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Sample records for adult gastrointestinal tract

  1. A Mathematical model for gastrointestinal tract dosimetry, and its application to adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is proposed for the computation of the dose delivered to any level of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of radioactive substances. The same method is used as that proposed by ICRP. The concentration of the radionuclide during the progression of the meal is the central concept of this model. A graph relates the MPC with the radioactive half life of the radionuclide and with any level of the gastrointestinal tract of adults.Soluble and insoluble radionuclides are considered. The case of daughter products is discussed in the Appendix. (author)

  2. A Mathematical model for gastrointestinal tract dosimetry, and its application to adults; Modele mathematique destine a la dosimetrie du tractus gastrointestinal - application a l'adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacca, G.; Bazin, J.P.; Karhausen, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A new method is proposed for the computation of the dose delivered to any level of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of radioactive substances. The same method is used as that proposed by ICRP. The concentration of the radionuclide during the progression of the meal is the central concept of this model. A graph relates the MPC with the radioactive half life of the radionuclide and with any level of the gastrointestinal tract of adults.Soluble and insoluble radionuclides are considered. The case of daughter products is discussed in the Appendix. (author) [French] Une methode nouvelle permet le calcul de la dose delivree a un niveau quelconque du tractus gastrointestinal apres ingestion de substances radioactives. Elle utilise d une part la technique de calcul proposee par l'ICRP et de l'autre la notion de concentration du radionuclide au cours de la progression du repas. Un graphique simple met en relation la valeur de la concentration maximale admissible avec la periode radioactive du radionuclide et le niveau considere du tractus gastrointestinal de l'adulte. Le cas d'un radionuclide soluble et celui d'un radionuclide insoluble sont envisages. Un appendice traite le cas des filiations. (auteur)

  3. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia in the gastrointestinal tract in adult patients: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreia; Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract is characterized by the presence of multiple small nodules, normally between between 2 and 10 mm in diameter, distributed along the small intestine(more often), stomach, large intestine, or rectum. The patho-genesis is largely unknown. It can occur in all age groups, but primarily in children and can affect adults with or without immunodeficiency. Some patients have an associated disease, namely, common variable immu-nodeficiency, selective IgA deficiency, Giardia infection, or, more rarely, human immunodeficiency virus infec-tion, celiac disease, or Helicobacter pylori infection. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia generally presents as an asymptomatic disease, but it may cause gastrointes-tinal symptoms like abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, bleeding or intestinal obstruction. A diagnosis is made at endoscopy or contrast barium studies and should be confirmed by histology. Its histological characteristics include markedly hyperplasic, mitotically active germi-nal centers and well-defined lymphocyte mantles found in the lamina propria and/or in the superficial submu-cosa, distributed in a diffuse or focal form. Treatment is directed towards associated conditions because the disorder itself generally requires no intervention. Nodu-lar lymphoid hyperplasia is a risk factor for both intes-tinal and, very rarely, extraintestinal lymphoma. Someauthors recommend surveillance, however, the duration and intervals are undefined.

  4. Enhancing the culturability of bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract of farmed adult turbot Scophthalmus maximus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengxin; Hou, Zhanhui; Qu, Yanmei; Liu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Eighteen agar media were tested for the culture of gut-associated bacteria from farmed adult turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus), including 16 agar media with or without 1% gastrointestinal (GI) supernatant, or with 2% or 4% GI supernatant. A total of 1 711 colonies were analyzed and 24 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified. The greatest bacterial diversity was isolated on Zobell 2216E/Zobell 2216E+ agar media, whereas MRS/MRS+ agar media produced a low diversity of colonies. Agar media with GI supernatant (1%, 2%, or 4%) showed increased diversity and yielded different profiles of OTUs from the corresponding original media, suggesting that GI supernatant provides substances that enhance the culture efficiency of bacteria from the turbot GI tract. The large majority of the colonies (82%) were γ-Proteobacteria, whereas 15.6% and 2.4% of colonies were Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, respectively. At the genus level, 49.4% of all colonies were assigned to Vibrio. Other potential pathogens, including Pseudomonas, Photobacterium, and Enterobacter, and potential probiotics, including Bacillus, Paenibacillus, and Pseudomonas, were also isolated on agar media. Most cultured bacteria belonged to species that were first described in the turbot GI tract. The impact of these species on turbot physiology and health should be investigated further.

  5. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-02-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Kefeli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ingested foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract are a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For this reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threatening complications. In this study, we aimed to analyze the characteristics of the patients with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies that were treated in our department. Methods: Patients diagnosed with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies who were admitted to our hospital between February 2010 and August2013 were evaluated retrospectively. The data regarding their age, gender, clinical profile, type and localization of the esophageal foreign body, performed endoscopic procedure and initial symptoms of the patients were noted and analyzed statistically. Results: Thirty-eight patients with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal foreign body were included in this study. Of these patients, 21 were male and 17 were female. The youngest patient was 17 years old and the oldest patient was 79 years old. Most of the foreign bodies (%55.3 detected in the stomach. Food waste and metallic objects in 21 and 16 patients respectively. The most common complaint was dysphagia (%50. After endoscopic intervention three of the patients were directed to surgery. Conclusion: Early recognition and treatment of gastrointestinal foreign bodies is important as their complications are life threatening. The best method of removal of foreign bodies is controversial. Early management with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most efficient and safe treatment method in current conditions.

  7. Parenteral nutrition in adult inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts: assessment of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2006-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common comorbidity that places inpatients at risk of complications, infections, long length of stay, higher costs, and increased mortality. Thus, nutrition support has become an important therapeutic adjunctive to the care of these patients. For patients unable to feed themselves, nutrition can be delivered via the parenteral or enteral routes. The formulations used to deliver nutrients and the route of nutrient delivery, absorption, and processing differ substantially between parenteral and enteral nutrition. Over the past two decades, many randomised clinical trials have assessed the effects of parenteral versus enteral nutrition on outcomes (ie, complications, infections, length of stay, costs, mortality) in diverse inpatient populations. From a search of medical publications, studies were selected that assessed important clinical outcomes of parenteral versus enteral feeding or intravenous fluids in patients with trauma/burn injuries, surgery, cancer, pancreatic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, critical illness, liver failure, acute renal failure, and organ transplantation. Our goal was to determine the optimum route of feeding in these patient groups. The available evidence lends support to the use of enteral over parenteral feeding in inpatients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts. PMID:16581410

  8. Terapia nutricional en pacientes adultos con quemaduras del tracto gastrointestinal por cáusticos Nutrition therapy for adult patients with caustic injuries to gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Muñoz Botero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Presentar la experiencia del Grupo de Terapia Nutricional del Hospital El Tunal, en el manejo nutricional de pacientes adultos con quemaduras por cáusticos del tracto gastrointestinal. Materiales y métodos: Es un estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo de pacientes manejados por el Grupo de Terapia Nutricional por quemaduras por cáusticos del tracto gastrointestinal en un periodo comprendido entre Enero de 2000 y Diciembre de 2007. Se revisaron las historias clínicas de los pacientes que tenían diagnóstico de quemaduras por cáusticos. Se analizaron los datos pertinentes al manejo nutricional, la evolución y el resultado final dedichos pacientes. Resultados: Se atendieron 30 pacientes, 17 hombres y 13 mujeres con edad promedio 34,4 ± 17,2 años. La ingesta del cáustico fue por intento de suicidio en 22 (73,3% pacientes y accidental en 8 (26,7%. La mortalidad global fue alta (43,3%. El 46,9% de los pacientes mostró perdida de peso y balance nitrogenado negativo el 62,5%. Diez y siete pacientes (53,12% recibieron nutrición mixta (enteral y/o parenteral por un tiempo promedio de 24 ± 22 días. Al comparar dos grupos clasificados como quemadura del TGI Grave vs Moderada se encontró que fue significativamente diferente la mortalidad, la estancia hospitalaria y el valor final de albúmina. Conclusiones: La quemadura del tracto gastrointestinal por cáusticos es una entidad poco frecuente, sucede principalmente en jóvenes por intento de suicidio y se asocia a alta mortalidad, sobre todo en quemaduras graves. Esta agresión lleva a catabolismo importante que produce balance nitrogenado negativo y perdida de peso. Estos pacientes requieren intervención nutricional temprana que puede extenderse por varios meses.Objectives: To present here the experience of our Nutrition Therapy Team of the Hospital El Tunal, for the nutritional management of adult patients with caustic injuries to gastrointestinal tract. Materials and methods: This is

  9. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals. PMID:27573953

  10. Endoscopic Management of Foreign Bodies in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract of Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chien Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Foreign object ingestion and food bolus impaction are a common clinical problem. We report our clinical experiences in endoscopic management for adults, foreign body ingestion, and food bolus impaction. Method. A retrospective chart review study was conducted on adult patients with foreign body ingestion and food bolus impaction between January 2011 and November 2014. Patients with incomplete medical records were excluded. Results. A total of 198 patients (226 incidents were included in the study (male/female: 1.54/1; age 57 ± 16 years. Among them, 168 foreign bodies were found successfully (74.3%. 75.6% of the foreign bodies were located in the esophagus. Food bolus impaction was most common (41.6%. 93.5% of foreign bodies in current study cohort were successfully extracted and 5 patients required surgical interventions. Comparisons between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients revealed that locations of foreign bodies in the pharynx and esophagus were the significant relevant factors (P<0.001. Shorter time taken to initiate endoscopic interventions increased detection rate (289.75 ± 465.94 versus 471.06 ± 659.93 minutes, P=0.028. Conclusion. Endoscopic management is a safe and highly effective procedure in extracting foreign body ingestion and food bolus impaction. Prompt endoscopic interventions can increase the chance of successful foreign bodies’ detection.

  11. Corrosive Injury of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: Review of Surgical Management and Outcome in 14 Adult Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Rajabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Caustic ingestion is responsible for a spectrum of upper gastrointestinal tract injury from self-limited to perforation. This study conducted to evaluate clinical characteristics as well as surgical outcomes in patients with caustic ingestion.   Materials and Methods: Between Nov1993 to march 2011, 14 adults with a clinical evidence of corrosive ingestion were admitted into our institutions (Omid and Ghaem hospitals. Patients evaluated for etiology of erosion, location, type of surgery, morbidity and mortality after surgery.   Results: 14 patients (10men and 4 women with a age range between18-53 years were evaluated. In 6 patients, the injury was accidental and in 8 patients ingestion was a suicide attempt. Ingested agent included nitric acid in 4 patients, hydrochloric acid in 7 patients, sulfuric acid in 2 patients and strong alkali in one patient. The location and extent of lesion varied included esophagus in 13 cases, stomach in 7 cases and the pharynx in 3 cases. Acute abdomen was developed In 2 patients and a procedure of total gasterectomy and blunt esophagectomy was performed. In the remaining patients, substernal esophageal bypass in 2 patients, esophageal resection and replacement surgery in 9 patients and gastroenterostomy in one patient performed to relieve esophageal stricture. Two patients died of mediastinitis after esophageal replacement surgery. Postoperative strictures were developed in 2 survived patients with hypopharyngeal reconstruction that was managed by per oral bougienage in one patient and KTP Laser and stenting in the other patient.   Conclusion:  Esophageal resection with replacement was safe and good technique for severe corrosive esophageal stricture with low mortality and morbidity.

  12. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  13. [Metagenomics in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Yang, Yunjuan; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-12-01

    Animal gastrointestinal tract contains a complex community of microbes, whose composition ultimately reflects the co-evolution of microorganisms with their animal host. The gut microbial community of humans and animals has received significant attention from researchers because of its association with health and disease. The application of metagenomics technology enables researchers to study not only the microbial composition but also the function of microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. In this paper, combined with our own findings, we summarized advances in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism with metagenomics and the bioinformatics technology.

  14. Histiocytic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Fagerberg, Christina R; Ousager, Lilian Bomme;

    2013-01-01

    a short review on histiocytic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract in general. The primary histiocytic disorders of uncertain origin, Rosai-Dorfman disease, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and Erdheim-Chester disease, are addressed. Reactive and infectious conditions such as xanthomatosis...

  15. Diagnosis of liver, biliary tract and gastrointestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of RI imaging in the diagnosis of lesions of the liver, biliary tracts and gastrointestinal tracts are reviewed, and representative cases are shown. Liver scintigraphy was of value for the diagnosis of lesions limitted to the liver such as primary and metastatic liver cancer and inflammatory liver diseases. However, RI methods were less useful in the diagnosis of lesions of the biliary tracts and stomach. RI scintigraphy was more sensitive than angiography in the detection of Meckel's deverticulum, Ballet's esophagus, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (Tsunoda, M.)

  16. Ghrelin Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Sakata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is 28-amino-acid peptide that was discovered from the rat and human stomach in 1999. Since the discovery of ghrelin, various functions of ghrelin, including growth hormone release, feeding behavior, glucose metabolism, memory, and also antidepressant effects, have been studied. It has also been reported that ghrelin in the gastrointestinal tract has an important physiological effect on gastric acid secretion and gastrointestinal motility. Ghrelin has a unique structure that is modified by O-acylation with n-octanoic acid at third serine residues, and this modification enzyme has recently been identified and named ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT. Ghrelin is considered to be a gut-brain peptide and is abundantly produced from endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal mucosa. In the gastrointestinal tract, ghrelin cells are most abundant in the stomach and are localized in gastric mucosal layers. Ghrelin cells are also widely distributed throughout the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, abundance of ghrelin cells in the gastric mucosa is evolutionally conserved from mammals to lower vertebrates, indicating that gastric ghrelin plays important roles for fundamental physiological functions. Ghrelin cells in the gastrointestinal tract are a major source of circulating plasma ghrelin, and thus understanding the physiology of these cells would reveal the biological significance of ghrelin.

  17. Gastrointestinal tract imaging in children: current techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiorns, Melanie P. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in children continues to evolve, with new techniques, both radiological and non-radiological, being added to the repertoire. This article provides a summary of current imaging techniques of the GI tract (primarily the upper GI tract) and the relationship between those techniques. It covers the upper GI series and other contrast studies, US, CT and MRI. Note is also made of the contribution now made by capsule endoscopy (CE). Abdominal emergency imaging is not covered in this article. (orig.)

  18. Targeting nitric oxide in the gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Gerard; van Goor, Harry; Jansen, Peter L M; Moshage, Han; van Goor, Harm

    2004-01-01

    This review discusses the contributions of the three nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) isozymes neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) to the function and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Small (nanomolar) quantities of NO produced by calcium-dependent nNOS play a

  19. Valine partitioning and kinetics between the gastrointestinal tract and hind limbs in lambs with an adult Trichostrongylus colubriformis burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, E N; McNabb, W C; Sinclair, B R; Tavendale, M H; Roy, N C

    2011-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infection increases the demand for AA because of increased protein synthesis in the intestine and increased luminal losses of AA, and these increased demands may be supported by increased mobilization of AA from the skeletal muscles. Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of parasitic infection on valine kinetics within the gastrointestinal tract and hind limbs of lambs fed fresh forages. On d 1, lambs were given 6,000 stage-3 Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae per day for 6 d (n = 6) or kept as parasite-free controls (n = 6) and fed fresh lucerne (Medicago sativa; Exp. 1) or fresh sulla (Hedysarum coronarium; Exp. 2). On d 48, valine kinetics within the mesenteric- (MDV) and portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hind limbs were obtained by carrying out concurrent infusions of para-amminohippuric acid into the mesenteric vein and indocyanin green into the abdominal aorta (for blood flow), and [3,4-(3)H]valine into the jugular vein and [1-(13)C]valine into the abomasum for 8 h (for kinetics). During the infusions, blood was collected from the mesenteric and portal veins and from the mesenteric artery and vena cava, and plasma was harvested. After the 8-h infusion, lambs were euthanized, ileal digesta were collected, and tissues were sampled from the intestine and muscle (biceps femoris). Tissues, digesta, and plasma were analyzed for valine concentration, specific radioactivity, and isotopic enrichment. In both experiments, intestinal worm burdens on d 48 were greater in parasitized lambs (P = 0.0001 and 0.003). In Exp. 1, parasitic infection increased (P = 0.03) the total valine irreversible loss rate (ILR) in the MDV and PDV. In Exp. 2, luminal ILR of valine in the MDV was reduced (P = 0.01); however, ILR of valine in the PDV was unaffected. Despite these changes within the MDV and PDV, parasitic infection did not affect the ILR of valine within the hind limbs, and valine transport rates were largely unchanged. We suggest that

  20. Functional lumen imaging of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottrup, Christian; Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Fynne, Lotte; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Krogh, Klaus; Regan, Julie; Kunwald, Peter; McMahon, Barry P

    2015-10-01

    This nonsystematic review aims to describe recent developments in the use of functional lumen imaging in the gastrointestinal tract stimulated by the introduction of the functional lumen imaging probe. When ingested food in liquid and solid form is transported along the gastrointestinal tract, sphincters provide an important role in the flow and control of these contents. Inadequate function of sphincters is the basis of many gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, traditional methods of sphincter diagnosis and measurement such as fluoroscopy, manometry, and the barostat are limited in what they can tell us. It has long been thought that measurement of sphincter function through resistance to distension is a better approach, now more commonly known as distensibility testing. The functional lumen imaging probe is the first medical measurement device that purports in a practical way to provide geometric profiling and measurement of distensibility in sphincters. With use of impedance planimetry, an axial series of cross-sectional areas and pressure in a catheter-mounted allantoid bag are used for the calculation of distensibility parameters. The technique has been trialed in many valvular areas of the gastrointestinal tract, including the upper esophageal sphincter, the esophagogastric junction, and the anorectal region. It has shown potential in the biomechanical assessment of sphincter function and characterization of swallowing disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, achalasia, and fecal incontinence. From this early work, the functional lumen imaging technique has the potential to contribute to a better and more physiological understanding of narrowing regions in the gastrointestinal tract in general and sphincters in particular. PMID:25980822

  1. Gastrointestinal tract modelling in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Hua Liao; Jing-Bo Zhao; Hans Gregersen

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the system of organs within multi-cellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste. The various patterns of GI tract function are generated by the integrated behaviour of multiple tissues and cell types. A thorough study of the GI tract requires understanding of the interactions between cells, tissues and gastrointestinal organs in health and disease. This depends on knowledge, not only of numerous cellular ionic current mechanisms and signal transduction pathways, but also of large scale GI tissue structures and the special distribution of the nervous network. A unique way of coping with this explosion in complexity is mathematical and computational modelling; providing a computational framework for the multilevel modelling and simulation of the human gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of biomechanical modelling work of the GI tract in humans and animals, which can be further used to integrate the physiological, anatomical and medical knowledge of the GI system. Such modelling will aid research and ensure that medical professionals benefit, through the provision of relevant and precise information about the patient's condition and GI remodelling in animal disease models. It will also improve the accuracy and efficiency of medical procedures, which could result in reduced cost for diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Development of a revised mathematical model of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this research are as follows. First, to incorporate new biological data into a revised mathematical adult gastrointestinal tract model that includes: ingestion in both liquid and solid forms; consideration of absorption in the stomach, small intestine, ascending colon, transverse colon or not at all; gender and age of the adult; and whether the adult is a smoker or not. Next, to create a computer program in basic language for calculating residence times in each anatomical section of the GI tract for commonly used radionuclides. Also, to compare and contrast the new model with the ICRP 30 GI tract model in terms of physiological concepts, mathematical concepts, and revised residence times for several commonly used radionuclides. Finally, to determine whether the new model is sufficiently better than the current model to warrant its use as a replacement for the Eve model

  3. Prion Diseases and the Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Gwynivere A; Bryant, Adam R; John D. Reynolds; Jirik, Frank R.; Keith A Sharkey

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Alhough they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform...

  4. Heterotopic pancreas in the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Zhou; Chen, Jie; Zheng, Qi; Huang, Xin-yu; Yang, Zhe; Tang, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is defined as pancreatic tissue found outside the usual anatomical location of the pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be found at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. It may become clinically evident when complicated by pathological changes such as inflammation, bleeding, obstruction, and malignant transformation. In this report, a 60-year-old man with carcinoid syndrome caused by heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the duodenum is described, along...

  5. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  6. Carbonic anhydrases in normal gastrointestinal tract and gastrointestinal tumours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antti J. Kivel(a); Jyrki Kivel(a); Juha Saarnio; Seppo Parkkila

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) catalyse the hydration of CO2to bicarbonate at physiological pH. This chemical interconversion is crucial since HCO3- is the substrate for several biosynthetic reactions. This review is focused on the distribution and role of CA isoenzymes in both normal and pathological gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues. It has been known for many years that CAs are widely present in the GI tract and play important roles in several physiological functions such as production of saliva, gastric acid, bile, and pancreatic juice as well as in absorption of salt and water in intestine. New information suggests that these enzymes participate in several processes that were not envisioned earlier. Especially, the recent reports on plasma membranebound isoenzymes Ⅸ and Ⅻ have raised considerable interest since they were reported to participate in cancer invasion and spread. They are induced by tumour hypoxia and may also play a role in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-mediated carcinogenesis.

  7. Post-natal growth of the gastrointestinal tract of the Siberian hamster: morphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołczuk, K; Kobak, J

    2014-12-01

    Post-natal growth of the gastrointestinal tract of the Siberian hamster was studied in newborn and 3-, 7-, 14-, 21-, 42- and 90-day-old animals. Morphometric measurements and calculations were carried out: length and internal surface of gastrointestinal tract segments, size (height, width, surface) and density of villi as well as allometric growth rate of the length and internal surface of the segments with respect to the body mass. The fastest growth rate of the gastrointestinal tract segments was noticed during the first 3 days of the post-natal life. Nevertheless, significant regional differences in their growth rate were found. The increase in the length and internal surface of the large intestine was fastest, while the smallest increase was observed in the oesophagus. All segments of the gastrointestinal tract except oesophagus exhibited a positive allometric relationship to the body mass from birth till final weaning, whereas during the post-weaning period, the increase was isometric. Thus, at birth, the gastrointestinal tract segments were relatively smaller compared with those observed in adults, but then, the gastrointestinal tract grew faster than the rest of the body and reached its adult proportions just before the transition to solid food. Most probably, reaching the adult structure of the gastrointestinal tract before the final weaning is an essential condition for the proper growth of an organism after the weaning.

  8. Heterotopic pancreas in the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yuan; Jie Chen; Qi Zheng; Xin-Yu Huang; Zhe Yang; Juan Tang

    2009-01-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is defined as pancreatic tissue found outside the usual anatomical location of the pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be found at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. It may become clinically evident when complicated by pathological changes such as inflammation, bleeding, obstruction, and malignant transformation. In this report, a 60-year-old man with carcinoid syndrome caused by heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the duodenum is described, along with a 62-year-old man with abdominal pain caused by heterotopic pancreatic tissue in the gastric antrum. The difficulty of making an accurate diagnosis is highlighted. The patients remain healthy and symptom-free after follow-up of 1 year. Frozen sections may help in deciding the extent of resection intraoperatively. Although heterotopic pancreas is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  9. Gastrothorax following upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, AlaEldin Hassan; Elsayed, Muaz Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with vomiting and breathlessness for 1 day, 5 days after upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. On admission, the patient was breathless but not cyanosed; he had sinus tachycardia (heart rate 110 beats/min) and was normotensive (blood pressure 120/75 mm Hg). There were signs of mediastinal shift to the right. There were no breath sounds over the left side of the chest but normal breath sounds were heard to the right of the sternum. His chest x ray, CT scan of the ...

  10. Biomechanical Remodeling of the Diabetic Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian;

    2010-01-01

    in diabetes mellitus is complex in nature, multi-factorial (motor dysfunction, autonomic neuropathy, glycemic control, psychological factors, etc.) and is not well understood. Histologically, many studies have demonstrated prominent proliferation of different GI wall layers during diabetes. During the past......Gastrointestinal tract sensory-motor abnormalities are common in patients with diabetes mellitus with symptoms arising from the whole GI tract. Common complaints include dysphasia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of GI symptoms...... several years, several studies demonstrated that experimental diabetes induces GI morphological and biomechanical remodeling. Following the development of diabetes, the GI wall becomes thicker and the stiffness of the GI wall increases in a time-dependent manner. It is well known that mechanosensitive...

  11. Radiological evaluation congenital gastrointestinal tract anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Hee; Kim, Ock [Hanil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jung Wha [Seoul Nationl Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    With the improvements, during recent years, in the control of the infections and nutritional diseases the subject of congenital malformation becomes of increasing importance. The radiologic signs are crucial for prompt diagnosis of anomalies of alimentary tract and with early identification of resulting complication, surgical therapy is usually life-saving. 30 cases of congenital anomalies of alimentary tract in infants were reviewed in respect of age, sex, incidence and radiological findings. The results are summarized as follows; 1, The most common lesion was hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, followed by congenital megacolon and anorectal anomaly, tracheoesophageal fistula, intestinal atresia. 2. Male outnumbered female in most congenital anomalies of alimentary tract. 25 cases were under the age of 1 month. 3. Common symptoms of upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction are vomiting and abdominal distension. In the obstruction of lower gastrointestinal tract, abdominal distension and failure of meconium passage were noted. 4. Roentgenologic findings were as follows, a. Chest A-P and lateral view: In tracheoesophageal fistula, saccular dilatation of upper esophagus and displacement of trachea anterolaterally were the most common finding. b. Simple abdomen: Obstructive pattern of proximal portion of duodenum shows in 11 cases, of distal bowel shows in 16 cases. Duodenal atresia showed 'double bubble' sign, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis showed marked gastric distension, paucity of air in small bowel and increases gastric peristalsis were the most common findings. Hirschsprung's disease showed absenced of rectal gas almostly. The variable length between blind hindgut to anus was seen in anorectal anomalies. c. Esophagogram: Blind sac of upper esophagus was seen at the 4th thoracic spinal level and displacement of trachea anterolaterally. 1 case of tracheoesophageal fistula had an intact esophageal lumen. d. Upper G-I series: In hypertrophic pyloric

  12. MRI of the fetal gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saguintaah, Magali; Couture, Alain; Veyrac, Corinne; Baud, Catherine [CHU, Nantes (France). Service de Radiodiagnostic; Quere, Marie-Pierre

    2002-06-01

    Objective: To determine the MRI patterns of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in normal fetuses and some GI tract abnormalities. Materials and methods: A retrospective (1996-1998) and prospective (1999-2000) study of 48 fetal abdominal MRI scans was performed between 23 and 38 weeks of gestation. T1-weighted (T1-W) fast gradient-echo (Flash 2D) and T2-weighted (T2-W) HASTE sequences were obtained on a 1.5-T unit, in frontal and sagittal planes, after maternal premedication. Fresh meconium was also studied. Results: Normal patterns (40 cases): the rectum was seen in all cases and exhibited meconium-like high signal on T1-W images and low signal on T2-W images. It was close to the bladder whatever the fetal gender with its cul-de-sac being at least 10 mm below the bladder neck. The large bowel had a same signal; the distal colon was demonstrated more frequently than the proximal colon. The small bowel was transiently hyperintense on TI-W images early in gestation and then hyperintense on T2-W images. Normal measurements were obtained. GI tract abnormalities (eight cases): cysts close to normal bowel (n=2), atresias (n=5; microcolon, dilated small bowel with abnormal signal, one with a meconium cyst) and a cloacal malformation with midgut malrotation (n=1; abnormal liquid signal in the rectum separated from the bladder wall and colon located on the left side). Conclusions: MRI provided complete visualisation of the fetal GI tract, showed specific signal intensities, identified the level of an obstruction, detected a microcolon, and demonstrated communication between urinary and GI tracts. It shows great potential. (orig.)

  13. US of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have used large-aperture, dynamically focused US imaging with the patient in an upright position in a series of cases with symptomatic upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract complaints. They found that the gastric antrum and portions of the bulb and remainder of the duodenum could be seen in each case. Scan planes tangential to the luminal surface show fold patterns, while conventional axial and transverse planes depict specific wall features, such as submucosal elevation with duodenitis, muscle layer fibrosis with chronic peptic ulcer disease, or focal subserosal hematomas. Motility patterns are evaluated with continuous imaging. The disadvantage is in limited or variable sampling. In their direct comparison of upper GI barium studies and US in these patients, there was generally diagnostic concordance, although the authors conclude that the methods are complementary since each detected individual abnormalities. Since US viewing of the upper GI tract requires only a brief increment of scanning time, they recommend that this be added routinely to each upper abdominal US study. They also urge that a US survey be an essential part of any upper GI tract study referred traditionally and selectively for a barium radiographic examination

  14. Gastrothorax following upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Alaeldin Hassan; Elsayed, Muaz Abdellatif

    2009-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with vomiting and breathlessness for 1 day, 5 days after upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. On admission, the patient was breathless but not cyanosed; he had sinus tachycardia (heart rate 110 beats/min) and was normotensive (blood pressure 120/75 mm Hg). There were signs of mediastinal shift to the right. There were no breath sounds over the left side of the chest but normal breath sounds were heard to the right of the sternum. His chest x ray, CT scan of the chest and a barium meal study revealed gastrothorax. He was operated on and at surgery the stomach and ascending colon were found herniating into the chest through a posterolateral defect of the left hemidiaphragm. These were moved back to the abdomen and the diaphragmatic defect was closed. The patient made an uneventful recovery and remained well when seen in the clinic 2 months following surgery. PMID:22140411

  15. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, G; Ciccarelli, G; Schwartz, S; Hughes, T; Boettcher, T; Barman, R; Langer, R; Swiston, A

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage.

  16. Somatostatin receptors in the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Reubi, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The multiple actions of somatostatin are mediated by specific membrane-bound receptors present in all somatostatin target tissues, such as brain, pituitary, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract. Three different types of tissues in the human gastrointestinal tract express somatostatin receptors: (1) the gastrointestinal mucosa, (2) the peripheral nervous system, and (3) the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, where the receptors are preferentially located in germinal centers. In all these cases, s...

  17. Prion diseases and the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G A; Bryant, Adam R; Reynolds, John D; Jirik, Frank R; Sharkey, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Although they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform (PrPsc) the process by which this isoform is propagated and transported to the brain remains poorly understood. M cells, dendritic cells and possibly enteroendocrine cells are important in the movement of infectious prions across the GI epithelium. From there, PrPsc propagation requires B lymphocytes, dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of Peyer's patches. The early accumulation of the disease-causing agent in the plexuses of the enteric nervous system supports the contention that the autonomic nervous system is important in disease transmission. This is further supported by the presence of PrPsc in the ganglia of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that innervate the GI tract. Additionally, the lymphoreticular system has been implicated as the route of transmission from the gut to the brain. Although normal cellular prion protein is found in the enteric nervous system, its role has not been characterized. Further research is required to understand how the cellular components of the gut wall interact to propagate and transmit infectious prions to develop potential therapies that may prevent the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. PMID:16432555

  18. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  19. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  20. The Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota and Allergic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyburz, Andreas; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota is required for optimal digestion of foods, for the development of resistance against pathogens (termed colonization resistance), for the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, and for local as well as systemic immune homeostasis. Certain constituents of the GI tract microbiota are widely recognized as critical regulators and modulators of their host's immune response. These include bacterial members of the microbiota as well as parasitic nematodes. Immune regulation by immunomodulatory members of the GI microbiota primarily serves to subvert host antimicrobial immune defenses and promote persistent colonization, but as a side effect may prevent or suppress immunological disorders resulting from inappropriate responses to harmless antigens, such as allergy, colitis or autoimmunity. Many of the best understood GI-resident immunomodulatory species have co-evolved with their mammalian hosts for tens of thousands of years and masterfully manipulate host immune responses. In this review, we discuss the epidemiological evidence for the role of the GI tract microbiota as a whole, and of specific members, in protection against allergic and other immunological disorders. We then focus on the mechanistic basis of microbial immunomodulation, which is presented using several well-understood paradigmatic examples, that is, helminths, Helicobacter pylori, Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. In a final chapter, we highlight past and ongoing attempts at harnessing the immunomodulatory properties of GI microbiota species and their secreted products for intervention studies and describe the promises and limitations of these experimental approaches. The effects of pro- and prebiotics, bacterial lysates, as well as of fecal microbiota transplantation are presented and compared. PMID:27028536

  1. Bacterial Community Mapping of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Shenghua; Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Jin-Na; Lv, Xiaoman; WANG Kun; Duan, Li-Ping; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Keeping mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract communities in balance is crucial for host health maintenance. However, our understanding of microbial communities in the GI tract is still very limited. In this study, samples taken from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities along the mouse GI tract, including those present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and feces. Further a...

  2. Multimodal pain stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Understanding and characterization of pain and other sensory symptoms are among the most important issues in the diagnosis and assessment of patient with gastrointestinal disorders. Methods to evoke and assess experimental pain have recently developed into a new area with the possibility for multimodal stimulation (e.g.,electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation)of different nerves and pain pathways in the human gut. Such methods mimic to a high degree the pain experienced in the clinic. Multimodal pain methods have increased our basic understanding of different peripheral receptors in the gut in health and disease. Together with advanced muscle analysis, the methods have increased our understanding of receptors sensitive to mechanical,chemical and temperature stimuli in diseases, such as systemic sclerosis and diabetes. The methods can also be used to unravel central pain mechanisms, such as those involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. Abnormalities in central pain mechanisms are often seen in patients with chronic gut pain and hence methods relying on multimodal pain stimulation may help to understand the symptoms in these patients.Sex differences have been observed in several diseases of the gut, and differences in central pain processing between males and females have been hypothesized using multimodal pain stimulations. Finally, multimodal methods have recently been used to gain more insight into the effect of drugs against pain in the GI tract.Hence, the multimodal methods undoubtedly represents a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut.

  3. Biomechanics of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Health and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease. The biome......The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease...

  4. Molecular characterization of bacterial communities in the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetendal, E.G.

    2001-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex ecosystem in which host and microbial cells live in close contact with each other. The microbial community in the human GI tract has an important nutritional and protective function and mainly consists of anaerobic bacteria. After birth, the germ-fr

  5. MR imaging of the gastro-intestinal tract in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging (MRI) is an established method for the evaluation of particularly inflammatory bowel disease in adults, as well as for acute abdominal pain in pregnant women. Despite the fact that MRI is ideally suited for the evaluation of children the method is still not established in these patients. The value of MRI in Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and appendicitis as well as intestinal tumors and malformations has been documented in children. There will be more indications in the future depending on the development of new imaging techniques, faster sequences, stronger gradients and increasing availability. Furthermore, the radiologist's attention must be drawn to decrease the radiation burden in children and to replace ionizing techniques especially in chronic disease with the need for repeated follow-up studies and in younger children. This review will discuss some general considerations for the use of MRI in evaluating the paediatric gastro-intestinal tract

  6. MR imaging of the gastro-intestinal tract in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoermann, Marcus [Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital, Department of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: marcus.hoermann@meduniwien.ac.at

    2008-11-15

    MR imaging (MRI) is an established method for the evaluation of particularly inflammatory bowel disease in adults, as well as for acute abdominal pain in pregnant women. Despite the fact that MRI is ideally suited for the evaluation of children the method is still not established in these patients. The value of MRI in Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and appendicitis as well as intestinal tumors and malformations has been documented in children. There will be more indications in the future depending on the development of new imaging techniques, faster sequences, stronger gradients and increasing availability. Furthermore, the radiologist's attention must be drawn to decrease the radiation burden in children and to replace ionizing techniques especially in chronic disease with the need for repeated follow-up studies and in younger children. This review will discuss some general considerations for the use of MRI in evaluating the paediatric gastro-intestinal tract.

  7. Tissue Staining (Chromoscopy) of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Fennerty, M. Brian

    1999-01-01

    Tissue staining, or chomoscopy, is used as an adjunctive technique during gastrointestinal endoscopy. Chemical agents are applied to the gastrointestinal mucosal surface to identify specific epithelia or to enhance the mucosal surface characteristics of the gastrointestinal epithelium. This aids in the recognition of subtle lesions (ie, polyps) or allows directed targeting of biopsies (ie, sprue or Barrett’s esophagus) to increase the yield of endoscopic diagnostic accuracy. The four endoscop...

  8. Imaging of the gastrointestinal tract-novel technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jens Brφndum Frφkjφr; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes; Hans Gregersen

    2009-01-01

    Imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is very useful for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from the gastrointestinal tract and in visualising anatomy and pathology. Traditional radiological techniques played a leading role in such studies for a long time. However, advances in non-invasive modalities including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), etc, have in the last decades revolutionised the way in which the gastrointestinal tract is studied. The resolution of imaging data is constantly being improved and 3D acquisition, tools for filtering, enhancement, segmentation and tissue classification are continually being developed. Additional co-registration techniques allow multimodal data acquisition with improved classification of tissue pathology. Furthermore, new functional imaging techniques have become available. Altogether, the future of gastrointestinal imaging looks very promising which will be of great benefit in clinical and research studies of gastrointestinal diseases. The purpose of this review is to highlight the capabilities of the newest techniques to explore the detailed morphology, biomechanical properties, function and pathology of the gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Aspects of Endoscopic Interventions of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Blomberg, John

    2010-01-01

    Interventional endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract is a rapidly evolving surgical discipline that minimizes the surgical trauma. Yet, complications occur that sometimes are severe. This thesis aims to improve upper gastrointestinal endoscopic therapeutic procedures by addressing aspects of their complications in three randomised clinical trials (paper I-III) and one prospective cohort study (paper IV). In distal oesophageal tumours the palliative placement of st...

  10. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Gahan, Cormac G. M.; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive e...

  11. Tissue Staining (Chromoscopy of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Brian Fennerty

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue staining, or chomoscopy, is used as an adjunctive technique during gastrointestinal endoscopy. Chemical agents are applied to the gastrointestinal mucosal surface to identify specific epithelia or to enhance the mucosal surface characteristics of the gastrointestinal epithelium. This aids in the recognition of subtle lesions (ie, polyps or allows directed targeting of biopsies (ie, sprue or Barrett’s esophagus to increase the yield of endoscopic diagnostic accuracy. The four endoscopic tissue-staining techniques in use are vital staining, contrast staining (chromoscopy, reactive staining and tattooing. Some of the agents used for endoscopic tissue staining and the uses of chromoscopy in identifying pathology of the esophagus, stomach, small bowel and colon during endoscopy are discussed.

  12. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  13. Selective decontamination of the digestive tract in elective gastrointestinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, D.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) surgery and especially colorectal surgery is associated with a high risk of postoperative infections due to contamination by bacteria in the large intestine. These postoperative infectious complications increase hospital stay and costs of treatment. The most common infectious complications after surgery are urinary tract, wound and pulmonary infections. These mainly Gram negative infections generally originate from the patient’s own digestive tract. The use of oral antib...

  14. Angiography and angiotherapy of gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In selected patients with upper and lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage there is an indication for angiography. Vasoconstrictive drugs or embolization materials can be submitted through the catheter to stop the hermorrhage (angiotherapy). 81 patients were diagnosed by this method. Treatment through the angiographic catheter followed the diagnostic procedure in 41 cases. The hemorrhage was controlled in 36 patients. (orig.)

  15. Yttrium-90 microsphere induced gastrointestinal tract ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    Rikabi Ali A; Thomas Fred B; Kim Edward Y; Meis Gregory; Meyer Marty M; South Christopher D; Khabiri Hooman; Bloomston Mark

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Radiomicrosphere therapy (RT) utilizing yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres has been shown to be an effective regional treatment for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. We sought to determine a large academic institution's experience regarding the extent and frequency of gastrointestinal complications. Methods Between 2004 and 2007, 27 patients underwent RT for primary or secondary hepatic malignancies. Charts were subsequently reviewed to determine the incidence and sev...

  16. Yttrium-90 microsphere induced gastrointestinal tract ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikabi Ali A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiomicrosphere therapy (RT utilizing yttrium-90 (90Y microspheres has been shown to be an effective regional treatment for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. We sought to determine a large academic institution's experience regarding the extent and frequency of gastrointestinal complications. Methods Between 2004 and 2007, 27 patients underwent RT for primary or secondary hepatic malignancies. Charts were subsequently reviewed to determine the incidence and severity of GI ulceration. Results Three patients presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent upper endoscopy. Review of the pretreatment angiograms showed normal vascular anatomy in one patient, sclerosed hepatic vasculature in a patient who had undergone prior chemoembolization in a second, and an aberrant left hepatic artery in a third. None had undergone prophylactic gastroduodenal artery embolization. Endoscopic findings included erythema, mucosal erosions, and large gastric ulcers. Microspheres were visible on endoscopic biopsy. In two patients, gastric ulcers were persistent at the time of repeat endoscopy 1–4 months later despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. One elderly patient who refused surgical intervention died from recurrent hemorrhage. Conclusion Gastrointestinal ulceration is a known yet rarely reported complication of 90Y microsphere embolization with potentially life-threatening consequences. Once diagnosed, refractory ulcers should be considered for aggressive surgical management.

  17. The fate of Bacillus cereus in the gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielaat A; Wijnands LM; Takumi K; Nauta MJ; Leusden FM van; MGB

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a mathematical dynamical model for the behaviour of Bacillus cereus in the gastro-intestinal tract. Biological processes and system dynamics are simultaneously incorporated in this mechanistic model. Variability in growth characteristics and physical traits of different B. cereu

  18. Health and functions of the gastrointestinal tract in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review on the effects of functional ingredients and processing of ingredients and diets on the functions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and health of the GIT in pigs. There is increasing attention for these topics since the ban of in-feed growth promoting antibiotics in ma

  19. Complications of stent placement for benign stricture of gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Sheng Cheng; Ming-Hua Li; Wei-Xiong Chen; Ni-Wei Chen; Qi-Xin Zhuang; Ke-Zhong Shang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the frequent complications of stent placement for stricture of the gastrointestinal tract and to find proper treatment.METHODS: A total number of 140 stents were inserted in 138 patients with benign stricture of the gastrointestinal tract. The procedure was completed under fluoroscopy in all of the patients.RESULTS: Stents were successfully placed in all the 138 patients. Pains occurred in 23 patients (16.7%), slight or dull pains were found in 21 patients and severe chest pain in 2 respectively.For the former type of pain, the patients received only analgesia or even no treatment, while peridural anesthesics was conducted for the latter condition. Reflux occurred in 16 of these patients (11.6%) after stent placement. It was managed by common antireflux procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in 13 patients (9.4%), and was treated by hemostat. Restenosis of the gastrointestinal tract occurred in 8 patients (5.8%), and was apparently associated with hyperplasia of granulation tissue. In 2 patients, the second stent was placed under X-ray guidance. The granulation tissue was removed by cauterization through hot-node therapy under gastroscope guidance in 3 patients, and surgical reconstruction was performed in another 3 patients. Stent migration occurredin 5 patients (3.6%), and were extracted with the aid of a gastroscope. Food-bolus obstruction was encountered in 2 patients (1.4%) and was treated by endoscope removal. No perforation occurred in all patients.CONCLUSION: Frequent complications after stent placement for benign stricture of the gastrointestinal tract include pain,reflux, bleeding, restenosis, stent migration and food-bolus obstruction. They can be treated by drugs, the second stent placement or gastroscopic procedures according to the specific conditions.

  20. Endoscopic mucosal resection in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anis Ahmadi; Peter Draganov

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is a technique used to locally excise lesions confined to the mucosa. Its main role is the treatment of advanced dysplasia and early gastrointestinal cancers. EMR was originally described as a therapy for early gastric cancer. Recently its use has expanded as a therapeutic option for ampullary masses, colorectal cancer, and large colorectal polyps. In the Western world, the predominant indication for EMR in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the staging and treatment of advance dysplasia and early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. This review will describe the basis, indications, techniques, and complications of EMR, and its role in the management of Barrett's esophagus.

  1. Changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure in functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheel, Hanne; Farré, Ricard

    2013-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia is an extremely common disorder of gastrointestinal function. The disorder is thought to be heterogeneous, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying varied symptom patterns. A diversity of changes in gastrointestinal tract function and structure has been described in functional dyspepsia. These involve alterations in the stomach, such as impaired accommodation, delayed gastric emptying and hypersensitivity, and alterations in the duodenum, such as increased sensitivity to duodenal acid and/or lipids and low-grade inflammation. In this Review, we summarize all these abnormalities in an attempt to provide an integrated overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms in functional dyspepsia. PMID:23318268

  2. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Brock; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Oliver Wilder-Smith; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and modality, as well as using validated methods for assessing sensory response have contributed to the understanding of pain mechanisms. Mechanical stimulation based on impedance planimetry allows direct recordings of luminal cross-sectional areas, and combined with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, the contribution of different gut layers can be estimated. Electrical stimulation depolarizes free nerve endings non-selectively. Consequently, the stimulation paradigm (single, train, tetanic) influences the involved sensory nerves. Visual controlled electrical stimulation combines the probes with an endoscopic approach, which allows the investigator to inspect and obtain small biopsies from the stimulation site. Thermal stimulation (cold or warm) activates selectively mucosal receptors, and chemical substances such as acid and capsaicin (either alone or in combination) are used to evoke pain and sensitization. The possibility of multimodal (e.g. mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical) stimulation in different gut segments has developed visceral pain research. The major advantage is involvement of distinctive receptors, various sensory nerves and different pain pathways mimicking clinical pain that favors investigation of central pain mechanisms involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. As impairment of descending control mechanisms partly underlies the pathogenesis in chronic pain, a cold pressor test that indirectly stimulates such control mechanisms can be added. Hence, the methods undoubtedly represent a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut, which provides knowledge to

  3. The impact of asthma on the gastrointestinal tract (GIT)

    OpenAIRE

    Warren Antonio Vieira; Etheresia Pretorius

    2010-01-01

    Warren Antonio Vieira, Etheresia PretoriusDepartment of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South AfricaAbstract: The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of vertebrates is composed of several distinct ­compartments and glands as well as an extensive mucosal surface. Its primary function is that of chemical and physical digestion of food and the absorption of nutrients; however, due to its continual antigen exposure, the GIT also has an i...

  4. [Biotherapy of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.P.; Knigge, U.

    2008-01-01

    Biotherapy of hormonal symptoms and tumour growth is a mainstay in the therapy of metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Symptomatic relief can be achieved by somatostatin analogues and interferon, either alone or in combination. The effect on tumour growth...... is less convincing although a stabilization of disease is recorded in almost 50% of patients. Interferon treatment should mainly be considered for tumours with a low proliferation index Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  5. Hemorrhage of the inferior gastrointestinal tract: Imaginelogic focuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of clinical history, imaging and evolution in three patients with bleeding in the lower gastrointestinal tract featuring different aetiologies studied by means of radiolabel red cells and selective angiographies using end vascular therapy intraarterial vase pressing infusion at the San Juan de Dios, Hospital, Bogota, from august 1996 to march 1997. A review of a recent literature and the diagnosis and therapeutical approach used as flowchart management are also included

  6. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia associated with gastrointestinal tract diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulas; D; Bayraktar; Soley; Bayraktar

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a common site of bleeding that may lead to iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Treatment of IDA depends on severity and acuity of patients’ signs and symptoms. While red blood cell transfusions may be required in hemodynamically unstable patients, transfusions should be avoided in chronically anemic patients due to their potential side effects and cost. Iron studies need to be performed after episodes of GI bleeding and stores need to be replenished before anemia develops. Oral ...

  7. Gastrointestinal chemosensation: chemosensory cells in the alimentary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breer, H; Eberle, J; Frick, C; Haid, D; Widmayer, P

    2012-07-01

    Sensing potentially beneficial or harmful constituents in the luminal content by specialized cells in the gastrointestinal mucosa is an essential prerequisite for governing digestive processes, initiating protective responses and regulating food intake. Until recently, it was poorly understood how the gastrointestinal tract senses and responds to nutrients and non-nutrients in the diet; however, the enormous progress in unraveling the molecular machinery underlying the responsiveness of gustatory cells in the lingual taste buds to these compounds has been an important starting point for studying intestinal chemosensation. Currently, the field of nutrient sensing in the gastrointestinal tract is evolving rapidly and is benefiting from the deorphanization of previously unliganded G-protein-coupled receptors which respond to important nutrients, such as protein degradation products and free fatty acids as well as from the FACS-assisted isolation of distinct cell populations. This review focuses on mechanisms and principles underlying the chemosensory responsiveness of the alimentary tract. It describes the cell types which might potentially contribute to chemosensation within the gut: cells that can operate as specialized sensors and transducers for luminal factors and which communicate information from the gut lumen by releasing paracrine or endocrine acting messenger molecules. Furthermore, it addresses the current knowledge regarding the expression and localization of molecular elements that may be part of the chemosensory machinery which render some of the mucosal cells responsive to constituents of the luminal content, concentrating on candidate receptors and transporters for sensing nutrients. PMID:22527698

  8. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  9. Microneedles for drug delivery via the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Giovanni; Schoellhammer, Carl M; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Polat, Baris E; Anderson, Daniel G; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Both patients and physicians prefer the oral route of drug delivery. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract, though, limits the bioavailability of certain therapeutics because of its protease and bacteria-rich environment as well as general pH variability from pH 1 to 7. These extreme environments make oral delivery particularly challenging for the biologic class of therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate proof-of-concept experiments in swine that microneedle-based delivery has the capacity for improved bioavailability of a biologically active macromolecule. Moreover, we show that microneedle-containing devices can be passed and excreted from the GI tract safely. These findings strongly support the success of implementation of microneedle technology for use in the GI tract.

  10. Bacterial community mapping of the mouse gastrointestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Gu

    Full Text Available Keeping mammalian gastrointestinal (GI tract communities in balance is crucial for host health maintenance. However, our understanding of microbial communities in the GI tract is still very limited. In this study, samples taken from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities along the mouse GI tract, including those present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and feces. Further analyses of the 283,234 valid sequences obtained from pyrosequencing revealed that the gastric, duodenal, large intestinal and fecal samples had higher phylogenetic diversity than the jejunum and ileum samples did. The microbial communities found in the small intestine and stomach were different from those seen in the large intestine and fecal samples. A greater proportion of Lactobacillaceae were found in the stomach and small intestine, while a larger proportion of anaerobes such as Bacteroidaceae, Prevotellaceae, Rikenellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae were found in the large intestine and feces. In addition, inter-mouse variations of microbiota were observed between the large intestinal and fecal samples, which were much smaller than those between the gastric and small intestinal samples. As far as we can ascertain, ours is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice.

  11. miRNAs in precancerous lesions of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matteo Fassan; Carlo M Croce; Massimo Rugge

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the well-established understanding of the phenotypic lesions occurring in the shift from native epithelia to invasive (adeno) carcinoma, the molecular typing of the precancerous changes in the gastrointestinal tract remains unreliable. In recent years, no biomarkers have aroused as much interest as the miRNAs, a class of non-coding RNA molecules that function as endogenous silencers of numerous target genes. Aberrant miRNA expression is a hallmark of human disease, including cancer. Unlike most mRNAs, miRNAs are both long-living in vivo and very stable in vitro. Such characteristics allow their testing in paraffin-embedded tissue samples, which is essential in the biological profiling of small (phenotypically characterized) preneoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract (as well as in other fields of human pathology). The upcoming challenge lies in the reliable identification of disease-specific targets of dysregulated miRNAs, to enable miRNA testing in the clinical management of the secondary prevention of gastrointestinal cancer.

  12. Three-dimensional surface model analysis in the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghua Liao; Jens B Fr(φ)kj(ae)r; Jian Yang; Jingbo Zhao; Asbj(φ)rn M Drewes; Odd H Gilja; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    The biomechanical changes during functional loading and unloading of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract are not fully understood. GI function is usually studied by introducing probes in the GI lumen. Computer modeling offers a promising alternative approach in this regard, with the additional ability to predict regional stresses and strains in inaccessible locations. The tension and stress distributions in the GI tract are related to distensibility (tension-strain relationship) and smooth muscle tone. More knowledge on the tension and stress on the GI tract are needed to improve diagnosis of patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A modeling framework that can be used to integrate the physiological,anatomical and medical knowledge of the GI system has recently been developed. The 3-D anatomical model was constructed from digital images using ultrasonography,computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Different mathematical algorithms were developed for surface analysis based on thin-walled structure and the finite element method was applied for the mucosa-folded three layered esophageal model analysis.The tools may be useful for studying the geometry and biomechanical properties of these organs in health and disease. These studies will serve to test the structurefunction hypothesis of geometrically complex organs.

  13. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Cormac G M; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive encounters with acidic environments (which include the glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase systems), and those which enable the organism to cope with bile acids (including bile salt hydrolase) and competition with the resident microbiota. An increased understanding of how the pathogen survives in this environment is likely to inform the future design of novel prophylactic approaches that exploit specific pharmabiotics; including probiotics, prebiotics, or phages. PMID:24551601

  14. Listeria monocytogenes: survival and adaptation in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac G.M. Gahan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has the capacity to survive and grow in a diverse range of natural environments. The transition from a food environment to the gastrointestinal tract begins a process of adaptation that may culminate in invasive systemic disease. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of how L. monocytogenes adapts to the gastrointestinal environment prior to initiating systemic infection. We will discuss mechanisms used by the pathogen to survive encounters with acidic environments (which include the glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase systems, and those which enable the organism to cope with bile acids (including bile salt hydrolase and competition with the resident microbiota. An increased understanding of how the pathogen survives in this environment is likely to inform the future design of novel prophylactic approaches that exploit specific pharmabiotics; including probiotics, prebiotics or phages.

  15. Endotoxin and cytokines in patients with gastrointestinal tract perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Endo

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma levels of endotoxin and various cytokines were assessed in 70 patients with gastrointestinal tract perforation. Sepsis developed in 29 of them, and eight of these (27.6% had on admission endotoxin levels higher than 9.8 pg ml-1. The clinical outcome correlated with the level of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα, rather than with the endotoxin level. The high interleukin 6 (IL-6 level was shown in septic patients and no correlation was observed between the IL-6 level and the clinical outcome. Plasma TNFα levels tended to change independently from endotoxin levels, suggesting that TNFα may have been locally produced in inflammatory lesions.

  16. Elastography and strain rate imaging of the gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havre, R., E-mail: roald.flesland.havre@helse-bergen.no [National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen (Norway); Gilja, O.H. [National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen (Norway); Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

    2014-03-15

    Ultrasound based elastography of the gastrointestinal tract may be a useful approach to improved tissue characterisation. Distinguishing malignant lesions from benign may be one useful application. Monitoring of inflammatory bowel lesions for degree of inflammation or fibrosis would be another clinically useful tool. The anatomy of the bowel, however, raises many challenges for strain or shear wave imaging due to thin structures, non-constant boundary conditions and intrinsic contractility. Pathological lesions tend to increase bowel wall thickness and may ease elastography imaging. Very few studies have addressed issues of bowel wall elastography so far, and both inflammatory and neoplastic lesions seem to increase tissue hardness in the bowel wall.

  17. Management of foreign bodies of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, W A

    1988-01-01

    In the United States, 1500 people die yearly of ingested foreign bodies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope has had a major impact on the treatment of these foreign bodies. The following discussion includes the management of coins, meat impaction, sharp and pointed objects, button batteries, and cocaine packets; and it reflects both a personal experience and a review of the literature. The uses of the rigid and the flexible endoscopes, the Foley catheter, glucagon, papain, and gas-forming agents are presented. The cost-effectiveness impact of the flexible endoscope is also detailed, and morbidity and mortality rates for foreign body management are included. PMID:3275566

  18. Child abuse: multiple foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhera, Raman; Kalra, Vijay; Gulati, Sat Paul; Ghai, Anju

    2013-02-01

    The incidents of foreign body ingestion in infants and children are usually viewed as accidents, but these events may be a form of child abuse. We are reporting a case of child abuse who presented with multiple foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract. Physicians are required to report abuse when they have reason to believe or to suspect that it occurred. The purpose of reporting is not punishment of the perpetrator - it is the protection of the child. It is certainly in the best interest of the child, because child abuse is a recurrent and usually escalating problem that exposes the child to substantial risk. PMID:23164499

  19. Contrast media for radiological examination in gastrointestinal tract leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this investigation has been to find a safe and suitable contrast medium (CM) for radiological evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in cases where leakage outside the GIT can be suspected. An experimental study was carried out to evaluate the reactions of various available CM in the bronchi and lungs, mediastinum, pleura and peritoneum of rats. The CM evaluated in the experimental study were, pure barium sulphate (without any additives), commercial barium sulphate (Micropaque, with additives), Dionosil, Hytrast, Gastrografin, Amipaque (in pleura Omnipaque) and Hexabrix. (Auth.)

  20. Elastography and strain rate imaging of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound based elastography of the gastrointestinal tract may be a useful approach to improved tissue characterisation. Distinguishing malignant lesions from benign may be one useful application. Monitoring of inflammatory bowel lesions for degree of inflammation or fibrosis would be another clinically useful tool. The anatomy of the bowel, however, raises many challenges for strain or shear wave imaging due to thin structures, non-constant boundary conditions and intrinsic contractility. Pathological lesions tend to increase bowel wall thickness and may ease elastography imaging. Very few studies have addressed issues of bowel wall elastography so far, and both inflammatory and neoplastic lesions seem to increase tissue hardness in the bowel wall

  1. Electroanalytical approaches to study signaling mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B A

    2011-07-01

    Electroanalytical techniques over the past few years have been applied to study real-time release of various signaling molecules in the GI tract. These approaches have become highly attractive as they provide dynamic spatial information on the amount of signaling molecules released. Although these approaches are relatively new to the field, the studies to date have provided useful insights into the alterations in signaling mechanisms during maturation, obesity and in a model of colitis. New methods and techniques have also allowed the possibility to obtain information on the signaling process and future developments will provide a wide diverse array of information that will be of benefit to all researchers in the field of gastroenterology. This review focuses on the types of techniques utilized, the information they can provide, their potential advantages and disadvantages in monitoring signaling processes in the gastrointestinal tract, the existing scientific studies that have utilized electroanalytical methods to date and the future potential impact of such approaches.

  2. Gastrointestinal tract volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose an intestine volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope. This method aims at assessment of the gastrointestinal function. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on morphological abnormalities. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are sometimes apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors for these diseases is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. For the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tract, both aspects of organic and functional assessment is important. While endoscopic diagnosis is essential for assessment of organic abnormalities, three-dimensional information is required for assessment of the functional abnormalities. Thus, we proposed the three dimensional endoscope system using compound eye. In this study, we forces on the volume of gastrointestinal tract. The volume of the gastrointestinal tract is thought to related its function. In our system, we use a compound eye type endoscope system to obtain three-dimensional information of the tract. The volume can be calculated by integrating the slice data of the intestine tract shape using the obtained three-dimensional information. First, we evaluate the proposed method by known-shape tube. Then, we confirm that the proposed method can measure the tract volume using the tract simulated model. Our system can assess the wall of gastrointestinal tract directly in a three-dimensional manner. Our system can be used for examination of gastric morphological and functional abnormalities.

  3. Localization of neurokinin B receptor in mouse gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wang; Yuan-Qiang Zhang; Yu-Qiang Ding; Jin-Shan Zhang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To observe the location of neurokinin receptor (NK3r)in the mouse gastrointestinal tract.METHODS: The abdomen of 8 male Kunming mice wereopened under anaesthesia with sodium pentobarbital. Theexposed gut organs were cleaned and kept moisture andtemperature. Then the esophagus, jejulum, ileum, colon,etc were respectively cut and the segments from thestomach to the distal colon were opened along themesenteric border. A circular 4mm ~ 6mm enteric part(pieces of 1 cr2 were to be prepared) and mucosa andsubmucosa were removed, then the longitudinal musclelayer was pulled off from the circular muscle layer undermicrophotography. They were rinsed in 50nmol @ L-1potassium phosphate-buffered saline ( PBS ).Immunohistochemistry and immunoreactive fluorescencewere used in the staining procedure.RESULTS: There was not NK3r-Like(-Li) positive material onthe smooth muscle cells of the esophagus, stomach,intestines and other regions. The nerve cell bodies withimmunoreactivity for NK3r were mainly distributed in thesubmucousal nerve plexus or myenteric nerve plexus of thegastrointestinal tract except for the esophagus, stomachand rectum. The reaction product was located on thesurface of the nerve cell plasma. lt was observedoccasionally in the cell plasma endosomes, but was veryweakly stained. Among the NK3-Like positive neurons in theplexus, the morphological type in many neurons' appenaedlike Dogiel Ⅱ type cells. Some neuron cell bodies were big,having many profiles, Some were long ones or havinggrading structure. Cell bodiy diameter was about 10μm-46μmand 8μm-42μm in myenteric plexus and submucous plexus.CONCLUSION: This study not only described the distributionof neurokinin B receptor in the mouse gut, but alsoprovided a morphological basis for deducing the functionalidentity of the NK3r-LI immunoreactivity neurons,suggesting the possibility that these neurons were closelyrelated to gastrointestinal tract contraction and relaxingactivity.

  4. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Schmidlin, F. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    1998-06-02

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist`s awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 56 refs.

  5. Infections and infestations of the gastrointestinal tract. Part 1: Bacterial, viral and fungal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to review the imaging findings of various infections affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Barium examinations, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography all play an important role in the diagnostic workup of gastrointestinal tract infections. Knowledge of differential diagnosis, sites of involvement, and typical imaging features of different infections can help in accurate diagnosis and guide treatment.

  6. Immunocytochemical studies on the distribution pattern of daunomycin in rat gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohara, Koji; Shin, Masashi; Nakamuta, Hiromichi;

    2007-01-01

    The cancer drug daunomycin is used in treatment of leukemia but possesses severe side effects that involve the gastrointestinal tract. We therefore used a newly developed immunocytochemical procedure to determine the distribution of DM in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats after i.v. injection. ...

  7. Infections and infestations of the gastrointestinal tract. Part 1: Bacterial, viral and fungal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R., E-mail: rakslide@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom); Rajesh, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Rawat, S. [Department of Radiology, Ruby Hall Clinic, Pune (India); Rajiah, P. [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ramachandran, I. [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the imaging findings of various infections affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Barium examinations, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography all play an important role in the diagnostic workup of gastrointestinal tract infections. Knowledge of differential diagnosis, sites of involvement, and typical imaging features of different infections can help in accurate diagnosis and guide treatment.

  8. Foreign Material in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Cocaine Packets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurten Turkel Kucukmetin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smuggling drugs by swallowing or inserting into a body cavity is not only a serious and growing international crime, but can also lead to lethal medical complications. The most common cause of death in ‘body packers', people transporting drugs by ingesting a packet into the gastrointestinal tract, is acute drug toxicity from a ruptured packet. However, more than 30 years after the initial report of body packing, there is still no definitive treatment protocol for the management of this patient group. The treatment strategy is determined according to the particular condition of the patient and the clinical experience of the treatment center. Surgical intervention is also less common now, due to both the use of improved packaging materials among smugglers and a shift towards a more conservative medical approach. Herein, we report a case of toxicity from ingested packets of cocaine that leaked and, despite surgery, resulted in exitus of the patient.

  9. [Microbiocenosis of parietal mucin in the gastrointestinal tract of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'ev, A A; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Bogdanova, E A; Korneev, L M

    2005-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbial community in parietal mucin at different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of rats was revealed. The pronounced variability in the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of microbiocenosis in parietal mucin of rats at different sections was revealed. The differences were most pronounced in the passage from upper to lower GIT sections, the large intestine found to be the richest biocenosis. The microbial composition of rat feces was faintly associated with the GIT parietal microbiocenosis. The individual areas of GIT mucosa were unique of their microbial characteristics and organization. This makes it possible to regard them as relatively independent biotopes and indicates that it is impossible to evaluate the microbial community by one of the colonic mucosal sifes. PMID:16438365

  10. INFLAMMATORY FIBROID POLYPS OF GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory fibroid polyp (IFP) of gastrointestinal tract. Methods: The clinical symptoms, histopathologic features and immunohistochemical (ABC method) staining in 9 cases were observed. Results: IFP presented either as a solitary pedunculated or sessile lesion arising from the submucosa and protroding into the lumen; composed of a background of fibroblasts and blood vessels infiltrated by a variable number of inflammatory cells, often numerous eosinophilias leukocytes. Immunohistochemical staining: the spindle cells of all cases reacted with Vimentin. The partial cells of several cases react with Actin, NSE, a -AT. 7 cases were follow-up. No patients had a recurrence of the lesion. Conclusion: IFP are rare lesions, and may represent an exaggerated response to inflammatory or other injury process. The prognosis is good when treated by segmental resections of endoscopic removals.

  11. Imaging and intervention in the gastrointestinal tract in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Robin D; Towbin, R B

    2002-09-01

    Vascular and interventional techniques have become an integral component of modern pediatric healthcare. Minimally invasive procedures of the gastrointestinal tract now comprise a large part of any active pediatric interventional practice. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography offers a reliable, non-invasive means to evaluate patients with possible pancreatic or biliary pathology. This article reviews treatment of esophageal strictures and placement of gastronomy and gastrojejunostomy tubes and discusses new developments. Placement of percutaneous cecostomy tubes is a relatively new procedure that creatively uses the techniques developed for placement of percutaneous gastronomy tubes. This procedure offers significant benefits and lasting positive lifestyle changes for patients suffering from fecal incontinence. Liver biopsy in high-risk patients can be performed safely using measures designed to significantly decrease the risk of post-biopsy hemorrhage, such as track embolization or the transjugular approach.

  12. Collision tumors in the gastrointestinal tract: a rare case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aruna Bhattacharya,1 Rama Saha,1 Jayanta Biswas,2 Jhuma Biswas,1 Biswajit Ghosh11Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, 2NRS Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, IndiaAbstract: A collision tumor is one where histology shows the presence of two distinct primaries involving the same organ without intermixture of individual cell types, ie, a side by side pattern. Here we present three rare cases of collision tumors involving the stomach and transverse colon. There were two cases of collision tumors involving the stomach, one of which was a combination of adenocarcinoma and low-grade non-Hodgkin's (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and the other showed the presence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the entire stomach wall along with adenocarcinoma infiltrating the muscle layer. The third case comprised a mucinous adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in the large gut.Keywords: collision tumor, histology, gastrointestinal tract

  13. Obesity and the gastrointestinal tract: you are what you eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, M Michael; Boylan, Michael O

    2014-01-01

    Obesity represents a complex multifactorial syndrome that develops from interactions among genetic and environmental factors and is a leading cause of illness and death. The prevalence of obesity in the United States has increased dramatically since 1975. Although often ignored, the gastrointestinal tract, and the gastrointestinal regulatory peptides in particular, constitutes an ideal starting point for defining and investigating obesity as it represents the route by which all nutrients are ingested, processed, and absorbed. Another important factor to consider when evaluating the etiology of obesity is the capacity for all animals to store nutrients. Insulin is the most potent anabolic hormone, and it appears to have evolved from the need to maximize energy efficiency, obviating the requirement to continuously forage for food. Organisms expressing this important peptide possessed a distinct survival advantage and flourished. During the course of evolution, insulin biosynthesis translocated from the intestine to pancreatic islets, which necessitated a messenger from the intestine to complete the "enteroinsular axis." The eventual development of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and other incretins fulfilled this requirement. GIP appears to offer an additional survival benefit by not only stimulating intestinal glucose transport and maximally releasing insulin to facilitate nutrient storage but also by its insulin-mimetic properties, including enhanced uptake of glucose by adipocytes. This physiological redundancy offered by insulin and GIP ensured the survival of organisms during times when food was scarce. As food is no longer scarce, at least in the West, this survival advantage appears to have contributed to the current obesity epidemic.

  14. Impact of Oat-Based Products on Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staka Aiga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oat is rich in valuable nutrients. In comparison to other cereals, oat contains more total proteins, carbohydrate, fat, non-starch fibre, as well as unique antioxidants (one of them - avenanthramides, vitamins, and minerals. One of the most often studied components of oats is β-glucan - a type of soluble dietary fibre located throughout the starch endosperm, but with highest concentration in the bran. Many studies have shown the beneficial health effects of oat β-glucan as a soluble dietary fibre. Until now, most of the studies on this nutrient have been conducted in the cardiovascular and diabetology field. This article aimed to review the literature on studies that investigated the effects of oat-based products on human gastrointestinal tract - gastrointestinal microflora, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease as well as prevention/treatment of colorectal cancer. A literature search was conducted using PubMed database. More than 80 potential articles were identified, which were selected afterwards according to aims of our study. Studies done on human were preferred. A long-term dietary intake of oat-based products improves human intestinal microflora, could have benefits in irritable bowel syndrome, and probable effects were seen in patients with ulcerative colitis, but this remains to be proven. There are few studies regarding prevention/treatment of colorectal cancer and they do not show clear benefit nor provide recommendations.

  15. Fractional absorption in gastrointestinal tract of 232Th by ingestion for Chinese man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To estimate fractional absorption in gastrointestinal tract (f1) of 232Th by ingestion for the Chinese male adults. Methods: According to f1 calculation method in literature and results of Th concentrations in dietary foods and organ or tissues for the Chinese male adults, obtained in recent years, f1 values were estimated from the median and mean Th concentrations and compared each other. Results: the f1 value from the median and mean Th concentrations was 0.00048 and 0.00028 respectively. Conclusion: The f1 of 232Th by ingestion for the Chinese male adults should be adopted as 0.00048, being lower than estimated result from the world reference concentrations in UNSCEAR 2000 Report, but quite near to the relevant reported value from Asian countries, such as India or Japan, and supporting the latest recommended value 0.0005 by ICRP too

  16. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment.

  17. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. PMID:27593246

  18. Gastrin, somatostatin, and experimental disturbance of the gastrointestinal tract in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Li Yao; Bo Xu; Wan Dai Zhang; Yu Gang Song

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION The field of gastrointestinal hormones has expanded at a dizzying rate[1-4].Gastrointestinal hormones as regulatory peptides that appear to be major components of bodily integration and have important regulatory actions on physioligical function of the gastrointestinal tract .The successful isolation of some gastrointestinal hormones and the development of sensitive methods for their detection have led to the unexpected finding that they also exist in the brain .

  19. The use of metrizamide (amipaque) to visualise the gastrointestinal tract in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metrizamide (amipaque) has not been used previously as a diagnostic contrast agent in the gastrointestinal tract. Metrizamide is a water-soluble isotonic contrast material having many advantages over barium and existing hypertonic water-soluble agents. There are many clinical situations in children in which metrizamide should be the contrast agent of choice for investigating the gastrointestinal tract. Four neonates are presented in whom barium or gastrografin were absolutely contraindicated. In each case metrizamide gave excellent visualisation of the gastrointestinal tract. It could be followed through the bowel giving excellent visualisation even up to 120h after ingestion. No harmful effects were noted in the four cases studied. (author)

  20. Autonomous device for photostimulation of the gastrointestinal tract immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Sergey A.; Dyrin, Vladimir N.; Vovk, Sergey M.; Petrov, Evgeny Y.; Udut, Vladimir V.; Borodulina, Elena V.

    2000-05-01

    A very small optoelectronic device emitting light in the red and green band has been developed as a small capsule consisting of two semispheres connected with light-transmitted coupling. The device -- a phototablet permits to irradiate all parts of the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) including the immunocompetent formations of the small intestine -- Peyer's patches responsible for production of secretory immunoglobulins A (IgA). The main mechanisms of realizing endogenic phototherapy using a phototablet begin functioning when irradiating both the walls of the GIT organs and its contents. The results of clinical trials of the phototablet testify to a favorable effect of endogenic therapy on the human organism in asthenic syndrome, some types of deficiency in the immunity function, in dysbioses, the syndrome of large intestine irritation, duodenostasis, etc. After endogenic phototherapy the patients had an increased level of lysozyme, leukocytes, a number of lactobacteria. There were no side effects when using a phototablet. Indications and contraindications for endogenic phototherapy were represented. Thus, the method of endogenic phototherapy allows us to have an effective and direct influence on the immunocompetent cells of GIT organs without medicamental agents and antigens that makes it possible to use the phototablet in medicine on a large scale.

  1. Gastrointestinal Tract Colonization Dynamics by Different Enterococcus faecium Clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Singh, Kavindra V; Murray, Barbara E

    2016-06-15

    Colonization of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) generally precedes infection with antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus faecium We used a mouse GIT colonization model to test differences in the colonization levels by strains from different E. faecium lineages: clade B, part of the healthy human microbiota; subclade A1, associated with infections; and subclade A2, primarily associated with animals. After mono-inoculation, there was no significant difference in colonization (measured as the geometric mean number of colony-forming units per gram) by the E. faecium clades at any time point (P > .05). However, in competition assays, with 6 of the 7 pairs, clade B strains outcompeted clade A strains in their ability to persist in the GIT; this difference was significant in some pairs by day 2 and in all pairs by day 14 (P < .0008-.0283). This observation may explain the predominance of clade B in the community and why antibiotic-resistant hospital-associated E. faecium are often replaced by clade B strains once patients leave the hospital. PMID:26671890

  2. The gastrointestinal tract microbiota of the Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Ngare; Hughes, Robert J; Aspden, William J; Chapman, James; Moore, Robert J; Stanley, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) plays an essential role in the health and well-being of the host. With the exception of chickens, this area has been poorly studied within birds. The avian GIT harbours unique microbial communities. Birds require rapid energy bursts to enable energy-intensive flying. The passage time of feed through the avian GIT is only 2-3.5 h, and thus requires the presence of microbiota that is extremely efficient in energy extraction. This investigation has used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to explore the GIT microbiota of the flighted bird, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). We are reporting, for the first time, the diversity of bacterial phylotypes inhabiting all major sections of the quail GIT including mouth, esophagus, crop, proventriculus, gizzard, duodenum, ileum, cecum, large intestine and feces. Nine phyla of bacteria were found in the quail GIT; however, their distribution varied significantly between GIT sections. Cecal microbiota was the most highly differentiated from all the other communities and showed highest richness at an OTU level but lowest richness at all other taxonomic levels being comprised of only 15 of total 57 families in the quail GIT. Differences were observed in the presence and absence of specific phylotypes between sexes in most sections. PMID:26758298

  3. Our experience with unusual gastrointestinal tract duplications in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Classical duplications may present along any part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT from mouth to anus. Atypical or unusual rare varieties of GIT duplications may also occur, but with different anatomical features. Materials and Methods: We reviewed our 5-year record (February 2008-January 2013 to describe clinical profile of unusual GIT duplications in neonates and small infants. Results: Three patients with atypical variety of GIT duplications were managed in our department during this tenure. Two were females and one male. Age was ranged between 11 days and 2 months. All patients presented with massive abdominal distension causing respiratory embarrassment in two of them. In all patients, the pre-operative differential diagnoses also included GIT duplication cysts. Computerized tomography (CT scan showed single huge cyst in one and multiple cysts in two patients. In one patient the CT scan also depicted a thoracic cyst in relation to posterior mediastinum. At operation, one patient had colonic tubular duplication cyst along with another isolated duplication cyst, the second case had a tubular duplication cyst of ileum with its segmental dilatation, and in the third case two isolated duplications were found. Duplication cysts were excised along with mucosal stripping in one patient, cyst excision and intestinal resection and anastomosis in one patient, and only cysts excision in one. All patients did well post-operatively. Conclusion: We presented unusual GIT duplications. These duplications are managed on similar lines as classical duplications with good prognosis when dealt early.

  4. Antibiotics influence on lactic acid bacteria inhibiting gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Čanžek Majhenič

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are common inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI tract and have important role in maintaining the equilibrium of GI flora, which can be influenced by various factors like diets, antimicrobials and stress. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC of 6 antibiotics, commonly used in human medicine for 8 selected lactobacilli strains were determined by macrodilution and microdilution methods in liquid media and by diffusion method on agar plates. The effects of Penicillin G and Ampicillin on intestinal LAB were tested in vivoon mice as well. Lactobacilli were sensitive to Penicillin G, (penicillines and their derivatives and Erythromycin (macrolides by in vitro testing. Clyndamycin (pyranosid showed moderate inhibitory effect. All lactobacilli strains were resistant to Kanamycin and Neomycin (aminoglycosides, while L. salivarius IM 124 has shown extra resistance to Erythromycin and Clyndamycin. The influence of orally administered Ampicillin showed no significant influence on LAB count in mice faeces. The effect of Penicillin G on mice LAB total count was significant, while no effect of orally administered lactobacilli was determined.

  5. Probiotics, prebiotics and the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitetta, Luis; Briskey, David; Alford, Hollie; Hall, Sean; Coulson, Samantha

    2014-06-01

    The microbiome located in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) comprises the largest community (diverse and dense) of bacteria, and in conjunction with a conducive internal milieu, promotes the development of regulated pro- and anti-inflammatory signals within the GIT that promotes immunological and metabolic tolerance. In addition, host-microbial interactions govern GIT inflammation and provide cues for upholding metabolic regulation in both the host and microbes. Failure to regulate inflammatory responses can increase the risk of developing inflammatory conditions in the GIT. Here, we review clinical studies regarding the efficacy of probiotics/prebiotics and the role they may have in restoring host metabolic homeostasis by rescuing the inflammatory response. The clinical studies reviewed included functional constipation, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile diarrhoea, infectious diarrhoea/gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases and necrotizing enterocolitis. We have demonstrated that there was an overall reduction in risk when probiotics were administered over placebo in the majority of GIT inflammatory conditions. The effect size of a cumulative reduction in relative risk for the GIT conditions/diseases investigated was 0.65 (0.61-0.70) (z = 13.3); p probiotics. We also progress a hypothesis that the GIT comprises numerous micro-axes (e.g. mucus secretion, Th1/Th2 balance) that are in operational homeostasis; hence probiotics and prebiotics may have a significant pharmacobiotic regulatory role in maintaining host GIT homeostasis in disease states partially through reactive oxygen species signalling.

  6. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition mediated tumourigenesis in the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar Natalwala; Robert Spychal; Chris Tselepis

    2008-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved process that has been well characterised in embryogenesis.Studies have shown that the aberrant activation of EMT in adult epithelia can promote tumour metastasis by repressing cell adhesion molecules,including epithelial (E)-cadherin.Reduced intracellular adhesion may allow tumour cells to disseminate and spread throughout the body.A number of transcription proteins of the Snail superfamily have been implicated in EMT.These proteins have been shown to be overexpressed in advanced gastrointestinal (GI) tumours including oesophageal adenocarcinomas,colorectal carcinomas,gastric and pancreatic cancers,with a concomitant reduction in the expression of E-cadherin.Regulators of EMT may provide novel clinical targets to detect GI cancers early,so that cancers previously associated with a poor prognosis such as pancreatic cancer can be diagnosed before they become inoperable.Furthermore,pharmacological therapies designed to inhibit these proteins will aim to prevent local and distant tumour invasion.

  7. Screening for Precancerous Lesions of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: From the Endoscopists' Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shuan Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal tract cancers are one of the most important leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Diagnosis at late stages always brings about poor outcome of these malignancies. The early detection of precancerous or early cancerous lesions of gastrointestinal tract is therefore of utmost importance to improve the overall outcome and maintain a good quality of life of patients. The desire of endoscopists to visualize the invisibles under conventional white-light endoscopy has accelerated the advancements in endoscopy technologies. Nowadays, image-enhanced endoscopy which utilizes optical- or dye-based contrasting techniques has been widely applied in endoscopic screening program of gastrointestinal tract malignancies. These contrasting endoscopic technologies not only improve the visualization of early foci missed by conventional endoscopy, but also gain the insight of histopathology and tumor invasiveness, that is so-called optical biopsy. Here, we will review the application of advanced endoscopy technique in screening program of upper gastrointestinal tract cancers.

  8. Guideline for fluoroscopy of low gastrointestinal tract in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yun Jung [Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung [Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Gye Yeon [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee Jung [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Although the availability of CT, MRI and endoscopy has resulted in a marked decline in fluoroscopic procedures in adult patients, fluoroscopy remains an important and frequently used procedure in pediatric patients because there is no appropriate choice of diagnostic imaging or treatment modality for certain diseases. The Korean Society of Pediatric Radiology has formulated evidence-based guidelines for fluoroscopy of the lower intestinal tract in the pediatric population (under age 18 including neonates) in order to assist physicians in clinical practice. The guidelines offer standards of examination practice including radiation doses that are as low as reasonably achievable for children under 18 years old, including neonates, for fluoroscopy of the lower intestinal tract, which has typically used relatively high doses. The recommendations of these guidelines should not be used as an absolute standard, and physicians should always refer to methods that do not adhere to the guidelines when those methods are considered more reasonable and beneficial to an individual patient's medical situation.

  9. [Historical schedule of management of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Jacek; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract were changed many times. First there were waiting (Hipocrates, Sydenham, Stahl), next transfusion of the blood were initiated (Denis, Blundell, Dieffenbach, Bierkowski, Dungren, Hirszfeld). Big (Rydygier) and small (Dragstedt) operations procedures were attempted. Discovery of endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract (Mikulicz) and initiation of elastic scopes (Hirschowitz) and exploration inhibitor of histamine receptors (H2) and proton pump inhibitors with recognition of role Helicobacter pylori in bleeding were permitted elaborate actual schemas of proceedings.

  10. [Biocenosis sparing treatment in the surgery of gastro-intestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, S M; Voronina, O V

    2009-01-01

    The authors present results of investigation of the state of microbiocenosis of the intestine and immune status of organism of 139 patients after emergency operations on the gastro-intestinal tract organs. Disbiosis and reduced indices of the immune system in the postoperative period was a cause of using biocenosis sparing treatment resulting in stabilization of microecology of the gastro-intestinal tract, higher colonization resistance and general reactivity of organism. PMID:19432155

  11. A Review on the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pomegranate in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Colombo; Enrico Sangiovanni; Mario Dell'Agli

    2013-01-01

    Several biological activities of pomegranate have been widely described in the literature, but the anti-inflammatory effect in the gastrointestinal tract has not been reviewed till now. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the evidence for or against the efficacy of pomegranate for coping with inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. The paper has been organized in three parts: (1) the first one is devoted to the modifications of pomegranate active compounds in the gast...

  12. The role of radiology assistant by fluoroscopic examination of gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    REMTOVÁ, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    I focus on working methods of radiologist assistants in various types of examinations of gastrointestinal tract in my thesis. The number of gastrointestinal tract has increased. In latest ten years the number of colorectal carcinomas has been rising, with women in particular, and carcinomas of liver with men. The Czech Republic dominates Europe considering the occurrence of colorectal carcinomas. Therefore these types of examinations have been indicated more and more often. When the carcinoma...

  13. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Gastrointestinal Tract Tissues Induced by Arsenic Toxicity in Cocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Guangyang; Hu, Zhibo; Tian, Li; Zhang, Kexin; Zhang, Wen; Xing, Mingwei

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed trace element which is known to be associated with numerous adverse effects on human beings and animals. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is an inorganic arsenical-containing toxic compound. The effect of excessive amounts of As2O3 exposure on gastrointestinal tract tissue damage in cocks is still unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of As2O3 exposure on gastrointestinal tract tissue damage in cocks. In total, 72 1-day-old male Hyline cocks were randomly divided into four groups and fed either a commercial diet or an As2O3 supplement diet containing 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg As2O3. The experiment lasted for 90 days and gastrointestinal tract tissue samples (gizzard, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and rectum) were collected at 30, 60, and 90 days. Catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities; malondialdehyde (MDA) contents; and hydroxyl radical (OH·)-mediated inhibition were examined. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that MDA content in the gastrointestinal tract was increased, while the activities of CAT, GSH, and GSH-Px and the ability to resist OH· was decreased in the As2O3 treatment groups. Extensive damage was observed in the gastrointestinal tract. These findings indicated that As2O3 exposure caused oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal tract of cocks due to alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities and elevation of free radicals.

  14. Atresia of the gastrointestinal tract: imaging evaluation; Atresia do trato gastrintestinal: avaliacao por metodos de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Sizenildo da Silva; Nobrega, Bruno Barcelos da; Ribeiro, Luiza Helena Vilela; Costa, Marlos Augusto Bittencourt; Monteiro, Soraya Silveira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: brunoradiol@hotmail.com; Oliveira, Galba Leite [Irmandade Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Esteves, Edward [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia e Urologia Pediatrica

    2005-04-01

    A wide spectrum of congenital anomalies may affect the gastrointestinal tract at any level from the esophagus to the anus. Atresia is an important cause of gastrointestinal obstruction with high morbidity rate in neonates. Different pathogenetic mechanisms could cause this malformation and the two classical explanations are: a defect of recanalization of the intestinal tube or an interruption of blood supply during intrauterine life. The authors present a literature review with an iconographic essay of imaging findings in children with gastrointestinal atresia. (author)

  15. Analyzing global gene expression of Lactobacillus plantarum in the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI)-tract represents a dynamic ecosystem comprising various habitats each with niche-specific microbial communites, collectively called microbiota. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered to be a large group of the microbiota in the upper GI-tract that is involved in he

  16. Some gastro-intestinal tract parasites in wild De Brazza's monkeys (Cercopithecus neglectus) in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karere, G M; Munene, E

    2002-12-11

    Fresh faecal droppings of wild group of De Brazza's monkeys (Cercopithecus neglectus), earmarked for translocation, were collected between January and July 1998. The samples were analysed using direct smears, ether-sedimentation and the Harada-Mori culture techniques for gastro-intestinal tract parasites (GIT). Two species of helminths and three of protozoa were detected. Entamoeba coli was found in all 40 samples screened from 11 monkeys. Entamoeba histolytica was detected in 71.8% of the total samples screened, Streptopharagus spp. in 12.8% and Strongyloides spp. and Balantidium coli each in 7.7% of the samples. E. histolytica and Streptopharagus spp. were most prevalent in faecal samples of juveniles while Strongyloides spp. and B. coli were mostly found in adult females. This, to our knowledge, is the first report of GIT parasites in a wild population of De Brazza's monkeys and our results are baseline. PMID:12446101

  17. Morphology and motor function of the gastrointestinal tract examined with endosonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Svein Odegaard; Lars Birger Nesje; Dag Arne Lihaug Hoff; Odd Helge Gilja; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Endosonography is a useful tool for studying the morphology and motor function of the gastrointestinal tract. Intraluminal ultrasonography is the common denomination of ultrasound examinations using intracorporal transducers which are inserted into the GI tract. Thus, the visceral wall and adjacent structures can be imaged in detail. This review describes the usefulness of endosonography in gastroenterology, in particular with respect to studies of the biomechanical and motor function of the gastrointestinal tract. New techniques such as 3-D EUS, elastography and strain rate imaging are discussed.

  18. Intravenous Inoculation with Chlamydia muridarum Leads to a Long-Lasting Infection Restricted to the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jin; Zhang, Tianyuan; Wang, Luying; Shao, Lili; Zhu, Cuiming; Zhang, Yuyang; Failor, Courtney; Schenken, Robert; Baseman, Joel; He, Cheng; Zhong, Guangming

    2016-08-01

    Chlamydia has been detected in the gastrointestinal tracts of both animals and humans. However, it remains unclear whether the chlamydial organisms can be introduced into the gastrointestinal tract via pathways independent of the oral and anal routes. We have recently shown that Chlamydia muridarum spreads from the genital tract to the gastrointestinal tract potentially via the circulatory system. To test whether hematogenous C. muridarum can spread to and establish a long-lasting colonization in the mouse gastrointestinal tract, we inoculated mice intravenously with a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum strain and monitored its distribution. After tail vein inoculation, most luciferase-generated bioluminescence signals were detected in the mouse abdominal area throughout the experiment. The ex vivo imaging revealed that the abdominal signals came from the gastrointestinal tract tissues. Simultaneous monitoring of chlamydial organisms in individual organs or tissues revealed an initial stage of systemic spreading followed by a long-lasting infection in the gastrointestinal tract. A retro-orbital vein inoculation of the C. muridarum organisms at a lower dose in a different mouse strain also led to colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. We have demonstrated that intravenous C. muridarum inoculation can result in colonization of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that the chlamydial organisms may use the sexual behavior-independent circulation pathway to infect the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27271744

  19. Metastatic breast cancer to the gastrointestinal tract: A case series and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Nazareno; Donald Taves; Harold G Preiksaitis

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer involving the hepatobiliary tract or ascites secondary to peritoneal carcinomatosis has been well described. Luminal gastrointestinal tract involvement is less common and recognition of the range of possible presentations is important for early and accurate diagnosis and treatment. We report 6 patients with a variety of presentations of metastatic breast cancer of the luminal gastrointestinal tract. These include oropharyngeal and esophageal involvement presenting as dysphagia with one case of pseudoachalasia, a linitis plastica-like picture with gastric narrowing and thickened folds, small bowel obstruction and multiple strictures mimicking Crohn's disease, and a colonic neoplasm presenting with obstruction. Lobular carcinoma,representing only 10% of breast cancers is more likely to metastasize to the gastrointestinal tract. These patients presented with gastrointestinal manifestations after an average of 9.5 years and as long as 20 years from initial diagnosis of breast cancer. Given the increased survival of breast cancer patients with current therapeutic regimes, more unusual presentations of metastatic disease, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract can be anticipated.

  20. Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity in the Gastrointestinal Tract of the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruninger, Robert J.; McAllister, Tim A.; Forster, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is the second largest living rodent and an iconic symbol of Canada. The beaver is a semi-aquatic browser whose diet consists of lignocellulose from a variety of plants. The beaver is a hindgut fermenter and has an enlarged ceacum that houses a complex microbiome. There have been few studies examining the microbial diversity in gastrointestinal tract of hindgut fermenting herbivores. To examine the bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract of the beaver, the microbiome of the ceacum and feaces was examined using culture-independent methods. DNA from the microbial community of the ceacum and feaces of 4 adult beavers was extracted, and the16S rRNA gene was sequenced using either bacterial or archaeal specific primers. A total of 1447 and 1435 unique bacterial OTUs were sequenced from the ceacum and feaces, respectively. On average, the majority of OTUs within the ceacum were classified as Bacteroidetes (49.2%) and Firmicutes (47.6%). The feaces was also dominated by OTUs from Bacteroidetes (36.8%) and Firmicutes (58.9%). The composition of bacterial community was not significantly different among animals. The composition of the ceacal and feacal microbiome differed, but this difference is due to changes in the abundance of closely related OTUs, not because of major differences in the taxonomic composition of the communities. Within these communities, known degraders of lignocellulose were identified. In contrast, to the bacterial microbiome, the archaeal community was dominated by a single species of methanogen, Methanosphaera stadtmanae. The data presented here provide the first insight into the microbial community within the hindgut of the beaver. PMID:27227334

  1. Classification of submucosal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura Graves Ponsaing; Katalin Kiss; Mark Berner Hansen

    2007-01-01

    This review is part two of three, which will present an update on the classification of gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Part one treats of the diagnosis and part three of the therapeutic methods regarding gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. In the past there has been some confusion as to the classification of gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Changes in classifications have emerged due to recent advances in mainly immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy.The aim of this paper is to update the reader on the current classification. Literature searches were performed to find information related to classification of gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Based on these searches the twelve most frequent submucosal tumor types were chosen for description of their classification.The factors that indicate whether tumors are benign or malignant are mainly size and number of mitotic counts.Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are defined mainly by their CD117 positivity. In the future, there should be no more confusion between gastrointestinal stromal tumors and other types of submucosal tumors.

  2. Diseases of the gastrointestinal tract in individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik Birkebæk; Isager, Torben; Rich, Bente

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence and types of diseases (International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders, 10th Edition codes K20-K93) relating to the gastrointestinal tract in a clinical sample of 89 individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism...... with atypical autism, a total of 22 (24.7%) were registered with at least one diagnosis of any disease of the gastrointestinal tract, against 47 of 258 (18.2%) in the comparison group (p = 0.22; odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval = 0.8-2.6). Without reaching statistical significance, the rate of diseases...... of the gastrointestinal tract was particularly high (odds ratio = 1.2) in those with intelligence quotient

  3. Narrow band imaging with magnification for the diagnosis of lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajvinder; Singh; Asif; Hussain; Cheong; Kuan; Loong

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal(GI)tract disorders.Chromoendoscopy has proven to be superior to white light endoscopy for early detection of various GI lesions.This has however been fraught with problems.The use of color stains,time taken to achieve an effect and the learning curve associated with the technique has been some of the pitfalls.Narrow band imaging(NBI)particularly in combination with magnifying endoscopy may allow the endoscopist to accomplish a fairly accurate diagnosis with good histological correlation similar to results achieved with chromoendoscopy.Such enhanced detection of pre-malignant and early neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract should allow better targeting of biopsies and could ultimately prove to be cost effective.Various studies have been done demonstrating the utility of this novel technology.This article will review the impact of NBI in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract disorders.

  4. Prokinetic Effect of Polyherbal Formulation on Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available PHF, a polyherbal formulation, consist of seven known herbs namely, Aegle marmelos, Elettaria cardamomum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Citrus aurantifolia, Rosa damascene, Cissus quadrangularis and Saccharum officinarum. The PHF was evaluated for acute toxicity, gastrointestinal motility and gastric emptying rate in mice and rats. Based on acute toxicity study, the PHF was considered as safe and 3 dose (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg levels were employed for further pharmacological studies. The gastrointestinal prokinetics effect of PHF in various dose levels (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg., p.o was studied by charcoal meal gastrointestinal transit and laxative effect in mice. The gastric emptying rate of PHF in rat was studied by disappearance of phenol red from stomach. The results illustrate that PHF at 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly (p< 0.001 enhanced the gastrointestinal transit. PHF at 400 mg/kg (p< 0.01 significantly enhanced the purging index, which is the measure of laxative activity. PHF at 200 mg/kg (p< 0.05 less significantly enhanced the purging index. In gastric emptying rate, PHF dose dependently increased the gastric emptying. From the above findings, PHF may be used as gastrointestinal prokinetics and to improve the intestinal motility.

  5. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Ganglia of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ruiqi; Gu, Huan; Qiu, Yamei; Guo, Yong; Korteweg, Christine; Huang, Jin; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CF is caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) which is an anion selective transmembrane ion channel that mainly regulates chloride transport, expressed in the epithelia of various organs. Recently, we have demonstrated CFTR expression in the brain, the spinal cord and the sympathetic ganglia. This study aims to investigate the expression and distribution of CFTR in the ganglia of the human gastrointestinal tract. Fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded normal gastrointestinal tract samples were collected from eleven surgical patients and five autopsy cases. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, laser-assisted microdissection and nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed. Expression of CFTR protein and mRNA was detected in neurons of the ganglia of all segments of the human gastrointestinal tract examined, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, colon and rectum. The extensive expression of CFTR in the enteric ganglia suggests that CFTR may play a role in the physiology of the innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract. The presence of dysfunctional CFTRs in enteric ganglia could, to a certain extent, explain the gastrointestinal symptoms frequently experienced by CF patients. PMID:27491544

  6. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Ganglia of Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ruiqi; Gu, Huan; Qiu, Yamei; Guo, Yong; Korteweg, Christine; Huang, Jin; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CF is caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) which is an anion selective transmembrane ion channel that mainly regulates chloride transport, expressed in the epithelia of various organs. Recently, we have demonstrated CFTR expression in the brain, the spinal cord and the sympathetic ganglia. This study aims to investigate the expression and distribution of CFTR in the ganglia of the human gastrointestinal tract. Fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded normal gastrointestinal tract samples were collected from eleven surgical patients and five autopsy cases. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, laser-assisted microdissection and nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed. Expression of CFTR protein and mRNA was detected in neurons of the ganglia of all segments of the human gastrointestinal tract examined, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, colon and rectum. The extensive expression of CFTR in the enteric ganglia suggests that CFTR may play a role in the physiology of the innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract. The presence of dysfunctional CFTRs in enteric ganglia could, to a certain extent, explain the gastrointestinal symptoms frequently experienced by CF patients. PMID:27491544

  7. Planar scintigraphic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Michael L; Strober, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    In the last 30 years, nuclear medicine has paralleled other imaging fields with the development of 3-dimensional techniques, including single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography. However, conventional nuclear medicine planar scintigraphy remains a common procedure at most imaging centers. Gastrointestinal studies constitute a significant portion of these planar procedures. The most common gastrointestinal studies, including hepatobiliary, gastric emptying, and gastrointestinal bleeding evaluations, resemble their original protocol. However, serial improvements have optimized the diagnostic efficacy of these procedures. Conventional Technetium-99m sulfur colloid liver/spleen imaging and hepatic blood pool imaging with labeled red blood cells now mainly serve an adjunctive role in the evaluation of equivocal findings on computed tomography. Salivary gland imaging is a less commonly requested evaluation, but can be used to evaluate functional capacity in some disease entities. PMID:22117811

  8. Analyzing global gene expression of Lactobacillus plantarum in the human gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    De, Vries, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI)-tract represents a dynamic ecosystem comprising various habitats each with niche-specific microbial communites, collectively called microbiota. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered to be a large group of the microbiota in the upper GI-tract that is involved in health-stimulating processes within the host. The lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum is one of the most versatile and flexible LAB that is encountered in a range of environmental niches, h...

  9. A retrospective analysis of ectopic varices in gastrointestinal tract diagnosed by endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李楠

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand the incidence,causes,clinical manifestations and treatment of ectopic varices (EV) in gastrointestinal (GI) tract.Methods GI endoscopic examinations were carried out in 99 783 patients from January 2004 to October 2012 in General Hospital of PLA.Sixty-four cases of ectopic varices in GI tract were discovered.The clinical manifestations of EV patients and treatment were analyzed retrospectively.The

  10. Targeting cancers in the gastrointestinal tract: role of capecitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Wasif SaifYale Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Capecitabine is currently the only novel, orally home-administered fluorouracil prodrug. It offers patients more freedom from hospital visits and less inconvenience and complications associated with infusion devices. The drug has been extensively studied in large clinical trials in many solid tumors, including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and many others. Furthermore, the drug compares favorably with fluorouracil in patients with such cancers, with a safe toxicity profile, consisting mainly of gastrointestinal and dermatologic adverse effects. Whereas gastrointestinal events and hand-foot syndrome occur often with capecitabine, the tolerability profile is comparatively favorable. Prompt recognition of severe adverse effects is the key to successful management of capecitabine. Ongoing and future clinical trials will continue to examine, and likely expand, the role of capecitabine as a single agent and/or in combination with other anticancer agents for the treatment of gastrointestinal as well as other solid tumors, both in the advanced palliative and adjuvant settings. The author summarizes the current data on the role of capecitabine in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, chemotherapy, adjuvant, advanced, colon cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular cancer, pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, rectal cancer, anal cancer

  11. Trophic factors and regulation of gastrointestinal tract and liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand the role of trophic factors in fetal and neonatal gastrointestinal (GI) and liver growth it is important to first consider the nature of growth. The fetal and neonatal period is the most dynamic period of postconceptual growth and includes critical developmental milestones, such as gas...

  12. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy inPaediatric Gastroenterology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Imdadur Rahman; Praful Patel; Philip Boger; Shahnawaz Rasheed; Mike Thomson; Nadeem Ahmad Afzal

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in childrenin the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growthin published experience and innovation in the field. Inthis review article we focus on modern age therapeuticendoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional aswell as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosisand treatment of diseases in the paediatric uppergastrointestinal tract.

  13. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking and allergies, especially to contrast materials. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, ... undergone surgery on the GI tract, or has allergies to other contrast materials. The radiologist will determine which type of ...

  14. Interstitial cells in the musculature of the gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT on cells referred to as interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) has been instrumental during the past decade in the tremendous interest in cells in the interstitium of the smooth muscle layers of the digestive tract. ICC generate the pacemaker component (e...

  15. Functional consequences of microbial shifts in the human gastrointestinal tract linked to antibiotic treatment and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez, E.; Bargiela, R.; Suarez Diez, M.; Friedrichs, A.; Pérez-Cobas, A.E.; Gosalbes, M.J.; Knecht, H.; Martinez-Martinez, M.; Seifert, J.; Bergen, von M.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    The microbiomes in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of individuals receiving antibiotics and those in obese subjects undergo compositional shifts, the metabolic effects and linkages of which are not clearly understood. Herein, we set to gain insight into these effects, particularly with regard to ca

  16. Impact of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) on surgical decision-making in upper gastrointestinal tract cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Michael Bau; Edwin, B; Hünerbein, M;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is an integrated part of the pretherapeutic evaluation program for patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancer. Whether the clinical impact of EUS differs between surgeons from different countries is unknown. The same applies to the potential...

  17. Isolation of DNA from bacterial samples of the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetendal, E.G.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Klaassens, E.S.; Booijink, C.C.G.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.

    2006-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract contains a complex microbial community that develops in time and space. The most widely used approaches to study microbial diversity and activity are all based on the analysis of nucleic acids, DNA, rRNA and mRNA. Here, we present a DNA isolation protocol that i

  18. Nitrogen transactions along the gastrointestinal tract in cattle: a meta-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endogenous nitrogen (EN) secretions occur along the whole gastrointestinal (GI) tract of animals constituting a loss of amino acids for the animal, but a supply of nitrogen (N) for the microbial population of the foregut and hindgut of ruminants. The quantification of these transactions is not only ...

  19. Infections and infestations of the gastrointestinal tract. Part 2: Parasitic and other infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R., E-mail: rakslide@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom); Rajesh, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Rawat, S. [Department of Radiology, Ruby Hall Clinic, Pune (India); Rajiah, P. [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ramachandran, I. [Department of Clinical Radiology, South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust, Warwick (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the imaging findings of various parasitic infestations and other miscellaneous infections affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Barium examinations play an important role in the diagnostic workup of parasitic intestinal infections. Knowledge of differential diagnosis, sites of involvement, and imaging features of different infections and infestations can help in accurate diagnosis and guide treatment.

  20. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of gastrointestinal tract: case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, B.; Wang, C.; Zhang, Junxiao; Kuiper, R.P.; Song, M.; Zhang, X.; Song, S.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Iwamoto, A.; Wang, J; Liu, H.

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors of gastrointestinal tract (GI PEComas) are exceedingly rare, with only a limited number of published reports worldwide. Given the scarcity of GI PEComas and their relatively short follow-up periods, our current knowledge of their biologic behavior, molecular gene

  1. Assessment of equine gastrointestinal tract using transabdominal ultrasonography: a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique do Amaral

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transabdominal ultrasonography is reported to be an important diagnostic tool used in horses with abdominal pain. Detailed knowledge of the topography of the major areas that provide diagnostic values for each sonographic window with regard to the changes in the gastrointestinal tract should be well established. The aim of this study was to describe the new areas of the abdominal cavity of the horse examined using transabdominal ultrasonography and evaluate the possible ultrasound changes in animals of different sizes, thereby determining the applicability and difficulty in performing this technique. Twenty horses were examined using transabdominal ultrasonography at a convex transducer frequency of 2.5–6.6 MHz at eleven established zones. The horses were divided into two groups based on their size. The potential for identification of the structures in each window was compared; the ultrasound characteristics and wall thickness in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract were described. Abdominal division in specific sonographic zones did not negatively impact the examination time, and the normal standards for the evaluated windows were defined. No sonographic differences were observed in the lumen size and thickness of all parts of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated according to the size of the animal. Abdominal division enables a more precise and standardized topographic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract, thereby enabling diagnosis of the changes and positioning that originate from different intestinal colic syndrome etiologies. This enables quick and accurate diagnosis.

  2. Optimal approach to obtaining mucosal biopsies for assessment of inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantiss, Rhonda K; Odze, Robert D

    2009-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and mucosal biopsy analysis have assumed important roles in the clinical management of patients with symptoms related to the gastrointestinal tract. Several common inflammatory diseases, including eosinophilic esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, Helicobacter pylori infection, celiac disease, lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, and inflammatory bowel disease, may display a patchy or discontinuous distribution and, thus, multiple mucosal samples may be required to obtain diagnostic tissue in some cases. Not surprisingly, clinicians and pathologists are increasingly challenged to determine the optimum number of procedures and tissue samples necessary to detect, or exclude, the presence of inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Unfortunately, clinical practice varies widely with respect to tissue sample procurement in the evaluation of these disorders, particularly when the endoscopic appearance of the gastrointestinal mucosa is normal or shows only minimal changes. Guidelines concerning the appropriate number of tissue samples are well established for some diseases, such as Barrett's esophagus and chronic gastritis, but are not clear in other instances. The purpose of this review is to discuss the available literature pertaining to appropriate endoscopic sampling in the assessment of medical diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, and to develop recommendations regarding the clinical evaluation of common gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:19209164

  3. The effect of selected factors on the survival of Bacillus cereus in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold-Pluta, Anna; Pluta, Antoni; Garbowska, Monika

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive bacterium widely distributed in soil and vegetation. This bacterial species can also contaminate raw or processed foods. Pathogenic B. cereus strains can cause a range of infections in humans, as well as food poisoning of an emetic (intoxication) or diarrheal type (toxico-infection). Toxico-infections are due to the action of the Hbl toxin, Nhe toxin, and cytotoxin K produced by the microorganism in the gastrointestinal tract. This occurs once the spores or vegetative B. cereus cells survive the pH barrier of the stomach and reach the small intestine where they produce toxins in sufficient amounts. This article discusses the effect of various factors on the survival of B. cereus in the gastrointestinal tract, including low pH and the presence of digestive enzymes in the stomach, bile salts in the small intestine, and indigenous microflora in the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Additional aspects also reported to affect B. cereus survival and virulence in the gastrointestinal tract include the interaction of the spores and vegetative cells with enterocytes. In vitro studies revealed that both vegetative B. cereus and spores can survive in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting that the biological form of the microorganism may have less influence on the occurrence of the symptoms of infection than was once believed. It is most likely the interaction between the pathogen and enterocytes that is necessary for the diarrheal form of B. cereus food poisoning to develop. The adhesion of B. cereus to the intestinal epithelium allows the bacterium to grow and produce enterotoxins in the proximity of the epithelium. Recent studies suggest that the human intestinal microbiota inhibits the growth of vegetative B. cereus cells considerably.

  4. Immunohistochemical study on distribution of endocrine cells in gastrointestinal tract of flower fish (Pseudophoxinus antalyae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenan (C)inar; Nurgül (S)enol; M Rü(s)tü (O)zen

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To detect distribution and relative frequency of endocrine cells in gastrointestinal tract of flower fish (Pseudophoxinus antalyae ).METHOIS:The intestinal tract of flower fish was divided into four portions from proximal to distal;the enlarged area after oesophagus and anterior, middle and posterior intestine. Immunohistochemical method using the peroxidase anti-peroxidase complex was employed.All antisera between four portions of flower fish were compared using ANOVA.RESULTS:Eleven types of gut endocrine cells were determined; they were immunoreactive for calcitonin gene related peptide, substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide, bombesin, somatostatin-14, secretin, TrkA, TrkB,TrkC, neurotensin, neuropeptide Y, which were found in almost all portions of the gastrointestinal tract.CONCLUSION:The regional distribution and relative frequency of immunoreactive cells in the flower fish,Pseudophoxinus antalyae, are essentially similar to those of other fish.

  5. Gastro-intestinal tract: The leading role of mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Anna; Radulovic, Katarina; Niess, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of mucosal immunity is essential for the comprehension of intestinal diseases that are often caused by a complex interplay between host factors, environmental influences and the intestinal microbiota. Not only improvements in endoscopic techniques, but also advances in high throughput sequencing technologies, have expanded knowledge of how intestinal diseases develop. This review discusses how the host interacts with intestinal microbiota by the direct contact of host receptors with highly conserved structural motifs or molecules of microbes and also by microbe-derived metabolites (produced by the microbe during adaptation to the gut environment), such as short-chain fatty acids, vitamins, bile acids and amino acids. These metabolites are recognised by metabolite-sensing receptors expressed by immune cells to influence functions of macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells, such as migration, conversion and maintenance of regulatory T cells and regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production, which is essential for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and the development of intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. First interventions in these complex interactions between microbe-derived metabolites and the host immune system for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, such as modification of the diet, treatment with antibiotics, application of probiotics and faecal microbiota transplantation, have been introduced into the clinic. Specific targeting of metabolite sensing receptors for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases is in development. In future, precision medicine approaches that consider individual variability in genes, the microbiota, the environment and lifestyle will become increasingly important for the care of patients with gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27045424

  6. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding.

  7. The gastrointestinal tract as a vehicle for drug smuggling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four cases of attempts to smuggle narcotics (marijuana, heroin, and cocaine) by swallowing a large number of drug-filled foreign bodies (condoms and capsules) and hiding them from customs authorities in the gastrointestinal canal during transit are described. This is compared with a psychiatric patient who swallowed 48 Vicks Inhalers. Drug smuggling by swallowing condoms or capsules containing narcotics is now a worldwide ethical-legal problem. It also is of therapeutic and prognostic importance as this may lead to such emergencies as mechanical obstruction, rupture of the drug-containing foreign bodies, and life-threatening intoxication of the carrier. (orig.)

  8. Localization in the gastrointestinal tract of immunoreactive prosomatostatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, J J; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1987-01-01

    parts of the small intestine but not in the stomach and the colon. The colon contained very few immunoreactive structures. Immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were found in the submucous plexus of the small intestine. All immunoreactive endocrine cells in the stomach and the duodenum and all immunoreactive...... nerves were stained by all 5 antisera whereas the small intestinal endocrine cells did not stain for the most N-terminal region of prosomatostatin. The results suggest that all gastrointestinal somatostatin is derived from the same precursor molecule, which, however, in the small intestinal endocrine...

  9. Gastrointestinal tract as a vehicle for drug smuggling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N.

    1981-10-15

    Four cases of attempts to smuggle narcotics (marijuana, heroin, and cocaine) by swallowing a large number of drug-filled foreign bodies (condoms and capsules) and hiding them from customs authorities in the gastrointestinal canal during transit are described. This is compared with a psychiatric patient who swallowed 48 Vicks Inhalers. Drug smuggling by swallowing condoms or capsules containing narcotics is now a worldwide ethical-legal problem. It also is of therapeutic and prognostic importance as this may lead to such emergencies as mechanical obstruction, rupture of the drug-containing foreign bodies, and life-threatening intoxication of the carrier.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Foreign Bodies in the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhael Bekkerman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body ingestion is a common diagnosis that presents in emergency departments throughout the world. Distinct foreign bodies predispose to particular locations of impaction in the gastrointestinal tract, commonly meat boluses in the esophagus above a preexisting esophageal stricture or ring in adults and coins in children. Several other groups are at high risk of foreign body impaction, mentally handicapped individuals or those with psychiatric illness, abusers of drugs or alcohol, and the geriatric population. Patients with foreign body ingestion typically present with odynophagia, dysphagia, sensation of having an object stuck, chest pain, and nausea/vomiting. The majority of foreign bodies pass through the digestive system spontaneously without causing any harm, symptoms, or necessitating any further intervention. A well-documented clinical history and thorough physical exam is critical in making the diagnosis, if additional modalities are needed, a CT scan and diagnostic endoscopy are generally the preferred modalities. Various tools can be used to remove foreign bodies, and endoscopic treatment is safe and effective if performed by a skilled endoscopist.

  11. Tissue engineering for neuromuscular disorders of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth L Koch; Khalil N Bitar; John E Fortunato

    2012-01-01

    The digestive tract is designed for the optimal processing of food that nourishes all organ systems.The esophagus,stomach,small bowel,and colon are sophisticated neuromuscular tubes with specialized sphincters that transport ingested food-stuffs from one region to another.Peristaltic contractions move ingested solids and liquids from the esophagus into the stomach; the stomach mixes the ingested nutrients into chyme and empties chyme from the stomach into the duodenum.The to-and-fro movement of the small bowel maximizes absorption of fat,protein,and carbohydrates.Peristaltic contractions are necessary for colon function and defecation.

  12. Diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of barium radiography and technetium scintigraphy in the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is described. Although the barium enema has been the standard diagnostic evaluation following proctoscopy in patients with hematochezia, it should never be used as an early diagnostic procedure in a patient who is vigorously bleeding. Insensitivity in these patients is also a problem in angiography and nuclear scans. Technetium scintigraphy is performed by labeling a patient's erythrocytes with /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate after which the abdomen may be scanned for as long as 20 hours. In general, if patients are bleeding one unit every two to four hours, the scan is likely to be abnormal. In many centers, the technetium scan is required before doing angiography. 24 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  13. Selenium Deficiency-Induced Inflammation and Increased Expression of Regulating Inflammatory Cytokines in the Chicken Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Ziwei; Xing, Houjuan; Yu, Jiao; Zhang, Naisheng; Xu, Shiwen

    2016-09-01

    Selenium (Se), a nutritionally essential trace element, plays an important role in various aspects of health for a wide range of species, including birds. Se deficiency inhibits the growth of immune organs and decreases immune function, leading to many inflammatory diseases. The present study determined the effects and mechanism of dietary Se deficiency on gastrointestinal tract tissue inflammation. The histopathological changes showed that Se deficiency induced inflammatory lesions in the gastrointestinal tract tissues (glandular stomach, gizzard, duodenum, small intestine, and rectum). The expression levels of PTGE (prostagland E synthase), COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α), and NF-κB (nuclear transfer factor κB) in the gastrointestinal tract tissues (glandular stomach, gizzard, duodenum, small intestine, and rectum) were determined by qPCR on days 15, 25, 35, 45, and 55, respectively. The results showed that Se deficiency induced high expression levels of PTGE, COX-2, TNF-α, and NF-κB in the gastrointestinal tract tissues. The effects were more obvious in the duodenum and small intestine than those in the glandular stomach, gizzard, and rectum. In addition, the expression levels of these proteins in the gastrointestinal tract tissue increased in a time-dependent manner with Se deficiency feeding time. Furthermore, Se deficiency induced the production of pro-inflammatory factors, thus aggravating inflammatory lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. The effect of Se deficiency on inflammation and other gastrointestinal tract diseases should be further studied. PMID:26899319

  14. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinomas (MANECs of the Gastrointestinal Tract: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Capella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The systematic application of immunohistochemical techniques to the study of tumors has led to the recognition that neuroendocrine cells occur rather frequently in exocrine neoplasms of the gut. It is now well known that there is a wide spectrum of combinations of exocrine and neuroendocrine components, ranging from adenomas or carcinomas with interspersed neuroendocrine cells at one extreme to classical neuroendocrine tumors with a focal exocrine component at the other. In addition, both exocrine and neuroendocrine components can have different morphological features ranging, for the former, from adenomas to adenocarcinomas with different degrees of differentiation and, for the latter, from well differentiated to poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. However, although this range of combinations of neuroendocrine and exocrine components is frequently observed in routine practice, mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinomas, now renamed as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs, are rare; these are, by definition, neoplasms in which each component represents at least 30% of the lesion. Gastrointestinal MANECs can be stratified in different prognostic categories according to the grade of malignancy of each component. The present paper is an overview of the main clinicopathological, morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular features of this specific rare tumor type.

  15. Interstitial cells in the musculature of the gastrointestinal tract: Cajal and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri J; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    ") or KIT negative "non-Cajal" (including the FLC and possibly also other cell types) cell types in the interstitium of the smooth musculature of the gastrointestinal tract, is proposed. Furthermore, evidence is accumulating to suggest that, as postulated by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, the concept of......Expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT on cells referred to as interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) has been instrumental during the past decade in the tremendous interest in cells in the interstitium of the smooth muscle layers of the digestive tract. ICC generate the pacemaker component...

  16. Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract; Multimodale Bildgebung neuroendokriner Tumoren des Gastrointestinaltrakts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, Konstantin; Eiber, Matthias; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Gaertner, Florian C. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2014-03-15

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendokrine Tumoren) are rare entities. They can be found in all organs and show substantial biologic heterogeneity depending on involved organ, clinical symptoms and histopathologic morphology. Involvement of organs like larynx, cervix uteri, ovary, gallbladder, liver or kidney is extensively rare. The majority of neuroendokrine Tumoren are found in gastrointestinal tract and lung and are classified as neuroendokrine Tumoren of foregut (stomach, duodenum, pancreas, lung), midgut (jejunum, ileum, appendix, right side of the colon) and hindgut (left side of the colon, rectum). The role of imaging is to localize and delineate the primary tumor and to detect metastases. In the diagnosis of neuroendokrine Tumoren radiologic techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are applied. In certain cases nuclear medicine techniques like somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and positron emission tomography (PET) using radioactively labelled somatostatin analogues are used. The present article reviews characteristic imaging findings of neuroendokrine Tumoren of the gastrointestinal tract. (orig.)

  17. Interdisciplinary Canadian guidelines on the use of metal stents in the gastrointestinal tract for oncological indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerlocher, M.O. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca; Asch, M.R. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Lakeridge Health Corp., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Dixon, P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Durham Regional Cancer Centre, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Dept. of Oncology, Queen' s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Kortan, P. [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Medicine, St. Michael' s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Myers, A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Lakeridge Health Corp., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Law, C. [Dept. of Surgical Oncology, Div. of General Surgery, Sunnybrook HSC, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    To provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the appropriate use of gastrointestinal stents for oncologic indications. This document describes the use of gastrointestinal stents by appropriately trained physicians. This document is based on a review of the published evidence and supplemented by consensus expert opinion. Gastrointestinal stenting has been evaluated in terms of technical success, complications, patient satisfaction, clinical outcome, and cost-benefit analysis. This document was approved by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association; approval from the other relevant Canadian societies is pending. Gastrointestinal stenting has a valuable role in the management of the gastrointestinal malignancy. The decision to use such devices should be taken after comprehensive multidisciplinary clinical, endoscopic, and radiologic evaluation. This interdisciplinary Canadian guideline on the use of metal stents in the gastrointestinal tract for ontological indications is based on a scientific literature review and relevant clinical experience. This guideline attempts to define principles of practice for most circumstances, though adherence to this guideline will not, of course, produce successful outcomes in every case. (author)

  18. The pan-genome of Lactobacillus reuteri strains originating from the pig gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Wegmann, Udo; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Zheng, Jinshui; Goesmann, Alexander; Roos, Stefan; Swarbreck, David; Walter, Jens; Crossman, Lisa C; Juge, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus reuteri is a gut symbiont of a wide variety of vertebrate species that has diversified into distinct phylogenetic clades which are to a large degree host-specific. Previous work demonstrated host specificity in mice and begun to determine the mechanisms by which gut colonisation and host restriction is achieved. However, how L. reuteri strains colonise the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of pigs is unknown. Results To gain insight into the ecology of L. reuteri in the pig...

  19. Factors important for persistence of Lactobacillus reuteri in the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Båth, Klara

    2007-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 is a commercially available probiotic i.e. health promoting bacterium. The interest for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics might be due to the tradition of use in food preservation, their non-pathogenic behavior and, a natural occurrence in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although examples of clinically proven probiotic effects are increasing, the understandings of bacterial-host interactions behind these effects are only beginning to be unravelle...

  20. Inflammatory Factor Alterations in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Cocks Overexposed to Arsenic Trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingwei; Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Guangyang; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Kexin; Tian, Li; He, Ying; Chai, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Exposure of people and animals to arsenic (As) is a global public health concern because As is widely distributed and associated with numerous adverse effects. As is a poisonous metalloid and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is a form of As. Thus far, there have been very few reports on the inflammatory factor alterations of the gastrointestinal tract in birds exposed to As2O3. To investigate the possible correlation of As2O3 with inflammatory injury induced by an arsenic-supplemented diet in birds, 72 1-day-old male Hy-line cocks were selected and randomly divided into four groups. They were fed with either a commercial diet or an arsenic-supplemented diet containing 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg As2O3. The experiment lasted for 90 days, and samples of gizzard, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and rectum were collected at days 30, 60, and 90 of the experiment period. The inflammation-related genes were determined, including NF-κB, iNOS, COX-2, PTGEs, and TNF-α. The connection between arsenic dosage and inflammation-related genes was assessed. The content of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) was measured by Western blot of the samples. The results showed that arsenic supplementation increased the mRNA expression levels of inflammation-related genes in the gastrointestinal tract of cocks at different time points (p function regression of the gastrointestinal tract by affecting inflammation-related genes and iNOS in cocks. This study offers some information on the mechanism of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory injury and iNOS expression level alterations induced by arseniasis. PMID:25784090

  1. Gastrointestinal Tract Abnormalities Induced by Prenatal Valproic Acid Exposure in Rat Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Choi, Chang Soon; Kim, Ki Chan; Park, Jin Hee; Seung, Hana; Joo, So Hyun; Yang, Sung Min; Shin, Chan Young; Park, Seung Hwa

    2013-01-01

    In-utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) has been known as a potent inducer of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), not only in humans, but also in animals. In addition to the defects in communication and social interaction as well as repetitive behaviors, ASD patients usually suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) problems. However, the exact mechanism underlying these disorders is not known. In this study, we examined the gross GI tract structure and GI motility in a VPA animal model of ASD. On embry...

  2. Botulinum Toxin and Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders: Panacea, Placebo, or Pathway to the Future?

    OpenAIRE

    Lacy, Brian E.; Weiser, Kirsten; Kennedy, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The history of botulinum toxin is fascinating. First recognized as the cause of botulism nearly 200 years ago, it was originally feared as a deadly poison. Over the last 30 years, however, botulinum toxin has been transformed into a readily available medication used to treat a variety of medical disorders. Interest in the use of botulinum toxin has been particularly strong for patients with spastic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with achalasia, diffuse esophag...

  3. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique Montalvillo; José Antonio Garrote; David Bernardo; Eduardo Arranz

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on inn...

  4. Role of cytopathology in the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal tract cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Rachel; Cobb, Camilla; Raza, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Cytology of gastro-intestinal (GI) tract lesions can be used successfully to diagnose neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions, especially when combined with biopsies. Cytologic evaluation is widely accepted as a cost-effective method that allows rapid interpretation and triaging of material. Technical advances over the years have allowed simultaneous visualization of abnormal tissue and procurement of needle aspirates, brushings and biopsies from mucosal and deeper seated lesions. Successful...

  5. Connection between inflammation and carcinogenesis in gastrointestinal tract: Focus on TGF-β signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suntaek; Hong; Ho-Jae; Lee; Seong; Jin; Kim; Ki-Baik; Hahm

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is a primary defense process against various extracellular stimuli,such as viruses,pathogens,foods,and environmental pollutants.When cells respond to stimuli for short periods of time,it results in acute or physiological inflammation.However,if the stimulation is sustained for longer time or a pathological state occurs,it is known as chronic or pathological inflammation.Several studies have shown that tumorigenesis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is closely associated with chronic inflammati...

  6. POTENTIALLY GRAVE GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT PROBLEMS IN PREGNANCY - A CHALLENGE TO THE OBSTETRICIAN!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Acute surgical pathology may be overlooked in pregnancy. Despite advances in medical technology, preoperative diagnosis of potentially grave pathologies of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT is often delayed due to overlap with symptoms of pregnancy non-specific elevation of some laboratory parameters due to pregnancy and a dilemma for obstetricians and surgeons in ordering radiological imaging modalities given the risk associated with fetal exposure to ionizing radiation and contrast. AIMS The aim of this study is to analyse the cases of gastrointestinal tract problems encountered in pregnancy so that increasing awareness can be created among obstetricians. This is important because early diagnosis and timely intervention can significantly improve maternal and fetal outcome in these cases. SETTINGS AND DESIGN There is a retrospective case study of potentially grave GIT problems encountered at Vanivilas hospital, Bangalore, a tertiary referral institute wherein the clinical presentation was confounded by pregnancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS All the included cases were analysed for age of the patient, pre-existing gastrointestinal tract disorders, gestational age at diagnosis, maternal and fetal outcome. RESULTS A total of 8 cases of GIT problems in pregnancy were studied. Though acute appendicitis is the most common cause of GIT emergency in pregnancy as quoted in literature 5, we did not encounter any case of acute appendicitis in pregnancy in the study period. Other conditions which were encountered were small bowel obstruction, stomach and bowel perforation and bleeding oesophageal varices. Whilst few of the conditions could be managed conservatively without harm to the pregnancy, others required a laparotomy and reparative procedures. Delay in diagnosis and intervention proved to be fatal in some of these women. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge about potentially grave gastrointestinal tract problems during pregnancy, high index of clinical suspicion

  7. Treatment tactics in patient with articular pathology and concominant disorders of upper gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    O N Minushkin

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To study nise efficacy and safety in pts with rheumatic diseases (RD) with concomitant disorders of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Material and methods. An open uncontrolled multicenter nise study was conducted on 600 pts (mean age 54,8 years) with RD (rheumatoid arthritis - RA, osteoarthritis - OA, spine osteochondrosis with radicular syndrome - ОС). 20% of pts had G1 diseases at inclusion. Nise® was administered 200 mg/day for 30 days. An additional examination (esophagogast...

  8. Molecular identification and characterisation of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the human gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    R.Satokari

    2002-01-01

    Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are considered to be members of the beneficial microbiota in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The present study describes the development and validation of new molecular methods for the detection and analysis of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli and the application of new techniques to study Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus populations in the human intestine. A method based on genus-specific PCR of 16S rDNA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE...

  9. Opinion: How to manage subepithelial lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract?

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Schulz, Ricardo Teles; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Subepithelial lesions (SELs) in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract are relatively frequent findings in patients undergoing an upper GI endoscopy. These tumors, which are located below the epithelium and out of reach of conventional biopsy forceps, may pose a diagnostic challenge for the gastroenterologist, especially when SELs are indeterminate after endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The decision to proceed with further investigation should take into consideration the size, locati...

  10. Polymeric oral contrast agents for MR imaging of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper develops polymeric MR T1 and T2 contrast agents to improve recognition of abnormal structures within the gastrointestinal tract. The T1 and T2 relaxivities of both the paramagnetic agent Gd-DTPA and supraparamagnetic ferrite particles were measured at 0.5 T in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of several water-soluble polymers, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), cellulose, and cellulose/xanthan mixtures

  11. Clinical value of CT three-dimensional imaging in diagnosing gastrointestinal tract diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Yin Duan; Dan-Tong Zhang; Qing-Chi Lin; Yan-Huan Wu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the clinical value of CT three-dimensional (3-D) imaging in diagnosing gastrointestinal tract diseases.METHODS: Three-D imaging findings of 52 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Three-D imaging methods included shaded surface display (SSD), volume rendering (VR), virtual endoscopy (VE) and multiplanar reformatting (MPR). The diagnosis results of CT 3-D were evaluated by comparison with those of endoscopy and/or surgical finding.RESULTS: Fifty-two patients with gastrointestinal tract diseases were diagnosed by CT 3-D imaging, of whom 50 cases were correctly diagnosed and 2 were misdiagnosed. There were 33 cases of gastric diseases (27 with carcinoma, 5 with peptic ulcer and 1 with leiomyoma) and 19 large intestinal diseases (10 with colon carcinoma, 2 with carcinoma of the rectum, 5 with colon polypus and 2 with tuberculosis of the ileocecal junction). Twenty-two cases with prominent lesions (9 with subsequent hollow lesions), 20 with stenosis of cavity (8 with concomitant prominent lesions) and 10 with hollow lesions (5 with concomitant prominent lesions) were shown in 3-D images. The minimal lesion shown was 1.0 cm × 0.8 cm × 0.5 cm.CONCLUSION: CT 3-D imaging, a non-invasive examination without pain, can display clearly and directly the lesions of gastrointestinal tract with accurate location and high diagnosis accuracy. It is an important complementary technique to endoscopy.

  12. Corrosive injury to upper gastrointestinal tract: Still a major surgical dilemma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siew Min Keh; Nzewi Onyekwelu; Kieran McManus; Jim McGuigan

    2006-01-01

    In the developed and developing countries, corrosive injury to the gastrointestinal system as a consequence of either accidental ingestion or as a result of self-harm has become a less common phenomenon compared to decades ago. This could partly be attributed to the tighter legislation imposed by the government in these countries on detergents and other corrosive products and general public awareness. Most busy upper gastrointestinal surgical units in these countries, especially in the developed countries will only encounter a small number of cases per year. Up to date knowledge on the best management approach is lacking. Tn this article, we present our experience of two contrasting cases of corrosive injury to the upper gastrointestinal tract in our thoracic unit in the last 2 years and an up-to-date Medline literature search has been carried out to highlight the areas of controversies in the management of corrosive injuries of the upper gastrointestinal tract. We concluded that the main principle in managing such patients requires a good understanding of the pathophysiology of corrosive injury in order to plan both acute and future management. Each patient must be evaluated individually as the clinical picture varies widely. Signs and symptoms alone are an unreliable guide to injury.

  13. Role of cytopathology in the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal tract cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Rachel; Cobb, Camilla; Raza, Anwar

    2012-09-01

    Cytology of gastro-intestinal (GI) tract lesions can be used successfully to diagnose neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions, especially when combined with biopsies. Cytologic evaluation is widely accepted as a cost-effective method that allows rapid interpretation and triaging of material. Technical advances over the years have allowed simultaneous visualization of abnormal tissue and procurement of needle aspirates, brushings and biopsies from mucosal and deeper seated lesions. Successful cytologic examination of the GI tract is highly dependent on the skill of the endoscopist, specimen preparation, the expertise of the pathologist, and the recognition of the limitations of cytology. This article reviews the key cytologic features of important GI tract lesions, differential diagnoses, and pitfalls, and addresses the advantages and limitations of different collection techniques.

  14. Plutonium gastrointestinal absorption by adults baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium was investigated in baboons after ingestion of plutonium solution (oxidation states III; IV; V; VI), and plutonium incorporated in soya bean and winkles. We studied the effects of oxidation state and ingested mass for masses ranging from 0.35 μg to 51.6 x 10+3 μg (4 x 10-2 to 7776 μg of plutonium per kg of body weight). No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown for concentrations of plutonium smaller than 1 μg/kg. From 1 μg/kg to 1 mg/kg no effects of mass or oxidation state was observed and the mean fractional retention value was 10-4. For ingested masses higher than 1 mg/kg the fractional retention values respectively increased for Pu(V) and Pu(III) to (0.9 + 0.2) x 10-2 and (7.4+ 4.1) x 10-4 of the ingested mass. This increase might be due to the weak hydrolysis of these oxidation states which would increase gastrointestinal absorption by decrease of hydroxide formation. The fraction of plutonium retained after ingestion of soya bean was (3.0 + 0.5) x 10-4 about 3 fold higher than the value for 238 Pu nitrate solution. No clear increase in plutonium retention was shown after ingestion of winkles containing 238 Pu. In conclusion, except for high masses of ingested Pu, the retention of which could reach 1% of the ingested dose, our results show that the gastrointestinal transfer factor of 10-4 proposed by ICRP for gastrointestinal absorption of soluble form of Pu is acceptable, but 10-3 would provide better safety margin

  15. Effects of acepromazine and butorphanol on positive-contrast upper gastrointestinal tract examination in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether acepromazine (ACE) and butorphanol (BUT) combination can be used for restraint of dogs during positive-contrast upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) examination. 6 healthy dogs. In a randomized crossover design study, weekly UGIT examinations were performed on each dog for 5 weeks after administration of normal saline solution (0.5 ml), xylazine (1.0 mg/kg of body weight), or a combination of ACE (0.1 mg/kg) and 1 of 3 doses of BUT (0.05, 0.2, 1.0 mg/kg). Gastrointestinal tract emptying time, GI motility, pulse, respiratory rate, and quality of restraint were assessed. Total gastric emptying time was significantly prolonged by use of an ACE and BUT (0.05 mg/kg) combination. Xylazine and higher dosages of BUT significantly prolonged gastric and intestinal emptying times. All anesthetic protocols significantly decreased motility and facilitated nonmanual restraint. Xylazine and BUT (1.0 mg/kg) significantly decreased pulse and respiratory rate. The ACE and BUT combination prolonged GI tract emptying times, decreased GI motility, and facilitated nonmanual restraint for duration of the examination. Although GI motility was decreased and total gastric emptying time was prolonged, administration of ACE (0.1 mg/kg) plus BUT (0.05 mg/kg) allowed morphologic examination of the GI tract within 5 hours. Xylazine prolonged GI tract emptying, decreased GI motility, and provided good to excellent initial restraint. Clinical Relevance-The ACE and BUT combination prohibits functional examination of the GI tract; however, morphologic examination is possible when low dosages of BUT (0.05 mg/kg) are used

  16. A revised model for radiation dosimetry in the human gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md. Nasir Uddin

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents. Each wall was divided into many small regions so that the histologic and radiosensitive variations of the tissues across the wall could be distinguished. The characteristic parameters were determined based on the newest information available in the literature. Each of these sections except the stomach was subdivided into multiple subsections to include the spatiotemporal variations in the shape and characteristic parameters. This new GIT was integrated into an anthropomorphic phantom representing both an adult male and a larger-than-average adult female. The current phantom contains 14 different types of tissue. This phantom was coupled with the MCNP 4C Monte Carlo simulation package. The initial design and coding of the phantom and the Monte Carlo treatment employed in this study were validated using the results obtained by Cristy and Eckerman (1987). The code was used for calculating specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) in various organs and radiosensitive tissues from uniformly distributed sources of fifteen monoenergetic photons and electrons, 10 keV - 4 MeV, in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. The present studies showed that the average photon SAFs to the walls were significantly different from that to the radiosensitive cells (stem cells) for the energies below 50 keV. Above 50 keV, the photon SAFs were found to be almost constant across the walls. The electron SAF at the depth of the stem cells was a small fraction of the SAF routinely estimated at the contents-mucus interface. Electron studies

  17. The distribution of advanced glycation end products and their receptor in the gastrointestinal tract in the rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Pengmin; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to provide a basis for further study of the association between AGE/RAGE and diabetic GI dysfunction. METHODS: The distribution of AGEs [N epsilon......-(carboxymethyl) lysine and N epsilon-(carboxyethyl) lysine] and RAGE were detected in the esopha-geal, gastric, duodenal, jejunal, ileal, colonic and rectal tissues of normal adult Wistar rats using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: In the esophagus, AGEs and RAGE were mainly distributed in striated muscle cells...... and squamous epithelial cells. In the stomach, AGEs were mainly distributed in parietal cells, and RAGE was strongly expressed in chief cells, mast cells and neurons in ganglia, moderately in parietal cells, and mildly in surface mucous cells. In the intestine, colon and rectum, AGEs and RAGE were distributed...

  18. CD34 immunoexpression in stromal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and in mesenteric fibromatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monihan, J M; Carr, N J; Sobin, L H

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether CD34 immunoreactivity can distinguish between different types of gastrointestinal stromal tumour, i.e. smooth muscle and neurogenic. We studied 87 stromal tumours from different sites in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as the omentum and mesentery, using a monoclonal antibody to CD34 (QBEND10). We also determined the immunoexpression of smooth muscle and muscle specific actins, S-100 protein, cytokeratin, desmin and vimentin. In addition, 15 cases of mesenteric fibromatosis were tested for CD34. Immunoexpression of CD34 was observed in 40 of the 87 stromal tumours and correlated with evidence of differentiation towards a smooth muscle phenotype. Large intestinal stromal tumours were less likely than gastric lesions to be CD34 positive. None of 15 cases of mesenteric fibromatosis was positive for CD34. We conclude that CD34 immunoexpression is seen in a proportion of stromal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery and omentum, particularly those of smooth muscle type, and it may be useful as part of an immunohistochemical panel in the differential diagnosis of these neoplasms.

  19. Candida albicans colonization and dissemination from the murine gastrointestinal tract: the influence of morphology and Th17 immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Vautier, Simon; Drummond, Rebecca A.; Chen, Kong; Murray, Graeme I.; Kadosh, David; Alistair J P Brown; Gow, Neil A R; MacCallum, Donna M.; Jay K Kolls; Brown, Gordon D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C andida albicans to cause disease is associated with its capacity to undergo morphological transition between yeast and filamentous forms, but the role of morphology in colonization and dissemination from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract remains poorly defined. To explore this, we made use of wild-type and morphological mutants of C . albicans in an established model of GI tract colonization, induced following antibiotic treatment of mice. Our data reveal that GI tract coloniza...

  20. A review of scientific topics and literature in abdominal radiology in Germany. Pt. 1. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group for abdominal and gastrointestinal diagnosis is a group of the German Radiological Society (DRG) focusing clinically and scientifically on the diagnosis and treatment of the gastrointestinal tract with all parenchymatous abdominal organs. In addition to the clinical and scientific further development of abdominal radiology, the education of radiologists within this core discipline of radiology is one of the major aims. In this article we give an up-to-date literature review of scientific radiological topics especially covered by German radiologists. This manuscript focuses on the most recent literature on the diagnosis of the stomach, small bowel, colon and rectum. The review with a focus on the most recent studies published by German radiologists concludes with a synopsis of mesenterial bleeding and ischemia followed by a critical appraisal of the current literature on conventional abdominal radiography.

  1. Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract: Case reports and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William; J; Salyers; Kenneth; J; Vega; Juan; Carlos; Munoz; Bruce; W; Trotman; Silvio; S; Tanev

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors(NET)previously called carcinoid tumors are neoplasms of enterochromaffin/neuroendocrine cell origin which display neurosecretory capacity that may result in the carcinoid syndrome.The annual incidence of patients with NET is 8.4 per 100000;yet many NET remain asymptomatic and clinically undetected.A majority of NET follows a benign course;however,some will display malignant characteristics.NET most commonly occur in the gastrointestinal tract(67%)and bronchopulmonary system(25%).Gastrointestinal NET occur within the stomach,small intestine,liver,and rectum.We report a retrospective study of 11 subjects:Eight with benign carcinoid tumors:duodenal bulb(n=2),terminal ileum(n=1),sigmoid colon(n=2),and rectum(n=3);three with malignant carcinoid:liver(n=1)and intra-abdominal site(n=2).The diagnosis,endoscopic images,outcome,treatment and review of the literature are presented.

  2. Bioaccessibility and degradation of naturally occurring arsenic species from food in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Capilla, Teresa; Beshai, Mona; Maher, William; Kelly, Tamsin; Foster, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Humans are exposed to organic arsenic species through their diet and therefore, are susceptible to arsenic toxicity. Investigating the transformations occurring in the gastrointestinal tract will influence which arsenic species to focus on when studying metabolism in cells. Using a physiologically based extraction test, the bioaccessibility of arsenic species was determined after the simulated gastrointestinal digestion of rice, seaweed and fish. Pure standards of the major arsenic species present in these foodstuffs (arsenic glutathione complexes, arsenosugars and short chain fatty acids) were also evaluated to assess the effect of the food matrix on bioaccessibility and transformation. Approximately 80% of arsenic is released from these foodstuffs, potentially becoming available. Hydrolysis and demethylation of arsenic glutathione complexes and arsenosugars standards was observed, but no transformations occurred to arsenosugars present in seaweed. Demethylation of MA and DMA from rice occurs increasing the amount of inorganic arsenic species available for metabolism. PMID:27374523

  3. Intraperitoneal ectopic infestation of parasites invading through gastrointestinal tract : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae Chul [Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwa; Ham, Soo Youn [Ulsan Univ. Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of parasitic ectopic infestation in the peritoneal cavity, a transitional route for parasites invading the gastrointestinal tract, to migrate to various target organs. CT scans of nine patients with pathologically(n=8) or serologically(n=1) proven intraperitoneal involvement of parasitic infestation were retrospectively reviewed. The primary causes of parasitic infestation in nine patients were Paragonimus westermani(n=5), Sparganosis(n=2), and hepatic fascioliasis(n=2). We analyzed the CT findings with regard to the sites and patterns of lesions in the peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal track, as well as in other solid organs. The clinical features of these patients were also evaluated. The clinical symptoms and signs were chronic abdominal pain and general weakness in seven patients, while peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed in four. The CT features of these nine patients included multiseptated cystic masses of 2-6cm, diameter (mean 4.1{+-}1.7cm) in the omentum or mesentery in six(67%), omental or mesenteric infiltration in seven(78%), focal peritoneal thickening in seven(78%), 1ymphadenopathy in five(56%), and ascites in four(44%). In six of the nine patients, the gastrointestinal tract(stomach in four, colon in one, both stomach and colon in one) was concomitantly involved with focal wall thickening. Branching patterns of hypoattenuating lesions were noted in the liver of three patients; two of these had hepatic fascioliasis and one had paragonimiasis. Ectopic parasitic infestation in the peritoneal cavity manifests as mass formation, adjacent gastrointestinal wall thickening, and focal peritonitis. An understanding of these image features is important for both early diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  4. Impaired contractility and remodeling of the upper gastrointestinal tract in diabetes mellitus type-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jens Brφndum Frφkjaer; Sφren Due Andersen; Niels Ejskjaer; Peter Funch-Jensen; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes; Hans Gregersen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate that both the neuronal function of the contractile system and structural apparatus of the gastrointestinal tract are affected in patients with longstanding diabetes and auto mic neuropathy.METHODS: The evoked esophageal and duodenal contractile activity to standardized bag distension was assessed using a specialized ultrasound-based probe. Twelve type-1 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy and severe gastrointestinal symptoms and 12 healthy controls were studied. The geometry and biomechanical parameters (strain, tension/stress, and stiffness) were assessed.RESULTS: The diabetic patients had increased frequency of distension-induced contractions (6.0 ±0.6 vs 3.3 ± 0.5, P < 0.001). This increased reactivity was correlated with the duration of the disease (P =0.009). Impaired coordination of the contractile activity in diabetic patients was demonstrated as imbalance between the time required to evoke the first contraction at the distension site and proximal to it (1.5 ± 0.6 vs 0.5± 0.1, P = 0.03). The esophageal wall and especially the mucosa-submucosa layer had increased thickness in the patients (P < 0.001), and the longitudinal and radial compressive stretch was less in diabetics (P <0.001). The esophageal and duodenal wall stiffness and circumferential deformation induced by the distensions were not affected in the patients (all P > 0.14).CONCLUSION: The impaired contractile activity with an imbalance in the distension-induced contractions likely reflects neuronal abnormalities due to autonomic neuropathy. However, structural changes and remodeling of the gastrointestinal tract are also evident and may add to the neuronal changes. This may contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetic gut dysfunction and impact on future management of diabetic patients with gastrointestinal symptoms.

  5. Mechanisms of gastric emptying disturbances in chronic and acute inflammation of the distal gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Beglinger, Christoph; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2009-01-01

    . Thirteen healthy subjects (CON), 13 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 10 with ulcerative colitis (UC), and 7 with diverticulitis (DIV) underwent a standardized (13)C-octanoic acid gastric emptying breath test. Plasma glucose, CCK, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured periodically......It is unclear why patients with inflammation of the distal bowel complain of symptoms referable to the upper gastrointestinal tract, specifically to gastric emptying (GE) disturbances. Thus we aimed to determine occurrence and putative pathomechanisms of gastric motor disorders in such patients...

  6. Cost-effectiveness of different diagnostic strategies in patients with nonresectable upper gastrointestinal tract malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M B; Ainsworth, A P; Scheel-Hincke, J D;

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Using a simple model, this retrospective study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different diagnostic strategies used for pretherapeutic detection of patients with disseminated or locally nonresectable upper gastrointestinal tract malignancies (UGIM). Of 162 consecutive...... cost, but a diagnostic strategy based on CT with US or CT with US and laparoscopy was not cost-effective. The inclusion of endoscopic or laparoscopic ultrasonography seemed necessary to the provision of a cost-effective strategy because both techniques had a high diagnostic accuracy combined with a low...

  7. The Geographical Clusters of Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer in Fars Province, Southern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad Askarian; Ali Goli; Mahbobeh Oroei; Hossein Faramarzi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal tract cancer (GI.C) is one of the common cancers in world-wide. The incidence rate of it is different in various geographical regions. This study was performed to assess spatial clusters of the occurrence of GI.C in Fars Province. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the new cases were 4569 cases from 2001 to 2009. The crude incidence rates were standardized based on world population for both sexes. The spatial analysis was conducted using the geographical ...

  8. Malignant tumours of the gastrointestinal tract in an area with an asbestos-cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarić, M; Curin, K

    1996-06-01

    Data on persons who died of cancer of the gastrointestinal tract in a Croatian coastal area with an asbestos-cement plant were analysed for the period 1970-1990. By poll method applied to the families of deceased subjects, additional data on occupation, lifestyle, educational level, length of resistance and cancer mortality among relatives were collected. The investigation showed that in the study area, but also in certain narrower locations within it (subarea settlements), some of the tumours studied occurred at higher rates than expected. Although not conclusive, these findings may indicate a role of environmental exposure to asbestos, particularly in the occurrence of peritoneal mesothelioma. PMID:8635157

  9. Bacteria and Methanogens Differ along the Gastrointestinal Tract of Chinese Roe Deer (Capreolus pygargus)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Wright, André-Denis G.; Li, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus). The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and a...

  10. Narrow-band imaging for the head and neck region and the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Osamu; Ezoe, Yasumasa; Morita, Shuko; Horimatsu, Takahiro; Muto, Manabu

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopy is essential for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers derived from the gastrointestinal tract. However, a conventional white-light image has technical limitations in detecting small or superficial lesions. Narrow-band imaging, especially with magnification, allows visualization of microstructure patterns and microvascular patterns on the mucosal surface. These technical breakthroughs enable endoscopists to easily detect small pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions and to make a differential diagnosis of these lesions. Appropriate diagnosis with narrow-band imaging contributes to minimally invasive endoscopic resection.

  11. Enhanced tumor development by butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in liver, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witschi, H.P.

    1986-04-03

    Continuous feeding of 0.5% or 0.05% of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) enhances the development of spontaneously occurring liver tumors in C3H mice, but not in BALB/c mice. In mouse lung, the tumor-enhancing effects of BHT vary with the carcinogen used and in the gastrointestinal tract of mice and rats BHT enhances development of dimethylhydrazine-induced tumors but is without effect on tumors produced by methylnitrosourea. Strain differences, effect upon various carcinogens, paradoxical dose-responses and mechanisms of action remain major questions in the toxicology of BHT. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Optical coherence tomography and Doppler optical coherence tomography in the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugen Osiac; Adrian S(a)ftoiu; Dan Ionut Gheonea; Ion Mandrila; Radu Angelescu

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography(OCT)is a noninvasive,high-resolution,high-potential imaging method that has recently been introduced into medical investigations.A growing number of studies have used this technique in the field of gastroenterology in order to assist classical analyses.Lately,3D-imaging and Doppler capabilities have been developed in different configurations,which make this type of investigation more attractive.This paper reviews the principles and characteristics of OCT and Doppler-OCT in connection with analyses of the detection of normal and pathological structures,and with the possibility to investigate angiogenesis in the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Biodistribution and endocytosis of ICAM-1-targeting antibodies versus nanocarriers in the gastrointestinal tract in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mane V

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Viraj Mane,1 Silvia Muro1, 21Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, 2Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USAAbstract: Drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI tract is key for improving treatment of GI maladies, developing oral vaccines, and facilitating drug transport into circulation. However, delivery of formulations to the GI tract is hindered by pH changes, degradative enzymes, mucus, and peristalsis, leading to poor GI retention. Targeting may prolong residence of therapeutics in the GI tract and enhance their interaction with this tissue, improving such aspects. We evaluated nanocarrier (NC and ligand-mediated targeting in the GI tract following gastric gavage in mice. We compared GI biodistribution, degradation, and endocytosis between control antibodies and antibodies targeting the cell surface determinant intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, expressed on GI epithelium and other cell types. These antibodies were administered either as free entities or coated onto polymer NCs. Fluorescence and radioisotope tracing showed proximal accumulation, with preferential retention in the stomach, jejunum, and ileum; and minimal presence in the duodenum, cecum, and colon by 1 hour after administration. Upstream (gastric retention was enhanced in NC formulations, with decreased downstream (jejunal accumulation. Of the total dose delivered to the GI tract, ~60% was susceptible to enzymatic (but not pH-mediated degradation, verified both in vitro and in vivo. Attenuation of peristalsis by sedation increased upstream retention (stomach, duodenum, and jejunum. Conversely, alkaline NaHCO3, which enhances GI transit by decreasing mucosal viscosity, favored downstream (ileal passage. This suggests passive transit through the GI tract, governed by mucoadhesion and peristalsis. In contrast, both free anti-ICAM and anti-ICAM NCs demonstrated significantly enhanced upstream (stomach and duodenum

  14. Current status of endoscopic ultrasound for the upper gastrointestinal tract in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Hilmi, Ida Normiha; Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Hara, Kazuo; Goda, Kenichi

    2015-04-01

    We summarize the current status of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract solely in Asia, focusing on the staging of superficial cancers and the diagnosis of submucosal tumors (SMT), by analysis of questionnaire responses and a literature review. EUS for assessing the depth of superficial cancers of the upper GI tract is useful; however, evidence is lacking to support that EUS is superior to other modalities. The current status of EUS varies across different Asian countries, and standardization of the methods used both during the procedure and for depth subclassification is necessary to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Although EUS alone is limited in the diagnosis of SMT, EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration is an effective and safe diagnostic tool. Although there is a role for EUS, there are still many limitations both technically and in terms of accessibility. PMID:25537645

  15. Dietary Proteins as Determinants of Metabolic and Physiologic Functions of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Harvey Anderson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary proteins elicit a wide range of nutritional and biological functions. Beyond their nutritional role as the source of amino acids for protein synthesis, they are instrumental in the regulation of food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, bone metabolism and immune function. The interaction of dietary proteins and their products of digestion with the regulatory functions of the gastrointestinal (GI tract plays a dominant role in determining the physiological properties of proteins. The site of interaction is widespread, from the oral cavity to the colon. The characteristics of proteins that influence their interaction with the GI tract in a source-dependent manner include their physico-chemical properties, their amino acid composition and sequence, their bioactive peptides, their digestion kinetics and also the non-protein bioactive components conjugated with them. Within the GI tract, these products affect several regulatory functions by interacting with receptors releasing hormones, affecting stomach emptying and GI transport and absorption, transmitting neural signals to the brain, and modifying the microflora. This review discusses the interaction of dietary proteins during digestion and absorption with the physiological and metabolic functions of the GI tract, and illustrates the importance of this interaction in the regulation of amino acid, glucose, lipid metabolism, and food intake.

  16. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for /sup 125/I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells.

  17. Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injection to Prevent Thermal Injury of Adjacent Gastrointestinal Tract during Percutaneous Liver Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takaaki, E-mail: hasegawat@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki; Miyagi, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Fujimori, Masashi; Sakuma, Hajime; Yamakado, Koichiro [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of hyaluronic acid gel injection to separate the gastrointestinal tract from the tumor during liver radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eleven patients with liver tumors measuring 0.9-3.5 cm (mean {+-} standard deviation, 2.1 {+-} 0.8 cm) that were adjacent to the gastrointestinal tracts received RFA after the mixture of hyaluronic acid gel and contrast material (volume, 26.4 {+-} 14.5 mL; range, 10-60 mL) was injected between the tumor and the gastrointestinal tract under computed tomographic-fluoroscopic guidance. Each tumor was separated from the gastrointestinal tract by 1.0-1.5 cm (distance, 1.2 {+-} 0.2 cm) after injection of hyaluronic acid gel, and subsequent RFA was performed without any complications in all patients. Although tumor enhancement disappeared in all patients, local tumor progression was found in a patient (9.1 %, 1 of 11) during the follow-up of 5.5 {+-} 3.2 months (range, 0.4-9.9 months). In conclusion, hyaluronic acid gel injection is a safe and useful technique to avoid thermal injury of the adjacent gastrointestinal tract during liver RFA.

  18. Antibody transferred from the blood to the gastrointestinal tract and its role in enteric immunity of neonatal calves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besser, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    High passive blood immunoglobulin concentrations are associated with decreased infectious enteric disease mortality in neonatal calves. Passive immunoglobulin transferred from the blood to the gastrointestinal tract may explain this protection. To measure the rate at which immunoglobulin G/sub 1/ (IgG/sub 1/) is transferred to the gastrointestinal tract, /sup 125/I-labelled bovine IgG/sub 1/ anti-DNP antibody was administered to calves by intravenous injection. The clearance rate of /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ from the blood was measured and compared to the rate of /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ appearance in the gastrointestinal tract, as measured (1) by the rate of fecal /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ excretion, and (2) by the amount of /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ in the gastrointestinal tract of calves at necropsy. Rotavirus antibody titers in the gastrointestinal contents of 5- and 10-days-old calves correlated with the calves' serum passive rotavirus antibody titers, and were increased in proportion to the amount of colostral antibody fed on the first day of life. In contrast, when colostral rotavirus antibody was fed to 48-hour-old calves, when absorption of passive immunoglobulin does not occur, there was no measurable increase in antibody in the intestine 5 days later. Intestinal antibody in the 5- and 10-day-old calves therefore resulted from blood antibody transferred to the gastrointestinal tract. Rotavirus antibody administered to calves by parenteral injection protected them from infection and diarrhea after rotavirus challenge. These results indicate that passive blood IgG enters the calf gastrointestinal tract, where it contributes to intestinal immunity.

  19. Histological and histochemical analysis of the gastrointestinal tract of the common pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus pipistrellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, S; Encarnação, J A; Becker, N I; Trenczek, T E

    2015-01-01

    Bats have a very high mass-specific energy demand due to small size and active flight. European bat species are mostly insectivorous and the morphology of the gastrointestinal tract should be adapted accordingly. This study investigated the general anatomy by histology and the function by analysing carbohydrate distribution in particular of the mucus of the GI tract of the insectivorous bat Pipistrellus pipistrellus. The GI tracts of three individuals were dissected, fixed in formaldehyde, and embedded in paraffin wax. The tissues and cells of the GI tract of P. pipistrellus were analysed by classical (Acid Alizarin Blue, Haematoxylin-Eosin, and Masson Goldner Trichrome), histochemical (periodic acid-Schiff, Alcian blue at pH 2.5) and lectin histochemical (lectins WGA and HPA) staining procedures. The GI tract of P. pipistrellus was organised into the typical mammalian layers. The short, narrow, and thin-walled esophagus was simple with a folded stratified squamous epithelium without glands but mucous surface cells secreting neutral mucus. The stomach was globular shaped without specialisation. Mucous surface cells produced neutral mucus whereas neck and parietal cells secreted a mixture of neutral and acid mucus. Chief cell surface was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and the cytoplasm for N-acetylgalactosamine residues. The intestine lacked a caecum and appendix. The small intestine was divided into duodenum, jejunum‑ileum and ileum‑colon. The epithelium consisted of columnar enterocytes and goblet cells. The large intestine was short, only represented by the descending colon-rectum. It lacked villi and the mucosa had only crypts of Lieberkühn. Towards the colon-rectum, goblet cells produced mucus with N-acetylglucosamine residues increasing in acidity except in colon-rectum where acidity was highest in the base of crypts. Along the tube the surface of enterocytes was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine. All over the mucus filling

  20. Histological and histochemical analysis of the gastrointestinal tract of the common pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus pipistrellus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Strobel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bats have a very high mass-specific energy demand due to small size and active flight. European bat species are mostly insectivorous and the morphology of the gastrointestinal tract should be adapted accordingly. This study investigated the general anatomy by histology and the function by analysing carbohydrate distribution in particular of the mucus of the GI tract of the insectivorous bat Pipistrellus pipistrellus. The GI tracts of three individuals were dissected, fixed in formaldehyde, and embedded in paraffin wax. The tissues and cells of the GI tract of P. pipistrellus were analysed by classical (Acid Alizarin Blue, Haematoxylin-Eosin, and Masson Goldner Trichrome, histochemical (periodic acid-Schiff, Alcian blue at pH 2.5 and lectin histochemical (lectins WGA and HPA staining procedures. The GI tract of P. pipistrellus was organised into the typical mammalian layers. The short, narrow, and thin-walled esophagus was simple with a folded stratified squamous epithelium without glands but mucous surface cells secreting neutral mucus. The stomach was globular shaped without specialisation. Mucous surface cells produced neutral mucus whereas neck and parietal cells secreted a mixture of neutral and acid mucus. Chief cell surface was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and the cytoplasm for N-acetylgalactosamine residues. The intestine lacked a caecum and appendix. The small intestine was divided into duodenum, jejunum‑ileum and ileum‑colon. The epithelium consisted of columnar enterocytes and goblet cells. The large intestine was short, only represented by the descending colon-rectum. It lacked villi and the mucosa had only crypts of Lieberkühn. Towards the colon-rectum, goblet cells produced mucus with N-acetylglucosamine residues increasing in acidity except in colon-rectum where acidity was highest in the base of crypts. Along the tube the surface of enterocytes was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine. All over the

  1. Complicated Urinary Tract Infection in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complicated urinary tract infection occurs in individuals with functional or structural abnormalities of the genitourinary tract.OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge relevant to complicated urinary tract infection, and to provide evidence-based recommendations for management.METHODS: The literature was reviewed through a PubMed search, and additional articles were identified by journal reference review. A draft guideline was prepared and critically reviewed by members of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada Guidelines Committee, with modifications incorporated following the review.RESULTS: Many urological abnormalities may be associated with complicated urinary infection. There is a wide spectrum of potential infecting organisms, and isolated bacteria tend to be more resistant to antimicrobial therapy. Morbidity and infection outcomes in subjects with complicated urinary infection are principally determined by the underlying abnormality rather than the infection. Principles of management include uniform collection of a urine specimen for culture before antimicrobial therapy, characterization of the underlying genitourinary abnormality, and nontreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria except before an invasive genitourinary procedure. The antimicrobial regimen is determined by clinical presentation, patient tolerance, renal function and known or anticipated infecting organisms. If the underlying abnormality contributing to the urinary infection cannot be corrected, then early post-treatment recurrence of infection is anticipated.CONCLUSIONS: The management of complicated urinary infection is individualized depending on patient variables and the infecting organism. Further clinical investigations are necessary to assist in determining optimal antimicrobial regimens.

  2. Glycol Methacrylate Embedding for the Histochemical Study of the Gastrointestinal Tract of Dogs Naturally Infected with Leishmania Infantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A.J.W.; de Amorim, I.F.G.; Pinheiro, L.J.; Madeira, I.M.V.M.; Souza, C.C.; Chiarini-Garcia, H.; Caliari, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    In canine visceral leishmaniasis a diffuse chronic inflammatory exudate and an intense parasite load throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been previously reported. However, these studies did not allow a properly description of canine cellular morphology details. The aim of our study was to better characterize these cells in carrying out a qualitative and quantitative histological study in the gastrointestinal tract of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum by examining gut tissues embedded in glycol methacrylate. Twelve infected adult dogs were classified in asymptomatic and symptomatic. Five uninfected dogs were used as controls. After necropsy, three samples of each gut segment, including oesophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, and rectum were collected and fixed in Carnoy’s solution for glycol methacrylate protocols. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue borate, and periodic acid-Schiff stain. Leishmania amastigotes were detected by immunohistochemistry employed in both glycol methacrylate and paraffin embedded tissues. The quantitative histological analysis showed higher numbers of plasma cells, lymphocytes and macrophages in lamina propria of all segments of GIT of infected dogs compared with controls. The parasite load was more intense and cecum and colon, independently of the clinical status of these dogs. Importantly, glycol methacrylate embedded tissue stained with toluidine blue borate clearly revealed mast cell morphology, even after mast cell degranulation. Infected dogs showed lower numbers of mast cells in all gut segments than controls. Despite the glycol methacrylate (GMA) protocol requires more attention and care than the conventional paraffin processing, this embedding procedure proved to be especially suitable for the present histological study, where it allowed to preserve and observe cell morphology in fine detail. PMID:26708180

  3. Opinion: How to manage subepithelial lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matheus; Cavalcante; Franco; Ricardo; Teles; Schulz; Fauze; Maluf-Filho

    2015-01-01

    Subepithelial lesions(SELs) in the upper gastrointestinal(GI) tract are relatively frequent findings in patients undergoing an upper GI endoscopy. These tumors, which are located below the epithelium and out of reach of conventional biopsy forceps, may pose a diagnostic challenge for the gastroenterologist, especially when SELs are indeterminate after endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound(EUS). The decision to proceed with further investigation should take into consideration the size, location in the GI tract, and EUS features of SELs. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor(GIST) is an example of an SEL that has a well-recognized malignant potential. Unfortunately, EUS is not able to absolutely differentiate GISTs from other benign hypoechoic lesions from the fourth layer, such as leiomyomas. Therefore, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration(EUS-FNA) is an important tool for correct diagnosis of SELs. However, small lesions(size < 2 cm) have a poor diagnostic yield with EUS-FNA. Moreover, studies with EUS-core biopsy needles did not report higher rates of histologic and diagnostic yields when compared with EUS-FNA. The limited diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA and EUS-core biopsies of SELs has led to the development of more invasive endoscopic techniques for tissue acquisition. There are initial studies showing good results for tissue biopsy or resection of SELs with endoscopic submucosal dissection, suck-ligate-unroof-biopsy, and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection.

  4. Effects of alfalfa meal on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract development of growing ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J F; Song, X M; Huang, X; Zhou, W D; Wu, J L; Zhu, Z G; Zheng, H C; Jiang, Y Q

    2012-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate effects of alfalfa meal on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract development of growing layer ducks to provide evidence for application of alfalfa meal in the duck industry. Two hundred and fifty-six healthy Shaoxing 7-wk old growing layer ducks were selected and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 dietary treatments based on corn and soybean meal and containing 0, 3, 6, and 9% of alfalfa meal for 8 wks. Each treatment consisted of 4 replicates of 16 ducks each. Briefly, birds were raised in separate compartments, and each compartment consisted of three parts: indoor floor house, adjacent open area and a connecting water area. The results showed: i) Growing ducks fed alfalfa meal diet were not significantly different in average daily gain, feed intake and gain-to-feed ratio from those fed no alfalfa diet (p>0.05). ii) Alfalfa meal increased the ratio crop, gizzard to live weight, caecum to live weight, the caecum index of growing ducks (pducks increased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (pducks decreased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (pducks could improve gastrointestinal tract growth and small intestinal morphology without effect on performance. This experiment provides evidence that alfalfa meal is a very valuable feedstuff for growing layer ducks.

  5. Structure and Function of the Gastrointestinal Tract of the Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) Hatchling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hualing CHEN; Mingbin YE; Yuyan LU; Jinxia DUAN; Pipeng LI; Hexiang GU

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of four Chelonia mydas hatchlings were examined at the anatomical, histological and ultrastructural level. Our results show that the gastrointestinal tract (GI) is composed by esophagus, stomach, small intestine (SI) and large intestine (LI), and histologically of mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa (ME) and serosa. The esophagus is marked by conical papillae lined by keratinized stratified squamous epithelium, whereas the remaining GI by simple columnar epithelium; esophageal diverticulum is absent. The stomach covered with mucous granule cells, contains cardia, fundic regions and pylorus, which are separately characterized by cardiac glands, fundic glands and pyloric glands, and have the thickest submucosa and ME of the GI. The ME of the esophagus mainly consist of one layer of circular smooth muscle whereas the rest of GI of two layers, inner circular muscle and outer longitudinal muscle. The SI is slightly longer than the LI and the GI is approximately 5.11 times of the carapace length. The SI is lined with longitudinal zigzag folds and characterized by absorptive cells with longer and denser microvilli, whereas the LI by transversal folds, goblet cells and lymphoid nodules. Only intestinal glands appear in duodenum. Endocrine cells are observed in all sections of the GI and accounted for the largest proportion in duodenum. The results demonstrate a perfect combination of the structure and function of the GI and reveal that the digestion and absorption primarily occurs in the foregut. C. mydas hatchling may prefer carnivorous diet.

  6. Role of Toll-like receptors in health and diseases of gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greg Harris; Rhonda KuoLee; Wangxue Chen

    2006-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is colonized by non-pathogenic commensal microflora and frequently exposed to many pathogenic organisms.For the maintenance of GI homeostasis, the host must discriminate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic organisms and initiate effective and appropriate immune and inflammatory responses. Mammalian toll-like receptors (TLRs) are members of the pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) family that plays a central role in the initiation of innate cellular immune responses and the subsequent adaptive immune responses to microbial pathogens. Recent studies have shown that gastrointestinal epithelial cells express almost all TLR subtypes characterized to date and that the expression and activation of TLRs in the GI tract are tightly and coordinately regulated. This review summarizes the current understanding of the crucial dual roles of TLRs in the development of host innate and adaptive immune responses to GI infections and the maintenance of the immune tolerance to commensal bacteria through down-regulation of surface expression of TLRs in intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. Opinion: How to manage subepithelial lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Schulz, Ricardo Teles; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-12-10

    Subepithelial lesions (SELs) in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract are relatively frequent findings in patients undergoing an upper GI endoscopy. These tumors, which are located below the epithelium and out of reach of conventional biopsy forceps, may pose a diagnostic challenge for the gastroenterologist, especially when SELs are indeterminate after endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The decision to proceed with further investigation should take into consideration the size, location in the GI tract, and EUS features of SELs. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is an example of an SEL that has a well-recognized malignant potential. Unfortunately, EUS is not able to absolutely differentiate GISTs from other benign hypoechoic lesions from the fourth layer, such as leiomyomas. Therefore, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an important tool for correct diagnosis of SELs. However, small lesions (size core biopsy needles did not report higher rates of histologic and diagnostic yields when compared with EUS-FNA. The limited diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA and EUS-core biopsies of SELs has led to the development of more invasive endoscopic techniques for tissue acquisition. There are initial studies showing good results for tissue biopsy or resection of SELs with endoscopic submucosal dissection, suck-ligate-unroof-biopsy, and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection. PMID:26675266

  8. Protective effect of adeturone on protein assimilation in the gastro-intestinal tract following acute X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of adeturone and AET on the process of assimilation of food stuffs in the gastro-intestinal tract and possibilities for its protection from radiation injury were studied. Comparative assessment of the protective capabilities of adeturone and AET on the process of protein hydrolysis and absorption in the gastro-intestinal tract and the loss of serum proteins in the small intestines in acute X-irradiation revealed that the two radioprotectors adeturone and AET, being chemical agents, induce almost identical and transient changes in the absorption of protein hydrolysis products in the gastro-intestinal tract. These changes seem to have no aggravating effect on the course of radiation injury. In comparison with AET, adeturone exerts superior radioprotective effect on the processes studied, following exposure to a lethal X-ray dose of 800 r. (author)

  9. Staphylococcal enterotoxins in the Etiopathogenesis of Mucosal Autoimmunity within the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryAnn Principato

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs are the products of Staphylococcus aureus and are recognized as the causative agents of classical food poisoning in humans following the consumption of contaminated food. While illness evoked by ingestion of the SE or its producer organism in tainted food are often self-limited, our current understanding regarding the evolution of S. aureus provokes the utmost concern. The organism and its associated toxins, has been implicated in a wide variety of disease states including infections of the skin, heart, sinuses, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease, toxic shock, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The intricate relationship between the various subsets of immunocompetent T cells and accessory cells and the ingested material found within the gastrointestinal tract present daunting challenges to the maintenance of immunologic homeostasis. Dysregulation of the intricate balances within this environment has the potential for extreme consequences within the host, some of which are long-lived. The focus of this review is to evaluate the relevance of staphylococcal enterotoxin in the context of mucosal immunity, and the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal autoimmune disease.

  10. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins William G; Cripps Allan W; Pyne David B; West Nicholas P; Eskesen Dorte C; Jairath Ashok; Christophersen Claus T; Conlon Michael A; Fricker Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effecti...

  11. A Multiphase Flow in the Antroduodenal Portion of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Mathematical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Trusov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A group of authors has developed a multilevel mathematical model that focuses on functional disorders in a human body associated with various chemical, physical, social, and other factors. At this point, the researchers have come up with structure, basic definitions and concepts of a mathematical model at the “macrolevel” that allow describing processes in a human body as a whole. Currently we are working at the “mesolevel” of organs and systems. Due to complexity of the tasks, this paper deals with only one meso-fragment of a digestive system model. It describes some aspects related to modeling multiphase flow in the antroduodenal portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Biochemical reactions, dissolution of food particles, and motor, secretory, and absorbing functions of the tract are taken into consideration. The paper outlines some results concerning influence of secretory function disorders on food dissolution rate and tract contents acidity. The effect which food density has on inflow of food masses from a stomach to a bowel is analyzed. We assume that the future development of the model will include digestive enzymes and related reactions of lipolysis, proteolysis, and carbohydrates breakdown.

  12. A Multiphase Flow in the Antroduodenal Portion of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Mathematical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusov, P V; Zaitseva, N V; Kamaltdinov, M R

    2016-01-01

    A group of authors has developed a multilevel mathematical model that focuses on functional disorders in a human body associated with various chemical, physical, social, and other factors. At this point, the researchers have come up with structure, basic definitions and concepts of a mathematical model at the "macrolevel" that allow describing processes in a human body as a whole. Currently we are working at the "mesolevel" of organs and systems. Due to complexity of the tasks, this paper deals with only one meso-fragment of a digestive system model. It describes some aspects related to modeling multiphase flow in the antroduodenal portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Biochemical reactions, dissolution of food particles, and motor, secretory, and absorbing functions of the tract are taken into consideration. The paper outlines some results concerning influence of secretory function disorders on food dissolution rate and tract contents acidity. The effect which food density has on inflow of food masses from a stomach to a bowel is analyzed. We assume that the future development of the model will include digestive enzymes and related reactions of lipolysis, proteolysis, and carbohydrates breakdown. PMID:27413393

  13. Gastrointestinal tract perforation: evaluation of MDCT according to perforation site and elapsed time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Sang Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Jin [Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate mutidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for the prediction of perforation site according to each gastrointestinal (GI) tract site and elapsed time. One hundred and sixty-eight patients who underwent MDCT before laparotomy for GI tract perforation were enrolled and allocated to an early or late lapse group based on an elapsed time of 7 h. Two reviewers independently evaluated the perforation site and assessed the following CT findings: free air location, mottled extraluminal air bubbles, focal bowel wall discontinuity, segmental bowel wall thickening, perivisceral fat stranding and localised fluid collection. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 91.07 % and 91.67 % for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively, with excellent agreement (kappa 0.86). Accuracies (98.97 % and 97.94 %) and agreements (kappa 0.894) for stomach and duodenum perforation were higher than for other perforation sites. Strong predictors of perforation at each site were: focal bowel wall discontinuity for stomach, duodenal bulb and left colon, mottled extraluminal air bubbles for retroperitoneal duodenum and right colon, and segmental bowel wall thickening for small bowel. The diagnostic accuracy was not different between the early- and late-lapse groups. MDCT can accurately predict upper GI tract perforation with high reliability. Elapsed time did not affect the accuracy of perforation site prediction. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of supporting role of early enteral feeding via tube jejunostomy following resection of upper gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Ghafouri, Ali; Salehi, Omran Abbas; Keshavarz, Seyed Ali; Hosseini, Saeed; Shojaifard, Abolfazl; Khorgami, Zhamak

    2012-01-01

    Background Today, early diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies and their surgical resection is becoming more feasible. One of the important side effects in upper GI tract malignancies is malnutrition which has direct relationship with postoperative complications. Nonetheless, there is no easy regimen of nutrition for these patients especially for the first week after operation. Accordingly we present a simple method for improving feeding such patients via tube jejunostomy...

  15. Extensive horizontal transfer of core genome genes between two Lactobacillus species found in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguin Emmanuelle

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While genes that are conserved between related bacterial species are usually thought to have evolved along with the species, phylogenetic trees reconstructed for individual genes may contradict this picture and indicate horizontal gene transfer. Individual trees are often not resolved with high confidence, however, and in that case alternative trees are generally not considered as contradicting the species tree, although not confirming it either. Here we conduct an in-depth analysis of 401 protein phylogenetic trees inferred with varying levels of confidence for three lactobacilli from the acidophilus complex. At present the relationship between these bacteria, isolated from environments as diverse as the gastrointestinal tract (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus johnsonii and yogurt (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, is ambiguous due to contradictory phenotypical and 16S rRNA based classifications. Results Among the 401 phylogenetic trees, those that could be reconstructed with high confidence support the 16S-rRNA tree or one alternative topology in an astonishing 3:2 ratio, while the third possible topology is practically absent. Lowering the confidence threshold for trees to be taken into consideration does not significantly affect this ratio, and therefore suggests that gene transfer may have affected as much as 40% of the core genome genes. Gene function bias suggests that the 16S rRNA phylogeny of the acidophilus complex, which indicates that L. acidophilus and L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus are the closest related of these three species, is correct. A novel approach of comparison of interspecies protein divergence data employed in this study allowed to determine that gene transfer most likely took place between the lineages of the two species found in the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion This case-study reports an unprecedented level of phylogenetic incongruence, presumably resulting from extensive

  16. Clinical impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract malignancies. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M B; Pless, T; Durup, J;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Several studies have evaluated the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB) in the upper gastrointestinal tract, but so far no studies have specifically evaluated the clinical impact of EUS-FNAB in upper gastrointestinal tract...

  17. Facile Synthesis of Uniform-Sized Bismuth Nanoparticles for CT Visualization of Gastrointestinal Tract in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Boxiong; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Cai; Jiang, Ying; Fu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Chunshui; Sun, Shao-Kai; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2016-05-25

    High-performance and biocompatible contrast agents are the key to accurate diagnosis of various diseases in vivo via CT imaging. Fabrication of pure Bi nanoparticles is the best way to maximize X-ray absorption efficiency due to the ultrahigh X-ray attenuation ability of Bi and 100% content of Bi element. However, high-quality Bi nanoparticles prepared through a facile strategy are still lacking. Herein, we report a simple noninjection method to fabricate uniformly sized pure Bi nanoparticles using only two commercial reagents by simply heating the mixture of raw materials in a short time. The obtained Bi nanoparticles owned highly uniform size, excellent monodispersity, and impressive antioxidant capacity. After being modified with oligosaccharide, the "sweet" Bi nanoprobe with comfortable patient experience and favorable biocompatibility was successfully used in CT visualization of gastrointestinal tract in detail.

  18. Mechanisms of Gastric Emptying Disturbances in Chronic and Acute Inflammation of the Distal Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Beglinger, Christoph; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2009-01-01

    Objective: It is unclear why patients with inflammation of the distal bowel complain of symptoms referable to the upper gastrointestinal tract, specifically to gastric emptying (GE) disturbances. Thus, we aimed to determine occurrence and putative pathomechanisms of gastric motor disorders...... (25.1[5.2] vs. 33.5[13.0] pmol/l, p=0.046) but markedly decreased in DIV (9.6[5.2] pmol/l, pdisturbances are most pronounced in CD and might partly be caused by excessive CCK release. In DIV there might...... be a pathophysiological link between decreased GLP-1 release, postprandial hyperglycemia and delayed GE. These explorative data encourage further studies in larger patient groups. Key words: inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, motility, hormonal regulation....

  19. Radiology of upper gastrointestinal tract with ASGB (adjustable silicone gastric banding) for morbid obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic syndrome is a result of multiple risk factors of atherosclerosis and diabetes. Obesity is an especially well recognized etiological factor. A rapidly increasing number of obese people constitutes a major social health problem in the developed, as well as developing countries. Bariatric surgeries are among methods of obesity treatment that gain on popularity. They include adjustable silicone gastric banding (ASGB), and adjustable laparoscopic gastric banding (ALGB). The aim of our study was to analyze and present the most typical radiological images obtained during 130 upper gastrointestinal tract examinations in patients after ASGB or ALGB in the last three years. ASGB and ALGB are effective and safe. However, they are connected with some postoperative complications. Application of these surgical procedures requires periodic, long-term radiological evaluations and cooperation between surgeons and radiologists. The radiologist must be familiar with bariatric surgical techniques, their complications and typical radiological presentations

  20. Terahertz spectroscopic imaging and properties of gastrointestinal tract in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young Bin; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jeong, Kiyoung; Choi, Yuna; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Lee, Sang Kil; Oh, Seung Jae; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated basic properties of normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues, including glandular stomach (GS), fore stomach (FS), large intestine (LI), small intestine (SI), and esophagus (ESO), from a rat model using terahertz (THz) reflection imaging and spectroscopy. The THz images collected from stratified squamous epithelia (SSE) of FS and ESO show a lower peak-to-peak value compared to those from columnar epithelia (CE) of GS, LI, or SI because the SSE contains less water than CE. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of FS were less than those of GS or LI, both having values similar to those of water. Additionally, we report internal reflection THz signals from ESO, although we were unable to determine the exact interface for this internal reflection. PMID:25574429

  1. Effects of berberine in the gastrointestinal tract - a review of actions and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunqiu; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid present in several plant species, including Coptis sp. and Berberis sp. In traditional medicine, extracts of berberine are used in the treatment of diarrhea of different origins. Recent studies have shown that berberine and its derivatives have significant biological effects on gastrointestinal (GI) and other functions and may become therapeutics for the treatment of diarrhea, gastroenteritis, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory conditions. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the actions of berberine in the GI tract. Binding and target sites, activated intracellular pathways, as well as the absorption and metabolism of berberine are discussed. Effects that may be useful in future clinical treatment, like antidiarrheal, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects are critically reviewed and potential clinical applications are presented in detail. PMID:25183302

  2. A position telemetric method for implantable microcapsules in the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xudong; Yan, Guozheng; He, Wenhui

    2008-04-01

    In order to measure the position and orientation of implantable microcapsules in the gastrointestinal tract, a novel non-contact method based on electromagnetic induction was presented. Six cylindrical coils were arrayed on the abdominal surface of a human body. These coils were excited one-by-one in sequence with a sinusoidal signal to generate an alternating magnetic field. Meanwhile, a small induction coil along with a signal-processing circuit and radio-frequency transmitter was mounted inside the microcapsule to measure the magnetic signal produced by the six excitation coils. Based on the newly derived localization model and the particle swarm algorithm, the position and orientation of the microcapsule can be calculated. The experiments show that the localization system has good stability, high precision and wide localization range.

  3. Histological analysis of the gastrointestinal tracts of young ostriches (Struthio camelus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Maria Rodrigues Monteiro

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The histological aspects of the gastrointestinal tract of the ostrich (Struthio camelus have been little studied, so this research is focused on such analysis. To this end, samples were obtained from different segments of the digestive tubes of five young ostriches aged 20 to 30 days. Based on the results, the authors conclude that the different segments of the digestive tube of the young ostrich presents the same general structure as that of other domestic birds and mammals, with some differences that may be due to age, the species involved, or feeding habits. It is hopes that this analysis will contribute to a better understanding of the physiological processes related to the nutrition and management of ostriches during their growth.

  4. Liver scanning in the diagnosis of metastases from malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology (INOR) established a line of clinical investigation in January, 1974, which was later added to clinical care. This line consisted of trying to arrive at a preoperative diagnosis - by means of liver scanning - of the potential liver metastases of primitive tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. Metastable 113Indium was used. A review of the results obtained in the 50 patients included in the investigation program is made. The results of preoperative scanning were compared with operative findings. Twelve liver metastases (24%) were found. In 40 patients there was agreement (80%) between preoperative scanning and operatory findings. At present, ultrasound is a necessary supplement to scans, which supplements it but does not exclude it. The tracer element used now is technetium-99 M coloidal sulphide

  5. Multiple primary malignant tumors of upper gastrointestinal tract:A novel role of ~(18)F-FDG PET/CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the capacity of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) for detecting multiple primary cancer of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract. METHODS: Fifteen patients (12 without cancer histories and 3 with histories of upper GI tract cancer) were investigated due to the suspicion of primary cancer of UGI tract on X-ray barium meal and CT scan. Subsequent whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan was carried out for initial staging or restaging. All the patient...

  6. Comparative in vitro fermentation activity in the canine distal gastrointestinal tract and fermentation kinetics of fiber sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, G.; Pellikaan, W.F.; Rutten, P.G.P.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2008-01-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the variation in fermentation activity along the distal canine gastrointestinal tract (GIT, Exp. 1). It also aimed to assess fermentation kinetics and end product profiles of 16 dietary fibers for dog foods using canine fecal inoculum (Exp. 2). For Exp. 1, digesta

  7. Role of Tyramine Synthesis by Food-Borne Enterococcus durans in Adaptation to the Gastrointestinal Tract Environment ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Palencia, Pilar; Fernández, Maria; Mohedano, Maria Luz; Ladero, Victor; Quevedo, Cristina; Alvarez, Miguel A.; López, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines in food constitute a human health risk. Here we report that tyramine-producing Enterococcus durans strain IPLA655 (from cheese) was able to produce tyramine under conditions simulating transit through the gastrointestinal tract. Activation of the tyramine biosynthetic pathway contributed to binding and immunomodulation of enterocytes. PMID:21097601

  8. Enhancing bile tolerance improves survival and persistence of Bifidobacterium and Lactococcus in the murine gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of commensal gastrointestinal bacteria used as probiotics are highly adapted to the specialised environment of the large bowel. However, unlike pathogenic bacteria; they are often inadequately equipped to endure the physicochemical stresses of gastrointestinal (GI delivery in the host. Herein we outline a patho-biotechnology strategy to improve gastric delivery and host adaptation of a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 and the generally regarded as safe (GRAS organism Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. Results In vitro bile tolerance of both strains was significantly enhanced (P Listeria monocytogenes bile resistance mechanism BilE. Strains harbouring bilE were also recovered at significantly higher levels (P n = 5, following oral inoculation. Furthermore, a B. breve strain expressing bilE demonstrated increased efficacy relative to the wild-type strain in reducing oral L. monocytogenes infection in mice. Conclusion Collectively the data indicates that bile tolerance can be enhanced in Bifidobacterium and Lactococcus species through rational genetic manipulation and that this can significantly improve delivery to and colonisation of the GI tract.

  9. Distinct stages during colonization of the mouse gastrointestinal tract by Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel ePrieto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a member of the human microbiota, colonizing both the vaginal and gastrointestinal tracts. This yeast is devoid of a life style outside the human body and the mechanisms underlying the adaptation to the commensal status remain to be determined. Using a model of mouse gastrointestinal colonization, we show here that C. albicans stably colonizes the mouse gut in about 3 days starting from a dose as low as 100 cells, reaching steady levels of around 107 cells/g of stools. Using fluorescent labeled strains we have assessed the competition between isogenic populations from different sources in cohoused animals. We show that long term (15 days colonizing cells have increased fitness in the gut niche over those grown in vitro or residing in the gut for 1-3 days. Therefore, two distinct states, proliferation and adaptation, seem to exist in the adaptation of this fungus to the mouse gut, a result with potential significance in the prophylaxis and treatment of Candida infections.

  10. Understanding the gastrointestinal tract of the elderly to develop dietary solutions that prevent malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémond, Didier; Shahar, Danit R.; Gille, Doreen; Pinto, Paula; Kachal, Josefa; Peyron, Marie-Agnès; Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Walther, Barbara; Bordoni, Alessandra; Dupont, Didier; Tomás-Cobos, Lidia; Vergères, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Although the prevalence of malnutrition in the old age is increasing worldwide a synthetic understanding of the impact of aging on the intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients is still lacking. This review article aims at filling the gap in knowledge between the functional decline of the aging gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and the consequences of malnutrition on the health status of elderly. Changes in the aging GIT include the mechanical disintegration of food, gastrointestinal motor function, food transit, chemical food digestion, and functionality of the intestinal wall. These alterations progressively decrease the ability of the GIT to provide the aging organism with adequate levels of nutrients, what contributes to the development of malnutrition. Malnutrition, in turn, increases the risks for the development of a range of pathologies associated with most organ systems, in particular the nervous-, muscoskeletal-, cardiovascular-, immune-, and skin systems. In addition to psychological, economics, and societal factors, dietary solutions preventing malnutrition should thus propose dietary guidelines and food products that integrate knowledge on the functionality of the aging GIT and the nutritional status of the elderly. Achieving this goal will request the identification, validation, and correlative analysis of biomarkers of food intake, nutrient bioavailability, and malnutrition. PMID:26091351

  11. Antioxidant enriched enteral nutrition and oxidative stress after major gastrointestinal tract surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mireille FM van Stijn; Gerdien C Ligthart-Melis; Petra G Boelens; Peter G Scheffer; Tom Teerlink; Jos WR Twisk; Alexander PJ Houdijk; Paul AM van Leeuwen

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of an enteral supplement containing antioxidants on circulating levels of antioxidants and indicators of oxidative stress after major gastrointestinal surgery.METHODS: Twenty-one patients undergoing major upper gastrointestinal tract surgery were randomised in a single centre, open label study on the effect of postoperative enteral nutrition supplemented with antioxidants. The effect on circulating levels of antioxidants and indicators of oxidative stress, such as F2-isoprostane, was studied.RESULTS: The antioxidant enteral supplement showed no adverse effects and was well tolerated. After surgery a decrease in the circulating levels of antioxidant parameters was observed. Only selenium and glutamine levels were restored to pre-operative values one week after surgery. F2-isoprostane increased in the first three postoperative days only in the antioxidant supplemented group. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) levels decreased faster in the antioxidant group after surgery.CONCLUSION: Despite lower antioxidant levelsthere was no increase in the circulating markers of oxidative stress on the first day after major abdominal surgery. The rise in F2-isoprostane in patients receiving the antioxidant supplement may be related to the conversion of antioxidants to oxidants which raises questions on antioxidant supplementation. Module AOX restored the postoperative decrease in selenium levels.The rapid decrease in LBP levels in the antioxidant group suggests a possible protective effect on gut wall integrity. Further studies are needed on the role of oxidative stress on outcome and the use of antioxidants in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

  12. In Vitro Culture Conditions for Maintaining a Complex Population of Human Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable intestinal microbiota is important in maintaining human physiology and health. Although there have been a number of studies using in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine the impact of diet and xenobiotics on intestinal microbiota, there is no consensus for the best in vitro culture conditions for growth of the human gastrointestinal microbiota. To investigate the dynamics and activities of intestinal microbiota, it is important for the culture conditions to support the growth of a wide range of intestinal bacteria and maintain a complex microbial community representative of the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we compared the bacterial community in three culture media: brain heart infusion broth and high- and low-carbohydrate medium with different growth supplements. The bacterial community was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, pyrosequencing and real-time PCR. Based on the molecular analysis, this study indicated that the 3% fecal inoculum in low-concentration carbohydrate medium with 1% autoclaved fecal supernatant provided enhanced growth conditions to conduct in vitro studies representative of the human intestinal microbiota.

  13. Embolization for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, S.; Tirukonda, P.; Nicholson, A. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Everett, S.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); McPherson, S.J., E-mail: simon.mcpherson@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To assess the published evidence on the endovascular treatment of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Materials and methods: An Ovid Medline search of published literature was performed (1966-2009). Non-English literature, experimental studies, variceal haemorrhage and case series with fewer than five patients were excluded. The search yielded 1888 abstracts. Thirty-five articles were selected for final analysis. Results: The total number of pooled patients was 927. The technical and clinical success of embolization ranged from 52-100% and 44-100%, respectively. The pooled mean technical/clinical success rate in primary upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage (PUGITH) only, trans-papillary haemorrhage (TPH) only, and mixed studies were 84%/67%, 93%/89%, and 93%/64%, respectively. Clinical outcome was adversely affected by multi-organ failure, shock, corticosteroids, transfusion, and coagulopathy. The anatomical source of haemorrhage and procedural variables did not affect the outcome. A successful embolization improved survival by 13.3 times. Retrospective comparison with surgery demonstrated equivalent mortality and clinical success, despite embolization being applied to a more elderly population with a higher prevalence of co-morbidities. Conclusions: Embolization is effective in this very difficult cohort of patients with outcomes similar to surgery.

  14. Age-related histomorphologic changes in the canine gastrointestinal tract: A histologic and immunohistologic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the changes in the histomorphology of the gastric, jejunal and colonic wall of dogs due to physiological aging.METHODS: Full thickness biopsies were taken from the gastrointestinal tracts of 28 dogs of different ages.The thickness of the different layers of the wall was measured and the numbers of proliferating cells as indicated by immunohistochemical detection of Ki67 were counted.RESULTS: In the three excision sites, the thickness of all subepithelial layers increased with rising age. The strongest correlation between age and thickness of the intestinal wall was found in the first 10 years of life and in the jejunum (r = 0.6-0.71 for the deep lamina propria mucosa, the muscularis mucosa, and the circular layer of the tunica muscularis). The number of proliferating cells decreased during aging, with the strongest correlation in the lamina propria mucosa and lamina muscularis mucosa of the jejunum and in the colonic submucosa (r= -0.61 to -0.71). Epithelial proliferation was only weakly correlated to the age.CONCLUSION: The morphology of the deeper layers and the proliferation of mesenchymal cells of the intestinal wall of healthy dogs are correlated with age.Gastrointestinal epithelial proliferation is only weakly age-correlated.

  15. Functional imaging of the upper gastrointestinal tract; Funktionsuntersuchungen des oberen Gastrointestinaltraktes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, R. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik mit Poliklinik, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Radionuclide procedures remain the most sensitive approaches for the measurement of in vivo physiology, biochemistry and metabolism, even in the light competing methods like endoscopy, manometry, MRI or ultrasound. The gastro-intestinal (GI) tract function is to digest food using various digestive juices and enzymes to facilitate absorption nutrients. Various segments of the GI tract (e.g. esophagus, stomach) coordinate in a complex yet precise way to control these processes. Accessory organs of digestion are i.e. the salivary glands. Functional alterations of these involved organs have been associated with various disease conditions. Nuclear medicine techniques provide physiological information about the integrity of the salivary glands and the drainage of the saliva. Esophageal scintigraphy is a non-invasive, quantitative method to objectively assess disturbances of esophageal bolus transit. Radionuclide studies of gastric emptying and motility are the most appropriate and physiologic tools available for studying gastric motor function. A Meckel scan is able to detect sites of ectopic gastric mucosa in the abdomen. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art of established but under-used scintigraphic techniques with an emphasis on their clinical applications and significance. (orig.)

  16. Integrated OCT-US catheter for detection of cancer in the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Cummins, Thomas; Shung, K. Kirk; Van Dam, Jacques; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-03-01

    Gastrointestinal tract cancer, the most common type of cancer, has a very low survival rate, especially for pancreatic cancer (five year survival rate of 5%) and bile duct cancer (five year survival rate of 12%). Here, we propose to use an integrated OCT-US catheter for cancer detection. OCT is targeted to acquire detailed information, such as dysplasia and neoplasia, for early detection of tumors. US is used for staging cancers according to the size of the primary tumor and whether or not it has invaded lymph nodes and other parts of the body. Considering the lumen size of the GI tract, an OCT system with a long image range (>10mm) and a US imaging system with a center frequency at 40MHz (penetration depth > 5mm) were used. The OCT probe was also designed for long-range imaging. The side-view OCT and US probes were sealed inside one probe cap piece and one torque coil and became an integrated probe. This probe was then inserted into a catheter sheath which fits in the channel of a duodenoscope and is able to be navigated smoothly into the bile duct by the elevator of the duodenoscope. We have imaged 5 healthy and 2 diseased bile ducts. In the OCT images, disorganized layer structures and heterogeneous regions demonstrated the existence of tumors. Micro-calcification can be observed in the corresponding US images.

  17. Spatial dynamics of the bacterial community structure in the gastrointestinal tract of red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meirong; Jin, Wei; Li, Yuanfei; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-06-01

    The quantification and community of bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum) of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) were examined by using real-time PCR and paired-end Illumina sequencing. The quantification of bacteria showed that the number of bacteria in jejunum and rectum was significantly lower than that in colon and cecum (P Ruminococcaceae was the most dominant family in large intestine and the total relative abundance of unclassified bacteria was above 50 %. In identified genera, Dorea was the most important variable to discriminate large intestine and it was significantly higher in cecum than in stomach, small intestine and colon (P < 0.05). Bifidobacterium (21.89 %) was the only dominant genus in colon. Future work on culture in vitro and genome sequencing of those unidentified bacteria might give us insight into the function of these microorganisms in the GI tract. In addition, the comparison of the bacterial community in the foregut of kangaroos and other herbivores and the rumen might give us insight into the mechanism of fiber degradation and help us exploit approaches to improve the feed efficiency and subsequently, reduce the methane emission from herbivores. PMID:27116964

  18. Diagnostic imaging of digestive tract involvement in cystic fibrosis. Part 2: pancreatic and gastrointestinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common fatal, autosomal recessive disease among the white population. Although recurrent pulmonary infections and pulmonary insufficiency are the major causes of morbidity and mortality, gastrointestinal symptoms generally present earlier and may suggest the diagnosis in the newborn or even prior to birth. The changes are attributed to the secretion of an abnormally thick mucous into the intestinal lumen, leading to the hallmark of diseases of the digestive tract: obstruction. This can be detected at birth in the form of mecanium ileus, ileal atresia, mecanium peritonitis and mecomiun plug, or present later on in childhood and adolescence as distal bowel obstruction syndrome or fibrosing colonopathy. This thick mucous can also trigger intussusception or acute appendicitis. Pancreatic insufficiency or pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the direct cause of most of these disorders. Plain radiography is of the utmost utility in assessing the digestive tract in CF. When the disease is detected in a newborn, the recommended approach is to perform plain abdominal X-ray, followed by barium enema, always accompanied by ultrasound. In older children and adolescents, enema and ultrasound are usually sufficient, although computed tomography and magnetic resonance may sometimes be necessary. (Author) 52 refs

  19. The effects of cannabidiolic acid and cannabidiol on contractility of the gastrointestinal tract of Suncus murinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluny, Nina L; Naylor, Robert J; Whittle, Brian A; Javid, Farideh A

    2011-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI) transit in pathophysiologic in vivo models, while having no effect in physiologic controls. The actions of the precursor of CBD, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), have not been investigated in the GI tract. The actions of these phytocannabinoids on the contractility of the GI tract of Suncus murinus were investigated in the current study. The effects of CBDA and CBD in resting state and pre-contracted isolated intestinal segments, and on the contractile effects of carbachol and electrical field stimulation (EFS) on the intestines of S. murinus were examined. CBDA and CBD induced a reduction in resting tissue tension of isolated intestinal segments which was not blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, the CB(2) receptor antagonist AM630, or tetrodotoxin. CBDA and CBD reduced the magnitude of contractions induced by carbachol and the tension of intestinal segments that were pre-contracted with potassium chloride. In tissues stimulated by EFS, CBDA inhibited contractions induced by lower frequencies (0.1-4.0 Hz) of EFS, while CBD inhibited contractions induced by higher frequencies (4.0-20.0 Hz) of EFS. The data suggest that CBDA and CBD have inhibitory actions on the intestines of S. murinus that are not neuronallymediated or mediated via CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. PMID:21975813

  20. Metabolic Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT: Host, Commensal, Probiotics, and Bacteriophage Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vitetta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Life on this planet has been intricately associated with bacterial activity at all levels of evolution and bacteria represent the earliest form of autonomous existence. Plants such as those from the Leguminosae family that form root nodules while harboring nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria are a primordial example of symbiotic existence. Similarly, cooperative activities between bacteria and animals can also be observed in multiple domains, including the most inhospitable geographical regions of the planet such as Antarctica and the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. In humans bacteria are often classified as either beneficial or pathogenic and in this regard we posit that this artificial nomenclature is overly simplistic and as such almost misinterprets the complex activities and inter-relationships that bacteria have with the environment as well as the human host and the plethora of biochemical activities that continue to be identified. We further suggest that in humans there are neither pathogenic nor beneficial bacteria, just bacteria embraced by those that tolerate the host and those that do not. The densest and most complex association exists in the human gastrointestinal tract, followed by the oral cavity, respiratory tract, and skin, where bacteria—pre- and post-birth—instruct the human cell in the fundamental language of molecular biology that normally leads to immunological tolerance over a lifetime. The overall effect of this complex output is the elaboration of a beneficial milieu, an environment that is of equal or greater importance than the bacterium in maintaining homeostasis.

  1. Effects of season and reproductive state on lipid intake and fatty acid composition of gastrointestinal tract contents in the European hare

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, F. D.; Hackländer, K.; Arnold, W.; Ruf, T.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of gastrointestinal tract contents in free-living, herbivorous European hares (Lepus europaeus). Mean crude fat content in hare stomachs and total gastrointestinal (GI) tracts was higher than expected for typical herbivore forages and peaked in late fall when hares massively deposited body fat reserves. Changes of FA proportions in different parts of the GI-tract indicated a highly preferential absorption of polyunsaturated fatty a...

  2. Lymphomatous involvement of gastrointestinal tract: Evaluation by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sith Phongkitkarun; Vithya Varavithya; Toshiki Kazama; Silvana C Faria; Martha V Mar; Donald A Podoloff; Homer A Macapinlac

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) findings in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) involving the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the clinical utility of modality despite of the known normal uptake of FDG in the GI tract.METHODS: Thirty-three patients with biopsy-proven gastrointestinal NHL who had undergone FDG-PET scan were included. All the patients were injected with 10-15 mCi FDG and scanned approximately 60 min later with a CTI/Siemens HR (+) PET scanner. PET scans were reviewed and the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the lesions was measured before and after the treatment,if data were available and compared with histologic diagnoses.RESULTS: Twenty-five patients had a high-grade lymphoma and eight had a low-grade lymphoma. The stomach was the most common site of the involvement (20 patients). In high-grade lymphoma, PET showed focal nodular or diffuse hypermetabolic activity. The average SUVmax±SD was 11.58±5.83. After the therapy,the patients whose biopsies showed no evidence of lymphoma had a lower uptake without focal lesions.The SUVmax±SD decreased from 11.58±5.83 to 2.21±0.78. In patients whose post-treatment biopsies showed lymphoma, the SUVmax±SD was 9.42±6.27. Low-grade follicular lymphomas of the colon and stomach showed diffuse hypermetabolic activity in the bowel wall (SUVmax 8.2 and 10.3, respectively). The SUVmax was 2.02-3.8 (mean 3.02) in the stomach lesions of patients with MALT lymphoma.CONCLUSION: 18F-FDG PET contributes to the diagnosis of high-grade gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma,even when there is the normal background FDG activity. Furthermore, the SUV plays a role in evaluating treatment response. Low-grade NHL demonstrates FDG uptake but at a lesser intensity than seen in high-grade NHL.

  3. Anatomic-physiological schema of the gastrointestinal tract, to be taken in account in determining the levels of radioactive contamination; Schema anatomo-physiologique du tractus gastro-intestinal a prendre en consideration pour le calcul des niveaux de contamination Radioactive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache, Association EURATOM-CEA, Niveaux de Contamination (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Anatomical and physiological data of the gastrointestinal tract of adults and children were summarized in a standard schema, to be used in calculating the levels of radioactive contamination, in the food chain. (author) [French] Cette note a pour objet de rassembler les donnees anatomiques et physiologiques du tractus gastrointestinal, chez l'adulte et chez l'enfant, et d'en deduire un schema standard qui puisse servir de base au calcul des niveaux de contamination de la chaine alimentaire par les substances radioactives. (auteur)

  4. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract; Syndrome aigu d'irradiation: les atteintes du systeme gastro-intestinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, N.M.; Dublineau, I.; Lebrun, F.; Linard, C.; Monti, P.; Picard, C.; Scanff, P.; Aigueperse, J. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2002-06-01

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  5. Evaluation of patient doses from upper gastrointestinal tract examinations based on the dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate organ dose and effective dose to patients from examinations of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Absorbed doses of various tissues and organs were measured using novel photodiode dosimeters installed in an anthropomorphic phantom representing a standard Japanese adult body. The organ dose and the effective dose were assessed from the absorbed doses according to the definitions seen in the publications of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Dose measurements were performed for each projection of the upper GI tract examination in seven procedures at four hospitals and in a mobile coach, and organ and effective doses were assessed for each procedure. Organ doses obtained in the observation areas such as the stomach, esophagus and colon were in the order of several to more than 60 mGy, though they decreased to less than 1 mGy for tissues and organs distant from the observation areas. Organ doses and effective doses differed largely according to tube voltage, filtration and tube current or mAs value of the x-ray generator used, and by examination protocol, number of images, fluoroscopy time, and imaging units such as screen/film, computed radiography, digital radiography and flat panel detector. The number of images and the fluoroscopy time were 7 and 1.5 min for the examination in the mobile coach, and 18-22 and 2-6 min in the hospitals. Evaluated effective dose for the examination in the mobile coach was 2.9 mSv, and that in the hospitals ranged from 4.0-13.4 mSv at a ratio of more than three. (author)

  6. X-ray diagnosis of synchronous multiple primary carcinoma in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hao Yang; Jian-Bo Gao; Song-Wei Yue; Hua Guo; Xue-Hua Yang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the radiological features of multiple primary carcinoma (MPC) in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, study its biological characteristics and evaluate X-ray examination in its diagnosis.METHODS: Hypotonic double-contrast GI radiography was performed in 59 multiple primary carcinoma cases, pathologically proved by surgery or endoscopy biopsy.Radiological findings were analyzed.RESULTS: Of the 59 cases, esophageal MPC (EMPC) was seen in 24, esophageal and gastric MPC (EGMPC) in 27 and gastric MPC (GMPC) in 8.Of the 49 lesions found in 24 EMPC, hyperplastic type was seen in 23, medullary type in 9.The lesions were located at the upper (n = 17), middle (n = 19) or lower (n = 13) segment of the esophagus.In 27 EGMPC, the esophageal lesions were located at the middle (n = 16) or lower (n = 11) segment of the esophagus, while the gastric lesions were located at the gastric cardia (n = 16), fundus (n = 1), body (n = 3) and antrum (n = 7).The esophageal lesions were mainly of the hyperplastic type (n = 12) or medullary type (n = 7), while the gastric lesions were mainly of the hyperplastic type (n = 18).A total of 119 lesions in the 59 patients with synchronous multiple carcinoma were proved by surgery or endoscopy biopsy, and preoperative upper radiographic examination detected 100 of them (84.03% sensitivity).Eighteen (52.94%) of the T1 lesions were found during preoperative diagnosis by radiographic examination.Moreover, only 3 (3.53%) of the T2-4 lesions were misdiagnosed.CONCLUSION: Hypotonic double-contrast upper gastrointestinal examination, providing accurate information about lesion morphology, location and size, can serve as a sensitive technique for the preoperative diagnosis of MPC.

  7. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  8. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Montalvillo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity. Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  9. Effects of ghrelin on interdigestive contractions of the rat gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Taniguchi; Hajime Ariga; Jun Zheng; Kirk Ludwig; Toku Takahashi

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin causes interdigestive contractions of the stom-ach in rats. However, it remains unknown whether ghrelin causes interdigestive contractions in the small intestine. Four strain gauge transducers were implanted on the antrum, duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum. After an overnight fast, gastrointestinal (GI) contrac-tions were recorded in freely moving conscious rats. Spontaneous phase Ⅲ-like contractions were observed at every 13-16 rain in rat GI tract. The fasted motor patterns were replaced by the fed motor pattern imme-diately after food intake. Two minutes after finishing the per min) significantly increased motility index of phase Ⅲ-like contractions at the antrum and jejunum in a dose dependent manner, compared to that of saline in-jection. Thus, it is likely that exogenously administered ghrelin causes phase Ⅲ-like contraction at the antrum, which migrates to the duodenum and jejunum. The possible role of 5-HT, in addition to ghrelin, in mediating intestinal migrating motor complex (MMC), is discussed.

  10. A rare case of langerhans cell histiocytosis of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Uday Shankar; Monika Prasad; Om P Chaurasia

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by the proliferation of specialized,bone marrow-derived langerhans cells and mature eosinophils.The clinical spectrum ranges from an acute,fulminant,disseminated disease called LettererSiwe disease to solitary or few,indolent and chronic lesions of the bone or other organs called eosinophilic granuloma.Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is very rare in LCH.We present the case of a 53-year-old woman referred by her primary care physician for a screening colonoscopy.A single sessile polyp,measuring 4 mm in size,was found in the rectum.Histopathological examination revealed that the lesion was relatively well circumscribed and comprised mainly a mixture of polygonal cells with moderate-to-abundant pink slightly granular cytoplasm.The nuclei within these cells had frequent grooves and were occasionally folded.Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD-1a which confirmed the diagnosis of LCH.On further workup,there was no evidence of involvement of any other organ.On follow up colonoscopy one year later,there was no evidence of disease recurrence.Review of the published literature revealed that LCH presenting as solitary colonic polyp is rare.However,with the increasing rates of screening colonoscopy,more colonic polyps may be identified as LCH on histopathology.This underscores the importance of recognizing this rare condition and ensuring proper follow-up to rule out systemic disease.

  11. Changes and Effects of Dietary Oxidized Lipids in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Holgado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the present state-of-the art of modifications and effects of dietary oxidized lipids during their transit along the gastrointestinal tract. A survey of the literature reporting changes and effects of oxidized lipids before absorption, first in the stomach and then during enzymatic lipolysis in the small intestine, are addressed. Also, the fate of non-absorbed compounds and their potential implications at the colorectal level are discussed. Among the results found, it is shown that acidic gastric conditions and the influence of other dietary components may lead to either further oxidation or antioxidative effects in the stomach. Also, changes in oxidized functions, especially of hydroperoxy and epoxy groups, seem likely to occur. Enzymatic hydrolysis by pancreatic lipase is not effective for triacylglycerol polymers, and hence they can be found as non-absorbed oxidized lipids in the large intestine. Interactions of oxidized lipids with cholesterol absorption in the small intestine and with microflora metabolism have been also observed.

  12. Live Probiotic Cultures and the Gastrointestinal Tract: Symbiotic Preservation of Tolerance Whilst Attenuating Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis eVitetta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria comprise the earliest form of independent life on this planet. Bacterial development has included co–operative symbiosis with plants (e.g., Leguminosae family and nitrogen fixing bacteria in soil and animals (e.g., the gut microbiome. A fusion event of two prokaryotes evolutionarily gave rise to the eukaryote cell in which mitochondria may be envisaged as a genetically functional mosaic, a relic from one of the prokaryote cells. The discovery of bacterial inhibitors such chloramphenicol and others has been exploited to highlight mitochondria as arising from a bacterial progenitor. As such the evolution of human life has been complexly connected to bacterial activity. This is embodied, by the appearance of mitochondria in eukaryotes (alphaproteobacteria contribution, a significant endosymbiotic evolutionary event. During the twentieth century there was an increasing dependency on anti–microbials as mainline therapy against bacterial infections. It is only comparatively recently that the essential roles played by the gastrointestinal tract (GIT microbiome in animal health and development has been recognized as opposed to the GIT microbiome being a toxic collection of micro–organisms. It is now well documented that t

  13. The use of BLT humanized mice to investigate the immune reconstitution of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Angela; Victor Garcia, J

    2014-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) track represents an important battlefield where pathogens first try to gain entry into a host. It is also a universe where highly diverse and ever changing inhabitants co-exist in an exceptional equilibrium without parallel in any other organ system of the body. The gut as an organ has its own well-developed and fully functional immune organization that is similar and yet different in many important ways to the rest of the immune system. Both a compromised and an overactive immune system in the gut can have dire and severe consequences to human health. It has therefore been of great interest to develop animal models that recapitulate key aspects of the human condition to better understand the interplay of the host immune system with its friends and its foes. However, reconstitution of the GI tract in humanized mice has been difficult and highly variable in different systems. A better molecular understanding of the development of the gut immune system in mice has provided critical cues that have been recently used to develop novel humanized mouse models that fully recapitulate the genesis and key functions of the gut immune system of humans. Of particular interest is the presence of human gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) aggregates in the gut of NOD/SCID BLT humanized mice that demonstrate the faithful development of bona fide human plasma cells capable of migrating to the lamina propria and producing human IgA1 and IgA2.

  14. Genomic analysis of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the calf gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William J.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Altermann, Eric; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Perry, Rechelle; Teh, Koon Hoong; Otter, Don E.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Leahy, Sinead C.

    2016-01-01

    Ruminant animals contribute significantly to the global value of agriculture and rely on a complex microbial community for efficient digestion. However, little is known of how this microbial-host relationship develops and is maintained. To begin to address this, we have determined the ability of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the faeces of newborn calves to grow on carbohydrates typical of a newborn ruminant diet. Genome sequences have been determined for these bacteria with analysis of the genomes providing insights into the host association and identification of several genes that may mediate interactions with the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. The present study provides a starting point from which we can define the role of potential beneficial microbes in the nutrition of young ruminants and begin to influence the interactions between the microbiota and the host. The differences observed in genomic content hint at niche partitioning among the bifidobacterial species analysed and the different strategies they employ to successfully adapt to this habitat. PMID:27468806

  15. Factors influencing gastrointestinal tract and microbiota immune interaction in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, María Carmen; Cernada, María; Neu, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Gormaz, María; Vento, Máximo

    2015-06-01

    The role of microbial colonization is indispensable for keeping a balanced immune response in life. However, the events that regulate the establishment of the microbiota, their timing, and the way in which they interact with the host are not yet fully understood. Factors such as gestational age, mode of delivery, environment, hygienic measures, and diet influence the establishment of microbiota in the perinatal period. Environmental microbes constitute the most important group of exogenous stimuli in this critical time frame. However, the settlement of a stable gut microbiota in preterm infants is delayed compared to term infants. Preterm infants have an immature gastrointestinal tract and immune system which predisposes to infectious morbidity. Neonatal microbial dynamics and alterations in early gut microbiota may precede and/or predispose to diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), late-onset sepsis or others. During this critical period, nutrition is the principal contributor for immunological and metabolic development, and microbiological programming. Breast milk is a known source of molecules that act synergistically to protect the gut barrier and enhance the maturation of the gut-related immune response. Host-microbe interactions in preterm infants and the protective role of diet focused on breast milk impact are beginning to be unveiled.

  16. Effect of encapsulation of selected probiotic cell on survival in simulated gastrointestinal tract condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasiah Ayama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The health benefits of probiotic bacteria have been led to their increasing use in foods. Encapsulation has been investigated to improve their survival. In this study, the selection, encapsulation and viability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB with probiotic properties in simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT condition were investigated. One hundred and fifty isolates of LAB were obtained from 30 samples of raw cow and goat milk and some fermented foods. Nine isolates could survive under GIT condition and only 3 isolates exhibited an antimicrobial activity against all food-borne pathogenic bacteria. Among them, 2 isolates (CM21 and CM53 exhibited bile salt hydrolase activity on glycocholate and glycodeoxycholate agar plates and were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. CM53 was selected for encapsulation using 1-3% alginate and 2% Hi-maize resistant starch by emulsion system. Viability and releasing ability of encapsulated CM53 in simulated GIT condition was increased in accordance to the alginate concentration and incubation time, respectively.

  17. Antibiotic resistance of Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated from different animals gastrointestinal tracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Hleba

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we monitored antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated from different animals gastrointestinal tracts  (GIT. We isolated Enterobacteriaceae from chicken, ducks, lambs, pigs, sheeps, cows and rabbits collected from slovakian farms. Enterobacteriaceae strains were cultivated on MacConkey agar at 35° ± 2°C at 24 hours. Pure cultures of Enterobacteriaceae strains were obtained by four-way streak method on Chromogenic coliform agar. Identification of purified Enterobacteriaceae strains were done by Enterotest 24 and MALDI TOF MS. For susceptibility testing disk diffusion method was used according by EUCAST. We determined the most resistance in Enterobacteriaceae strains against streptomycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, piperecillin, levofloxacine, chloramphenicol and smaller level of resistance against amikacin, ceftriaxone and ofloxacine. Equally we detected resistance to more antibiotics in one strain. The most resistance was Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium. Also E. coli was resistance against four antibiotics and Raoultella ornithinolytica too. Antibiotic resistance was found in other isolated strains too.

  18. Building a three-dimensional model of the upper gastrointestinal tract for computer simulations of swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelum, Alfonso; Mata, Lucely; Brito-de-la-Fuente, Edmundo; Delmas, Patrice; Vicente, William; Salinas-Vázquez, Martín; Ascanio, Gabriel; Marquez, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to provide realistic three-dimensional (3D) models to be used in numerical simulations of peristaltic flow in patients exhibiting difficulty in swallowing, also known as dysphagia. To this end, a 3D model of the upper gastrointestinal tract was built from the color cryosection images of the Visible Human Project dataset. Regional color heterogeneities were corrected by centering local histograms of the image difference between slices. A voxel-based model was generated by stacking contours from the color images. A triangle mesh was built, smoothed and simplified. Visualization tools were developed for browsing the model at different stages and for virtual endoscopy navigation. As result, a computer model of the esophagus and the stomach was obtained, mainly for modeling swallowing disorders. A central-axis curve was also obtained for virtual navigation and to replicate conditions relevant to swallowing disorders modeling. We show renderings of the model and discuss its use for simulating swallowing as a function of bolus rheological properties. The information obtained from simulation studies with our model could be useful for physicians in selecting the correct nutritional emulsions for patients with dysphagia.

  19. Genomic analysis of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the calf gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William J; Cookson, Adrian L; Altermann, Eric; Lambie, Suzanne C; Perry, Rechelle; Teh, Koon Hoong; Otter, Don E; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Leahy, Sinead C

    2016-01-01

    Ruminant animals contribute significantly to the global value of agriculture and rely on a complex microbial community for efficient digestion. However, little is known of how this microbial-host relationship develops and is maintained. To begin to address this, we have determined the ability of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the faeces of newborn calves to grow on carbohydrates typical of a newborn ruminant diet. Genome sequences have been determined for these bacteria with analysis of the genomes providing insights into the host association and identification of several genes that may mediate interactions with the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. The present study provides a starting point from which we can define the role of potential beneficial microbes in the nutrition of young ruminants and begin to influence the interactions between the microbiota and the host. The differences observed in genomic content hint at niche partitioning among the bifidobacterial species analysed and the different strategies they employ to successfully adapt to this habitat. PMID:27468806

  20. Treatment tactics in patient with articular pathology and concominant disorders of upper gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O N Minushkin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study nise efficacy and safety in pts with rheumatic diseases (RD with concomitant disorders of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Material and methods. An open uncontrolled multicenter nise study was conducted on 600 pts (mean age 54,8 years with RD (rheumatoid arthritis - RA, osteoarthritis - OA, spine osteochondrosis with radicular syndrome - ОС. 20% of pts had G1 diseases at inclusion. Nise® was administered 200 mg/day for 30 days. An additional examination (esophagogastroduodenoscopy - EGDS, US, laboratory investigation was performed in 30 pts with RD (20 - OA, 10 - ОС, mean age 48,4 years and concomitant GI disorders (gastric ulcer in remission, erosive duodenitis, chronic pancreatitis, cholecystilis. Results. Nise® was effective in 40% from 600 pts with RD. (% of pts had non severe GI adverse events. The drug was withdrawn due to dyspepsia in only 0,2% of cases. Pain syndrome was eliminated in 90% from 30 pts with RD and GI disorders. 25 from them completed the trial. Severe adverse events did not appear. EGDS did not revealed exacerbation or appearance of new GI ulcers. Conclusion. Nise® is an effective and relatively safe NSAID which can be administered in pts with RD and concomitant GI disorders with EGDS control.

  1. Reduced expression of Ca2+-regulating proteins in the upper gastrointestinal tract of patients with achalasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harald Fischer; Judith Fischer; Peter Boknik; Ulrich Gergs; Wilhelm Schmitz; Wolfram Domschke; Jan W Konturek; Joachim Neumann

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare expression of Ca2+-regulating proteins in upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract of achalasia patients and healthy volunteers and to elucidate their role in achalasia.METHODS: Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA)isoforms 2a and 2b, phospholamban (PLB), calsequestrin (CSQ), and calreticulin (CRT) were assessed by quantitative Western blotting in esophagus and heart of rats, rabbits, and humans. Furthermore, expression profiles of these proteins in biopsies of lower esophageal sphincter and esophagus from patients with achalasia and healthy volunteers were analyzed.RESULTS: SERCA 2a protein expression was much higher in human heart (cardiac ventricle) compared to esophagus. However, SERCA 2b was expressed predominantly in the esophagus. The highest CRT expression was noted in the human esophagus, while PLB, although highly expressed in the heart, was below our detection limit in upper GI tissue. Compared to healthy controls, CSQ and CRT expression in lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophageal body were significantly reduced in patients with achalasia (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: PLB in the human esophagus might be of lesser importance for regulation of SERCA than in heart. Lower expression of Ca2+ storage proteins (CSQ and CRT) might contribute to increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure in achalasia, possibly by increasing free intracellular Ca2+.

  2. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  3. Tea, coffee, carbonated soft drinks and upper gastrointestinal tract cancer risk in a large United States prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, JS; Freedman, ND; Kamangar, F; Dawsey, SM; Hollenbeck, AR; Schatzkin, A; Abnet, CC

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between hot tea, iced tea, coffee and carbonated soft drinks consumption and upper gastrointestinal tract cancers risk in the NIH-AARP Study. During 2,584,953 person-years of follow-up on 481,563 subjects, 392 oral cavity, 178 pharynx, 307 larynx, 231 gastric cardia, 224 gastric noncardia cancer, 123 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and 305 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC) cases were accrued. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% Confidence Intervals (...

  4. Mapping enteroendocrine cell populations in transgenic mice reveals an unexpected degree of complexity in cellular differentiation within the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined with a monolayer of cells that undergo perpetual and rapid renewal. Four principal, terminally differentiated cell types populate the monolayer, enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, and enteroendocrine cells. This epithelium exhibits complex patterns of regional differentiation, both from crypt- to-villus and from duodenum-to-colon. The "liver" fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene represents a useful model for analyzing the molecular basis for intes...

  5. Isolation of a complete circular virus genome sequence from an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Zachary R.; Runckel, Charles; Fuchs, Jerome; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Mindell, David P.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.; Dumbacher, John P.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a circular virus isolated from samples of an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract. The genome is 2,152 bp in length and is most similar (30 to 44.5% amino acid identity) to the genome sequences of other single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) circular viruses belonging to the gemycircularvirus group.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus associated lymphoproliferative disorder with fatal involvement of the gastrointestinal tract in an infant.

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, L X; P. Ramani; Diss, T. C.; Liang, L N; Isaacson, P G

    1995-01-01

    A case of fatal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated lymphoproliferative disorder is reported in an 11 month old female. Heavy infiltrates of CD20 + and EBV EBER mRNA expressing lymphoid blasts were found to cause a series of ulcers along the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract and there was an ileal perforation. Similar infiltrates were also found in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Although blood phenotypic analysis performed shortly before her death revealed a severe decrease in T ly...

  7. Quality of life and its related factors among Iranian patients with metastatic gastrointestinal tract cancer: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbar Heydari Fard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Quality of life (QoL is an important issue in all cancer patients; especially in patients with metastatic cancer. But there is very little information available about QoL in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal cancer. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life and its associated factors among Iranian patients with metastatic gastrointestinal tract cancer. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 250 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal tract cancer were recruited from the one oncology center related to the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, between March 2012 and August 2013. Their QoL was evaluated using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire (Persian version. Results: In this study, the overall QoL score of patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer was 57.63, which was relatively optimal. There was a statistically significant relationship between symptoms scale and general health status domains of quality of life with age ( P < 0.05. Also, there was a significant association between patients′ gender and their social functioning ( P = 0.017 and also their emotional functioning ( P = 0.015. Conclusions: The findings suggest that in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal cancers, the most affected functions in their QoL were social and emotional functioning which get worse with age. Thus, providing psychological counseling and psychotherapy services to deliver culturally appropriate mental health care and social support for these patients and their families′ which can lead to the improvement of QoL in these patients is strongly recommended.

  8. Gastrointestinal tract metastasis from tubulolobular carcinoma of the breast: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang GX

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Guixin Wang, Tingjiang Wang, Jian Jiang, Luyao Zhou, Haidong Zhao Department of Breast Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Shahekou District, Dalian, Liaoning Province, People's Republic of China Abstract: Metastasis of breast cancer into the gastrointestinal tract happens rarely. The diagnosis of this kind of disease is difficult because of the nonspecific symptoms and the long interval between primary manifestations and recurrence. Awareness of this condition may lead to an accurate diagnosis and an earlier initiation of systemic treatment, thus avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention. In this paper, we report a rare case of a patient with tubulolobular carcinoma metastases to the colon, presenting with abdominal pain, discomfort, and weight loss. The patient underwent radical mastectomy and received postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Ten years later, she presented with gastrointestinal tract symptoms. Surgery combined with systemic treatment was chosen for the colon lesion. Immunohistochemical staining suggested a breast origin. The patient was still living 24 months after the diagnosis of the metastasis. This is the fourth case report in our literature review. Keywords: breast cancer, tubulolobular carcinoma, metastasis, gastrointestinal tract

  9. Clinical application of magnification endoscopy and narrow-band imaging in the upper gastrointestinal tract: new imaging techniques for detecting and characterizing gastrointestinal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kenshi; Takaki, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori; Anagnostopoulos, George K; Kaye, Philip; Ragunath, Krish

    2008-07-01

    This article introduces one of the most advanced endoscopy imaging techniques, magnification endoscopy with narrow-band imaging. This technique can clearly visualize the microvascular (MV) architecture and microsurface (MS) structure. The application of this technique is quite useful for characterizing the mucosal neoplasia in the hypopharynx, oropharynx, esophagus, and stomach. The key characteristic findings for early carcinomatous lesions are an irregular MV pattern or irregular MS pattern as visualized by this technique. Such a diagnostic system could be applied to the early detection of mucosal neoplasia throughout the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Actions of crude hydroalcoholic extract of Pfaffia sp on gastrointestinal tract

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    Cristina Setim Freitas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The plants that compound the Pfaffia genus are used in folk medicine to treat gastric disturbances. This study examined the effects of a crude hydroalcoholic extract of Pfaffia sp on the gastrointestinal tract. Female Wistar rats were pretreated orally (p.o. with the hydroalcoholic extract of Pfaffia (0.5, 1 and 2 g.kg-1 before the induction of ulcer with hypothermic restraint stress (HRS, ethanol (ET or indomethacin (IND. Control animals received water (C or ranitidine (60mg/kg p.o. The hydroalcoholic extract of Pfaffia (0.5, 1 and 2 mg.kg-1 protected rats against HRS and ET - induced ulcers, but was not able to protect the gastric mucosa against IND - induced ulcers. When injected into the duodenal lumen, the hydroalcoholic extract of Pfaffia inhibited basal and stimulated acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats. These results indicate that this plant has a protective action against gastric lesions of the mucosa involving the reduction of gastric acid secretion.As plantas que compõem o gênero Pfaffia são utilizadas na medicina popular para tratar distúrbios gástricos. O presente estudo verificou os efeitos de um extrato bruto hidroalcoólico de Pfaffia sp sobre o trato gastrointestinal. Ratos Wistar fêmeas, foram pré-tratados por via oral (p.o. com o extrato hidroalcoólico de Pfaffia sp (0,5; 1,0 e 2,0 g/kg 1 hora antes da indução de úlceras com estresse por imobilização e frio, com etanol 70% ou indometacina. Animais controle receberam água (C ou ranitidina (R: 60mg/kg - p.o. O tratamento com o extrato protegeu a mucosa gástrica contra o aparecimento de úlceras induzidas por estresse e etanol, mas não foi capaz de proteger a mucosa contra úlceras induzidas por indometacina. Quando injetado pela via intraduodenal (na luz do duodeno - i.d., o extrato hidroalcoólico de Pfaffia sp inibiu tanto a secreção ácida gástrica basal quanto a estimulada com histamina e betanecol (drogas agonistas, em ratas com ligadura de piloro. Os

  11. Silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods as multimodal contrast agents for a non-invasive visualization of the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaopeng; Shi, Junxin; Bu, Yang; Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Yin, Wenyan; Gao, Bifen; Yang, Zhiyong; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xiangfeng; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method and then coated with a SiO2 layer to improve their biocompatibility and stability in the harsh environments of the GI tract, such as the stomach and the small intestine. Due to their strong X-ray- and near infrared-absorption abilities, we demonstrate that, following oral administration in mice, the Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs can be used as a dual-modal contrast agent for the real-time and non-invasive visualization of NRs distribution and the GI tract via both X-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) techniques. Importantly, integration of PAT with CT provides complementary information on anatomical details with high spatial resolution. In addition, we use Caenorhabditis Elegans (C. Elegans) as a simple model organism to investigate the biological response of Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs by oral administration. The results indicate that these NRs can pass through the GI tract of C. Elegans without inducing notable toxicological effects. The above results suggest that Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs pave an alternative way for the fabrication of multi-modal contrast agents which integrate CT and PAT modalities for a direct and non-invasive visualization of the GI tract with low toxicity.Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile

  12. Retention time of digesta in the gastrointestinal tract of growing Saanen goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, R F; Krizsan, S J; Figueiredo, F O M; Carvalho, V B; Teixeira, I A M A; Huhtanen, P

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effect of increased BW on mean retention time (MRT) of both particulate and solute marker, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development, and fiber digestion in the whole tract of growing Saanen goats using the slaughter technique. A total of 58 Saanen goats with initial BW of 15.7 ± 0.9 kg were allocated into 9 treatments with a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement consisting of 3 sexes (female, castrated males, and intact males) and 3 slaughter weights (initial, intermediate, and final; target BW of 16, 23, and 30 kg at slaughter, respectively). They were fed twice daily (0700 and 1600 h) with the identical diets for ad libitum intake. Mean retention time of particulate matter was estimated by in situ determination of indigestible NDF (iNDF), and the MRT of solute marker was determined by Cr-EDTA. Treatment effects were evaluated in a split-plot design, with sex as the main plot and slaughter weight as the subplot. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts were used to determine linear and quadratic effects of slaughter weight, whereas the effect of sex was compared using the Tukey test. The effects of sex and sex × slaughter weight were not significant for most of variables evaluated. The results showed that DMI (% BW) linearly decreased as slaughter weight increased ( slaughter weight ( ≤ 0.05). The ratio of iNDF:NDF for both ingested diet and reticulorumen digesta linearly increased as slaughter weight increased ( ≤ 0.05). The MRT of particles did not change with increasing slaughter weight ( = 0.94). Mean retention time of particulate matter linearly increased in the omasum but linearly decreased in the abomasum with increasing slaughter weight ( slaughter weight ( < 0.01). The results revealed a decreased selectivity with increasing BW, as supported by a greater ratio of iNDF:NDF for ingested diet. Increasing BW led to neither a longer particle MRT in the reticulorumen nor a digestive advantage. The results also indicated that, on average, 91% of

  13. Gastrointestinal tolerance and utilization of agave inulin by healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holscher, Hannah D; Doligale, Jamie L; Bauer, Laura L; Gourineni, Vishnupriya; Pelkman, Christine L; Fahey, George C; Swanson, Kelly S

    2014-06-01

    Little clinical research exists on agave inulin as a fiber source. Due to differences in botanical origin and chemical structure compared to other inulin-type fibers, research is needed to assess gastrointestinal (GI) tolerance following consumption. This study aimed to evaluate GI tolerance and utilization of 5.0 and 7.5 g per day of agave inulin in healthy adults (n = 29) using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial consisting of three 21 day periods with 1 week washouts among periods. GI tolerance was assessed via daily and weekly questionnaires, three fecal samples were collected on days 16-20 of each period, and breath hydrogen testing was completed on the final day of each treatment period. Survey data were compared using a generalized linear mixed model. All other outcomes were analyzed using a mixed linear model with a repeated measures procedure. Composite GI intolerance scores for 5.0 and 7.5 g treatments were both greater (P inulin. Abdominal pain and rumbling intensity were marginally greater (P inulin did not affect diarrhea (P > 0.05). Number of bowel movements per day increased, stools were softer, and stool dry matter percentage was lower with 7.5 g (P inulin compared to control. These data demonstrate that doses up to 7.5 g per day of agave inulin led to minimal GI upset, do not increase diarrhea, and improve laxation in healthy young adults.

  14. Cancers of the upper gastro-intestinal tract: a review of somatic mutation distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Hainaut, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Cancers of the upper gastro-intestinal tract (UGIT) comprise esophageal, esophago-gastric junction, stomach and duodenal cancers. Together, these cancers represent over 1.5 million cases and are the cause of about 1.25 million deaths annually. This group of cancers encompasses diseases with marked disparities in etiology, geographic distribution, histopathological features and frequency. Based on histological origin, squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), which arises through a dysplasia-carcinoma sequence within the squamous mucosa, is a completely different cancer than junction, stomach and duodenal cancers, which develop within glandular epithelia through cascades involving inflammation, metaplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma. At the frontline between these two histological domains, cancers of the esophago-gastric junction constitute a mixed group of glandular tumors including distal esophageal adenocarcinomas and cancers arising within the most proximal part of the stomach - the cardia. Most of UGIT cancers are sporadic, although familial susceptibility genes have been identified for stomach and rare cases of ESCC. We have used the COSMIC database (http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/CGP/cosmic/) to identify genes commonly mutated in UGIT cancers. Regardless of etiology and histopathology, three genes are mutated in at least 5% of UGIT cancers: TP53, CDKN2a and PIK3CA. Another three genes, NFE2L2, PTCH1 and NOTCH1, are mutated in ESCC only. Conversely, genes of the RAS family and of the CDH1/APC/CTNNB1 pathway are mutated only in non-squamous cancers, with differences in mutated genes according to topography. We review the potential functional significance of these observations for understanding mechanisms of UGIT carcinogenesis.

  15. Age and Gender Affect the Composition of Fungal Population of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Francesco; Di Paola, Monica; Stefanini, Irene; Albanese, Davide; Rizzetto, Lisa; Lionetti, Paolo; Calabrò, Antonio; Jousson, Olivier; Donati, Claudio; Cavalieri, Duccio; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    The fungal component of the human gut microbiota has been neglected for long time due to the low relative abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria, and only recently few reports have explored its composition and dynamics in health or disease. The application of metagenomics methods to the full understanding of fungal communities is currently limited by the under representation of fungal DNA with respect to the bacterial one, as well as by the limited ability to discriminate passengers from colonizers. Here, we investigated the gut mycobiota of a cohort of healthy subjects in order to reduce the gap of knowledge concerning fungal intestinal communities in the healthy status further screening for phenotypical traits that could reflect fungi adaptation to the host. We studied the fecal fungal populations of 111 healthy subjects by means of cultivation on fungal selective media and by amplicon-based ITS1 metagenomics analysis on a subset of 57 individuals. We then characterized the isolated fungi for their tolerance to gastrointestinal (GI) tract-like challenges and their susceptibility to antifungals. A total of 34 different fungal species were isolated showing several phenotypic characteristics associated with intestinal environment such as tolerance to body temperature (37°C), to acidic and oxidative stress, and to bile salts exposure. We found a high frequency of azoles resistance in fungal isolates, with potential and significant clinical impact. Analyses of fungal communities revealed that the human gut mycobiota differs in function of individuals' life stage in a gender-related fashion. The combination of metagenomics and fungal cultivation allowed an in-depth understanding of the fungal intestinal community structure associated to the healthy status and the commensalism-related traits of isolated fungi. We further discussed comparatively the results of sequencing and cultivation to critically evaluate the application of metagenomics-based approaches to

  16. Histopathological and parasitological study of the gastrointestinal tract of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum

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    Pinto Aldair JW

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to provide a systematic pathological and parasitological overview of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon, of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania. Methods Twenty mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania infantum and obtained from the Control Zoonosis Center of the Municipality of Ribeirão das Neves, Belo Horizonte Metropolitan area, Minas Gerais (MG state, Brazil, were analyzed. The dogs were divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised nine clinically normal dogs and group 2 comprised 11 clinically affected dogs. After necropsy, one sample was collected from each GIT segment, namely the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon. Furthermore, paraffin-embedded samples were used for histological and parasitological (immunohistochemistry evaluation and a morphometrical study were carried out to determine the parasite load (immunolabeled amastigote forms of Leishmania. The Friedman and the Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The Friedman test was used to analyze each segment of the GIT within each group of dogs and the Mann Whitney test was used to compare the GIT segments between clinically unaffected and affected dogs. Results The infected dogs had an increased number of macrophages, plasma cells and lymphocytes, but lesions were generally mild. Parasite distribution in the GIT was evident in all intestinal segments and layers of the intestinal wall (mucosal, muscular and submucosal irrespective of the clinical status of the dogs. However, the parasite load was statistically higher in the caecum and colon than in other segments of the GIT. Conclusion The high parasite burden evident throughout the GIT mucosa with only mild pathological alterations led us to consider whether Leishmania gains an advantage from the intestinal immunoregulatory response (immunological tolerance.

  17. Age and Gender Affect the Composition of Fungal Population of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Francesco; Di Paola, Monica; Stefanini, Irene; Albanese, Davide; Rizzetto, Lisa; Lionetti, Paolo; Calabrò, Antonio; Jousson, Olivier; Donati, Claudio; Cavalieri, Duccio; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    The fungal component of the human gut microbiota has been neglected for long time due to the low relative abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria, and only recently few reports have explored its composition and dynamics in health or disease. The application of metagenomics methods to the full understanding of fungal communities is currently limited by the under representation of fungal DNA with respect to the bacterial one, as well as by the limited ability to discriminate passengers from colonizers. Here, we investigated the gut mycobiota of a cohort of healthy subjects in order to reduce the gap of knowledge concerning fungal intestinal communities in the healthy status further screening for phenotypical traits that could reflect fungi adaptation to the host. We studied the fecal fungal populations of 111 healthy subjects by means of cultivation on fungal selective media and by amplicon-based ITS1 metagenomics analysis on a subset of 57 individuals. We then characterized the isolated fungi for their tolerance to gastrointestinal (GI) tract-like challenges and their susceptibility to antifungals. A total of 34 different fungal species were isolated showing several phenotypic characteristics associated with intestinal environment such as tolerance to body temperature (37°C), to acidic and oxidative stress, and to bile salts exposure. We found a high frequency of azoles resistance in fungal isolates, with potential and significant clinical impact. Analyses of fungal communities revealed that the human gut mycobiota differs in function of individuals' life stage in a gender-related fashion. The combination of metagenomics and fungal cultivation allowed an in-depth understanding of the fungal intestinal community structure associated to the healthy status and the commensalism-related traits of isolated fungi. We further discussed comparatively the results of sequencing and cultivation to critically evaluate the application of metagenomics-based approaches to

  18. Management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage: Controversies and areas of uncertainty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric P Trawick; Patrick S Yachimski

    2012-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage (UGIH) remains a common presentation requiring urgent evaluation and treatment.Accurate assessment,appropriate intervention and apt clinical skills are needed for proper management from time of presentation to discharge.The advent of pharmacologic acid suppression,endoscopic hemostatic techniques,and recognition of Helicobacter pylori as an etiologic agent in peptic ulcer disease (PUD)has revolutionized the treatment of UGIH.Despite this,acute UGIH still carries considerable rates of morbidity and mortality.This review aims to discuss current areas of uncertainty and controversy in the management of UGIH.Neoadjuvant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has become standard empiric treatment for UGIH given that PUD is the leading cause of non-variceal UGIH,and PPIs are extremely effective at promoting ulcer healing.However,neoadjuvant PPI administration has not been shown to affect hard clinical outcomes such as rebleeding or mortality.The optimal timing of upper endoscopy in UGIH is often debated.Upon completion of volume resuscitation and hemodynamic stabilization,upper endoscopy should be performed within 24 h in all patients with evidence of UGIH for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.With rising healthcare cost paramount in today's medical landscape,the ability to appropriately triage UGIH patients is of increasing value.Upper endoscopy in conjunction with the clinical scenario allows for accurate decision making concerning early discharge home in low-risk lesions or admission for further monitoring and treatment in higher-risk lesions.Concomitant pharmacotherapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antiplatelet agents,such as clopidogrel,has a major impact on the etiology,severity,and potential treatment of UGIH.Long-term PPI use in patients taking chronic NSAIDs or clopidogrel is discussed thoroughly in this review.

  19. Cancers of the upper gastro-intestinal tract: a review of somatic mutation distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Hainaut, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Cancers of the upper gastro-intestinal tract (UGIT) comprise esophageal, esophago-gastric junction, stomach and duodenal cancers. Together, these cancers represent over 1.5 million cases and are the cause of about 1.25 million deaths annually. This group of cancers encompasses diseases with marked disparities in etiology, geographic distribution, histopathological features and frequency. Based on histological origin, squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), which arises through a dysplasia-carcinoma sequence within the squamous mucosa, is a completely different cancer than junction, stomach and duodenal cancers, which develop within glandular epithelia through cascades involving inflammation, metaplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma. At the frontline between these two histological domains, cancers of the esophago-gastric junction constitute a mixed group of glandular tumors including distal esophageal adenocarcinomas and cancers arising within the most proximal part of the stomach - the cardia. Most of UGIT cancers are sporadic, although familial susceptibility genes have been identified for stomach and rare cases of ESCC. We have used the COSMIC database (http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/CGP/cosmic/) to identify genes commonly mutated in UGIT cancers. Regardless of etiology and histopathology, three genes are mutated in at least 5% of UGIT cancers: TP53, CDKN2a and PIK3CA. Another three genes, NFE2L2, PTCH1 and NOTCH1, are mutated in ESCC only. Conversely, genes of the RAS family and of the CDH1/APC/CTNNB1 pathway are mutated only in non-squamous cancers, with differences in mutated genes according to topography. We review the potential functional significance of these observations for understanding mechanisms of UGIT carcinogenesis. PMID:24724606

  20. Bacteria and methanogens differ along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Wright, André-Denis G; Li, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus). The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and assigned to 2,223 core operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (12 bacterial phyla and 87 genera). The phyla Firmicutes (51.2%) and Bacteroidetes (39.4%) were the dominant bacteria in the GIT of roe deer. However, the bacterial community in the rumen was significantly (Pbacteria within the families Veillonellaceae and Paraprevotellaceae were more abundant in the rumen than in the other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Enterobacteriaceae, Succinivibrio spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. were more predominant in the colon than in other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroides spp. were more prevalent in the ileum, cecum and fecal pellets. For methanogens in the rumen and cecum, a total of 375,647 high quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and assigned to 113 core OTUs. Methanobrevibacter millerae was the dominant species accounting for 77.3±7.4 (S.E) % and 68.9±4.4 (S.E) % of total sequences in the rumen and cecum of roe deer, respectively. However, the abundance of Methanobrevibacter smithii was higher in the rumen than in the cecum (P = 0.004). These results revealed that there was intra variation in the bacterial community composition across the GIT of roe deer, and also showed that the methanogen community in the rumen differed from that in the cecum.

  1. Functional Development of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Hormone- and Growth Factor-Mediated Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ménard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the control of gastrointestinal (GI tract development. The first section addresses the differences in general mechanisms of GI development in humans versus rodents, highlighting that morphogenesis of specific digestive organs and the differentiation of digestive epithelia occur not only at different stages of ontogeny but also at different rates. The second section provides an overview of studies from the author's laboratory at the Université de Sherbrooke pertaining to the development of the human fetal small intestine and colon. While both segments share similar morphological and functional characteristics, they are nevertheless modulated by distinct regulatory mechanisms. Using the organ culture approach, the author and colleagues were able to establish that hormones and growth factors, such as glucocorticoids, epidermal growth factor, insulin and keratinocyte growth factor, not only exert differential effects within these two segments, they can also trigger opposite responses in comparison with animal models. In the third section, emphasis is placed on the functional development of human fetal stomach and its various epithelial cell types; in particular, the glandular chief cells responsible for the synthesis and secretion of gastric enzymes such as pepsinogen-5 and gastric lipase. Bearing in mind that limitations of available cell models have, until now, greatly impeded the comprehension of molecular mechanisms regulating human gastric epithelial cell functions, the last section focuses on new human gastric epithelial cell models recently developed in the author's laboratory. These models comprise a novel primary culture system of human fetal gastric epithelium including, for the first time, functional chief cells, and human gastric epithelium cell lines cloned from the parental NCI-N87 strain. These new cells lines could serve important applications in the study of pathogenic action and epithelial

  2. Diagnosis of dysplasia in upper gastro-intestinal tract biopsies through digital microscopy

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    Dorina Gui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide digital imaging (WSDI offers an alternative to glass slides for diagnostic interpretation. While prior work has concentrated on the use of whole slide digital imaging for routine diagnostic cases, this study focuses on diagnostic interpretation of digital images for a highly challenging area, upper gastro-intestinal (GI dysplasia. The aim of this study is to study the accuracy and efficiency of WSDI in the diagnosis of upper GI tract dysplasia. Materials and Methods: Forty-two hematoxylin and eosin (H and E-stained slides representing negative, indefinite, low grade and high grade dysplasia were selected and scanned at 20x (Aperio XT. Four attending GI pathologists reviewed the WSDI, then glass slides, with at least 3-4 weeks between each media; glass slides were re-reviewed 16-18 months later. Results: Intraobserver variability for three clinically relevant categories (negative, indefinite/low grade, high grade was wider for WSDI to glass (kappa range 0.36-0.78 than glass to glass (kappa range 0.58-0.75. In comparison to glass slide review, WSDI review required more time and was associated with an unexpected trend toward downgrading dysplasia. Conclusions: Our results suggest: (1 upper GI dysplasia can be diagnosed using WSDI with similar intraobserver reproducibility as for glass slides; however, this is not true for all pathologists; (2 pathologists may have a tendency to downgrade dysplasia in digital images; and (3 pathologists who use WSDI for interpretation of GI dysplasia cases may benefit from regular, on-going, re-review of paired digital and glass images to ensure the most accurate utilization of digital technology, at least in the early stages of implementation.

  3. Chemical coding and chemosensory properties of cholinergic brush cells in the mouse gastrointestinal and biliary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard eSchütz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mouse gastro-intestinal and biliary tract mucosal epithelia harbor choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-positive brush cells with taste cell-like traits. With the aid of two transgenic mouse lines that express green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the control of the ChAT promoter (EGFPChAT and by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that EGFPChAT cells were clustered in the epithelium lining the gastric groove. EGFPChAT cells were numerous in the gall bladder and bile duct, and found scattered as solitary cells along the small and large intestine. While all EGFPChAT cells were also ChAT-positive, expression of the high-affinity choline transporter (ChT1 was never detected. Except for the proximal colon, EGFPChAT cells also lacked detectable expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT. EGFPChAT cells were found to be separate from enteroendocrine cells, however they were all immunoreactive for cytokeratin 18 (CK18, transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5, and for cyclooxygenases 1 (COX1 and 2 (COX2. The ex vivo stimulation of colonic EGFPChAT cells with the bitter substance denatonium resulted in a strong increase in intracellular calcium, while in other epithelial cells such an increase was significantly weaker and also timely delayed. Subsequent stimulation with cycloheximide was ineffective in both cell populations. Given their chemical coding and chemosensory properties, EGFPChAT brush cells thus may have integrative functions and participate in induction of protective reflexes and inflammatory events by utilizing ACh and prostaglandins for paracrine signaling.

  4. Age and gender affect the composition of fungal population of the human gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Strati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fungal component of the human gut microbiota has been neglected for long time due to the low relative abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria, and only recently few reports have explored its composition and dynamics in health or disease. The application of metagenomics methods to the full understanding of fungal communities is currently limited by the under representation of fungal DNA with respect to the bacterial one, as well as by the limited ability to discriminate passengers from colonizers. Here we investigated the gut mycobiota of a cohort of healthy subjects in order to reduce the gap of knowledge concerning fungal intestinal communities in the healthy status further screening for phenotypical traits that could reflect fungi adaptation to the host. We studied the fecal fungal populations of 111 healthy subjects by means of cultivation on fungal selective media and by amplicon-based ITS1 metagenomics analysis on a subset of 57 individuals. We then characterized the isolated fungi for their tolerance to gastrointestinal tract-like challenges and their susceptibility to antifungals. A total of 34 different fungal species were isolated showing several phenotypic characteristics associated with intestinal environment such as tolerance to body temperature (37°C, to acidic and oxidative stress and to bile salts exposure. We found a high frequency of azoles resistance in fungal isolates, with potential and significant clinical impact. Analyses of fungal communities revealed that the human gut mycobiota differs in function of individuals’ life stage in a gender-related fashion. The combination of metagenomics and fungal cultivation allowed an in-depth understanding of the fungal intestinal community structure associated to the healthy status and the commensalism-related traits of isolated fungi. We further discussed comparatively the results of sequencing and cultivation to critically evaluate the application of metagenomics

  5. Ex vivo optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy imaging of murine gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Wade, Norman; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) have separately been found to have clinical potential in identifying human gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, yet their diagnostic capability in mouse models of human disease is unknown. We combine the two modalities to survey the GI tract of a variety of mouse strains and sample dysplasias and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of the small and large intestine. Segments of duodenum and lower colon 2.5 cm in length and the entire esophagus from 10 mice each of two colon cancer models (ApcMin and AOM treated A/J) and two IBD models (Il-2 and Il-10) and 5 mice each of their respective controls were excised. OCT images and LIF spectra were obtained simultaneously from each tissue sample within 1 hour of extraction. Histology was used to classify tissue regions as normal, Peyer"s patch, dysplasia, adenoma, or IBD. Features in corresponding regions of OCT images were analyzed. Spectra from each of these categories were averaged and compared via the student's t-test. Features in OCT images correlated to histology in both normal and diseased tissue samples. In the diseased samples, OCT was able to identify early stages of mild colitis and dysplasia. In the sample of IBD, the LIF spectra displayed unique peaks at 635nm and 670nm, which were attributed to increased porphyrin production in the proliferating bacteria of the disease. These peaks have the potential to act as a diagnostic for IBD. OCT and LIF appear to be useful and complementary modalities for imaging mouse models.

  6. Debilitating Chronic Diarrhea Caused by Generalized Gastrointestinal Cytomegalovirus Infection in an Immunocompetent Adult

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    Emmanouil Telakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is a common opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, especially patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and transplant recipients. In contrast, CMV infection of the gastrointestinal tract is rare in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of severe, protracted, and debilitating diarrhea caused by generalized CMV infection of the gastrointestinal tract in an elderly woman with no apparent immunosuppression. An extensive diagnostic investigation demonstrated CMV-associated disease affecting both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts (esophagus, small intestine, and colon. Such extensive simultaneous involvement of the alimentary tract in an immunocompetent patient is rare and presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The diagnosis was based on a combination of endoscopic, histopathological, serological, and polymerase chain reaction analysis findings and our patient was successfully treated with intravenous ganciclovir. Our case demonstrates that gastrointestinal CMV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe chronic diarrhea in immunocompetent patients and that antiviral treatment may be justified in this setting.

  7. Expression of Ciona intestinalis variable region-containing chitin-binding proteins during development of the gastrointestinal tract and their role in host-microbe interactions.

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    Assunta Liberti

    Full Text Available Variable region-containing chitin-binding proteins (VCBPs are secreted, immune-type molecules that have been described in both amphioxus, a cephalochordate, and sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, a urochordate. In adult Ciona, VCBP-A, -B and -C are expressed in hemocytes and the cells of the gastrointestinal tract. VCBP-C binds bacteria in the stomach lumen and functions as an opsonin in vitro. In the present paper the expression of VCBPs has been characterized during development using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical staining and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR technologies. The expression of VCBP-A and -C is detected first in discrete areas of larva endoderm and becomes progressively localized during differentiation in the stomach and intestine, marking the development of gut tracts. In "small adults" (1-2 cm juveniles expression of VCBP-C persists and VCBP-A gradually diminishes, ultimately replaced by expression of VCBP-B. The expression of VCBP-A and -C in stage 7-8 juveniles, at which point animals have already started feeding, is influenced significantly by challenge with either Gram-positive or -negative bacteria. A potential role for VCBPs in gut-microbiota interactions and homeostasis is indicated.

  8. Survival and synergistic growth of mixed cultures of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli combined with prebiotic oligosaccharides in a gastrointestinal tract simulator

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    Signe Adamberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotics, especially in combination with non-digestible oligosaccharides, may balance the gut microflora while multistrain preparations may express an improved functionality over single strain cultures. In vitro gastrointestinal models enable to test survival and growth dynamics of mixed strain probiotics in a controlled, replicable manner. Methods: The robustness and compatibility of multistrain probiotics composed of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli combined with mixed prebiotics (galacto-, fructo- and xylo-oligosaccharides or galactooligosaccharides and soluble starch were studied using a dynamic gastrointestinal tract simulator (GITS. The exposure to acid and bile of the upper gastrointestinal tract was followed by dilution with a continuous decrease of the dilution rate (de-celerostat to simulate the descending nutrient availability of the large intestine. The bacterial numbers and metabolic products were analyzed and the growth parameters determined. Results: The most acid- and bile-resistant strains were Lactobacillus plantarum F44 and L. paracasei F8. Bifidobacterium breve 46 had the highest specific growth rate and, although sensitive to bile exposure, recovered during the dilution phase in most experiments. B. breve 46, L. plantarum F44, and L. paracasei F8 were selected as the most promising strains for further studies. Conclusions: De-celerostat cultivation can be applied to study the mixed bacterial cultures under defined conditions of decreasing nutrient availability to select a compatible set of strains.

  9. 99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphy fails to detect Crohn's disease in the proximal gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, S; Chapman, S; Murphy, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the use of 99mTc-HMPAO (hexamethyl propylene amine oxime) leucocyte scintigraphy as a non-invasive screening test for inflammatory bowel disease.
PATIENTS—10 children with suspected Crohn's disease, in whom routine investigation using barium contrast radiology, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, and mucosal biopsies had identified severe gastroduodenal and/or jejunal involvement.
DESIGN—99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphic studies performed in each of these cases were assessed by a radiologist who was blinded to the disease distribution.
RESULTS—In nine cases there was no scintigraphic evidence of inflammation in the proximal gastrointestinal tract. The 10th child had both gastroduodenal and jejunal involvement, but scintigraphy only revealed faint jejunal positivity.
CONCLUSIONS—99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphy should not be depended upon as a screening test for Crohn's disease. False negative results are likely in cases with Crohn's disease confined to the proximal gastrointestinal tract.

 PMID:11420197

  10. Review on sedation for gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in children by non-anesthesiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Rok; Brecelj, Jernej; Dias, Jorge Amil; Romano, Claudio; Barros, Fernanda; Thomson, Mike; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present evidence and formulate recommendations for sedation in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy by non-anesthesiologists. METHODS: The databases MEDLINE, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for the following keywords “endoscopy, GI”, “endoscopy, digestive system” AND “sedation”, “conscious sedation”, “moderate sedation”, “deep sedation” and “hypnotics and sedatives” for publications in English restricted to the pediatric age. We searched additional information published between January 2011 and January 2014. Searches for (upper) GI endoscopy sedation in pediatrics and sedation guidelines by non-anesthesiologists for the adult population were performed. RESULTS: From the available studies three sedation protocols are highlighted. Propofol, which seems to offer the best balance between efficacy and safety is rarely used by non-anesthesiologists mainly because of legal restrictions. Ketamine and a combination of a benzodiazepine and an opioid are more frequently used. Data regarding other sedatives, anesthetics and adjuvant medications used for pediatric GI endoscopy are also presented. CONCLUSION: General anesthesia by a multidisciplinary team led by an anesthesiologist is preferred. The creation of sedation teams led by non-anesthesiologists and a careful selection of anesthetic drugs may offer an alternative, but should be in line with national legislation and institutional regulations. PMID:26240691

  11. Review on sedation for gastrointestinal tract endoscopy inchildren by non-anesthesiologists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To present evidence and formulate recommendationsfor sedation in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI)endoscopy by non-anesthesiologists.METHODS: The databases MEDLINE, Cochrane andEMBASE were searched for the following keywords"endoscopy, GI", "endoscopy, digestive system" AND"sedation", "conscious sedation", "moderate sedation","deep sedation" and "hypnotics and sedatives" forpublications in English restricted to the pediatric age.We searched additional information published between January 2011 and January 2014. Searches for (upper) GIendoscopy sedation in pediatrics and sedation guidelinesby non-anesthesiologists for the adult population wereperformed.RESULTS: From the available studies three sedationprotocols are highlighted. Propofol, which seems tooffer the best balance between efficacy and safety israrely used by non-anesthesiologists mainly becauseof legal restrictions. Ketamine and a combination ofa benzodiazepine and an opioid are more frequentlyused. Data regarding other sedatives, anesthetics andadjuvant medications used for pediatric GI endoscopyare also presented.CONCLUSION: General anesthesia by a multidisciplinaryteam led by an anesthesiologist is preferred. The creationof sedation teams led by non-anesthesiologists anda careful selection of anesthetic drugs may offer analternative, but should be in l

  12. Tumor markers for diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jie-Xian; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Ting; Tian, Bao-Guo; Du, Li-Li; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS for the clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer and to analyze the efficacy of these tumor markers (TMs) in evaluating curative effects and prognosis. A total of 573 patients with upper GIT cancer between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were examined preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively by ELISA. The sensitivity of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were 26.8%, 36.2%, 42.9%, 2.84%, 25.4%, 34.6%, 34.2% and 30.9%, respectively. The combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 had higher sensitivity and specificity in gastric cancer (GC) and cardiac cancer, while CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC was the best combination of diagnosis for esophageal cancer (EC). Elevation of preoperative CEA, CA19-9 and CA24-2, SCC and CA72-4 was significantly associated with pathological types (pCEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC decreased obviously 3 months after operations. When metastasis and recurrence occurred, the levels of TMs significantly increased. On multivariate analysis, high preoperative CA72-4, CA24-2 and SCC served as prognostic factors for cardiac carcinoma, GC and EC, respectively. combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC proved to be the most economic and practical strategy in diagnosis of EC; CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 proved to be a better evaluation indicator for cardiac cancer and GC. CEA and CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC, examined postoperatively during follow-up, were useful to find early tumor recurrence and metastasis, and evaluate prognosis. AFP, TPA and TPS have no significant value in diagnosis of patients with upper GIT cancer.

  13. A 90-day dietary study on kappa carrageenan with emphasis on the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Myra L; Nuber, David; Blakemore, William R; Harriman, Jay F; Cohen, Samuel M

    2007-01-01

    Groups of Fischer 344 rats (20/sex/group) received control or treated diets at levels of 0, 25,000 or 50,000 ppm kappa carrageenan with a molecular weight range (Mw) of 196,000-257,000 Da for 90 days. The Low Molecular Weight Tail (LMT) ranged between 1.9% and 12.0%<50 kDa (mean 7%) based on the results of a program initiated to develop a validated analytical method to measure the LMT. This is the first GLP dietary study in which carrageenan is characterized by percentage LMT. Clinical examinations were performed daily. Individual food consumption/body weight measurements were made weekly. Ophthalmic exam was conducted prior to and at the end of treatment. Hematology/serum chemistry and urinalysis evaluations were done at necropsy, as were organ weight determinations for adrenals, brain, heart, kidneys, liver, ovaries, spleen, testes and thyroid with parathyroids. Full histopathological evaluation of organs was conducted on the control and 50,000 ppm groups, including hematoxylin-eosin-stained cross sections of paraffin-embedded rolled colon. Clinical signs were limited to soft feces in high dose rats and to a lesser extent in low dose rats. There were no treatment-related effects on body weights, urinalysis, hematology or clinical chemistry parameters, or on organ weights or ophthalmic, macroscopic or microscopic findings. The gastrointestinal tract appeared normal in detailed histopathological evaluation using the Swiss roll technique. The NOAEL is 50,000 ppm in the diet (mean calculated test material consumption of 3394+/-706 mg/kg/day in males, 3867+/-647 mg/kg/day in females). The results of the study provide evidence that it is not necessary to characterize carrageenan by a specification for LMT (less than 5% below 50 kDa) as has been done in Commission Directive 2004/45/EC of 16 April 2004 (Commission Directive, 2004/45/EC of 16 April 2004 amending Directive 96/77/EC laying down specific purity criteria on food additives other than colors and sweeteners

  14. Bacteria and methanogens differ along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus.

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    Zhipeng Li

    Full Text Available The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus. The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and assigned to 2,223 core operational taxonomic units (OTUs (12 bacterial phyla and 87 genera. The phyla Firmicutes (51.2% and Bacteroidetes (39.4% were the dominant bacteria in the GIT of roe deer. However, the bacterial community in the rumen was significantly (P<0.01 different from the other sampled regions along the GIT. Secondly, Prevotella spp., Anaerovibrio spp., and unidentified bacteria within the families Veillonellaceae and Paraprevotellaceae were more abundant in the rumen than in the other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Enterobacteriaceae, Succinivibrio spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. were more predominant in the colon than in other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroides spp. were more prevalent in the ileum, cecum and fecal pellets. For methanogens in the rumen and cecum, a total of 375,647 high quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and assigned to 113 core OTUs. Methanobrevibacter millerae was the dominant species accounting for 77.3±7.4 (S.E % and 68.9±4.4 (S.E % of total sequences in the rumen and cecum of roe deer, respectively. However, the abundance of Methanobrevibacter smithii was higher in the rumen than in the cecum (P = 0.004. These results revealed that there was intra variation in the bacterial community composition across the GIT of roe deer, and also showed that the methanogen community in the rumen differed from that in the cecum.

  15. Comparison of different intervention procedures in benign stricture of gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Cheng Cheng; Ming-Hua Li; Wei-Xiong Chen; Ni-Wei Chen; Qi-Xin Zhuang; Ke-Zhong Shang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the most effective intervention procedure by evaluation of mid and long-term therapeutic efficacy in patients of stricture of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT).METHODS: Different intervention procedures were used to treat benign stricture of GIT in 180 patients including pneumatic dilation (group A, n=80), permanent (group B,n=25) and temporary (group C, n=75) placement of expandable metallic stents.RESULTS: The diameters of the strictured GIT were significantly greater after the treatment of all procedures employed (P<0.01). For the 80 patients in group A, 160 dilations were performed (mean, 2.0 times per patient).Complications in group A included chest pain (n=20), reflux (n=16), and bleeding (n=6). Dysphagia relapse occurred in 24 (30%) and 48 (60%) patients respectively during 6-and-12 momth follow-up periods in group A. In group B, 25 uncovered or partially covered or antireflux covered expandable metallic stents were placed permantly,complications included chest pain (n=10), reflux (n=15),bleeding (n=3), and stent migration (n=4), and dysphagia relapse occurred in 5 (20%) and 3 patients (25%) during the 6-and-12 month follow-up periods, respectively. In group C, the partially covered expandable metallic stents were temporarily placed in 75 patients and removed after 3 to 7 days via gastroscope, complications including chest pain (n=30), reflux (n=9), and bleeding (,n=12), and dysphagia relapse occurred in 9 (12%) and 8 patients (16%) during the 6-and-12 month follow-up periods, respectively. The placement and withdrawal of stents were all successfully performed. The follow-up of all patients lasted for 6 to 96 months (mean 45.3±18.6 months).CONCLUSION: The effective procedures for benign GIT stricture are pneumatic dilation and temporary placement of partially-covered expandable metallic stents. Temporary placement of partially-covered expandable metallic stents is one of the best methods for benign GIT strictures in mid and long

  16. The influence of age and weaning on permeability of the gastrointestinal tract in Holstein bull calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, K M; Palmer, S I; Steele, M A; Metcalf, J A; Penner, G B

    2015-10-01

    Fourteen Holstein bull calves were used in a randomized complete block design to investigate the effect of calf age and weaning on permeability of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: (1) a weaning protocol that was initiated on d 35; WN; n=7), or (2) a control treatment where calves were not weaned (CON; n=7). Calves were bottle-fed milk replacer (150 g/L), in 3 equal portions/d targeting 15% of their body weight (BW) in liquid milk intake [approximately 21.1g/kg of BW/d, dry matter (DM) basis]. On d 35, the amount of milk replacer offered to WN calves was reduced to 7.5% of BW for 7 d before calves were weaned on d 42. On d 14, 28, and 42, calves were orally dosed with 500 mL of Cr-EDTA (179 mM Cr-EDTA solution) and housed in a metabolism crate to enable total urine collection and determination of total urinary Cr recovery as an indicator of total-tract permeability. On d 44, calves were killed and tissues from the rumen, omasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and proximal and distal colon were collected, rinsed, and transported in buffer solution (pH 7.4 at 38.5°C). Tissues were incubated in Ussing chambers under short-circuit conditions with buffer solutions designed to mimic the mucosal and serosal energy source that would be available in vivo (glucose for tissues from the small intestine and short-chain fatty acids for tissues that would be exposed to fermentation; rumen, omasum, and large intestinal tissues). The serosal to mucosal flux of (14)C-mannitol and (3)H-inulin was measured for each region. Although we detected treatment × period interactions for BW and starter intake, dietary treatments did not differ within a week. Overall, the time that ruminal pH was <5.5 was less before weaning than after weaning. We observed a differential response for the appearance of Cr in urine for WN and CON calves, where the appearance of Cr (mg/48 h) in urine decreased for both treatments from d 14 to 28, but

  17. Uptake of the glycosphingolipid sulfatide in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas in vivo and in isolated islets of Langerhans

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    Fredman Pam

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glycosphingolipid sulfatide has previously been found in several mammalian tissues, but information on the uptake of exogenously administered sulfatide in different organs in vivo is limited. In pancreatic beta cells, sulfatide has been shown to be involved in insulin processing and secretion in vitro. In this study, we examined the uptake of exogenously administered sulfatide and its distribution to the pancreatic beta cells. This might encourage future studies of the function(s of sulfatide in beta cell physiology in vivo. Radioactive sulfatide was given orally to mice whereafter the uptake of sulfatide in the gastrointestinal tract and subsequent delivery to the pancreas was examined. Sulfatide uptake in pancreas was also studied in vivo by i.p. administration of radioactive sulfatide in mice, and in vitro in isolated rat islets. Isolated tissue/islets were analysed by scintillation counting, autoradiography and thin-layer chromatography-ELISA. Results Sulfatide was taken up in the gastrointestinal tract for degradation or further transport to other organs. A selective uptake of short chain and/or hydroxylated sulfatide fatty acid isoforms was observed in the small intestine. Exogenously administered sulfatide was found in pancreas after i.p, but not after oral administration. The in vitro studies in isolated rat islets support that sulfatide, independently of its fatty acid length, is endocytosed and metabolised by pancreatic islets. Conclusion Our study supports a selective uptake and/or preservation of sulfatide in the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration and with emphasises on pancreatic sulfatide uptake, i.p. administration results in sulfatide at relevant location.

  18. Gastrointestinal tract radionuclide activity on In-111 labeled leukocyte imaging: clinical significance in patients with fever of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency and clinical significance of indium-111 labeled leukocyte activity in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of patients with fever of unknown origin, we reviewed 312 leukocyte studies involving 271 patients. Radionuclide activity was noted in the bowel in 59 cases. Of these, only 27 were due to the infection or inflammatory disease that caused the patient's fever. The 32 false-positive results were due primarily to swallowed leukocytes or bleeding. In two cases, no explanation was found for the activity in the GI tract. We conclude that bowel activity on In-111 labeled leukocyte scans in patients with fever of unknown origin often does not correlate with the true cause of the patient's fever

  19. Effects of ghrelin and motilin on smooth muscle contractility of the isolated gastrointestinal tract from the bullfrog and Japanese fire belly newt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Takio; Shimazaki, Misato; Kikuta, Ayumi; Yaosaka, Noriko; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin has been identified in some amphibians and is known to stimulate growth hormone release and food intake as seen in mammals. Ghrelin regulates gastrointestinal motility in mammals and birds. The aim of this study was to determine whether ghrelin affects gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility in bullfrogs (anuran) and Japanese fire belly newts (urodelian) in vitro. Neither bullfrog ghrelin nor rat ghrelin affected longitudinal smooth muscle contractility of gastrointestinal strips from the bullfrog. Expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) mRNA was confirmed in the bullfrog gastrointestinal tract, and the expression level in the gastric mucosa was lower than that in the intestinal mucosa. In contrast, some gastrointestinal peptides, including substance P, neurotensin and motilin, and the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol showed marked contraction, indicating normality of the smooth muscle preparations. Similar results were obtained in another amphibian, the Japanese fire belly newt. Newt ghrelin and rat ghrelin did not cause any contraction in gastrointestinal longitudinal muscle, whereas substance P and carbachol were effective causing contraction. In conclusion, ghrelin does not affect contractility of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle in anuran and urodelian amphibians, similar to results for rainbow trout and goldfish (fish) but different from results for rats and chickens. The results suggest diversity of ghrelin actions on the gastrointestinal tract across animals. This study also showed for the first time that motilin induces gastrointestinal contraction in amphibians. PMID:26704852

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins.

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    Yoshiki Misawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA mutant (ΔtagO failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin.

  1. Patients with brain metastases from gastrointestinal tract cancer treated with whole brain radiation therapy:Prognostic factors and survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanne Bartelt; Felix Momm; Christian Weissenberger; Johannes Lutterbach

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the prognostic factors with regard to survival for patients with brain metastasis from primary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.METHODS: Nine hundred and sixteen patients with brain metastases, treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) between January 1985 and December 2000 at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg, were analyzed retrospectively.RESULTS: Fifty-seven patients presented with a primary tumor of the gastrointestinal tract (esophagus: n = 0, stomach:n = 10, colorectal: n = 47). Twenty-six patients had a solitary brain metastasis, 31 patients presented with multiple brain metastases. Surgical resection was performed in 25 patients.WBRTwas applied with daily fractions of 2 Gray (Gy) or 3 Gy to a total dose of 50 Gy or 30 Gy, respectively. The interval between diagnoses of the primary tumors and brain metastases was 22.6 mo vs8.0 mo for patients with primary tumors of the colon/rectum vs other primary tumors,respectively (P<0.01, log-rank). Median overall survival for all patients with brain metastases (n = 916) was 3.4 mo and 3.2 mo for patients with gastrointestinal neoplasms.Patients with gastrointestinal primary tumors presented significantly more often with a solitary brain metastasis than patients with other primary tumors (P<0.05, log-rank). In patients with gastrointestinal neoplasms (n = 57), the median overall survival was 5.8 mo for patients with solitary brain metastasis vs 2.7 mo for patients with multiple brain metastases (P<0.01, log-rank). The median overall survival for patients with a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70was 5.5 mo vs2.1 mo for patients with KPS <70 (P<0.01,log-rank). At multivariate analysis (Cox Model) the performance status and the number of brain metastases were identified as independent prognostic factors for overall survival.CONCLUSION: Brain metastases occur late in the course of gastrointestinal tumors. Pretherapeutic variables like KPS and the

  2. Advanced glycation end-product expression is upregulatedin the gastrointestinal tract of type 2 diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate changes in advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) expressionin the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in type 2 diabetic rats.METHODS: Eight inherited type 2 diabetic rats Goto-Kakizak (GK) and ten age-matched normal rats wereused in the study. From 18 wk of age, the body weightand blood glucose were measured every week and 2wk respectively. When the rats reached 32 wk, twocentimetersegments of esophagus, duodenum,jejunum, ileum, and colon were excised and the wetweight was measured. The segments were fixedin 10% formalin, embedded in paraffin and fivemicron sections were cut. The layer thickness wasmeasured in Hematoxylin and Eosin-stained slides.AGE [N epsilon-(carboxymethyl) lysine and N epsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine] and RAGE were detected byimmunohistochemistry staining and image analysis wasdone using Sigmascan Pro 4.0 image analysis software.RESULTS: The blood glucose concentration (mmol/L)at 18 wk age was highest in the GK group (8.88 ±1.87 vs 6.90 ± 0.43, P 〈 0.001), a difference thatcontinued to exist until the end of the experiment.The wet weight per unit length (mg/cm) increased inesophagus, jejunum and colon from the normal to theGK group (60.64 ± 9.96 vs 68.56 ± 11.69, P 〈 0.05 foresophagus; 87.01 ± 9.35 vs 105.29 ± 15.45, P 〈 0.01for jejunum; 91.37 ± 7.25 vs 97.28 ± 10.90, P 〈 0.05for colon). Histologically, the layer thickness of the GI tract was higher for esophagus, jejunum and colon inthe GK group [full thickness (μm): 575.37 ± 69.22 vs753.20 ± 150.41, P 〈 0.01 for esophagus; 813.51 ±44.44 vs 884.81 ± 45.31, P 〈 0.05 for jejunum; 467.12± 65.92 vs 572.26 ± 93.60, P 〈 0.05 for colon]. Inesophagus, the AGE and RAGE mainly distributed instriated muscle cells and squamous epithelial cells. TheAGE distribution was much stronger in the GK groupcompared to the normal group both in the striatedmuscle layer and mucosa layer

  3. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

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    Gulhadiye Avcu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients.

  4. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Yazici, Pinar; Duyu, Muhterem; Polat, Suleyha Hilmioglu; Atabay, Berna; Doganavsargil, Basak; Karapinar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immun...

  5. Technetium sulfur colloid scintigraphy in the detection of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid scintigraphy is a technique which can be used to localize sites of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Two reports of patients illustrate its use clinically. This procedure is non-invasive, relatively inexpensive, easily performed and has a high degree of sensitivity. The technique may, in some instances, replace angiography or endoscopy as the initial procedure used to diagnose the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding or, more likely, serve as a complementary diagnostic modality

  6. Characterization of proteases from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis (Sasaki)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yulan; Wang, Yurong; Xiao, Lin; Lin, Xiukun

    2016-05-01

    A crude protease produced from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 is described, and its effectiveness as an additive in liquid detergent evaluated. We isolate the protease-producing Planomicrobium sp. L-2 from the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis. At least three caseinolytic protease clear bands were observed in zymogram analysis. The crude alkaline protease was highly tolerant of a pH range from 7.0 to 9.0, and temperatures to 50°C after incubation for 1 h. Proteolytic enzymes were stable towards three surfactants (5% Tween 80, 1% Triton X-100 and 0.05% SDS) and an oxidizing agent (1% hydrogen peroxide), in addition to being highly stable and compatible with popular commercial laundry powered detergent brands available in China. Our study demonstrates the potential these proteases have for development into novel classes of detergent additive. This study also suggests that the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis may be a rich source of commercially valuable strains of enzyme.

  7. Effect of Nutrition with Propolis and Bee Pollen Supplements on Bacteria Colonization Pattern in Gastrointestinal Tract of Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Kročko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available For replace of banned antibiotics used as growth promoters in broiler chicken nutrition, the supplements as probiotics, prebiotics, antioxidants, acidifiers and enzymes, has been mainly studied. These alternative substances improved the feed conversion, performance, growth and health of broiler chickens through a mechanisms associated with gastrointestinal tract and bacteria colonization. Propolis and bee pollen belong to the group of naturally occurring substances of animal and plant origin with antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. The scope of this study was to find a counts of Enterococcus sp., Enterobacteriaceae family and lactic acid bacteria in crop, ileum and caecum of broiler chickens after propolis and bee pollen addition in their nutrition. Lower dosages of propolis and higher dosages of bee pollen in chicken nutrition significantly (P<0.05 reduced the count of Enterobacteriaceae family isolates in chicken’s crops, while the number of beneficial lactic acid bacteria in chicken’s crops with presence of propolis was increased. Ileum and caecum of broiler chickens in experimental group of chickens with higher amount of bee pollen had the lowest (P>0.05 number of Enterobacteriaceae family isolates. The bacteria colonization pattern in gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens can be affected also by combination of nutrition supplements and pH value which can provide the advantage to some bacteria and influenced their competitiveness.

  8. The role of some natural products in protecting against the effect of gamma irradiation on the gastrointestinal tract in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation induces a wide range of biological effects including inflammation, DNA damage, chromosomal aberration, mutation, carcinogenesis, and hereditary diseases. These effects are mainly mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which affect particularly tissues with a high rate of cell turnover, such as gastrointestinal tract. Thus, patients with abdominal and pelvic malignancies are at high risk of developing ulceration, perforation, chronic atrophic gastroenteritis, and depression of secretory and motor function due to high doses of ionizing radiation exposure. Therefore there is a continued interest and need for the identification and development of non-toxic and effective radio-protective compounds that can reduce the deleterious effect of radiation. Such compounds could potentially protect humans against the genetic damage, mutation, alteration in the immune system and teratogenic effects of toxic agents including radiation, which act through the generation of free radicals. Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) is known to contain flavonoids which confer on it various biological and pharmacological properties, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects. However in Ginger, the gingerols were identified as the major active components which have radio protective, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activity, stimulation of digestion and absorption in the digestive tract. This study was designed to investigate the possible protective effect of certain natural products such as Ginkgo biloba extract and Ginger powder and their mechanism of actions in guarding against the oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction induced in gastrointestinal tissues after exposure to whole body γ-radiation as acute doses.

  9. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in the carcinogenesis of gastrointestinal tract cancers: A review and report of personal experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takashi Fujimura; Tetsuo Ohta; Katsunobu Oyama; Tomoharu Miyashita; Koichi Miwa

    2006-01-01

    Selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors (coxibs)were developed as one of the anti-inflammatory drugs to avoid the various side effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, coxibs also have an ability to inhibit tumor development of various kinds the same way that NSAIDs do. Many experimental studies using cell lines and animal models demonstrated an ability to prevent tumor proliferation of COX-2 inhibitors. After performing a randomized study for polyp chemoprevention study in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP),which showed that the treatment with celecoxib,one of the coxibs, significantly reduced the number of colorectal polyps in 2000, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) immediately approved the clinicai use of celecoxib for FAP patients. However, some coxibs were recently reported to increase the risk of serious cardiovascular events including heart attack and stroke. In this article we review a role of COX-2in carcinogenesis of gastrointestinal tract, such as the esophagus, stomach and colorectum, and also analyze the prospect of coxibs for chemoprevention of gastrointestinal tract tumors.

  10. Considerations concerning a tailored, individualized therapeutic management of patients with (neuro)endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, W W; Krenning, E P; Van Eijck, C H J; Lamberts, S W J

    2004-03-01

    Endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas may present at different disease stages with either hormonal or hormone-related symptoms/syndromes, or without hormonal symptoms. They may occur either sporadically or as part of hereditary syndromes. In the therapeutic approach to a patient with these tumours, excessive hormonal secretion and/or its effects should always be controlled first. Tumour-related deficiencies or disorders should also be corrected. Subsequently, control should be aimed at the tumour growth. Surgery is generally considered as first-line therapy for patients with localized disease, as it can be curative. However, in patients with metastatic disease the role of first-line surgery is not clearly established and other therapies should be considered, such as non-surgical cytoreductive therapies, biotherapy (with somatostatin analogues or interferon-alpha), embolization and chemoembolization of liver metastases, chemotherapy (with single or multiple dose regimens) and peptide receptor-targeted radiotherapy. The delicate balance of the use of the different therapeutical options in patients with endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas emphasizes the importance of team approach and team expertise. PMID:15027883

  11. Impact of extraneous proteins on the gastrointestinal fate of sunflower seed (Helianthus annuus) oil bodies: a simulated gastrointestinal tract study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkhun, Sakunkhun; Khosla, Amit; Foster, Tim; McClements, David Julian; Grundy, Myriam M L; Gray, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the physicochemical nature of sunflower seed oil bodies (in the absence and presence of added protein) exposed to gastrointestinal conditions in vitro: crude oil bodies (COB); washed oil bodies (WOB); whey protein isolate-enriched oil bodies (WOB-WPI); and, sodium caseinate enriched-oil bodies (WOB-SC). All oil body emulsions were passed through an in vitro digestion model that mimicked the stomach and duodenal environments, and their physicochemical properties were measured before, during, and after digestion. Oil bodies had a positive charge under gastric conditions because the pH was below the isoelectric point of the adsorbed protein layer, but they had a negative charge under duodenal conditions which was attributed to changes in interfacial composition resulting from adsorption of bile salts. Oil bodies were highly susceptible to flocculation and coalescence in both gastric and duodenal conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated degradation of oleosin proteins (ca. 18-21 kDa) to a greater or lesser extent (dependent on the emulsion) during the gastric phase in all emulsions tested; there is evidence that some oleosin remained intact in the crude oil body preparation during this phase of the digestion process. Measurements of protein displacement from the surface of COBs during direct exposure to bile salts, without inclusion of a gastric phase, indicated the removal of intact oleosin from native oil bodies.

  12. Impact of extraneous proteins on the gastrointestinal fate of sunflower seed (Helianthus annuus) oil bodies: a simulated gastrointestinal tract study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkhun, Sakunkhun; Khosla, Amit; Foster, Tim; McClements, David Julian; Grundy, Myriam M L; Gray, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the physicochemical nature of sunflower seed oil bodies (in the absence and presence of added protein) exposed to gastrointestinal conditions in vitro: crude oil bodies (COB); washed oil bodies (WOB); whey protein isolate-enriched oil bodies (WOB-WPI); and, sodium caseinate enriched-oil bodies (WOB-SC). All oil body emulsions were passed through an in vitro digestion model that mimicked the stomach and duodenal environments, and their physicochemical properties were measured before, during, and after digestion. Oil bodies had a positive charge under gastric conditions because the pH was below the isoelectric point of the adsorbed protein layer, but they had a negative charge under duodenal conditions which was attributed to changes in interfacial composition resulting from adsorption of bile salts. Oil bodies were highly susceptible to flocculation and coalescence in both gastric and duodenal conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated degradation of oleosin proteins (ca. 18-21 kDa) to a greater or lesser extent (dependent on the emulsion) during the gastric phase in all emulsions tested; there is evidence that some oleosin remained intact in the crude oil body preparation during this phase of the digestion process. Measurements of protein displacement from the surface of COBs during direct exposure to bile salts, without inclusion of a gastric phase, indicated the removal of intact oleosin from native oil bodies. PMID:25284307

  13. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching; Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood. PMID:27171415

  14. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ya Huang

    Full Text Available Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI = 1.10-1.20 for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10 for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14 for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood.

  15. [Dissolution, absorption and bioaccumulation in gastrointestinal tract of mercury in HgS-containing traditional medicines Cinnabar and Zuotai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-yuan; Li, Cen; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Hong-xia; Geng, Lu-jing; Li, Lin-shuai; Du, Yu-zhi; Wei, Li-xin

    2015-06-01

    α-HgS is the main component of traditional Chinese medicine cinnabar, while β-HgS is the main component of Tibetan medicine Zuotai. However, there was no comparative study on the dissolution and absorption in gastrointestinal tract and bioaccumulation in organs of mercury in Cinnabar, Zuotai, α-HgS and β-HgS. In this study, the dissolution process of the four compounds in the human gastrointestinal tract was simulated to determine the mercury dissolutions and compare the mercury dissolution of different medicines and the dissolution-promoting capacity of different solutions. To explore the absorption and bioaccumulation of cinnabar and Zuotai in organisms, mice were orally administered with clinical equivalent doses cinnabar and Zuotai. Meanwhile, a group of mice was given α-HgS and β-HgS with the equivalent mercury with cinnabar, while another group was given β-HgS and HgCl2 with the equivalent mercury with Zuotai. The mercury absorption and bioaccumulation capacities of different medicines in mice and their mercury bioaccumulation in different tissues and organs were compared. The experimental results showed a high mercury dissolutions of Zuotai in artificial gastrointestinal fluid, which was followed by β-HgS, cinnabar and α-HgS. As for the mercury absorption and bioaccumulation in mice, HgCl2 was the highest, β-HgS was the next, and a-HgS was slightly higher than cinnabar. The organs with the mercury bioaccumulation from high to low were kidney, liver and brain. This study is close to clinical practices and can provide reference for the clinical safe medication as well as a study model for the safety evaluation on heavy metal-containing medicines by observing the mercury dissolution, absorption, distribution and accumulation of mercury-containing medicines cinnabar and zuotai. PMID:26591542

  16. Comparative evaluation of scintigraphy and upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy for detection of duodenogastric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, B.R.; Ibrarullah, Mohammad; Agarwal, D.K.; Maini, Atul; Ali, Wasif; Sikora, S.S.; Das, B.K. (Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences (India))

    1994-08-01

    Duodenogastric reflux, the reflux of duodenal bile into stomach, when suspected clinically requires an objective evaluation for proper management. In this study hepatobiliary scintigraphy in 91 patients of different clinical conditions was evaluated for presence of duodenogastric reflux. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was also performed in 44 of these patients. On scintigraphy duodenogastric reflux was present in 26 (29%) of 91 patients. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed presence of refluxed bile in the stomach in 12 (27%) of 44 patients. In the same groups of patients scintigraphy detected reflux in 18 (41%) of 44 patients. This shows that hepatobiliary scintigraphy is superior to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in detection of duodenogastric reflux and also has the advantage of being non-invasive and physiological. (author).

  17. Diagnosis of follicular lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract: A better initial diagnostic workup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Kondo, Eisei; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increasing incidence and more frequent recognition by endoscopists, gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma has been established as a variant of follicular lymphoma. However, due to its rarity, there are no established guidelines on the optimal diagnostic strategy for patients with primary gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma or secondary gastrointestinal involvement of systemic follicular lymphoma. This review offers an overview and pitfalls to avoid during the initial diagnostic workup of this disease entity. Previously reported case reports, case series, and retrospective studies are reviewed and focus on the disease’s endoscopic and histological features, the roles of computed tomography and positron emission tomography scanning, the clinical utility of the soluble interleukin-2 receptor, and the possible pathogenesis. PMID:26819532

  18. Dynamic In Vitro Models of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract as Relevant Tools to Assess the Survival of Probiotic Strains and Their Interactions with Gut Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Cordonnier; Jonathan Thévenot; Lucie Etienne-Mesmin; Sylvain Denis; Monique Alric; Valérie Livrelli; Stéphanie Blanquet-Diot

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotics are conditioned by their survival during passage through the human gastrointestinal tract and their ability to favorably influence gut microbiota. The main objective of this study was to use dynamic in vitro models of the human digestive tract to investigate the effect of fasted or fed state on the survival kinetics of the new probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CNCM I-3856 and to assess its influence on intestinal microbiota composition and activity...

  19. Some comparative gross and morphometrical studies on the gastrointestinal tract in pigeon (columbia livia and Japanese quail (coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Akau Hena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available To study the comparative morphology and morphometry of the gastrointestinal tract of the Japanese quail and pigeon, a total number of twenty birds twenty birds (comprising of ten pigeons and ten Japanese quails of both sexes were used obtained and used by the researhers. The birds were weighed, dissected and the different parts of the gastrointestinal tract located and eviscerated from which the comparative morphologic and morphometric studies were carried out. The numerical data generated were subjected to statistical analyses using the Microsoft Office Excel 2007 and GraphPad Instat statistical package, with values of P0.05, their corresponding lengths were 9.77±0.35cm and 12.46±0.99cm respectively, while the mean body weights of the quail and pigeon used in the study were 159.5±8.18g and 265±4.86g for the quail and pigeon, respectively (P>0.05. The mean weights of the proventriculus in the quail and pigeon were 0.69±0.07g and 0.54±0.09g respectively (P>0.05 and their mean lengths were 1.75±0.13cm and 1.44±0.28cm respectively; this was not considered significant relative terms. The weights and lengths of gizzard in the quail and pigeon showed different values with the ultimate conclusion that the gizzard’s weight and length were higher in the pigeon than in the quail (P0.05. The ceca in the pigeon was rudimentary in contrast to the robust type found in the quail, the weights of both the right and left ceca in the quail and pigeon were considered very significant (P The vertebrate gastrointestinal tract is a dynamic and energetically expensive organ system whose various anatomical and physiological parameters were regularly being used in clinical evaluations and for assessing dynamics of growth and associated physiological functions for normal and anomalous developments in birds, the knowledge of which will not only add to literatures in these bird types but which will also aid in understanding their biology and mode of domestication

  20. Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bocavirus (HBoV is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI and gastrointestinal illness. Our study is the first to analyze the characteristics of HBoV-positive samples from ARTI patients with a wide age distribution from Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=2811 were collected and analyzed from children and adults with ARTI over a 13-month period. The HBoV complete genome from a 60 year-old female patient isolate was also determined. Results HBoV DNA was detected in 65/2811 (2.3% samples, of which 61/1797 were from children (Mycoplasma pneumoniae had the highest frequency of 16.9% (11/65. Upper and lower respiratory tract illness were common symptoms, with 19/65 (29.2% patients diagnosed with pneumonia by chest radiography. All four adult patients had systemic influenza-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome revealed a close relationship with other HBoVs, and a more distant relationship with HBoV2 and HBoV3. Conclusions HBoV was detected from children and adults with ARTI from Guangzhou, southern China. Elderly people were also susceptive to HBoV. A single lineage of HBoV was detected among a wide age distribution of patients with ARTI.

  1. Evaluación de la terapia nutricional perioperatoria en pacientes con neoplasia del tracto gastrointestinal superior Evaluation of perioperative nutritional therapy in patients with gastrointestinal tract neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MªB. Gómez Sánchez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: La enfermedad oncológica se acompaña de un grado importante de desnutrición que se asocia con elevadas tasas de morbi-mortalidad postoperatoria. El propósito de este estudio fue evaluar la efectividad de un programa de apoyo nutricional perioperatorio de cara a reducir complicaciones postoperatorias, estancias hospitalarias y mortalidad entre pacientes sometidos a cirugía oncológica del tracto digestivo superior. Métodos: Estudio prospectivo aleatorizado sobre una muestra de pacientes intervenidos por cáncer gastrointestinal alto (esófago, estómago, cardias y duodeno/páncreas durante un periodo de 4 años. Se realizó una valoración nutricional y se administró de forma perioperatoria una formula enteral inmunomoduladora a un grupo de pacientes malnutridos (DS, mientras que otro grupo de pacientes malnutridos (DNS y los normonutridos (NN recibieron consejo dietético antes de la cirugía y después de esta sueros por vía intravenosa hasta la reintroducción de la dieta normal. Las variables estudiadas fueron edad, sexo, estadio tumoral, tipo de neoplasia y estancia hospitalaria. También se recogieron la situación nutricional, mortalidad, complicaciones postoperatorias y alteraciones gastrointestinales. Para el análisis estadístico realizamos un estudio de frecuencias y aplicamos el test de Chi-cuadrado en las variables cualitativas. Para las cuantitativas usamos la ANOVA y el test Post-hoc de Tukey. Se consideraron significativos aquellos valores de p Objectives: Cancer is usually associated to an important level of desnutrition together with a postoperative morbidity and mortality increase. The purpose of this study was evaluating its efficacy perioperative nutritional support to reduce surgical complications, stances and mortality significantly in patients undergoing higher digestive tract procedures. Method: A prospective, randomized trial was done among a sample of neoplasic patients undergoing higher intestinal

  2. Linfomas plasmoblásticos del tracto gastrointestinal en pacientes con sida Plasmablastic lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract in AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Avilés-Salas

    2011-12-01

    was to review the clinical-pathologic features of PL of the gastrointestinal tract in 5 patients with HIV/aids disease. We performed a retrospective study of PL of the gastrointestinal tract diagnosed at the National Institute of Cancer at Mexico City, from 2000 to 2009. Clinical and pathological information was obtained and immunohistochemical studies were performed in paraffin-embedded tissue sections. The presence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV was examined by in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Four male and 1 female were included with a median of age of 29 years. Three tumors involved the ano-rectal area, one tumor the ascendant colon and one tumor the stomach. All tumors were histologically characterized by a monotonous proliferation of large lymphoid cell with plasmablastic features. Tumor cells were CD 138 / MUM-1positive and CD 20 / PAX-5 negative in all cases. EVB genome was detected by in situ PCR in 4 cases. The median of follow-up was 18 months, and revealed that three patients are alive with neoplasm disease and two patients are still alive with no evidence of the neoplasm. Recognition of this entity by pathologists and clinicians is important in order to establish the correct diagnosis and the early treatment of these patients.

  3. Optical coherence tomography in detection of dysplasia and cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and bilio-pancreatic ductal system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pier Alberto Testoni; Benedetto Mangiavillano

    2008-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging modality that performs high-resolution, cross-sectional, subsurface tomographic imaging of the microstructure of tissues. The physical principle of OCT is similar to that of B-mode ultrasound imaging, except that it uses infrared light waves rather than acoustic waves. The in vivo resolution is 10-25 times better (about 10 μm) than with high-frequency ultrasound imaging, but the depth of penetration is limited to 1-3 mm, depending upon tissue structure, depth of focus of the probe used, and pressure applied to the tissue surface. In the last decade, OCT technology has evolved from an experimental laboratory tool to a new diagnostic imaging modality with a wide spectrum of clinical applications in medical practice, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and pancreatic-biliary ductal system. OCT imaging from the GI tract can be done in humans by using narrow-diameter, catheter-based probes that can be inserted through the accessory channel of either a conventional front-view endoscope, for investigating the epithelial structure of the GI tract, or a side-view endoscope, inside a standard transparent ERCP catheter, for investigating the pancreatico-biliary ductal system. Esophagus and the esophago-gastric junction has been the most widely investigated organ so far; more recently, also duodenum, colon and pancreatico-biliary ductal system have been extensively investigated. OCT imaging of the gastro-intestinal wall structure is characterized by a multiple-layer architecture that permits an accurate evaluation of the mucosa, lamina propria, muscularis mucosae, and part of the submucosa. The technique may be, therefore, used to identify pre-neoplastic conditions of the GI tract, such as Barrett's epithelium and dysplasia, and evaluate the depth of penetration of early-stage neoplastic lesions. OCT imaging of the pancreatic and biliary ductal system could improve the diagnostic accuracy for ductal epithelial

  4. Impact of microbial transformation of food on health - from fermented foods to fermentation in the gastro-intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T; Veiga, Patrick; Zhang, Chenhong; Derrien, Muriel; Zhao, Liping

    2011-04-01

    Fermentation of food components by microbes occurs both during certain food production processes and in the gastro-intestinal tract. In these processes specific compounds are produced that originate from either biotransformation reactions or biosynthesis, and that can affect the health of the consumer. In this review, we summarize recent advances highlighting the potential to improve the nutritional status of a fermented food by rational choice of food-fermenting microbes. The vast numbers of microbes residing in the human gut, the gut microbiota, also give rise to a broad array of health-active molecules. Diet and functional foods are important modulators of the gut microbiota activity that can be applied to improve host health. A truly multidisciplinary approach is required to increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying health beneficial effects that arise from the interaction of diet, microbes and the human body. PMID:21247750

  5. FoxO4 is the main forkhead transcriptional factor localized in the gastrointestinal tracts of pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhen-qi; WANG Tian; PAN Ling-mei; HUANG Rui-hua; SHI Fang-xiong

    2007-01-01

    Forkhead box (Fox) proteins play critical roles in the regulation of differentiation, proliferation, immunity and aging of cells. Most studies on Fox proteins are limited to cultured cells and rodent. The aim of the current study is to detect by immunohistrochemistry whether FoxO1, FoxO3a and FoxO4 proteins are localized in the stomach and intestine of the pig. The results showed that FoxO4 exists in the mucosa in all parts of the stomach and intestine; FoxO3a exists mainly in the lamina propria and muscularis of some parts. However, FoxO1 is not detectable in all parts of the stomach and intestine. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that there exists a distinct expression pattern of Fox proteins, and that FoxO4 is a primary forkhead transcriptional factor localized in the gastrointestinal tracts of the pig.

  6. Concentration of volatile sulphur-containing compounds along the gastrointestinal tract of pigs fed a high-sulphur or a low-sulphur diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Canibe, Nuria; Finster, Kai;

    2010-01-01

    Volatile sulphur-containing compounds (VSC) are formed in large quantities in the gastrointestinal tract (GI-tract) of pigs and upon excretion from the animal; these compounds are released from the faeces causing emission of foul odour. However, very little is known about the rate and extent...... of their production or concentration along the GI-tract of the pig, and to what extent these parameters are influenced by the sulphur content of the diet. In order to address these questions, two diets with different sulphur content were formulated. Growing pigs were fed one of each diet during a minimum of three...

  7. Confocal laser endomicroscopy in the " in vivo" histological diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni D De Palma

    2009-01-01

    Recent technological advances in miniaturization have allowed for a confocal scanning microscope to be integrated into a conventional flexible endoscope, or into trans-endoscopic probes, a technique now known as confocal endomicroscopy or confocal laser endomicroscopy. This newly-developed technology has enabled endoscopists to collect real-time in vivo histological images or "virtual biopsies" of the gastrointestinal mucosa during endoscopy, and has stimulated significant interest in the application of this technique in clinical gastroenterology. This review aims to evaluate the current data on the technical aspects and the utility of this new technology in clinical gastroenterology and its potential impact in the future, particularly in the screening or surveillance of gastrointestinal neoplasia.

  8. Gastrointestinal tract obstruction secondary to post-operative oedema: does dexamethasone administration help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atie, M; Khoma, O; Dunn, G; Falk, G L

    2016-01-01

    Oedema can occur in handled tissues following upper gastrointestinal surgery with anastomosis formation. Obstruction of the lumen may result in delayed return of enteric function. Intravenous steroid use may be beneficial. Three cases of delayed emptying following fundoplication, gastro-enteric and entero-enteric anastomoses are reviewed. Conservative management with supportive measures failed. Dexamethasone was administered to treat the oedematous obstruction. A literature review in PubMed, Cochrane database and Medline for English language publications on the use of dexamethasone in the treatment of acute post surgical oedema of the upper gastrointestinal was conducted. Administration of dexamethasone led to resolution of symptoms and successful outcome. No reports on the use of steroids in this context were identified in the literature. The use of dexamethasone may effectively treat intestinal obstruction due to inflammatory or oedematous cause in the early post-operative period. PMID:27554826

  9. β-Glucan as an encapsulating agent: Effect on probiotic survival in simulated gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Asima; Gani, Adil; Ahmad, Mudasir; Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Masoodi, F A

    2016-01-01

    Three strains of probiotics Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus plantarum were encapsulated in β-glucan matrix using emulsion technique. Further the encapsulated cells were studied for their tolerance in simulated gastrointestinal conditions and its storage stability. The average encapsulation efficiency of β-glucan-probiotic beads was found to be 74.01%. The surface morphology of β-glucan containing bacteria was studied using SEM. The noteworthy absorptions in the FT-IR spectra between 1300-900 cm(-1) and 2918-2925 cm(-1) corresponds to the presence of bacteria into the glucan matrix. Also, the thermal stability of β-glucan was evaluated using Differential Scanning Calorimeter. The efficiency of β-glucan in protecting the surviability of probiotic cells under simulated gastrointestinal conditions was studied. Results revealed significant (pencapsulated cells were subjected to stresses like low pH, heat treatment, simulated intestinal conditions and storage.

  10. POTENCY OF LIGNOCELLULOSE DEGRADING BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM BUFFALO AND HORSE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT AND ELEPHANT DUNG FOR FEED FIBER DEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wahyudi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is limiting factor for cellulose and hemicellulose degradation in rumen. Isolation andselection bacteria from buffalo and horse gastrointestinal tract and elephant dung could be foundbacteria that have superiority to degrade lignin, xylan, and cellulose. Those animals were chosenbecause they were herbivores that consume low quality crude fiber as their main energy sources.Lignocellulose degrading bacteria were isolated by Hungate selective media, by using lignin (tannicacid, xylan, and cellulose as selective substrates. The morphological identification used an enrichmentmedia by measuring color, colony size, diffusion zone, clear zone, and biochemical identification usingproduction of ligninase, xylanase, and cellulase enzymes. The best lignocellulose degrading bacteriathen was determined by the morphological and biochemical character. This study showed thatlignocellulose degrading bacteria could be found in gastrointestinal tract of buffalo and horse, andelephant dung. Highest number colony was found in samples from buffalo's colon (376, followed byhorse's cecum (203, elephant’s dung (46, buffalo’s cecum (23, buffalo's rumen (9 and horse’s colon(7. The highest isolates activity of lignolytic, xylanolytic, and cellulolytic were reached by buffalo’scecum (7.64, horse's cecum (6.27, and buffalo’s colon (2.48. Meanwhile the highest enzymesproductivities were: buffalo’s cecum (0.0400 µmol, horse’s cecum (1.3912 µmol and buffalo’s colon(0.1971 µmol. Based on morphologycal character and biochemical test, it could be concluded thatlignolytic from buffalo’s cecum, xylanolytic from horse’s cecum, and cellulolytic from buffalo’s colonwere the superior isolates and they were 99% analyzed as Enterococcus casseliflavus/gallinarumspecies.

  11. The influence of lactose intolerance and other gastro-intestinal tract disorders on L-thyroxine absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchała, Marek; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Zybek, Ariadna

    2012-01-01

    The preferred treatment for hypothyroidism is oral levothyroxine (LT4) ingestion, in doses that ensure a sustained state of hormonal balance. Many different factors may significantly influence the absorption of LT4, including: interval between the ingestion of the drug and the last meal, eating habits, and different functional and organic pathologies of the gastro-intestinal tract. The main purpose of this paper is to review and systematise the available literature on the subject of the influence of different malabsorption syndromes on the effectiveness of LT4 preparations. The need to use high LT4 doses in the substitutional treatment of hypothyroidism is often the very first sign of one of the pathologies that are connected with malabsorption syndrome, which might have been asymptomatic and undiagnosed previously. Patients who require more than 2 μg/kg body weight of LT4 per day, with constantly increased thyrotropin level, should be diagnosed with the suspicion of pseudomalabsorption or real absorption disorder. An LT4 absorption test, using high doses of LT4, may be useful in the diagnosis of pseudomalabsorption. After excluding non-compliance, the differential diagnosis should include such disorders as lactose intolerance, coeliac disease, atrophic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection, bowel resection, inflammatory bowel disease, and parasite infection. Where there is a diagnosis of lactose intolerance, both a low lactose diet and a lactose-free LT4 preparation should be administered to restore euthyroidism or make it possible to decrease the dose of the LT4 preparation. In coeliac disease, a gluten-free diet usually allows a normalisation of the need for LT4, as do eradication of the H. pylori infection or parasite colonisation. In cases of atrophic gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease, treating the underlying diseases and regaining the state of remission may improve the absorption of LT4. In patients after gastro-intestinal tract surgery, a dose of

  12. Role of hydrogen sulfide in the physiology of gastrointestinal tract and in the mechanism of gastroprotection 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Magierowski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is commonly known as a toxic gas with an unpleasant odor. However, in the human body it plays a role as a gaseous transmitter involved in the control of physiological processes. Studies published so far have shown that H2S increased synaptic long-term potentiation in the central nervous system and exerted the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects on vascular endothelium. These effects clearly depend on the concentration of this gaseous molecule. H2S exerts vasodilatory effect in the cardiovascular system similar to those exhibited by carbon monoxide or nitric oxide. It is believed that H2S may play a potential role in the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract including the mechanism of gastroprotection of gastric mucosa and possibly exerts a protective effect in other parts of the digestive system. The administration of L-cysteine, the precursor of H2S or NaHS, the exogenous donor of this gaseous molecule, significantly reduced gastric damage induced by ethanol, an agent that is known to induce acute gastric damage and hemorrhagic necrosis to the gastric mucosa. The administration of H2S results in increased secretion of protective bicarbonate and mucus secretions and these effects could, in part, explain the H2S-induced protection of duodenal mucosa against the damage induced by gastric acid. Despite these promising results, little is known about the therapeutic efficacy of H2S in relation to two other important gases, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, and future studies are definitely needed to assess its usefulness in the treatment of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract disorders. 

  13. Mantle cell lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract presenting with multiple intussusceptions – case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is an aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that originates from small to medium sized lymphocytes located in the mantle zone of the lymph node. Extra nodal involvement is present in the majority of cases, with a peculiar tendency to invade the gastro-intestinal tract in the form of multiple lymphomatous polyposis. MCL can be accurately diagnosed with the use of the highly specific marker Cyclin D1. Few cases of mantle cell lymphoma presenting with intussuception have been reported. Here we present a rare case of multiple intussusceptions caused by mantle cell lymphoma and review the literature of this disease. Case presentation A 68-year-old male presented with pain, tenderness in the right lower abdomen, associated with nausea and non-bilious vomiting. CT scan of abdomen revealed ileo-colic intussusception. Laparoscopy confirmed multiple intussusceptions involving ileo-colic and ileo-ileal segments of gastrointestinal tract. A laparoscopically assisted right hemicolectomy and extended ileal resection was performed. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The histology and immuno-histochemistry of the excised small and large bowel revealed mantle cell lymphoma with multiple lymphomatous polyposis and positivity to Cyclin D1 marker. The patient was successfully treated with Rituximab-CHOP chemotherapy and remains in complete remission at one-year follow-up. Conclusion This is a rare case of intestinal lymphomatous polyposis due to mantle cell lymphoma presenting with multiple small bowel intussusceptions. Our case highlights laparoscopic-assisted bowel resection as a potential and feasible option in the multi-disciplinary treatment of mantle cell lymphoma.

  14. Colonization and Immunomodulation by Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Valeur, Nana; Engel, Peter; Carbajal, Noris; Connolly, Eamonn; Ladefoged, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 is a probiotic (health-promoting) bacterium widely used as a dietary supplement. This study was designed to examine local colonization of the human gastrointestinal mucosa after dietary supplementation with L. reuteri ATCC 55730 and to determine subsequent immune responses at the colonized sites. In this open clinical investigation, 10 healthy volunteers and 9 volunteers with ileostomy underwent gastroscopy or ileoscopy and biopsy samples were taken from the s...

  15. Expression analysis of MAC30 in human pancreatic cancer and tumors of the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Jörg; Ding, J.; Hammer, J.; Giese, T; Zentgraf, H; Büchler, M W; Friess, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Meningioma-associated protein, MAC30, is a protein with unknown function and cellular localization that is differentially expressed in certain malignancies. In the present study, the expression of MAC30 in a variety of normal and cancerous human gastrointestinal tissues, with special emphasis on pancreatic tissues was analyzed. Quantitative RT-PCR was utilized to compare MAC30 expression levels. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were carried ou...

  16. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Passel, Mark W.J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Kant, Ravi [University of Helsinki; Palva, Airi [University of Helsinki; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; De Vos, Willem M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Zoetendal, Erwin G. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  17. Effects of xylanase and citric acid on the performance, nutrient retention, and characteristics of gastrointestinal tract of broilers fed low-phosphorus wheat-based diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esmaeilipour, O.; Shivazad, M.; Moravej, H.; Aminzadeh, S.; Rezaian, M.; Krimpen, van M.M.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of xylanase and citric acid on the performance, nutrient retention, jejunal viscosity, and size and pH of the gastrointestinal tract of broilers fed a low-P wheat-based diet. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with 2 levels

  18. Effects of selected dietary probiotics on the growth performance and morphology of gastrointestinal tract in young yellow-bellied slider turtles (Trachemys scripta scripta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Rawski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The slider turtle (Trachemys scripta is one of the most popular pet reptiles. The high mortality of young turtles shortly after hatching is a main problem in captivity. This may be partly attributed to infections of the gastrointestinal tract. In many cases, turtles are asymptomatic carriers of many pathogenic bacterial strains including Salmonella sp. posing a threat to these animals and their keepers. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of selected probiotics on growth performance, body condition score and the gastrointestinal tract development in turtles. Forty young yellowbellied sliders (Trachemys scripta scripta were divided into four groups: CON – control without probiotics, A – with and addition of Bacillus subtilis PB6, B – with mix of probiotic strains, C – with Bacillus subtilis C-3102. In the course of the performed experiment, growth performance parameters and morphology of gastrointestinal tract were measured using electronic caliper and laboratory weight. Tested probiotics did not significantly (P > 0.05 affect the growth performance and body condition of turtles, as well as morphometric parameters of their gastrointestinal tract. It indicates that probiotics did not disturb their natural rate of development and may be used as safe feed additive for this group of animals.

  19. Application of a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal tract model to study the availability of food mutagens, using heterocyclic aromatic amines as model compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Luiten-Schuite, A.; Baan, R.; Verhagen, H.; Mohn, G.; Feron, V.; Havenaar, R.

    2000-01-01

    The TNO gastro-Intestinal tract Model (TIM) is a dynamic computer-controlled in vitro system that mimics the human physiological conditions in the stomach and small intestine. In the current TIM physiological parameters such as pH, temperature, peristaltic movements, secretion of digestion enzymes,

  20. Utility of models of the gastrointestinal tract for assessment of the digestion and absorption of engineered nanomaterials released from food matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, D.E.; Venema, K.; Gombau, L.; Valerio, L.G.; Raju, J.; Bondy, G.S.; Bouwmeester, H.; Singh, R.P.; Clippinger, A.J.; Collnot, E.M.; Mehta, R.; Stone, V.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered metal/mineral, lipid and biochemical macromolecule nanomaterials (NMs) have potential applications in food. Methodologies for the assessment of NM digestion and bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract are nascent and require refinement. A working group was tasked by the Internationa

  1. Expression of mRNA for proglucagon and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) receptor in the ruminant gastrointestinal tract and the influence of energy intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor-Edwards, C C; Burrin, D G; Matthews, J C;

    2010-01-01

    demonstrate that cattle express GCG and GLP2R mRNA primarily in small intestinal and colon tissues. Increased nutrient intake increases ileal GCG mRNA and plasma GLP-2, suggesting that GLP-2 may play a role in the trophic response of the ruminant gastrointestinal tract to increased feed intake....

  2. Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Individuals Diagnosed as Children with Atypical Autism: A Danish Register Study Based on Hospital Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Isager, Torben; Rich, Bente

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence and types of diseases (International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders, 10th Edition codes K20-K93) relating to the gastrointestinal tract in a clinical sample of 89 individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism/pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified…

  3. Potential Benefits of Edible Berries in the Management of Aerodigestive and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishayee, Anupam; Haskell, Yennie; Do, Chau; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Mohandas, Nima; Sethi, Gautam; Stoner, Gary D

    2016-07-26

    Epidemiological reports as well as experimental studies have demonstrated the significant health benefits provided by regular berry consumption. Berries possess both prophylactic and therapeutic potential against several chronic illnesses, such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic diseases. Berries owe their health benefits to phytoconstituents, such as polyphenolic anthocyanins, ellagic acid, and a diverse array of phytochemicals bestowed with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects as well as the ability to engage a multitude of signaling pathways. This review highlights the principal chemical constituents present in berries and their primary molecular targets. The article presents and critically analyzes the chemopreventive and therapeutic potential of berry extracts, fractions, and bioactive components on various cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including esophageal, stomach, intestinal, and colorectal cancers as well as cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, such as oral cancer. The current status of clinical studies evaluating berry products in several aforementioned cancers is presented. Various emerging issues including dose-ranging and dosage forms, the role of synergy and the usage of combination therapy as well as other relevant areas essential for the development of berry phytoconstituents as mainstream chemopreventive and therapeutic agents against aerodigestive and GIT cancers are critically discussed. PMID:25781639

  4. Characteristics of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Gastrointestinal Tract of Cemani Chicken and Their Potential Use as Probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Jannah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to screen and characterize lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from gastrointestinal (GI tract of Cemani chicken, one of Indonesian local chicken and to investigate their potential use as probiotics. LAB were isolated from GI tract using MRSA and GYPA media and incubated anaerobically. Selected LAB were determined their probiotic properties with several assays. Identification of selected LAB was based on 16S rDNA sequences, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Ninety five bacteria were isolated and characterized as lactic acid bacteria (Gram positive, catalase negative, non sporeforming and acid producing. Twenty four isolates of LAB demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli JCM 1649 and Salmonella enteritidis B2586, and three selected isolates, i.e. CCM011, CSP004, and CVM002 showed the highest inhibition activity. The isolates had characters of high cell surface hydrophobicity and inter-isolate coaggregation ability of LAB, high survival at low pH, high phytase and protease activity (but no amylase and lipase activity, weak coaggregation with pathogen and no resistance to the examined antibiotics. The isolates were identified based on sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene as Lactobacillus salivarius, however, each isolate had different profiles of sugar fermentation. Therefore the three LAB isolates had potential application as probiotics for chicken.

  5. Lactobacillus genus identification isolated from gastrointestinal tract of chickens after bee products application using FISH and RTQ PCR methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Kačániová

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this study was to examine the effect of bee products on the lactobacilli colonization of chickens. Bee products were administered to both feed mixtures in various amounts in addition to the control group. First experimental group was with propolis in feed mixture with the addition of 400 mg propolis per 1 kg of compound and second group was with pollen in feed mixture with the addition of 450 mg pollen per 1 kg of compound. In this experiment, quantitative counts of lactobacilli in ceca of 49-day-old chicken (Ross 308 using classical and FISH method were investigated. Counts of lactobacilli on MRS agar were monitored. To check the reliability of traditional methods of cultivation samples were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Lactobacillus cells, isolated from gastrointestinal tract, were detected after hybridization of fluorescently labeled probe with bacterial cells. Counts of CFU of lactobacilli were compared in experimental and control treatments, respectively. The lowest count was detected in the control experimental group. The highest count was detected in the third experimental group where was 450 mg of pollen added to 1 kg of feed mixture. Using Real-time PCR method, we identified the species range of the genera Lactobacillus in the intestinal tract of broiler. Detected species from the genus Lactobacillus were L. crispatus, L. salivarius and L. acidophilus.

  6. New Principles In Operating Gastro-Intestinal Tract With CO2 Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skobelkin, O. K.; Litwin, G. D.; Smoljaninov, M. V.; Brehov, E. I.; Rjabov, V. I.; Kirpitchev, A. G.

    1988-06-01

    Laser devicea are becoming morn popular in surgery. They are mainly used for controling hemorrages through an endoscope, for radicalevaporating benign and small malignant tumors in esophagus, stomach, colon, and for palliative destruction of inoperable tumors to recanalize the lumen. According, to literature operations on abdominal parenchymal organs with laser are rather seldom. And the operations with laser on hollow organs of digestive tract are being mainly performed in the USSR, and they being rather effective.

  7. Intraluminal High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Tumors of Gastrointestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : Intraluminal High dose rate brachytherapy is an accepted treatment for the tumors of GI tract. However, there is only some limited clinical data for intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy for the tumors of GI tract. Materials and Methods : Between February 1991 and July 1993, 18 patients who have the tumors of GI tract (esophageal cancer-8 cases, rectal cancer-10 cases) were treated with high dose rae iridium-192 afterloading system )Microselectron-HDR, Nucletron CO, Netherland) at the department of therapeutic radiology, St. Mary's hospital, Catholic university medical college. Age rage was 47-87 years with a mean age 71 years. All patients were treated with intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy within two weeks after conventional external radiation therapy and received 3-5 Gy/fraction 3-4 times per week to a total dose 12-20 Gy (mean 17 Gy). Standard fractionation and conventional dose were delivered for external radiation therapy. Total dose of external radiation therapy ranged 41.4-59.4 Gy (mean 49.6 Gy). Median follow up was 19 months. Results : The analysis was based on 18 patients. The complete response and partial response in esophageal cancer was similar (38%). Two year rates for survival and median survival were 13% and 10 months, respectively. Among 10 patients of rectal cancers, partial response was obtained in 6 patients (60%). There was no complete response in the patients with rectal cancer, but good palliative results were achieved in all patients. Conclusion : Although the number of patients was not large and the follow up period was relatively short, these findings suggested that intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy could be useful in the treatment of the patients with advanced tumors of GI tract

  8. The use of BLT humanized mice to investigate the immune reconstitution of the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Angela; Garcia, J. Victor

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) track represents an important battlefield where pathogens first try to gain entry into a host. It is also a universe where highly diverse and ever changing inhabitants co-exist in an exceptional equilibrium without parallel in any other organ system of the body. The gut as an organ has its own well-developed and fully functional immune organization that is similar and yet different in many important ways to the rest of the immune system. Both a compromised and an ove...

  9. [Possibilities and limits of endoscopic therapy in hemorrhage of the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleig, W E

    1987-04-01

    Most of the hemostatic modalities currently used for endoscopic therapy of gastrointestinal bleeding are based on the principle of thermic coagulation of protein. Injection of vasoactive and sclerosing agents is also widely used, while the application of various other methods is rather limited. There are specific benefits and drawbacks inherent with each of the treatment modalities. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation in stopping upper gastrointestinal bleeding has been demonstrated in several controlled trials; however, effects on survival are controversial. None of the other methods used has been evaluated sufficiently by controlled clinical trials up to date. Depending on the availability at a local institution, each of the various methods may be used for an attempt of endoscopic hemostasis when Forrest type I and II (visible vessel) lesions are detected at emergency endoscopy. However, patients suffering from lesions, which are notable for their high risk of recurrent bleeding like ulcers with a spurting artery, with a visible vessel and lesions at the posterior wall of the duodenum, should be transferred to the surgeon for operative treatment in the absence of active bleeding immediately after successful endoscopic treatment. In the future, patients requiring surgery despite effective endoscopic hemostasis might be identified with high accuracy by checking the coagulated or injected ulcer base with an endoscopic Doppler device. PMID:3495714

  10. The Protective Role of Ginkgo Biloba against Radiation Induced Injury on Rat Gastro-intestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginkgo Biloba extract (EGb 761) is an antioxidant substance exhibits a wide variety of biological activities. The present study was performed to evaluate oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters of gastrointestinal injury induced by exposing rats to acute doses of γ-rays and the potential value of EGb 761 in preventing changes in these parameters. Male albino rats were treated orally with the extract in a dose of 100 mg/ kg for 7 successive days before whole body exposure to acute radiation levels of 2 and 6 Gray (Gy). Control groups were run concurrently. The rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation. Various inflammatory mediators and biochemical parameters were determined in the stomach and intestine. Both tissues were also examined histopathologically. Exposure to radiation led to dose dependent changes in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers (elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and nitrite associated with a glutathione (GSH) decrease as well as in the level of inflammatory parameters (elevation of Tumour necrosis factorα (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) associated with depletion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Pre-treatment with EGb 761 protected against the changes in both oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory mediators. EGb 761 exerted a protective effect against the radiation induced gastrointestinal damage, possibly through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

  11. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopkins William G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a probiotic on faecal microbiology, self-reported illness symptoms and immunity in healthy well trained individuals. Methods Competitive cyclists (64 males and 35 females; age 35 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 y, VO2max 56 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ± SD were randomised to either probiotic (minimum 1 × 109 Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® per day or placebo treatment for 11 weeks in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. The outcome measures were faecal L. fermentum counts, self-reported symptoms of illness and serum cytokines. Results Lactobacillus numbers increased 7.7-fold (90% confidence limits 2.1- to 28-fold more in males on the probiotic, while there was an unclear 2.2-fold (0.2- to 18-fold increase in females taking the probiotic. The number and duration of mild gastrointestinal symptoms were ~2-fold greater in the probiotic group. However, there was a substantial 0.7 (0.2 to 1.2 of a scale step reduction in the severity of gastrointestinal illness at the mean training load in males, which became more pronounced as training load increased. The load (duration×severity of lower respiratory illness symptoms was less by a factor of 0.31 (99%CI; 0.07 to 0.96 in males taking the probiotic compared with placebo but increased by a factor of 2.2 (0.41 to 27 in females. Differences in use of cold and flu medication mirrored these symptoms. The observed effects on URTI had too much uncertainty for a decisive outcome. There were clear reductions in

  12. Image-enhanced endoscopy technology in the gastrointestinal tract: what is available?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Sabina; Ragunath, Krish

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancy accounts for approximately a fifth of all cancer deaths in the United Kingdom. By the time patients are symptomatic, lesions are often advanced, with limited treatment options available. The development of effective endoscopic therapies means that neoplastic lesions can now be treated with improved patient outcomes. This has led to a paradigm shift, whereby the aim of digestive endoscopy is to identify premalignant conditions or early neoplastic change, in order to make an impact on their natural history. This has necessitated an improvement in imaging techniques in order to identify subtle mucosal changes that may harbour precancerous cells. At present there is an array of available imaging modalities, each with implications on cost, training and lesion detection. Here we describe the scientific rationale behind the major commercially available techniques as well as offering a glimpse at possible future directions.

  13. Bisphosphonate use and gastrointestinal tract cancer risk:Meta-analysis of observational studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Hwan Oh; Chan Yoon; Sang Min Park

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To perform a meta-analysis of observational studies to further elucidate the relationship between oral bisphosphonate use and gastrointestinal cancer risk.METHODS:Systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE,EMBASE,and the Cochrane Library to identify studies through January 2011.Search terms were "bisphosphonates" or trade names of the drugs,and "observational studies" or "cohort studies" or "case-control studies".Two evaluators reviewed and selected articles on the basis of predetermined selection criteria as followed:(1) observational studies (casecontrol or cohort studies) on bisphosphonate use; (2)with at least 2 years of follow-up; and (3) reported data on the incidence of cancer diagnosis.The DerSimonian and Laird random effects model were used to calculate the pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI).Two-by-two contingency table was used to calculate the outcomes not suitable for meta-analysis.Subgroup meta-analyses were conducted for the type of cancer (esophageal,gastric and colorectal cancers).Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the effect sizes when only studies with long-term follow-up (mean 5 years; subgroup 3 years) were included.RESULTS:Of 740 screened articles,3 cohort studies and 3 case-control studies were included in the analyses.At first,4 cohort studies and 3 case-control studies were selected for the analyses but one cohort study was excluded because the cancer outcomes were not categorized by type of gastrointestinal cancer.More than 124 686 subjects participated in the 3 cohort studies.The mean follow-up time in all of the cohort studies combined was approximately 3.88 years.The 3 casecontrol studies reported 3070 esophageal cancer cases and 15 417 controls,2018 gastric cancer cases and 10 007 controls,and 11 574 colorectal cancer cases and 53 955 controls.The percentage of study participants who used bisphosphonate was 2.8% among the cases and 2.9% among the controls.The meta-analysis of all

  14. Barium sulphate preparations for use in double contrast examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical properties relevant to upper gastrointestinal radiology have been compared for five barium sulphate preparations and related to radiographic results. Evaluation of particles (size and stability) and whole suspension (dispersibility and fluidity) resulted in ranking of the preparations generally in accord with that based on radiological experience in double contrast examinations of the stomach. Experiments with extirpated pig stomach revealed a tendency for large particles in a low viscosity barium sulphate suspension to settle in mucosal grooves. This is believed to contribute to good radiographic definition of both the areae gastricae and small lesions. Particle size is therefore important and susceptibility to flocculation, a possible cause of random change in size during use, was assessed by measuring particle electrophoretic mobility under varying conditions; quantitative differences in suspension flow and dispersibility were also demonstrated. Fluidity and dispersibility together with rapid sedimentation of suitably sized particles resistant to flocculation underlie the successful use of low viscosity high density barium sulphate suspensions. (U.K.)

  15. Efficient Inhibition of HIV Replication in the Gastrointestinal and Female Reproductive Tracts of Humanized BLT Mice by EFdA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Shanmugasundaram

    Full Text Available The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA in preclinical development exhibits improved safety and antiviral activity profiles with minimal drug resistance compared to approved NRTIs. However, the systemic antiviral efficacy of EFdA has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we utilized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT humanized mice to investigate the systemic effect of EFdA treatment on HIV replication and CD4+ T cell depletion in the peripheral blood (PB and tissues. In particular, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the female reproductive tract (FRT and gastrointestinal (GI tract, major sites of transmission, viral replication, and CD4+ T cell depletion and where some current antiretroviral drugs have a sub-optimal effect.EFdA treatment resulted in reduction of HIV-RNA in PB to undetectable levels in the majority of treated mice by 3 weeks post-treatment. HIV-RNA levels in cervicovaginal lavage of EFdA-treated BLT mice also declined to undetectable levels demonstrating strong penetration of EFdA into the FRT. Our results also demonstrate a strong systemic suppression of HIV replication in all tissues analyzed. In particular, we observed more than a 2-log difference in HIV-RNA levels in the GI tract and FRT of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. In addition, HIV-RNA was also significantly lower in the lymph nodes, liver, lung, spleen of EFdA-treated BLT mice compared to untreated HIV-infected control mice. Furthermore, EFdA treatment prevented the depletion of CD4+ T cells in the PB, mucosal tissues and lymphoid tissues.Our findings indicate that EFdA is highly effective in controlling viral replication and preserving CD4+ T cells in particular with high efficiency in the GI and FRT tract. Thus, EFdA represents a strong potential candidate for further development as a part of antiretroviral therapy regimens.

  16. Amyloid in biopsies of the gastrointestinal tract-a retrospective observational study on 542 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthaler, Sophie; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Krüger, Sandra; Röcken, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    In this retrospective observational study, we investigated the histopathological and demographic characteristics of amyloid in gastrointestinal biopsies. From the Amyloid Registry Kiel, we retrieved all cases with amyloid in biopsies of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum submitted for tertiary referral between January 2003 and April 2013. Amyloid was identified by Congo red staining in combination with polarization microscopy and classified by immunohistochemistry. The TTR-genotype was assessed in 56 patients. Amyloid type was correlated with demographic patient characteristics. Six hundred sixty-three biopsies from 542 patients were retrieved. Amyloid was found in each biopsy as vascular and/or interstitial amyloid deposits. Biopsies were obtained from the colon [254 biopsies (38.3 %)], stomach, [153 (23.1 %)], rectum [112 (16.9 %)], duodenum [105 (15.8 %)], and jejunum/ileum [39 (5.9 %)]. ALλ amyloid was found in 286 (52.8 %), ATTR in 88 (16.2 %), ALκ in 74 (13.7 %), AA in 58 (10.7 %), and ApoAI amyloid in 4 (0.7 %) patients. The remaining 21 cases were ALys amyloid in 4 (0.7 %), AL n.o.s. in 14 (2.6 %), and mixed type amyloidosis in 3 (0.6 %). The amyloid of 11 (2.0 %) cases remained unclassified. The median age of the patients was 68 years. Men [332 (61.7 %)] were significantly more prevalent than women [206 (38.3 %); p < 0.001]. TTR mutations were found in 24 % of the patients with ATTR amyloidosis. The median age, the histoanatomical distribution (proximal to distal; mucosal to submucosal), and the deposition pattern (vascular/interstitial) varied between different amyloid types. Amyloid in gastrointestinal biopsies mainly affects male elderly patients and shows amyloid-type-specific demographic patient characteristics. PMID:26915034

  17. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

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    Webb, J.A.W. [Diagnostic Radiology Department, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Changes of blood and urine parameters and microflora in the gastrointestinal tract of carp exposed to diluted sewage for a short period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in blood and urine parameters of carp exposed to diluted (20%) raw sewage for a short period were investigated. Carp exposed to the sewage lost their balance within 30 minutes. When carp lost their balance, haematocrite (Ht) and plasma non-nitrogenous compounds (NPN), ammonia, Ca2+, Mg2+, S and catecholamines (CAs) increased significantly, whereas no remarkable changes were observed in urine parameters. Four hours after the exposure, marked changes were found in blood and urine parameters as follows; much higher values for Ht, plasma NPN, ammonia, glucose, lactate, Mg2+, S, Cl, Br and CAs, and for urine ammonia, S, Cl, K, Ca, Zn and Br were observed. After 12 hours, some slight aftereffects were still found on blood and urine parameters. After 36 hours, both blood and urine parameters recovered to the control levels. Effects of the sewage exposure on microflora in the gastrointestinal tract of carp were also studied. Microflora were widely different between upper and lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract in the control. Remarkable bacteriological changes in the tract, particularly in the lower part, were found 12 hours after the exposure. This study suggests that (i) even a short-term exposure to sewage causes considerable stress responses on carp, (ii) urinalysis and examination of gut microbes as well as blood test are effective for the diagnosis of physiological dysfunction in carp, and (iii) microflora in the gastrointestinal tract of carp are strikingly affected by the physiological conditions of fish and by microflora in environmental water. (author)

  19. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to polydextrose and changes in bowel function (ID 784), changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and/or pH in the gastro-intestinal tract (ID 784), decreasing, potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 785) and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort (ID 784) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to polydextrose and changes in bowel function, changes in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and/or pH in the gastro-intestinal tract, decreasing potentially pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms and reduction of gastro-intestinal discomfort. The scientific substantiation...

  20. Tethered capsule OCT endomicroscopy for upper gastrointestinal tract imaging by using ball lens probe (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Gora, Michalina J.; Reddy, Rohith; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Poupart, Oriane; Lu, Weina; Carruth, Robert W.; Grant, Catriona N.; Soomro, Amna R.; Tiernan, Aubrey R.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Nishioka, Norman S.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-03-01

    While endoscopy is the most commonly used modality for diagnosing upper GI tract disease, this procedure usually requires patient sedation that increases cost and mandates its operation in specialized settings. In addition, endoscopy only visualizes tissue superfically at the macroscopic scale, which is problematic for many diseases that manifest below the surface at a microscopic scale. Our lab has previously developed technology termed tethered capsule OCT endomicroscopy (TCE) to overcome these diagnostic limitations of endoscopy. The TCE device is a swallowable capsule that contains optomechanical components that circumferentially scan the OCT beam inside the body as the pill traverses the organ via peristalsis. While we have successfully imaged ~100 patients with the TCE device, the optics of our current device have many elements and are complex, comprising a glass ferrule, optical fiber, glass spacer, GRIN lens and prism. As we scale up manufacturing of this device for clinical translation, we must decrease the cost and improve the manufacturability of the capsule's optical configuration. In this abstract, we report on the design and development of simplificed TCE optics that replace the GRIN lens-based configuration with an angle-polished ball lens design. The new optics include a single mode optical fiber, a glass spacer and an angle polished ball lens, that are all fusion spliced together. The ball lens capsule has resolutions that are comparable with those of our previous GRIN lens configuration (30µm (lateral) × 7 µm (axial)). Results in human subjects show that OCT-based TCE using the ball lens not only provides rapid, high quality microstructural images of upper GI tract, but also makes it possible to implement this technology inexpensively and on a larger scale.

  1. Efeito protetor da lactoferrina humana no trato gastrintestinal Efecto protector de la lactoferrina humana en el sistema gastrointestinal Protective effect of human lactoferrin in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valterlinda Alves de O. Queiroz

    2013-03-01

    gastrointestinal morbidities. DATA SOURCES: Nonsystematic literature review using the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs and Medline from 1990 to 2011. The key-words used were lactoferrin, human milk/breastfeeding, gastrointestinal, and immunity, in Portuguese and English. DATA SYNTHESIS: Lactoferrin is the second predominant protein in the human milk, with higher concentrations in the colostrum (5.0 to 6.7mg/mL if compared to mature milk (0.2 to 2.6mg/mL. In contrast, cow's milk has lower levels, with 0.83mg/mL in the colostrum and 0.09mg/mL in the mature milk. Lactoferrin has several physiological functions to protect the gastrointestinal tract. The antimicrobial activity is related to the ability to sequester iron from biological fluids and/or to destruct the membrane of microorganisms. Lactoferrin also has the ability to stimulate cell proliferation. The anti-inflammatory action exercised by lactoferrin is associated with its ability to penetrate the core of the leukocyte and to block the Kappa B nuclear factor transcription. Given the importance of lactoferrin to prevent infectious diseases for breastfed children, the industry is using genetic engineering techniques to develop the expression of recombinant human lactoferrin in animals and plants, attempting to adjust the composition of infant formulas to that of human milk. CONCLUSIONS: Human lactoferrin is a peptide with great potential for preventing morbidity, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. Scientific evidence of the protective effects of human lactoferrin strengthens even more the recommendation for breastfeeding.

  2. Clostridium perfringens challenge and dietary fat type affect broiler chicken performance and fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefiak, D; Kierończyk, B; Rawski, M; Hejdysz, M; Rutkowski, A; Engberg, R M; Højberg, O

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine how different fats commonly used in the feed industry affect broiler performance, nutrient digestibility and microbial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens challenged with virulent Clostridium perfringens strains. Two experiments were carried out, each including 480-day-old male broilers (Ross 308), which were randomly distributed to eight experimental groups using six replicate pens per treatment and 10 birds per pen. In Experiment 1, birds were fed diets containing soybean oil, palm kernel fatty acid distillers, rendered pork fat and lard. In Experiment 2, birds were fed diets containing rapeseed oil, coconut oil, beef tallow and palm oil. In both experiments, the birds were either not challenged or challenged with a mixture of three C. perfringens type A strains. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens did not affect broiler chicken body weight gain (BWG) and mortality in either of the two experiments. The BWG was affected by dietary fat type in both experiments, indicating that the fatty acid composition of the fat source affects broiler growth performance. In particular, the inclusion of animal fats tended to improve final BW to a greater extent compared with the inclusion of unsaturated vegetable oils. In Experiment 2, irrespective of the dietary fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge significantly impaired feed conversion ratio in the period from 14 to 28 days (1.63 v. 1.69) and at 42 days (1.65 v. 1.68). In both experiments apparent metabolizable energy values were affected by dietary fat type. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge decreased the digesta pH in the crop and ileum, but had no effect in cecal contents. Moreover, in Experiment 1, total organic acid concentration in the ileum was two to three times lower on soybean oil diets as compared with other treatments, indicating that C. perfringens as well as

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract using a curved-array transducer. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmann, P; Khattar, S; Hancke, S

    1991-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound examination (EUS) of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract for the assessment of mural and extramural pathology has attracted growing international interest in recent years. Since February 1989, EUS has been performed on selected patients in our institution using a new Picker-Pentax fiber-optic ultrasound (US) gastroscope. The instrument consists of a forward-view fiber-optic gastroscope with a 5-MHz curved-array linear US transducer mounted directly behind the lens. The scanning plane lies in the long axis of the scope. Based on in vitro US examinations and EUS of 118 patients over an 18-month period, our preliminary experience with the instrument is described. Using EUS, various lesions in the esophageal wall as well as in the gastric and duodenal walls can be visualized. Furthermore, organs and structures outside the GI tract can be seen, and lesions such as enlarged lymph nodes in the mediastinum and abdomen; solid and cystic masses in the liver, pancreas and retroperitoneum; arterial aneurysms; esophageal varices; and gall stones and calcifications can be demonstrated. The 5-MHz transducer does not provide very detailed information on the GI wall. The direction of the ultrasound scanning planes is difficult to define, as the transducer cannot be seen through the optic lens. The method demands great expertise in endoscopy and ultrasound. Indications for EUS have not been definitively established. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of this technique requires further controlled studies. We believe that EUS using a curved-array linear transducer will provide significant diagnostic information of clinical relevance to gastroenterology. PMID:1948619

  4. In vivo subsurface morphological and functional cellular and subcellular imaging of the gastrointestinal tract with confocal mini-microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Goetz; Beena Memadathil; Stefan Biesterfeld; Constantin Schneider; Sebastian Gregor; Peter R Galle; Markus F Neurath; Ralf Kiesslich

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a newly developed hand-held confocal probe for in vivo microscopic imaging of the complete gastrointestinal tract in rodents.METHODS: A novel rigid confocal probe (diameter 7 mm) was designed with optical features similar to the flexible endomicroscopy system for use in humans using a 488 nm single line laser for fluorophore excitation.Light emission was detected at 505 to 750 nm. The field of view was 475 μm × 475 μm. Optical slice thickness was 7 μm with a lateral resolution of 0.7 μm. Subsurface serial images at different depths (surface to 250 μm)were generated in real time at 1024 × 1024 pixels (0.8 frames/s) by placing the probe onto the tissue in gentle,stable contact. Tissue specimens were sampled for histopathological correlation.RESULTS: The esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine and meso, liver, pancreas and gall bladder were visualised in vivo at high resolution in n = 48 mice.Real time microscopic imaging with the confocal minimicroscopy probe was easy to achieve. The different staining protocols (fluorescein, acriflavine, FITC-labelled dextran and L. esculentum lectin) each highlighted specific aspects of the tissue, and in vivo imaging correlated excellently with conventional histology. In vivo blood flow monitoring added a functional quality to morphologic imaging.CONCLUSION: Confocal microscopy is feasible in vivo allowing the visualisation of the complete GI tract at high resolution even of subsurface tissue structures.The new confocal probe design evaluated in this study is compatible with laparoscopy and significantly expands the field of possible applications to intra-abdominal organs. It allows immediate testing of new in vivo staining and application options and therefore permits rapid transfer from animal studies to clinical use in patients.

  5. Usefulness of Double-Balloon Endoscopy in the Postoperative Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Endo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The small intestine has been considered to be a highly difficult organ to visualize in imaging examinations due to its anatomical location compared with the stomach and the colon. In recent years, many imaging modalities have become available, such as CT enterography, MR enterography, capsule endoscopy (CE, and double-balloon endoscopy (DBE. Patients and Methods. DBE was performed in the postoperative intestines of 91 patients (128 DBE examinations at Iwate Medical University between 2004 and 2010. There were 61 male and 30 female patients, and their mean age was 69.7 years (range: 30–80 years. Results. A total of 124 DBE examinations were performed with endoscope insertion into the reconstructed intestines. The endoscope reached the blind end in 115 of 124 examinations, (92.7%. There were 17 patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in whom 30 DBE examinations were performed. The bleeding site was identified in 12 patients (70.6%. Nine patients underwent endoscopic treatment. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Conclusion. DBE is very useful modality for the assessment and application of endotherapy to areas of the small bowel which have been altered by surgery.

  6. Survival of cheese-ripening microorganisms in a dynamic simulator of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adouard, Nadège; Magne, Laurent; Cattenoz, Thomas; Guillemin, Hervé; Foligné, Benoît; Picque, Daniel; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    A mixture of nine microorganisms (six bacteria and three yeasts) from the microflora of surface-ripened cheeses were subjected to in vitro digestive stress in a three-compartment "dynamic gastrointestinal digester" (DIDGI). We studied the microorganisms (i) grown separately in culture medium only (ii) grown separately in culture medium and then mixed, (iii) grown separately in culture medium and then included in a rennet gel and (iv) grown together in smear-ripened cheese. The yeasts Geotrichum candidum, Kluyveromyces lactis and Debaryomyces hansenii, were strongly resistant to the whole DIDGI process (with a drop in viable cell counts of less than Brevibacterium aurantiacum and Arthrobacter arilaitensis were clearly more sensitive to the overall digestive process than when grown in pure cultures. Lactococcus lactis displayed poorer survival in gastric and duodenal compartments when it had been grown in cheese. In vivo experiments in BALB/c mice agreed with the DIDGI experiments and confirmed the latter's reliability. PMID:26611167

  7. Low-Dose Aspirin-Associated Upper and Mid Gastrointestinal Tract Damage and Gene Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiotani, Akiko; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    The risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is increased in association with the use of low-dose aspirin (LDA). There are few studies of the association between genetic polymorphisms and the risks of aspirin-induced ulcer or its complications. Individuals with two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), A-842G and C50T, exhibit increased sensitivity to aspirin and lower prostaglandin synthesis capacity but the polymorphism lacked statistical significance in relation to an association with bleeding peptic ulcer. In our previous Japanese study, SLCO1B1 521TT genotype and the SLCO1B1 *1b haplotype were significantly associated with the risk of peptic ulcer and ulcer bleeding in patients taking LDA, especially in the patients with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), or statin co-treatment. Protonpump inhibitors (PPIs) are recommended for patients who require antiplatelet therapy and have a history of upper GI bleeding. The interaction between PPIs and consequent impaired effectiveness of clopidogrel has caused concern regarding the effect of genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2C19 which mediates conversion of clopidogrel to its active metabolite. The later recent genome-wide analysis of SNPs indicated the association of several SNPs with small bowel bleeding in Japanese patients taking LDA. The data are still lacking and further prospective studies are needed to identify the specific gene polymorphisms as risk or protective factors for GI bleeding associated with LDA. PMID:26369686

  8. Neural control disturbances of the gastrointestinal tract and visceral pain in inflammatory bowel diseases 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ciesielczyk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition, the etiology of which is composed of factors such as the environment, genetic predisposition, gut dysbiosis and inadequate immune response. The pathologic findings in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are related to dysfunction of gastrointestinal secretion and motility and also disturbed visceral sensory function, with accompanying intestinal and parenteral complications. The systemic inflammatory response affects neurological control via the gut-brain axis, which modulates the cooperation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS, enteric nervous system (ENS and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT. In chronic inflammation the intestinal neuropathy disrupts peristalsis and intestinal secretion as well as causing unpleasant symptoms of the patients. Pain receptors are stimulated by inflammatory mediators, and due to the intensified activation of the nociceptive system visceral hypersensitivity through central and peripheral sensitization is generated. Chronic visceral pain negatively influences the course of disease and the quality of the patient’s life. The growing knowledge about the neurological control dysfunction of the intestine and immune system dysregulation could provide proper directives for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. The role of gallium 67 imaging in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, M; Kawamura, M; Tsuda, T; Itoh, H; Komatsu, A; Tanada, S; Iio, A; Hamamoto, K

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of gallium 67 imaging in the detection of gastrointestinal (GI) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and in the assessment of the therapeutic effects, images were reviewed in 24 cases (25 lesions: stomach, 20; ileum, 2; and terminal ileum and or cecum, 3) and were compared using barium studies and, in 16 cases, computerized tomography (CT). In all, 23 (92.0%) of the 25 lesions were detected by 67Ga citrate imaging, the barium studies detected all 25, and CT detected 15 of 16 lesions (93.8%). The two lesions not identified by imaging and the one not found by CT were the smallest of all. In 2 (8.7%) of the 23 lesions positively identified by 67Ga-citrate imaging, both CT and imaging revealed the extent of the tumor more accurately than did the barium studies. In all but one of the patients, a close correlation existed between the imaging results and the therapeutic effects. These data suggest that 67Ga imaging is useful in conjunction with CT and barium studies for the detection of GI NHL and for the assessment of both the spatial extent of disease and the therapeutic effects, although a lack of 67Ga uptake after therapy does not always indicate a good therapeutic effect. PMID:2279495

  10. Intoxication from an accidentally ingested lead shot retained in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Per; Gerhardsson, Lars

    2005-04-01

    A 45-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health in January 2002 because of increased blood lead concentrations of unknown origin. She suffered from malaise, fatigue, and diffuse gastrointestinal symptoms. She had a blood lead level of 550 microg/L (normal range game occasionally. Clinical examination, including standard neurologic examination, was normal. No anemia was present. Laboratory tests showed an increased excretion of lead in the urine, but there were no signs of microproteinuria. An abdominal X ray in October 2002 revealed a 6-mm rounded metal object in the colon ascendens. Before the object could be further localized, the patient contracted winter vomiting disease (gastroenteritis) and the metal object was spontaneously released from the colon during a diarrhea attack. The object was a lead shot pellet, possibly but not normally used in Sweden for hunting wild boar or roe deer. Blood lead levels slowly decreased. Nine months later the patient's blood lead levels were almost normal (approximately 70 microg/L) and her symptoms had almost completely disappeared. In this case, a rare source of lead exposure was found. In investigations of blood lead elevations of unknown origin, we recommend abdominal X ray in parallel with repeated blood lead determinations. PMID:15811841

  11. A piglet model for studying Candida albicans colonization of the human oro-gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeflinger, Jennifer L; Coleman, David A; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Miller, Michael J; Hoyer, Lois L

    2014-08-01

    Pigs from a variety of sources were surveyed for oro-gastrointestinal (oro-GIT) carriage of Candida albicans. Candida albicans-positive animals were readily located, but we also identified C. albicans-free pigs. We hypothesized that pigs could be stably colonized with a C. albicans strain of choice, simply by feeding yeast cells. Piglets were farrowed routinely and remained with the sow for 4 days to acquire a normal microbiota. Piglets were then placed in an artificial rearing environment and fed sow milk replacer. Piglets were inoculated orally with one of three different C. albicans strains. Piglets were weighed daily, and culture swabs were collected to detect C. albicans orally, rectally and in the piglet's environment. Stable C. albicans colonization over the course of the study did not affect piglet growth. Necropsy revealed mucosally associated C. albicans throughout the oro-GIT with the highest abundance in the esophagus. Uninoculated control piglets remained C. albicans-negative. These data establish the piglet as a model to study C. albicans colonization of the human oro-GIT. Similarities between oro-GIT colonization in humans and pigs, as well as the ease of working with the piglet model, suggest its adaptability for use among investigators interested in understanding C. albicans-host commensal interactions.

  12. [Anthelmintic control of multiresistant nematodes in the gastrointestinal tract of imported goats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corba, J; Várady, M; Praslicka, J; Veselý, L

    1993-01-01

    Multiple resistant strains of Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus were detected in a flock of cashmere and angora goats imported from New Zealand. The ED50 values detected by in vitro EHA test were from 0.27 to 0.36 micrograms/ml (while the reference value of sensitivity is 0.10 microgram/ml TBZ). Multiple resistance to all the types of currently used anthelmintics was confirmed by in vivo FECRT, when the efficacy of recommended doses was lower than 90% (albendazole 74%, levamisole 86%, ivermectin 83%). Two control schemes were investigated. In the simultaneous application of anthelmintics in the double or triple of recommended doses (0.4 mg/kg ivermectin s.c., 30 mg/kg levamisole and 20 mg/kg albendazole p.o.) was effective. Examination of goats 7 and 8 months after treatment revealed the repeated presence of multiple resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. It is the first published case of intercontinental transfer of resistant strains of nematodes when importing small ruminants.

  13. Survival of cheese-ripening microorganisms in a dynamic simulator of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adouard, Nadège; Magne, Laurent; Cattenoz, Thomas; Guillemin, Hervé; Foligné, Benoît; Picque, Daniel; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    A mixture of nine microorganisms (six bacteria and three yeasts) from the microflora of surface-ripened cheeses were subjected to in vitro digestive stress in a three-compartment "dynamic gastrointestinal digester" (DIDGI). We studied the microorganisms (i) grown separately in culture medium only (ii) grown separately in culture medium and then mixed, (iii) grown separately in culture medium and then included in a rennet gel and (iv) grown together in smear-ripened cheese. The yeasts Geotrichum candidum, Kluyveromyces lactis and Debaryomyces hansenii, were strongly resistant to the whole DIDGI process (with a drop in viable cell counts of less than cheese-grown cultures. Ripening bacteria such as Hafnia alvei survived gastric stress less well when grown in cheese (with no viable cells after 90 min of exposure of the cheese matrix, compared with 6 CFU mL(-1) in lab cultures). The ability of Corynebacterium casei and Staphylococcus equorum to withstand digestive stress was similar for cheese and pure culture conditions. When grow in a cheese matrix, Brevibacterium aurantiacum and Arthrobacter arilaitensis were clearly more sensitive to the overall digestive process than when grown in pure cultures. Lactococcus lactis displayed poorer survival in gastric and duodenal compartments when it had been grown in cheese. In vivo experiments in BALB/c mice agreed with the DIDGI experiments and confirmed the latter's reliability.

  14. The chemical coding of 5-hydroxytryptamine containing enteroendocrine cells in the mouse gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Yohan; Fakhry, Josiane; Fothergill, Linda; Callaghan, Brid; Ringuet, Mitchell; Hunne, Billie; Bravo, David M; Furness, John B

    2016-06-01

    The majority of 5-HT (serotonin) in the body is contained in enteroendocrine cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa. From the time of their discovery over 80 years ago, the 5-HT-containing cells have been regarded as a class of cell that is distinct from enteroendocrine cells that contain peptide hormones. However, recent studies have cast doubt on the concept of there being distinct classes of enteroendocrine cells, each containing a single hormone or occasionally more than one hormone. Instead, data are rapidly accumulating that there are complex patterns of colocalisation of hormones that identify multiple subclasses of enteroendocrine cells. In the present work, multiple labelling immunohistochemistry is used to investigate patterns of colocalisation of 5-HT with enteric peptide hormones. Over 95 % of 5-HT cells in the duodenum also contained cholecystokinin and about 40 % of them also contained secretin. In the jejunum, about 75 % of 5-HT cells contained cholecystokinin but not secretin and 25 % contained 5-HT plus both cholecystokinin and secretin. Small proportions of 5-HT cells contained gastrin or somatostatin in the stomach, PYY or GLP-1 in the small intestine and GLP-1 or somatostatin in the large intestine. Rare or very rare 5-HT cells contained ghrelin (stomach), neurotensin (small and large intestines), somatostatin (small intestine) and PYY (in the large intestine). It is concluded that 5-HT-containing enteroendocrine cells are heterogeneous in their chemical coding and by implication in their functions. PMID:26803512

  15. Oxalate-Degrading Capacities of Gastrointestinal Lactic Acid Bacteria and Urinary Tract Stone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kargar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium oxalate is one the most significant causes of human kidney stones. Increasing oxalate uptake results in increased urinary oxalate. Elevated urinary oxalate is one the most important causes of kidney stone formation. This study aims to evaluate oxalate-degrading capacity of lactic acid bacteria and its impact on incidence of kidney stone.Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on serum, urinary, and fecal samples. The research population included a total of 200 subjects divided in two equal groups. They were selected from the patients with urinary tract stones, visiting urologist, and also normal people. The level of calcium, oxalate, and citrate in the urinary samples, parathyroid and calcium in the serum samples, and degrading activity of fecal lactobacillus strains of all the subjects were evaluated. Then, data analysis was carried out using SPSS-11.5, χ2 test, Fisher’s exact test, and analysis of variance. Results: The results revealed that the patients had higher urinary level of oxalate and calcium, as well as higher serum level of parathyroid hormone than normal people. In contrast, urinary level of citrate was higher in normal people. In addition, there was a significant difference between the oxalate-degrading capacities of lactobacillus isolated from the patients and their normal peers.Conclusion: Reduction of digestive lactobacillus-related oxalate-degrading capacity and increased serum level of parathyroid hormone can cause elevated urinary level of oxalate and calcium in people with kidney stone.

  16. Structural changes in the mucous membranes of the upper gastrointestinal tract in experimental gastroduodenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanenko E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of long-term intragastric administration of the bile to laboratory rats are examined. The experiment was reproduced on immature rats of both sexes of Wistar (28 animals of experimental group, 12 – control. Morphologic study founds non-uniform thickness of gingival epithelium, the presence of phenomena dyskeratosis, incomplete keratinization. Degenerative changes in the granular layer, the basal layer of the epithelium in places represented by two rows of cells, which constitutes a violation of trophic epithelium and cell division are marked. In the lamina propria gum thickened collagen fibers and sealed, there are phenomena fibrosis and obstruction of blood capillaries. Microscopic examination of the gastric mucosa observed shallow defects of the epithelium, glands gaps widened, glandular cells increased. In the stroma defines the fibrosis and dense lymphocytic infiltration with a mixture of eosinophils. In the duodenum in the proximal mucosa glandular epithelial desquamation, superficial erosion of the proximal villi, covered a lot of mucus are marked. In the submucosal layer there are sharply fully fledged vessels. In the mucosa there are stasis in the capillaries, which constitutes a violation of the microcirculatory level of the vascular system. The findings suggest that the role of functional disorders of the digestive tract in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal comorbidity and periodontal tissues.

  17. Lymphocytic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract: a review for the practicing pathologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Susanne W; Lash, Richard H; Gulizia, James M; Genta, Robert M

    2009-09-01

    Increased numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes (lymphocytosis) can be found in the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon in a variety of clinical circumstances. This review, directed at practicing pathologists, portrays the normal resident lymphocyte population in the mucosa of each segment of the digestive tract and discusses the different situations that may result in quantitative or qualitative alterations of intraepithelial lymphocytes. Esophageal lymphocytosis has not been fully characterized and its clinical significance, if any, awaits definition. Thus, this diagnosis is presently discouraged. In the stomach, it is particularly important to exclude Helicobacter pylori infection and celiac sprue before diagnosing lymphocytic gastritis. Duodenal lymphocytic infiltrates, inextricably tied with alterations of the villous architecture of the mucosa, are often caused by gluten sensitivity. However, similar morphologic changes may be caused by a vast array of other conditions that must be carefully considered and excluded. Lymphocytic and collagenous colitis are most often unexplained, but their frequent association with autoimmune conditions or certain medications deserve a thorough investigation in each case. Using a combination of histologic and clinical clues, a cause for the intraepithelial lymphocytic infiltration can be identified in many instances. As some of the associated conditions are amenable to effective treatment, the importance of diligently seeking such associations before resorting to a diagnosis of primary lymphocytosis is emphasized. PMID:19700939

  18. PATHOGENICITY OF Blastocystis sp. TO THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF MICE: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INOCULUM SIZE AND PERIOD OF INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanelli, Mariana F; Kaneshima, Edilson Nobuyoshi; Uda, Carla F; Colli, Cristiane M; Falavigna-Guilherm, Ana L; Gomes, Mônica L

    2015-12-01

    The pathogenic potential of Blastocystis sp. in experimental models requires further investigation. In this work, the pathogenicity of this parasite in the gastrointestinal tract of male Swiss mice was evaluated according to the inoculum size and period of infection. Animals were infected intragastrically, with 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 Blastocystis sp. vacuolar forms obtained from a mixture of eight human isolates cultured axenically in Jones' medium. After seven, 14, 21, 28 and 60 days of infection, the animals were sacrificed and fragments of the small intestine (duodenum), large intestine, and cecum were subjected to histopathological analysis. Blastocystis sp. triggered an inflammatory response in the different tissues analyzed, with a predominance of mononuclear cells. The parasite was found in the muscular layer of the cecum, showing its invasive character. Larger inocula triggered inflammatory processes earlier (seven days) than smaller ones (from 21 days). We conclude that, in the proposed model, the pathogenicity of Blastocystis sp. isolates that were studied is related to inoculum size and period of infection. PMID:27049699

  19. Screening of lactic acid bacteria from gastrointestinal tracts of marine fish for their potential use as probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipparat Hongpattarakere

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB with inhibitory activity against pathogenic Escherichia coli were isolated from gastrointestinal tracts of fish, shrimp and shellfish. One hundred and sixteen isolates were obtained from fish, twenty isolates from shrimp and twenty-four isolates from shellfish. Three strains were selected based on their bile and acid tolerances. All acid-tolerant strains showed inhibitory activity against human pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli. However, the antibacterial activities were lost when the culture supernatants were neutralized to pH 6.5- 7.0 and treated with catalase, indicating that the inhibition may be contributed by acid and hydrogen-peroxide production of the strains. Nucleotide sequences of their 16s rDNA showed 98% (655/668 bp, 97% (691/712 bp and 98% (492/501 bp homology to Pediococcus pentosaceus LM2, Pediococcus pentosaceus SL4 and Enterococcus faecium SF, respectively.

  20. LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL SCREENING FROM GASTROINTESTINAL DIGESTIVE TRACT OF NATIVE AND BROILER CHICKEN FOR PROBIOTIC CANDIDATE PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Damayanti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of his research was to obtain lactic acid bacteria (LAB from gastrointestinal digestive tract (GIT of chickens for probiotic candidate purposes. LAB was isolated from GIT of broiler and native chickens on selective medium (MRS+0.2% CaCO3. Screening method based on microbiological and biochemical characteristics, antibacterial properties, growth on various temperature, aeration, and agitation, antibiotic sensitivity, and viability on acid pH, gastric juice and bile salt. Thirty nine of LAB isolates was selected from native chicken and 18 isolates from broiler chicken. The selected LAB inhibited Escherichia coli FNCC 0091 growth and grown on 30, 39 and 45oC of temperature, aerobic, anaerobic and agitation conditions. Biochemical identification using API 50 CHL kit revealed that I72 from native chicken ileum as Lactobacillus salivarius and Db9 from broiler chicken duodenum as Pediococcus pentosaceus. All LAB were resistant to Erythromicin, Penicillin G and Streptomycin as tested antibiotics. Both of them have non significantly different of viability on acid pH (1, 2 and 3, gastric juice pH 2 and bile salt which were 91.78% for L. salivarius I72 and 94.48% for P. pentosaceus Db9 (P<0.05. Based on characteristics, both the selected LAB have potentiality as chicken probiotic candidates.

  1. Detection of bovine papilloma viruses in wart-like lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract of cattle and buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Nagarajan, N; Saikumar, G; Arya, R S; Somvanshi, R

    2015-06-01

    In present investigation, etiopathological characterization of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours of cattle and buffaloes was undertaken. A total of 27 GIT wart-like lesions in rumen, reticulum, mouth and oesophagus of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of small nodular to larger spherical or slender growths with thin base present on mucosa and ruminal pillar. Histopathologically, these cases were diagnosed as fibropapilloma/papilloma. This is the first world record on ruminal papillomatosis in buffaloes. Ruminal warts of cattle and buffaloes revealed the presence of BPV-5, -1 & -2, which is the first report of presence of these BPVs in the ruminal warts from India. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that DNA samples of different GIT wart-like lesions contained varying amount of BPV DNA copy numbers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PCNA and Ki67 immunopositivity was present in the basal and spinosum layer of the fibropapilloma/papilloma, indicating these as the cellular proliferation site. In conclusion, the present investigation revealed that BPV-5, -1 & -2 are associated with certain ruminal wart-like lesions/growths in cattle and buffaloes, and the basal and spinosum layer of the ruminal fibropapilloma/papilloma were cellular proliferation sites.

  2. Aflatoxin B(1) in affecting broiler's performance, immunity, and gastrointestinal tract: a review of history and contemporary issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Agha W; Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Bohm, Josef

    2011-06-01

    Aflatoxin B(1) is a common contaminant of poultry feeds in tropical and subtropical climates. Research during the last five decades has well established the negative effects of the mycotoxin on health of poultry. However, the last ten years of relevant data have accentuated the potential of low levels of aflatoxin B(1) to deteriorate broiler performance. In this regard, any attempt to establish a dose-effect relationship between aflatoxin B(1) level and broiler performance is also complicated due to differences in types of broilers and length of exposure to the mycotoxin in different studies. Contrary to the prevalent notion regarding literature saturation with respect to aflatoxicosis of chicken, many areas of aflatoxicosis still need to be explored. Literature regarding effects of the mycotoxin on the gastrointestinal tract in this regard is particular scanty and non-conclusive. In addition to these issues, the metabolism of aflatoxin B(1) and recently proposed hypotheses regarding biphasic effects of the mycotoxin in broilers are briefly discussed.

  3. Phytase transgenic corn in nutrition of laying hens: residual phytase activity and phytate phosphorus content in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C Q; Ji, C; Zhao, L H; Zhang, J Y; Ma, Q G

    2013-11-01

    The residual activities of transgenic corn-derived and 2 commercial microbial phytases (PA and PB) along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of laying hens were compared to evaluate their relative resistance to hydrolysis in the GIT when added to P-deficient diets. The treatments consisted of a negative control (NC) diet containing 0.10 nonphytate P and an NC diet supplemented with transgenic corn-derived phytase (TCDP), PA, and PB at 500 to 5,000 FTU/kg of diet, respectively. Seven diets were fed to Hy-Line Brown laying hens (n = 504; 8 replicates of 9 hens per treatment) for 21 d. At the end of the experiment, the hens were killed and digesta samples from the crop, proventriculus and gizzard, jejunum, and ileum were collected and analyzed for residual phytase activities and phytate P content. Phytase activity in the transgenic corn was determined to be 8,980 FTU/kg of DM. The residual phytase activities along the GIT had increased (P corn is as efficacious as the commercial microbial phytases (PA and PB) in P-deficient diets for the improvement of phytate P digestibility, which would eliminate the need for supplemental phytase and corn separately in laying hen diets.

  4. The Role of Cell Surface Architecture of Lactobacilli in Host-Microbe Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjita Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus species can exert health promoting effects in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT through many mechanisms, which include pathogen inhibition, maintenance of microbial balance, immunomodulation, and enhancement of the epithelial barrier function. Different species of the genus Lactobacillus can evoke different responses in the host, and not all strains of the same species can be considered beneficial. Strain variations may be related to diversity of the cell surface architecture of lactobacilli and the bacteria's ability to express certain surface components or secrete specific compounds in response to the host environment. Lactobacilli are known to modify their surface structures in response to stress factors such as bile and low pH, and these adaptations may help their survival in the face of harsh environmental conditions encountered in the GIT. In recent years, multiple cell surface-associated molecules have been implicated in the adherence of lactobacilli to the GIT lining, immunomodulation, and protective effects on intestinal epithelial barrier function. Identification of the relevant bacterial ligands and their host receptors is imperative for a better understanding of the mechanisms through which lactobacilli exert their beneficial effects on human health.

  5. Association between common variable immunodeficiency and collagenous infiltrative disorders of the gastrointestinal tract: A series of four patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Burkart, Ashlie L; DiMarino, Anthony J; Rattan, Satish; Cohen, Sidney

    2016-03-01

    Hypogammaglobulinemia/common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) may lead to disruption of the gut mucosal immune barrier. Collagenous infiltrative disorders of the intestinal tract (colitis, gastritis, sprue) constitute a relatively new spectrum of gastrointestinal disorders. Our aims were (1) to determine the association between immunoglobulin deficiency state like CVID and collagenous infiltrative disorders of the gut and (2) to study the clinic-pathologic characteristics and treatment outcomes in these patients. A retrospective search was conducted to identify cases with concurrence of these two conditions at an academic center from 2007 to 2013. Four such patients were identified from our database: three with collagenous colitis and one with collagenous gastritis. All patients with collagenous colitis had normal colonic mucosa while the patient with collagenous gastritis had nodular gastric mucosa. Only one patient out of four had decreased plasma cells in the submucosa as expected in low immunoglobulin states. All patients had improvement in their symptoms on immunoglobulin therapy with considerable remission on budesonide. Literature search revealed reporting of four similar patients. In conclusion, (1) the association between collagenous infiltrative disorders of the gut and CVID and its prompt response to immunoglobulins with effective maintenance with budesonide are novel findings. Our study also shows that the presence of plasma cells should not rule out the possibility of CVID. (2) In patients with chronic diarrhea, hypogammaglobulinemia and collagenous colitis/sprue should be considered for the available effective treatments such as immunoglobulins and budesonide. PMID:27053352

  6. GEP-NETS update: functional localisation and scintigraphy in neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP-NETs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-05-01

    For patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP) (GEP-NETs), excellent care should ideally be provided by a multidisciplinary team of skilled health care professionals. In these patients, a combination of nuclear medicine imaging and conventional radiological imaging techniques is usually mandatory for primary tumour visualisation, tumour staging and evaluation of treatment. In specific cases, as in patients with occult insulinomas, sampling procedures can provide a clue as to where to localise the insulin-hypersecreting pancreatic NETs. Recent developments in these fields have led to an increase in the detection rate of primary GEP-NETs and their metastatic deposits. Radiopharmaceuticals targeted at specific tumour cell properties and processes can be used to provide sensitive and specific whole-body imaging. Functional imaging also allows for patient selection for receptor-based therapies and prediction of the efficacy of such therapies. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) and single-photon emission CT/CT are used to map functional images with anatomical localisations. As a result, tumour imaging and tumour follow-up strategies can be optimised for every individual GEP-NET patient. In some cases, functional imaging might give indications with regard to future tumour behaviour and prognosis.

  7. The gut microbiome and its potential role in the development and function of newborn calf gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilusha eMalmuthuge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A diverse microbial population colonizes the sterile mammalian gastrointestinal tract during and after the birth. There is increasing evidence that this complex microbiome plays a crucial role in the development of the mucosal immune system and influences newborn health. Microbial colonization is a complex process influenced by a two-way interaction between host and microbes and a variety of external factors, including maternal microbiota, birth process, diet, and antibiotics. Following this initial colonization, continuous exposure to host-specific microbes is not only essential for development and maturation of the mucosal immune system but also the nutrition and health of the animal. Thus, it is important to understand host-microbiome interactions within the context of individual animal species and specific management practices. Data is now being generated revealing significant associations between the early microbiome, development of the mucosal immune system, and the growth and health of newborn calves. The current review focuses on recent information and discusses the limitation of current data and the potential challenges to better characterizing key host-specific microbial interactions. We also discuss potential strategies that may be used to manipulate the early microbiome to improve production and health during the time when newborn calves are most susceptible to enteric disease.

  8. Endoscopic evaluation and biopsy collection of the gastrointestinal tract in the green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris): application in a case of chronic regurgitation with gastric mucus gland hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Jenny; Sidor, Inga F; Field, Cara; Roddy, Nicole; Sirpenski, Gayle; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    A green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris) was evaluated for chronic regurgitation. By using flexible endoscopy, the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated and revealed multifocal proliferative gastric masses and an intestinal ulcer. Biopsy specimens revealed gastric mucus gland hyperplasia, intestinal nematodiasis, and mild enteritis. Esophagoscopy and gastroscopy were performed by using a larger endoscope (length, 200 cm). A smaller endoscope (length, 100 cm) facilitated entering the intestinal tract in normograde or retrograde directions. A control eel was also evaluated, and no gross or histologic abnormalities were detected. The case eel was treated with metoclopramide and fenbendazole, responded well to therapy, and regurgitation decreased. A year later, the animal died of unrelated causes. Necropsy revealed coelomic gastric adhesions. The gastric proliferative lesions were associated with degeneration and necrosis of gastric pit mucosa without significant inflammation; etiology was unknown. Gastrointestinal endoscopy proved a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation and biopsy collection in this eel species.

  9. Effect of graded levels of rapeseed oil in isonitrogenous diets on the development of the gastrointestinal tract, and utilisation of protein, fat and energy in broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Zhao, Xin Quan; Theil, Peter Kappel;

    2008-01-01

    of the gastrointestinal tract. There was a positive effect on feed utilisation as well as on digestibility especially of dietary fat together with higher utilisation of protein with addition of rapeseed oil. The partial fat digestibility of rapeseed oil estimated by regression was 91.1% and the partial metabolisability......The effect of feeding 0, 4, 8 and 16% rapeseed oil from 12-42 days of age was studied in broiler chickens on performance, digestibility of nutrients, and development of gastrointestinal tract, protein and energy metabolism. Thirty six female chickens (Ross 208) with initial body weight average 246...... periods each of five days with two 24 h measurements of gas exchange in two open-air-circuit respiration chambers inserted on the second and third day of each period. The addition of rapeseed oil increased the amount of gutfill indicating a reduced rate of passage and causing a hypertrophy...

  10. Endoscopic management of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choichi; Sugawa; Hiromi; Ono; Mona; Taleb; Charles; E; Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common condition, es-pecially among children who represent 80% of these emergencies. The most frequently ingested foreign bodies in children are coins, toys, magnets and batter-ies. Most foreign body ingestions in adults occur while eating, leading to either bone or meat bolus impaction. Flexible endoscopy is the therapeutic method of choice for relieving food impaction and removing true foreign bodies with a success rate of over 95% and with mini-mal complications. This review describes a comprehen-sive approach towards patients presenting with foreign body ingestion. Recommendations are based on a review of the literature and extensive personal experi-ence.

  11. Characterization of the contents and histology of the gastrointestinal tracts of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) captured from Upper Lake Roosevelt, Washington, October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsley, Michael J.; van der Leeuw, Bjorn K.; Elliott, Diane G.

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of 37 juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) captured from the upper part of Lake Roosevelt during October 2008, were examined to identify prey taxa and to determine if the fish were consuming smelter slag along with other sediments. Histological examination of the gastrointestinal tract tissues and comparison with similar tissues from hatchery-reared fish also was performed. The contents of the gastro-intestinal tracts (guts) indicated that white sturgeon were actively foraging on various benthic invertebrates and the diet was quite diverse, with more than 50 percent of the fish feeding on five or more different taxa. Slag was present in 76 percent of the guts examined. Although not all guts contained slag particles, larger fish tended to have greater amounts of slag in their guts. Histology of the gut tissues showed the presence of a chronic inflammatory response, and the severity of the response had a significant positive correlation (P = 0.01) with fish length and weight suggesting that the inflammation represented a response to long-term exposure to one or more stressors. However, additional work is needed to determine if the physical or chemical properties of slag contributed to this response.

  12. Surgical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Its Vasculature in the Laboratory Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Vdoviaková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate the morphology of the stomach, liver, intestine, and their vasculature to support the planning of surgical therapeutic methods in abdominal cavity. On adult Wistar rats corrosion casts were prepared from the arterial system and Duracryl Dental and PUR SP were used as a casting medium and was performed macroscopic anatomical dissection of the stomach, liver, and intestine was performed. The rat stomach was a large, semilunar shaped sac with composite lining. On the stomach was very marked fundus, which formed a blind sac (saccus cecus. The rat liver was divided into six lobes, but without gall bladder. Intestine of the rat was simple, but cecum had a shape as a stomach. The following variations were observed in the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. On the corrosion cast specimens we noticed the presence of the anastomosis between middle colic artery (a. colica media and left colic artery (a. colica sinistra. We investigated the second anastomosis between middle colic artery and left colic artery. The results of this study reveal that the functional anatomical relationship between the rat stomach, liver and intestine is important for the development of surgical research in human and veterinary medicine.

  13. Regulation of α-Transducin and α-Gustducin Expression by a High Protein Diet in the Pig Gastrointestinal Tract.

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    Roberto De Giorgio

    Full Text Available The expression of taste receptors (TASRs and their signalling molecules in the gastrointestinal (GI epithelial cells, including enteroendocrine cells (EECs, suggests they participate in chemosensing mechanisms influencing GI physiology via the release of endocrine messengers. TASRs mediate gustatory signalling by interacting with different transducers, including α-gustducin (Gαgust and α-transducin (Gαtran G protein subunits. This study tested whether Gαtran and Gαgust immunoreactive (-IR cells are affected by a short-term (3 days and long-term (30 days high protein (Hp diet in the pig GI tract.In the stomach, Gαgust and Gαtran-IR cells contained serotonin (5-HT and ghrelin (GHR, while in the small and large intestine, Gαgust and Gαtran-IR colocalized with 5-HT-, cholecystokinin (CCK- and peptide YY (PYY-IR. There was a significant increase in the density of Gαtran-IR cells in the pyloric mucosa in both short- and long-term Hp diet groups (Hp3 and Hp30 vs. the control group (Ctr (P<0.05, while the increase of Gαgust-IR cells in the pyloric mucosa was significant in Hp30 group vs. Ctr and vs. Hp3 (P<0.05; these cells included Gαtran / 5HT-IR and Gαtran / GHR-IR cells (P<0.05 and P<0.001 vs. Ctr, respectively as well as Gαgust /5-HT-IR or Gαgust / GHR-IR cells (P<0.05 and P<0.01 vs. Ctr, respectively. In the small intestine, we recorded a significant increase in Gαtran-IR cells in the duodenal crypts and a significant increase of Gαgust-IR cells in the jejunal crypts in Hp3 group compared to HP30 (P<0.05. With regard to the number of Gαtran-Gαgust IR cells colocalized with CCK or 5-HT, there was only a significant increase of Gαtran / CCK-IR cells in Hp3 group compared to Ctr (P = 0.01.This study showed an upregulation of selected subpopulations of Gαgust / Gαtran-IR cells in distinct regions of the pig GI tract by short- and long-term Hp diet lending support to TASR-mediated effects in metabolic homeostasis and satiety

  14. In vitro characterization of cadmium transport along the gastro-intestinal tract of freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinck, Joel S., E-mail: klinckjs@mcmaster.ca [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    An in vitro gut sac technique was used to examine the mechanism(s) of cadmium (Cd) uptake along the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The spatial distribution of Cd between three compartments (mucus-binding, mucosal epithelium, and transport into blood space) was determined using a modified Cortland saline containing 50 {mu}M Cd (as CdCl{sub 2}) labeled with {sup 109}Cd radiotracer. Taking into account total surface areas, the order of relative importance for total Cd uptake rate was: posterior intestine > anterior intestine > stomach > mid intestine. Cd transport was not inhibited by experimentally reducing fluid transport rates by manipulation of osmotic gradients using mannitol, but was sensitive to internal luminal pressure changes, suggesting a mechanosensitive pathway. Q{sub 10} values (1, 11, and 19 {sup o}C) indicated a facilitated transport of Cd in the anterior- and mid-intestine. The effects of 10 mM Ca on the kinetics of Cd uptake suggest the presence of a common uptake pathway for Cd and Ca in the stomach, anterior-, and mid-intestine. Further evidence of a shared route of entry was found using three Ca channel blockers, lanthanum, verapamil, and nifedipine: both voltage-insensitive and voltage-sensitive Ca channels appear to be present in either some, or all portions of the GIT. Elevated Fe (500 {mu}M), Mg (50 mM), and Zn (500 {mu}M) showed varying degrees of inhibition of Cd transport depending on the compartment and segment of the GIT. Overall it appears that there are multiple sites, and mechanisms, of Cd uptake along the GIT of rainbow trout.

  15. Amrubicin in patients with platinum-refractory metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma and mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Tomonori; Takashima, Atsuo; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Honma, Yoshitaka; Iwasa, Satoru; Okita, Natsuko; Kato, Ken; Yamada, Yasuhide; Hashimoto, Hironobu; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kushima, Ryoji; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Boku, Narikazu; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Although the same treatment strategy as used for small cell lung cancer, including second-line chemotherapy, is generally applied to metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) and mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT; GIT-NEC/MANEC), the efficacy of amrubicin (AMR) for GIT-NEC/MANEC is not well known. We retrospectively analyzed platinum-refractory GIT-NEC/MANEC patients who received AMR between February 2004 and July 2012 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. The AMR dose administered was 30-45 mg/m on days 1-3 every 3-4 weeks. The overall response rate according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors guidelines, version 1.0, progression-free survival, overall survival, and adverse events by National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events guidelines, version 4.0 were evaluated. Nineteen patients received AMR. The response rate for 16 assessable patients was 18.8% (95% confidence interval, 4.1-45.7), the median progression-free survival was 3.8 months (2.3-5.3), and the median overall survival was 7.7 months (7.1-8.2). Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 52.6% of patients and febrile neutropenia occurred in 10.5%. Other nonhematological toxicities were mild and treatment-related deaths were not observed. AMR may have a modest effect, with tolerable toxicities, on patients with platinum-refractory GIT-NEC/MANEC. Further prospective evaluations are warranted. PMID:27341105

  16. Effects of Dietary Fiber and Grit on Performance, Gastrointestinal Tract Development, Lipometabolism, and Grit Retention of Goslings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ling; GAO Yu-yun; YE Hui; WANG Wen-ce; LIN Zhen-ping; YANG Hui-yong; HUANG Song-bo; YANG Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated effects of dietary ifbre and grit on growth performance, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development, serum indexes and grit retention of Sichuan white goslings in China. The experiment was a 3×2 factorial design consisting of dietary crude ifbre (CF) at 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0%levels by adding grass meal and with or without grit supplementation. A total of 720 1-d-old male goslings were randomly allocated into 36 pens of 20 goslings/pen (n=6 pens/treatment). At 21 d of age, GIT, blood samples and grit in gizzards were collected. Body weight (BW), empty BW (without GIT), average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) were affected by CF levels and the medium (4.0%) had the highest value. Adding grit improved BW, empty BW, ADG and ADFI. CF affected relative weight or length of proventriculus, gizzard and duodenum. Increasing CF levels decreased jejunum villus height and affected caecal crypt depth and villus height to crypt depth ratio. Higher CF levels decreased serum triglyceride. Adding grit increased relative weight of abdominal fat. Grit addition increased grit weight in gizzard and the ratio of grit in 0.45-1 and 1-2 mm while decreasing the ratio of grit<0.45 and 2-3 mm. In conclusion, moderate CF level and grit addition increased performance of goslings without interaction. Dietary CF levels affected the development of upper GIT and serum triglyceride. Grit needed by goslings should be less than 2 mm. Goslings’ gizzard would accumulate grit from feed when other grit could not be acquired.

  17. Correction of chloride transport and mislocalization of CFTR protein by vardenafil in the gastrointestinal tract of cystic fibrosis mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dhooghe

    Full Text Available Although lung disease is the major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF, gastrointestinal (GI manifestations are the first hallmarks in 15-20% of affected newborns presenting with meconium ileus, and remain major causes of morbidity throughout life. We have previously shown that cGMP-dependent phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5 inhibitors rescue defective CF Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR-dependent chloride transport across the mouse CF nasal mucosa. Using F508del-CF mice, we examined the transrectal potential difference 1 hour after intraperitoneal injection of the PDE5 inhibitor vardenafil or saline to assess the amiloride-sensitive sodium transport and the chloride gradient and forskolin-dependent chloride transport across the GI tract. In the same conditions, we performed immunohistostaining studies in distal colon to investigate CFTR expression and localization. F508del-CF mice displayed increased sodium transport and reduced chloride transport compared to their wild-type littermates. Vardenafil, applied at a human therapeutic dose (0.14 mg/kg used to treat erectile dysfunction, increased chloride transport in F508del-CF mice. No effect on sodium transport was detected. In crypt colonocytes of wild-type mice, the immunofluorescence CFTR signal was mostly detected in the apical cell compartment. In F508del-CF mice, a 25% reduced signal was observed, located mostly in the subapical region. Vardenafil increased the peak of intensity of the fluorescence CFTR signal in F508del-CF mice and displaced it towards the apical cell compartment. Our findings point out the intestinal mucosa as a valuable tissue to study CFTR transport function and localization and to evaluate efficacy of therapeutic strategies in CF. From our data we conclude that vardenafil mediates potentiation of the CFTR chloride channel and corrects mislocalization of the mutant protein. The study provides compelling support for targeting the cGMP signaling pathway in CF

  18. Transducer Like Proteins of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176: Role in chemotaxis and colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gireesh eRajashekara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transducer Like Proteins (Tlps, also known as Methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP, enable enteric pathogens to respond to changing nutrient levels in the environment by mediating taxis towards or away from specific chemoeffector molecules such as nutrients. Despite recent advances in the characterization of chemotaxis responses in Campylobacter jejuni, the impact of Tlps on the adaptation of this pathogen to disparate niches and hosts is not fully characterized. The latter is particularly evident in the case of C. jejuni 81-176, a strain that is known to be highly invasive. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic group C Tlps (Tlp5, 6, and 8 was not extensively evaluated. Here, we investigated the role of C. jejuni 81-176 Tlps in chemotaxis towards various substrates, biofilm formation, in vitro interaction with human intestinal cells, and chicken colonization. We found that the ∆tlp6 and ∆tlp10 mutants exhibited decreased chemotaxis towards aspartate whereas the ∆tlp6 mutant displayed a decreased chemotaxis towards Tri-Carboxylic Acid (TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate, isocitrate, and succinate. Our findings also corroborated that more than one Tlp is involved in mediating chemotaxis towards the same nutrient. The deletion of tlps affected important phenotypes such as motility, biofilm formation, and invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells (INT-407. The ∆tlp8 mutant displayed increased motility in soft agar and showed decreased biofilm formation. The ∆tlp8 and ∆tlp9 mutants were significantly defective in invasion in INT-407 cells. The ∆tlp10 mutant was defective in colonization of the chicken proximal and distal gastrointestinal tract, while the ∆tlp6 and ∆tlp8 mutants showed reduced colonization of the duodenum and jejunum. Our results highlight the importance of Tlps in C. jejuni’s adaptation and pathobiology.

  19. The dynamics of bacteria population on the skin, throat, and gastrointestinal tract of HIV-seropositive patients

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    Kwashie Ajibade Ako-Nai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study determined bacteria population on the skin, throat, and gastrointestinal tract of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-seropositive patients and HIV seronegative controls at the baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively, at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex (OAUTHC, Ilé-Ifè, Osun State, Nigeria and State Specialist Hospital, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria between May and November, 2012. Materials and Methods: Seventy HIV-seropositive subjects and 51 HIV seronegative controls who attended the HIV clinics were recruited. Skin, throat, and rectal swabs were obtained from the participants using sterile cotton-tipped applicators introduced into thioglycollate broth and incubated at 37°C overnight. When growth was noticed, the broth culture was streaked on different bacteriologic media and the isolates were characterized by the standard methods and disc diffusion for antibiotic sensitivity. Results: The number of isolates cultured from the HIV-seropositive subjects was 934, with the distribution being 397, 326, and 211 at the baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The distribution of 1,138 isolates cultured from 51 HIV-seronegative controls was 433, 354, and 351 at the baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. At the baseline among HIV-seropositive patients, the predominant isolates were Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus (B. cereus. However, Corynebacterium haemolyticum, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli (E. coli were predominant at 3 months while at 6 months, Corynebacterium haemolyticum and Corynebacterium diphtheriae had the highest frequency followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens. In the controls, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus xylosus (S. xylosus predominated at the baseline and at 3 months while at 6 months, B. cereus, S. xylosus, and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus were

  20. Characterizing variability in in vivo Raman spectra of different anatomical locations in the upper gastrointestinal tract toward cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical vibrational technology capable of probing biomolecular changes of tissue associated with cancer transformation. This study aimed to characterize in vivo Raman spectroscopic properties of tissues belonging to different anatomical regions in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and explore the implications for early detection of neoplastic lesions during clinical gastroscopy. A novel fiber-optic Raman endoscopy technique was utilized for real-time in vivo tissue Raman measurements of normal esophageal (distal, middle, and proximal), gastric (antrum, body, and cardia) as well as cancerous esophagous and gastric tissues from 107 patients who underwent endoscopic examinations. The non-negativity-constrained least squares minimization coupled with a reference database of Raman active biochemicals (i.e., actin, histones, collagen, DNA, and triolein) was employed for semiquantitative biomolecular modeling of tissue constituents in the upper GI. A total of 1189 in vivo Raman spectra were acquired from different locations in the upper GI. The Raman spectra among the distal, middle, and proximal sites of the esophagus showed no significant interanatomical variability. The interanatomical variability of Raman spectra among normal gastric tissue (antrum, body, and cardia) was subtle compared to cancerous tissue transformation, whereas biomolecular modeling revealed significant differences between the two organs, particularly in the gastroesophageal junction associated with proteins, DNA, and lipids. Cancerous tissues can be identified across interanatomical regions with accuracies of 89.3% [sensitivity of 92.6% (162/175) specificity of 88.6% (665/751)], and of 94.7% [sensitivity of 90.9% (30/33) specificity of 93.9% (216/230)] in the gastric and esophagus, respectively, using partial least squares-discriminant analysis together with the leave-one tissue site-out, cross validation. This work demonstrates that Raman endoscopy technique has

  1. Bitter, sweet and umami taste receptors and downstream signaling effectors: Expression in embryonic and growing chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Druyan, Shelly; Uni, Zehava

    2015-08-01

    Taste perception is a crucial biological mechanism affecting food and water choices and consumption in the animal kingdom. Bitter taste perception is mediated by a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family-the taste 2 receptors (T2R)-and their downstream proteins, whereas sweet and umami tastes are mediated by the GPCR family -taste 1 receptors (T1R) and their downstream proteins. Taste receptors and their downstream proteins have been identified in extra-gustatory tissues in mammals, such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and their GIT activation has been linked with different metabolic and endocrinic pathways in the GIT. The chicken genome contains three bitter taste receptors termed ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, and ggTas2r7, and the sweet/umami receptors ggTas1r1 and ggTas1r3, but it lacks the sweet receptor ggTas1r2. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the expression of genes related to taste perception in the chicken GIT, both at the embryonic stage and in growing chickens. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time, using real-time PCR, expression of the chicken taste receptor genes ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, ggTas2r7, ggTas1r1, and ggTas1r3 and of their downstream protein-encoding genes TRPM5, α-gustducin, and PLCβ2 in both gustatory tissues-the palate and tongue, and extra-gustatory tissues-the proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of embryonic day 19 (E19) and growing (21 d old) chickens. Expression of these genes suggests the involvement of taste pathways for sensing carbohydrates, amino acids and bitter compounds in the chicken GIT.

  2. Expected Survival Using Models of Life Table Compared with Survival of Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer Patients in North of Iran

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    H Zeraati

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Northern regions of Iran have been encountered to dominate malignancies of gastrointestinal (GI tract. We came to examine the total excess mortality due to the GI cancer in Mazandaran province.Methods: Socio-demographic and clinical data of 484 patients with GI cancer collected during the years 1990-1991were available from Babol Cancer Registry. Patients were followed up for 15 years by the year 2006. Using the West Coale-De­meny life table model, a number of five life tables for men and four for women, corresponding to each birth cohort, were constructed. Observed survival was obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the Expected survival cal­culated using the direct adjusted method represented by STEIN et al.Results: The sample of subjects encompassed 66.3% men and 33.7% women with mean age 58.26 ± 10.90, and endoscopy was the general method for cancer detection. Esophagus accounted for 74.2%, and stomach and colorectal accounted for 22.7% and 3.1% of GI cancers, respectively. Survival rate in 15 years following diagnosis was nearly 6%. Comparing pa­tient and expected survival curves showed a significantly reduced survival for patients of each GI cancer over the whole period and especially during the first two years after diagnosis.Conclusion: Patients experienced reduced survival associated with the development of GI cancers. Considering individuals in a population come from different cohorts, adjustment by constructing distinct life tables for different birth cohorts is rec­ommended. The West model is recommended as a first choice to represent mortality in countries whose registration systems are exposed to various errors.

  3. Identification of Rothia bacteria as gluten-degrading natural colonizers of the upper gastro-intestinal tract.

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    Maram Zamakhchari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gluten proteins, prominent constituents of barley, wheat and rye, cause celiac disease in genetically predisposed subjects. Gluten is notoriously difficult to digest by mammalian proteolytic enzymes and the protease-resistant domains contain multiple immunogenic epitopes. The aim of this study was to identify novel sources of gluten-digesting microbial enzymes from the upper gastro-intestinal tract with the potential to neutralize gluten epitopes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oral microorganisms with gluten-degrading capacity were obtained by a selective plating strategy using gluten agar. Microbial speciations were carried out by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Enzyme activities were assessed using gliadin-derived enzymatic substrates, gliadins in solution, gliadin zymography, and 33-mer α-gliadin and 26-mer γ-gliadin immunogenic peptides. Fragments of the gliadin peptides were separated by RP-HPLC and structurally characterized by mass spectrometry. Strains with high activity towards gluten were typed as Rothia mucilaginosa and Rothia aeria. Gliadins (250 µg/ml added to Rothia cell suspensions (OD(620 1.2 were degraded by 50% after ∼30 min of incubation. Importantly, the 33-mer and 26-mer immunogenic peptides were also cleaved, primarily C-terminal to Xaa-Pro-Gln (XPQ and Xaa-Pro-Tyr (XPY. The major gliadin-degrading enzymes produced by the Rothia strains were ∼70-75 kDa in size, and the enzyme expressed by Rothia aeria was active over a wide pH range (pH 3-10. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: While the human digestive enzyme system lacks the capacity to cleave immunogenic gluten, such activities are naturally present in the oral microbial enzyme repertoire. The identified bacteria may be exploited for physiologic degradation of harmful gluten peptides.

  4. Strain-resolved microbial community proteomics reveals simultaneous aerobic and anaerobic function during gastrointestinal tract colonization of a preterm infant

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    Brandon eBrooks

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While there has been growing interest in the gut microbiome in recent years, it remains unclear whether closely related species and strains have similar or distinct functional roles and if organisms capable of both aerobic and anaerobic growth do so simultaneously. To investigate these questions, we implemented a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in fecal samples collected on days of life 13-21 from an infant born at 28 weeks gestation. No prior studies have coupled strain-resolved community metagenomics to proteomics for such a purpose. Sequences were manually curated to resolve the genomes of two strains of Citrobacter that were present during the later stage of colonization. Proteome extracts from fecal samples were processed via a nano-2D-LC-MS/MS and peptides were identified based on information predicted from the genome sequences for the dominant organisms, Serratia and the two Citrobacter strains. These organisms are facultative anaerobes, and proteomic information indicates the utilization of both aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms throughout the time series. This may indicate growth in distinct niches within the gastrointestinal tract. We uncovered differences in the physiology of coexisting Citrobacter strains, including differences in motility and chemotaxis functions. Additionally, for both Citrobacter strains we resolved a community-essential role in vitamin metabolism and a predominant role in propionate production. Finally, in this case study we detected differences between genome abundance and activity levels for the dominant populations. This underlines the value in layering proteomic information over genetic potential.

  5. Bitter, sweet and umami taste receptors and downstream signaling effectors: Expression in embryonic and growing chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Druyan, Shelly; Uni, Zehava

    2015-08-01

    Taste perception is a crucial biological mechanism affecting food and water choices and consumption in the animal kingdom. Bitter taste perception is mediated by a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family-the taste 2 receptors (T2R)-and their downstream proteins, whereas sweet and umami tastes are mediated by the GPCR family -taste 1 receptors (T1R) and their downstream proteins. Taste receptors and their downstream proteins have been identified in extra-gustatory tissues in mammals, such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and their GIT activation has been linked with different metabolic and endocrinic pathways in the GIT. The chicken genome contains three bitter taste receptors termed ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, and ggTas2r7, and the sweet/umami receptors ggTas1r1 and ggTas1r3, but it lacks the sweet receptor ggTas1r2. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the expression of genes related to taste perception in the chicken GIT, both at the embryonic stage and in growing chickens. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time, using real-time PCR, expression of the chicken taste receptor genes ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, ggTas2r7, ggTas1r1, and ggTas1r3 and of their downstream protein-encoding genes TRPM5, α-gustducin, and PLCβ2 in both gustatory tissues-the palate and tongue, and extra-gustatory tissues-the proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of embryonic day 19 (E19) and growing (21 d old) chickens. Expression of these genes suggests the involvement of taste pathways for sensing carbohydrates, amino acids and bitter compounds in the chicken GIT. PMID:26049797

  6. Characteristic features of ghrelin cells in the gastrointestinal tract and the regulation of stomach ghrelin expression and production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhao; Takafumi Sakai

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin was isolated as an endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor from the rat stomach. Although physiological effects of ghrelin have been revealed by numerous studies, the regulation of stomach ghrelin remains obscure, and the factor that directly regulates ghrelin expression and production has not been identified. Here, we show some data regarding the characteristic features of ghrelin cells and the regulation of stomach ghrelin. In the gastrointestinal tract, ghrelin cells were identified as opened- and closed-type cells, and it was found that the number of ghrelin cells decreased from the stomach to the colon. The postnatal change in number of ghrelin cells in the stomach showed a sexually dimorphic pattern, indicating a role of estrogen in the regulation of stomach ghrelin. In vitro studies revealed that estrogen stimulated both ghrelin expression and production and that treatment with formestane, an aromatase (estrogen synthetase) inhibitor, decreased ghrelin expression level. On the other hand, leptin was found to inhibit both basal and estrogen-stimulated ghrelin expression. Moreover, both aromatase mRNA-expressing cells and leptin cells were found to be located close to ghrelin cells in the gastric mucosa. Furthermore, we found an inverse relationship between gastric ghrelin and leptin levels in a fasting state, and we revealed relative changes in expression of gastric ghrelin, estrogen and leptin in the postnatal rats. We propose that gastric estrogen and leptin directly regulate stomach ghrelin and that the balance control through gastric estrogen and leptin contributes to the altered ghrelin expression level in some physiological states.

  7. Pattern of gastrointestinal diseases in adult patients admitted to Samtah General Hospital, Gizan region, Saudi Arabia

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    Aderoju Emmanuel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the relative frequencies of gastrointestinal diseases (GI in patients admitted to Samtah General Hospital, Gizan, the records of 2,442 adults admitted to the medical and surgical services for gastrointestinal diseases during the period 1413 to 1416 were analyzed retrospectively. 1,028 patients had acute appendicitis. The remaining 1,414 patients were admitted for various other GI diseases. In these 1,414 patients the commonest diseases were gastrointestinal infections (36.4%, peptic ulcer disease (19%, gall bladder disease (18.5%, viral hepatitis and its sequelae (20.7%. Despite the high prevalence of cholelithiasis, acute pancreatitis was uncommon (0.1 %. Inflammatory bowel disease was rare. There was no gender - related difference in the prevalence of gastrointestinal infections, peptic ulcer disease and carcinoma of the stomach. Males were significantly more afflicted than females with viral hepatitis (p< 0.0001, cirrhosis of the liver (p< 0.0001, hepatocellular carcinoma (p< 0.0005, variceal bleeding (p< 0.0005, and peptic ulcer bleeding (p< 0.005. As a large proportion of our patients had preventable diseases, it is expected that immunization and other public health measures will reduce the frequency of these diseases in the future.

  8. Implicaciones nutricionales de la cirugía bariátrica sobre el tracto gastrointestinal Nutritional implications of bariatric surgery on the gastrointestinal tract

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    M. A. Rubio

    2007-05-01

    esencial que la educación nutricional tiene en el aprendizaje de nuevos hábitos alimenticios que contribuyan a mantener esta pérdida de peso a lo largo del tiempo.Anatomical change in the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract after bariatric surgery leads to modification of dietary patterns that have to be adapted to new physiological conditions, either related with the volume of intakes or the characteristics of the macro- and micronutrients to be administered. Restrictive diet after bariatric surgery (basically gastric bypass and restrictive procedures is done at several steps. The first phase after surgery consists in the administration of clear liquids for 2-3 days, followed by completely low-fat and high-protein content (> 50-60 g/day liquid diet for 2-4 weeks, normally by means of formula-diets. Soft or grinded diet including very soft protein-rich foods, such as egg, low-calories cheese, and lean meats such as chicken, cow, pork, or fish (red meats are not so well tolerated is recommended 2-4 weeks after hospital discharge. Normal diet may be started within 8 weeks from surgery or even later. It is important to incorporate hyperproteic foods with each meal, such egg whites, lean meats, cheese or milk. All these indications should be done under the supervision of an expert nutrition professional to always advise the patients and adapting the diet to some special situations (nausea/vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, dumping syndrome, dehydration, food intolerances, overfeeding, etc.. The most frequent vitamin and mineral deficiencies in the different types of surgeries are reviewed, with a special focus on iron, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D metabolism. It should not be forgotten that the aim of obesity surgery is making the patient loose weight and thus post-surgery diet is designed to achieve that goal although without forgetting the essential role that nutritional education has on the learning of new dietary habits contributing to maintain that weight loss

  9. Frequent detection of human adenovirus from the lower gastrointestinal tract in men who have sex with men.

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    Marcel E Curlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between baseline seropositivity to human adenovirus (HAdV type 5 and increased HIV acquisition in the Step HIV Vaccine Study has raised questions concerning frequency of acquired and/or persistent Adenovirus infections among adults at high risk of HIV-1 infection. METHODOLOGY: To evaluate the frequency and pattern of HAdV shedding from the lower GI tract, we retrospectively tested rectal swabs for HAdVs in a cohort of 20 HSV-2 positive HIV-positive Peruvian men who have sex with men (MSM undergoing rectal swabbing three times/week for 18 consecutive weeks, in a prospective study of HSV-2 suppression in HIV infection. Viral DNA was extracted and amplified using a sensitive multiplex PCR assay that detects all currently recognized HAdV types. Molecular typing of viruses was performed on selected samples by hexon gene sequencing. Baseline neutralizing antibody titers to HAdVs -5, -26, -35 and -48 were also assessed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 15/20 individuals had HAdV detected during follow up. The median frequency of HAdV detection was 30% of samples (range 2.0% to 64.7%. HAdV shedding typically occurred on consecutive days in clustered episodes lasting a median of 4 days (range 1 to 9 days separated by periods without shedding, suggesting frequent new infections or reactivation of latent infections over time. 8 of the 15 shedders had more than one type detected in follow-up. 20 HAdV types from species B, C, and D were identified, including HAdV-5, -26 and -48, HAdV types under development as potential vaccine candidates. 14/20 subjects were seropositive for HAdV-5; 15/20 for HAdV-26; 3/20 for HAdV-35; and 2/20 for HAdV-48. HAdV shedding did not correlate with CD4 count, plasma HIV-1 viral load, or titers to HAdV-5 or HAdV-35. The sole individual with HAdV-5 shedding was HAdV-5 seropositive. CONCLUSIONS: HAdV shedding was highly prevalent and diverse, including types presently under consideration as HIV vaccine vectors

  10. Efeitos do exercício físico sobre o trato gastrintestinal Effects of physical exercise on the gastrointestinal tract

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    Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O impacto do exercício sobre o trato gastrintestinal (TGI, apesar de pouco investigado, é uma área de grande interesse. O exercício aeróbio intenso e de longa duração pode provocar sintomas gastrintestinais. Estes podem ser divididos em sintomas superiores (vômitos, náuseas e pirose retroesternal - azia e inferiores (diarréia, cólica abdominal, perda de apetite, sangramento, aceleração dos movimentos intestinais e vontade de defecar. A etiologia desses sintomas durante o exercício é multifatorial e inclui a redução do fluxo sanguíneo intestinal, a liberação de hormônios gastrintestinais, o estresse mecânico sobre o TGI, a desidratação, os fatores psicológicos, a idade, o sexo, a dieta e o nível de treinamento do indivíduo. Por outro lado, o exercício de baixa intensidade tem efeito protetor sobre o TGI, principalmente com relação à predisposição a certas doenças como o câncer de cólon, a diverticulite, a colelitíase e a constipação. Diversos mecanismos são postulados para explicar os efeitos do exercício sobre o TGI, contribuindo para o desenvolvimento de estratégias terapêuticas no tratamento de indivíduos com sintomas e doenças gastrintestinais.The impact of exercise on the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract, although being little investigated, is a field of high interest. Intense endurance aerobic exercise can lead to gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms can be classified into upper symptoms (vomiting, nausea and retrosternal pyrosis - heartburn and lower symptoms (diarrhea, abdominal cramps, loss of appetite, bleeding, accelerated bowel transit time, urge to defecate. These symptoms’ etiology during exercise is multifactorial and includes: reduction of intestinal blood flow, release of gastrointestinal hormones, mechanical stress on the GI tract, dehydration, psychological factors, age, gender, diet, and training status. On the other hand, low intensity exercise has a protective effect on the

  11. The protective effects of total phenols in magnolia officinalix rehd. et wils on gastrointestinal tract dysmotility is mainly based on its influence on interstitial cells of cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Huang, Dazhi; Li, Tao; Huang, Lihua; Zheng, Xingguang; Tang, Danxia; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils is a kind of herb which is widely used for gastrointestinal tract mobility disorder in Asian countries. In this study, we investigated whether the total phenols of Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils (TPM) treatment improves gastrointestinal tract dysmobility induced by intraperitoneal injection of atropine (5 mg/kg) in rats. Rats were randomly grouped into three units: TPM-pretreated/atropine-treated group, atropinetreated group and control group. TPM were administrated for 7 days. Gastric residual rate and intestinal transit were measured 20 min after atropine injected, and gastrointestinal hormones (including: gastrin (GAS), motilin (MTL), somatostatin (SS) and p substance (PS) levels in serum were also measured by ELISA kits. The number and distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in stomach were detected by immunohistochemistry analysis, while c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) expressions in stomach were also measured by western blotting. We found that TPM pretreatment significantly improved atropine-induced gastric residual rate increase, while had no significantly effects on intestinal transit; it also significantly normalized GAS, MTL and PS serum levels. Atropine-induced ICCs numbers decreased in both sinuses ventriculi and body of stomach, which is improved by TPM pretreatment. Western blotting results showed the expressions of c-kit and SCF were down-regulated after atropine injection, which can be reversed with TPM pretreatment. These results above indicates that TPM treatment can significantly protected atropine-induced gastric dysmoblility, which may owed to its regulation on c-kit/SCF signing pathway.

  12. Modern views on the pathogenesis of hard dental tissues and periodontium lesions and means of their treatment in children with chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract

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    Krupey V.Y.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the mouth covity often reflect regularities of pathogenesis of a number of disease states, and primarily from the digestive tract. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to clarify pathogenesis of certain lesions of hard dental tissues and periodontal tissues in children with chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and development of schemes for their treatment. The study observed 441 children aged from 7 to 15 years with dental caries and generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis on the background of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, duodenal ulcer and malabsorption syndrome. All the children were divided into 2 groups - basic and comparison one. The study identified the most dan¬gerous and little-known way of pathogenesis, which passes through the general processes of reducing the production of various proteins (immune system and antiseptics, is a violation of the general and local resistance and, ultimately, mineral metabolism. Such disorders impair complete mineralization of tooth enamel, reduce optimal composition and properties of saliva stimulating glycolysis processes in oral cavity. Prevention of dental caries and generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with chronic pathology of the gastrointestinal tract is based on the use of developed therapeutic and prophylactic complex, which includes mucosal gel Kvertulin, probiotic Latsidofil and drug Calcium D.

  13. Dynamic In Vitro Models of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract as Relevant Tools to Assess the Survival of Probiotic Strains and Their Interactions with Gut Microbiota

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    Charlotte Cordonnier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of probiotics are conditioned by their survival during passage through the human gastrointestinal tract and their ability to favorably influence gut microbiota. The main objective of this study was to use dynamic in vitro models of the human digestive tract to investigate the effect of fasted or fed state on the survival kinetics of the new probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CNCM I-3856 and to assess its influence on intestinal microbiota composition and activity. The probiotic yeast showed a high survival rate in the upper gastrointestinal tract whatever the route of admistration, i.e., within a glass of water or a Western-type meal. S. cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 was more sensitive to colonic conditions, as the strain was not able to colonize within the bioreactor despite a twice daily administration. The main bacterial populations of the gut microbiota, as well as the production of short chain fatty acids were not influenced by the probiotic treatment. However, the effect of the probiotic on the gut microbiota was found to be individual dependent. This study shows that dynamic in vitro models can be advantageously used to provide useful insight into the behavior of probiotic strains in the human digestive environment.

  14. Presence of Selected Methanogens, Fibrolytic Bacteria, and Proteobacteria in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Neonatal Dairy Calves from Birth to 72 Hours.

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    Cesar E Guzman

    Full Text Available The microbial communities in the gastrointestinal tract of a young calf are essential for the anatomical and physiological development that permits a transition from milk to solid feed. Selected methanogens, fibrolytic bacteria, and proteobacteria were quantified in the rumen fluid and tissue, abomasum fluid, cecum fluid and tissue, and feces of Holstein bull calves on day 0 (0-20 mins after birth, day 1 (24 ± 1 h after birth, day 2 (48 ± 1 h after birth, and day 3 (72 ± 1 h after birth. Methanogens, fibrolytic bacteria, and Geobacter spp. were found to be already present from birth, indicating that microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract occurred before or during delivery. The abundance of methanogens and Geobacter spp. differed between the days tested and between compartments of the digestive tract and feces, but such difference was not observed for fibrolytic bacteria. Our findings suggests that methanogens might have an alternative hydrogen provider such as Geobacter spp. during these early stages of postnatal development. In addition, fibrolytic bacteria were present in the rumen well before the availability of fibrous substrates, suggesting that they might use nutrients other than cellulose and hemicellose.

  15. The gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else M.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    is not one of the core battery of tests that pharmaceutical companies are obliged to investigate as part of drug development. This review aims to cover the basics of GIT function before highlighting aspects of relevance for safety pharmacology in terms of age, cancerogenesis, and noth drug and diet...

  16. Liver and gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver is often a site of a variety of diseases. A palpable liver during a routine clinical examination is an important finding and requires further investigations. The availability of non-invasive liver imaging procedures using nuclear, ultrasound, CT (and now MRI) techniques have immensely enhanced diagnostic accuracy in liver diseases. In this Chapter, a detailed description of routinely practised nuclear medicine procedures related to liver is given. Brief reference is also made to other imaging techniques, particularly ultrasonography, only for the purposes of comparison. Most of the information is based on our own clinical experience of past 30 years

  17. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC) Ultrastructure and Connexin 43 Protein Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Functional Dyspepsia (FD) Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoshan; Xie, Shen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuer; Liu, Mailan; Liu, Mi; Chang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal motility disorder is the main clinical manifestation in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. Electroacupuncture is effective in improving gastrointestinal motility disorder in FD; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and the pacemaker potential is transmitted to nearby cells through gap junctions between ICC or ICC and the smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture on ICC ultrastructure and expression of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in FD rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS The animals were randomized into 3 groups: control, model, and electroacupuncture. Electroacupuncture was applied at Zusanli (ST36) in the electroacupuncture group daily for 10 days, while no electroacupuncture was applied to model group animals. RESULTS Ultrastructure of ICC recovered normally in gastric antrum and small intestine specimens was improved, with Cx43 expression levels in these tissues significantly increased in the electroacupuncture group compared with the model group. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicated that electroacupuncture is effective in alleviating ICC damage and reduces Cx43 levels in FD rats, and suggest that ICC and Cx43 are involved in electroacupuncture treatment in rats with FD to improve gastrointestinal motility disorders.

  18. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

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    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. A review of scientific topics and literature in abdominal radiology in Germany. Pt. 1. Gastrointestinal tract; Aktuelle Schwerpunkte und Literatur der Abdominalradiologie im deutschsprachigen Raum. T. 1. Gastrointestinaltrakt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, A.G. [University Hospital Regensburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Wessling, J. [Clemens Hospital, Muenster (Germany). Clinic for Radiology; Kinner, S.; Lauenstein, T.C. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Juchems, M.S. [Konstanz Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Holzapfel, K. [Technical University Munich (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Konietzke, P. [University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Grenacher, L. [Diagnostic Muenchen - Diagnostic Imaging Center, Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The working group for abdominal and gastrointestinal diagnosis is a group of the German Radiological Society (DRG) focusing clinically and scientifically on the diagnosis and treatment of the gastrointestinal tract with all parenchymatous abdominal organs. In addition to the clinical and scientific further development of abdominal radiology, the education of radiologists within this core discipline of radiology is one of the major aims. In this article we give an up-to-date literature review of scientific radiological topics especially covered by German radiologists. This manuscript focuses on the most recent literature on the diagnosis of the stomach, small bowel, colon and rectum. The review with a focus on the most recent studies published by German radiologists concludes with a synopsis of mesenterial bleeding and ischemia followed by a critical appraisal of the current literature on conventional abdominal radiography.

  20. In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Meyer, Anne S.;

    2015-01-01

    Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may...... be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by...

  1. Aspect Ratio Plays a Role in the Hazard Potential of CeO2 Nanoparticles in Mouse Lung and Zebrafish Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dong, Yuan; Meng, Huan; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Song, Tze-Bin; Kohan, Sirus; Xia, Tian; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Lin, Shuo; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that there is a relationship between the aspect ratio (AR) of CeO2 nanoparticles and in vitro hazard potential. CeO2 nanorods with AR ≥ 22 induced lysosomal damage and progressive effects on IL-1β production and cytotoxicity in the human myeloid cell line, THP-1. In order to determine whether this toxicological paradigm for long aspect ratio (LAR) CeO2 is also relevant in vivo, we performed comparative studies in the mouse lung and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) ...

  2. Spatial expression patterns of peptide transporters in the human and rat gastrointestinal tracts, Caco-2 In Vitro cell culture model, and multiple human tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera-Ruiz, Dea; Wang, Qing; Cook, Thomas J.; Knipp, Gregory T.; Gudmundsson, Olafur S.; Ronald L. Smith; Teresa N. Faria

    2001-01-01

    This study sought to identify the spatial patterns of expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT1), peptide transporter 3 (PTR3), peptide/histidine transporter 1 (PHT1), and the human peptide transporter 1 (HPT-1) mRNA in complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries of the human and rat gastrointestinal tracts (GIT), Caco-2 in vitro cell culture model, and in a human multiple tissue panel. Human PTR3 and PHT1 are putative peptide transporters recently discovered. Using sequence-specific primers designed...

  3. An adult case of urinary tract infection with Kingella kingae: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramana KV

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Kingella kingae, though part of the normal upper respiratory tract and genitourinary tract, is increasingly being recognized as an important human pathogen. During the past decade, it has emerged as a significant pathogen in the pediatric age group primarily causing bacteremia and osteoarticular infections. Adult infection usually occurs in individuals who are severely immunocompromised and most infections have taken the form of septicemia or septic arthritis. Bacteremia due to K. kingae has been reported as the immediate cause of death in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Case presentation We present a microbiologically confirmed urinary tract infection with K. kingae in an immunocompetent 45-year-old adult woman with post-menopausal bleeding and with a history of clots. Her urine was subjected to culture and sensitivity tests. The isolated colonies were identified as K. kingae because of their typical culture characteristics such as long incubation period required for growth, beta-hemolysis, positive oxidase and negative catalase, urease indole, nitrate and citrate tests. Penicillin G disc test was positive. They were sensitive to all conventional antibiotics. Conclusion K. kingae infection is a rare occurrence in immunocompetent adults. Very few cases of microbiologically confirmed infections have been reported so far. The isolation of K. kingae from urine sample has rarely been reported. K. kingae isolates are either missed or misinterpreted by clinical microbiologists. Therefore, K. kingae deserves recognition as a pathogen.

  4. Combination of erythritol and fructose increases gastrointestinal symptoms in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonsoo; Park, Sonhee C; Wolf, Bryan W; Hertzler, Steven R

    2011-11-01

    Consumption of a large amount of dietary fructose induces gastrointestinal intolerance, and glucose has been known as an enhancer of fructose absorption. Erythritol is a nonglycemic sugar alcohol, and it has been suggested that erythritol is absorbed paracellularly. It was hypothesized that paracellular absorption of erythritol could also enhance paracellular absorption of fructose in healthy adults. This is one of the proposed pathways for how additional glucose enhances the absorption of fructose. Thirty-seven nondiabetic, healthy adults participated in a randomized, double-masked, controlled crossover study. After an overnight fast, participants consumed beverages containing either 50 g fructose and 50 g glucose, 50 g fructose and 33.3 g erythritol (an equimolar concentration of fructose), or 50 g fructose alone. Breath hydrogen response was determined for 8 hours postprandially. Gastrointestinal intolerance symptoms and the number and consistency of bowel movements were recorded for 24 hours postprandially. The breath hydrogen area under the curve (AUC) of the fructose and erythritol beverage was 2 times the AUC of the fructose beverage and 8.75 times the AUC of the fructose and glucose beverage (P fructose and glucose beverage and fructose alone, frequency of watery stools increased (P fructose and erythritol. These data suggest that coingestion of equimolar concentrations of fructose and erythritol increased carbohydrate malabsorption.

  5. Molecular Occurrence of Enterocin A Gene among Enterococcus faecium Strains Isolated from Gastro-Intestinal Tract and Antimicrobial Effect of this Bacteriocin Against Clinical Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Salehi

    2014-06-01

    Materials and Methods: In this study occurrence of class II enterocin structural gene (enterocin A in a target of 42 Enterococcus faecium strains, isolated from gastrointestinal tract of animal have been surveyed. E. faecium identification and occurrence of enterocin A gene was performed by PCR method. Cell-free neutralized supernatant of gene positive strains was used to test bacteriocin production and antimicrobial spectrum of supernatant was assayed by wall diffusion method on the gram-positive and negative indicators bacteriaResults: Based on our results, 73.8% of isolated strains had enterocin A gene that they inhibited growth of indicator bacteria such as clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enteric PTCC1709, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis.Conclusions: Studied enterocins have growth inhibitory spectrum on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria especially against pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, these strains have the potential to explore and use as, alternative antimicrobial compound and bio-preservatives in food or feed or as probiotics.

  6. Epithelial, metabolic and innate immunity transcriptomic signatures differentiating the rumen from other sheep and mammalian gastrointestinal tract tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ruidong; Oddy, Victor Hutton; Archibald, Alan L; Vercoe, Phillip E; Dalrymple, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ruminants are successful herbivorous mammals, in part due to their specialized forestomachs, the rumen complex, which facilitates the conversion of feed to soluble nutrients by micro-organisms. Is the rumen complex a modified stomach expressing new epithelial (cornification) and metabolic programs, or a specialised stratified epithelium that has acquired new metabolic activities, potentially similar to those of the colon? How has the presence of the rumen affected other sections of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of ruminants compared to non-ruminants? Methods. Transcriptome data from 11 tissues covering the sheep GIT, two stratified epithelial and two control tissues, was analysed using principal components to cluster tissues based on gene expression profile similarity. Expression profiles of genes along the sheep GIT were used to generate a network to identify genes enriched for expression in different compartments of the GIT. The data from sheep was compared to similar data sets from two non-ruminants, pigs (closely related) and humans (more distantly related). Results. The rumen transcriptome clustered with the skin and tonsil, but not the GIT transcriptomes, driven by genes from the epidermal differentiation complex, and genes encoding stratified epithelium keratins and innate immunity proteins. By analysing all of the gene expression profiles across tissues together 16 major clusters were identified. The strongest of these, and consistent with the high turnover rate of the GIT, showed a marked enrichment of cell cycle process genes (P = 1.4 E-46), across the whole GIT, relative to liver and muscle, with highest expression in the caecum followed by colon and rumen. The expression patterns of several membrane transporters (chloride, zinc, nucleosides, amino acids, fatty acids, cholesterol and bile acids) along the GIT was very similar in sheep, pig and humans. In contrast, short chain fatty acid uptake and metabolism appeared to be different

  7. The protective effects of total phenols in magnolia officinalix rehd. et wils on gastrointestinal tract dysmotility is mainly based on its influence on interstitial cells of cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Huang, Dazhi; Li, Tao; Huang, Lihua; Zheng, Xingguang; Tang, Danxia; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils is a kind of herb which is widely used for gastrointestinal tract mobility disorder in Asian countries. In this study, we investigated whether the total phenols of Magnolia officinalix Rehd. et Wils (TPM) treatment improves gastrointestinal tract dysmobility induced by intraperitoneal injection of atropine (5 mg/kg) in rats. Rats were randomly grouped into three units: TPM-pretreated/atropine-treated group, atropinetreated group and control group. TPM were administrated for 7 days. Gastric residual rate and intestinal transit were measured 20 min after atropine injected, and gastrointestinal hormones (including: gastrin (GAS), motilin (MTL), somatostatin (SS) and p substance (PS) levels in serum were also measured by ELISA kits. The number and distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in stomach were detected by immunohistochemistry analysis, while c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) expressions in stomach were also measured by western blotting. We found that TPM pretreatment significantly improved atropine-induced gastric residual rate increase, while had no significantly effects on intestinal transit; it also significantly normalized GAS, MTL and PS serum levels. Atropine-induced ICCs numbers decreased in both sinuses ventriculi and body of stomach, which is improved by TPM pretreatment. Western blotting results showed the expressions of c-kit and SCF were down-regulated after atropine injection, which can be reversed with TPM pretreatment. These results above indicates that TPM treatment can significantly protected atropine-induced gastric dysmoblility, which may owed to its regulation on c-kit/SCF signing pathway. PMID:26884941

  8. Phytoplankton composition of the water and gastrointestinal tract of the mussel Diplodon enno (Ortmann, 1921) from São Francisco river (Bahia, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, T; Lima, P; Lima, G M S; Cunha, M C C; Ferreira, S; Domingues, B; Machado, J

    2016-06-01

    The knowledge on diet composition of the freshwater mussel Diplodon enno (Ortmann) would aid in its culture and propagation allowing, this way, the replacement of natural endangered populations in Brazil. Microalgae are the main food source for captive mussels and unionids have displayed an ability to sort algae based on the cellular characteristics prior to ingestion. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the phytoplankton composition of the water from and of the gastrointestinal contents of the mussel D. enno, as an initial step for development of a suitable rearing diet. Therefore, water samples and bivalve specimens were collected from S. Francisco River, city of Paulo Afonso, Bahia, Brazil. The microalgal composition found in water and stomach/gut content samples was very diverse being represented by the following divisions: Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, Dinophyta and Heterokontophyta (Diatoms). Concerning the relative abundance of microalgae divisions, it is possible to state, for the water and gastrointestinal contents, that Cyanophyta represents 15% and 14%, Chlorophyta 54% in both, Heterokontophyta 31% and 27% and Dinophyta 0% and 5%, respectively. According to the Brazilian CETESB criteria for phytoplankton species classification, 50% of Cyanophyta and 15% of Chlorophyta species observed in the water samples were classified as "very frequent", as were 68% of Heterokontophyta and 33% of Chlorophyta species in the gut/stomach tract samples. Focusing at a species level, although in the water only Coelastrum sp. and Chroococcus sp. were observed in 100% and 75% of the samples, respectively, in the gastrointestinal tract the species Staurastrum sp., Aulacoseira sp., Scenedesmus sp. and Fragilaria crotonensis occurred in 80% to 100% of the samples. The present results showed that D. enno feeds not only on small chlorophytes microalgae, due to their convenient size that facilitates higher feeding rates, but also on large size diatoms, due to a possible

  9. [Disturbances of gastrointestinal motility of the stomach in patients with chronic gastric erosions and biliary tract disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svintsitskyĭ, A S; Solovĭova, H A

    2012-12-01

    Article dwells on comparison data about motor function of the stomach in the three groups of patients: with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases, duodenal ulcer disease, chronic gastritis. It is shown, that patients with gastric erosions and biliary tract diseases are characterized by slower evacuation function of the stomach, hypotonus of the stomach. Frequency of duodenal reflux in this group of patients is very high (85,9 %).

  10. The Role of Hox Genes in Female Reproductive Tract Development, Adult Function, and Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongling; Taylor, Hugh S

    2016-01-01

    HOX genes convey positional identity that leads to the proper partitioning and adult identity of the female reproductive track. Abnormalities in reproductive tract development can be caused by HOX gene mutations or altered HOX gene expression. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and other endocrine disruptors cause Müllerian defects by changing HOX gene expression. HOX genes are also essential regulators of adult endometrial development. Regulated HOXA10 and HOXA11 expression is necessary for endometrial receptivity; decreased HOXA10 or HOXA11 expression leads to decreased implantation rates. Alternation of HOXA10 and HOXA11 expression has been identified as a mechanism of the decreased implantation associated with endometriosis, polycystic ovarian syndrome, leiomyoma, polyps, adenomyosis, and hydrosalpinx. Alteration of HOX gene expression causes both uterine developmental abnormalities and impaired adult endometrial development that prevent implantation and lead to female infertility. PMID:26552702

  11. Molecularly defined adult-type hypolactasia among working age people with reference to milk consumption and gastrointestinal symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sari R Anthoni; Heli A Rasinper(a); Antti J Kotamies; Hanna A Komu; Harri K Pihlajam(a)ki; Kaija-Leena Kolho; Irma E J(a)rvel(a)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study milk consumption and subjective milkrelated symptoms in adults genotyped for adult-type hypolactasia.METHODS: A total of 1900 Finnish adults were genotyped for the C/T-13910 variant of adult-type hypolactasia and filled in a structured questionnaire concerning milk consumption and gastrointestinal problems.RESULTS: The C/C-13910 genotype of adult-type hypolactasia was present in 18% of the study population. The prevalence of the C/C-13910 genotype was higher among subjects who were undergoing investigations because of abdominal symptoms (24%,P < 0.05). Those with the C/C-13910 genotype drank less milk than subjects with either the C/T-13910 or the T/T-13910genotype of lactase persistence (18% vs 38%; 18% vs36%, P < 0.01). Subjects with the C/C-13910 genotype had experienced more gastrointestinal symptoms (84%)during the preceding three-month period than those with the C/T-13910 (79%, P < 0.05) or the T/T-13910 genotype (78 %, P < 0.05). Only 9% (29/338) of the subjects with the C/C-13910 genotype consumed milk and reported no symptoms from it.CONCLUSION: Gastrointestinal symptoms are more common among adults with the C/C-13910 genotype of adult-type hypolactasia than in those with genotypes of lactase persistence.

  12. Clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of 216 cases with primary gastrointestinal tract non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹文娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinicopathological features of primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (PGI-NHL) and their prognostic values.Methods The clinical and pathological data of 216 patients diagnosed as PGI-NHL from Zhejiang Cancer Hospital were

  13. Study on the colonization ability of six strains of Lactobacillus in gastrointestinal tract%六株乳杆菌胃肠道定植能力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝冉; 罗学刚; 贾玮; 李方; 张同存

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析确定Lactobacillus Acidophilus(L.acidophilus)1.1等六株乳杆菌胃肠道定植能力强弱.方法 通过模拟人体胃酸环境(pH 3)和高胆盐环境(胆盐含量:0.1%~0.3%),及用胶原蛋白和人结肠癌细胞SW-480模拟人肠道黏附环境,利用MTT法分别测定六株乳杆菌在酸性和高胆盐环境下37℃作用4h后的存活菌率及与黏附介质作用1h后的黏附率.结果 六株乳杆菌均具有一定的耐酸和耐胆盐能力,以及不同程度的胶原蛋白及肠道细胞黏附能力,其中以L.acidophilus 1.2相对最为突出.结论 L.acidophilus 1.2等六株乳杆菌均能够不同程度的黏附定植在胃肠道中,发挥其益生作用,是较为理想的胃肠道微生态制剂候选菌株.%Purpose To study the colonization ability of 6 strains of Lactobacillus in gastrointestinal tract. Methods Lactobacillus were cultured at 37 X. for 4 h in MRS broth with high concentration of acid ( pH 3 ) or bile salt to simulate human gastric or intestinal bile salt condition, respectively, and then the MTT assay was performed to determine the viability of different strains. The collagen and human colon cancer cells SW-480 were used to imitate the human intestinal environment and MTT assay was also be carried out to detect the adhesive ability of Lactobacillus after oo-cultured for 1 h. Results All the six strains of Lactobacillus have acid and bile sale resistant ability, as well as adhesive ability to collagen and human colon cancer cells. Of these strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus 1. 2 exhibited the greatest ability to pass the gastrointestinal tract and colonize in the colon. Conclusion Six strains of Lactobacillus,especially the Lactobacillus acidophilus 1.2, could adhere and colonize in the gastrointestinal tract, and then facilitate to play their healthcare functions in vivo. They can therefore be used as ideal probiotics candidates of functional food additives or drugs.

  14. The Sonoma Water Evaluation Trial (SWET): A randomized drinking water intervention trial to reduce gastrointestinal illness in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives. We estimate the risk of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) among adults 55 and older in a community drinking tap water meeting current U.S. standards. Methods. We conducted a randomized, triple-blinded, crossover trial in 714 households (988 indiv...

  15. Cytological evaluation and prediction of progression of acute erosive ulcered lesions of upper parts of gastrointestinal tract in acute and early periods of cerebrospinal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norkin I.A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 80 cytological preparations derived by fibrogastroduodenoscopy from 20 patients with cerebrospinal trauma at cervical part level served as the research subject. Dynamics of the progression of acute erosive ulcered lesions of mucous membrane of the upper parts of the gastrointestinal tract was studied on the basis of the cytological analyses of mucous membrane biopsy materials. In the course of our work we used endoscopic (fibrogastroduodenoscopy and cytological research methods. Cytological analyses of mucous membrane biopsy materials were carried out on the 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th day. Biopsy material cellular composition was evaluated on the grounds of the calculation of neutrophilic leukocytes and epithelial cells with the use of an immersion objective. In so doing we registered neutrophilic leukocyte number for 100 cells and determined neutrophilic and epithelial index. Monitoring of neutrophilic leukocyte number enables to determine presence or absence of inflammatory changes in stomach mucous membrane and duodenum in different periods of cerebrospinal trauma

  16. Chronic inflammatory and non-inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract in cats: diagnostic advantages of full-thickness intestinal and extraintestinal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Sven; Harder, Jasmine; Nolte, Ingo; Marsilio, Sina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2010-02-01

    An evaluation of histological findings in full-thickness biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and extraintestinal samples of 43 cats with chronic GIT disease signs was performed. In the majority of cases (46.5%) inflammatory bowel disease, ie, lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis/colitis (32.6%), eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis (11.6%) and mixed inflammatory infiltration (2.3%), was diagnosed. Furthermore, in four animals non-inflammatory mucosal band-shaped fibrosis (9.3%), and in 10 cats (23.3%) a diffuse lymphoma, was found. Six cats displayed only a gastritis (7.0%) or lymphangiectasia (7.0%), respectively. In two cats a mast cell tumour (4.7%) was diagnosed. In one cat no histopathological lesions were found. The availability of transmural biopsies from all segments of the intestine and the collection of extraintestinal samples, especially mesenteric lymph nodes, is especially helpful for diagnosing intestinal tumours such as lymphomas and tumours of mast cell origin.

  17. Adverse effects and complications related to the use of barium sulphate contrast media for radiological examinations of the gastrointestinal tract - a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barium sulphate is considered a safe and efficacious contrast medium that is routinely used for radiologic examinations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the examinations rarely result in complications, the technique is moderately invasive and not entirely innocuous. Complications resulting from the procedures, and adverse reactions from the barium itself, have ranged from mild to severe and in rare instances have led to patient death. This paper reviews the clinical application, biological requirements and clinical properties of barium sulphate contrast media used in diagnostic x-ray imaging. It also outlines the risk factors and associated adverse reactions and complications involved with the use of barium sulphate, and presents documented cases where iatrogenic injuries have resulted. (author)

  18. Upper and lower urinary tract outcomes in adult myelomeningocele patients: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Veenboer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The introduction of sophisticated treatment of bladder dysfunction and hydrocephalus allows the majority of SB patients to survive into adulthood. However, no systematic review on urological outcome in adult SB patients is available and no follow-up schemes exist. OBJECTIVES: To systematically summarize the evidence on outcome of urinary tract functioning in adult SB patients. METHODS: A literature search in PubMed and Embase databases was done. Only papers published in the last 25 years describing patients with open SB with a mean age >18 years were included. We focused on finding differences in the treatment strategies, e.g., clean intermittent catheterization and antimuscarinic drugs versus early urinary diversion, with regard to long-term renal and bladder outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 13 articles and 5 meeting abstracts on urinary tract status of adult SB patients were found describing a total of 1564 patients with a mean age of 26.1 years (range 3-74 years, with a few patients <18 years. All were retrospective cohort studies with relatively small and heterogeneous samples with inconsistent reporting of outcome; this precluded the pooling of data and meta-analysis. Total continence was achieved in 449/1192 (37.7%; range 8-85% patients. Neurological level of the lesion and hydrocephalus were associated with incontinence. Renal function was studied in 1128 adult patients. In 290/1128 (25.7%; range 3-81.8% patients some degree of renal damage was found and end-stage renal disease was seen in 12/958 (1.3% patients. Detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy and detrusor-overactivity acted as adverse prognostic factors for the development of renal damage. CONCLUSIONS: These findings should outline follow-up schedules for SB patients, which do not yet exist. Since renal and bladder deterioration continues beyond adolescence, follow-up of these individuals is needed. We recommend standardization in reporting the outcome of urinary tract function in

  19. Regulation of α-Transducin and α-Gustducin Expression by a High Protein Diet in the Pig Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto De Giorgio; Maurizio Mazzoni; Claudia Vallorani; Rocco Latorre; Cristiano Bombardi; Maria Laura Bacci; Monica Forni; Mirella Falconi; Catia Sternini; Paolo Clavenzani

    2016-01-01

    Background The expression of taste receptors (TASRs) and their signalling molecules in the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells, including enteroendocrine cells (EECs), suggests they participate in chemosensing mechanisms influencing GI physiology via the release of endocrine messengers. TASRs mediate gustatory signalling by interacting with different transducers, including α-gustducin (Gαgust) and α-transducin (Gαtran) G protein subunits. This study tested whether Gαtran and Gαgust immunor...

  20. Survival and synergistic growth of mixed cultures of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli combined with prebiotic oligosaccharides in a gastrointestinal tract simulator.

    OpenAIRE

    Adamberg, Signe; Sumeri, Ingrid; Uusna, Riin; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Adamberg, Kaarel; Wadström, Torkel; Ljungh, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Probiotics, especially in combination with non-digestible oligosaccharides, may balance the gut microflora while multistrain preparations may express an improved functionality over single strain cultures. In vitro gastrointestinal models enable to test survival and growth dynamics of mixed strain probiotics in a controlled, replicable manner.Methods: The robustness and compatibility of multistrain probiotics composed of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli combined with mixed prebiotic...

  1. Arsenic in cooked rice: Effect of chemical, enzymatic and microbial processes on bioaccessibility and speciation in the human gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, used as staple food for half of the world population, can easily accumulate arsenic (As) into its grain, which often leads to As contamination. The health risk induced by presence of As in food depends on its release from the food matrix, i.e., its bioaccessibility. Using an in vitro gastrointestinal simulator, we incubated two types of cooked rice (total As: 0.389 and 0.314 mg/kg). Arsenic bioaccessibility and speciation changes were determined upon gastrointestinal digestion. Washing with deionized water and cooking did not result in changes of As speciation in the rice although the arsenic content dropped by 7.1–20.6%. Arsenic bioaccessibility of the cooked rice in the small intestine ranged between 38 and 57%. Bioaccessibility slightly increased during digestion in the simulated small intestine and decreased with time in the simulated colon. Significant speciation changes were noted in the simulated colon, with trivalent monomethylarsonate (MMAIII) becoming an important species. - Highlights: ► We studied arsenic bioaccessibility and speciation in rice during in vitro digestion. ► Bioaccessibility in cooked rice ranged between 38 and 57%. ► Bioaccessibility increased in the small intestine and dropped in the colon. ► Significant speciation changes were observed in the colon. ► Toxic trivalent monomethylarsonate (MMAIII) was produced in the colon. - Arsenic bioaccessibility and speciation changes were studied upon in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of As-polluted rice with specific attention to the role of colon micro-organisms.

  2. Bioconversion of red ginseng saponins in the gastro-intestinal tract in vitro model studied by high-performance liquid chromatography-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kong, H.; Wang, M.; Venema, K.; Maathuis, A.; Heijden, R. van der; Greef, J. van der; Xu, G.; Hankemeier, T.

    2009-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC-FTICR-MS) method was developed to investigate the metabolism of ginsenosides in in vitro models of the gastro-intestinal tract. The metabolites were identified by high-resolutio

  3. Horizontal transfer of tet(M) and erm(B) resistance plasmids from food strains of Lactobacillus plantarum to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 in the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Louise; Wilcks, Andrea; Hammer, Karin;

    2007-01-01

    Two wild-type strains of Lactobacillus plantarum previously isolated from fermented dry sausages were analysed for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance plasmids in the gastrointestinal tract. For this purpose, we used gnotobiotic rats as an in vivo model. Rats were initially inoculated...

  4. The effects of different thermal treatments and organic acid levels in feed on microbial composition and activity in gastrointestinal tract of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi Boroojeni, F; Vahjen, W; Mader, A; Knorr, F; Ruhnke, I; Röhe, I; Hafeez, A; Villodre, C; Männer, K; Zentek, J

    2014-06-01

    Thermal treatments of feed and organic acids are known to affect the gastrointestinal microbiota in chickens. The present study evaluated the effect of different thermal processes including pelleting (P), long-term conditioning at 85°C for 3 min (L), expanding at 110°C (E110), and 130°C for 3 to 5 s (E130) as well as organic acid (63.75% formic acid, 25.00% propionic acid, and 11.25% water) inclusion levels (0, 0.75, and 1.5%) on gastrointestinal microbiota in broilers. In total, 960 one-day-old chicks were randomly assigned to 8 replicates using a 3 × 4 factorial arrangement. At d 35, bacterial cell numbers in the crop, ileum, and cecum, and bacterial metabolites in the crop, gizzard, ileum, and cecum were determined. The inclusion of 1.5% organic acids increased cell numbers of all clostridial clusters in the crop. The organic acid supplementation increased the propionic acid concentration in the crop and gizzard and there was a decrease in lactic acid concentration. In the ileum, the 0% organic acid group had the highest numbers of Lactobacillus spp. and enterobacteria. Inclusion of 1.5% organic acids increased ileal acetate concentration. Increasing the feed processing temperature led to an increase of lactobacilli in the crop and ileum, whereas clostridia and enterobacteria seemed unaffected. Similarly, lactate concentrations increased in the ileum, but short-chain fatty acids remained identical. In the crop, an increase for acetate was found for the E130 group compared with all other thermal treatments. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that thermal treatments and organic acid supplementation to broiler diets more markedly influenced the bacterial status of the crop compared with the downstream segments and their effects decreased along the length of gastrointestinal tract. Whereas organic acids markedly modified bacterial composition and activity in the crop, expansion increased lactobacilli and lactate in the crop and ileum. PMID:24879694

  5. MSCT manifestations with pathologic correlation of abdominal gastrointestinal tract and mesenteric tumor and tumor-like lesions in children: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yue, E-mail: liuyue20036@yahoo.com.c [Department of Radiology, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University. 56 Nanlishi Road, West District, Beijing 100045 (China); Peng Yun, E-mail: ppengyun@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University. 56 Nanlishi Road, West District, Beijing 100045 (China); Li Jianying; Zeng Jinjin; Sun Guoqiang [Department of Radiology, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University. 56 Nanlishi Road, West District, Beijing 100045 (China); Gao Peiyi, E-mail: cjr.gaopeiyi@vip.163.co [Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University. 6 Tiantanxili Road, Chongwen District, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2010-09-15

    To study the multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) manifestations of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and mesenteric tumor and tumor-like lesions in children and correlation with pathologic findings. 22 patients (17 male, 5 female; age ranged from 3 days to 11 years; with mean of 4.2 years) were screened out by ultrasonography (US) at first, then were performed with abdominal non-enhanced CT (NECT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) scans. All CT images were evaluated independently by two radiologists and a consensus was reached regarding the morphologic features for lesions such as size, solid/cyst, unilocular/multilocular and thin/thick wall characteristics. The 26 lesions were categorized into two groups based on CT characteristics of lesions' nature, group 1 with the prominent cystic lesions, group 2 with prominent solid lesions. Group 1 was further divided into two subgroups: group 1A for the cystic lesions with thin walls, and group 1B for the cystic lesions with thick walls. In group 1A, 7 lesions were unilocular cysts (6 lymphangioma, 1 ileum mesenteric cyst) and 5 were multilocular cysts with internal septation (4 lymphangioma, 1 greater omental cyst). In group 1B, 10 lesions in 7 patients were unilocular without internal septation, which had two kinds of shape-cystic and tubular, their histopathological types were all enteric duplication cyst (10 segments, with two patients with 2 or 3 segments each); In group 2, all lesions had solid mass (2 gastrointestinal stromal tumors and 2 enteric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma). The majority of gastrointestinal tumors and tumor-like lesions are cystic and benign. MSCT manifestations of cystic/solid and thin/thick wall may be great helpful for differentiating different types of GIT and mesenteric lesions. MSCT manifestations have close correlations with their topographic sites and histopathologic findings.

  6. Potential Probiotic Escherichia coli 16 Harboring the Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin Gene Improves Gastrointestinal Tract Colonization and Ameliorates Carbon Tetrachloride Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the beneficial effects of potential probiotic E. coli 16 (pUC8:16gfp expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb gene, associated with bacterial respiration under microaerobic condition, on gastrointestinal (GI colonization and its antioxidant activity on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 induced toxicity in Charles Foster rats. In vitro, catalase activity in E. coli 16 (pUC8:16gfp was 1.8 times higher compared to E. coli 16 (pUC-gfp control. In vivo, E. coli 16 (pUC8:16gfp not only was recovered in the fecal matter after 70 days of oral administration but also retained antibacterial activities, whereas E. coli 16 (pUC-gfp was not detected. Oral administration of 200 and 500 μL/kg body weight of CCl4 to rats at weekly interval resulted in elevated serum glutamyl pyruvate transaminase (SGPT and serum glutamyl oxalacetate transaminase (SGOT levels compared to controls. Rats prefed with E. coli 16 (pUC8:16gfp demonstrated near to normal levels for SGPT and SGOT, whereas the liver homogenate catalase activity was significantly increased compared to CCl4 treated rats. Thus, pUC8:16gfp plasmid encoding vgb improved the growth and GI tract colonization of E. coli 16. In addition, it also enhanced catalase activity in rats harboring E. coli 16 (pUC8:16gfp, thereby preventing the absorption of CCl4 to GI tract.

  7. Application of Luxol Fast Blue staining in locating the corticospinal tract in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liu; Guangyu Shen; Guangming Lü; Xiaosong Gu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many methods for myelin staining,mordant,or the special reaction of osmic acid with lipoid is used according to different principles.The commonly used methods are classic Well staining ,classic lithium carbonate-haematine staining,fast green staining,silver staining ,etc.Luxol Fast Blue can brightly stain myelin sheath,and has certain specificity .The background can be very clean if there is proper differentiation,whereas Luxol Fast Blue is cheap and convenient to operate,thus it is an ideal staining reagent for routine myelin sheath.OBJECTIVE: To show the coricospinal tract of normal adult rats with Luxol Fast Blue shaining method.DESIGN:A repetitive measurement design.SETTINGS: Institute of Nuerobiology,Nantong University;Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University.MATERIALS: Six healthy adult male SD rats of clean dergree,weighing averagely 300 g.were provided by the experimental animal center of Nantong University.1 g/L Luxol Fast Blue solution was provided by Sigma Company;Leica CM1900 cryostat microtome by Leica Company;Leica DMR microscope by Leica Company.METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Staff Room of Human Anatomy,Nantong University in May 2005.The rats were given intraperitoneal injection of combined anesthetic(2 mL/kg),then the chest was open for perfusing saline and phosphate buffer containing formamint via heart. Brain and spinal cord were removed after 1 hour then fixed,then changed to phosphate buffer(pH 7.4)containing 300 g/L saccharu at 4 ℃.and stayed overnight,tissue blocks at pyramid,decussation of pyramid and cervical,thoracic,lumbar and sacral segments of spinal cord were removed to prepare continuous horizontal frozen sections(30 μm) after sedimentation,the sections were dried at room temperature.The corticospinal tract of normal adult rats were shown with Luxol Fast Blue staining method,and observed under Leica DMR microscope.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Positive fibers in

  8. Phytoplankton composition of the water and gastrointestinal tract of the mussel Diplodon enno (Ortmann, 1921) from São Francisco river (Bahia, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, T; Lima, P; Lima, G M S; Cunha, M C C; Ferreira, S; Domingues, B; Machado, J

    2016-06-01

    The knowledge on diet composition of the freshwater mussel Diplodon enno (Ortmann) would aid in its culture and propagation allowing, this way, the replacement of natural endangered populations in Brazil. Microalgae are the main food source for captive mussels and unionids have displayed an ability to sort algae based on the cellular characteristics prior to ingestion. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the phytoplankton composition of the water from and of the gastrointestinal contents of the mussel D. enno, as an initial step for development of a suitable rearing diet. Therefore, water samples and bivalve specimens were collected from S. Francisco River, city of Paulo Afonso, Bahia, Brazil. The microalgal composition found in water and stomach/gut content samples was very diverse being represented by the following divisions: Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, Dinophyta and Heterokontophyta (Diatoms). Concerning the relative abundance of microalgae divisions, it is possible to state, for the water and gastrointestinal contents, that Cyanophyta represents 15% and 14%, Chlorophyta 54% in both, Heterokontophyta 31% and 27% and Dinophyta 0% and 5%, respectively. According to the Brazilian CETESB criteria for phytoplankton species classification, 50% of Cyanophyta and 15% of Chlorophyta species observed in the water samples were classified as "very frequent", as were 68% of Heterokontophyta and 33% of Chlorophyta species in the gut/stomach tract samples. Focusing at a species level, although in the water only Coelastrum sp. and Chroococcus sp. were observed in 100% and 75% of the samples, respectively, in the gastrointestinal tract the species Staurastrum sp., Aulacoseira sp., Scenedesmus sp. and Fragilaria crotonensis occurred in 80% to 100% of the samples. The present results showed that D. enno feeds not only on small chlorophytes microalgae, due to their convenient size that facilitates higher feeding rates, but also on large size diatoms, due to a possible

  9. Research of nursing care of tumor patients with gastrointestinal tract adverse effect after undergoing chemotherapy%肿瘤化疗后胃肠道反应的护理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一敏; 孙秋华

    2011-01-01

    Through analyzing the research status quo of nursing care of patients with gastrointestinal tract adverse effect after undergoing chemotherapy,it expounded that scientific and reasonable nursing is necessary for alleviating gastro intestinal tract adverse effect of patients. It put forward some countermeasures and suggestions for probing into nursing care of patients with gastrointestinal tract adverse effect after undergoing chemotherapy.%通过分析总结化疗后胃肠道反应护理的研究现状,阐述科学合理的护理对缓解胃肠道反应的必要性,提出进一步探讨化疗后胃肠道反应护理的对策和建议.

  10. Mucosa-associated bacterial microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract of weaned pigs and dynamics linked to dietary calcium-phosphorus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Mann

    Full Text Available Dietary composition largely influences pig's gastrointestinal microbiota and represents a useful prophylactic tool against enteric disturbances in young pigs. Despite the importance for host-microbe interactions and bacterial colonization, dietary responses of the mucosa-associated bacterial communities are less well investigated. In the present study, we characterized the mucosa-associated bacterial communities at the Pars non-glandularis of the stomach, ileum and colon, and identified shifts in these communities in response to different dietary calcium-phosphorus (Ca-P contents (100% versus 190% of the Ca and P requirements in combination with two basal diets (wheat-barley- or corn-based in weaned pigs. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from 93 mucosal samples yielded 447,849 sequences, clustering into 997 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at 97% similarity level. OTUs were assigned to 198 genera belonging to 14 different phyla. Correlation-based networks revealed strong interactions among OTUs at the various gastrointestinal sites. Our data describe a previously not reported high diversity and species richness at the Pars non-glandularis of the stomach in weaned pigs. Moreover, high versus adequate Ca-P content significantly promoted Lactobacillus by 14.9% units (1.4 fold change at the gastric Pars non-glandularis (P = 0.035. Discriminant analysis revealed dynamic changes in OTU composition in response to dietary cereals and Ca-P contents at all gastrointestinal sites which were less distinguishable at higher taxonomic levels. Overall, this study revealed a distinct mucosa-associated bacterial community at the different gut sites, and a strong effect of high Ca-P diets on the gastric community, thereby markedly expanding our comprehension on mucosa-associated microbiota and their diet-related dynamics in weaned pigs.

  11. A psyllium fiber-enriched meal strongly attenuates postprandial gastrointestinal peptide release in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhunen, Leila J; Juvonen, Kristiina R; Flander, Sanna M; Liukkonen, Kirsi-Helena; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Siloaho, Maritta; Laaksonen, David E; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Uusitupa, Matti I; Poutanen, Kaisa S

    2010-04-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) and protein are essential constituents of a healthy diet and are well known for their high satiety impact. However, little is known about their influence on postprandial gastrointestinal (GI) peptide release. Our aim in this single-blind, randomized, cross-over study was to investigate the effects of DF and/or protein enrichments on satiety-related metabolic and hormonal responses. Sixteen healthy, nonobese volunteers participated in the study and ingested 1 of 5 isoenergetic test meals in a randomized order on separate days. The test meals were as follows: 1) low in protein (2.8 g) and fiber (7.6 g); 2) low in protein (2.6 g) and high in soluble fiber (psyllium, 23.0 g); 3) high in protein (soy, 19.7 g) and low in fiber (6.2 g); 4) high in protein (18.4 g) and fiber (23.0 g); and 5) white wheat bread. Serum insulin and plasma glucose, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations were determined for 2 h following the meals. In addition, hunger and satiety ratings were collected. Postprandial glucose, insulin, ghrelin, GLP-1, and PYY responses all differed among the meals (P tract. PMID:20147463

  12. Diet-induced bacterial immunogens in the gastrointestinal tract of dairy cows: Impacts on immunity and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dairy cows are often fed high grain diets to meet the energy demand for high milk production or simply due to a lack of forages at times. As a result, ruminal acidosis, especially subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA, occurs frequently in practical dairy production. When SARA occurs, bacterial endotoxin (or lipopolysaccharide, LPS is released in the rumen and the large intestine in a large amount. Many other bacterial immunogens may also be released in the digestive tract following feeding dairy cows diets containing high proportions of grain. LPS can be translocated into the bloodstream across the epithelium of the digestive tract, especially the lower tract, due to possible alterations of permeability and injuries of the epithelial tissue. As a result, the concentration of blood LPS increases. Immune responses are subsequently caused by circulating LPS, and the systemic effects include increases in concentrations of neutrophils and the acute phase proteins such as serum amyloid-A (SAA, haptoglobin (Hp, LPS binding protein (LBP, and C-reactive protein (CRP in blood. Entry of LPS into blood can also result in metabolic alterations. Blood glucose and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations are enhanced accompanying an increase of blood LPS after increasing the amount of grain in the diet, which adversely affects feed intake of dairy cows. As the proportions of grain in the diet increase, patterns of plasma β-hydoxybutyric acid, cholesterol, and minerals (Ca, Fe, and Zn are also perturbed. The bacterial immunogens can also lead to reduced supply of nutrients for synthesis of milk components and depressed functions of the epithelial cells in the mammary gland. The immune responses and metabolic alterations caused by circulating bacterial immunogens will exert an effect on milk production. It has been demonstrated that increases in concentrations of ruminal LPS and plasma acute phase proteins (CRP, SAA, and LBP are associated with declines in

  13. Effect of fermentation of cereals on the degradation of polysaccharides and other macronutrients in the gastrointestinal tract of growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sholly, D.M.; Jørgensen, Henry Johs. Høgh; Sutton, A.L.;

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the present investigation was to study the impact of fermentation of cereals on the degradation of polysaccharides and other macronutrients in the small intestine and total tract of growing pigs. Eight pigs (initial BW, 34.5 ± 0.9 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin.......243) on the fecal digestibility of nonstarch polysaccharides in either of the cereals but their digestibility was 10.0% greater (P ... of polysaccharides and other macronutrients at the ileum and in feces to a larger extent for barley than wheat....

  14. Intensified microbiological investigations in adult patients admitted to hospital with lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Jens; Rasmussen, TR; Sommer, T;

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the diagnostic yield of a programme with intensified microbiological investigations in immunocompetent adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Patients in the study group were included prospectively and consecutively from...... lavage (BAL). Only 7% in the historic control group were discharged with an aetiological diagnosis of their infections; while the diagnostic yield in the study group increased to 51% of patients. In the study group the presence of new infiltrates on chest X-ray increased the detection...... of a microbiological aetiology from 37% with no infiltrates to 62% with infiltrates and recent antibiotic therapy reduced the detection of a microbiological cause of infection from 61% in 36 patients who had not received antibiotic therapy to 39% in 31 patients who had received recent antibiotic therapy prior...

  15. Delay discounting and frontostriatal fiber tracts: a combined DTI and MTR study on impulsive choices in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Jiska S; Mandl, René C W; Braams, Barbara R; de Water, Erik; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Crone, Eveline A

    2013-07-01

    Delay discounting, a measure of impulsive choice, has been associated with decreased control of the prefrontal cortex over striatum responses. The anatomical connectivity between both brain regions in delaying gratification remains unknown. Here, we investigate whether the quality of frontostriatal (FS) white matter tracts can predict individual differences in delay-discounting behavior. We use tract-based diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer imaging to measure the microstructural properties of FS fiber tracts in 40 healthy young adults (from 18 to 25 years). We additionally explored whether internal sex hormone levels affect the integrity of FS tracts, based on the hypothesis that sex hormones modulate axonal density within prefrontal dopaminergic circuits. We calculated fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), longitudinal diffusivity, radial diffusivity (RD), and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), a putative measure of myelination, for the FS tract. Results showed that lower integrity within the FS tract (higher MD and RD and lower FA), predicts faster discounting in both sexes. MTR was unrelated to delay-discounting performance. In addition, testosterone levels in males were associated with a lower integrity (higher RD) within the FS tract. Our study provides support for the hypothesis that enhanced structural integrity of white matter fiber bundles between prefrontal and striatal brain areas is associated with better impulse control.

  16. Deficiência de ferro nas afecções gastrointestinais do adulto Iron deficiency related to gastrointestinal diseases in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrla Zaltman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A anemia por deficiência de ferro (ADF ou a deficiência de ferro (DF isolada são comuns em crianças e mulheres pré-menopausa. Entretanto, em adultos do sexo masculino e mulheres pós-menopausa, essa condição se associa frequentemente a perdas sanguíneas gastrointestinais ou mal absorção. A prevalência das lesões gastrointestinais torna essencial o exame do aparelho digestório superior e inferior através da endoscopia. Investigações complementares devem ser realizadas se os procedimentos endoscópicos não evidenciarem sangramento em situações clínicas, tais como a necessidade de múltiplas hemotransfusões, a ausência de sangramento visível à endoscopia digestiva alta e colonoscopia e a falta de resposta à reposição de ferro.Esses casos devem ser direcionados para investigação do intestino delgado com métodos radiológicos ou, mais recentemente, com a cápsula endoscópica e da enteroscopia com duplo balão. A cintigrafia com hemácias marcadas e a angiografia têm papel restrito, sendo utilizadas apenas no sangramento aberto. O tratamento varia de acordo com a etiologia, a intensidade da perda sanguínea e da deficiência de ferro.Iron deficiency anaemia and isolated iron deficiency are common in children and pre-menopausal women. However, in male adults and post-menopausal women this condition is most frequently caused by gastrointestinal blood loss or malabsorption. The prevalence of gastrointestinal lesions makes the examination by endoscopy of both upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts essential. Further investigations, when the initial exams are negative, are only warranted in cases of multiple transfusions, visible blood loss or lack of response to oral iron supplementation. In these cases examinations should be focused on the small bowel by radiological methods or more recently using capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy. Nuclear medicine and angiography have a limited role to play in this

  17. Development of a zero-order sustained-release tablet containing mesalazine and budesonide intended to treat the distal gastrointestinal tract in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareb, Bahez; Eissens, Anko C; Kosterink, Jos G W; Frijlink, Hendrik W

    2016-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are diseases affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment depends on the severity of the disease, site of inflammation, and patient's response. The aim of this study was to develop a zero-order sustained-release tablet containing both the anti-inflammatory drugs mesalazine and budesonide as a new treatment option for ileo-colonic CD and UC. Tablets were attained by wet granulation with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and direct compression. Our newly developed tablet core was coated with different ColoPulse® coating thicknesses and the mesalazine and budesonide release profiles were investigated in a 600-min gastrointestinal simulation system (GISS) experiment, together with commercially available MMX®-mesalazine and MMX®-budesonide. Lag-time, release rate (k0), completeness of release, and zero-order correlation coefficient (R(2)0) could be manipulated by varying ColoPulse® coating thickness. Our newly developed combination preparation (C[4.92]) complied with all conducted European Pharmacopoeia tests as well as an accelerated 6-month stability test and had a lag-time of 250min (simulated ileum targeted), a linear release profile (mesalazine R(2)0=0.9002; budesonide R(2)0=0.9481), and drug release of 100% mesalazine and 77% budesonide. Like C[4.92], MMX®-mesalazine had a linear (R(2)0=0.9883) and complete release profile (96%). However, C[4.92] lag-time was longer (250 vs. 210min), assuring simulated ileum specificity. Remarkably, MMX®-budesonide lag-time was 480min and release was only 7% with a linear character (R(2)0=0.9906). The in vitro results suggest that MMX®-budesonide effectiveness may be improved if budesonide release in the aqueous phase would be increased and that C[4.92] is a potential, new treatment option for ileo-colonic CD and UC. PMID:27000751

  18. The geographic distribution of obesity by census tract among 59 767 insured adults in King County, WA

    OpenAIRE

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D.; Arterburn, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the geographic concentration of adult obesity prevalence by census tract (CT) in King County, WA, in relation to social and economic factors. Methods and Design Measured heights and weights from 59 767 adult men and women enrolled in the Group Health (GH) health care system were used to estimate obesity prevalence at the CT level. CT-level measures of socioeconomic status (SES) were median home values of owner-occupied housing units, percent of residents with a college d...

  19. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prasanna Ghimire; Guang-Yao Wu; Ling Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific,thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways.

  20. The effect of Shen-Fu on gastrointestinal tract injury and its potential mechanism during cardio-pulmonary bypass in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏中元; 詹丽英; 何宇红; 刘先义

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Shen-Fu (SF) injection on gastrointestinal tract injury and its potential mechanism. Methods: Thirty-eight patients undergoing elective open heart surgery were assigned to Group C (control group, n=18) and Group SF (n=20) randomly. In Group SF, the patients received intravenous injection of SF (0.5 ml/kg) at the beginning of the surgery followed by a continuous infusion of 100 ml SF (1.0 ml/kg) solution diluted by saline at a rate of 0.004 ml*Kg-1*min-1with a Grasby pump. The control group was injected with normal saline in the same volume. Gastric intramucosal pH (pHi), activity of blood diamine oxidase (DAO), and concentrations of blood LPS and IL-6 were measured before CPB (S0) and 1 h (S1) and 2 h (S2) after aortic declamping, respectively.Results: In Group C, pHi value was significantly lower at S1 and S2 than at S0 ( mean P<0.01) and blood DAO and concentrations of LPS and IL-6 were significantly higher at S1 and S2 than at S0 ( meanP<0.01). In Group SF, pHi was obviously lower at S1 and S2 than at S0 (P<0.05) but LPS and IL-6 levels and DAO were higher at S0 (mean P<0.05). Blood DAO and LPS level demonstrated significant negative correlations with pHi (mean P<0.01) while LPS concentration showed a positive correlation with blood DAO (P<0.01) and IL-6 concentration(P<0.05). At S1 and S2 after aortic declamping, the levels of pHi were higher in Group SF than in Group C (mean P<0.01 ) but DAO and LPS and IL-6 levels were significantly lower in Group SF than in Group C ( P<0.01).Conclusions: SF has a protective effect on gastrointestinal tract and can reduce inflammatory actions.

  1. Expression of key ion transporters in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus acclimated to fresh water, seawater and hypersaline water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Li

    Full Text Available The ability of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia to tolerate extreme environmental salinities makes it an excellent model for investigating iono-regulation. This study aimed to characterize and fill important information gap of the expression levels of key ion transporters for Na(+ and Cl(- in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of Mozambique tilapia acclimated to freshwater (0 ppt, seawater (30 ppt and hypersaline (70 ppt environments. Among the seven genes studied, it was found that nkcc2, nkcc1a, cftr, nka-α1 and nka-α3, were more responsive to salinity challenge than nkcc1b and ncc within the investigated tissues. The ncc expression was restricted to gills of freshwater-acclimated fish while nkcc2 expression was restricted to intestinal segments irrespective of salinity challenge. Among the tissues investigated, gill and posterior intestine were found to be highly responsive to salinity changes, followed by anterior and middle intestine. Both esophagus and stomach displayed significant up-regulation of nka-α1 and nka-α3, but not nkcc isoforms and cftr, in hypersaline-acclimated fish suggesting a response to hypersalinity challenge and involvement of other forms of transporters in iono-regulation. Changes in gene expression levels were partly corroborated by immunohistochemical localization of transport proteins. Apical expression of Ncc was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells in freshwater-acclimated gills while Nkcc co-localized with Nka-immunoreactive cells expressing Cftr apically in seawater- and hypersaline-acclimated gills. In the intestine, Nkcc-stained apical brush border was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells at greater levels under hypersaline conditions. These findings provided new insights into the responsiveness of these genes and tissues under hypersalinity challenge, specifically the posterior intestine being vital for salt absorption and iono-osmoregulation in the Mozambique tilapia; its ability to survive in

  2. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  3. Bacterial Composition of the Human Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiome Is Dynamic and Associated with Genomic Instability in a Barrett's Esophagus Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alevtina Gall

    Full Text Available The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC has increased nearly five-fold over the last four decades in the United States. Barrett's esophagus, the replacement of the normal squamous epithelial lining with a mucus-secreting columnar epithelium, is the only known precursor to EAC. Like other parts of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, the esophagus hosts a variety of bacteria and comparisons among published studies suggest bacterial communities in the stomach and esophagus differ. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori in the stomach has been inversely associated with development of EAC, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear.The bacterial composition in the upper GI tract was characterized in a subset of participants (n=12 of the Seattle Barrett's Esophagus Research cohort using broad-range 16S PCR and pyrosequencing of biopsy and brush samples collected from squamous esophagus, Barrett's esophagus, stomach corpus and stomach antrum. Three of the individuals were sampled at two separate time points. Prevalence of H. pylori infection and subsequent development of aneuploidy (n=339 and EAC (n=433 was examined in a larger subset of this cohort.Within individuals, bacterial communities of the stomach and esophagus showed overlapping community membership. Despite closer proximity, the stomach antrum and corpus communities were less similar than the antrum and esophageal samples. Re-sampling of study participants revealed similar upper GI community membership in two of three cases. In this Barrett's esophagus cohort, Streptococcus and Prevotella species dominate the upper GI and the ratio of these two species is associated with waist-to-hip ratio and hiatal hernia length, two known EAC risk factors in Barrett's esophagus. H. pylori-positive individuals had a significantly decreased incidence of aneuploidy and a non-significant trend toward lower incidence of EAC.

  4. Morphology of interstitial cells of Cajal in the gastrointestinal tract of Mongolian gerbil%长爪沙鼠胃肠道Cajal间质细胞的形态学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽; 孙海梅; 吴波; 周德山

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨长爪沙鼠胃肠道Cajal间质细胞(ICCs)的形态和分布规律.方法 采用10只成年长爪沙鼠,体重50~ 70g,取胃、小肠、结肠制作冷冻切片,结合全层铺片的c-Kit免疫荧光染色.结果 ICCs呈网络状分布于整个胃肠道,不同部位ICCs的分布及形态有所不同.在胃底部,仅见肌内ICCs(ICC-IM),而在胃体和胃窦部除ICC-IM外,可见肌间ICCs(ICC-MY)分布在肌间神经丛周围;其细胞密度胃底ICC-IM最多,由胃底至胃窦逐渐减少,而ICC-MY由胃体至胃窦逐渐增多.在小肠可见ICC-IM,ICC-MY和深肌层ICCs (ICC-DMP)3个亚群,结肠管壁内也分布有ICC-IM、ICC-MY和黏膜下ICCs(ICC-SM)3个亚群.结论 沙鼠可用于有关ICCs正常形态、结构及功能的研究.%Objective To observe the distribution and morphological features of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the gastrointestinal ( GI) tract of Mongolian gerbil. Methods Whole GI tracts, including stomach, small and large intestines of ten adult Mongolian gerbils were removed and performed for C-kit immunocytochemical staining with whole-mount preparations and cryo-sections. Results c-Kit positive immunoreactivity cells distributed along the entire GI tract. Intramuscular ICC ( ICC-IM ) cells were only in the fundus of the stomach. Myenteric ICC ( ICC-MY) profiels were encountered between the longitudinal and circular muscle layers of the corpus and antrum of the stomach. The density of ICC-IM profiels gradually decreased from the fundus to the antrum. Whereas, ICC-MY profiels gradually increased from the corpus to the antrum. In the small intestine, ICCs were often observed in three regions, i. e. deep muscular plexus ICC (ICC-DMP) , ICC-IM and ICC-MY. While in the colon, ICCs were seen as ICC-IM, ICC-MY and Swbmucosal ICC(ICC-SM). Conclusion Mongolian gerbil may be used to research the morphology and function of ICCs.

  5. Neonatal gastrointestinal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Padma [Department of Radiology, Royal Children' s Hospital and University of Melbourne, Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Vic. 3052 (Australia)]. E-mail: padma.rao@rch.org.au

    2006-11-15

    Radiological imaging is an important part of the evaluation and management of neonates with suspected anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical presentation is often non-specific, commonly with abdominal distension and vomiting for which the underlying cause may or may not be clinically apparent. In a proportion of patients, the clinical assessment alone may suffice in providing the diagnosis and no further imaging is necessary. The reader must have an understanding of the normal radiographic appearances of the gastrointestinal tract in neonates and appreciate normal variants and differences to adults. In certain cases, the abdominal radiograph alone is diagnostic. In others, sonography and contrast studies are useful adjunct investigations and the indications for CT and MRI are few, but specific. Appropriate radiological investigation will help to establish the diagnosis and guide surgical intervention whilst also avoiding unnecessary radiation. Some of the conditions require transfer to specialist paediatric institutions for care. Thus, in some circumstances it is appropriate for imaging to be delayed and performed at the specialist centre with early referral often essential for the continued well being of the child.

  6. In-situ visualization and evaluation of neoplastic lesions of the human gastrointestinal tract using endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Andrew M.; Westphal, Volker; Das, Ananya; Pfau, Patrick; Chak, Amitabh; Wong, Richard C. K.; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2001-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel biomedical imaging technique that uses low-coherence optical interferometry to obtain micron-scale resolution cross- sectional images of tissue microstructure noninvasively. OCT fills a valuable niche in imaging of tissue structure, providing subsurface imaging with high spatial resolution (on the order of 10 micrometers) and penetration depths of 1 - 2 mm with no contact or matching medium needed between the probe and the tissue. An OCT system for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy has been developed using a small-diameter rotary-scanning probe compatible with standard GI endoscopes and capable of imaging in real-time. To date more than 100 volunteers have been imaged during routine upper and lower endoscopic procedures. Results of imaging in normal organs have demonstrated visualization of morphological layers (epithelium, lamina propria, muscularis mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria) and microscopic structures (glands, villi, crypts, vessels) in all endoscopically accessible GI organs. It has been observed in more than 30 patients that the EOCT appearance of Barrett's mucosa is clearly differentiable from normal gastric or esophageal mucosa. Furthermore, the EOCT appearance of dysplasia and neoplastic lesions, including adenocarcenoma in Barrett's and villous tumor in colon have been observed and are under investigation. Preliminary data indicate the potential of EOCT for routine clinical diagnostics in GI tissues, including early cancer detection and staging and detection of tumor margins.

  7. Kallikrein-related peptidases in cancers of gastrointestinal tract: an inside view of their role and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linardoutsos, Dimitrios; Gazouli, Maria; Machairas, Anastasios; Bramis, Ioannis; Zografos, Georgios C

    2014-01-01

    Human tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and is related peptidases (KLK2-KLK15) are a family of 15 homologous serine proteases, participating in numerous processes of normal physiology. Considering the irreversible impact of proteases on substrates, the tissue-dependent regulation of KLKs activity becomes crucial for their beneficial role in normal homeostasis. Moreover, KLKs expression is strongly regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level by steroid hormones and miRNAs, respectively. Deregulation of KLKs expression, secretion and/or activation has been observed in most human malignancies and there is a trend to identify their role in the multi-complex process of cancer development. The identification of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, cell-surface receptors, cell-surface adhesion molecules and growth factors among substrates, clearly support the driving role of KLK abnormal expression and function during tumorigenesis and cancer progression. KLKs have also clinical utility in cancer diagnosis and monitoring like KLK 3 (PSA) in prostate cancer. In this review, we tried to summarize the existing literature about the role of KLKs in gastrointestinal cancers as well as to emphasize their clinical significance for patients' prognosis.

  8. An in vitro study of urea, water, ion and CO2/HCO3- transport in the gastrointestinal tract of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias): the influence of feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Hon Jung; De Boeck, Gudrun; Wood, Chris M

    2013-06-01

    In vitro gut sac preparations made from the cardiac stomach (stomach 1), pyloric stomach (stomach 2), intestine (spiral valve) and colon were used to examine the impact of feeding on transport processes in the gastrointestinal tract of the dogfish shark. Preparations were made from animals that were euthanized after 1-2 weeks of fasting, or at 24-48 h after voluntary feeding on a 3% ration of teleost fish (hake). Sacs were incubated under initially symmetrical conditions with dogfish saline on both surfaces. In comparison to an earlier in vivo study, the results confirmed that feeding caused increases in H(+) secretion in both stomach sections, but an increase in Cl(-) secretion only in stomach 2. Na(+) absorption, rather than Na(+) secretion, occurred in both stomach sections after feeding. All sections of the tract absorbed water and the intestine strongly absorbed Na(+) and Cl(-), regardless of feeding condition. The results also confirmed that feeding increased water absorption in the intestine (but not in the colon), and had little influence on the handling of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), which exhibited negligible absorption across the tract. However, K(+) was secreted in the intestine in both fasted and fed preparations. Increased intestinal water absorption occurred despite net osmolyte secretion into the mucosal saline. The largest changes occurred in urea and CO2/HCO3(-) fluxes. In fasted preparations, urea was absorbed at a low rate in all sections except the intestine, where it was secreted. Instead of an increase in intestinal urea secretion predicted from in vivo data, feeding caused a marked switch to net urea absorption. This intestinal urea transport occurred at a rate comparable to urea reabsorption rates reported at gills and kidney, and was apparently active, establishing a large serosal-to-mucosal concentration gradient. Feeding also greatly increased intestinal CO2/HCO3(-) secretion; if interpreted as HCO3(-) transport, the rates were in the upper range

  9. INCIDENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI WITH ACID PEPTIC DISEASE AND MALIGNANT CONDITIONS OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT IN A TERTIARY CENTRE - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunamoorthy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients with dyspepsia undergoing upper gastro intestine endoscopy in Chennai Medical College Hospital and Research Institute and to study the association of Helicobacter pylori with Acid peptic diseases and Malignant conditions of upper gastro intestine tract. MATERIALS AND METHODS 389 cases of dyspepsia, studied clinically as per the proforma over a period of three years from July 2012 to April 2015, were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy under topical anaesthesia, during which 4 biopsies, two each from the antrum and the pathological areas were taken. Two biopsy specimens, one of the antral area and the other of the pathological finding were immediately subjected to rapid urease test. Positive test for Helicobacter pylori was indicated by change in colour of the medium from yellow to pink or red. The other two biopsy specimens were sent for routine histopathology and special staining with Giemsa stain. The case was taken as Helicobacter pylori positive when the rapid urease test and/or histopathological examination was positive. RESULTS Out of 389 patients with mean age of 41.8 years; 172 patients were diagnosed to have been infected with Helicobacter pylori (44.21%. Out of 49 patients with gastric and duodenal ulcers, 37 patients were infected with Helicobacter pylori (75.51%; 22 out of 25 patients (88% with duodenal ulcers and 10 out of 14 patients (71.4% with gastric ulcers were positive for H. pylori, while only 8 out of 10 patients (80% with gastric cancer were positive for H. pylori. Out of remaining 340 patients, out of which 43 were found to be positive for Helicobacter pylori infection (33.85% and 213 patients with gastritis/duodenitis, out of which 92 were infected with Helicobacter pylori (43.19%. There were 127 patients with normal endoscopic findings. CONCLUSION In this study, we found that Helicobacter pylori was consistently associated with

  10. Motor activity of the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract as determinants of enterohepatic circulation. A scintigraphic and manometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qvist, N. [Odense University Hospital, Dept. of Surgical Gastroenterology and Clinical Physiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    1995-12-31

    The aims of the study were to describe the dynamics of the enterohepatic circulation in relation to gallbladder and gastrointestinal motility in the interdigestive as well as the postprandial period. Furthermore, to investigate the level of circulating cholecystokinin, secretin, pancreatic polypeptide, motilin and bile acids in relation to gallbladder motility and MMC during the interdigestive period. All investigations were carried out on healthy male volunteers aged 18-40 years. The most suitable method for studying various characteristics of the enterohepatic circulation, and especially gallbladder motility in humans, is scintigraphy. It is non-invasive, and allows a continuing dynamic investigation of the partitioning of the radioactive marker between the various compartment. Two entirely different pharmacological substances may be use. HIDA (diethyl-acetanilide-iminodiacetic acid) which is semisynthetic and closely related to lidocaine forms a chelate with {sup 99m}Tc for intravenous administration only. The transport of {sup 99m}Tc-HIDA across the hepatocyte is a carrier-mediated organic anion pathway, similar to the hepatic handling of bilirubin. Homocholic-acid-taurine (HCAT) is a synthetic bile acid analogue, corresponding to the naturally occurring bile acid cholic acid-taurine. It is marked with {sup 75}Se and is available for peroral use only. The {sup 75}SeHCAT is adsorbed in the same manner as the naturally occurring conjugated trihydroxy bile acids, involving specific carrier systems for absorption and secretion, i.e. with a high first pass extraction and a secretory rate proportional to the blood concentration. (EG) 24 refs.

  11. Effects of dietary pH and phosphorus source on performance, gastrointestinal tract digesta, and bone measurements of weanling pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straw, M L; Kornegay, E T; Evans, J L; Wood, C M

    1991-11-01

    Crossbred pigs (n = 144, average age and weight = 28 +/- 3 d, 7.5 kg) were used in two 6-wk trials to assess the effects of dietary pH and P source on growth performance, gastrointestinal digesta pH and chloride ion concentration (Cl-), and bone characteristics. Treatments were randomly allotted within blocks (based on weight within gender) to a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement with three dietary pH levels (5.4, 6.0, and 6.7) and two P sources: dicalcium phosphate (DCP) and defluorinated phosphate (DFP). Pigs fed the pH 6.7 diet had reduced ADG (P less than .01) and average daily feed intakes (ADFI; P less than .001) during wk 1 to 3 and overall compared with pigs fed the pH 6.0 diet, but ADG and ADFI were not affected when the pH 5.4 diet was fed. There was a dietary pH x P source interaction (P less than .05) for ADFI. Pigs had decreased ADFI as dietary pH was increased from 6.0 to 6.7 for both DCP and DFP, but ADFI was similar for the pH 6.0 and 5.4 diets with DFP, whereas ADFI was greater for the pH 5.4 diet with DCP. Dietary pH did not influence ADFI:ADG ratio (F:G; P greater than .05), and P source had no effect (P greater than .05) on either ADG, ADFI, or F:G.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Effects of Different Dietary Levels of Two Types of Olive Pulp and Exogenous Enzyme Supplementation on the Gastrointestinal tract size, Immunology and Hematology of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sayehban

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The effects of the dietary inclusion of olive pulp (OP and the supplementation of a commercial enzyme blend (ENZ on the gastrointestinal tract (GIT size, and immune and hematological parameters were evaluated. In total, 600 one-day-old Ross 308 male broiler chicks were divided into 6 treatments according to a completely randomized design, in a 2×2×2 factorial scheme, consisting of the dietary inclusion of two olive pulp levels (50 and 100 g/kg in diet, two pulp categories (processed and unprocessed, and the inclusion or not of an enzyme blend. On d 42, birds were euthanized and blood samples were collected, and lymphoid, hematologic, and GIT organs were measured. The inclusion of 100g/kg OP in the diets increased jejunum relative weight (J% and jejunum length (p ≤ 0.05. Processed OP reduced jejunum weight and length, J%, and left cecum length, serum triglycerides and VLDL cholesterol levels (p ≤ 0.05. Enzyme supplementation did affect any of the studied parameters (p>0.05. The OP inclusion improved the GIT size, while processed OP reduced GIT measurements and serum lipid levels.

  13. 3H-thymidine autoradiographic study of cell proliferation and the influence of isoproterenol and kallikrein in various cell populations of the gastrointestinal tract in animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological studies were carried out with the aim of studying cell proliferation in various tissues (stable and epithelial tissues) of the gastrointestinal tract. The cells were studied by 3H thymidine autoradiography in the normal age cycle and under the influence of kallikrein or isoproterenol. Epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells of the forestomach, stomach, small intestine and colon were investigated and, in the case of the stomach, also connective-tissue cells of the mucotic stroma. Counts across the total epithelial thickness yielded similar results for the oesophagus and the forestomach. A count of 1000 cells per animal was found to yield representative information on a defined type of cell. Kallikrein was not found to have a constant mitosis-promoting effect. Isoproterenol caused the labelling index to increase or to decrease; in higher concentrations, it increased the proliferation rate in all cell types. In male animals, the labelling indices of connective-tissue cells of the gastric mucosa were significantly higher than in female animals. (orig./MG)

  14. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma abutting the diaphragm and gastrointestinal tracts with the use of artificial ascites: safety and technical efficacy in 143 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Inyoung; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo K.; Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with the use of artificial ascites for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) adjacent to the diaphragm and gastrointestinal tract. One hundred forty-three patients with 181 HCCs who underwent US-guided percutaneous RFA with the use of artificial ascites were retrospectively reviewed. Among the 181 HCCs, 148 HCCs were defined as problematic nodules for two major reasons: poor sonic window or possible thermal injury. We artificially induced ascites before performing RFA by dripping 5% dextrose in a water solution. We assessed the technical success of introducing artificial ascites, technical feasibility of the use of artificial ascites and complications. The technical success rate, as well as the primary and secondary technique success rate, was assessed by regular follow-up CT examinations. RFA with artificial ascites was successfully achieved in 130 of 143 patients. The primary technique effectiveness was 85.3%. During follow-up (mean, 20.4 months), remote intrahepatic recurrence occurred in 49 patients and local tumor progression occurred in 15 patients. Three (2.1%) of the 143 patients experienced major complications (hemoperitoneum, lobar infarction and biloma) related to the RFA procedure. The use of artificial ascites is a simple and useful technique to minimize collateral thermal injury and to improve the sonic window. (orig.)

  15. Detection of Helicobacter species in the gastrointestinal tract of ringtail possum and koala: possible influence of diet, on the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldham, Thosaporn; Rose, Karrie; O'Rourke, Jani; Neilan, Brett A; Dalton, Helen; Lee, Adrian; Mitchell, Hazel

    2013-10-25

    The presence of Helicobacter spp. was examined in the liver and in different regions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) including the stomach, 3 cm above ileum, ileum, caecum, colon and rectum of 10 ringtail possums (RTPs) and 3 koalas using a combination of microscopy, culture and PCR. Helicobacter was detected in the distal end of the GIT of 7 of 10 RTPs by direct PCR and in all (10/10) RTPs by nested PCR. Five 'S' shaped isolates with bipolar sheathed flagella were isolated from the lower bowel of 3 of the 10 RTPs. 16S rRNA sequence analysis of these 5 isolates confirmed them as potentially novel Helicobacter species. No Helicobacter species were cultured from the koalas, however Helicobacter DNA was detected, in the majority of liver and/or stomach samples of the three koalas and in the colonic region of one koala, using nested PCR. The 16S rRNA gene was sequenced directly from DNA extracted from the homogenised livers and mucus scrapings of the stomach from koala 1 and were confirmed to be Helicobacter species. Based on histopathological examination of sections from the liver and intestine no evidence of infection could be related to the presence of helicobacters in either the RTP or koala. Based on our results, it is possible that diet may influence the detection of Helicobacter species; however this required further investigation.

  16. The Expression of Type-1 and Type-2 Nitric Oxide Synthase in Selected Tissues of the Gastrointestinal Tract during Mixed Mycotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Gajęcka

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that intoxication with low doses of mycotoxins leads to changes in the mRNA expression levels of nitric oxide synthase-1 and nitric oxide synthase-2 genes in tissues of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver. The experiment involved four groups of immature gilts (with body weight of up to 25 kg which were orally administered zearalenone in a daily dose of 40 μg/kg BW (group Z, n = 18, deoxynivalenol at 12 μg/kg BW (group D, n = 18, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol (group M, n = 18 or placebo (group C, n = 21 over a period of 42 days. The lowest mRNA expression levels of nitric oxide synthase-1 and nitric oxide synthase-2 genes were noted in the sixth week of the study, in particular in group M. Our results suggest that the presence of low mycotoxin doses in feed slows down the mRNA expression of both nitric oxide synthase isomers, which probably lowers the concentrations of nitric oxide, a common precursor of inflammation.

  17. Anthocyanin-rich tea Sunrouge upregulates expressions of heat shock proteins in the gastrointestinal tract of ICR mice: A comparison with the conventional tea cultivar Yabukita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Murakami

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sunrouge is an anthocyanin-rich, new tea cultivar that contains similar levels of catechins as Yabukita, the most popular tea cultivar consumed in Japan. Interestingly, Sunrouge preparations have previously been shown to have more pronounced acetylcholinesterase inhibitory and anticolitis activities than those of Yabukita. In this study, we examined their effects on expressions of self-defensive molecules, including heat shock proteins (HSPs, which are molecular chaperones involved in homeostasis and longevity. Hot water extract from freeze-dried Sunrouge significantly upregulated messenger RNA (mRNA expressions of HSP40, HSP70, and HSP32 (heme oxygenase-1, with grades greater than those shown by Yabukita. Oral administration of freeze-dried preparation of Sunrouge to male ICR mice at a dose of 1% in the basal diet for 1 month resulted in marked upregulations of several HSP mRNA expressions in mucosa from the gastrointestinal tract, especially the upper small intestine. Again, its efficacy was remarkably higher than that of Yabukita. Moreover, exposure of Caenorhabditis elegans to Sunrouge conferred thermoresistant phenotype, and also resulted in a significant life-span elongation. Taken together, our results suggest that Sunrouge is a unique and promising tea cultivar for regulating self-defense systems.

  18. In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Meyer, Anne Strunge; Boye, Mette

    2015-12-01

    Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by-product, we show that high molecular weight galacto-rhamnogalacturonan can be solubilized in the stomach of weaning piglets. The release of this fiber is in the order of 22-38 % of the theoretical amount, achieved within 20 min. The catalysis takes place mainly in the stomach of the animal and is then followed by distribution through the small intestines. To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model. PMID:26475351

  19. Holy basil (Ocimum sanctum Linn.) essential oil delivery to swine gastrointestinal tract using gelatin microcapsules coated with aluminum carboxymethyl cellulose and beeswax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitprasert, Pakamon; Sutaphanit, Polin

    2014-12-31

    Holy basil essential oil (HBEO) can be applied as a feed additive; however, its benefits depend on the available amount in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, the physicochemical properties, including the release properties of three different microcapsules, HBEO-loaded gelatin microcapsules (UC), UC coated with aluminum carboxymethyl cellulose (CC), and UC coated with aluminum carboxymethyl cellulose-beeswax composite (CB), were compared. The encapsulation efficiency, HBEO content, and 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity for the microcapsules were 95.4 ± 0.17%, 66.7-67.7%, and 94.3-96.5%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed nonuniform HBEO distributions in honeycomb-like networks in the microcapsules. An X-ray diffraction analysis determined that UC and CC microcapsules were amorphous, but CB microcapsules were semicrystalline. UV-vis spectrophotometer and CLSM analyses results determined that HBEO was released from CC and CB microcapsules in greater amounts than from UC microcapsules in simulated intestinal fluid. Therefore, the HBEO amount reaching the intestine can be controlled using the optimal encapsulation system. PMID:25382222

  20. Analysis Clinical Nursing Effect on Severe Peptic Ulcer of Massive Hemorrhage of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract%重症消化性溃疡上消化道大出血的临床护理效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective To severe peptic ulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding, explore the effect of clinical nursing. Methods Random selected from January 2013 to September 2014 patients with severe peptic ulcer hemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract in our hospital 110 cases, the average can be divided into experimental group (n=55) and the control group (n=55), shall be the nursing intervention group and control group routine nursing care, the two groups of patients with severe peptic ulcer hemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract nursing satisfaction and quality of life observation and statistics. Results The experimental group of 55 patients with severe peptic ulcer hemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract nursing satisfaction was 98.18%, while the control group patients with severe peptic ulcer hemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract nursing satisfaction was 87.27%, P<0.05, had difference statistically signiifcance. Conclusion The clinical nursing of severe peptic ulcer hemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract can effectively improve the patient's nursing satisfaction, has the signiifcance in clinical medicine.%目的:探究重症消化性溃疡上消化道大出血的临床护理效果。方法在我院随机选取自2013年1月~2014年9月收治的重症消化性溃疡上消化道大出血的患者110例,将其平均分为实验组(n=55)和对照组(n=55),实验组给与护理干预,对照组给予常规护理,对两组重症消化性溃疡上消化道大出血患者的护理满意度以及生活质量进行观察和统计。结果实验组55例患者护理满意度为98.18%,而对照组护理满意度为87.27%,P<0.05,差异具有统计学意义。结论对重症消化性溃疡上消化道大出血患者采取临床护理能够提高患者的护理满意度。

  1. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila ventral nervous system: Neuroglian expression reveals the adult hemilineage associated fiber tracts in the adult thoracic neuromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, David; Harris, Robin; Williams, Darren W; Truman, James W

    2016-09-01

    During larval life most of the thoracic neuroblasts (NBs) in Drosophila undergo a second phase of neurogenesis to generate adult-specific neurons that remain in an immature, developmentally stalled state until pupation. Using a combination of MARCM and immunostaining with a neurotactin antibody, Truman et al. (2004; Development 131:5167-5184) identified 24 adult-specific NB lineages within each thoracic hemineuromere of the larval ventral nervous system (VNS), but because of the neurotactin labeling of lineage tracts disappearing early in metamorphosis, they were unable extend the identification of these lineages into the adult. Here we show that immunostaining with an antibody against the cell adhesion molecule neuroglian reveals the same larval secondary lineage projections through metamorphosis and bfy identifying each neuroglian-positive tract at selected stages we have traced the larval hemilineage tracts for all three thoracic neuromeres through metamorphosis into the adult. To validate tract identifications we used the genetic toolkit developed by Harris et al. (2015; Elife 4) to preserve hemilineage-specific GAL4 expression patterns from larval into the adult stage. The immortalized expression proved a powerful confirmation of the analysis of the neuroglian scaffold. This work has enabled us to directly link the secondary, larval NB lineages to their adult counterparts. The data provide an anatomical framework that 1) makes it possible to assign most neurons to their parent lineage and 2) allows more precise definitions of the neuronal organization of the adult VNS based in developmental units/rules. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2677-2695, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878258

  2. The Nursing Experience of Emergency Endoscopy in Treatment of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Foreign Bodies%急诊胃镜治疗上消化道异物的护理体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁金红

    2015-01-01

    目的 分析急诊胃镜治疗上消化道异物的护理措施.方法 将急诊胃镜治疗上消化道异物患者88例分为两组,观察组行综合护理,对照组行常规护理.结果 观察组并发症发生率、护理满意度均优于对照组,P<0.05,差异具有统计学意义.结论 给予急诊胃镜治疗上消化道异物患者综合护理效果显著.%Objective To analysis the emergency endoscopy nursing measures for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract foreign bodies. Methods Selected 88 patients with the treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract foreign bodies of emergency gastroscopy, were divided into two groups, the observation group line comprehensive care, the control group routine nursing.Results The incidence of complications and nursing satisfaction the observation group were better than the control group , P<0.05, was difference had statistically significance.Conclusion The treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract foreign bodies of emergency gastroscopy patients' comprehensive nursing effect is remarkable.

  3. Radiological imaging of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Pt. 1. The esophagus; Radiologische Bildgebung des oberen Gastrointestinaltrakts. T. 1. Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansmann, J.; Grenacher, L. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Abteilung Radiodiagnostik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    In the diagnosis of diseases of the esophagus, conventional x-ray evaluation still plays a more important role than endoscopy in the visualization of stenoses. CT plays a major role in the staging of malignancies of the esophagus, while MRI plays does not play a major part in the diagnostic evaluation of the upper GI-tract but is equal to CT for the staging and evaluation of the extent of local infiltration. The main indication for the radiological examination of the esophagus by barium studies is dysphagia. The use of barium allows a functional examination of esophageal motility. Swallow motility disorders can be diagnosed by videofluorography using high frame rate imaging. Zenker's diverticulum and other pulsion diverticula should also be investigated by functional esophageal imaging. Candida esophagitis can be identified by its characteristic ulcerations using barium swallow. The extension of gastroesophageal hernias are more accurately evaluated with barium studies than with endoscopy. The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease should be made by barium studies, but discrete inflammation as well as epithelial dysplasia are best investigated by classic endoscopy and modern endoscopic techniques. In cases of esophageal carcinoma, radiology adds to the findings of endoscopy and endosonography. (orig.) Mit konventionellem Roentgen kann die Funktion des Oesophagus untersucht werden, zudem sind Stenosen besser darstellbar als in der Endoskopie. Die CT liefert beim Staging des Oesophaguskarzinoms gute Ergebnisse. Die MRT wird im oberen Gastrointestinaltrakt kaum mehr diagnostisch verwendet, ist aber im Umfeldstaging und fuer die lokale Infiltrationsausdehnung dem CT gleichwertig. Hauptindikation zur radiologischen Oesophagusdiagnostik ist die Dysphagie. Der Oesophagusbreischluck dient der morphologischen Diagnostik, die Motilitaet kann in Bauchlage mit Barium untersucht werden. Schluckstoerungen werden mit der Roentgenkinematographie abgeklaert. Das Zenker

  4. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably cons...

  5. Effects of young coconut juice on the numbers of argyrophil endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract of male rats: Novel preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisaudah Radenahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Apart from calcium itself, there are many factors including vitamin D and estrogen, that play important roles in bone formation. Hormones, especially estrogen, used for replacement therapy is highly effective at reducing the rate of bone loss and can also replace lost bone in postmenopausal women. Estrogen replacement therapy has been proposed to prevent bone loss in males as well as in females. Estrogen, however, has been considered to be one of the hormonal risk factors of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer and also other side effects. With this background, in the present study, young coconut juice (YCJ, that is known to contain the phytoestrogen, -sitosterol, was investigated for its possible beneficial effects on delaying osteoporosis using a male orchidectomized rat model, and as a replacement for estrogen replacement therapy. In the present study we used the Grimelius stain which is a broad endocrine cell marker, especially in the gastrointestinal (GI tract to quantify the argyrophil endocrine cells and if possible to relate this to reflex GI functions, e.g. calcium absorption, GI motility etc. that might have an influence on osteoporosis. There were five groups of rats (6 per group included in this study. The first group consisted of sham-operated rats, the second group consisted of orchidectomized (orx rats, and the third group consisted of orx rats injected intraperitoneally with exogenous estrogen (2.5 g/kgBW of estradiol benzoate, EB five days a week for two weeks. The fourth group consisted of orx rats that received YCJ (100 mL/ kgBW/day and the fifth group was sham-operated rats receiving YCJ (100 mL/kgBW/day for two weeks. After sacrifice, the GI tract including stomach, small and large intestines were removed, fixed and paraffin embedded for routine H&E and Grimelius silver staining. Most of the argyrophil cells were dispersed in the mucosa, particularly in the basal mucosa and were generally round or spindle

  6. Phenotypical characterization, distribution and quantification of different mast cell subtypes in transmural biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract of cats with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Sven; Harder, Jasmine; Nolte, Ingo; Marsilio, Sina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2010-10-15

    In this study subtypes, distribution and number of mast cells were investigated within mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract of 24 cats with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in comparison to 11 control cats. Paraffin sections of formalin-fixed transmural gastrointestinal biopsies from stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were examined. Mast cells were phenotyped and quantified based on their chymase and tryptase content, by applying a combined enzyme-histochemical and immunohistochemical double-labeling technique and on their heparin content by a metachromatic staining method (kresylecht-violet, MC(KEV)). Mast cells containing both chymase and tryptase were not found in any of the samples examined. Furthermore, in the stomach neither chymase (MC(C)) nor tryptase (MC(T)) bearing mast cells were detected. In cats with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or enterocolitis elevated numbers of MC(T) or MC(C) were identified in comparison to controls mainly located in the inflamed segments. The highest quantity of MC(C) was found in cats with eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis or enterocolitis in comparison to other IBD forms, but only minor numbers of MC(T) were detected in these cases. In cats with fibrosing enteropathy (FE) a decrease of MC(C) and mast cells containing heparin was detected in affected segments, while increased numbers of MC(T) were detected in all locations. The elevation in the number of MC(T) was higher in unaffected areas than in fibrotic regions. Regarding all IBD cases higher counts of MC(C) were found especially in the inflamed locations, whereas in unaffected segments increased numbers of MC(T) were detected. The clear predominance of MC(C) and MC(T) within the mucosa and of MC(KEV) within the submucosa of all cats examined possibly represents differences of the cytokine milieu within the intestinal layers. In FE, mast cells are possibly pivotal for the containment of the inflammatory process because of their antiinflammatory

  7. In vitro characterization of cadmium and zinc uptake via the gastro-intestinal tract of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): Interactive effects and the influence of calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo, Adeola A. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: adeolaojo25@yahoo.com; Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: woodcm@mcmaster.ca

    2008-08-11

    An in vitro gut sac technique was employed to study whether Cd and Zn uptake mechanisms in the gastro-intestinal tract of the rainbow trout are similar to those at the gills, where both metals are taken up via the Ca transport pathway. Metal accumulation in surface mucus, in the mucosal epithelium, and transport into the blood space were assayed using radiolabelled Cd or Zn concentrations of 50 {mu}mol L{sup -1} in the luminal (internal) saline. Elevated luminal Ca (10 or 100 mmol L{sup -1}versus 1 mmol L{sup -1}) reduced Cd uptake into all three phases by approximately 60% in the stomach, but had no effect in the anterior, mid, or posterior intestine. This finding is in accordance with recent in vivo evidence that Ca is taken up mainly via the stomach, and that high [Ca] diets inhibit Cd accumulation from the food specifically in this section of the tract. In contrast, 10 mmol L{sup -1} luminal Ca had no effect on Zn transport in any section, whereas 100 mmol L{sup -1} Ca stimulated Zn uptake, by approximately threefold, into all three phases in the stomach only. There was no influence of elevated luminal Zn (10 mmol L{sup -1}) on Cd uptake in the stomach or anterior intestine, or of high Cd (10 mmol L{sup -1}) on Zn uptake in these sections. However, high [Zn] stimulated Cd transport into the blood space but inhibited accumulation in the mucosal epithelium and/or mucus-binding in the mid and posterior intestine, whereas high [Cd] exerted a reciprocal effect in the mid-intestine only. We conclude that Cd uptake occurs via an important Ca-sensitive mechanism in the stomach which is different from that at the gills, while Cd transport mechanisms in the intestine are not directly Ca-sensitive. Zn uptake does not appear to involve Ca uptake pathways, in contrast to the gills. These results are discussed in the context of other possible Cd and Zn transport pathways, and the emerging role of the stomach as an organ of divalent metal uptake.

  8. Observational study of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding events in patients taking duloxetine and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a case-control analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li H

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hu Li, Yingkai Cheng, Jonna Ahl, Vladimir SkljarevskiNeurosciences, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USAPurpose: To determine whether the concomitant use of duloxetine with prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs or aspirin was associated with an increased risk for upper gastrointestinal (UGI bleeding compared with taking these analgesics alone.Methods: Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases were examined for hospital admissions of adult patients indexed from January 1, 2007–December 31, 2011. Cases were patients with UGI hemorrhage or peptic ulcer disease. Controls were randomly selected from the remaining admissions to match 10:1 with cases based on age, sex, and admission date. Prescription medication exposure groups of interest were: 1 no exposure to duloxetine, NSAIDs or aspirin; 2 duloxetine only; 3 NSAIDs or aspirin only; 4 duloxetine plus NSAIDs or aspirin. Logistic regression and relative excess risk due to interaction was utilized to estimate any increased risk of UGI bleeding for patients prescribed these medications across these groups.Results: There were 33,571 cases and 335,710 controls identified. Comparing exposure group 2 and group 4, the adjusted odds ratio was 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94, 1.12, and the adjusted relative excess risk due to interaction was 0.352 (95% CI: –0.18, 0.72 for risk of UGI bleeding, neither of which support an increased risk or an interaction between duloxetine and prescription NSAID or aspirin for these events.Conclusion: There was no evidence of an increased risk for UGI bleeding when duloxetine was taken with prescription NSAIDs or aspirin. In addition, there was no evidence of an interaction between duloxetine and prescription NSAIDs or aspirin for an increased risk of these events.Keywords: duloxetine, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, NSAIDs, aspirin

  9. Characterization of melatonin synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): distribution, relation with serotonin, daily rhythms and photoperiod regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Pérez, José L; López-Patiño, Marcos A; Álvarez-Otero, Rosa; Gesto, Manuel; Soengas, José L; Míguez, Jesús M

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin is synthesized in peripheral locations of vertebrates, including the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In teleost, information regarding this topic is scarce. Here we studied the presence and synthesis of melatonin at the rainbow trout GIT. Different sections of trout GIT (from esophagus to hindgut) were dissected out and assayed for contents of melatonin, serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, as well as for aanat1, aanat2 and hiomt mRNA abundance. A trout group was pinealectomized to evaluate changes in plasma and gut melatonin content. Finally, the daily profile of melatonin and 5-HT content, and aanat1, aanat2 and hiomt mRNA abundance were analyzed in gut of trout kept under normal lighting, and then under constant darkness. Melatonin was detected in all GIT regions with higher concentrations in the muscular wall than in the mucosa, a similar trend to that of 5-HT. In contrast, transcripts of melatonin synthesis enzymes were more abundant in the mucosa. Pinealectomy did not affect melatonin levels in midgut and hindgut either at day or at night. Additionally, no daily rhythms could be defined for melatonin content in gut tissues but increases during late light phase and at midnight occurred. However, aanat1, aanat2 and hiomt mRNA abundance showed clear daily rhythms with peaks at night. These rhythms remained with a 3-h phase advanced peak in fish exposed to constant darkness. Our results provide clear evidence for a local synthesis of melatonin in trout GIT that might be influenced by the content of 5-HT in the tissue. The process is affected by environmental light cycle and is likely to be under circadian regulation. PMID:26873742

  10. Radio-guided surgery with the use of [{sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate in intra-operative detection of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A. [Medical College at Jagiellonian University, Nuclear Medicine Unit of the Department of Endocrinology, Cracow (Poland); Krakow (Poland); Kulig, J.; Szybinski, P. [Medical College at Jagiellonian University, The Gastrointestinal and General Surgery Department, Cracow (Poland); Mikolajczak, R. [Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Pach, D.; Sowa-Staszczak, A.; Froess-Baron, K.; Huszno, B. [Medical College at Jagiellonian University, Nuclear Medicine Unit of the Department of Endocrinology, Cracow (Poland)

    2007-10-15

    Radio-guided surgery (RGS) is an intra-operative localising technique which enables identification of tissue ''marked'' by a specific radiotracer injected before surgery. It is mainly used for sentinel node mapping and for detection of parathyroid adenomas and other tumours, including neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract (GEP-NET). The aim of this study was to determine whether intra-operative radio-detection with the use of [{sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate, a new somatostatin analogue, is able to reveal an unknown primary and secondary sites, thereby improving surgical treatment and the final outcome of GEP-NET. The study group included nine patients with suspected GEP-NET (four carcinoids, five pancreatic NET) localised with somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (with [{sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate), who had negative results on other pre-operative imaging tests. At surgery, suspected tumours were measured in situ and ex vivo and precise exploration of the abdominal cavity was performed with the intra-operative scintillation detector (Navigator). Intra-operative gamma counting localised three carcinoids. In one patient SRS was false positive (owing to inflammatory infiltration). Compared with SRS, RGS revealed additional lymph node metastases in one case. RGS resulted in successful localisation of all pancreatic NET (the smallest lesion was 8 mm in diameter). [{sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate SRS followed by RGS is a promising technique to improve the rate of detection and efficacy of treatment of GEP-NET, especially in the presence of occult endocrine tumours. The imaging properties of [{sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC]octreotate and the 1-day imaging protocol offer opportunities for more widespread application of this tracer followed by RGS in oncology. (orig.)

  11. Late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract in the H2 and H5 EORTC Hodgkin's disease trials: emphasis on the role of exploratory laparotomy and fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosset, J M; Henry-Amar, M; Burgers, J M; Noordijk, E M; Van der Werf-Messing, B; Meerwaldt, J H; van der Schueren, E

    1988-09-01

    Out of 516 patients who entered in the two successive EORTC trials H2 and H5 for supra-diaphragmatic stages I and II Hodgkin's disease (HD), and who received an infra-diaphragmatic irradiation, 36 (7%) developed late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Twenty-five patients presented with ulcers (stomach or duodenum), 2 with severe gastritis, 6 with small bowel obstruction or perforation and 3 patients had both an ulcer and bowel obstruction. A previous laparotomy played an important role. While the complication rate was 2.7% without any previous abdominal surgery, it was 11.5% after laparotomy (p less than 0.001). Fractionation was also found to be of importance in the occurrence of complications: three different weekly schedules were used -5 x 2 Gy, 4 x 2.5 Gy and 3 x 3.3 Gy; the GIT complication rates were 4, 9 and 22%, respectively (p less than 0.001). When combining laparotomy and fractionation, we found that the patients who were treated using 5 weekly fractions of 2 Gy without any prior laparotomy had a very low rate of late digestive complications (1%), whereas the patients who received 3 weekly fractions of 3.3 Gy after laparotomy presented a 39% complication rate. The other subgroups of patients were at an intermediate risk (from 5 to 13%) of late digestive injuries. Since most patients received 40 Gy with only very small variations, the influence of the radiation dose could not be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Complex therapeutic-diagnostic endoscopy with laser irradiation and in-Situ spectrophotometry of erosive-ulcerative impairments of upper part of the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogatkin, Dmitrii A.; Tereschenko, Sergey G.; Lapaeva, Ludmila G.; Gorenkov, Roman V.

    2002-05-01

    Today in the world there are a lot of effective methods to treat different disease with the use of low-level laser (LLL) radiation. And there are a number of well-known effective noninvasive optical diagnostic techniques, such as a laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS), elastic-scattering spectroscopy (ESS), absorption spectroscopy (ABSS), etc. In this paper the first experience of the complex laser-optical therapeutic-diagnostic treatment for the erosive-ulcerative impairments (EUI) of the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (UPGT) are discussed. The EUI of the UPGT very often have a resistance to a medicamentous therapy and the treatment of that is very difficult in this case. The method of LLL irradiation through an endoscope has been used to increase the efficiency of LLL-therapy and to monitor a general process of recovery respectively. The standard biopsy was investigated to estimate the effect of care as well. As it is shown in this paper the in-situ ABSS allows to optimize the LLL treatment parameters for each patient and for each procedure if the laser has effect on a blood circulation in the irradiated zone. In this case the doctors can see the considerable effect and the reduction period of the cure for EUI. Otherwise, the ABSS indicates that there will be no any effect of LLL therapy for such patient and another methods of treatment are needed. The LFS in this case shows the absence of effect during the care course too. On the basis of analysis of the obtained results this paper presents our current understanding of mechanisms of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics and LLL therapy effect for EUI of the UPGT. Today this technique has the official approval of the Ministry of Health of Russian Federation.

  13. Applications of In Ovo Technique for the Optimal Development of the Gastrointestinal Tract and the Potential Influence on the Establishment of Its Microbiome in Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roto, Stephanie M.; Kwon, Young Min; Ricke, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    As the current poultry production system stands, there is a period of time when newly hatched chicks are prevented from access to feed for approximately 48–72 h. Research has indicated that this delay in feeding may result in decreased growth performance when compared to chicks that are fed immediately post-hatch. To remedy this issue, in ovo methodology may be applied in order to supply the embryo with additional nutrients prior to hatching and those nutrients will continue to be utilized by the chick post-hatch during the fasting period. Furthermore, in ovo injection of various biologics have been researched based on the ability of not only supplying the chick embryo with additional nutrients that would promote improved growth but also compounds that may benefit the future health of the chicken host. Such compounds include various immunostimulants, live beneficial bacteria, prebiotics, and synbiotics. However, it is important to determine the site and age of the in ovo injection for the most productive effects. The primary focus of the current review is to address these two issues [the most effective site(s) and age(s) of in ovo injection] as well as provide the framework for the development of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of the chick embryo. Additionally, recent research suggests the colonization of the microbiota in the developing chick may occur during the late stages of embryogenesis. Therefore, we will also discuss the potentials of the in ovo injection method in establishing a healthy and diverse community of microorganisms to colonize the developing GIT that will provide both protection from pathogen invasion and improvement in growth performance to developing chicks.

  14. A comparison of rectal, oesophageal and gastro-intestinal tract temperatures during moderate-intensity cycling in temperate and hot conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mündel, Toby; Carter, James M; Wilkinson, David M; Jones, David A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three of the most commonly used methods of core temperature (Tcore) measurement during cycling under different environmental conditions as there are practical problems associated with each method and, sometimes, uncertainty as to which is the appropriate measure. Eight trained males (VO2 max: 60 ± 7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed two 60-min cycling trials at ~70% VO2 max at 20°C (MOD) and 35°C (HOT). Measures of Tcore were made every 5 min with oesophageal (Toes) and rectal (Trec) thermistors and of the gastro-intestinal tract temperature (Tgi ) with a temperature-sensitive disposable radio pill. During MOD Toes initially plateaued after 10 min, Tgi after 25 min and Trec after 50 min, whereas during HOT these times had increased to 25 min for Toes and 55 min for both Tgi and Trec. Toes consistently provided lower readings than Trec (0·24-0·26°C) and Tgi (0·26-0·28°C) with Tgi and Trec similar (0·02°C). Readings for Tgi displayed closer agreement with Trec (ICC = 0·92) than Toes (ICC = 0·86) with less agreement between Trec and Toes (ICC = 0·84). 95% of all Tgi readings were within ±0·5°C of Trec and within ±0·6°C of Toes with 95% of all Toes readings being within ±0·7°C of Trec . These results demonstrate distinct response times, absolute values and agreement between Tcore measured at different body locations under different ambient conditions. Implications and considerations are discussed.

  15. 猪肠道来源乳杆菌的益生特性研究%Potential Probiotic Properties of Lactobacilli Isolated from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春红; 戴春燕

    2011-01-01

    通过体外耐酸、耐胆盐和抗氧化活性分析法研究了猪肠道来源的5株乳杆菌的潜在益生特性。结果表明,5株乳酸杆菌均能耐受pH3.0。菌株PCL 3对pH 2.0具有良好耐受能力。受试菌株对0.3%~1.0%的牛胆盐具有良好的耐受能力,1%(w/v)胆盐处理4h,所有受试菌株的存活率均高于80%。抗氧化活性分析表明,菌株具有一定的体外清除羟自由基和DPPH自由基能力。%Five strains of lactobacilli which were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of pig were evaluated for probiotic potential with the pH and bile salts tolerance,and antioxidative activities.The results showed that all strains grew well at acid condition(pH 3.0,3h of incubation).Among 5 lactobacilli strains,PCL3 showed good tolerance to pH 2.0 for 3h.All strains could survive in the medium at 0.3%-1% bile salts.PCL3 possessed the highest ability of bile salts tolerance.Bioactivity tests in vitro showed that the all strains displayed ability to scavenge hydroxyl and DPPH radicals.

  16. Histochemical and immunohistochemical study on endocrine cells (5HT, GAS, and SST) of the gastrointestinal tract of a teleost, the characin Astyanax bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Nathália das Neves; Firmiano, Enely Maris da Silveira; Gomes, Iracema D; do Nascimento, Aparecida A; Sales, Armando; Araújo, Francisco G

    2015-09-01

    Endocrine cells secrete hormones through the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and act on the overall regulation of digestive processes such as nutrient absorption, gut motility and intestinal blood flow. This study aimed to determine regional distribution and frequency of endocrine cells secretory of serotonin (5-HT), somatostatin (SST) and gastrin (GAS) in the GIT of a small-bodied widespread characin Astyanax bimaculatus using histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Fragments of the stomach and gut fixed for 8h in Bouin liquid were subjected to histological processing and immunohistochemical routine. For the histological analyses, the technique of staining with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) was used, whereas for the histochemical analyses Gomori's trichrome, periodic acid+Schiff (PAS) and Alcian blue pH 2.5 (AB) were used to further immunohistochemical processing. The stomach has a mucosa lined with a simple columnar epithelium with mucus-secreting cells; the glandular region (proximal and distal portions) has folds and pits, whereas the non-glandular region has pits only. The intestinal epithelium is simple with plain cylindrical grooved and goblet cells. The anterior region has thin folds with few goblet cells, and the posterior region with thick folds and many goblet cells. The regional distribution and frequency of endocrine cells varied across regions of the GIT with the stomach showing the highest amount of immunoreactive (IR) cells. Only the 5-HT was found in the stomach (epithelia and glands) and gut regions, with comparatively higher frequency in the stomach. SST-IR cells were found in the stomach (epithelia and gastric glands) with higher frequency in the glandular region, whereas GAS-IR were found in the gastric glands only. The stomach was the only organ to have all the three types of endocrine cells, indicating that this organ is the main site of digestion of food in this species. PMID:26073464

  17. Applications of In Ovo Technique for the Optimal Development of the Gastrointestinal Tract and the Potential Influence on the Establishment of Its Microbiome in Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roto, Stephanie M; Kwon, Young Min; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    As the current poultry production system stands, there is a period of time when newly hatched chicks are prevented from access to feed for approximately 48-72 h. Research has indicated that this delay in feeding may result in decreased growth performance when compared to chicks that are fed immediately post-hatch. To remedy this issue, in ovo methodology may be applied in order to supply the embryo with additional nutrients prior to hatching and those nutrients will continue to be utilized by the chick post-hatch during the fasting period. Furthermore, in ovo injection of various biologics have been researched based on the ability of not only supplying the chick embryo with additional nutrients that would promote improved growth but also compounds that may benefit the future health of the chicken host. Such compounds include various immunostimulants, live beneficial bacteria, prebiotics, and synbiotics. However, it is important to determine the site and age of the in ovo injection for the most productive effects. The primary focus of the current review is to address these two issues [the most effective site(s) and age(s) of in ovo injection] as well as provide the framework for the development of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of the chick embryo. Additionally, recent research suggests the colonization of the microbiota in the developing chick may occur during the late stages of embryogenesis. Therefore, we will also discuss the potentials of the in ovo injection method in establishing a healthy and diverse community of microorganisms to colonize the developing GIT that will provide both protection from pathogen invasion and improvement in growth performance to developing chicks. PMID:27583251

  18. In vitro analysis of the bioavailability of six metals via the gastro-intestinal tract of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo, Adeola A. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: abosede_07@hotmail.com; Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: woodcm@mcmaster.ca

    2007-06-05

    An in vitro gut sac technique was used to compare the uptake rates of essential (copper, zinc and nickel) and non-essential metals (silver, cadmium and lead) at 50 {mu}mol L{sup -1} each (a typical nutritive level in solution in chyme) in the luminal saline in four sections of the gastro-intestinal tract (stomach, anterior, mid and posterior intestines) of the freshwater rainbow trout. Cu, Zn, Cd and Ag exhibited similar regional patterns: on an area-specific basis, uptake rates for these metals were highest in the anterior intestine, lowest in the stomach, and approximately equal in the mid and posterior intestinal segments. When these rates were converted to a whole animal basis, the predominance of the anterior intestine increased because of its greater area, while the contribution of the stomach rose slightly to approach those of the mid and posterior intestines. However, for Pb and Ni, area-specific and whole organism transport rates were greatest in the mid (Pb) and posterior (Ni) intestines. Surprisingly, total transport rates did not differ appreciably among the essential and non-essential metals, varying only from 0.025 (Ag) to 0.050 nmol g{sup -1} h{sup -1} (Ni), suggesting that a single rate constant can be applied for risk assessment purposes. These rates were generally comparable to previously reported uptake rates from waterborne exposures conducted at concentrations 1-4 orders of magnitude lower, indicating that both routes are likely important, and that gut transporters operate with much lower affinity than gill transporters. Except for Ni, more metal was bound to mucus and/or trapped in the mucosal epithelium than was transported into the blood space in every compartment except the anterior intestine, where net transport predominated. Overall, mucus binding was a significant predictor of net transport rate for every metal except Cd, and the strongest relationship was seen for Pb.

  19. Upper gastrointestinal sensitivity to meal-related signals in adult humans - relevance to appetite regulation and gut symptoms in health, obesity and functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Both the stomach and small intestine play important roles in sensing the arrival of a meal, and its physico-chemical characteristics, in the gastrointestinal lumen. The presence of a meal in the stomach provides a distension stimulus, and, as the meal empties into the small intestine, nutrients interact with small intestinal receptors, initiating the release of gut hormones, associated with feedback regulation of gastrointestinal functions, including gut motility, and signaling to the central nervous system, modulating eating behaviours, including energy intake. Lipid appears to have particularly potent effects, also in close interaction with, and modulating the effects of, gastric distension, and involving the action of gut hormones, particularly cholecystokinin (CCK). These findings have not only provided important, and novel, insights into how gastrointestinal signals interact to modulate subjective appetite perceptions, including fullness, but also laid the foundation for an increasing appreciation of the role of altered gastrointestinal sensitivities, e.g. as a consequence of excess dietary intake in obesity, or underlying the induction of gastrointestinal symptoms in functional dyspepsia (a condition characterized by symptoms, including bloating, nausea and early fullness, amongst others, after meals, particularly those high in fat, in the absence of any structural or functional abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract). This paper will review the effects of dietary nutrients, particularly lipid, on gastrointestinal function, and associated effects on appetite perceptions and energy intake, effects of interactions of gastrointestinal stimuli, as well as the role of altered gastrointestinal sensitivities (exaggerated, or reduced) in eating-related disorders, particularly obesity and functional dyspepsia. PMID:27013098

  20. Milk protein IgG and IgA: The association with milk-induced gastrointestinal symptoms in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sari Anthoni; Erkki Savilahti; Hilpi Rautelin; Kaija-Leena Kolho

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between serum levels of milk protein IgG and IgA antibodies and milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms in adults.METHODS: Milk protein IgG and IgA antibodies were determined in serum samples of 400 subjects from five outpatient clinics in Southern Finland. Subjects were randomly selected from a total of 1900 adultsundergoing laboratory investigations in primary care. All 400 participants had completed a questionnaire onabdominal symptoms and dairy consumption while waiting for the laboratory visit. The questionnairecovered the nature and frequency of gastrointestinal problems, the provoking food items, family history and allergies. Twelve serum samples were disqualified due to insufficient amount of sera. The levels of specific milkprotein IgG and IgA were measured by using the ELISA technique. The association of the milk protein-specific antibody level was studied in relation to the milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms and dairy consumption.RESULTS: Subjects drinking milk ( n = 265) had higher levels of milk protein IgG in their sera than non-milk drinkers ( n = 123, P < 0.001). Subjects with gastrointestinal problems related to milk drinking ( n = 119) consumed less milk but had higher milk protein IgG levels than those with no milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms ( n = 198, P = 0.02). Among the symptomatic subjects, those reporting dyspeptic symptoms had lower milk protein IgG levels than non-dyspeptics ( P < 0.05). However, dyspepsia was not associated with milk drinking ( P = 0.5). The association of high milk protein IgG levels with constipation was close to the level of statistical significance. Diarrhea had no association with milk protein IgG level ( P = 0.5). With regard to minor symptoms, flatulence and bloating ( P = 0.8), were not associated with milk protein IgG level. Milk protein IgA levels did not show any association with milk drinking or abdominal symptoms. The levels of milk protein IgA and IgG declined as the