes have been shown to occur in hematopoietic neoplasms, where they display both tumor-suppressor and oncogenic activities. We therefore comprehensively reviewed the latest research on the role of PcG genes in normal and malignant blood cell development. We conclude that future research to elucidate the compositional changes of the PRCs and methods to intervene in PRC assembly will be of great therapeutic relevance to combat hematological malignancies.

  20. Regulation of hematopoiesis and the hematopoietic stem cell niche by Wnt signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J Nemeth; David M Bodine

    2007-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare population of cells that are responsible for life-long generation of blood cells of all lineages. In order to maintain their numbers, HSCs must establish a balance between the opposing cell fates of self-renewal (in which the ability to function as HSCs is retained) and initiation of hematopoietic differentiation. Multiple signaling pathways have been implicated in the regulation of HSC cell fate. One such set of pathways are those activated by the Wnt family of ligands. Wnt signaling pathways play a crucial role during embryogenesis and deregulation of these pathways has been implicated in the formation of solid tumors. Wnt signaling also plays a role in the regulation of stem cells from multiple tissues, such as embryonic, epidermal, and intestinal stem cells. However, the function of Wnt signaling in HSC biology is still controversial. In this review, we will discuss the basic characteristics of the adult HSC and its regulatory microenvironment, the "niche", focusing on the regulation of the HSC and its niche by the Wnt signaling pathways.

  1. Autophagy as an ultrastructural marker of heavy metal toxicity in human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, Mario [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)], E-mail: m.digioacchino@unich.it; Petrarca, Claudia; Perrone, Angela [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Farina, Massimo; Sabbioni, Enrico; Hartung, Thomas [Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Martino, Simone [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Esposito, Diana L. [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mariani-Costantini, Renato [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Stem cells are a key target of environmental toxicants, but little is known about their toxicological responses. We aimed at developing an in-vitro model based on adult human stem cells to identify biomarkers of heavy metal exposure. To this end we investigated the responses of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells to hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and cadmium (Cd). Parallel cultures of CD34+ cells isolated from umbilical cord blood were exposed for 48 h to 0.1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd. Cultures treated with 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd showed marked cell loss. Ultrastructural analysis of surviving cells revealed prominent autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes, which is diagnostic of autophagy, associated with mitochondrial damage and replication, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and chromatin condensation. Treated cells did not show the morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis. Treatment with 0.1 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd did not result in cell loss, but at the ultrastructural level cells showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum and evidence of mitochondrial damage. We conclude that autophagy is implicated in the response of human hematopoietic stem cells to toxic concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cd. Autophagy, which mediates cell survival and death under stress, deserves further evaluation to be established as biomarker of metal exposure.

  2. Evaluation of febrile neutropenia in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahideh Amini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and causes of fever as a major problem contributing to transplantation related mortality among patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and evaluation of antibiotic use, according to reliable guidelines.We retrospectively reviewed hospital records of 195 adult patients who underwent HSCT between 2009-2011 at hematology-oncology and bone marrow transplantation research center. Baseline information and also data related to fever and neutropenia, patient's outcomes, duration of hospitalization and antibiotic use pattern were documented.A total of 195 patients were analyzed and a total of 268 febrile episodes in 180 patients were recorded (mean 1.5 episodes per patient. About 222 episodes (82% were associated with neutropenia which one-fourth of them were without any documented infection sources. Microbiologic documents showed that the relative frequencies of gram positive and gram negative bacteria were 62.5% and 37.5%, respectively. The hospital stay duration was directly related to the numbers of fever episodes (P<0.0001.The rate of febrile episodes in autologous stem cell transplantation was significantly higher compared to allogeneic type (P<0.05.It is necessary to determine not only the local profile of microbiologic pattern, but also antibiotic sensitivities in febrile neutropenic patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and reassess response to antibiotic treatment to establish any necessity for modifications to treatment guidelines in order to prevent any fatal complications from infection.

  3. 重视造血干细胞移植中的造血微环境问题%Pay close attention to hematopoietic inductive microenvironment in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张曦; 张诚; 陈幸华

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic method in treatment of various hematologic neoplastic disorders. Successful transplantion relies on the normal proliferation, differentiation of the transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in the recipients, and the low occurence of complications. In previous studies, more attention has been paid to the hematopoietic stem cells rather than the hematopoietic inductive microenvironment , which is actually necessary for the survival and function of the transplanted hematopoietic stem cells. Results from our studies indicate that the hematopoietic inductive microenvironment is as important as the hematopoietic stem cells in the transplantation therapy.

  4. Deficiency of GRP94 in the hematopoietic system alters proliferation regulators in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Biquan; Tseng, Chun-Chih; Adams, Gregor B; Lee, Amy S

    2013-12-01

    We have previously reported that acute inducible knockout of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP94 led to an expansion of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell pool. Here, we investigated the effectors and mechanisms for this phenomenon. We observed an increase in AKT activation in freshly isolated GRP94-null HSC-enriched Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells, corresponding with higher production of PI(3,4,5)P3, indicative of PI3K activation. Treatment of GRP94-null LSK cells with the AKT inhibitor MK2206 compromised cell expansion, suggesting a causal relationship between elevated AKT activation and increased proliferation in GRP94-null HSCs. Microarray analysis demonstrated a 97% reduction in the expression of the hematopoietic cell cycle regulator Ms4a3 in the GRP94-null LSK cells, and real-time quantitative PCR confirmed this down-regulation in the LSK cells but not in the total bone marrow (BM). A further examination comparing freshly isolated BM LSK cells with spleen LSK cells, as well as BM LSK cells cultured in vitro, revealed specific down-regulation of Ms4a3 in freshly isolated BM GRP94-null LSK cells. On examining cell surface proteins that are known to regulate stem cell proliferation, we observed a reduced expression of cell surface connexin 32 (Cx32) plaques in GRP94-null LSK cells. However, suppression of Cx32 hemichannel activity in wild-type LSK cells through mimetic peptides did not lead to increased LSK cell proliferation in vitro. Two other important cell surface proteins that mediate HSC-niche interactions, specifically Tie2 and CXCR4, were not impaired by Grp94 deletion. Collectively, our study uncovers novel and unique roles of GRP94 in regulating HSC proliferation.

  5. Human peripheral blood-born hematosphere as a niche for hematopoietic stem cell expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Hur; Eun Ju Lee; Hyun-Jai Cho; Hyun-Jae Kang; Byung-Hee Oh; Young-Bae Park; Hyo-Soo Kim; Jonghanne Park; Sang Eun Lee; Chang-Hwan Yoon; Jae Hee Jang; Ji Min Yang; Tae-Kyu Lee; Jae-Il Choi; Han-Mo Yang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from the adult peripheral blood has been widely used in the treatment of various hematological diseases [1].However,the small number of circulating HSPC is the major limitation and necessitates additional interventions such as G-CSF mobilization and leukapheresis.There have been several attempts to overcome the limitation with ex vivo expansion of HSPC.These strategies are largely based on supplementation of one or more "stem cell niche components"such as supporting-cells,growth factors,extracellular matrix (ECM) or physicochemical microenvironment in the bone marrow [2].Spheroid culture methods of stem ceils from different tissues have been successfully used for expansion of cardiac and neural stem cells.These spheres sensitize target stem cells to growth factors and provide sufficient cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix contacts,mimicking the in vivo stem cell niche [3,4].Here we asked whether spheroid culture of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) would potentiate the expansion of circulating blood HSPC.

  6. Icing oral mucositis: Oral cryotherapy in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joey; Seabrook, Jamie; Fulford, Adrienne; Rajakumar, Irina

    2017-03-01

    Background Up to 70% of patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant develop oral mucositis as a side effect of high-dose melphalan conditioning chemotherapy. Oral cryotherapy has been documented to be potentially effective in reducing oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the cryotherapy protocol implemented within the hematopoietic stem cell transplant program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of adult multiple myeloma patients who received high-dose melphalan conditioning therapy for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Primary endpoints were incidence and severity of oral mucositis. Secondary endpoints included duration of oral mucositis, duration of hospital stay, parenteral narcotics use and total parenteral nutrition use. Results One hundred and forty patients were included in the study, 70 patients in both no cryotherapy and cryotherapy groups. Both oral mucositis incidence and severity were found to be significantly lower in the cryotherapy group. Fifty (71.4%) experienced mucositis post cryotherapy compared to 67 (95.7%) in the no cryotherapy group (p < 0.001). The median oral mucositis severity, assessed using the WHO oral toxicity scale from grade 0-4, experienced in the no group was 2.5 vs. 2 in the cryotherapy group (p = 0.03). Oral mucositis duration and use of parenteral narcotics were also significantly reduced. Duration of hospital stay and use of parenteral nutrition were similar between the two groups. Conclusion The cryotherapy protocol resulted in a significantly lower incidence and severity of oral mucositis. These results provide evidence for the continued use of oral cryotherapy, an inexpensive and generally well-tolerated practice.

  7. Megakaryocytes regulate hematopoietic stem cell quiescence via Cxcl4 secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Ingmar; Lucas, Daniel; Pinho, Sandra; Ahmed, Jalal; Lambert, Michele P.; Kunisaki, Yuya; Scheiermann, Christoph; Schiff, Lauren; Poncz, Mortimer; Bergman, Aviv; Frenette, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) lodge in specialized microenvironments that tightly control their proliferative state to adapt to the varying needs for replenishment of blood cells while also preventing exhaustion1. All putative niche cells suggested thus far have a non-hematopoietic origin2-8. Thus, it remains unclear how feedback from mature cells is conveyed to HSCs to adjust proliferation. Here we show that megakaryocytes (Mk) can directly regulate HSC pool size. Three-dimensional whole-mount imaging revealed that endogenous HSCs are frequently located adjacent to Mk in a non-random fashion. Selective in vivo depletion of Mk resulted in specific loss of HSC quiescence and led to a marked expansion of functional HSCs. Gene expression analyses revealed that Mk were the source of chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 4 (Cxcl4, also named platelet factor 4, Pf4) in the BM and Cxcl4 injection reduced HSC numbers via increased quiescence. By contrast, Cxcl4−/− mice exhibited increased HSC numbers and proliferation. Combined use of whole-mount imaging and computational modelling was highly suggestive of a megakaryocytic niche capable of influencing independently HSC maintenance by regulating quiescence. Thus, these results indicate that a terminally differentiated HSC progeny contributes to niche activity by directly regulating HSC behavior. PMID:25326802

  8. Lentiviral gene therapy of murine hematopoietic stem cells ameliorates the Pompe disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Til, Niek P; Stok, Merel; Aerts Kaya, Fatima S F; de Waard, Monique C; Farahbakhshian, Elnaz; Visser, Trudi P; Kroos, Marian A; Jacobs, Edwin H; Willart, Monique A; van der Wegen, Pascal; Scholte, Bob J; Lambrecht, Bart N; Duncker, Dirk J; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J; Verstegen, Monique M; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    Pompe disease (acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency) is a lysosomal glycogen storage disorder characterized in its most severe early-onset form by rapidly progressive muscle weakness and mortality within the first year of life due to cardiac and respiratory failure. Enzyme replacement therapy prolongs the life of affected infants and supports the condition of older children and adults but entails lifelong treatment and can be counteracted by immune responses to the recombinant enzyme. We have explored the potential of lentiviral vector-mediated expression of human acid alpha-glucosidase in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in a Pompe mouse model. After mild conditioning, transplantation of genetically engineered HSCs resulted in stable chimerism of approximately 35% hematopoietic cells that overexpress acid alpha-glucosidase and in major clearance of glycogen in heart, diaphragm, spleen, and liver. Cardiac remodeling was reversed, and respiratory function, skeletal muscle strength, and motor performance improved. Overexpression of acid alpha-glucosidase did not affect overall hematopoietic cell function and led to immune tolerance as shown by challenge with the human recombinant protein. On the basis of the prominent and sustained therapeutic efficacy without adverse events in mice we conclude that ex vivo HSC gene therapy is a treatment option worthwhile to pursue.

  9. DI-3-butylphthalide-enhanced hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and endogenous stem cell mobilization for the treatment of cerebral infarcts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoquan Lu; Xiaoming Shang; Yongqiu Li; Hongying Ma; Chunqin Liu; Jianmin Li; Yingqi Zhang; Shaoxin Yao

    2011-01-01

    Exogenous stem cell transplantation and endogenous stem cell mobilization are both effective for the treatment of acute cerebral infarction. The compound dl-3-butylphthalide is known to improve microcirculation and help brain cells at the infarct loci. This experiment aimed to investigate the effects of dl-3-butylphthalide intervention based on the transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and mobilization of endogenous stem cells in a rat model of cerebral infarction, following middle cerebral artery occlusion. Results showed that neurological function was greatly improved and infarct volume was reduced in rats with cerebral infarction. Data also showed that dl-3-butylphthalide can promote hematopoietic stem cells to transform into vascular endothelial cells and neuronal-like cells, and also enhance the therapeutic effect on cerebral infarction by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and endogenous stem cell mobilization.

  10. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Manipulation of hematopoietic stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Iwama, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by their capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into all blood cell lineages while retaining robust capacity to regenerate hematopoiesis. Based on these characteristics, they are widely used for transplantation and gene therapy. However, the dose of HSCs available for use in treatments is limited. Therefore, extensive work has been undertaken to expand HSCs in culture and to produce HSCs from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in order to improve the efficiency and outcome of HSC-based therapies. Various surface markers have been characterized to improve the purification of HSCs and a huge number of cytokines and small-molecule compounds have been screened for use in the expansion of HSCs. In addition, attempts to generate not only HSCs but also mature blood cells from ESCs and iPSCs are currently ongoing. This review covers recent approaches for the purification, expansion or production of human HSCs and provides insight into problems that need to be resolved.

  14. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hande H Tuncer; Naveed Rana; Cannon Milani; Angela Darko; Samer A Al-Homsi

    2012-01-01

    Recognition and management of gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has gained increasing importance as indications and techniques of transplantation have expanded in the last few years.The transplant recipient is at risk for several complications including conditioning chemotherapy related toxicities,infections,bleeding,sinusoidal obstruction syndrome,acute and chronic graftversus-host disease (GVHD) as well as other long-term problems.The severity and the incidence of many complications have improved in the past several years as the intensity of conditioning regimens has diminished and better supportive care and GVHD prevention strategies have been implemented.Transplant clinicians,however,continue to be challenged with problems arising from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched and unrelated donor transplants,expanding transplant indications and age-limit.This review describes the most commonly seen transplant related complications,focusing on their pathogenesis,differential diagnosis and management.

  15. Bone Marrow Vascular Niche: Home for Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though discovered later than osteoblastic niche, vascular niche has been regarded as an alternative indispensable niche operating regulation on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. As significant progresses gained on this type niche, it is gradually clear that the main work of vascular niche is undertaking to support hematopoiesis. However, compared to what have been defined in the mechanisms through which the osteoblastic niche regulates hematopoiesis, we know less in vascular niche. In this review, based on research data hitherto we will focus on component foundation and various functions of vascular niche that guarantee the normal hematopoiesis process within bone marrow microenvironments. And the possible pathways raised by various research results through which this environment undergoes its function will be discussed as well.

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatter, Mary A; Cant, Andrew J

    2011-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is now highly successfully curing a widening range of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Better tissue typing, matching of donors, less toxic chemotherapy, better virus detection and treatment, improved supportive care, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis mean up to a 90% cure for severe combined immunodeficiency patients and a 70-80% cure for other PIDs given a matched unrelated donor, and rising to 95% for young patients with specific PIDs, such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Precise molecular diagnosis, detailed data on prognosis, and careful pre-HSCT assessment of infective lung and liver damage will ensure an informed benefit analysis of HSCT and the best outcome. It is now recognized that the best treatment option for chronic granulomatous disease is HSCT, which can also be curative for CD40 ligand deficiency and complex immune dysregulation disorders.

  17. Bone Niches, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, and Vessel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tamma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow (BM is a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. HSCs are localized in both the endosteum, in the so-called endosteal niche, and close to thin-walled and fenestrated sinusoidal vessel in the center of BM, in the so-called vascular niche. HSCs give rise to all types of mature blood cells through a process finely controlled by numerous signals emerging from the bone marrow niches where HSCs reside. This review will focus on the description of the role of BM niches in the control of the fate of HSCs and will also highlight the role of the BM niches in the regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Moreover, alterations of the signals in niche microenvironment are involved in many aspects of tumor progression and vascularization and further knowledge could provide the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Parental caregiving of children prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodday, Angie Mae; Pedowitz, Elizabeth J; Mayer, Deborah K; Ratichek, Sara J; Given, Charles W; Parsons, Susan K

    2012-08-01

    Using the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA), we assessed positive reactions and burdens of the caregiving experience among parental caregivers (n = 189) of children scheduled to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Although widely used in non-parental caregivers, the CRA has not been used in parents of pediatric patients. Reliability (Cronbach's alpha: .72-.81 vs. .63) and concurrent validity (correlation: .41-.61 vs. .28) were higher for negatively framed than positively framed subscales. Results indicate that the caregiving experience is complex. The parents experienced high caregiver's esteem and moderate family support, but also negative impacts on finances and schedule, and to a lesser degree, health. Compared to non-parental caregivers, parental caregivers experienced higher esteem and more impact on finances and schedule.

  19. Gastrointestinal Complications Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Lim, Gye Yeon; Im, Soo Ah; Chung, Nak Gyun; Hahn, Seung Tae [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Gastrointestinal system involvement is one of the principal complications seen in the recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and it is also a major cause of morbidity and death in these patients. The major gastrointestinal complications include typhlitis (neutropenic enterocolitis), pseudomembranous enterocolitis, viral enteritis, graft-versus-host disease, benign pneumatosis intestinalis, intestinal thrombotic microangiopathy, and post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease. As these patients present with nonspecific abdominal symptoms, evaluation with using such imaging modalities as ultrasonography and CT is essential in order to assess the extent of gastrointestinal involvement and to diagnose these complications. We present here a pictorial review of the imaging features and other factors involved in the diagnosis of these gastrointestinal complications in pediatric HSCT recipients.

  20. Sexual health in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S M; Shaw, Bronwen E; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S; Savani, Bipin N; Rovó, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT.

  1. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönig, M; Schulz, A; Friedrich, W

    2011-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a heterogeneous group of congenital diseases characterized by their presentation with life threatening infections in the first months of life. The clinical presentation and the therapeutic outcome is influenced by multiple factors: the genetic defect, infectious complications, the presence of maternal T cells the development of Omenn syndrome, as well as non-immunological signs and symptoms of the disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to date is the only established curative option and allows long-term cure of the disease. Therapeutic objectives of HSCT in SCID clearly differ from those in malignant or hematological disease. Disease specific aspects and their influence on the therapeutic strategy in SCID will be discussed in this review.

  3. Definitive hematopoietic stem cells first develop within the major arterial regions of the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.T.R. de Bruijn (Marella); N.A. Speck; M.C. Peeters (Marian); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is a potent hematopoietic site within the mammalian embryo body, and the first place from which hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge. Within the complex embryonic vascular, excretory and reproductive tissues of the

  4. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, M; van Os, R; Velders, GA; Hagoort, H; Heegaard, PMH; Lindley, IJD; Willemze, R; Fibbe, WE

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory

  5. Improvement of Thymopoiesis after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation by Cytokines: Translational studies in experimental animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-J. Wils (Evert-Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAllogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AlloHSCT) is a powerful treatment modality that is frequently applied as part of treatment of hematological malignancies, aplastic anemia and inborn errors of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A major drawback of alloHSCT is the treatment

  6. JAM-B regulates maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Frontera, Vincent; Bardin, Florence; Obrados, Elodie; Adams, Susanne; Chabannon, Christian; Schiff, Claudine; Mancini, Stephane J C; Adams, Ralf H; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2011-10-27

    In adult mammals, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in the bone marrow (BM) and are maintained in a quiescent and undifferentiated state through adhesive interactions with specialized microenvironmental niches. Although junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) is expressed by HSCs, its function in adult hematopoiesis remains elusive. Here, we show that HSCs adhere to JAM-B expressed by BM stromal cells in a JAM-C dependent manner. The interaction regulates the interplay between HSCs and BM stromal cells as illustrated by the decreased pool of quiescent HSCs observed in jam-b deficient mice. We further show that this is probably because of alterations of BM stromal compartments and changes in SDF-1α BM content in jam-b(-/-) mice, suggesting that JAM-B is an active player in the maintenance of the BM stromal microenvironment.

  7. BAF180 regulates cellular senescence and hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis through p21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyemin; Dai, Fangyan; Zhuang, Li; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; Kim, Jongchan; Zhang, Yilei; Ma, Li; You, M James; Wang, Zhong; Gan, Boyi

    2016-04-12

    BAF180 (also called PBRM1), a subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, plays critical roles in the regulation of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, and is frequently mutated in several human cancers. However, the role of mammalian BAF180 in tumor suppression and tissue maintenance in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, using a conditional somatic knockout approach, we explored the cellular and organismal functions of BAF180 in mouse. BAF180 deletion in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) triggers profound cell cycle arrest, premature cellular senescence, without affecting DNA damage response or chromosomal integrity. While somatic deletion of BAF180 in adult mice does not provoke tumor development, BAF180 deficient mice exhibit defects in hematopoietic system characterized by progressive reduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), defective long-term repopulating potential, and hematopoietic lineage developmental aberrations. BAF180 deletion results in elevated p21 expression in both MEFs and HSCs. Mechanistically, we showed that BAF180 binds to p21 promoter, and BAF180 deletion enhances the binding of modified histones associated with transcriptional activation on p21 promoter. Deletion of p21 rescues cell cycle arrest and premature senescence in BAF180 deficient MEFs, and partially rescues hematopoietic defects in BAF180 deficient mice. Together, our study identifies BAF180 as a critical regulator of cellular senescence and HSC homeostasis, which is at least partially regulated through BAF180-mediated suppression of p21 expression. Our results also suggest that senescence triggered by BAF180 inactivation may serve as a failsafe mechanism to restrain BAF180 deficiency-associated tumor development, providing a conceptual framework to further understand BAF180 function in tumor biology.

  8. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary complications due to infection and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), a noninfectious lung injury in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, are frequent causes of transplantation-related mortality and morbidity. Our objective was to characterize the global bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein expression of IPS to identify proteins and pathways that differentiate IPS from infectious lung injury after HSCT. We studied 30 BALF samples from patients who developed lung injury within 180 days of HSCT or cellular therapy transfusion (natural killer cell transfusion). Adult subjects were classified as having IPS or infectious lung injury by the criteria outlined in the 2011 American Thoracic Society statement. BALF was depleted of hemoglobin and 14 high-abundance proteins, treated with trypsin, and labeled with isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) 8-plex reagent for two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and data dependent peptide tandem mass spectrometry (MS) on an Orbitrap Velos system in higher-energy collision-induced dissociation activation mode. Protein identification employed a target-decoy strategy using ProteinPilot within Galaxy P. The relative protein abundance was determined with reference to a global internal standard consisting of pooled BALF from patients with respiratory failure and no history of HSCT. A variance weighted t-test controlling for a false discovery rate of ≤5% was used to identify proteins that showed differential expression between IPS and infectious lung injury. The biological relevance of these proteins was determined by using gene ontology enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We characterized 12 IPS and 18 infectious lung injury BALF samples. In the 5 iTRAQ LC-MS/MS experiments 845, 735, 532, 615, and 594 proteins were identified for a total of 1125 unique proteins and 368 common proteins across all 5 LC-MS/MS experiments. When comparing IPS to

  9. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia:a report of 12 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙于谦

    2013-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively review the efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT)for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia(CMML).Methods The engraftment,graft versus host disease(GVHD)

  10. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2010-09-01

    Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function.

  11. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity: Biobehavioral influences on recovery following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Review of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and its potential “window of opportunity” during which interventions targeting stress-related behavioral factors can influence the survival, health, and well-being of recipients.

  12. Differential outcome of neurological HCMV infection in two hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Anna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection of the central nervous system (CNS is a rare but life threatening condition which may follow hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Diagnosis, monitoring and treatment approaches rely on anecdotal reports. Case presentations The different outcomes of HCMV CNS disease in an adult and a pediatric T-cell depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipient are reported. In the first case, HCMV encephalitis emerged in the context of simultaneous impairment of the T- and B-cell immunity. Antiviral treatment only reduced viral load in peripheral blood and the patient died. In the second case, an HCMV radiculopathy was observed and antiviral treatment was adjusted on the basis of intrathecal drug level. In addition, donor HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs were infused. Viral load in the CNS decreased and the patient recovered from the acute event. In neither case were drug-resistant HCMV variants observed in blood or CNS samples. Conclusions T-cell depleted HSCT appears a predisposing condition for CNS HCMV infection since never observed in other HSCT recipients at our center in the last 15 years. Intensive diagnostic approaches and timely aggressive combination treatments might improve clinical outcome in these patients.

  13. The histone demethylase Jarid1b is required for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Morag H; Albert, Mareike; Sroczynska, Patrycja;

    2015-01-01

    Jarid1b/KDM5b is a histone demethylase that regulates self-renewal and differentiation in stem cells and cancer, however its function in hematopoiesis is unclear. Here, we find that Jarid1b is highly expressed in primitive hematopoietic compartments and is overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias...... compromises hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal capacity and suggest that Jarid1b is a positive regulator of HSC potential....

  14. [Potential of hematopoietic stem cells as the basis for generation of advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönig, H; Heiden, M; Schüttrumpf, J; Müller, M M; Seifried, E

    2011-07-01

    Individualized, (stem) cell-based therapies of congenital and acquired illnesses are among the most exciting medical challenges of the twenty-first century. Before the full potential of such therapies can be achieved, many basic scientific and biotechnological questions remain to be answered. What is the ideal source for the generation of such cellular drugs is one of those issues. In many respects, hematopoietic stem cells fulfill the requirements for stem cells as starting material for novel cellular therapeutics, including the simple access to large amounts of stem cells, the availability of good phenotypic markers for their prospective isolation, and an extensive body of knowledge about the in vitro manipulation of these cells. This manuscript discusses the general and specific usability of hematopoietic stem cells as starting material for novel cellular therapeutics and presents some examples of hematological and nonhematological therapeutic approaches which are based on hematopoietic stem cells.

  15. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  16. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Igor; Milanovich, Natalia; Uss, Anatoly; Iskrov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSI) remain a frequent complication during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), resulting in high mortality rates. This study evaluated risk factors for mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period. Methods This prospective case control study was performed at the Center of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation in Minsk, Republic of Belarus. Data relating to patient age and gender, date and type of transplantation, conditioning chemotherapy regimen, microorganisms isolated from blood, and antibacterial therapy were prospectively collected from all hematopoietic stem cell recipients with microbiologically proven cases of BSI in the pre-engraftment period. The primary outcome was all-cause 30-day mortality after onset of febrile neutropenia. Results A total of 135 adult patients with microbiologically proven BSI after HSCT were studied, with 65.2% of cases caused by gram-negative microorganisms and 21.5% by non-fermenting bacteria. Inadequate empiric antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were independently associated with increased all-cause 30-day mortality in these patients. Conclusion The risk factors for mortality in adult patients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period after HSCT were inadequacy of empirical antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii or P. aeruginosa. PMID:27382554

  17. BMP and Hedgehog Regulate Distinct AGM Hematopoietic Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Crisan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, the self-renewing cells of the adult blood differentiation hierarchy, are generated during embryonic stages. The first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region of the embryo through endothelial to a hematopoietic transition. BMP4 and Hedgehog affect their production and expansion, but it is unknown whether they act to affect the same HSCs. In this study using the BRE GFP reporter mouse strain that identifies BMP/Smad-activated cells, we find that the AGM harbors two types of adult-repopulating HSCs upon explant culture: One type is BMP-activated and the other is a non-BMP-activated HSC type that is indirectly controlled by Hedgehog signaling through the VEGF pathway. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that the two HSC types express distinct but overlapping genetic programs. These results revealing the bifurcation in HSC types at early embryonic stages in the AGM explant model suggest that their development is dependent upon the signaling molecules in the microenvironment.

  18. Adult stem cells: hopes and hypes of regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulak, Józef; Szade, Krzysztof; Szade, Agata; Nowak, Witold; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells that can differentiate into specialized cell type(s). Pluripotent stem cells, i.e. embryonic stem cells (ESC) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) differentiate into cells of all three embryonic lineages. Multipotent stem cells, like hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), can develop into multiple specialized cells in a specific tissue. Unipotent cells differentiate only into one cell type, like e.g. satellite cells of skeletal muscle. There are many examples of successful clinical applications of stem cells. Over million patients worldwide have benefited from bone marrow transplantations performed for treatment of leukemias, anemias or immunodeficiencies. Skin stem cells are used to heal severe burns, while limbal stem cells can regenerate the damaged cornea. Pluripotent stem cells, especially the patient-specific iPSC, have a tremendous therapeutic potential, but their clinical application will require overcoming numerous drawbacks. Therefore, the use of adult stem cells, which are multipotent or unipotent, can be at present a more achievable strategy. Noteworthy, some studies ascribed particular adult stem cells as pluripotent. However, despite efforts, the postulated pluripotency of such events like "spore-like cells", "very small embryonic-like stem cells" or "multipotent adult progenitor cells" have not been confirmed in stringent independent studies. Also plasticity of the bone marrow-derived cells which were suggested to differentiate e.g. into cardiomyocytes, has not been positively verified, and their therapeutic effect, if observed, results rather from the paracrine activity. Here we discuss the examples of recent studies on adult stem cells in the light of current understanding of stem cell biology.

  19. Investigating the interaction between hematopoietic stem cells and their niche during embryonic development: optimizing the isolation of fetal and newborn stem cells from liver, spleen, and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huimin; Williams, Brenda; Nilsson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in a particular microenvironment termed a "niche." Within the niche, a number of critical molecules and supportive cell types have been identified to play key roles in modulating adult HSC quiescence, proliferation, differentiation, and reconstitution. However, unlike in the adult bone marrow (BM), the components of stem cell niches, as well as their interactions with fetal HSC during different stages of embryonic development, are poorly understood. During embryogenesis, hematopoietic development migrates through multiple organs, each with different cellular and molecular components and hence each with a potentially unique HSC niche. As a consequence, isolating fetal HSC from each organ at the time of hematopoietic colonization is fundamental for assessing and understanding both HSC function and their interactions with specific microenvironments. Herein, we describe methodologies for harvesting cells as well as the purification of stem and progenitors from fetal and newborn liver, spleen, and BM at various developmental stages following the expansion of hematopoiesis in the fetal liver at E14.5.

  20. Histone acetyltransferase cofactor Trrap is essential for maintaining the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, Joanna I; Oser, Gabriela; Shukla, Vivek; Sawan, Carla; Murr, Rabih; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Trumpp, Andreas; Herceg, Zdenko

    2009-11-15

    The pool of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which provide life-long reconstitution of all hematopoietic lineages, is tightly controlled and regulated by self-renewal and apoptosis. Histone modifiers and chromatin states are believed to govern establishment, maintenance, and propagation of distinct patterns of gene expression in stem cells, however the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we identified a role for the histone acetytransferase cofactor Trrap in the maintenance of hematopietic stem/progenitor cells. Conditional deletion of the Trrap gene in mice resulted in ablation of bone marrow and increased lethality. This was due to the depletion of early hematopoietic progenitors, including hematopoietic stem cells, via a cell-autonomous mechanism. Analysis of purified bone marrow progenitors revealed that these defects are associated with induction of p53-independent apoptosis and deregulation of Myc transcription factors. Together, this study has identified a critical role for Trrap in the mechanism that maintains hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic system, and underscores the importance of Trrap and histone modifications in tissue homeostasis.

  1. Characteristics of adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Manuel A; Bernad, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their unlimited ability to divide specifically; a stem cell is capable of making an immense number of copies of itself, maintaining the same characteristics. Moreover, these cells are able to generate several of the cell lineages which make up the body, including cells from the heart, liver, kidney, neurons, and muscles. Investigation of the mechanisms through which this differentiation occurs, the genes involved and the possibility of increasing the efficiency with which stem cells can be isolated and/or characterized are currently among the most important fields in biology and biomedicine.To date, stems cells have been identified from four different sources: Embryonic stem cells (ESC), germinal stem cells, and those derived from embryonic carcinomas (teratocarcinomas) and from somatic tissues (somatic stem cells). The latter are called adult stem cells (ASC) when they are found in postnatal tissues. We now know that there is a great diversity among ASC, with some tissues, such as the bone marrow, containing more than one type of ASC. Adult stem cells have several characteristics that make them to be the main players in current regenerative medicine and are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for a wide variety of diseases. Specifically, HSC and MSC are being assessed in increasing numbers of clinical trials.

  2. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  3. Highly proliferative primitive fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells are fueled by oxidative metabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed K. Manesia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in the fetal liver (FL unlike adult bone marrow (BM proliferate extensively, posing different metabolic demands. However, metabolic pathways responsible for the production of energy and cellular building blocks in FL HSCs have not been described. Here, we report that FL HSCs use oxygen dependent energy generating pathways significantly more than their BM counterparts. RNA-Seq analysis of E14.5 FL versus BM derived HSCs identified increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos and the citric acid cycle (TCA. We demonstrated that FL HSCs contain more mitochondria than BM HSCs, which resulted in increased levels of oxygen consumption and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Higher levels of DNA repair and antioxidant pathway gene expression may prevent ROS-mediated (genotoxicity in FL HSCs. Thus, we here for the first time highlight the underestimated importance of oxygen dependent pathways for generating energy and building blocks in FL HSCs.

  4. Highly proliferative primitive fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells are fueled by oxidative metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesia, Javed K; Xu, Zhuofei; Broekaert, Dorien; Boon, Ruben; van Vliet, Alex; Eelen, Guy; Vanwelden, Thomas; Stegen, Steve; Van Gastel, Nick; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Carmeliet, Geert; Carmeliet, Peter; Khurana, Satish; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the fetal liver (FL) unlike adult bone marrow (BM) proliferate extensively, posing different metabolic demands. However, metabolic pathways responsible for the production of energy and cellular building blocks in FL HSCs have not been described. Here, we report that FL HSCs use oxygen dependent energy generating pathways significantly more than their BM counterparts. RNA-Seq analysis of E14.5 FL versus BM derived HSCs identified increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) and the citric acid cycle (TCA). We demonstrated that FL HSCs contain more mitochondria than BM HSCs, which resulted in increased levels of oxygen consumption and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Higher levels of DNA repair and antioxidant pathway gene expression may prevent ROS-mediated (geno)toxicity in FL HSCs. Thus, we here for the first time highlight the underestimated importance of oxygen dependent pathways for generating energy and building blocks in FL HSCs.

  5. Characterization of Selectin Ligands on Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Hanan

    2013-05-18

    Successful bone marrow (BM) transplantation requires the homing of the transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow niche, where they undergo differentiation to form mature cells that are eventually released into the peripheral blood. However, the survival rate of patients receiving BM transplants is poor since many of the transplanted HSPCs do not make it to their BM niches in the recipient’s body. Since the availability of HSPCs from traditional sources is limited, transplanting more number of HSPCs is not a solution to this problem. This study aims to characterize the adhesion molecules mediating cell migration in order to better understand the adhesion mechanisms of HSCs with the bone marrow endothelium. This will aid in developing future tools to improve the clinical transplantation of HSPCs. This study also aims to understand the factors that influence HSPC proliferation in the bone marrow niche. E-selectin plays an important role in the process of homing; however, its ligands on HSPCs are not well characterized. We used western blotting and immunoprecipitation to show that endomucin is expressed on HSPCs and plays a role in the binding of HSPCs to E-selectin. We also studied the effect of recombinant E-selectin on the expression of a newly characterized E-selectin ligand in our lab, CD34, in HSPCs. This will provide us insight into novel roles for endomucin and E-selectin and help us to understand the factors influencing HSPC migration to BM endothelium.

  6. Segmentation of occluded hematopoietic stem cells from tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowski, Walter C; Winter, Mark R; Wait, Eric; Lodder, Mels; Schumacher, Ton; Naik, Shalin H; Cohen, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Image sequences of live proliferating cells often contain visual ambiguities that are difficult even for human domain experts to resolve. Here we present a new approach to analyzing image sequences that capture the development of clones of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from live cell time lapse microscopy. The HSCs cannot survive long term imaging unless they are cultured together with a secondary cell type, OP9 stromal cells. The HSCs frequently disappear under the OP9 cell layer, making segmentation difficult or impossible from a single image frame, even for a human domain expert. We have developed a new approach to the segmentation of HSCs that captures these occluded cells. Starting with an a priori segmentation that uses a Monte Carlo technique to estimate the number of cells in a clump of touching cells, we proceed to track and lineage the image data. Following user validation of the lineage information, an a posteriori resegmentation step utilizing tracking results delineates the HSCs occluded by the OP9 layer. Resegmentation has been applied to 3031 occluded segmentations from 77 tracks, correctly recovering over 84% of the occluded segmentations.

  7. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Orio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo- and autologous- (auto- stem cell transplant (HSCT. This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma, gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT.

  8. Dyslipidemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Michelle L; Savani, Bipin N; Boord, Jeffrey B

    2010-08-26

    Currently, approximately 15,000 to 20,000 patients undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually throughout the world, with the number of long-term survivors increasing rapidly. In long-term follow-up after transplantation, the focus of care moves beyond cure of the original disease to the identification and treatment of late effects after HSCT. One of the more serious complications is therapy-related cardiovascular disease. Long-term survivors after HSCT probably have an increased risk of premature cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular complications related to dyslipidemia and other risk factors account for a significant proportion of late nonrelapse morbidity and mortality. This review addresses the risk and causes of dyslipidemia and impact on cardiovascular complications after HSCT. Immunosuppressive therapy, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and other long-term complications influence the management of dyslipidemia. There are currently no established guidelines for evaluation and management of dyslipidemia in HSCT patients; in this review, we have summarized our suggested approach in the HSCT population.

  9. Predictors for severe cardiac complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Kanda, Y; Nakagawa, M; Asano-Mori, Y; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Imai, Y; Hangaishi, A; Kurokawa, M; Tsujino, S; Ogawa, S; Chiba, S; Motokura, T; Hirai, H

    2004-05-01

    The value of pre-transplant factors for predicting the development of cardiac complications after transplantation has been inconsistent among studies. We analyzed the impact of pre-transplant factors on the incidence of severe cardiac complications in 164 hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. We identified eight patients (4.8%) who experienced grade III or IV cardiac complications according to the Bearman criteria. Seven died of cardiac causes a median of 3 days after the onset of cardiac complications. On univariate analysis, both the cumulative dose of anthracyclines and the use of anthracyclines within 60 days before transplantation affected the incidence of severe cardiac complications (P=0.0091 and 0.011). The dissociation of heart rate and body temperature, which reflects "relative tachycardia", was also associated with a higher incidence of cardiac complications (P=0.024). None of the variables obtained by electrocardiography or echocardiography were useful for predicting cardiac complications after transplantation, although the statistical power might not be sufficient to detect the usefulness of ejection fraction. On a multivariate analysis, the cumulative dose of anthracyclines was the only independent significant risk factor for severe cardiac complications. We conclude that the cumulative dose of anthracyclines is the most potent predictor of cardiac complications and the administration of anthracyclines should be avoided within two months before transplantation.

  10. Optimising gene therapy of hypoparathyroidism with hematopoietic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yi; L(U) Bing-jie; XU Ping; SONG Chun-fang

    2005-01-01

    Background The treatment of hypoparathyroidism (HPT) is still a difficult clinical problem, which necessitates a new therapy. Gene therapy of HPT has been valuable, but how to improve the gene transfer efficiency and expression stability is a problem. This study was designed to optimize the gene therapy of HPT with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) recombined with the parathyroid hormone (PTH) gene. Methods The human PTH gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from pcDNA3.1-PTH vectors and inserted into murine stem cell virus (MSCV) vectors with double enzyme digestion (EcoRI and XhoI). The recombinant vectors were transfected into PA317 packaging cell lines by the lipofectin method and screened by G418 selective medium. The condensed recombinant retroviruses were extracted and used to infect HSCs, which were injected into mice suffering from HPT. The change of symptoms and serum levels of PTH and calcium in each group of mice were investigated. Results The human PTH gene was inserted into MSCV vectors successfully and the titres were up to 2×107 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml in condensed retroviral solution. The secretion of PTH reached 15 ng·10-6·cell-1 per 48 hours. The wild type viruses were not detected via PCR amplification, so they were safe for use. The mice suffering from HPT recovered quickly and the serum levels of calcium and PTH remained normal for about three months after the HSCs recombined with PTH were injected into them. The therapeutic effect of this method was better than simple recombinant retroviruses injection.Conclusions The recombinant retroviral vectors MSCV-PTH and the high-titre condensed retroviral solution recombined with the PTH gene are obtained. The recombinant retroviral solution could infect HSCs at a high rate of efficiency. The infected HSCs could cure HPT in mice. This method has provided theoretical evidence for the clinical gene therapy of HPT.

  11. Placenta as a source of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dzierzak, Elaine; Robin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The placenta is a large, highly vascularised hematopoietic tissue that functions during the embryonic and foetal development of eutherian mammals. Although recognised as the interface tissue important in the exchange of oxygen, nutrients and waste products between the foetus and mother, the placenta has increasingly become a focus of research concerning the ontogeny of the blood system. Here, we describe recent data showing the intrinsic hematopoietic potential and appearance of hematopoietic...

  12. A systems biology approach for defining the molecular framework of the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbord, Pierre; Pouget, Claire; Binder, Hans; Dumont, Florent; Stik, Grégoire; Levy, Pacifique; Allain, Fabrice; Marchal, Céline; Richter, Jenna; Uzan, Benjamin; Pflumio, Françoise; Letourneur, Franck; Wirth, Henry; Dzierzak, Elaine; Traver, David; Jaffredo, Thierry; Durand, Charles

    2014-09-04

    Despite progress in identifying the cellular composition of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) niches, little is known about the molecular requirements of HSPC support. To address this issue, we used a panel of six recognized HSPC-supportive stromal lines and less-supportive counterparts originating from embryonic and adult hematopoietic sites. Through comprehensive transcriptomic meta-analyses, we identified 481 mRNAs and 17 microRNAs organized in a modular network implicated in paracrine signaling. Further inclusion of 18 additional cell strains demonstrated that this mRNA subset was predictive of HSPC support. Our gene set contains most known HSPC regulators as well as a number of unexpected ones, such as Pax9 and Ccdc80, as validated by functional studies in zebrafish embryos. In sum, our approach has identified the core molecular network required for HSPC support. These cues, along with a searchable web resource, will inform ongoing efforts to instruct HSPC ex vivo amplification and formation from pluripotent precursors.

  13. Nucleofection, an efficient nonviral method to transfer genes into human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levetzow, G. von; Spanholtz, J.; Beckmann, J.; Fischer, J.; Kogler, G.; Wernet, P.; Punzel, M.; Giebel, B.

    2006-01-01

    The targeted manipulation of the genetic program of single cells as well as of complete organisms has strongly enhanced our understanding of cellular and developmental processes and should also help to increase our knowledge of primary human stem cells, e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), within

  14. In vitro generation of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells by fibroblast growth factor-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G; Weersing, E; Dontje, B; van Os, R; Bystrykh, LV; Vellenga, E; Miller, G

    2003-01-01

    The role of fibroblast growth factors and their receptors (FGFRs) in the regulation of normal hematopoietic stem cells is unknown. Here we show that, in mouse bone marrow, long-term repopulating stem cells are found exclusively in the FGFR(+) cell fraction. During differentiation toward committed pr

  15. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mawatari, Momoko; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kei; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein.

  16. The combination of valproic acid and lithium delays hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; Bystrykh, Leonid; van den Boom, Vincent; Olthof, Sandra; Ausema, Albertina; Ritsema, Martha; Huls, Gerwin; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge on the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) self-renewal and differentiation, in vitro control of stem cell fate decisions has been difficult. The ability to inhibit HSPC commitment in culture may be of benefit to cell therapy protocols. Small molecule

  17. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  18. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice reconstituted with retrovirus-transduced hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.M.; Danos, O.; Grossman, M.; Raulet, D.H.; Mulligan, R.C. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses encoding human adenosine deaminase have been used to infect murine hematopoietic stem cells. In bone marrow transplant recipients reconstituted with the genetically modified cells, human ADA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the recipients for at least 6 months after transplantation. In animals analyzed in detail 4 months after transplantation, human ADA and proviral sequences were detected in all hematopoietic lineages; in several cases, human ADA activity exceeded the endogenous activity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a functional human ADA gene into hematopoietic stem cells and obtaining expression in multiple hematopoietic lineages long after transplantation. This approach should be helpful in designing effective gene therapies for severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

  19. Brief Report: Efficient Generation of Hematopoietic Precursors and Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S.; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K.; Firth, Amy L.; Brennand, Kristen J.; Berggren, W. Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H.; Verma, Inder M.

    2012-01-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD341 and CD45+/CD341/CD38− hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD341) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability. PMID:21544903

  20. Brief report: efficient generation of hematopoietic precursors and progenitors from human pluripotent stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K; Firth, Amy L; Brennand, Kristen J; Berggren, W Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H; Verma, Inder M

    2011-07-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD34+ and CD45+/CD34+/CD38- hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD34+) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability.

  1. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cells, overview and pathways implied on their self-renewal mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Blood tissue is composed approximately in 45% by cells and its derivatives, with a life span of around 120 days for erythrocytes and 3 years for certain type of lymphocytes. This lost is compensated with the hematopoietic system activity and the presence of an immature primitive cell population known as Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) which perform the hematopoiesis, a process that is active from the beginning of the fetal life and produces near to 2 x 1011 eritrocytes and 1010 white blood ce...

  3. National Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplant Registry in Poland: Nationwide Internet Reporting System and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łęczycka, A; Dudkiewicz, M; Czerwiński, J; Malanowski, P; Żalikowska-Hołoweńko, J; Danielewicz, R

    2016-06-01

    History of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Poland begins in early 1980s; the 1st bone marrow allotransplantation was performed in 1983 in the Central Clinical Hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Warsaw. Following years brought the 1st autologous stem cell transplantations. Ten years later, unrelated bone marrow transplantation was performed for the 1st time by the team of the Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit in Katowice. Since then, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation developed to be standard procedure and one of the most important therapies applied in leukemia treatment. The number of allotransplantations in Poland has grown significantly in the past 2 decades, which generated new needs and problems. In 2005, based on a new Transplant Law, a National Transplants Registry was created. Its main role is to collect data (registration of procedures and follow-up data) related to every transplantation case for stem cells and tissues as well as for organs. We present statistics concerning stem cell transplantations performed in Poland, as collected in the National Transplants Registry in the years 2006-2014. There are 18 centers transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in Poland. The total number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations performed in 2006-2014 was 3,537, with allotransplantations from relatives accounted for 1,491 and from unrelated donors for 2,046. The main indication for allotransplantation in past years was acute leukemia.

  4. [A medical-pharmaceutical partnership model as a contributor to the success in conditioning regimen for allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults: a cross-reflection on our organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourget, Philippe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Suarez, Felipe; Galland, Valérie; Blot, Dominique; Trompette, Caroline; Sibon, David; Fontbrune, Flore Sicre de; Merlette, Christophe; Vidal, Fabrice; Corriol, Odile; Giraud, Bérénice; Broissand, Christine; Clement, Rozenn; Hermine, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (allo-SCT) remains the only cure for many hematological malignancies and some benign and congenital diseases. Busulfan, proposed in its injectable form, has quickly become a mainstay of pharmacological and myeloablative (or non-myeloablative) conditioning. This is following the outbreak in 2010 of a multicenter international clinical phase II trial, we tested the robustness and reliability of our organization in a complex model of organization and multifactorial partnership. In this type "BuCy2" protocol based on a classical treatment duration of 4 consecutive days, the administration of IV busulfan is given in one single daily infusion instead of the conventional 16 infusions, while keeping the same total dose. Under these conditions, the treatment is totally secured using a therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan, applied in real-time. The process is technically complex and requires the very close cooperation of the teams involved. A strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) analysis has been constructed; it fully supports continuous quality improvement to the triple benefit of the nursing chain, the patients and their environment. Several critical points were identified and corrected. The experiment strongly contributes to the safety and security of the medication circuit at the hospital and, improves the performance of allo-SCT. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in the health field and their working environment via a well-functioning quality management system.

  5. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Féraud

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process.

  6. Rumba and Haus3 are essential factors for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during zebrafish hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Linsen; Xu, Jin; Li, Xiuling; Ma, Ning; Liu, Yanmei; Peng, Jinrong; Osato, Motomi; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong

    2011-02-01

    The hallmark of vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis is the establishment of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) pool during embryogenesis. This process involves a defined ontogenic switching of HSPCs in successive hematopoietic compartments and is evolutionarily conserved from teleost fish to human. In zebrafish, HSPCs originate from the ventral wall of the dorsal aorta (VDA), from which they subsequently mobilize to an intermediate hematopoietic site known as the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT) and finally colonize the kidney for adult hematopoiesis. Despite substantial understanding of the ontogeny of HSPCs, the molecular basis governing migration, colonization and maintenance of HSPCs remains to be explored fully. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two zebrafish mutants, rumba(hkz1) and samba(hkz2), that are defective in generating definitive hematopoiesis. We find that HSPC initiation in the VDA and subsequent homing to the CHT are not affected in these two mutants. However, the further development of HSPCs in the CHT is compromised in both mutants. Positional cloning reveals that Rumba is a novel nuclear C2H2 zinc-finger factor with unknown function and samba encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein that is homologous to human augmin complex subunit 3 (HAUS3). Furthermore, we show that these two factors independently regulate cell cycle progression of HSPCs and are cell autonomously required for HPSC development in the CHT. Our study identifies Rumba and Haus3 as two essential regulators of HSPC maintenance during zebrafish fetal hematopoiesis.

  7. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury via regulation of cellular MAPK/phosphatase levels and increasing hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, R S; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K

    2014-03-01

    Here we describe a novel strategy for mitigation of ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by suppressing the activity of MKP3, resulting in ERK activation and enhanced abundance of hematopoietic stem cells, using the antioxidant flavonoid baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone). It offered complete protection to mouse splenic lymphocytes against radiation-induced cell death. Inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 could significantly abrogate baicalein-mediated radioprotection in lymphocytes. Baicalein inhibited phosphatase MKP3 and thereby enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and its downstream proteins such as Elk and Nrf-2. It also increased the nuclear levels of Nrf-2 and the mRNA levels of its dependent genes. Importantly, baicalein administration to mice before radiation exposure led to significant recovery of loss of bone marrow cellularity and also inhibited cell death. Administration of baicalein increased the hematopoietic stem cell frequency as measured by side-population assay and also by antibody staining. Further, baicalein offered significant protection against whole-body irradiation (WBI; 7.5Gy)-induced mortality in mice. Interestingly, we found that baicalein works by activating the same target molecules ERK and Nrf-2 both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, administration of all-trans-retinoic acid (inhibitor of Nrf-2) significantly abrogated baicalein-mediated protection against WBI-induced mortality in mice. Thus, in contrast to the generalized conception of antioxidants acting as radioprotectors, we provide a rationale that antioxidants exhibit pleiotropic effects through the activation of multiple cellular signaling pathways.

  8. A problem-solving education intervention in caregivers and patients during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Castro, Kathleen; Prince, Patricia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in informal caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. Patient/caregiver teams attended three 1-hour problem-solving education sessions to help cope with problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Primary measures included the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale-transplant and Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Active caregivers reported improvements in self-efficacy (p caregiver responders also reported better health outcomes such as fatigue. The effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation caregivers supports its inclusion in future interventions to meet the multifaceted needs of this population.

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficient-SCID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Brigida, Immacolata; Ferrua, Francesca; Cappelli, Barbara; Chiesa, Robert; Marktel, Sarah; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a highly attractive strategy for many types of inherited disorders of the immune system. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficient-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) has been the target of several clinical trials based on the use of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells engineered with retroviral vectors. The introduction of a low intensity conditioning regimen has been a crucial factor in achieving stable engrafment of hematopoietic stem cells and therapeutic levels of ADA-expressing cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that gene therapy for ADA-SCID has favorable safety profile and is effective in restoring normal purine metabolism and immune functions. Stem cell gene therapy combined with appropriate conditioning regimens might be extended to other genetic disorders of the hematopoietic system.

  10. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

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  20. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  1. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eCoste

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  2. Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Fails to Fully Regenerate the B-Lymphocyte Compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Waters, Jeffrey; Phillips, Megan; Yamamoto, Ryo; Long, Brian R; Yang, Yang; Gerstein, Rachel; Stoddart, Cheryl A; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2016-01-12

    B cells are key components of cellular and humoral immunity and, like all lymphocytes, are thought to originate and renew from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, our recent single-HSC transfer studies demonstrate that adult bone marrow HSCs do not regenerate B-1a, a subset of tissue B cells required for protection against pneumonia, influenza, and other infections. Since B-1a are regenerated by transfers of fetal liver, the question arises as to whether B-1a derive from fetal, but not adult, HSCs. Here we show that, similar to adult HSCs, fetal HSCs selectively fail to regenerate B-1a. We also show that, in humanized mice, human fetal liver regenerates tissue B cells that are phenotypically similar to murine B-1a, raising the question of whether human HSC transplantation, the mainstay of such models, is sufficient to regenerate human B-1a. Thus, our studies overtly challenge the current paradigm that HSCs give rise to all components of the immune system.

  3. Elevated fluoride levels and periostitis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients receiving long-term voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlock, Katherine; Johnson, Darren; Cornell, Cathy; Parnell, Shawn; Meshinchi, Soheil; Baker, K Scott; Englund, Janet A

    2015-05-01

    Azole therapy is widely utilized in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients for the treatment of aspergillus. Complications of voriconazole treatment related to its elevated fluoride content have been described in adults, including reports of symptomatic skeletal fluorosis. We review fluoride levels, clinical, and laboratory data in five pediatric HCT recipients on long-term voriconazole therapy, all found to have elevated serum fluoride levels. Two patients had toxic fluoride levels, one infant had symptoms of significant pain with movement and radiographs confirmed skeletal fluorosis. Monitoring fluoride levels in children, especially with skeletal symptoms, should be considered in patients on long-term voriconazole.

  4. Zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Clyde; Su, Tammy; Lau, Ryan P; Shah, Arpit; Laurie, Payton C; Avalos, Brenda; Aggio, Julian; Harris, Elena; Traver, David; Stachura, David L

    2015-12-01

    Forward genetic screens in zebrafish have been used to identify genes essential for the generation of primitive blood and the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but have not elucidated the genes essential for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation because of the lack of methodologies to functionally assess these processes. We previously described techniques used to test the developmental potential of HSPCs by culturing them on zebrafish kidney stromal (ZKS) cells, derived from the main site of hematopoiesis in the adult teleost. Here we describe an additional primary stromal cell line we refer to as zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells, derived from tissue surrounding the embryonic dorsal aorta, the site of HSC emergence in developing fish. ZEST cells encouraged HSPC differentiation toward the myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid pathways when assessed by morphologic and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. Additionally, ZEST cells significantly expanded the number of cultured HSPCs in vitro, indicating that these stromal cells are supportive of both HSPC proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Examination of ZEST cells indicates that they express numerous cytokines and Notch ligands and possess endothelial characteristics. Further characterization of ZEST cells should prove to be invaluable in understanding the complex signaling cascades instigated by the embryonic hematopoietic niche required to expand and differentiate HSPCs. Elucidating these processes and identifying possibilities for the modulation of these molecular pathways should allow the in vitro expansion of HSPCs for a multitude of therapeutic uses.

  5. Physical characterization of hematopoietic stem cells using multidirectional label-free light scatterings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Hesam; Gupta, Manisha; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Rozmus, Wojciech; Tsui, Ying Y

    2016-12-12

    An experimental setup capable of measuring simultaneous 2D scattered light angular distribution from two directions to study cell morphology without the use of bio-labels was developed. Experiments with hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+ cells) show good agreement with detailed numerical simulations of light scattering. Numerical simulations and computer models of cells are used to identify physical features of cells with the largest scattering cross sections. This allows for determination of size, geometry of the nucleus and distribution of mitochondria in hematopoietic stem cells by means of our label-free method.

  6. Black hairy tongue associated with allo peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yi; ZOU Ping; LI Qiu-bai; YOU Yong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Tongue lesions resulting from mucositis are a frequent complication of high-dose chemotherapy and irradiation. They are very common in patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and tongue lesions due to other causes have also been reported. Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a special tongue lesion, not rare in the population with tobacco abuse, but so far it has not been reported after allo peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-PBHST). Here we presented a patient who developed BHT after allo-PBHST and discussed the factors that may cause this condition.

  7. Hematopoietic stem cells: ex-vivo expansion and therapeutic potential for myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Lu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jingwei Lu, Vincent J Pompili, Hiranmoy DasCardiovascular Stem Cell Research Laboratory, The Dorothy M Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USAAbstract: Despite recent advances in cardiovascular medicine, ischemic heart disease remains the major cause of death in the United States and abroad. Cell-based therapy for degenerative diseases like myocardial ischemia using stem cells is currently under serious investigation. Various types of stem cells are being considered to be candidates for cell transplantation in cell-based therapy. Hematopoietic stem cells are one of the most promising cell types as several studies demonstrated their ability to improve ischemic cardiac functions by enhancing neovascularization and by reducing the total size of scar tissue. However, in order to procure sufficient numbers of functional stem cells, ex-vivo expansion technology became critically important. In this review, we focus on the state-of-the-art ex-vivo technology for the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, and the underlying mechanisms regulating stem cell self-renewal as well as differentiation.Keywords: ischemic heart disease, ex-vivo expansion, hematopoietic stem cells, cytokines, nanofibers

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Need for Research & Potential Applications. It’s status in India

    OpenAIRE

    Shripad D Banavali

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that through replications have the capabilities of both self-renewal and differentiation into mature specialized cells. Broadly, there are two types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cell biology has been associated with ethical controversy and also their growth is difficult to control. Adult stem cells are located in tissues throughout the body and function as a reservoir to replace damaged or aging cells. Embryonic...

  9. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials.

  10. Hematopoietic Support Capacity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Orduña, Guadalupe R; Mayani, Héctor; Montesinos, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in the physiology and homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. Because MSCs generate most of the stromal cells present in the bone marrow (BM), form part of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche, and produce various molecules regulating hematopoiesis, their hematopoiesis-supporting capacity has been demonstrated. In the last decade, BM-MSCs have been proposed to be useful in some ex vivo protocols for HSC expansion, with the aim of expanding their numbers for transplant purposes (HSC transplant, HSCT). Furthermore, application of MSCs has been proposed as an adjuvant cellular therapy for promoting rapid hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Although the MSCs used in preliminary clinical trials have come from the BM, isolation of MSCs from far more accessible sources such as neonatal tissues has now been achieved, and these cells have been found to possess similar biological characteristics to those isolated from the BM. Therefore, such tissues are now considered as a potential alternative source of MSCs for clinical applications. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the biological characteristics of MSCs as related to their capacity to support the formation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We also describe MSC manipulation for ex vivo HSC expansion protocols used for transplants and their clinical relevance for hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients.

  11. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Tarafdar

    Full Text Available The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  12. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Anuradha; Dobbin, Edwina; Corrigan, Pamela; Freeburn, Robin; Wheadon, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP) formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  13. PRDM11 is dispensable for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoren, Lina A; Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T;

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC)(1) supply organisms with life-long output of mature blood cells. To do so, the HSC pool size has to be maintained by HSC self-renewing divisions. PRDM3 and PRDM16 have been documented to regulate HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function. We found Prdm11 to have...... similar expression patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) compartments as Prdm3 and Prdm16. Therefore, we undertook experiments to test if PRDM11 regulates HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function by investigating the Prdm11(-/-) mice. Our data shows that phenotypic HSPCs...... are intact in bone marrow (BM) of one-year-old Prdm11(-/-) mice. In addition, Prdm11(-/-) mice were able to fully regenerate the hematopoietic system upon BM transplantation (BMT) into lethally irradiated mice with a mild drop in lymphoid output only. Taken together, this suggests that PRDM11, in contrast...

  14. ERG promotes the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells by restricting their differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kasper Jermiin; Rehn, Matilda Carolina; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd;

    2015-01-01

    The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is crucial for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Whereas numerous gene regulatory factors have been shown to control HSC self-renewal or drive their differentiation, we have relatively few insights into transcription factors...

  15. Hematopoietic stem cells are coordinated by the molecular cues of the endosteal niche.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurne, M.C. ter; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.

    2010-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) accomplish a complex task. On a daily base billions of the 8 different mature cells are delivered in the right proportions. HSCs are located in niches located at several locations in the body. Communication between these spatially separated niches is accomplished by s

  16. Solid organ transplantation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective, multicenter study of the EBMT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenecke, C; Hertenstein, B; Schetelig, J;

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the outcome of solid organ transplantation (SOT) in patients who had undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), a questionnaire survey was carried out within 107 European Group of Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers. This study covered HSCT between 1984...

  17. Pregnancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Fanconi anemia patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashkhoei, Simin; Fakhari, Solmaz; Bilehjani, Eissa; Farzin, Haleh

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is rare. However, there are reports of successful pregnancy in Fanconi patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). We describe the case of a term pregnant woman with FA who was treated with BMT 2 years earlier. She underwent successful delivery with cesarean section using spinal anesthesia without any complications.

  18. Basic oral care for hematology–oncology patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elad, Sharon; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Brennan, Michael T;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hematology-oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients are at risk for oral complications which may cause significant morbidity and a potential risk of mortality. This emphasizes the importance of basic oral care prior to, during...

  19. Wnt3a nanodisks promote ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lalefar, Nahal R.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Simonsen, Jens Bæk;

    2016-01-01

    -elutes with ND. In signaling assays, Wnt3a ND induced β-catenin stabilization in mouse fibroblasts as well as hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Prolonged exposure of HSPC to Wnt3a ND stimulated proliferation and expansion of Lin- Sca-1+ c-Kit+ cells. Surprisingly, ND lacking Wnt3a contributed...

  20. Early highly aggressive MS successfully treated by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagius, J.; Lundgren, J.; Oberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the last 15 years, high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has globally been performed for severe multiple sclerosis (MS). Most patients have been in progressive phase with long disease duration. As a rule, treatment effect has been...

  1. The risk factors of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders following haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder(PTLD)occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT)is rare but severe.Risk factors including pre-HSCT exposure variables,conditioning regimens,transplant-related complications,and post-HSCT immune reconstitution were investigated in the development of PTLD after allo-HSCT.Methods A

  2. Oral cyclosporine A treatment is feasible after myeloablative conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, M; Hovgaard, D; Schjødt, I M;

    2015-01-01

    underwent myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Twenty-one patients (44%) tolerated CsA orally throughout the transplantation period without increased incidence of acute graft versus host disease(aGVHD). Low concentration of CsA in week 2 was associated with increased incidence of a...

  3. Cure for thalassemia major – from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Alok; Shaji, Ramachandran V.

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been well established for several decades as gene replacement therapy for patients with thalassemia major, and now offers very high rates of cure for patients who have access to this therapy. Outcomes have improved tremendously over the last decade, even in high-risk patients. The limited data available suggests that the long-term outcome is also excellent, with a >90% survival rate, but for the best results, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be offered early, before any end organ damage occurs. However, access to this therapy is limited in more than half the patients by the lack of suitable donors. Inadequate hematopoietic stem cell transplantation services and the high cost of therapy are other reasons for this limited access, particularly in those parts of the world which have a high prevalence of this condition. As a result, fewer than 10% of eligible patients are actually able to avail of this therapy. Other options for curative therapies are therefore needed. Recently, gene correction of autologous hematopoietic stem cells has been successfully established using lentiviral vectors, and several clinical trials have been initiated. A gene editing approach to correct the β-globin mutation or disrupt the BCL11A gene to increase fetal hemoglobin production has also been reported, and is expected to be introduced in clinical trials soon. Curative possibilities for the major hemoglobin disorders are expanding. Providing access to these therapies around the world will remain a challenge. PMID:27909215

  4. CD133-targeted Gene Transfer Into Long-term Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwaeble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Mueller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J.; Grez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem cell

  5. Recommendations on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for inherited bone marrow failure syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Latour, R. Peffault; Peters, C.; Gibsons, B.; Strahm, B.; Lankester, A.; de Heredia, C. D.; Longoni, D.; Fioredda, F.; Locatelli, F.; Yaniv, I.; Wachowiak, J.; Donadieu, J.; Lawitschka, A.; Bierings, M.; Wlodarski, M.; Corbacioglu, S.; Bonanomi, S.; Samarasinghe, S.; Leblanc, T.; Dufour, C.; Dalle, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers the potential to cure patients with an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS). However, the procedure involves the risk of treatment-related mortality and may be associated with significant early and late morbidity. For these r

  6. Uncovering regulatory pathways that effect hematopoietic stem cell function using 'genetical genomics'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid; Weersing, Ellen; Dontje, Bert; Sutton, Sue; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Wiltshire, Tim; Su, Andrew I.; Vellenga, Edo; Wang, Jintao; Manly, Kenneth F.; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J.; Alberts, Rudi; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Williams, Robert W.; Cooke, M.; de Haan, G; Pletcher, MT; Su, AI; Wang, JT; Manly, KF; Chesler, EJ; Williams, O.

    2005-01-01

    We combined large-scale mRNA expression analysis and gene mapping to identify genes and loci that control hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. We measured mRNA expression levels in purified HSCs isolated from a panel of densely genotyped recombinant inbred mouse strains. We mapped quantitative tr

  7. Effectiveness of Partner Social Support Predicts Enduring Psychological Distress after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, Christine; Redd, William H.; Austin, Jane; Mosher, Catherine E.; Meschian, Yeraz Markarian; Isola, Luis; Scigliano, Eileen; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza; Labay, Larissa E.; Rowley, Scott; Burkhalter, Jack E.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; DuHamel, Katherine N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors who are 1 to 3 years posttransplant are challenged by the need to resume valued social roles and activities--a task that may be complicated by enduring transplant-related psychological distress common in this patient population. The present study investigated whether transplant…

  8. Routine Surveillance for Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Cohort: Do Patients Benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Rigby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients are at a high risk for late bloodstream infection (BSI. Controversy exists regarding the benefit of surveillance blood cultures in this immunosuppressed population. Despite the common use of this practice, the practical value is not well established in non-neutropenic children following HSCT.

  9. Introduction of a quality management system and outcome after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, A.; Brand, R.; Niederwieser, D.; Baldomero, H.; Chabannon, C.; Cornelissen, J.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Ljungman, P.; McDonald, F.; McGrath, E.; Passweg, J.; Peters, C.; Rocha, V.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I.; Sureda, A.; Tichelli, A.; Apperley, J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: A comprehensive quality management system called JACIE (Joint Accreditation Committee International Society for Cellular Therapy and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation), was introduced to improve quality of care in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We ther

  10. Introduction of a Quality Management System and Outcome After Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, Alois; Brand, Ronald; Niederwieser, Dietger; Baldomero, Helen; Chabannon, Christian; Cornelissen, Jan; de Witte, Theo; Ljungman, Per; McDonald, Fiona; McGrath, Eoin; Passweg, Jakob; Peters, Christina; Rocha, Vanderson; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Sureda, Anna; Tichelli, Andre; Apperley, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A comprehensive quality management system called JACIE (Joint Accreditation Committee International Society for Cellular Therapy and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation), was introduced to improve quality of care in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We there

  11. Oral bacteria and yeasts in relationship to oral ulcerations in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.; von dem Borne, P.A.; Kuijper, E.J.; Kraneveld, E.A.; van Loveren, C.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral mucositis is a serious and debilitating side effect of conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Through HSCT, the homeostasis in the oral cavity is disrupted. The contribution of the oral microflora to mucositis remains to be clarified. The aim of our stu

  12. The clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells well known for repairing tissue, supporting hematopoiesis, and modulating immune and inflammation response. These outstanding properties make MSCs as an attractive candidate for cellular therapy in immune-based disorders, especially hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. In this review, we outline the progress of MSCs in preventing and treating engraftment failure (EF, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD following HSCT and critically discuss unsolved issues in clinical applications.

  13. Assessing the Influence of Different Comorbidities Indexes on the Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Developing Country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Machado Teixeira

    Full Text Available Although the application of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-specific Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI has enabled better prediction of transplant-related mortality (TRM in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (AHSCT, data from developing countries are scarce. This study prospectively evaluated the HCT-CI and the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation (ACE-27, in its original and in a modified version, as predictors of post-transplant complications in adults undergoing a first related or unrelated AHSCT in Brazil. Both bone marrow (BM and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC as graft sources were included. We analyzed the cumulative incidence of granulocyte and platelet recovery, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse and transplant-related mortality, and rates of event-free survival and overall survival. Ninety-nine patients were assessed. Median age was 38 years (18-65 years; HCT-CI ≥ 3 accounted for only 8% of cases; hematologic malignancies comprised 75.8% of the indications for AHSCT. There was no association between the HCT-CI or the original or modified ACE-27 with TRM or any other studied outcomes after AHSCT. These results show that, in the population studied, none of the comorbidity indexes seem to be associated with AHSCT outcomes. A significantly low frequency of high-risk (HCT-CI ≥ 3 in this Brazilian population might justify these results.

  14. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells as a potential source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplant in PNH patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phondeechareon, Tanapol; Wattanapanitch, Methichit; U-Pratya, Yaowalak; Damkham, Chanapa; Klincumhom, Nuttha; Lorthongpanich, Chanchao; Kheolamai, Pakpoom; Laowtammathron, Chuti; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2016-10-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hemolytic anemia caused by lack of CD55 and CD59 on blood cell membrane leading to increased sensitivity of blood cells to complement. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative therapy for PNH, however, lack of HLA-matched donors and post-transplant complications are major concerns. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from patients are an attractive source for generating autologous HSCs to avoid adverse effects resulting from allogeneic HSCT. The disease involves only HSCs and their progeny; therefore, other tissues are not affected by the mutation and may be used to produce disease-free autologous HSCs. This study aimed to derive PNH patient-specific iPSCs from human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), characterize and differentiate to hematopoietic cells using a feeder-free protocol. Analysis of CD55 and CD59 expression was performed before and after reprogramming, and hematopoietic differentiation. Patients' dermal fibroblasts expressed CD55 and CD59 at normal levels and the normal expression remained after reprogramming. The iPSCs derived from PNH patients had typical pluripotent properties and differentiation capacities with normal karyotype. After hematopoietic differentiation, the differentiated cells expressed early hematopoietic markers (CD34 and CD43) with normal CD59 expression. The iPSCs derived from HDFs of PNH patients have normal levels of CD55 and CD59 expression and hold promise as a potential source of HSCs for autologous transplantation to cure PNH patients.

  15. Placenta as a source of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); C. Robin (Catherine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe placenta is a large, highly vascularised hematopoietic tissue that functions during the embryonic and foetal development of eutherian mammals. Although recognised as the interface tissue important in the exchange of oxygen, nutrients and waste products between the foetus and mother,

  16. In utero depletion of fetal hematopoietic stem cells improves engraftment after neonatal transplantation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derderian, S Christopher; Togarrati, P Priya; King, Charmin; Moradi, Patriss W; Reynaud, Damien; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Weissman, Irving L; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2014-08-07

    Although in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation is a promising strategy to treat congenital hematopoietic disorders, levels of engraftment have not been therapeutic for diseases in which donor cells have no survival advantage. We used an antibody against the murine c-Kit receptor (ACK2) to deplete fetal host hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and increase space within the hematopoietic niche for donor cell engraftment. Fetal mice were injected with ACK2 on embryonic days 13.5 to 14.5 and surviving pups were transplanted with congenic hematopoietic cells on day of life 1. Low-dose ACK2 treatment effectively depleted HSCs within the bone marrow with minimal toxicity and the antibody was cleared from the serum before the neonatal transplantation. Chimerism levels were significantly higher in treated pups than in controls; both myeloid and lymphoid cell chimerism increased because of higher engraftment of HSCs in the bone marrow. To test the strategy of repeated HSC depletion and transplantation, some mice were treated with ACK2 postnatally, but the increase in engraftment was lower than that seen with prenatal treatment. We demonstrate a successful fetal conditioning strategy associated with minimal toxicity. Such strategies could be used to achieve clinically relevant levels of engraftment to treat congenital stem cell disorders.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cells: potential new applications for translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfly, Hady; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are multipotent cells that produce the various lineages of blood and HSC transplantations (HSCT) are widely used to reconstitute damaged bone marrow (BM). Over time, HSCT has evolved for the treatment of non-blood diseases as well, brain in particular. However, HSCT required total myeloablation through irradiation and/or chemotherapy for the treatment of BM-related diseases, and HSCs are difficult to safely deliver in large amounts into the brain. In blood disorders, for a minimal myelosuppression to be sufficient and allow donor cells to engraft, it is necessary to determine the minimal percentage of normal BM cells needed to achieve phenotypic correction. Recent studies on animal models of ?-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD), through Competitive Repopulation Assay (CRA) following lethal irradiation of recipients, demonstrated that an average of 25% normal BM cells allows the production of enough normal red blood cells to significantly correct the ?-thalassemia and SCD phenotypes, at the levels of BM, blood, histology, and survival, with normal donor cells contributing to 50-60% of peripheral red blood cells. Further assays using mild myelosuppression showed that long term sustained phenotypic correction can be obtained for both diseases through a novel transplantation strategy based on modulating four parameters: dose of irradiation/myelosuppression, number of transplanted cells, timing of cell injections, and number of cell doses. Through a minimal dose of irradiation of 1Gy (100 Rads) or 2Gy, two injections of BM cells within the first 24h after myelosuppression resulted in engraftment in 100% of mice and a sustained therapeutic mixed chimerism in ?-thalassemia, while three to four injections were needed to achieve a similar outcome in SCD. Following the success of these trials, we modified this novel HSCT strategy and applied it to determine whether we can protect mice from lethal stroke induced through the Middle

  18. Phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes during post-transplant adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Erbacher, Annika; Haufe, Susanne; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hofbeck, Michael; Kerst, Gunter

    2015-05-01

    Phagocytosis of granulocytes and monocytes presents a major mechanism that contributes to the clearance of pathogens and cell debris. We analyzed the phagocytic activity of the peripheral blood cell monocytes, three monocyte subpopulations and granulocytes before and up to one year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as well as during transplant-related adverse events. 25 pediatric patients and young adults (median age of 11.0 years) with hemato-oncological malignancies and non malignancies were enrolled in the prospective study. Ingestion of fluorescence-labeled Escherichia coli bacteria was used to assess the phagocytic activity of monocytes and their subpopulations and granulocytes by means of flow cytometry in the patient group as well as in a control group (n=36). During sepsis, a significant increase of phagocytic activity of monocytes (P=0.0003) and a significant decrease of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes (P=0.0003) and the CD14+ CD16++ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0020) occurred. At the onset of a veno-occlusive disease, a significant increase of phagocytic activity in the CD14++ CD16+ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.001) and a significant decrease in the phagocytic activity of the CD14++ CD16- monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0048) were observed. In conclusion, the phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes might be a useful and easy determinable parameter that enables identification of post-transplant complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The alterations of phagocytic activity contribute to the altered immune response that accompanies adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cells : Self-renewing or aging?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G

    2002-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by their extensive self-renewal properties, and yet there is abundant evidence of erosion of stem cell functioning during aging. Whereas intracellular repair and protection mechanisms determine the lifespan of an individual cell, here an argument is made that somatic stem cell

  20. The Hematopoietic Differentiation and Production of Mature Myeloid Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kyung-Dal; Vodyanik, Maxim; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for hematopoietic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and generation of mature myeloid cells from hPSCs through expansion and differentiation of hPSC-derived lin-CD34+CD43+CD45+ multipotent progenitors. The protocol is comprised of three major steps: (i) induction of hematopoietic differentiation by coculture of hPSCs with OP9 bone marrow stromal cells, (ii) short-term expansion of multipotent myeloid progenitors with a high dose of GM-CSF, and ...

  1. Imaging approaches to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir; Stein, Jerry; Farkas, Daniel L

    2007-01-01

    Cell tracking in vivo continues to provide significant insights into hematopoietic cell function and donor cell engraftment after transplantation. The combination of proliferation tracking dyes and induced expression of reporters with advanced imaging modalities has led to better understanding of qualitative and quantitative aspects of hematopoietic cells' homing, seeding and engraftment. Currently, there is no single technique that allows in vivo tracking of cells with molecular resolution, thus several techniques need to be combined. Recent developments promise better implementation of non-invasive imaging modalities to study functional and molecular characteristics of stem cells.

  2. Study on Fractionated Total Body Irradiation before Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Fang; Bo Liu; Hong Gao

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the dose and the complications from total body irradiation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS This study involved 312 patients with total body irradiation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. They were entered into the treated research from May 1999 to October 2005. All patients had Received the irradiation from 60Co of an absorbed dose rate of (5.2 ± 1.13) cGy/min. The total dose of TBI was 7~12 Gy, 1 f/d × 2 d. A high-dose rate group (≥ 10 Gy) included 139 cases and a low-dose rate group (< 10 Gy) included 173 cases.RESULTS The probability of acute gastrointestinal reactions in the high-dose rate group was more compared with that in the low-dose rate group. The differences for other reactions, such as hematopoietic reconstitution and graft survival rate, between the two groups were insignificant.CONCLUSION Using fractional total body irradiation at a dose rate of 5 cGy/min, with a total dose of 7~12 Gy, 1 f/d x 2 d, with the lung receiving under 7.5 Gy is a safe and effective pretreatment for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  3. The combined influence of substrate elasticity and ligand density on the viability and biophysical properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji S; Harley, Brendan A C

    2012-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity to give rise to all blood and immune cells in the body. HSCs are housed in a specialized microenvironment known as the stem cell niche, which provides intrinsic and extrinsic signals to regulate HSC fate: quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization, homing, and apoptosis. These niches provide a complex, three dimensional (3D) microenvironment consisting of cells, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and ECM-bound or soluble biomolecules that provides cellular, structural, and molecular signals that regulate HSC fate decisions. In this study, we examined the decoupled effects of substrate elasticity, construct dimensionality, and ligand concentration on the biophysical properties of primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) using homologous series of two and three dimensional microenvironments. Microenvironments were chosen to span the range of biophysical environments presented physiologically within the bone marrow, ranging from soft marrow and adipose tissue (cell membranes (1-3 kPa), to developing osteoid (>30 kPa). We additionally investigated the influence of collagen ligand density on HSPC biophysical parameters and compared these behaviors to those observed in HSPCs grown in culture on stiff glass substrates. This work suggests the potential for substrate stiffness and ligand density to directly affect the biophysical properties of primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells at the single cell level and that these parameters may be critical design criteria for the development of artificial HSC niches.

  4. Indicações em transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas em pacientes adultos com leucemia linfoide aguda Indications for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Zanichelli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Na leucemia linfoide aguda (LLA, a proliferação, acúmulo e infiltração de células imaturas caracterizam uma entidade heterogênea, apresentando ampla diversidade de aspectos clínicos e biológicos. Na LLA do adulto, a concentração de fatores prognósticos de alto risco, como o imunofenótipo B, alterações cromossômicas e, principalmente, a presença do cromossomo Ph positivo. Considerações a respeito da alta morbidade e mortalidade relacionadas ao transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas (TCTH têm gerado controvérsias quanto à indicação desta modalidade terapêutica, nos pacientes adultos com LLA em primeira remissão (1ª RC. Os resultados da terapia convencional com quimioterapia, diante dos diferentes grupos de risco em pacientes com LLA, têm sido utilizados para a indicação de TCTH. Apresentamos o algoritmo de indicações do transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas em pacientes adultos com LLA.In acute lymphoblastic leukemia, accumulation and proliferation of immature cells infiltration characterise a heterogeneous entity, featuring a wide variety of clinical and biological aspects. In the adult LLA concentration of high-risk prognosis factors such as age, B-cell, chromosomic changes, and chiefly the presence of chromosome positive Ph. Considerations of high morbidity and mortality rates related to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (TCTH have generated controversy about this therapeutic modality in adult patients with LLA in first remission (1st RC. The results of conventional therapy with chemotherapy in contrast with different risk groups of patients with LLA, has been used for the indication of TCTH. Thus we present the algorithm indications of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with LLA. Rev.

  5. The role of apoptosis in the development of AGM hematopoietic stem cells revealed by Bcl-2 overexpression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio; K.N. Harvey; C. Miles; R.A. Oostendorp (Robert); K. van der Horn; E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractApoptosis is an essential process in embryonic tissue remodeling and adult tissue homeostasis. Within the adult hematopoietic system, it allows for tight regulation of hematopoietic cell subsets. Previously, it was shown that B-cell leukemia 2 (Bcl-2) overexpression in

  6. The sixth sense: hematopoietic stem cells detect danger through purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Lara; Salvestrini, Valentina; Ferrari, Davide; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2012-09-20

    Over the past decade, extracellular nucleotides (such as ATP and UTP) have emerged as key immunomodulators. This family of molecules, already known for its key metabolic functions, has been the focus of intense investigation that has unambiguously shown its crucial role as mediators of cell-to-cell communication. More recently, in addition to its involvement in inflammation and immunity, purinergic signaling has also been shown to modulate BM-derived stem cells. Extracellular nucleotides promote proliferation, CXCL12-driven migration, and BM engraftment of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells. In addition, purinergic signaling acts indirectly on hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells by regulating differentiation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in BM-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells, which are part of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche. HSC research has recently blended into the field of immunology, as new findings highlighted the role played by immunologic signals (such as IFN-α, IFN-γ, or TNF-α) in the regulation of the HSC compartment. In this review, we summarize recent reports unveiling a previously unsuspected ability of HSCs to integrate inflammatory signals released by immune and stromal cells, with particular emphasis on the dual role of extracellular nucleotides as mediators of both immunologic responses and BM stem cell functions.

  7. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin.

  8. Role of reactive oxygen species in the radiation response of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, which are present in small numbers in hematopoietic tissues, can differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages and self-renew to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. HSPCs are extremely sensitive to oxidative stressors such as anti-cancer agents, radiation, and the extensive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The quiescence and stemness of HSPCs are maintained by the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, ROS, and energy homeostasis in a special microenvironment called the stem cell niche. The present study evaluated the relationship between the production of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial function during the proliferation and differentiation of X-irradiated CD34(+ cells prepared from human placental/umbilical cord blood HSPCs. Highly purified CD34(+ HSPCs exposed to X-rays were cultured in liquid and semi-solid medium supplemented with hematopoietic cytokines. X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs treated with hematopoietic cytokines, which promote their proliferation and differentiation, exhibited dramatically suppressed cell growth and clonogenic potential. The amount of intracellular ROS in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs was significantly higher than that in non-irradiated cells during the culture period. However, neither the intracellular mitochondrial content nor the mitochondrial superoxide production was elevated in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs compared with non-irradiated cells. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX expression was observed immediately following exposure to 4 Gy of X-rays and gradually decreased during the culture period. This study reveals that X-irradiation can increase persistent intracellular ROS in human CD34(+ HSPCs, which may not result from mitochondrial ROS due to mitochondrial dysfunction, and indicates that substantial DNA double-strand breakage can critically reduce the stem cell function.

  9. DAS181 Treatment of Severe Parainfluenza Virus 3 Pneumonia in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Requiring Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dhakal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parainfluenza virus (PIV may cause life-threatening pneumonia in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients. Currently, there are no proven effective therapies. We report the use of inhaled DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein, for treatment of PIV type 3 pneumonia in two allogeneic hematopoietic SCT recipients with respiratory failure.

  10. IL-18 single nucleotide polymorphisms in hematologic malignancies with HLA matched sibling donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡小矜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of interleukin-18(IL-18)single nucleotide polymorphisms on outcomes of hematologic malignancies with HLA-matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT).Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-18 promoter was detected by PCR-sequence-specific primer analysis(PCR-SSP)in 93 recipients and their HLA matched sibling donors.Hematopoietic reconstitution,

  11. Vascular Platform to Define Hematopoietic Stem Cell Factors and Enhance Regenerative Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Poulos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs inhabit distinct microenvironments within the adult bone marrow (BM, which govern the delicate balance between HSC quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation. Previous reports have proposed that HSCs localize to the vascular niche, comprised of endothelium and tightly associated perivascular cells. Herein, we examine the capacity of BM endothelial cells (BMECs to support ex vivo and in vivo hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that AKT1-activated BMECs (BMEC-Akt1 have a unique transcription factor/cytokine profile that supports functional HSCs in lieu of complex serum and cytokine supplementation. Additionally, transplantation of BMEC-Akt1 cells enhanced regenerative hematopoiesis following myeloablative irradiation. These data demonstrate that BMEC-Akt1 cultures can be used as a platform for the discovery of pro-HSC factors and justify the utility of BMECs as a cellular therapy. This technical advance may lead to the development of therapies designed to decrease pancytopenias associated with myeloablative regimens used to treat a wide array of disease states.

  12. Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b have overlapping and distinct functions in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challen, Grant A; Sun, Deqiang; Mayle, Allison; Jeong, Mira; Luo, Min; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Mallaney, Cates; Celik, Hamza; Yang, Liubin; Xia, Zheng; Cullen, Sean; Berg, Jonathan; Zheng, Yayun; Darlington, Gretchen J; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A

    2014-09-04

    Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) ensures lifelong production of blood and bone marrow. Recently, we reported that loss of de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a results in HSC expansion and impaired differentiation. Here, we report conditional inactivation of Dnmt3b in HSCs either alone or combined with Dnmt3a deletion. Combined loss of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b was synergistic, resulting in enhanced HSC self-renewal and a more severe block in differentiation than in Dnmt3a-null cells, whereas loss of Dnmt3b resulted in a mild phenotype. Although the predominant Dnmt3b isoform in adult HSCs is catalytically inactive, its residual activity in Dnmt3a-null HSCs can drive some differentiation and generates paradoxical hypermethylation of CpG islands. Dnmt3a/Dnmt3b-null HSCs displayed activated β-catenin signaling, partly accounting for the differentiation block. These data demonstrate distinct roles for Dnmt3b in HSC differentiation and provide insights into complementary de novo methylation patterns governing regulation of HSC fate decisions.

  13. Circulation-Independent Differentiation Pathway from Extraembryonic Mesoderm toward Hematopoietic Stem Cells via Hemogenic Angioblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Tanaka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A large gap exists in our understanding of the course of differentiation from mesoderm to definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Previously, we reported that Runx1+ cells in embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5 embryos contribute to the hemogenic endothelium in the E10.5 aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region and HSCs in the adult bone marrow. Here, we show that two Runx1+ populations subdivided by Gata1 expression exist in E7.5 embryos. The hemogenic endothelium and the HSCs are derived only from the Runx1+Gata1− population. A subset of this population moves from the extra- to intraembryonic region during E7.5–E8.0, where it contributes to the hemogenic endothelium of the dorsal aorta (DA. Migration occurs before the heartbeat is initiated, and it is independent of circulation. This suggests a developmental trajectory from Runx1+ cells in the E7.5 extraembryonic region to definitive HSCs via the hemogenic endothelium.

  14. Dietary restriction improves repopulation but impairs lymphoid differentiation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells in early aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Duozhuang; Tao, Si; Chen, Zhiyang; Koliesnik, Ievgen Oleksandrovich; Calmes, Philip Gerald; Hoerr, Verena; Han, Bing; Gebert, Nadja; Zörnig, Martin; Löffler, Bettina; Morita, Yohei; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    2016-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) improves health, delays tissue aging, and elongates survival in flies and worms. However, studies on laboratory mice and nonhuman primates revealed ambiguous effects of DR on lifespan despite improvements in health parameters. In this study, we analyzed consequences of adult-onset DR (24 h to 1 yr) on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. DR ameliorated HSC aging phenotypes, such as the increase in number of HSCs and the skewing toward myeloid-biased HSCs during aging. Furthermore, DR increased HSC quiescence and improved the maintenance of the repopulation capacity of HSCs during aging. In contrast to these beneficial effects, DR strongly impaired HSC differentiation into lymphoid lineages and particularly inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid progenitors, resulting in decreased production of peripheral B lymphocytes and impaired immune function. The study shows that DR-dependent suppression of growth factors and interleukins mediates these divergent effects caused by DR. Supplementation of insulin-like growth factor 1 partially reverted the DR-induced quiescence of HSCs, whereas IL-6/IL-7 substitutions rescued the impairment of B lymphopoiesis exposed to DR. Together, these findings delineate positive and negative effects of long-term DR on HSC functionality involving distinct stress and growth signaling pathways.

  15. Clinical features of late cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano-Mori, Yuki; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Oshima, Kumi; Kako, Shinichi; Shinohara, Akihito; Nakasone, Hideki; Sato, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Takuro; Hosoya, Noriko; Izutsu, Koji; Asai, Takashi; Hangaishi, Akira; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-04-01

    Late cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease beyond day 100 after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an increasing problem after the introduction of preemptive ganciclovir (GCV) administration. To clarify the risk factors and outcome for late CMV reactivation and disease, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 101 Japanese adult patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT between 1998 and 2005 at our hospital. Fifty-one developed late positive CMV antigenemia, with a cumulative incidence of 53%. Recipient CMV seropositivity, the use of alemtuzumab, chronic GVHD, and high-dose steroids were significantly associated with late positive antigenemia. Eight patients developed late CMV disease, with a cumulative incidence of 8%, including retinitis and gastrointestinal disease. None progressed to a fatal disease. The use of alemtuzumab was identified as an independent significant risk factor for late CMV disease, although it was not associated with increased non-relapse mortality. Among the 51 patients with late positive antigenemia, 28 had consistently less than three positive cells, 25 of whom showed negative conversion without antiviral agents. In conclusion, late CMV antigenemia appeared to develop frequently, especially in patients with profound immune suppression; however, a fatal outcome could be prevented by optimal preemptive therapy. Low-level antigenemia may not require antiviral treatments.

  16. Cardiac complications after haploidentical HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using in vivo alemtuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, K; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Asano-Mori, Y; Izutsu, K; Watanabe, T; Shoda, E; Ogawa, S; Motokura, T; Chiba, S; Kurokawa, M; Hirai, H; Kanda, Y

    2005-11-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against human CD52 with a strong lympholytic effect. We have performed unmanipulated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from 2- or 3-locus-mismatched family donors in 14 patients using in vivo alemtuzumab. All achieved complete donor cell engraftment and grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in only one patient. However, eight of the 14 patients developed grade II-IV cardiac complications according to Bearman's criteria. Next, we retrospectively analyzed the records of 142 adult patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT from 1995 to 2004 to evaluate whether the use of alemtuzumab was an independent risk factor for cardiac complications. Among several factors that increased the incidence of grade II-IV cardiac complications with at least borderline significance, a multivariate analysis identified the cumulative dose of anthracyclines (P=0.0016) and the use of alemtuzumab (P=0.0001) as independent significant risk factors. All of the cardiac complications in the alemtuzumab group were successfully treated with diuretics and/or catecholamines. Patient selection and close monitoring of cardiac function may be important in HLA-mismatched HSCT using in vivo alemtuzumab.

  17. Posaconazole plasma concentration in pediatric patients receiving antifungal prophylaxis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Werner J; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin M; Klinker, Hartwig; Blume, Olivia; Feucht, Judith; Hartmann, Ulrike; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Döring, Michaela

    2016-02-01

    Posaconazole has been proven to be effective for antifungal prophylaxis in adults after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to low gastrointestinal resorption of posaconazole suspension, bioavailability is impaired. Fatty food improves the uptake of posaconazole, but insufficient data on the pharmacokinetics of posaconazole in pediatric patients are available so far. The single-center analysis investigated 161 posaconazole serum concentrations in 27 pediatric patients after HSCT receiving 12 mg·kg BW(-1)·d(-1) posaconazole suspension depending on age, gender, and intestinal graft-versus-host (iGvHD) disease, and the influence of posaconazole on cyclosporine A plasma concentrations. To improve the uptake of posaconazole, one patient cohort received higher fat nutrition with the drug administration. A comparison of the regular nutrition and higher-fat nutrition groups revealed the following values: 31 (27.4%) versus 8 (16.7%) 2000 ng/ml. The mean posaconazole concentrations in patients with regular nutrition was 1123 ± 811 ng/ml and with higher-fat nutrition was 1191 ± 673 ng/ml. Posaconazole levels in patients with iGvHD were significantly lower (P = 0.0003) than in patients without GvHD. The majority of samples showed a sufficient posaconazole concentration above 700 ng/ml. Posaconazole levels were slightly higher in patients with higher-fat nutrition and significantly lower in patients with iGvHD. Cyclosporine A levels were not significantly higher during posaconazole administration.

  18. Expression and function of P2 receptors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenli; Wang, Lina; Zheng, Guoguang

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotides have unambiguously emerged as a family of mediators of intercellular communication, which bind to a class of plasma membrane receptors, P2 receptors, to trigger intercellular signaling. P2 receptors can be further divided into P2X and P2Y subfamilies based on structure and function. Different hematopoietic cells express diverse spectrums of P2 receptors at different levels, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exerts different effects on HSPCs, regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and chemotaxis, release of cytokines or lysosomal constituents, and generation of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The relationship between abnormal P2 receptor function and human diseases attracts more and more attention. This review summarizes the expression and function of P2 receptors in HSPCs and the relationship to hematopoietic diseases.

  19. Hematopoietic Development from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A decade of research on human embryonic stem cells (ESC) has paved the way for the discovery of alternative approaches to generating pluripotent stem cells.Combinatorial overexpression of a limited number of proteins linked to pluripotency in ESC was recently found to reprogram differentiated somatic cells back to a pluripotent state, enabling the derivation of isogenic (patient-specific) pluripotent stem cell lines. Current research is focusing on improving reprogramming protocols (e.g. circ...

  20. Development of patient-specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell grafts from pluripotent stem cells, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, H; Teichweyde, N; Meyer, C; Horn, P A

    2013-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for future applications in many areas of regenerative medicine. Their defining property of differentiation towards any of the three germ layers and all derivatives thereof, including somatic stem cells, explains the special interest of the biomedical community in this cell type. In this review, we focus on the current state of directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are especially interesting because they are the longest known and, thus, most intensively investigated somatic stem cells. They were the first stem cells successfully used for regenerative purposes in clinical human medicine, namely in bone marrow transplantation, and also the first stem cells to be genetically altered for the first successful gene therapy trial in humans. However, because of the technical difficulties associated with this rare type of cell, such as the current incapability of prospective isolation, in vitro expansion and gene repair by homologous recombination, there is great interest in using pluripotent stem cells, such as Embryonic Stem (ES-) cells, as a source for generating and genetically altering HSCs, ex vivo. This has been hampered by ethical concerns associated with the use of human ES-cells. However, since Shinya Yamanaka´s successful attempts to reprogram somatic cells of mice and men to an ES-cell like state, so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, this field of research has experienced a huge boost. In this brief review, we will reflect on the status quo of directed hematopoietic differentiation of human and mouse pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Total body irradiation in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fundagul Andic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Total body irradiation is used in conjunction with chemotherapy as a conditioning regimen in the treatment of many disease such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma prior to the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation. The main purposes of the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation are eradication of the recipient bone marrow and any residual cancer cells, creation of space in the receipient bone marrow for donor hematopoetic stem cells, and immunosuppression to prevent rejection of donor stem cells in the case of an allotransplant. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 398-410

  2. Analysis of efficacy and prognosis of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from different donors in treatment of hematologic malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余正平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT) from unrelated donors and that from related donors in treatment of hematologic malignancies. Methods

  3. Analysis of the efficacy and prognosis on first-line autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of patients with multiple myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹徳慧

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy and prognosis of first-line autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(ASCT) for newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma(MM).Methods From January 2005 to

  4. The association of killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor gene polylmorphism with cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小津

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of the killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor(KIR)gene polymorphism on cytomegalovirus(CMV)infection and pathogenesis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(HSCT)

  5. High-Dose [131I]Tositumomab (anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Maloney, David G.; Eary, Janet F.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2007-04-10

    Purpose: The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) are over 60 years of age, yet they are often denied potentially curative high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) due to the risk of excessive treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Myeloablative anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) can deliver curative radiation doses to tumor sites while limiting exposure to normal organs and may be particularly suited for older adults requiring high-dose therapy. Methods: Patients over age 60 with relapsed B-NHL received infusions of tositumomab anti-CD20 antibody labeled with 5-10mCi I-131 tracer for dosimetry purposes followed 10 days later by individualized therapeutic infusions of I-131-tositumomab (median 525 mCi, range 328-1154 mCi) to deliver 25-27Gy to the critical normal organ receiving the highest radiation dose. ASCT was performed approximately 2 weeks after therapy. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 64 (range 60-76) who had received a median of four prior regimens (range 2-14) were treated. Thirteen (54%) had chemotherapy-resistant disease. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survivals were 59% and 51%, respectively with a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 1-6 years). All patients experienced expected myeloablation with engraftment of platelets (≥20K/µL) and neutrophils (≥500/µL) occurring a median of 9 and 15 days, respectively following ASCT. There were no treatment-related deaths, and only two patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Myeloablative RIT and ASCT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for older adults with relapsed B-NHL.

  6. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    is the necessity to be able to identify, select, expand and manipulate cells outside the body. Recent advances in adult stem cell technologies and basic biology have accelerated therapeutic opportunities aimed at eventual clinical applications. Adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate down multiple...... lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...... cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...

  7. Immunological Basis of Bone Marrow Failure after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masouridi-Levrat, Stavroula; Simonetta, Federico; Chalandon, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow failure (BMF) syndromes are severe complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In this paper, we distinguish two different entities, the graft failure (GF) and the poor graft function (PGF), and we review the current understanding of the interactions between the immune and hematopoietic compartments in these conditions. We first discuss how GF occurs as the result of classical alloreactive immune responses mediated by residual host cellular and humoral immunity persisting after conditioning and prevented by host and donor regulatory T cells. We next summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of inflammatory mediators to the development of PGF. In situations of chronic inflammation complicating allo-HSCT, such as graft-versus-host disease or infections, PGF seems to be essentially the result of a sustained impairment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and proliferation caused by inflammatory mediators, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α, and of induction of apoptosis through the Fas/Fas ligand pathway. Interestingly, the production of inflammatory molecules leads to a non-MHC restricted, bystander inhibition of hematopoiesis, therefore, representing a promising target for immunological interventions. Finally, we discuss immune-mediated impairment of bone marrow microenvironment as a potential mechanism hampering hematopoietic recovery. Better understanding of immunological mechanisms responsible for BMF syndromes after allo-HSCT may lead to the development of more efficient immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:27695456

  8. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Pel, M.; van Os, R.; Velders, G.A.;

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulat......Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases...... are regulatory mediators in cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization, we considered a possible role for protease inhibitors in the induction of HSC/HPC mobilization. Bone marrow (BM) extracellular extracts that were obtained from murine femurs after 0.5 Gy of TBI contained an inhibitor of elastase. Also, after low......-dose TBI, both Serpina1 mRNA and protein concentrations were increased in BM extracts, compared with extracts that were obtained from controls. The inhibitory activity in BM extracts of irradiated mice was reversed by addition of an Ab directed against Serpina1. To further study a possible in vivo role...

  9. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  10. Stem cell antigen 2 expression in adult and developing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antica, M; Wu, L; Scollay, R

    1997-01-01

    Stem cell antigen 2 (Sca-2) expression can distinguish the most immature T-lymphocyte precursors in the thymus from the hemopoietic stem cells. Sequence analysis of the Sca-2 protein showed that Sca-2 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored molecule that shares some characteristics with the members of the Ly-6 multigene family, and that it is the same as the thymic shared antigen-1 (TSA-1). Here we extend these studies and critically reassess the expression of the Sca-2/TSA-1 antigen in hematopoietic tissues of adult and developing mice. With more sensitive methods we show that the distribution of Sca-2/TSA-1 differs from existing reports. We find especially high expression of Sca-2/TSA1 at day 14 of fetal development.

  11. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adolescents: 3 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yeon Jin; Lee, Hyun Young; Jung, In Ah; Cho, Won-Kyoung; Cho, Bin; Suh, Byung-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS) is a rare disease characterized by a extracellular volume depletion and hyponatremia induced by marked natriuresis. It is mainly reported in patients who experience a central nervous system insult, such as cerebral hemorrhage or encephalitis. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is a main cause of severe hyponatremia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, whereas CSWS is rarely reported. We report 3 patients with childhood acute leukemia who developed CSWS with central nervous system complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The diagnosis of CSW was made on the basis of severe hyponatremia accompanied by increased urine output with clinical signs of dehydration. All patients showed elevated natriuretic peptide and normal antidiuretic hormone. Aggressive water and sodium replacement treatment was instituted in all 3 patients and 2 of them were effectively recovered, the other one was required to add fludrocortisone administration.

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation monitoring in childhood. Hematological diseases in Serbia: STR-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Aleksandra D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a very successful method of treatment for children with different aquired or inborn diseases. The main goal of post-transplantation chimerism monitoring in HSCT is to predict negative events (such as disease relapse and graft rejection, in order to intervene with appropriate therapy and improve the probability of long-term DFS (disease free survival. In this context, by quantifying the relative amounts of donor and recipient cells present in the peripheral blood sample, it can be determined if engraftment has taken place at all, or if full or mixed chimerism exists. In a group of patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Mother and Child Health Care Institute, we decided to use standard human identfication tests based on multiplex PCR analyses of short tandem repeats (STRs, as they are highly informative, sensitive, and fast and therefore represent an optimal methodological approach to engraftment analysis.

  13. Different Motile Behaviors of Human Hematopoietic Stem versus Progenitor Cells at the Osteoblastic Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Foster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in our understanding of interactions between mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and their niche, little is known about communication between human HSCs and the microenvironment. Using a xenotransplantation model and intravital imaging, we demonstrate that human HSCs display distinct motile behaviors to their hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC counterparts, and the same pattern can be found between mouse HSCs and HPCs. HSCs become significantly less motile after transplantation, while progenitor cells remain motile. We show that human HSCs take longer to find their niche than previously expected and suggest that the niche be defined as the position where HSCs stop moving. Intravital imaging is the only technique to determine where in the bone marrow stem cells stop moving, and future analyses should focus on the environment surrounding the HSC at this point.

  14. Microsatellite instability confounds engraftment analysis of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Hui; Tang, Jih-Luh; Haley, Lisa; Beierl, Katie; Gocke, Christopher D; Eshleman, James R; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2014-07-01

    Polymorphic short tandem-repeat, or microsatellite, loci have been widely used to analyze chimerism status after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. In molecular diagnostic laboratories, it is recommended to calculate mixed chimerism for at least 2 informative loci and to avoid microsatellite loci on chromosomes with copy number changes. In this report, we show that microsatellite instability observed in 2 patients with acute leukemia may confound chimerism analysis. Interpretation errors may occur even if 2 to 3 loci are analyzed because of length variation in multiple microsatellite loci. Although microsatellite loci with length variation should not be selected for chimerism analysis, the presence of microsatellite instability, like copy number alteration because of aberrant chromosomes, provides evidence of recurrent or residual cancer cells after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  15. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  16. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  17. Cutaneous graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplant - a review*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Cesar Daniel Villarreal; Alanis, Julio Cesar Salas; Pérez, Jose Carlos Jaime; Candiani, Jorge Ocampo

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (allo-HSCT) associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The earliest and most common manifestation is cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, prevention and treatment of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. We discuss various insights into the disease's mechanisms and the different treatments for acute and chronic skin graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27438202

  18. Pregnancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Fanconi anemia patient

    OpenAIRE

    Atashkhoei S; Fakhari S; Bilehjani E; Farzin H

    2017-01-01

    Simin Atashkhoei, Solmaz Fakhari, Eissa Bilehjani, Haleh Farzin Department of Anesthesiology, Al-Zahra Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Abstract: Pregnancy in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is rare. However, there are reports of successful pregnancy in Fanconi patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). We describe the case of a term pregnant woman with FA who was treated with BMT 2 years earlie...

  19. Pregnancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Fanconi anemia patient

    OpenAIRE

    Atashkhoei,Simin; Fakhari,Solmaz; Bilehjani,Eissa; Farzin,Haleh

    2017-01-01

    Simin Atashkhoei, Solmaz Fakhari, Eissa Bilehjani, Haleh Farzin Department of Anesthesiology, Al-Zahra Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Abstract: Pregnancy in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is rare. However, there are reports of successful pregnancy in Fanconi patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). We describe the case of a term pregnant woman with FA who was treated with BMT 2&n...

  20. Qualitative Properties in a More General Delayed Hematopoietic Stem Cells Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz-Alaoui M. A.; Yafia R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a more general model describing the dynamics of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC) model with one delay. Its dynamics are studied in terms of local stability and Hopf bifurcation. We prove the existence of the possible steady state and their stability with respect to the time delay and without delay. We show that a sequence of Hopf bifurcations occur at the positive steady state as the delay crosses some critical values. We illustrate our results by some numerical ...

  1. The role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we present 1) scientific basis for the use of high dose immunosuppression followed by autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2) an update of clinical and laboratory outcomes in 21 patients transplanted at the University Hospital of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Brazil, including 6 relapses in patients without previous ketoacidosis and 3) a discussion of future prospectives ...

  2. Hepatitis B-related events in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zcan; eneli; Zübeyde; Nur; zkurt; Kadir; Acar; Seyyal; Rota; Sahika; Zeynep; Aki; Zeynep; Arzu; Yegin; Münci; Yagci; Seren; zenirler; Gülsan; Türkz; Sucak

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the frequency of occult hepatitis B, the clinical course of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and reverse seroconversion and associated risk factors in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. METHODS: This study was conducted in 90 patients undergoing autologous HSCT. Occult HBV infection was investigated by HBV-DNA analysis prior to transplantation, while HBV serology and liver function tests were screened prior to and serially after transplantation. HBV...

  3. Herpesvirus-Associated Central Nervous System Diseases after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with encephalitis/myelitis and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As of now, data of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases in transplant recipients is limited. Hence, in this prospective study, we investigated the incidence of herpesvirus-associated CNS diseases and explored the diagnosis of these diseases in 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients. Herpesv...

  4. Nutritional status and tissue composition in children after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    A. Yu. Vashura; M. V. Konovalova; Skorobogatova, E. V.; S. V. Belmer; G. Ya. Tseytlin

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (HSCT) is currently widely used for solid tumors, leukemia and autoimmune diseases therapy. Complications in post-transplant period, as well as specific therapy of these complications lead to nutritional status changes, which worsen post-transplant period and influence of outcome. To analyze nutritional status and tissue composition characteristics and determine the value of bioimpedance methods for complex examination of nutritional status in children...

  5. Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Luni, Camilla; Feldman, Hope C.; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo; Meinhart, Carl D.; Elvassore, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the development of an array of bioreactors where finely controlled stirring is provided at the microliter scale (100–300 μl). The microliter-bioreactor array is useful for performing protocol optimization in up to 96 parallel experiments of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) cultures. Exploring a wide range of experimental conditions at the microliter scale minimizes cost and labor. Once the cell culture protocol is optimized, it can be applied to large-scale bioreactors for ste...

  6. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in HIV/AIDS and immune reconstitution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jielin Zhang; Clyde S Crumpacker

    2010-01-01

    @@ The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).HIV-1 infects human immune cells,specifically CD4+ lymphocytes, which leads to AIDS and undermines reconstitution of immunity. The unique challenges of HIV/AIDS have triggered multidisciplinary investigators to study the virology of the pathogen and the biology of the host cells, especially the interactions of HIV-1 with T-lymphocytes,macrophages, and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) [1-8].

  7. Endoscopic diagnosis of cytomegalovirus gastritis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuo; Kakugawa; Masahiro; Kami; Takahisa; Matsuda; Yutaka; Saito; Sung-Won; Kim; Takahiro; Fukuda; Shin-ichiro; Mori; Tadakazu; Shimoda; Ryuji; Tanosaki; Daizo; Saito

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the endoscopic and clinical findings of cytomegalovirus(CMV) gastritis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-SCT).METHODS:Between 1999 and 2005,523 patients underwent allo-SCT at our hospital,and 115 of these patients with gastrointestinal symptoms underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy.RESULTS:CMV gastritis was diagnosed pathologically in seven patients(1.3%) with the other 108 patients serving as controls.Six of the seven patients developed positive CMV antigenemia,and...

  8. Mechanical unloading of bone in microgravity reduces mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Blaber

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading of mammalian tissues is a potent promoter of tissue growth and regeneration, whilst unloading in microgravity can cause reduced tissue regeneration, possibly through effects on stem cell tissue progenitors. To test the specific hypothesis that mechanical unloading alters differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell lineages, we studied cellular and molecular aspects of how bone marrow in the mouse proximal femur responds to unloading in microgravity. Trabecular and cortical endosteal bone surfaces in the femoral head underwent significant bone resorption in microgravity, enlarging the marrow cavity. Cells isolated from the femoral head marrow compartment showed significant down-regulation of gene expression markers for early mesenchymal and hematopoietic differentiation, including FUT1(−6.72, CSF2(−3.30, CD90(−3.33, PTPRC(−2.79, and GDF15(−2.45, but not stem cell markers, such as SOX2. At the cellular level, in situ histological analysis revealed decreased megakaryocyte numbers whilst erythrocytes were increased 2.33 fold. Furthermore, erythrocytes displayed elevated fucosylation and clustering adjacent to sinuses forming the marrow–blood barrier, possibly providing a mechanistic basis for explaining spaceflight anemia. Culture of isolated bone marrow cells immediately after microgravity exposure increased the marrow progenitor's potential for mesenchymal differentiation into in-vitro mineralized bone nodules, and hematopoietic differentiation into osteoclasts, suggesting an accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors during exposure to microgravity. These results support the idea that mechanical unloading of mammalian tissues in microgravity is a strong inhibitor of tissue growth and regeneration mechanisms, acting at the level of early mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

  9. The thrombopoietin receptor, c-Mpl, is a selective surface marker for human hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr William G

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombopoietin (TPO, the primary cytokine regulating megakaryocyte proliferation and differentiation, exerts significant influence on other hematopoietic lineages as well, including erythroid, granulocytic and lymphoid lineages. We previously demonstrated that the receptor for TPO, c-mpl, is expressed by a subset of human adult bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/PC that are enriched for long-term multilineage repopulating ability in the SCID-hu Bone in vivo model of human hematopoiesis. Methods Here, we employ flow cytometry and an anti-c-mpl monoclonal antibody to comprehensively define the surface expression pattern of c-mpl in four differentiation stages of human CD34+ HSC/PC (I: CD34+38--, II: CD34+38dim, III: CD34+38+, IV: CD34dim38+ for the major sources of human HSC: fetal liver (FL, umbilical cord blood (UCB, adult bone marrow (ABM, and cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (mPBSC. We use a surrogate in vivo model of human thymopoiesis, SCID-hu Thy/Liv, to compare the capacity of c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl-- CD34+38--/dim HSC/PC for thymocyte reconstitution. Results For all tissue sources, the percentage of c-mpl+ cells was significantly highest in stage I HSC/PC (FL 72 ± 10%, UCB 67 ± 19%, ABM 82 ± 16%, mPBSC 71 ± 15%, and decreased significantly through stages II, III, and IV ((FL 3 ± 3%, UCB 8 ± 13%, ABM 0.6 ± 0.6%, mPBSC 0.2 ± 0.1% [ANOVA: P I, decreasing through stage IV [ANOVA: P + cells [P = 0.89] or intensity of c-mpl expression [P = 0.21]. Primary Thy/Liv grafts injected with CD34+38--/dimc-mpl+ cells showed slightly higher levels of donor HLA+ thymocyte reconstitution vs. CD34+38--/dimc-mpl---injected grafts and non-injected controls (c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl--: CD2+ 6.8 ± 4.5% vs. 2.8 ± 3.3%, CD4+8-- 54 ± 35% vs. 31 ± 29%, CD4--8+ 29 ± 19% vs. 18 ± 14%. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that the TPO receptor, c-mpl, participates in the regulation of primitive human HSC

  10. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslisah Yasar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88 dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life.

  11. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Neslisah

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88) dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life. PMID:28116155

  12. Activation of the canonical Wnt pathway leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell repopulation and multilineage differentiation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Anderson, Kristina; Porse, Bo T;

    2006-01-01

    of hematopoietic stem cell function was associated with decreased expression of Cdkn1a (encoding the cell cycle inhibitor p21(cdk)), Sfpi1, Hoxb4 and Bmi1 (encoding the transcription factors PU.1, HoxB4 and Bmi-1, respectively) and altered integrin expression in Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) cells, whereas PU.1......Wnt signaling increases hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and is activated in both myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, indicating involvement in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. We report here activated canonical Wnt signaling in the hematopoietic system through conditional expression...... of a stable form of beta-catenin. This enforced expression led to hematopoietic failure associated with loss of myeloid lineage commitment at the granulocyte-macrophage progenitor stage; blocked erythrocyte differentiation; disruption of lymphoid development; and loss of repopulating stem cell activity. Loss...

  13. Serum- and stromal cell-free hypoxic generation of embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic cells in vitro, capable of multilineage repopulation of immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Dietrich Armin; Heinz, Niels; Pilat-Carotta, Sandra; Rudolph, Cornelia; Jacobs, Roland; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Klump, Hannes; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard

    2012-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may become a promising source for the generation of patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro. A crucial prerequisite will be the availability of reliable protocols for the directed and efficient differentiation toward HSCs. So far, the most robust strategy for generating HSCs from pluripotent cells in vitro has been established in the mouse model involving ectopic expression of the human transcription factor HOXB4. However, most differentiation protocols include coculture on a xenogenic stroma cell line and the use of animal serum. Involvement of any of both would pose a major barrier to the translation of those protocols to human autologous iPSCs intended for clinical use. Therefore, we asked whether long-term repopulating HSCs can, in principle, be generated from embryonic stem cells without stroma cells or serum. Here, we showed that long-term multilineage engraftment could be accomplished in immunocompetent mice when HSCs were generated in serum-free medium without stroma cell support and when hypoxic conditions were used. Under those conditions, HOXB4(+) embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were immunophenotypically similar to definitive bone marrow resident E-SLAM(+) (CD150(+)CD48(-)CD45(+)CD201(+)) HSCs. Thus, our findings may ease the development of definitive, adult-type HSCs from pluripotent stem cells, entirely in vitro.

  14. Homing and long-term engraftment of long- and short-term renewal hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liansheng Liu

    Full Text Available Long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSC and short-term hematopoietic stem cells (ST-HSC have been characterized as having markedly different in vivo repopulation, but similar in vitro growth in liquid culture. These differences could be due to differences in marrow homing. We evaluated this by comparing results when purified ST-HSC and LT-HSC were administered to irradiated mice by three different routes: intravenous, intraperitoneal, and directly into the femur. Purified stem cells derived from B6.SJL mice were competed with marrow cells from C57BL/6J mice into lethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice. Serial transplants into secondary recipients were also carried out. We found no advantage for ST-HSC engraftment when the cells were administered intraperitoneally or directly into femur. However, to our surprise, we found that the purified ST-HSC were not short-term in nature but rather gave long-term multilineage engraftment out to 387 days, albeit at a lower level than the LT-HSC. The ST-HSC also gave secondary engraftment. These observations challenge current models of the stem cell hierarchy and suggest that stem cells are in a continuum of change.

  15. Expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived stromal cells on hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jin-rong; LIU Wen-li; ZHOU Yu-feng; ZHOU Jian-feng; SUN Han-ying; LUO Li; ZHANG Heng; XU Hui-zhen

    2005-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood and immune cells and are used in clinical transplantation protocols to treat a wide variety of refractory diseases, but the amplification of HSCs has been difficult to achieve in vitro. In the present study, the expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region derived stromal cells on HSCs were explored, attempting to improve the efficiency of HSC transplantation in clinical practice.Methods The murine stromal cells were isolated from the AGM region of 12 days postcoitum (dpc) murine embryos and bone marrow(BM)of 6 weeks old mice, respectively. After identification with flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, the stromal cells were co-cultured with ESCs-derived, cytokines-induced HSCs. The maintenance and expansion of ESCs-derived HSCs were evaluated by detecting the population of CD34+ and CD34+Sca-1+cells with flow cytometry and the blast colony-forming cells (BL-CFCs), high proliferative potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFCs) by using semi-solid medium colonial culture. Finally, the homing and hematopoietic reconstruction abilities of HSCs were evaluated using a murine model of HSC transplantation in vivo.Results AGM and BM-derived stromal cells were morphologically and phenotypically similar, and had the features of stromal cells. When co-cultured with AGM or BM stromal cells, more primitive progenitor cells (HPP-CFCs ) could be detected in ESCs derived hematopoietic precursor cells, but BL-CFC's expansion could be detected only when co-cultured with AGM-derived stromal cells. The population of CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were expanded 3 times,but no significant expansion in the population of CD34+Sca-1+ cells was noted when co-cultured with BM stromal cells. While both CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and CD34+Sca-1+ cells were expanded 4 to 5 times respectively when co-cultured with AGM stromal cells. AGM region-derived stromal cells, like BM-derived stromal

  16. Early Natural Killer Cell Reconstitution Predicts Overall Survival in T Cell-Replete Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minculescu, Lia; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Friis, Lone Smidstrup

    2016-01-01

    Early immune reconstitution plays a critical role in clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Natural killer (NK) cells are the first lymphocytes to recover after transplantation and are considered powerful effector cells in HSCT. We aimed to evaluate...... the clinical impact of early NK cell recovery in T cell-replete transplant recipients. Immune reconstitution was studied in 298 adult patients undergoing HSCT for acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome from 2005 to 2013. In multivariate analysis NK cell numbers...... on day 30 (NK30) > 150 cells/µL were independently associated with superior overall survival (hazard ratio, .79; 95% confidence interval, .66 to .95; P = .01). Cumulative incidence analyses showed that patients with NK30 > 150 cells/µL had significantly less transplant-related mortality (TRM), P = .01...

  17. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy.

  18. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Luevano

    Full Text Available Adoptive natural killer (NK cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+ being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+ and frozen PBCD34(+ to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+ cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+ cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+ and PBCD34(+ expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+ for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+, without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  19. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano, Martha; Domogala, Anna; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Derniame, Sophie; Escobedo-Cousin, Michelle; Querol, Sergio; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+)) being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+)) and frozen PBCD34(+) to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+) cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+) cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+) and PBCD34(+) expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+)-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+)-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+) for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+), without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  20. Individualization of drug exposure in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelink, I.H.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic haematopoeitic stem cell transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for a variety of diseases. Its use is limited by 1) the risk of graft failures and relapse of malignant diseases, 2) transplantation-associated complications, and 3) late effects. There is a large and largely unp

  1. Collection of hematopoietic stem cells from patients with autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, RK; Fassas, A; Snowden, JA; Kozak, T; Wulffraat, NM; Nash, RA; Dunbar, CE; Arnold, R; Prentice, G; Bingham, S; Marmont, AM; McSweeney, PA; van Laar, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed data from 24 transplant centers in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America to determine the outcomes of stem cell collection including methods used, cell yields, effects on disease activity, and complications in patients with autoimmune diseases. Twenty-one unprimed bone marrow harves

  2. Autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in a patient with refractory pemphigus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in the treatment of refractory pemphigus.A 35-year-old male patient presented with a 4-year history of recurrent bullae on his trunk and extremities.The diagnosis of pemphigus was made on the basis of the clinical,histologic and immunofluorescence findings.The patient had shown resistance to conventional therapy with glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive agents.Two months before admission,he complained of hip joint pain.X-ray and CT scan revealed aseptic necrosis of the femoral head.Stem-cell mobilization was achieved by treatment with cyclophosphamide,granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)and rituximab.Peripheral blood stem cells were collected via leukapheresis and cryopreserved for later use.Immunoablation was accomplished by using cyclophosphamide(200 mg/kg;divided into 50 mg/kg on days-5,-4,-3,and-2),antithymocyte globulin(ATG;10 mg/kg;divided into 2.5 mg/kg on days-6,-5,-4,and-3),and rituximab (1200 mg/d;divided into 600 mg/d on days 0 and 7).Autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was followed by reconstitution of the immune system which was monitored by flow cytometry.The glucocorticoid was withdrawn immediately after transplantation.The pemphigus titer turned negative 6 weeks after transplantation and remained negative.The patient was in complete drug-free remission with no evidence of residual clinical or serological activity of pemphigus during 1 year of followup.The patient's response suggests that autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be a potential "cure" for refractory pemphigus.However,further studies are needed to evaluate the risk-benefit ratio of this approach in patients with pemphigus showing resistance to conventional therapy.

  3. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of adequacy of hematopoietic stem cell collection for autologous transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combariza, Juan F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to carry out an autologous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells should be mobilized to peripheral blood and later collected by apheresis. The CD34+ cell count is a tool to establish the optimal time to begin the apheresis procedure. Objective: To evaluate the association between peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Materials and methods: A predictive test evaluation study was carried out to establish the usefulness of peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of successful stem cell collection in patients that will receive an autologous transplantation. Results: 77 patients were included (median age: 49 years; range: 5-66. The predominant baseline diagnosis was lymphoma (53.2 %. The percentage of patients with successful harvest of hematopoietic stem cells was proportional to the number of CD34+cells in peripheral blood at the end of the mobilization procedure. We propose that more than 15 CD34+cells/μL must be present in order to achieve an adequate collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Conclusion: Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count is a useful tool to predict the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells.

  4. Spiritual absence and 1-year mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Deidre B; Christian, Lisa M; Patidar, Seema; Bishop, Michelle M; Dodd, Stacy M; Athanason, Rebecca; Wingard, John R; Reddy, Vijay S

    2010-08-01

    Religiosity and spirituality have been associated with better survival in large epidemiologic studies. This study examined the relationship between spiritual absence and 1-year all-cause mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Depression and problematic compliance were examined as possible mediators of a significant spiritual absence-mortality relationship. Eighty-five adults (mean = 46.85 years old, SD = 11.90 years) undergoing evaluation for allogeneic HSCT had routine psychologie evaluation prior to HSCT admission. The Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic was used to assess spiritual absence, depression, and problematic compliance, the psychosocial predictors of interest. Patient status at 1 year and survival time in days were abstracted from medical records. Cox regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the psychosocial factors of interest and mortality after adjusting for relevant biobehavioral factors. Twenty-nine percent (n = 25) of participants died within 1 year of HSCT. After covarying for disease type, individuals with the highest spiritual absence and problematic compliance scores were significantly more likely to die 1-year post-HSCT (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.49, P = .043 and HR = 3.74, P = .029, respectively), particularly secondary to infection, sepsis, or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR = 4.56, P = .01 and HR = 5.61, P = .014), relative to those without elevations on these scales. Depression was not associated with 1-year mortality, and problematic compliance did not mediate the relationship between spiritual absence and mortality. These preliminary results suggest that both spiritual absence and problematic compliance may be associated with poorer survival following HSCT. Future research should examine these relations in a larger sample using a more comprehensive assessment of spirituality.

  5. Differential Reponses of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells to mTOR Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway has been observed in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, targeting of the mTOR pathway is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment and several mTOR inhibitors, including AZD8055 (AZD, a novel dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor, are currently in clinical trials. Although bone marrow (BM suppression is one of the primary side effects of anticancer drugs, it is not known if pharmacological inhibition of dual mTORC1/2 affects BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs function and plasticity. Here we report that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 by AZD or its analogue (KU-63794 depletes mouse BM Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ cells in cultures via the induction of apoptotic cell death. Subsequent colony-forming unit (CFU assays revealed that inhibition of mTORC1/2 suppresses the clonogenic function of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, we found that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 markedly inhibits the growth of day-14 cobblestone area-forming cells (CAFCs but enhances the generation of day-35 CAFCs. Given the fact that day-14 and day-35 CAFCs are functional surrogates of HPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, respectively, these results suggest that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 may have distinct effects on HPCs versus HSCs.

  6. Reticular dysgenesis–associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  7. The role of osteoblasts in regulating hematopoietic stem cell activity and tumor metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells are critical regulators of hematopoiesis. Osteoblasts are part of the stromal cell support system in bone marrow and may be derived from a common precursor. Several studies suggested that osteoblasts regulate hematopoiesis, yet the entire mechanism is not understood. It is clear, however, that both hematopoietic precursors and osteoblasts interact for the production of osteoclasts and the activation of resorption. We observed that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs regulate osteoblastic secretion of various growth factors, and that osteoblasts express some soluble factors exclusively in the presence of HSCs. Osteoblasts and hematopoietic cells are closely associated with each other in the bone marrow, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between them to develop the HSC niche. One critical component regulating the niche is stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 which regulates stem cell homing and, as we have recently demonstrated, plays a crucial role in facilitating those tumors which metastasize to bone. Osteoblasts produce abundant amounts of SDF-1 and therefore osteoblasts play an important role in metastasis. These findings are discussed in the context of the role of osteoblasts in marrow function in health and disease.

  8. Evidence that β7 Integrin Regulates Hematopoietic Stem Cell Homing and Engraftment Through Interaction with MAdCAM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Jodi L.; Xu, Baohui; Franco, Christopher B.; Hu, Xingbin; Galli, Stephen J.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    α4β7 integrin is a cell adhesion receptor that is crucial for the migration of hematopoietic progenitors and mature effector cells in the periphery, but its role in adult hematopoiesis is controversial. We identified a subset of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow (BM) that expressed β7 integrin. These β7+ HSCs were capable of multilineage, long-term reconstitution and had an inherent competitive advantage over β7− HSCs. On the other hand, HSCs that lacked β7 integrin (β7KO) had reduced engraftment potential. Interestingly, quantitative RT-PCR and flow cytometry revealed that β7KO HSCs expressed lower levels of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Accordingly, β7KO HSCs exhibited impaired migration abilities in vitro and BM homing capabilities in vivo. Lethal irradiation induced expression of the α4β7 integrin ligand—mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) on BM endothelial cells. Moreover, blocking MAdCAM-1 reduced the homing of HSCs and impaired the survival of recipient mice. Altogether, these data indicate that β7 integrin, when expressed by HSCs, interacted with its endothelial ligand MAdCAM-1 in the BM microenvironment, thereby promoting HSC homing and engraftment. PMID:26422691

  9. Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Regulates Embryonic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development via Prostaglandin E2 and P-Selectin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esain, Virginie; Kwan, Wanda; Carroll, Kelli J; Cortes, Mauricio; Liu, Sarah Y; Frechette, Gregory M; Sheward, Lea M V; Nissim, Sahar; Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E

    2015-08-01

    Cannabinoids (CB) modulate adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPCs) function, however, impact on the production, expansion, or migration of embryonic HSCs is currently uncharacterized. Here, using chemical and genetic approaches targeting CB-signaling in zebrafish, we show that CB receptor (CNR) 2, but not CNR1, regulates embryonic HSC development. During HSC specification in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, CNR2 stimulation by AM1241 increased runx1;cmyb(+) HSPCs, through heightened proliferation, whereas CNR2 antagonism decreased HSPC number; FACS analysis and absolute HSC counts confirmed and quantified these effects. Epistatic investigations showed AM1241 significantly upregulated PGE2 synthesis in a Ptgs2-dependent manner to increase AGM HSCs. During the phases of HSC production and colonization of secondary niches, AM1241 accelerated migration to the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT), the site of embryonic HSC expansion, and the thymus; however these effects occurred independently of PGE2. Using a candidate approach for HSC migration and retention factors, P-selectin was identified as the functional target of CNR2 regulation. Epistatic analyses confirmed migration of HSCs into the CHT and thymus was dependent on CNR2-regulated P-selectin activity. Together, these data suggest CNR2-signaling optimizes the production, expansion, and migration of embryonic HSCs by modulating multiple downstream signaling pathways.

  10. A limited role for p21(Cip1/Waf1) in maintaining normal hematopoietic stem cell functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Os, Ronald; Kamminga, Leonie M.; Ausema, Albertina; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Draijer, Deanna P.; Van Pelt, Kyrjon; Dontje, Bert; De Haan, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 plays a crucial role in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor pool size. To allow assessment of long-term stem cell functioning in vivo, we have backcrossed a p21 null allele to C57BL/6 (B6) mice, the most com

  11. In vivo generation of transplantable human hematopoietic cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Giovanni; Welner, Robert S; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Ye, Min; Kocher, Olivier; Neuberg, Donna S; Khrapko, Konstantin; Silberstein, Leslie E; Tenen, Daniel G

    2013-02-21

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through overexpression of 4 transcription factors. iPS cells are similar to human embryonic stem (hES) cells and have the same ability to generate all the cells of the human body, including blood cells. However, this process is extremely inefficient and to date has been unsuccessful at differentiating iPS into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We hypothesized that iPS cells, injected into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ immunocompromised (NSG) mice could give rise to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during teratoma formation. Here, we report a novel in vivo system in which human iPS cells differentiate within teratomas to derive functional myeloid and lymphoid cells. Similarly, HSPCs can be isolated from teratoma parenchyma and reconstitute a human immune system when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our data provide evidence that in vivo generation of patient customized cells is feasible, providing materials that could be useful for transplantation, human antibody generation, and drug screening applications.

  12. Ex vivo expansions and transplantations of mouse bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin-fu(王金福); WU Yi-fan(吴亦凡); HARRINTONG Jenny; McNIECE Ian K.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effects of co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and the capacities of rapid neutrophil engraftment and hematopoietic reconstitution of the expanded cells, we expanded mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34+/c-kit+ cells from mouse bone marrow and transplanted the expanded cells into the irradiated mice. MNCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow and CD34+/c-kit+ cells were selected from MNCs by using MoFlo Cell Sorter. MNCs and CD34+/c-kit+ cells were co-cultured with mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under a two-step expansion. The expanded cells were then transplanted into sublethally irradiated BDF1 mice. Results showed that the co-culture with MSCs resulted in expansions of median total nucleated cells,CD34+ cells, GM-CFC and HPP-CFC respectively by 10.8-, 4.8-, 65.9- and 38.8-fold for the mononuclear cell culture, and respectively by 76.1-, 2.9-, 71.7- and 51.8-fold for the CD34+/c-kit+ cell culture. The expanded cells could rapidly engraft in the sublethally irradiated mice and reconstitute their hematopoiesis. Co-cultures with MSCs in conjunction with two-step expansion increased expansions of total nucleated cells, GM-CFC and HPP-CFC, which led us to conclude MSCs may create favorable environment for expansions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The availability of increased numbers of expanded cells by the co-culture with MSCs may result in more rapid engraftment ofneutrophils following infusion to transplant recipients.

  13. DNA damage response in adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    This review discusses the processes of DNA-damage-response and DNA-damage repair in stem and progenitor cells of several tissues. The long life-span of stem cells suggests that they may respond differently to DNA damage than their downstream progeny and, indeed, studies have begun to elucidate the unique stem cell response mechanisms to DNA damage. Because the DNA damage responses in stem cells and progenitor cells are distinctly different, stem and progenitor cells should be considered as two different entities from this point of view. Hematopoietic and mammary stem cells display a unique DNA-damage response, which involves active inhibition of apoptosis, entry into the cell-cycle, symmetric division, partial DNA repair and maintenance of self-renewal. Each of these biological events depends on the up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Moreover, inhibition of apoptosis and symmetric stem cell division are the consequence of the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor p53, as a direct result of p21 up-regulation. A deeper understanding of these processes is required before these findings can be translated into human anti-aging and anti-cancer therapies. One needs to clarify and dissect the pathways that control p21 regulation in normal and cancer stem cells and define (a) how p21 blocks p53 functions in stem cells and (b) how p21 promotes DNA repair in stem cells. Is this effect dependent on p21s ability to inhibit p53? Such molecular knowledge may pave the way to methods for maintaining short-term tissue reconstitution while retaining long-term cellular and genomic integrity.

  14. Immuno-metabolism and adipose tissue: The key role of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, B; Casteilla, L; Laharrague, P; Luche, E; Lorsignol, A; Cuminetti, V; Paupert, J

    2016-05-01

    The field of immunometabolism has come a long way in the past decade, leading to the emergence of a new role for white adipose tissue (WAT) that is now recognized to stand at the junction of immune and metabolic regulations. Interestingly, a crucial role of the abundant and heterogeneous immune population present in WAT has been proposed in the induction and development of metabolic diseases. Although a large body of data focused on mature immune cells, only few scattered studies are dedicated to leukocyte production, and the activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in these pathological states. Considering that blood cell production and the differentiation of HSCs and their progeny is orchestrated, in part, by complex interacting signals emanating from their microenvironment, it thus seems worth to better understand the relationships between metabolism and HSC. This review discusses the alterations of hematopoietic process described in metabolic diseases and focused on the emerging data concerning HSC present in WAT.

  15. Roles of p53 in Various Biological Aspects of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Nii

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs have the capacity to self-renew as well as to differentiate into all blood cell types, and they can reconstitute hematopoiesis in recipients with bone marrow ablation. In addition, transplantation therapy using HSCs is widely performed for the treatment of various incurable diseases such as hematopoietic malignancies and congenital immunodeficiency disorders. For the safe and successful transplantation of HSCs, their genetic and epigenetic integrities need to be maintained properly. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms that respond to various cellular stresses in HSCs is important. The tumor suppressor protein, p53, has been shown to play critical roles in maintenance of “cell integrity” under stress conditions by controlling its target genes that regulate cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, senescence, DNA repair, or changes in metabolism. In this paper, we summarize recent reports that describe various biological functions of HSCs and discuss the roles of p53 associated with them.

  16. Genetic Modification of Hematopoietic Stem Cells as a Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Younan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The combination of genetic modification and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation may provide the necessary means to develop an alternative treatment option to conventional antiretroviral therapy. As HSCs give rise to all hematopoietic cell types susceptible to HIV infection, modification of HSCs is an ideal strategy for the development of infection-resistant immune cell populations. Although promising results have been obtained in multiple animal models, additional evidence is needed to convincingly demonstrate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Here, we review the potential of HSC transplantation and the recently identified limitations of this approach. Using the Berlin Patient as a model for a functional cure, we contrast the confines of autologous versus allogeneic transplantation. Finally, we suggest that although autologous, gene-modified HSC-transplantation may significantly reduce plasma viremia, reaching the lower detection limits currently obtainable through daily HAART will remain a challenging endeavor that will require innovative combinatorial therapies.

  17. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells as a therapy for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Patrick; Kowalski, John; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-28

    The combination of genetic modification and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation may provide the necessary means to develop an alternative treatment option to conventional antiretroviral therapy. As HSCs give rise to all hematopoietic cell types susceptible to HIV infection, modification of HSCs is an ideal strategy for the development of infection-resistant immune cell populations. Although promising results have been obtained in multiple animal models, additional evidence is needed to convincingly demonstrate the feasibility of this approach as a treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Here, we review the potential of HSC transplantation and the recently identified limitations of this approach. Using the Berlin Patient as a model for a functional cure, we contrast the confines of autologous versus allogeneic transplantation. Finally, we suggest that although autologous, gene-modified HSC-transplantation may significantly reduce plasma viremia, reaching the lower detection limits currently obtainable through daily HAART will remain a challenging endeavor that will require innovative combinatorial therapies.

  18. Blockage of caspase-1 activation ameliorates bone marrow inflammation in mice after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianlin; Wu, Jinyan; Li, Yuanyuan; Xia, Yuan; Chu, Peipei; Qi, Kunming; Yan, Zhiling; Yao, Haina; Liu, Yun; Xu, Kailin; Zeng, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cause damage to bone marrow and inflammation. Whether inflammasomes are involved in bone marrow inflammation remains unclear. The study aims to evaluate the role of inflammasomes in bone marrow inflammation after HSCT. On days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after HSCT, mice were sacrificed for analysis of bone marrow inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion, inflammasomes expression and caspase-1 activation. Bone marrow inflammation with neutrophils and macrophages infiltration was observed after HSCT. Secretion of IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6 were elevated, with increased caspase-1 activation and inflammasomes expression. Caspase-1 inhibitor administration after HSCT significantly reduced infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages into bone marrow and increased the numbers of megakaryocytes and platelets. In conclusion, inflammasomes activation is involved in bone marrow inflammation after HSCT and caspase-1 inhibition attenuates bone marrow inflammation and promoted hematopoietic reconstitution, suggesting targeting caspase-1 might be beneficial for improving HSCT outcomes.

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E Graham

    2009-01-01

    therapeutic option if a suitable HLA-matched stem-cell donation is available. Reduced-intensity conditioning was particularly safe, and mixed-donor chimerism seems sufficient to prevent significant symptoms, although careful long-term monitoring will be required for these patients....... Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 62 months (extending to 14 years), the overall survival rate was 75%. Myeloablative conditioning regimens were used in 28 patients, and reduced-intensity conditioning in 8 patients, with no deaths in this subgroup. Survival rates...

  20. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  1. Estimating the number of hematopoietic or lymphoid stem cells giving rise to clonal chromosome aberrations in blood T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, M; Kodama, Y; Ohtaki, K; Itoh, M; Awa, A A; Cologne, J; Kusunoki, Y; Nakamura, N

    2004-03-01

    Quantifying the proliferative capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells in humans is important for bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Obtaining appropriate data is difficult, however, because the experimental tools are limited. We hypothesized that tracking clonal descendants originating from hematopoietic stem cells would be possible if we used clonal chromosome aberrations as unique tags of individual hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Using FISH, we screened 500 blood T lymphocytes from each of 513 atomic bomb survivors and detected 96 clones composed of at least three cells with identical aberrations. The number of clones was inversely related to their population size, which we interpreted to mean that the progenitor cells were heterogeneous in the number of progeny that they could produce. The absolute number of progenitor cells contributing to the formation of the observed clones was estimated as about two in an unexposed individual. Further, scrutiny of ten clones revealed that lymphocyte clones could originate roughly equally from hematopoietic stem cells or from mature T lymphocytes, thereby suggesting that the estimated two progenitor cells are shared as one hematopoietic stem cell and one mature T cell. Our model predicts that one out of ten people bears a non- aberrant clone comprising >10% of the total lymphocytes, which indicates that clonal expansions are common and probably are not health-threatening.

  2. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Deater, Matthew; Schubert, Kathryn; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Pelz, Carl; Sinclair, David A; Grompe, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2(-/-) mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1-p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  3. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Shuo Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2−/− mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1–p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  4. Eculizumab before and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Göker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by the triad of intravascular hemolysis, venous thrombosis, and cytopenia. Treatment of PNH is generally supportive. Bone marrow transplantation is the only curative therapy for PNH, but is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Herein, we present a patient with PNH that received eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks activation of the terminal complement at C5, before and immediately following allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation. Prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation eculizumab treatment markedly reduced hemolysis and transfusion requirement; however, 1 d post transplantation a hemolytic episode occured, which was successfully stopped with eculizumab re-treatment. Afterwards the patient did not require additional transfusions. The results of this study indicate that early administration of eculizumab may be a safe and effective therapy for hemolytic episodes associated with allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation in patients with PNH.

  5. FoxO transcription factors and stem cell homeostasis: insights from the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tothova, Zuzana; Gilliland, D Gary

    2007-08-16

    The forkhead O (FoxO) family of transcription factors participates in diverse physiologic processes, including induction of cell-cycle arrest, stress resistance, differentiation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Several recent studies indicate that FoxO-dependent signaling is required for long-term regenerative potential of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment through regulation of HSC response to physiologic oxidative stress, quiescence, and survival. These observations link FoxO function in mammalian systems with the evolutionarily conserved role of FoxO in promotion of stress resistance and longevity in lower phylogenetic systems. Furthermore, these findings have implications for aging in higher organisms and in malignant stem cell biology, and suggest that FoxOs may play an important role in the maintenance and integrity of stem cell compartments in a broad spectrum of tissues.

  6. The ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and lymphoid commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryan; Boccalatte, Francesco; Moran-Crusio, Kelly; Wolf, Elmar; Wang, Jingjing; Kayembe, Clarisse; Lazaris, Charalampos; Yu, Xiaofeng; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lasorella, Anna; Aifantis, Iannis

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dormant in the bone marrow and can be activated in response to diverse stresses to replenish all blood cell types. Here we identify the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 as a crucial regulator of HSC functions via its post-translational control of N-myc. We found Huwe1 to be essential for HSC self-renewal, quiescence and lymphoid fate specification. Using a novel fluorescent fusion allele (MycnM), we observed that N-myc expression was restricted to the most immature, multipotent stem and progenitor populations. N-myc was upregulated in response to stress or upon loss of Huwe1, leading to increased proliferation and stem cell exhaustion. Mycn depletion reversed most of these phenotypes in vivo, suggesting that the attenuation of N-myc by Huwe1 is essential to reestablish homeostasis following stress. PMID:27668798

  7. The use of covalently immobilized stem cell factor to selectively affect hematopoietic stem cell activity within a gelatin hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadik, B.P.; Haba, S. Pedron; Skertich, L.J.; Harley, B.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare stem cell population found primarily in the bone marrow and responsible for the production of the body’s full complement of blood and immune cells. Used clinically to treat a range of hematopoietic disorders, there is a significant need to identify approaches to selectively expand their numbers ex vivo. Here we describe a methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel for in vitro culture of primary murine HSCs. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a critical biomolecular component of native HSC niches in vivo and is used in large dosages in cell culture media for HSC expansion in vitro. We report a photochemistry based approach to covalently immobilize SCF within GelMA hydrogels via acrylate-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethers. PEG-functionalized SCF retains the native bioactivity of SCF but can be stably incorporated and retained within the GelMA hydrogel over 7 days. Freshly-isolated murine HSCs cultured in GelMA hydrogels containing covalently-immobilized SCF showed reduced proliferation and improved selectivity for maintaining primitive HSCs. Comparatively, soluble SCF within the GelMA hydrogel network induced increased proliferation of differentiating hematopoietic cells. We used a microfluidic templating approach to create GelMA hydrogels containing gradients of immobilized SCF that locally direct HSC response. Together, we report a biomaterial platform to examine the effect of the local presentation of soluble vs. matrix-immobilized biomolecular signals on HSC expansion and lineage specification. This approach may be a critical component of a biomaterial-based artificial bone marrow to provide the correct sequence of niche signals to grow HSCs in the laboratory. PMID:26232879

  8. Adult stem cell responses to nanostimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Tsimbouri, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both interna...

  9. Adult stem cells applied to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca-López, M D; Zamora-Navas, P; García-Herrera, J M; Godino, M; López-Puertas, J M; Guerado, E; Becerra, J; Andrades, J A

    2008-01-01

    Regeneration takes place in the body at a moment or another throughout life. Bone, cartilage, and tendons (the key components of the structure and articulation in the body) have a limited capacity for self-repair and, after traumatic injury or disease, the regenerative power of adult tissue is often insufficient. When organs or tissues are irreparably damaged, they may be replaced by an artificial device or by a donor organ. However, the number of available donor organs is considerably limited. Generation of tissue-engineered replacement organs by extracting stem cells from the patient, growing them and modifying them in clinical conditions after re-introduction in the body represents an ideal source for corrective treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the multipotential progenitors that give rise to skeletal cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, muscle (skeletal and cardiac muscle), adipocytes (fat tissue) and hematopoietic (blood)-supportive stromal cells. MSCs are found in multiple connective tissues, in adult bone marrow, skeletal muscles and fat pads. The wide representation in adult tissues may be related to the existence of a circulating blood pool or that MSCs are associated to the vascular system.

  10. Junctional adhesion molecule-A, JAM-A, is a novel cell-surface marker for long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yasuyoshi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Hirata, Ayami; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Toshio; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A/JAM-1/F11R) is a cell adhesion molecule expressed in epithelial and endothelial cells, and also hematopoietic cells, such as leukocytes, platelets, and erythrocytes. Here, we show that JAM-A is expressed at a high level in the enriched hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fraction; that is, CD34(+)c-Kit(+) cells in embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) aorta-gonod-mesonephros (AGM) and E11.5 fetal liver (FL), as well as c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+)Lineage(-) (KSL) cells in E14.5 FL, E18.5FL, and adult bone marrow (BM). Although the percentage of JAM-A(+) cells in those tissues decreases during development, the expression in the HSC fraction is maintained throughout life. Colony-forming assays reveal that multilineage colony-forming activity in JAM-A(+) cells is higher than that in JAM-A(-) cells in the enriched HSC fraction in all of those tissues. Transplantation assays show that long-term reconstituting HSC (LTR-HSC) activity is exclusively in the JAM-A(+) population and is highly enriched in the JAM-A(+) cells sorted directly from whole BM cells by anti-JAM-A antibody alone. Together, these results indicate that JAM-A is expressed on hematopoietic precursors in various hematopoietic tissues and is an excellent marker to isolate LTR-HSCs.

  11. Dose Response for Radiation Cataractogenesis: A Meta-Regression of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Matthew D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E., E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Smith, David D. [Division of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Nguyen, Khanh H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Bayhealth Cancer Center, Dover, Delaware (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a meta-regression on published data and to model the 5-year probability of cataract development after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with and without total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies reporting cataract incidence after HSCT with TBI were identified by a PubMed search. Seventeen publications provided complete information on radiation dose schedule, fractionation, dose rate, and actuarial cataract incidence. Chemotherapy-only regimens were included as zero radiation dose regimens. Multivariate meta-regression with a weighted generalized linear model was used to model the 5-year cataract incidence and contributory factors. Results: Data from 1386 patients in 21 series were included for analysis. TBI was administered to a total dose of 0 to 15.75 Gy with single or fractionated schedules with a dose rate of 0.04 to 0.16 Gy/min. Factors significantly associated with 5-year cataract incidence were dose, dose times dose per fraction (D•dpf), pediatric versus adult status, and the absence of an ophthalmologist as an author. Dose rate, graft versus host disease, steroid use, hyperfractionation, and number of fractions were not significant. Five-fold internal cross-validation showed a model validity of 83% ± 8%. Regression diagnostics showed no evidence of lack-of-fit and no patterns in the studentized residuals. The α/β ratio from the linear quadratic model, estimated as the ratio of the coefficients for dose and D•dpf, was 0.76 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-1.55). The odds ratio for pediatric patients was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.7-4.6) relative to adults. Conclusions: Dose, D•dpf, pediatric status, and regimented follow-up care by an ophthalmologist were predictive of 5-year cataract incidence after HSCT. The low α/β ratio indicates the importance of fractionation in reducing cataracts. Dose rate effects have been observed in single institution studies but not in the

  12. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy.

  13. The Use of Statins in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Solid Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Schlösser, Hans; Kisner, Tulay; Stippel, Dirk L; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael

    2013-01-14

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and solid organ transplantation have become established treatments offered to patients for whom there are otherwise no curative treatment options. Unfortunately, these therapeutic modalities are associated with severe complications that limit its applicability. Alloimmunity is an important cause of morbidity and mortality after both organ transplantation and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and represents a major barrier to the more wide-spread use of these treatment modalities. Statins are a class of lipid-lowering drugs, which also posses immunomodulatory effects. Results from preclinial research and early-stage clinical studies indicate that treatment with statins could be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease and transplant rejection. In addition to preventing graft-versus-host disease or graft rejection statins possess several other effects that might prove beneficial in the setting of transplantation, such as cardiovascular protection and antineoplastic activity. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the immunomodulatory effects of statins and discuss the clinical implications for their use in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation or solid organ transplantation.

  14. Distribution of dystrophin- and utrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC/UAPC) in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniente-De Alba, Carmen; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Vivanco-Calixto, Raúl; Galván, Iván J; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Cerecedo, Doris

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are defined by their cardinal properties, such as sustained proliferation, multilineage differentiation, and self-renewal, which give rise to a hierarchy of progenitor populations with more restricted potential lineage, ultimately leading to the production of all types of mature blood cells. HSC are anchored by cell adhesion molecules to their specific microenvironment, thus regulating their cell cycle, while cell migration is essentially required for seeding the HSC of the fetal bone marrow (BM) during development as well as in adult BM homeostasis. The dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is a large group of membrane-associated proteins linking the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and exhibiting scaffolding, adhesion, and signaling roles in muscle and non-muscle cells including mature blood cells. Because adhesion and migration are mechanisms that influence the fate of the HSC, we explored the presence and the feasible role of DAPC. In this study, we characterized the pattern expression by immunoblot technique and, by confocal microscopy analysis, the cellular distribution of dystrophin and utrophin gene products, and the dystrophin-associated proteins (α-, β-dystroglycan, α-syntrophin, α-dystrobrevin) in relation to actin filaments in freshly isolated CD34+ cells from umbilical cord blood. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the presence of Dp71d/Dp71Δ110m ∼DAPC and Up400/Up140∼DAPC. The subcellular distribution of the two DAPC in actin-based structures suggests their dynamic participation in adhesion and cell migration. In addition, the particular protein pattern expression found in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells might be indicative of their feasible participation during differentiation.

  15. Clinical characteristics of late-onset severe pneumonia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘代红

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics of the late-onset severe pneumonia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) .Methods A retrospective study was conducted in patients diagnosed as late-onset severe pneumonia after allo-HSCT from March,2009 to January,2013 in People’s Hospital of Peking University.Results Of 1538 patients receiving allo-HSCT,20 developed late-onset severe pneumonia with an incidence rate of 1.3%.Among the 20 patients,17 (85%) had human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical donors.The other 3 (15%) patients had received haploidentical transplantation.Severe pneumonia occurred at a

  16. Prostate cancer cells metastasize to the hematopoietic stem cell niche in bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evan T Keller

    2011-01-01

    @@ The majority of men with advanced prostate cancer develop bone metastases as opposed to metastases at other sites.1 It has been unclear why prostate cancer selectively metastasizes to and proliferates in bone.Recently, Shiozawa et al.Delineated a mechanism that may account for the establishment of prostate cancer in bone.2 Specifically, they identified that prostate cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for the osteoblast in the HSC niche of the bone.Defining the mechanisms through which prostate cancer cells establish themselves in bone is critical towards developing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent or target bone metastases.

  17. Replication stress caused by low MCM expression limits fetal erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Silvia; Díaz, Marcos; Flach, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    -chromosome maintenance (MCM)3 that limiting origin licensing in vivo affects the functionality of hematopoietic stem cells and the differentiation of rapidly-dividing erythrocyte precursors. Mcm3-deficient erythroblasts display aberrant DNA replication patterns and fail to complete maturation, causing lethal anemia. Our......' origins provide a backup in the presence of stalled forks and may confer flexibility to the replication program in specific cell types during differentiation, a role that has remained unexplored. Here we show, using a mouse strain with hypomorphic expression of the origin licensing factor mini...

  18. Rehabilitative intervention during and after pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: An analysis of the existing literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Coppo, Monica; Zucchetti, Giulia; Bazzano, Daniela; Ricci, Federica; Vassallo, Elena; Nesi, Francesca; Fagioli, Franca

    2016-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic strategy for several oncohematological diseases. It increases survival rates but leads to a high incidence of related effects. The objective of this paper was to examine the existing literature on physical exercise interventions among pediatric HSCT recipients to explore the most often utilized rehabilitative assessment and treatment tools. Studies published from 2002 to April 1, 2015 were selected: 10 studies were included. A previous literary review has shown that rehabilitation programs have a positive impact on quality of life. Our analysis identified some significant outcome variables and shared intervention areas.

  19. Pregnancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Fanconi anemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atashkhoei S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Simin Atashkhoei, Solmaz Fakhari, Eissa Bilehjani, Haleh Farzin Department of Anesthesiology, Al-Zahra Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Abstract: Pregnancy in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA is rare. However, there are reports of successful pregnancy in Fanconi patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We describe the case of a term pregnant woman with FA who was treated with BMT 2 years earlier. She underwent successful delivery with cesarean section using spinal anesthesia without any complications. Keywords: Fanconi anemia, bone marrow transplantation, pregnancy, cesarean section, spinal anesthesia

  20. Clinical relevance of KIRs in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Natural Killer cells (NK cells represent the subset of peripheral lymphocytes that play critical role in the innate immune response to virus-infected and tumor transformed cells. Lysis of NK sensitived target cells could be mediated independently of antigen stimulation, and unlike cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, they do not require peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. NK cell cytotoxic activity is controlled by considerable number of cell surface Killer cell Immunoglobulin like Receptors (KIRs, which can exist in both inhibitory and activating isoforms. The inhibitory KIRs are mostly specific for HLA class I ligands and I HLA class like molecules, while the specificity of activating receptors is regarded to lectine-like superfamily. The role of NK cells in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT: NK cells are the first lymphocyte subset that reconstitute the peripheral blood following allogeneic HSCT. By selecting donors mismatched for relevant HLA ligands in the context of recipients KIR genotype, multiple roles for alloreactive donor NK cells have been demonstrated, in diminishing Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD through selective killing of recipient dendritic cells, prevention of graft rejection by killing recipient T cells and participation in Graft vs. Leukaemia (GvL effect through destruction of residual host tumor cells. Conclusion Investigation of KIRs heterogenity play an important role in the field of HSCT, because it is useful for the early diagnosis of post transplant complications and can serve as a predictive risk factor for GvHD development.

  1. Epigenetic therapy in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Qaiser Bashir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and other epigenetic phenomena appear to be relevant in the pathogenesis of several malignant disorders. DNA methyltransferases add methyl groups to cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG islandsleading to gene promoter silencing. The DNA methyltransferases inhibitors azacitidine and decitabine have anti-tumor activity against a broad range of malignancies, but have been investigated mostly in myelodysplastic syndrome. In addition, these agents have immunomodulatory effects that are under investigation in the allogeneic stem cell transplantation scenario. Both drugs have been used in the perioperative period of allogeneic transplantations with varying degrees of success. It has been hypothesized that low dose azacitidine may increase the graftversus-leukemia effect and have a role in the maintenance of remission after allogeneic transplantation for myeloid leukemias. It is also intriguing that this favorable effect might occur while mitigating graft-versus-host disease. Here we present a review of the rapidly growing field of epigenetic manipulation using hypomethylating agents in allogeneic transplantation.

  2. Epigenetic regulations of hematopoietic stem cells ageing and the regulation of traditional Chinese medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Zheng Yang; Xin-Yuan Luan; Shu-Bin Wang

    2016-01-01

    因为衰老而导致的干细胞功能缺陷会影响组织的稳态,并最终导致机体寿命缩短。干细胞具有自我更新和增殖分化能力,在机体生长发育过程中对组织的自我修复及再生无疑是至关重要的。成体干细胞中研究比较透彻的干细胞是造血干细胞(HSCs),但是对其自身衰老调控的机制尚不清楚。表观修饰的改变被认为是哺乳动物衰老的标志之一,并且参与了HSCs 的衰老过程。另外,近期的研究发现HSCs 的衰老与血液肿瘤密切相关,因此表观遗传调控者或许可以成为治疗血液肿瘤的新靶点。长久以来中药一直被用于治疗血液肿瘤并且疗效确切,比如三氧化二砷。在这篇综述中,我们总结了表观修饰改变与HSCs 衰老的关系,并且重点论述了DNA 甲基化及组蛋白修饰调控HSCs 衰老的机制。我们还总结了目前用于治疗血液肿瘤的部分中药,并对其表观遗传调控的角色进行了论述,旨在为开发新的药物提供依据。%Age-related defects in stem cells can limit proper tissue maintenance and hence contribute to a shortened lifespan. Given the essential role of a stem cell to self-renew, differentiate, and proliferate, it is no wonder that they are critically important to an organism during development and to tissue self-healing and regeneration. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as one of adult stem cells, have been well characterized recently. However, the regulation mechanism of HSCs ageing remains unclear. Epigenetic alterations are now recognized as a hallmark of mammalian ageing and involved in HSCs ageing. In addition, recent studies showed that HSCs ageing is related to hematological malignancies. Therefore, epigenetic modifiers maybe novel targets for hematological malignancies therapy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat hematological malignancies for centuries. Here, we aim to review the current progress in the

  3. Assessment of human multi-potent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell potential using a single in vitro screening system.

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    Julien Calvo

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells are responsible for the generation of the entire blood system through life. This characteristic relies on their ability to self renew and on their multi-potentiality. Thus quantification of the number of hematopoietic stem cells in a given cell population requires to show both properties in the studied cell populations. Although xenografts models that support human hematopoietic stem cells have been described, such in vivo experimental systems remain restrictive for high throughput screening purposes for example. In this work we developed a conditional tetracycline inducible system controlling the expression of the human NOTCH ligand Delta-like 1 in the murine stromal MS5 cells. We cultured hematopoietic immature cells enriched in progenitor/stem cells in contact with MS5 cells that conditionally express Delta-like 1, in conditions designed to generate multipotential lineage differentiation. We show that upon induction or repression of DL1 expression during co-culture, human immature CD34(+CD38(-/low(CD45RA(-CD90(+ cells can express their B, T, NK, granulo/monocytic and erythroid potentials in a single well, and at the single cell level. We also document the interference of low NOTCH activation with human B and myelo/erythroid lymphoid differentiation. This system represents a novel tool to precisely quantify human hematopoietic immature cells with both lymphoid and myeloid potentials.

  4. The effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

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    Ferensztajn-Rochowiak, Ewa; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2016-04-01

    Lithium has been used in modern psychiatry for more than 65 years, constituting a cornerstone for the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. A number of biological properties of lithium have been discovered, including its hematological, antiviral and neuroprotective effects. In this article, a systematic review of the effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells is presented. The beneficial effects of lithium on the level of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and growth factors have been reported since 1970s. Lithium improves homing of stem cells, the ability to form colonies and HSC self-renewal. Lithium also exerts a favorable influence on the proliferation and maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Studies on the effect of lithium on neurogenesis have indicated an increased proliferation of progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and enhanced mitotic activity of Schwann cells. This may be connected with the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of lithium, reflected in an improvement in synaptic plasticity promoting cell survival and inhibiting apoptosis. In clinical studies, lithium treatment increases cerebral gray matter, mainly in the frontal lobes, hippocampus and amygdala. Recent findings also suggest that lithium may reduce the risk of dementia and exert a beneficial effect in neurodegenerative diseases. The most important mediators and signaling pathways of lithium action are the glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. Recently, to study of bipolar disorder pathogenesis and the mechanism of lithium action, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) obtained from bipolar patients have been used.

  5. MiR-24 is required for hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

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    Lynn Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of miRNA, miR-24, in mouse hematopoietic progenitors increases monocytic/ granulocytic differentiation and inhibits B cell development. To determine if endogenous miR-24 is required for hematopoiesis, we antagonized miR-24 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs and performed in vitro differentiations. Suppression of miR-24 resulted in an inability to produce blood and hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs from ESCs. The phenotype is not a general defect in mesoderm production since we observe production of nascent mesoderm as well as mesoderm derived cardiac muscle and endothelial cells. Results from blast colony forming cell (BL-CFC assays demonstrate that miR-24 is not required for generation of the hemangioblast, the mesoderm progenitor that gives rise to blood and endothelial cells. However, expression of the transcription factors Runx1 and Scl is greatly reduced, suggesting an impaired ability of the hemangioblast to differentiate. Lastly, we observed that known miR-24 target, Trib3, is upregulated in the miR-24 antagonized embryoid bodies (EBs. Overexpression of Trib3 alone in ESCs was able to decrease HPC production, though not as great as seen with miR-24 knockdown. These results demonstrate an essential role for miR-24 in the hematopoietic differentiation of ESCs. Although many miRNAs have been implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis, this is the first miRNA observed to be required for the specification of mammalian blood progenitors from early mesoderm.

  6. Bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells infiltrate allogeneic and syngeneic transplants.

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    Fan, Z; Enjoji, K; Tigges, J C; Toxavidis, V; Tchipashivili, V; Gong, W; Strom, T B; Koulmanda, M

    2014-12-01

    Lineage (CD3e, CD11b, GR1, B220 and Ly-76) negative hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infiltrate islet allografts within 24 h posttransplantation. In fact, lineage(negative) Sca-1(+) cKit(+) ("LSK") cells, a classic signature for HSCs, were also detected among these graft infiltrating cells. Lineage negative graft infiltrating cells are functionally multi-potential as determined by a standard competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT) assay. By 3 months post-BMT, both CD45.1 congenic, lineage negative HSCs/HPCs and classic "LSK" HSCs purified from islet allograft infiltrating cells, differentiate and repopulate multiple mature blood cell phenotypes in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus of CD45.2 hosts. Interestingly, "LSK" HSCs also rapidly infiltrate syngeneic islet transplants as well as allogeneic cardiac transplants and sham surgery sites. It seems likely that an inflammatory response, not an adaptive immune response to allo-antigen, is responsible for the rapid infiltration of islet and cardiac transplants by biologically active HSCs/HPCs. The pattern of hematopoietic differentiation obtained from graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs, cells that are recovered from inflammatory sites, as noted in the competitive BMT assay, is not precisely the same as that of intramedullary HSCs. This does not refute the obvious multi-lineage potential of graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of Foxo3a and Fancd2 regulated genes in mouse hematopoietic stem cells

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    Xiaoli Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is constantly challenged by stresses like DNA damage and oxidative stress. Foxo factors particularly Foxo3a function to regulate the self-renewal of HSCs and contribute to the maintenance of the HSC pool during aging by providing resistance to oxidative stress. Fancd2-deficient mice had multiple hematopoietic defects including HSC loss in early development and in response to cellular stresses including oxidative stress. The cellular mechanisms underlying HSC loss in Fancd2-deficient mice include abnormal cell cycle status loss of quiescence and compromised hematopoietic repopulating capacity of HSCs. To address on a genome wide level the genes and pathways that are impacted by deletion of the Fancd2 and Foxo3a we performed microarray analysis on phenotypic HSCs (Lin−ckit+Sca-1+CD150+CD48− from Fancd2 single knockout Foxo3a single knockout and Fancd2−/−Foxo3a−/− double-knockout (dKO mice. Here we provide detailed methods and analysis on these microarray data which has been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: GSE64215.

  8. FIP200 is required for the cell-autonomous maintenance of fetal hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Liu, Fei; Lee, Jae Y; Wei, Huijun; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James D; Morrison, Sean J; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2010-12-02

    Little is known about whether autophagic mechanisms are active in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or how they are regulated. FIP200 (200-kDa FAK-family interacting protein) plays important roles in mammalian autophagy and other cellular functions, but its role in hematopoietic cells has not been examined. Here we show that conditional deletion of FIP200 in hematopoietic cells leads to perinatal lethality and severe anemia. FIP200 was cell-autonomously required for the maintenance and function of fetal HSCs. FIP200-deficient HSC were unable to reconstitute lethally irradiated recipients. FIP200 ablation did not result in increased HSC apoptosis, but it did increase the rate of HSC proliferation. Consistent with an essential role for FIP200 in autophagy, FIP200-null fetal HSCs exhibited both increased mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species. These data identify FIP200 as a key intrinsic regulator of fetal HSCs and implicate a potential role for autophagy in the maintenance of fetal hematopoiesis and HSCs.

  9. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

  10. Evi1 regulates Notch activation to induce zebrafish hematopoietic stem cell emergence.

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    Konantz, Martina; Alghisi, Elisa; Müller, Joëlle S; Lenard, Anna; Esain, Virginie; Carroll, Kelli J; Kanz, Lothar; North, Trista E; Lengerke, Claudia

    2016-11-02

    During development, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from aortic endothelial cells (ECs) through an intermediate stage called hemogenic endothelium by a process known as endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). While Notch signaling, including its upstream regulator Vegf, is known to regulate this process, the precise molecular control and temporal specificity of Notch activity remain unclear. Here, we identify the zebrafish transcriptional regulator evi1 as critically required for Notch-mediated EHT In vivo live imaging studies indicate that evi1 suppression impairs EC progression to hematopoietic fate and therefore HSC emergence. evi1 is expressed in ECs and induces these effects cell autonomously by activating Notch via pAKT Global or endothelial-specific induction of notch, vegf, or pAKT can restore endothelial Notch and HSC formations in evi1 morphants. Significantly, evi1 overexpression induces Notch independently of Vegf and rescues HSC numbers in embryos treated with a Vegf inhibitor. In sum, our results unravel evi1-pAKT as a novel molecular pathway that, in conjunction with the shh-vegf axis, is essential for activation of Notch signaling in VDA endothelial cells and their subsequent conversion to HSCs.

  11. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

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    Lisa B. Boyette

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan.

  12. Human Non-Hematopoietic CD271pos/CD140alow/neg Bone Marrow Stroma Cells Fulfill Stringent Stem Cell Criteria in Serial Transplantations

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    Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Li, Hongzhe; Zacharaki, Dimitra; Lim, Hooi Ching

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow contains a population of non-hematopoietic stromal stem/progenitor cells (BMSCs), which play a central role for bone marrow stroma and the hematopoietic microenvironment. However, the precise characteristics and potential stem cell properties of defined BMSC populations have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Using standard adherent colony-forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) assays, we have previously shown that BMSCs were highly enriched in the nonhematopoietic CD271pos/CD140alow/neg fraction of normal adult human bone marrow. In this study, we demonstrate that prospectively isolated CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs expressed high levels of hematopoiesis supporting genes and signature mesenchymal and multipotency genes on a single cell basis. Furthermore, CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs gave rise to non-adherent sphere colonies (mesenspheres) with typical surface marker profile and trilineage in vitro differentiation potential. Importantly, serial transplantations of CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSC-derived mesenspheres (single cell and bulk) into immunodeficient NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice showed increased mesensphere numbers and full differentiation potential after both primary and secondary transplantations. In contrast, BMSC self-renewal potential decreased under standard adherent culture conditions. These data therefore indicate that CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs represent a population of primary stem cells with MSC phenotype and sphere-forming capacity that fulfill stringent functional stem cell criteria in vivo in a serial transplantation setting. PMID:27527928

  13. Current status and development of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in China: a report from Chinese Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Register Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lan-ping; HUANG Xiao-jun

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has three decades history in China. During these periods,the number of HSCT has been increasing, donor and stem cell sources were expanded, indication of diseases and patients for HSCT extended. Forty-two HSCT units offered their data 1-6 times from July 2007 to June 2010. The annual increase rates were 8.8% to 10.8%. Matched sibling donor is 41%, mismatched related/haploidentical donor is 24%,unrelated volunteer donor is 16%, and umbilical cord blood is 2%. The indications of major disease entities are acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 35%), acute lymphobastic leukemia (ALL, 25%), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 21%), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, 8%). The different opinions on the indication of HSCT were supported by some trials,matched/haploidentical HSCT fit for middle or high risk ALL and AML in first complete remission (CR1), the international prognosis score system (IPSS) - middle-Ⅱ/high risk MDS, CML in advanced stage and so on, when patients have no matched sibling donor. In the Peking University Institute of Hematology, Peking University People's Hospital,haploidentical HSCT has received a comparable result to matched simbling donor HSCT and unrelated matched donor HSCT; we suggest haploidentical donor might be a routine alternative donor for high-risk patents who need an urgent HSCT without matched related donor in special center.

  14. The molecular signature of therapeutic mesenchymal stem cells exposes the architecture of the hematopoietic stem cell niche synapse

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    Mancardi Gianluigi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs niche of the bone marrow is comprised of HSCs, osteoblasts, endothelial cells and a stromal component of non-hematopoietic multipotent cells of mesenchymal origin named "mesenchymal stem cells" (MSCs. Results Here we studied the global transcriptional profile of murine MSCs with immuno-therapeutic potential and compared it with that of 486 publicly available microarray datasets from 12 other mouse tissues or cell types. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering identified a unique pattern of gene expression capable of distinctively classifying MSCs from other tissues and cells. We then performed an analysis aimed to identify absolute and relative abundance of transcripts in all cell types. We found that the set of transcripts uniquely expressed by MSCs is enriched in transcription factors and components of the Wnt signaling pathway. The analysis of differentially expressed genes also identified a set of genes specifically involved in the HSC niche and is complemented by functional studies that confirm the findings. Interestingly, some of these genes play a role in the maintenance of HSCs in a quiescent state supporting their survival and preventing them from proliferating and differentiating. We also show that MSCs modulate T cell functions in vitro and, upon in vivo administration, ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Conclusion Altogether, these findings provide novel and important insights on the mechanisms of T cell function regulation by MSCs and help to cement the rationale for their application in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Reduced intensity conditioning, combined transplantation of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells in patients with severe aplastic anemia.

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    Xiao-Hong Li

    Full Text Available We examined if transplantation of combined haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC affected graft failure and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA. Patients with SAA-I (N = 17 received haploidentical HSCT plus MSC infusion. Stem cell grafts used a combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells of haploidentical donors and the culture-expanded third-party donor-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs, respectively. Reduced intensity conditioning consisted of fludarabine (30 mg/m2·d+cyclosphamide (500 mg/m2·d+anti-human thymocyte IgG. Transplant recipients also received cyclosporin A, mycophenolatemofetil, and CD25 monoclonal antibody. A total of 16 patients achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. The median mononuclear cell and CD34 count was 9.3×10(8/kg and 4.5×10(6/kg. Median time to ANC was >0.5×10(9/L and PLT count >20×10(9/L were 12 and 14 days, respectively. Grade III-IV acute GVHD was seen in 23.5% of the cases, while moderate and severe chronic GVHD were seen in 14.2% of the cases. The 3-month and 6-month survival rates for all patients were 88.2% and 76.5%, respectively; mean survival time was 56.5 months. Combined transplantation of haploidentical HSCs and MSCs on SAA without an HLA-identical sibling donor was safe, effectively reduced the incidence of severe GVHD, and improved patient survival.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

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    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in sickle cell disease: patient selection and special considerations

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    Bhatia M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monica Bhatia,1 Sujit Sheth21Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplantation, Columbia University Medical Center, 2Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative treatment currently in use for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The first successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed in 1984. To date, approximately 1,200 transplants have been reported. Given the high prevalence of this disorder in Africa, and its emergence in the developed world through immigration, this number is relatively small. There are many reasons for this; primary among them are the availability of a donor, the risks associated with this complex procedure, and the cost and availability of resources in the developing world. Of these, it is fair to say that the risks associated with the procedure have steadily decreased to the point where, if currently performed in a center with experience using a matched sibling donor, overall survival is close to 100% and event-free survival is over 90%. While there is little controversy around offering hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to symptomatic SCD patients with a matched sibling donor, there is much debate surrounding the use of this modality in “less severe” patients. An overview of the current state of our understanding of the pathology and treatment of SCD is important to show that our current strategy is not having the desired impact on survival of homozygous SCD patients, and should be changed to significantly impact the small proportion of these patients who have matched siblings and could be cured, especially those without overt clinical manifestations. Both patient families and providers must be made to understand the progressive nature of SCD, and should be encouraged to screen full siblings of patients with homozygous SCD for their potential to

  18. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia Associated With Allogenic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Successfully Treated With Corticosteroids

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    Lam-Phuong Nguyen DO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP is an extremely rare, relatively new, and distinct histological pattern of acute lung injury characterized predominately by the presence of intra-alveolar fibrin and associated organizing pneumonia. AFOP may be idiopathic or associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. It has a variable clinical presentation from mild respiratory symptoms to that similar to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Currently there is no consensus on treatment, and corticosteroids previously were of unclear benefit. To date, there are less than 40 cases of AFOP reported in the literature and only one has been linked to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we report the first case series of 2 patients who developed AFOP following allogenic stem cell transplant that were successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids.

  19. Roseomonas bacteremia in a recipient of an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anazi, K A; AlHashmi, H; Abdalhamid, B; AlSelwi, W; AlSayegh, M; Alzayed, A; Alshibani, Z; AlGarni, A; Al-Ghanem, A; Hassan, H; AlSagheir, A

    2013-08-01

    Roseomonas are pink-pigmented, oxidative, slowly growing, nonfermentative, gram-negative coccobacilli whose identification may require extensive biochemical testing and molecular profiling. Roseomonas infections vary in severity and clinical presentation, and they predominantly occur in immunocompromised and chronically ill patients. The organism is generally susceptible to carbapenems and aminoglycosides, but resistant to most of the cephalosporins and broad-spectrum penicillins. Reported here is a patient with lymphoblastic lymphoma who developed Roseomonas mucosa bacteremia after receiving her hematopoietic stem cell allograft. The bacteremic episode was successfully treated with imipenem and amikacin in addition to removal of the central venous catheter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Roseomonas bacteremia in a stem cell transplantation recipient.

  20. Reverse seroconversion of hepatitis B virus after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyama, S; Kanda, Y; Nannya, Y; Kawazu, M; Takeshita, M; Niino, M; Komeno, Y; Nakamoto, T; Kurokawa, M; Tsujino, S; Ogawa, S; Aoki, K; Chiba, S; Motokura, T; Shiratori, Y; Hirai, H

    2002-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in patients previously positive for hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), so-called reverse seroconversion, has been considered to be a rare complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We experienced two patients who developed reverse seroconversion among nine who were HBsAb positive and Hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) positive before HSCT; one after autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and another after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). We reviewed the literature and considered that reverse seroconversion of HBV after HSCT is not uncommon among HBsAb positive recipients. The use of corticosteroids, the lack of HBsAb in donor, and a decrease in serum HBsAb and HBcAb levels may predict reverse seroconversion after HSCT.

  1. Angiopoietin-like proteins stimulate ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Ge, Guangtao; Xie, Kathleen; Tong, Wei; Hug, Christopher; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-02-01

    Successful ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) would greatly benefit the treatment of disease and the understanding of crucial questions of stem cell biology. Here we show, using microarray studies, that the HSC-supportive mouse fetal liver CD3(+) cells specifically express the proteins angiopoietin-like 2 (Angptl2) and angiopoietin-like 3 (Angptl3). We observed a 24- or 30-fold net expansion of long-term HSCs by reconstitution analysis when we cultured highly enriched HSCs for 10 days in the presence of Angptl2 or Angptl3 together with saturating levels of other growth factors. The coiled-coil domain of Angptl2 was capable of stimulating expansion of HSCs. Furthermore, angiopoietin-like 5, angiopoietin-like 7 and microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 also supported expansion of HSCs in culture.

  2. Cytokine combinations on the potential for ex vivo expansion of murine hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Lui, Wing Chi; Chan, Yuen Fan; Chan, Li Chong; Ng, Ray Kit

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a rare cell population, which is capable of self-renewal and differentiation to all blood lineages. The clinical potential of HSCs for treating hematological disorders has led to the use of cytokine stimulation for ex vivo expansion. However, little is known about the molecular features of the HSC populations expanded under different cytokine combinations. We studied the expansion of murine HSCs cultured with six different cytokine combinations under serum-containing or serum-free conditions for 14days. We found that all the cytokine combinations promoted expansion of murine HSCs. Although SCF/IL-3/IL-6 induced the highest expansion of the immunophenotypic Lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells at day 14, over 90% of them were FcεRIα(+) mast cells. In contrast, the serum-free medium with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 effectively promoted the expansion of LSK/FcεRIα(-) HSCs by over 50-fold. HSCs expanded by SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 combination formed compact hematopoietic colonies and demonstrated a higher degree of multipotency compared to the HSCs cultured with other cytokine combinations. Surprisingly, despite the same LSK/FcεRIα(-) immunophenotype, HSCs cultured with different cytokine combinations demonstrated differential patterns of hematopoietic gene expression. HSCs cultured with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 maintained a transcription profile resembling that of freshly isolated HSCs. We propose that serum-free medium supplemented with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 is the optimal culture condition to maintain the stemness of ex vivo expanded HSCs. This study used molecular characterization of cytokine-expanded murine HSCs to facilitate the selection of cytokine combinations that could induce fully competent HSC for clinical applications.

  3. Gab2 promotes hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and self-renewal synergistically with STAT5.

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    Geqiang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Grb2-associated binding (Gab adapter proteins play major roles in coordinating signaling downstream of hematopoietic cytokine receptors. In hematopoietic cells, Gab2 can modulate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and mitogen associated protein kinase activities and regulate the long-term multilineage competitive repopulating activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Gab2 may also act in a linear pathway upstream or downstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT5, a major positive regulator of HSC function. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Gab2 and STAT5 function in hematopoiesis in a redundant or non-redundant manner. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To do this we generated Gab2 mutant mice with heterozygous and homozygous deletions of STAT5. In heterozygous STAT5 mutant mice, deficiencies in HSC/multipotent progenitors were reflected by decreased long-term repopulating activity. This reduction in repopulation function was mirrored in the reduced growth response to early-acting cytokines from sorted double mutant c-Kit(+Lin(-Sca-1(+ (KLS cells. Importantly, in non-ablated newborn mice, the host steady-state engraftment ability was impaired by loss of Gab2 in heterozygous STAT5 mutant background. Fetal liver cells isolated from homozygous STAT5 mutant mice lacking Gab2 showed significant reduction in HSC number (KLS CD150(+CD48(-, reduced HSC survival, and dramatic loss of self-renewal potential as measured by serial transplantation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate new functions for Gab2 in hematopoiesis in a manner that is non-redundant with STAT5. Furthermore, important synergy between STAT5 and Gab2 was observed in HSC self-renewal, which might be exploited to optimize stem cell-based therapeutics.

  4. Catalase inhibits ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

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    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N; LaRue, Amanda C; Schulte, Bradley A; Wang, Gavin Y

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs.

  5. Normal hematopoietic stem cell function in mice with enforced expression of the Hippo signaling effector YAP1.

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    Lina Jansson

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway has recently been implicated in the regulation of organ size and stem cells in multiple tissues. The transcriptional cofactor yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1 is the most downstream effector of Hippo signaling and is functionally repressed by the upstream components of the pathway. Overexpression of YAP1 stimulates proliferation of stem and progenitor cells in many tissues, consistent with inhibition of Hippo signaling. To study the role of Hippo signaling in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, we created a transgenic model with inducible YAP1 expression exclusively within the hematopoietic system. Following 3 months induction, examination of blood and bone marrow in the induced mice revealed no changes in the distribution of the hematopoietic lineages compared to control mice. Moreover, the progenitor cell compartment was unaltered as determined by colony forming assays and immunophenotyping. To address whether YAP1 affects the quantity and function of HSCs we performed competitive transplantation experiments. We show that ectopic YAP1 expression does not influence HSC function neither during steady state nor in situations of hematopoietic stress. This is in sharp contrast to effects seen on stem- and progenitor cells in other organs and suggests highly tissue specific functions of the Hippo pathway in regulation of stem cells.

  6. Bmi1 confers resistance to oxidative stress on hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Shunsuke Nakamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The polycomb-group (PcG proteins function as general regulators of stem cells. We previously reported that retrovirus-mediated overexpression of Bmi1, a gene encoding a core component of polycomb repressive complex (PRC 1, maintained self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during long-term culture. However, the effects of overexpression of Bmi1 on HSCs in vivo remained to be precisely addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we generated a mouse line where Bmi1 can be conditionally overexpressed under the control of the endogenous Rosa26 promoter in a hematopoietic cell-specific fashion (Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1. Although overexpression of Bmi1 did not significantly affect steady state hematopoiesis, it promoted expansion of functional HSCs during ex vivo culture and efficiently protected HSCs against loss of self-renewal capacity during serial transplantation. Overexpression of Bmi1 had no effect on DNA damage response triggered by ionizing radiation. In contrast, Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1 HSCs under oxidative stress maintained a multipotent state and generally tolerated oxidative stress better than the control. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Bmi1 had no impact on the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that overexpression of Bmi1 confers resistance to stresses, particularly oxidative stress, onto HSCs. This thereby enhances their regenerative capacity and suggests that Bmi1 is located downstream of ROS signaling and negatively regulated by it.

  7. Nutritional assessment as predictor of complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Marcela Espinoza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Nutritional support is pivotal in patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Nutritional status has been associated with time of engraftment and infection rates. In order to evaluate the association between nutritional parameters and clinical outcomes after transplantation a cohort of transplant patients was retrospectively evaluated. Methods: All 50 patients transplanted between 2011 and 2014 were included. The nutritional status before transplantation, ten days after transplantation and before discharge was assessed including anthropometry, body mass index, albumin, prealbumin and total urinary nitrogen. Results: The median follow-up time was 41 months and the median age of patients was 41 years. Thirty-two underwent allogeneic and 18 autologous transplants. Diagnoses included acute leukemias (n = 27, lymphoma (n = 7, multiple myeloma (n = 13, and aplastic anemia (n = 3. Thirty-seven patients developed mucositis (three Grade 1, 15 Grade 2, 18 Grade 3 and one Grade 4, and twenty-two allogeneic, and five autologous transplant patients required total parenteral nutrition. Albumin and total urinary nitrogen were associated with length of hospital stay and platelet and neutrophil engraftment. None of the nutritional parameters evaluated were associated with overall survival. Non-relapse mortality was 14% and overall survival was 79% at 41 months of follow-up. Conclusions: After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, high catabolism was associated with longer length of hospital stay, the need of total parenteral nutrition and platelet and neutrophil engraftment times. Nutritional parameters were not associated with overall survival.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation—50 Years of Evolution and Future Perspectives

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    Israel Henig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a highly specialized and unique medical procedure. Autologous transplantation allows the administration of high-dose chemotherapy without prolonged bone marrow aplasia. In allogeneic transplantation, donor-derived stem cells provide alloimmunity that enables a graft-versus-tumor effect to eradicate residual disease and prevent relapse. The first allogeneic transplantation was performed by E. Donnall Thomas in 1957. Since then the field has evolved and expanded worldwide. New indications beside acute leukemia and aplastic anemia have been constantly explored and now include congenital disorders of the hematopoietic system, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease. The use of matched unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, and partially matched related donors has dramatically extended the availability of allogeneic transplantation. Transplant-related mortality has decreased due to improved supportive care, including better strategies to prevent severe infections and with the incorporation of reduced-intensity conditioning protocols that lowered the toxicity and allowed for transplantation in older patients. However, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease remain the two major causes of mortality with unsatisfactory progress. Intense research aiming to improve adoptive immunotherapy and increase graft-versus-leukemia response while decreasing graft-versus-host response might bring the next breakthrough in allogeneic transplantation. Strategies of graft manipulation, tumor-associated antigen vaccinations, monoclonal antibodies, and adoptive cellular immunotherapy have already proved clinically efficient. In the following years, allogeneic transplantation is likely to become more complex, more individualized, and more efficient.

  9. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

  10. Bacterial c-di-GMP affects hematopoietic stem/progenitors and their niches through STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Chiharu I; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Karigane, Daiki; Haeno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Sato, Taku; Ohteki, Toshiaki; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Barber, Glen N; Kurokawa, Mineo; Suda, Toshio; Takubo, Keiyo

    2015-04-01

    Upon systemic bacterial infection, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to the periphery in order to supply a sufficient number of immune cells. Although pathogen-associated molecular patterns reportedly mediate HSPC activation, how HSPCs detect pathogen invasion in vivo remains elusive. Bacteria use the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) for a variety of activities. Here, we report that c-di-GMP comprehensively regulated both HSPCs and their niche cells through an innate immune sensor, STING, thereby inducing entry into the cell cycle and mobilization of HSPCs while decreasing the number and repopulation capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, we show that type I interferon acted as a downstream target of c-di-GMP to inhibit HSPC expansion in the spleen, while transforming growth factor-β was required for c-di-GMP-dependent splenic HSPC expansion. Our results define machinery underlying the dynamic regulation of HSPCs and their niches during bacterial infection through c-di-GMP/STING signaling.

  11. Less is More: unveiling the functional core of hematopoietic stem cells through knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Lara; Lin, Kuanyin K.; Boles, Nathan C.; Yang, Liubin; King, Katherine Y.; Jeong, Mira; Mayle, Allison; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) represent one of the first recognized somatic stem cells. As such, nearly 200 genes have been examined for roles in HSC function in knockout mice. In this review, we compile the majority of these reports to provide a broad overview of the functional modules revealed by these genetic analyses and highlight some key regulatory pathways involved, including cell cycle control, TGF-β signaling, Pten/AKT signaling, Wnt signaling, and cytokine signaling. Finally, we propose recommendations for characterization of HSC function in knockout mice to facilitate cross-study comparisons that would generate a more cohesive picture of HSC biology. In the field of design, the minimalist movement stripped down buildings and objects to their most basic features, a sentiment that architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe summarized in his motto “less is more”. By depleting HSCs of specific genes, knockout studies transpose the minimalist approach into research biology, providing insights into the essential core of genetic features that is indispensable for a well-functioning hematopoietic system. PMID:22958929

  12. The TIF1β-HP1 System Maintains Transcriptional Integrity of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

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    Satoru Miyagi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available TIF1β is a transcriptional corepressor that recruits repressive chromatin modifiers to target genes. Its biological function and physiological targets in somatic stem cells remain largely unknown. Here, we show that TIF1β is essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Deletion of Tif1b in mice induced active cycling and apoptosis of HSCs and promoted egression of HSCs from the bone marrow, leading to rapid depletion of HSCs. Strikingly, Tif1b-deficient HSCs showed a strong trend of ectopic expression of nonhematopoietic genes. Levels of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1α, β and γ proteins, which form a complex with TIF1β, were significantly reduced in the absence of TIF1β and depletion of HP1 recapitulated a part of the phenotypes of Tif1b-deficient HSCs. These results demonstrate that the TIF1β-HP1 system functions as a critical repressive machinery that targets genes not normally activated in the hematopoietic compartment, thereby maintaining the transcriptional signature specific to HSCs.

  13. Human CD8 T cells generated in vitro from hematopoietic stem cells are functionally mature

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    Zúñiga-Pflücker Juan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell development occurs within the highly specialized thymus. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells are critical in adaptive immunity by targeting virally infected or tumor cells. In this study, we addressed whether functional CD8 T cells can be generated fully in vitro using human umbilical cord blood (UCB hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in coculture with OP9-DL1 cells. Results HSC/OP9-DL1 cocultures supported the differentiation of CD8 T cells, which were TCR/CD3hi CD27hi CD1aneg and thus phenotypically resembled mature functional CD8 single positive thymocytes. These in vitro-generated T cells also appeared to be conventional CD8 cells, as they expressed high levels of Eomes and low levels of Plzf, albeit not identical to ex vivo UCB CD8 T cells. Consistent with the phenotypic and molecular characterization, upon TCR-stimulation, in vitro-generated CD8 T cells proliferated, expressed activation markers (MHC-II, CD25, CD38, secreted IFN-γ and expressed Granzyme B, a cytotoxic T-cell effector molecule. Conclusion Taken together, the ability to direct human hematopoietic stem cell or T-progenitor cells towards a mature functional phenotype raises the possibility of establishing cell-based treatments for T-immunodeficiencies by rapidly restoring CD8 effector function, thereby mitigating the risks associated with opportunistic infections.

  14. Importance of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Danilo Santana Alessio Franceschi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic diseases, such as multiple myeloma, bone marrow aplasia and leukemia. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA compatibility is an important tool to prevent post-transplant complications such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease, but the high rates of relapse limit the survival of transplant patients. Natural Killer cells, a type of lymphocyte that is a key element in the defense against tumor cells, cells infected with viruses and intracellular microbes, have different receptors on their surfaces that regulate their cytotoxicity. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are the most important, interacting consistently with human leukocyte antigen class I molecules present in other cells and thus controlling the activation of natural killer cells. Several studies have shown that certain combinations of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leukocyte antigens (in both donors and recipients can affect the chances of survival of transplant patients, particularly in relation to the graft-versusleukemia effect, which may be associated to decreased relapse rates in certain groups. This review aims to shed light on the mechanisms and effects of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors - human leukocyte antigen associations and their implications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and to critically analyze the results obtained by the studies presented herein.

  15. Correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Megan D.; Cost, Gregory J.; Mendel, Matthew C.; Romero, Zulema; Kaufman, Michael L.; Joglekar, Alok V.; Ho, Michelle; Lumaquin, Dianne; Gray, David; Lill, Georgia R.; Cooper, Aaron R.; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Senadheera, Shantha; Zhu, Allen; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Wilber, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Reik, Andreas; Hollis, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by a single point mutation in the seventh codon of the β-globin gene. Site-specific correction of the sickle mutation in hematopoietic stem cells would allow for permanent production of normal red blood cells. Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to flank the sickle mutation, we demonstrate efficient targeted cleavage at the β-globin locus with minimal off-target modification. By codelivering a homologous donor template (either an integrase-defective lentiviral vector or a DNA oligonucleotide), high levels of gene modification were achieved in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Modified cells maintained their ability to engraft NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull mice and to produce cells from multiple lineages, although with a reduction in the modification levels relative to the in vitro samples. Importantly, ZFN-driven gene correction in CD34+ cells from the bone marrow of patients with SCD resulted in the production of wild-type hemoglobin tetramers. PMID:25733580

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy to Countermeasure Cancer in Astronauts during Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.; Kindred, R. P.; Roach, A-N.; Edossa, A.; Kim, B. C.; Gonda, S. R.; Emami, K.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation can cause chromosomal mutations, which may lead to cancer in astronauts engaged in space exploration. Therefore, our goals are to develop countermeasures to prevent space-induced cancer using hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) and gene therapy. This presentation focuses on HSCT for cancer. Our previous experiments on a simulated, space-induced immuno-deficiency model (mouse hind limb unloading ) indicated that transplanted hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) could enhance the host's immunity by effectively eliminating bacterial infection (Ohi S, et. al. J Grav Physiol 10, P63-64, 2003; Ohi S, et. al. Proceedings of the Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF) . American Institute of Physics, New York, pp. 938-950, 2004). Hence, we hypothesized that the HSCs might be effective in combating cancer as well. Studies of cocultured mouse HSCs with beta-galactosidase marked rat gliosarcoma spheroids (9L/lacZ), a cancer model, indicated antagonistic interactions , resulting in destruction of the spheroids by HSCs. Trypan Blue dye-exclusion assays were consistent with the conclusion. These results show potential usehlness of HSCT for cancer. Currently, the NASA Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB), a space analog tissue/cell culture system, is being used to study invasion of the gliosarcoma (GS) spheroids into mouse brain with or without co-cultured HSCs. This may simulate the metastasis of gliosarcoma to brain. There is a tendency for the HSCs to inhibit invasion of GS spheroids into brain, as evidenced by the X-gal staining.

  17. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke: Challenges and Progress

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    Bang, Oh Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Cha, Jae Min; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell t...

  18. Hematopoietic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011370 The efficacy and safety of second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for post-transplant hematologic malignancies relapse. CHEN Yuhong(陳育紅),et al.Instit Hematol,People’s Hosp,Peking Univ,Beijing 100044. Abstract:Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the relapsed hematologic malignancies.Methods The data of 25 relapsed patients received the second allogeneic transplantation as a salvage therapy

  19. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

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    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-07-01

    Gene therapy nowadays constitutes a safe and efficient treatment for a number of monogenic diseases affecting the hematopoietic system. Risks of insertional mutagenesis derived from the use of integrative vectors cannot, however, be completely excluded. Therefore, gene targeting has been proposed as a safer alternative, since the insertion of the herapeutic gene is driven to a specific locus in the genome. Gene targeting approaches are based on the use of specific nucleases which generate double strand breaks (DSBs) in a specific site of the genome,markedly enhancing the efficacy of homologous recombination (HR) with donor constructs harboring the gene of interest flanked by the corresponding homology arms. In this study we have optimized the conditions to target human lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from healthy donors, with the final aim of correcting by gene editing the hematopoietic progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia subtype A (FA-A) patients. In particular, we have established a robust method to target both LCLs and HSCs in a safe harbor site in the genome, the AAVS1 locus. Our approach is based on the transduction of these cells with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors carrying a donor with the gene of interest, followed by the nucleofection of these cells with zinc finger nucleases used as mRNA. Using a control donor vector carrying the GFP reporter gene we have obtained, on average, 9.43% gene targeting efficiency in cord blood CD34+ cells from healthy donors. Moreover, we confirmed that gene targeting was also efficient in HSCs with long term and multipotent repopulation capacity, as demonstrated by transplants into immunodeficient mice. To improve the gene targeting efficiency, we investigated the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles, which were shown to improve the transduction efficiency of integrase-defective and competent lentiviral vectors in HSCs. This increment, however, did not lead to a higher gene

  20. Inactivation of a single copy of Crebbp selectively alters pre-mRNA processing in mouse hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Madeleine E Lemieux

    Full Text Available Global expression analysis of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells (FL HSCs revealed the presence of unspliced pre-mRNA for a number of genes in normal FL HSCs. In a subset of these genes, Crebbp+/- FL HSCs had less unprocessed pre-mRNA without a corresponding reduction in total mRNA levels. Among the genes thus identified were the key regulators of HSC function Itga4, Msi2 and Tcf4. A similar but much weaker effect was apparent in Ep300+/- FL HSCs, indicating that, in this context as in others, the two paralogs are not interchangeable. As a group, the down-regulated intronic probe sets could discriminate adult HSCs from more mature cell types, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is regulated with differentiation stage and is active in both fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Consistent with increased myelopoiesis in Crebbp hemizygous mice, targeted reduction of CREBBP abundance by shRNA in the multipotent EML cell line triggered spontaneous myeloid differentiation in the absence of the normally required inductive signals. In addition, differences in protein levels between phenotypically distinct EML subpopulations were better predicted by taking into account not only the total mRNA signal but also the amount of unspliced message present. CREBBP thus appears to selectively influence the timing and degree of pre-mRNA processing of genes essential for HSC regulation and thereby has the potential to alter subsequent cell fate decisions in HSCs.

  1. AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR LYMPHOMA: AN EVALUATION OF GRAFTS SOURCE AND MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Shu-ling; ZHANG Qiao-hua; HAN Wei-e; GUI Wei; WANG Yu-luan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the source of autologous hematopoietic stem cells altered the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) for aggressive lymphoma and to study the problem of minimal residual disease (MRD). Methods: 14 lymphoma patients who had lymphoma with high risk factors, relapsed lymphoma or refractory lymphoma received autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). 14 lymphoma patients who were similar to ABMT group received autologous peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (APBSCT). Regimen of CBV (cyclophos phamide 50~60 mg/kg/d×2 d, carmustine 15 mg/kg/d×1 d,etoposide 45~60 mg/kg/d×1 d) was received by all the patients as conditioning regimen in the transplant pretreatment followed by ABMT or APBSCT. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell (APBSC) was mobilized by CTX 2g~3g/m2/d×2 d iv and G-CSF 5 μg/kg/d for five to seven days. MRD was continually supervised by PCR in bone marrow before and after transplantation. Cellular immunocyte function, such as natural killer cell (NK), CD3, CD4, CD8 and sIL-2R was tested before and twenty days after transplantation. Results: In ABMT group, the median time for hematopoietic recovery of absolute neutrophilia counts ≥0.5×109/L and platelet counts ≥20×109/L was +18 days and +20 days respectively. In contrast, the APBSCT group was both at 12 days. Patients who have undergone ABMT all got complete remission (CR), while 81.8% patients in APBSCT group got CR. The 3-year disease free survival (DFS) in APBSCT and ABMT group was 75% and 72.7% respectively (P>0.05). The mean days of immunity recovering in APBSCT was ±20 days. After transplantation, MRD in 11 patients were positive, in whom 6 patients died. Conclusion: Aggressive lymphoma patients' hemapoiesis recovered more rapidly in APBSCT group than that in ABMT group, but 3-year DFS had no statistical difference. Patients positive for IgH/TCR-γ by

  2. Biochemical analysis and quantification of hematopoietic stem cells by infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelig, Udi; Dror, Ziv; Iskovich, Svetlana; Zwielly, Amir; Ben-Harush, Miri; Nathan, Ilana; Mordechai, Shaul; Kapelushnik, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Identification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in different stages of maturation is one of the major issues in stem cell research and bone marrow (BM) transplantation. Each stage of maturation of HSCs is characterized by a series of distinct glycoproteins present on the cell plasma membrane surface, named a cluster of differentiation (CD). Currently, complicated and expensive procedures based on CD expression are needed for identification and isolation of HSCs. This method is under dispute, since the correct markers' composition is not strictly clear, thus there is need for a better method for stem cell characterization. In the present study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is employed as a novel optical method for identification and characterization of HSCs based on their entire biochemical features. FTIR spectral analysis of isolated mice HSCs reveals several spectral markers related to lipids, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates, which distinguish HSCs from BM cells. The unique ``open'' conformation of HSC DNA as identified by FTIR is exploited for HSCs quantification in the BM. The proposed method of FTIR spectroscopy for HSC identification and quantification can contribute to stem cell research and BM transplantation.

  3. Index sorting resolves heterogeneous murine hematopoietic stem cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Reiner; Wilson, Nicola K.; Prick, Janine C.M.; Cossetti, Chiara; Maj, Michal K.; Gottgens, Berthold; Kent, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of single stem cells have uncovered significant heterogeneity in the functional properties of stem cell populations. This has prompted the development of approaches to study single cells in isolation, often performed using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, many stem cell populations are too rare to test all possible cell surface marker combinations, and virtually nothing is known about functional differences associated with varying intensities of such markers. Here we describe the use of index sorting for further resolution of the flow cytometric isolation of single murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Specifically, we associate single-cell functional assay outcomes with distinct cell surface marker expression intensities. High levels of both CD150 and EPCR associate with delayed kinetics of cell division and low levels of differentiation. Moreover, cells that do not form single HSC-derived clones appear in the 7AADdim fraction, suggesting that even low levels of 7AAD staining are indicative of less healthy cell populations. These data indicate that when used in combination with single-cell functional assays, index sorting is a powerful tool for refining cell isolation strategies. This approach can be broadly applied to other single-cell systems, both to improve isolation and to acquire additional cell surface marker information. PMID:26051918

  4. Adult stem-like cells in kidney

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiichi Hishikawa; Osamu Takase; Masahiro Yoshikawa; Taro Tsujimura; Masaomi Nangaku; Tsuyoshi Takato

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatmentfor kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivationof kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidneytissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lowervertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephronsafter tubular damages is commonly observed after renalinjury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitorcell or system is reportedly presents suggesting thatadult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinicaltargets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclearif kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. Ingeneral, stemness is defined by several factors suchas self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency andcharacteristic gene expression profiles. The definiteuse of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidneyregeneration, and here we describe the recent broadfindings of kidney regeneration and the cells thatcontribute regeneration.

  5. Concise Review: Quiescence in Adult Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumman, M; Dhawan, J; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) are tissue resident stem cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration following injury. In uninjured tissues, ASCs exist in a nonproliferating, reversibly cell cycle-arrested state known as quiescence or G0. A key function of the quiescent state is to preserve...... stemness in ASCs by preventing precocious differentiation, and thus maintaining a pool of undifferentiated ASCs. Recent evidences suggest that quiescence is an actively maintained state and that excessive or defective quiescence may lead to compromised tissue regeneration or tumorigenesis. The aim...

  6. Analyses of risk factors for intestinal acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕法红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors of intestinal acute graft-versus-host disease(aGVHD)after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT).Methods The clinical data of 534 cases of 533 patients undergoing allo-HSCT during Jan 2004 and Sep 2012were retrospectively analyzed.The effects of donor-recipient HLA

  7. Fbxl10 overexpression in murine hematopoietic stem cells induces leukemia involving metabolic activation and upregulation of Nsg2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueda, Takeshi; Nagamachi, Akiko; Takubo, Keiyo;

    2015-01-01

    investigate the role of Fbxl10 in leukemogenesis, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress Fbxl10 in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Interestingly, Fbxl10 Tg mice developed myeloid or B-lymphoid leukemia with complete penetrance. HSCs from the Tg mice exhibited an accelerated G0/G1 to S transition...

  8. Successful clinical treatment and functional immunological normalization of human MALT1 deficiency following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmus, Jacob; McDonald, Rachel; Fung, Shan-Yu; Del Bel, Kate L; Roden, Juliana; Senger, Christof; Schultz, Kirk R; McKinnon, Margaret L; Davis, Jeffrey; Turvey, Stuart E

    2016-07-01

    MALT1 mutations impair normal NF-κB activation and paracaspase activity to cause a novel combined immunodeficiency. The clinical and immunological phenotype of MALT1 deficiency can be successfully treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following reduced intensity conditioning.

  9. Physical exercise for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haren, I.E.P.M.; Timmerman, H.; Potting, C.M.J.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Staal, J.B.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment-related burden for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may be relieved by physical exercises. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to summarize and analyze the evidence provided by randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on physical exercise int

  10. Impact of genomic risk factors on outcome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, A.M.; Pearce, K.F.; Norden, J.; O'Brien, S.G.; Holler, E.; Bickeboller, H.; Balavarca, Y.; Rocha, V.; Kolb, H.J.; Hromadnikova, I.; Sedlacek, P.; Niederwieser, D.; Brand, R.; Ruutu, T.; Apperley, J.; Szydlo, R.; Goulmy, E.; Siegert, W.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Gratwohl, A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-HLA gene polymorphisms have been shown to influence outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Results were derived from heterogeneous, small populations and their value remains a matter of debate. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this study, we assessed the effect of si

  11. Impact of genomic risk factors on outcome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, Anne M.; Pearce, Kim F.; Norden, Jean; O'Brien, Stephen G.; Holler, Ernst; Bickeboeller, Heike; Balavarca, Yesilda; Rocha, Vanderson; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Hromadnikova, Ilona; Sedlacek, Petr; Niederwieser, Dietger; Brand, Ronald; Ruutu, Tapatti; Apperleyy, Jane; Szydlo, Richard; Goulmy, Els; Siegert, Wolfgang; de Witte, Theo; Gratwohl, Alois

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-HLA gene polymorphisms have been shown to influence outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Results were derived from heterogeneous, small populations and their value remains a matter of debate. Design and Methods In this study, we assessed the effect of sing

  12. Psychosocial Changes Associated with Participation in Art Therapy Interventions for Siblings of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jo; Packman, Wendy; Huffman, Lynne C.; Horn, Biljana; Cowan, Morton; Amylon, Michael D.; Kahn, Colleen; Cordova, Matt; Moses, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an accepted medical treatment for many serious childhood diseases. HSCT is a demanding procedure that creates both physical and emotional challenges for patients and their family members. Research has demonstrated that siblings of children undergoing HSCT are at risk for developing psychosocial…

  13. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, J.M. van; Farge, D.; Sont, J.K.; Naraghi, K.; Marjanovic, Z.; Larghero, J.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Marijt, E.W.; Vonk, M.C.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Loosdrecht, A.A. van de; Daikeler, T.; Kotter, I.; Schmalzing, M.; Martin, T.; Lioure, B.; Weiner, S.M.; Kreuter, A.; Deligny, C.; Durand, J.M.; Emery, P.; Machold, K.P.; Sarrot-Reynauld, F.; Warnatz, K.; Adoue, D.F.; Constans, J.; Tony, H.P.; Papa, N. Del; Fassas, A.; Himsel, A.; Launay, D. de; Monaco, A. Lo; Philippe, P.; Quere, I.; Rich, E.; Westhovens, R.; Griffiths, B.; Saccardi, R.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Fibbe, W.E.; Socie, G.; Gratwohl, A.; Tyndall, A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: High-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have shown efficacy in systemic sclerosis in phase 1 and small phase 2 trials. OBJECTIVE: To compare efficacy and safety of HSCT vs 12 successive monthly intravenous pulses of cyclophosphami

  14. Quantitative and qualitative differences in use and trends of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation : a Global Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, Alois; Baldomero, Helen; Gratwohl, Michael; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Bouzas, Luis Fernando; Horowitz, Mary; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Lipton, Jeff; Iida, Minako; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Passweg, Jakob; Szer, Jeff; Madrigal, Alejandro; Frauendorfer, Karl; Niederwieser, Dietger

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-five years after publication of the first hematopoietic stem cell transplantation this technique has become an accepted treatment option for defined hematologic and non-hematologic disorders. There is considerable interest in understanding differences in its use and trends on a global level an

  15. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade: clinical manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, David Cavalcanti; de Oliveira, José Salvador Rodrigues; Parísio, Katya; Ramalho, Fernanda Maria Morselli

    2014-03-01

    The authors report a case with pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade as a rare clinical manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease in a young man with acute myelogenous leukemia submitted to an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a related donor.

  16. Retrospective Study of Incidence and Prognostic Significance of Eosinophilia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Influence of Corticosteroid Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Yamamoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The clinical significance of eosinophilia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is controversial. This study aimed to retrospectively study the impact of eosinophilia on the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation by taking into account the influence of corticosteroid therapy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied 204 patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from January 2001 to December 2010. Results: The median age was 43 years (minimum-maximum: 17- 65 years. Myeloablative conditioning was used in 153 patients and reduced intensity conditioning was employed in 51 patients. Donor cells were from bone marrow in 132 patients, peripheral blood in 34, and cord blood in 38. Eosinophilia was detected in 71 patients and there was no significant predictor of eosinophilia by multivariate analysis. There was no relationship between occurrence of eosinophilia and the incidence or grade of acute graft-versus-host disease when the patients were stratified according to corticosteroid treatment. Although eosinophilia was a prognostic factor for 5-year overall survival by univariate analysis, it was not a significant indicator by multivariate analysis. Conclusion: These results suggest that the clinical significance of eosinophilia in patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be assessed with consideration of systemic corticosteroid administration.

  17. HLA-mismatched/haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation:a field in which Chinese doctors are making great contributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-jun

    2010-01-01

    @@ Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is one of the best, or even the only,option for the cure of leukemia, especially for patients with high risk factors.1 However, it is limited by the shortage of suitable donors, because only 25%-30% patients can find a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor.

  18. The OP9-DL1 System: Generation of T-Lymphocytes from Embryonic or Hematopoietic Stem Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Roxanne Holmes and Juan Carlos Zúñiga-Pflücker Corresponding author: []() ### INTRODUCTION Differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from fetal liver or bone marrow into T-lymphocytes can be achieved in vitro with the support of OP9-DL1 cells, a bone-marrow-derived stromal cell line that ectopically expresses the Notch ligand, Delta-like 1 (Dll1). This approach provides a simple, versat...

  19. An optimization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell isolation for scientific and clinical purposes by the application of a new parameter determining the hematopoietic graft efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, B; Grymuła, K; Pietruszka, D; Kotowski, M; Mielczarek, M; Dziedziejko, V; Hałasa, M; Czerny, B; Walczak, M; Machaliński, B

    2008-01-01

    The transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) is an established lifesaving therapy. Bone marrow (BM), harvested from heparinized cadaveric organ donors, peripheral blood (PB) and cord blood (CB), are important sources of hematopoietic stem cells. HSPCs, which are used for transplantation purposes, are routinely evaluated in terms of number of mononuclear cells (MNCs), CD34+ MNCs count and viability. The efficacy of grafting is determined additionally in clonogenic tests in vitro. These tests deliver important information about the number of HSPCs and their proliferative potential. Unfortunately, they do not give a possibility to evaluate the functional HSPC chemotactic reactivity in the SDF-1 gradient, which is probably the key phenomenon for HSPC homing after transplantation procedure. Thus, the aim of our study was to optimize HSPC isolation according to their chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient. Using multiparameter cell sorter (FACS Aria, BD) we examined the HSPCs attracted by SDF-1 on a single cell level. The population of cells which participated in the chemotactic process was highly enriched in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45+ cells (referred as hematopoietic stem cells) and to our surprise in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45- cells (referred as pluripotent stem cells) in quantitative amounts. Since reactivity of HSPCs may depend on various factors involved in the protocol of their isolation and short-term storage, we tested the most commonly used anticoagulants (ACD, CPDA-1, EDTA and Heparin) and culture media (DME, IMDM, RPMI). HSPCs, harvested from CB, PB and BM, were subsequently investigated for clonogenic growth of CFU-GM in methylcellulose cultures and for the level of apoptosis by employing annexin V staining. Evaluating clonogenic potential, ability of chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient and intensification of apoptosis of HSPC as the most safe anticoagulant and medium were selected. This study has proved that chemotactic reactivity of

  20. An optimization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell isolation for scientific and clinical purposes by the application of a new parameter determining the hematopoietic graft efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Walczak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC is an established lifesaving therapy. Bone marrow (BM, harvested from heparinized cadaveric organ donors, peripheral blood (PB and cord blood (CB, are important sources of hematopoietic stem cells. HSPCs, which are used for transplantation purposes, are routinely evaluated in terms of number of mononuclear cells (MNCs, CD34+ MNCs count and viability. The efficacy of grafting is determined additionally in clonogenic tests in vitro. These tests deliver important information about the number of HSPCs and their proliferative potential. Unfortunately, they do not give a possibility to evaluate the functional HSPC chemotactic reactivity in the SDF-1 gradient, which is probably the key phenomenon for HSPC homing after transplantation procedure. Thus, the aim of our study was to optimize HSPC isolation according to their chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient. Using multiparameter cell sorter (FACS Aria, BD we examined the HSPCs attracted by SDF-1 on a single cell level. The population of cells which participated in the chemotactic process was highly enriched in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45+ cells (referred as hematopoietic stem cells and to our surprise in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45- cells (referred as pluripotent stem cells in quantitative amounts. Since reactivity of HSPCs may depend on various factors involved in the protocol of their isolation and short-term storage, we tested the most commonly used anticoagulants (ACD, CPDA-1, EDTA and Heparin and culture media (DME, IMDM, RPMI. HSPCs, harvested from CB, PB and BM, were subsequently investigated for clonogenic growth of CFU-GM in methylcellulose cultures and for the level of apoptosis by employing annexin V staining. Evaluating clonogenic potential, ability of chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient and intensification of apoptosis of HSPC as the most safe anticoagulant and medium were selected. This study has proved that chemotactic