WorldWideScience

Sample records for adult drosophila melanogaster

  1. Adult Heat Tolerance Variation in Drosophila melanogaster is Not Related to Hsp70 Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Toft; Cockerell, Fiona Elizabeth; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard;

    2010-01-01

    Expression of heat-inducible Hsp70 is considered closely linked to thermotolerance in Drosophila melanogaster and other ectotherms. However, intra-specific variation of Hsp70 expression levels and its relationship to heat resistance has only been investigated in a few studies. Although...... in adult heat tolerance. Therefore, although Hsp70 expression is a major component of the cellular heat stress response, its influence on intra-specific heat tolerance variation may be life-stage specific. J. Exp. Zool. 313A:35-44, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc...... in Drosophila larvae Hsp70 expression may be a key determinant of heat tolerance, the evidence for this in adults is equivocal. We therefore examined heat-induced Hsp70 expression and several measurements of adult heat tolerance in three independent collections of D. melanogaster, measured in three laboratories...

  2. [Adult of Drosophila melanogaster parasitized in human nasal cavity: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaodong; Tang, Xiaoniu; Wang, Shaosheng

    2015-05-01

    We reported a case of adult Drosophila melanogaster parasitized in nasal cavity of a 81-year-old woman who was living in Xuancheng City, Anhui Province now. She was admitted for treatment of cerebral infarction and water accumulation in the lungs in 2014 June. The patient was also suffering from secretory otitis media, a history of hypertension and heart stents were placed in 2007. A foreign body was found in the left nasal cavity during the preoperative examination process, and then the part of the inflammatory tissue was removed through the nasal endoscopy, and sent to our department for identification. There are three adults of Drosophila in paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens. The parasites length is approximately 3mm, with huge red compound eyes. The end of the body is tip, with 5 ring lines in back, has no dark spots. The abdomen of the parasites have seven sections. Tarsus of foot I have no sex comb on base, and they are male adult of Drosophila melanogaster after identification. After a thorough reviewing of medical history, we knew the patient began to sneeze violently and frequently six years ago. But there was no clear or purulent nasal discharge flowing, therefore did not attract attention. After removing the parasites the sneezing symptoms were relieved, and had no abnormal symptoms in the follow-up 6 months. PMID:26281068

  3. An integrated hybrid microfluidic device for oviposition-based chemical screening of adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jacob C K; Hilliker, Arthur J; Rezai, Pouya

    2016-02-21

    Chemical screening using Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly) is vital in drug discovery, agricultural, and toxicological applications. Oviposition (egg laying) on chemically-doped agar plates is an important read-out metric used to quantitatively assess the biological fitness and behavioral responses of Drosophila. Current oviposition-based chemical screening studies are inaccurate, labor-intensive, time-consuming, and inflexible due to the manual chemical doping of agar. In this paper, we have developed a novel hybrid agar-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device for single- and multi-concentration chemical dosing and on-chip oviposition screening of free-flying adult stage Drosophila. To achieve this, we have devised a novel technique to integrate agar with PDMS channels using ice as a sacrificial layer. Subsequently, we have conducted single-chemical toxicity and multiple choice chemical preference assays on adult Drosophila melanogaster using zinc and acetic acid at various concentrations. Our device has enabled us to 1) demonstrate that Drosophila is capable of sensing the concentration of different chemicals on a PDMS-agar microfluidic device, which plays significant roles in determining oviposition site selection and 2) investigate whether oviposition preference differs between single- and multi-concentration chemical environments. This device may be used to study fundamental and applied biological questions in Drosophila and other egg laying insects. It can also be extended in design to develop sophisticated and dynamic chemical dosing and high-throughput screening platforms in the future that are not easily achievable with the existing oviposition screening techniques. PMID:26768402

  4. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired.

  5. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster. PMID:27271968

  6. Gene–environment interplay in Drosophila melanogaster: Chronic food deprivation in early life affects adult exploratory and fitness traits

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, James Geoffrey; Svetec, Nicolas; Rowe, Locke; Mery, Frederic; Dolan, Michael J.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Sokolowski, Marla B.

    2012-01-01

    Early life adversity has known impacts on adult health and behavior, yet little is known about the gene–environment interactions (GEIs) that underlie these consequences. We used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to show that chronic early nutritional adversity interacts with rover and sitter allelic variants of foraging (for) to affect adult exploratory behavior, a phenotype that is critical for foraging, and reproductive fitness. Chronic nutritional adversity during adulthood did not aff...

  7. Protein and carbohydrate composition of larval food affects tolerance tothermal stress and desiccation in adult Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laila H; Kristensen, Torsten N; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2010-01-01

    Larval nutrition may affect a range of different life history traits as well as responses to environmental stress in adult insects. Here we test whether raising larvae of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, on two different nutritional regimes affects resistance to cold, heat and desiccation...... when developing on the protein-enriched medium. Our study indicates that larval nutrition has a strong impact on the ability to cope with stress, and that the optimal nutrient composition varies with the type of stress...

  8. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micael Reis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes.

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  10. [Carbohydrate restriction in the larval diet causes oxidative stress in adult insects of Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenko, B M; Lushchak, V I; Lushchak, O V

    2013-01-01

    The influence of 20 and 1% glucose and fructose, which were components of larval diet, on the level of oxidized proteins and lipids, low molecular mass antioxidant content as well as activities of antioxidant and associated enzymes in adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were investigated. The restriction of carbohydrates in larval diet leads to oxidative stress in adult insects. It is supported by 40-50% increased content of protein carbonyl groups and by 60-70% decreased level of protein thiol groups as well as by a 4-fold increase of lipid peroxide content in 2-day-old flies of both sexes, developed on the diet with 1% carbohydrates. Oxidative stress, induced by carbohydrate restriction of the larval diet, caused the activation of antioxidant defence, differently exhibited in male and female fruit flies. Caloric restriction increased activity of superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase associating only in males with 2-fold higher activity of NADPH-producing enzymes--glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase. Carbohydrate restriction in the larval diet caused the increase of uric acid content, but the decrease in catalase activity in males. In females the values of these parameters were changed in opposite direction compared with males. The obtained results let us conclude the different involvement of low molecular mass antioxidants, glutathione and uric acid, and antioxidant enzyme catalase in the protection of male and female fruit fly macromolecules against oxidative damages, caused by calorie restriction of larval diet.

  11. Segment-specific Ca(2+) transport by isolated Malpighian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster: A comparison of larval and adult stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Austin; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Haemolymph calcium homeostasis in insects is achieved through the regulation of calcium excretion by Malpighian tubules in two ways: (1) sequestration of calcium within biomineralized granules and (2) secretion of calcium in soluble form within the primary urine. Using the scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET), basolateral Ca(2+) transport was measured at the distal, transitional, main and proximal tubular segments of anterior tubules isolated from both 3rd instar larvae and adults of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Basolateral Ca(2+) transport exceeded transepithelial secretion by 800-fold and 11-fold in anterior tubules of larvae and adults, respectively. The magnitude of Ca(2+) fluxes across the distal tubule of larvae and adults were larger than fluxes across the downstream segments by 10 and 40 times, respectively, indicating a dominant role for the distal segment in whole animal Ca(2+) regulation. Basolateral Ca(2+) transport across distal tubules of Drosophila varied throughout the life cycle; Ca(2+) was released by distal tubules of larvae, taken up by distal tubules of young adults and was released once again by tubules of adults ⩾ 168 h post-eclosion. In adults and larvae, SIET measurements revealed sites of both Ca(2+) uptake and Ca(2+) release across the basolateral surface of the distal segment of the same tubule, indicating that Ca(2+) transport is bidirectional. Ca(2+) uptake across the distal segment of tubules of young adults and Ca(2+) release across the distal segment of tubules of older adults was also suggestive of reversible Ca(2+) storage. Our results suggest that the distal tubules of D. melanogaster are dynamic calcium stores which allow efficient haemolymph calcium regulation through active Ca(2+) sequestration during periods of high dietary calcium intake and passive Ca(2+) release during periods of calcium deficiency. PMID:26802560

  12. INTERACTION BETWEEN THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER - ADULT SURVIVAL AT HIGH-TEMPERATURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    1992-01-01

    The role of high temperature resistance in the world-wide cline of Adh and alpha-Gpdh allele frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated. Experimental strains were used with different combinations of Adh and alpha-Gpdh alleles but with similar genetic background. The survival time of adu

  13. Egg-laying rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Manjunatha; Shantala Hari Dass; Vijay Kumar Sharma

    2008-12-01

    Extensive research has been carried out to understand how circadian clocks regulate various physiological processes in organisms. The discovery of clock genes and the molecular clockwork has helped researchers to understand the possible role of these genes in regulating various metabolic processes. In Drosophila melanogaster, many studies have shown that the basic architecture of circadian clocks is multi-oscillatory. In nature, different neuronal subgroups in the brain of D. melanogaster have been demonstrated to control different circadian behavioural rhythms or different aspects of the same circadian rhythm. Among the circadian phenomena that have been studied so far in Drosophila, the egg-laying rhythm is unique, and relatively less explored. Unlike most other circadian rhythms, the egg-laying rhythm is rhythmic under constant light conditions, and the endogenous or free-running period of the rhythm is greater than those of most other rhythms. Although the clock genes and neurons required for the persistence of adult emergence and activity/rest rhythms have been studied extensively, those underlying the circadian egg-laying rhythm still remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the circadian egg-laying rhythm in D. melanogaster, and the possible molecular and physiological mechanisms that control the rhythmic output of the egg-laying process.

  14. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  15. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  16. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the mechanisms controlling radioresistant in Drosophila the sensibility of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster to sex-linked recessive lethal mutations induced by 5kR Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 0,006 M EMS or 0,25% of caffeine was determined. (M.A.C.)

  17. Neurogenetics of female reproductive behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laturney, Meghan; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Friedmann, T; Dunlap, JC; Goodwin, SF

    2014-01-01

    We follow an adult Drosophila melanogaster female through the major reproductive decisions she makes during her lifetime, including habitat selection, precopulatory mate choice, postcopulatory physiological changes, polyandry, and egg-laying site selection. In the process, we review the molecular an

  18. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  19. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound 125I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to 125I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to 125I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development

  20. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    . Whereas, 20% of Drosophila genes are annotated as encoding alternatively spliced premRNAs, splice-junction microarray experiments indicate that this number is at least 40% (ref. 7). Determining the diversity of mRNAs generated by alternative promoters, alternative splicing and RNA editing will substantially increase the inferred protein repertoire. Non-coding RNA genes (ncRNAs) including short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAS (miRNAs) (reviewed in ref. 10), and longer ncRNAs such as bxd (ref. 11) and rox (ref. 12), have important roles in gene regulation, whereas others such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs)and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are important components of macromolecular machines such as the ribosome and spliceosome. The transcription and processing of these ncRNAs must also be fully documented and mapped. As part of the modENCODE project to annotate the functional elements of the D. melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes, we used RNA-Seq and tiling microarrays to sample the Drosophila transcriptome at unprecedented depth throughout development from early embryo to ageing male and female adults. We report on a high-resolution view of the discovery, structure and dynamic expression of the D. melanogaster transcriptome.

  1. Ref(2)P, the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of mammalian p62, is required for the formation of protein aggregates in adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezis, Ioannis P; Simonsen, Anne; Sagona, Antonia P; Finley, Kim; Gaumer, Sébastien; Contamine, Didier; Rusten, Tor Erik; Stenmark, Harald; Brech, Andreas

    2008-03-24

    P62 has been proposed to mark ubiquitinated protein bodies for autophagic degradation. We report that the Drosophila melanogaster p62 orthologue, Ref(2)P, is a regulator of protein aggregation in the adult brain. We demonstrate that Ref(2)P localizes to age-induced protein aggregates as well as to aggregates caused by reduced autophagic or proteasomal activity. A similar localization to protein aggregates is also observed in D. melanogaster models of human neurodegenerative diseases. Although atg8a autophagy mutant flies show accumulation of ubiquitin- and Ref(2)P-positive protein aggregates, this is abrogated in atg8a/ref(2)P double mutants. Both the multimerization and ubiquitin binding domains of Ref(2)P are required for aggregate formation in vivo. Our findings reveal a major role for Ref(2)P in the formation of ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates both under physiological conditions and when normal protein turnover is inhibited.

  2. The Digestive Tract of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Bassler, Bl; Lichten, M; Schupbach, G.; Lemaitre, Bruno; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The digestive tract plays a central role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Far from being a passive tube, it provides the first line of defense against pathogens and maintains energy homeostasis by exchanging neuronal and endocrine signals with other organs. Historically neglected, the gut of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has recently come to the forefront of Drosophila research. Areas as diverse as stem cell biology, neurobiology, metabolism, and immunity are benefitting ...

  3. A major QTL affects temperature sensitive adult lethality and inbreeding depression in life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    of inbreeding effects in specific traits, such as age-specific mortality and life span, provide a good starting point, as a limited set of genes is expected to be involved. Results Here we report on a QTL mapping study on inbreeding related and temperature sensitive lethality in male Drosophila melanogaster....... The inbreeding effect was expressed at moderately high temperature, and manifested itself as severe premature mortality in males, but not in females. We used a North Carolina crossing design 3 to estimate average dominance ratio and heritability. We found the genetic basis of the lethal effect to be relatively...... This demonstrates that analysis of large conditional lethal effects is a viable strategy for delineating genes which are sensitive to inbreeding depression....

  4. Metabolic effects of CO2 anaesthesia in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Colinet, H.; Renault, D.

    2012-01-01

    Immobilization of insects is necessary for various experimental purposes, and CO2 exposure remains the most popular anaesthetic method in entomological research. A number of negative side effects of CO2 anaesthesia have been reported, but CO2 probably brings about metabolic modifications that are poorly known. In this work, we used GC/MS-based metabolic fingerprinting to assess the effect of CO2 anaesthesia in Drosophila melanogaster adults. We analysed metabolic variation of flies submitted ...

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasu Sheeba

    2008-12-01

    As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity. More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit presents a relatively simple and attractive model for the study of neuronal circuits and their functions.

  6. A Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kushner, Rebekah F.; Ryan, Emily L.; Sefton, Jennifer M. I.; Rebecca D Sanders; Lucioni, Patricia Jumbo; Kenneth H Moberg; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disorder that results from profound impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Despite decades of research, the underlying pathophysiology of classic galactosemia remains unclear, in part owing to the lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, we report the establishment of a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia; this is the first whole-animal genetic model to mimic aspects of the patient phenotype. Analogous t...

  7. Sterol requirements in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida de Carvalho, Maria Joao

    2009-01-01

    Sterol is an abundant component of eukaryotic cell membranes and is thought to influence membrane properties such as permeability, fluidity and microdomain formation. Drosophila is an excellent model system in which to study functional requirements for membrane sterol because, although it does not synthesize sterol, it nevertheless requires sterols to complete development. Moreover, Drosophila normally incorporates sterols into cell membranes. Thus, dietary sterol depletion can be used to ...

  8. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila. PMID:20360379

  9. Insecticidal sesquiterpene from Alpinia oxyphylla against Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishikawa, Y

    2000-08-01

    In the course of screening for novel naturally occurring insecticides from Chinese crude drugs, an MeOH extract of Alpinia oxyphylla was found to possess insecticidal activity against larvae of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. From the extract, an insecticidal compound was isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation and identified as nootkatone (1) by GC, GC-MS, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In bioassays for insecticidal activity, 1 showed an LC(50) value of 11.5 micromol/mL of diet against larvae of D. melanogaster and an LD(50) value of 96 microg/adult against adults. Epinootkatol (1A), however, showed slight insecticidal activity in both assays, indicating that the carbonyl group at the 2-position in 1 was the important function for enhanced activity of 1. PMID:10956162

  10. Visual attention in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Sareen, Preeti

    2012-01-01

    There is such vast amount of visual information in our surroundings at any time that filtering out the important information for further processing is a basic requirement for any visual system. This is accomplished by deploying attention to focus on one source of sensory inputs to the exclusion of others (Luck and Mangun 2009). Attention has been studied extensively in humans and non human primates (NHPs). In Drosophila, visual attention was first demonstrated in 1980 (Wolf and Heisenberg 198...

  11. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Chi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis.

  12. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, N.E.; Clausen, A.R.;

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 angstrom resolution s...... structure of DmdNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK(....

  13. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Wolfgang [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Mikkelsen, Nils Egil [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Clausen, Anders Ranegaard [Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden); Willer, Mette [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Eklund, Hans [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Gojkovic, Zoran [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Piskur, Jure, E-mail: Jure.Piskur@cob.lu.se [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  14. Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayak, Pooja; Coupar, Jamie; Hughes, S. Emile; Fozdar, Preeya; Kilby, Jack; Garren, Emma; Yoshii, Taishi; Hirsh, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM) shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles. PMID:23874218

  15. Exquisite light sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Vinayak

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles.

  16. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  17. Multigenerational Effects of Rearing Atmospheric Oxygen Level on the Tracheal Dimensions and Diffusing Capacities of Pupal and Adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, C Jaco; Kaiser, Alexander; Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-01-01

    Insects are small relative to vertebrates, and were larger in the Paleozoic when atmospheric oxygen levels were higher. The safety margin for oxygen delivery does not increase in larger insects, due to an increased mass-specific investment in the tracheal system and a greater use of convection in larger insects. Prior studies have shown that the dimensions and number of tracheal system branches varies inversely with rearing oxygen in embryonic and larval insects. Here we tested whether rearing in 10, 21, or 40 kPa atmospheric oxygen atmospheres for 5-7 generations affected the tracheal dimensions and diffusing capacities of pupal and adult Drosophila. Abdominal tracheae and pupal snorkel tracheae showed weak responses to oxygen, while leg tracheae showed strong, but imperfect compensatory changes. The diffusing capacity of leg tracheae appears closely matched to predicted oxygen transport needs by diffusion, perhaps explaining the consistent and significant responses of these tracheae to rearing oxygen. The reduced investment in tracheal structure in insects reared in higher oxygen levels may be important for conserving tissue PO2 and may provide an important mechanism for insects to invest only the space and materials necessary into respiratory structure.

  18. Physiological homology between Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cardiovascular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Choma, Michael A.; Suter, Melissa J.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The physiology of the Drosophila melanogaster cardiovascular system remains poorly characterized compared with its vertebrate counterparts. Basic measures of physiological performance remain unknown. It also is unclear whether subtle physiological defects observed in the human cardiovascular system can be reproduced in D. melanogaster. Here we characterize the cardiovascular physiology of D. melanogaster in its pre-pupal stage by using high-speed dye angiography and optical coherence ...

  19. Simulation of gene pyramiding in Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Gene pyramiding has been successfully practiced in plant breeding for developing new breeds or lines in which favorable genes from several different lines were integrated.But it has not been used in animal breeding,and some theoretical investigation and simulation analysis with respect to its strategies,feasibility and efficiency are needed before it can be implemented in animals.In this study,we used four different pure fines of Drosophila melanogaster,each of which is homozygous at a specific mutant gene with a visible effect on phenotype,to simulate the gene pyramiding process and analyze the duration and population size required in different pyramiding strategies.We finally got the ideal individuals,which are homozygous at the four target genes simultaneously.This study demonstrates that gene pyramiding is feasible in animal breeding and the interaction between genes may affect the final results.

  20. A Protein Interaction Map of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giot, L.; Bader, J. S.; Brouwer, C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Kuang, B.; Li, Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Ooi, C. E.; Godwin, B.; Vitols, E.; Vijayadamodar, G.; Pochart, P.; Machineni, H.; Welsh, M.; Kong, Y.; Zerhusen, B.; Malcolm, R.; Varrone, Z.; Collis, A.; Minto, M.; Burgess, S.; McDaniel, L.; Stimpson, E.; Spriggs, F.; Williams, J.; Neurath, K.; Ioime, N.; Agee, M.; Voss, E.; Furtak, K.; Renzulli, R.; Aanensen, N.; Carrolla, S.; Bickelhaupt, E.; Lazovatsky, Y.; DaSilva, A.; Zhong, J.; Stanyon, C. A.; Finley, R. L.; White, K. P.; Braverman, M.; Jarvie, T.; Gold, S.; Leach, M.; Knight, J.; Shimkets, R. A.; McKenna, M. P.; Chant, J.; Rothberg, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a proven model system for many aspects of human biology. Here we present a two-hybrid-based protein-interaction map of the fly proteome. A total of 10,623 predicted transcripts were isolated and screened against standard and normalized complementary DNA libraries to produce a draft map of 7048 proteins and 20,405 interactions. A computational method of rating two-hybrid interaction confidence was developed to refine this draft map to a higher confidence map of 4679 proteins and 4780 interactions. Statistical modeling of the network showed two levels of organization: a short-range organization, presumably corresponding to multiprotein complexes, and a more global organization, presumably corresponding to intercomplex connections. The network recapitulated known pathways, extended pathways, and uncovered previously unknown pathway components. This map serves as a starting point for a systems biology modeling of multicellular organisms, including humans.

  1. Adult Drosophila melanogaster evolved for antibacterial defense invest in infection-induced expression of both humoral and cellular immunity genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGraw Elizabeth A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the transcription of innate immunity genes in response to bacterial infection has been well-characterised in the Drosophila model, we recently demonstrated the capacity for such transcription to evolve in flies selected for improved antibacterial defense. Here we use this experimental system to examine how insects invest in constitutive versus infection-induced transcription of immunity genes. These two strategies carry with them different consequences with respect to energetic and pleiotropic costs and may be more or less effective in improving defense depending on whether the genes contribute to humoral or cellular aspects of immunity. Findings Contrary to expectation we show that selection preferentially increased the infection-induced expression of both cellular and humoral immunity genes. Given their functional roles, infection induced increases in expression were expected for the humoral genes, while increases in constitutive expression were expected for the cellular genes. We also report a restricted ability to improve transcription of immunity genes that is on the order of 2-3 fold regardless of total transcription level of the gene. Conclusions The evolved increases in infection-induced expression of the cellular genes may result from specific cross talk with humoral pathways or from generalised strategies for enhancing immunity gene transcription. A failure to see improvements in constitutive expression of the cellular genes suggests either that increases might come at too great a cost or that patterns of expression in adults are decoupled from the larval phase where increases would be most effective. The similarity in fold change increase across all immunity genes may suggest a shared mechanism for the evolution of increased transcription in small, discrete units such as duplication of cis-regulatory elements.

  2. Three-dimensional imaging of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeanne McGurk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major hindrance to imaging the intact adult Drosophila is that the dark exoskeleton makes it impossible to image through the cuticle. We have overcome this obstacle and describe a method whereby the internal organs of adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D by bleaching and clearing the adult and then imaging using a technique called optical projection tomography (OPT. The data is displayed as 2D optical sections and also in 3D to provide detail on the shape and structure of the adult anatomy. METHODOLOGY: We have used OPT to visualize in 2D and 3D the detailed internal anatomy of the intact adult Drosophila. In addition this clearing method used for OPT was tested for imaging with confocal microscopy. Using OPT we have visualized the size and shape of neurodegenerative vacuoles from within the head capsule of flies that suffer from age-related neurodegeneration due to a lack of ADAR mediated RNA-editing. In addition we have visualized tau-lacZ expression in 2D and 3D. This shows that the wholemount adult can be stained without any manipulation and that this stain penetrates well as we have mapped the localization pattern with respect to the internal anatomy. CONCLUSION: We show for the first time that the intact adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D using OPT, also we show that this method of clearing is also suitable for confocal microscopy to image the brain from within the intact head. The major advantage of this is that organs can be represented in 3D in their natural surroundings. Furthermore optical sections are generated in each of the three planes and are not prone to the technical limitations that are associated with manual sectioning. OPT can be used to dissect mutant phenotypes and to globally map gene expression in both 2D and 3D.

  3. Ionizing radiation causes the stress response in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentiality of the stress-reaction arising in Drosophila melanogaster under gamma-irradiation of the source with 137Cs (irradiation dose is 10 Gy , radiation dose rate amounts 180 c Gy/min) is studied. It is shown that radiation induces the stress-reaction in Drosophila resulting in alterations in energetic metabolism (biogenic amines metabolic system) and in reproductive function

  4. Tracking individual nanodiamonds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, David A; Kowarsky, Mark; Zeeshan, Nida F; Barson, Michael S J; Hall, Liam; Yan, Yan; Kaufmann, Stefan; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Caruso, Frank; Scholten, Robert; Saint, Robert B; Murray, Michael J; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2013-01-01

    Tracking the dynamics of fluorescent nanoparticles during embryonic development allows insights into the physical state of the embryo and, potentially, molecular processes governing developmental mechanisms. In this work, we investigate the motion of individual fluorescent nanodiamonds micro-injected into Drosophila melanogaster embryos prior to cellularisation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and wide-field imaging techniques are applied to individual fluorescent nanodiamonds in blastoderm cells during stage 5 of development to a depth of ~40 \\mu m. The majority of nanodiamonds in the blastoderm cells during cellularisation exhibit free diffusion with an average diffusion coefficient of (6 $\\pm$ 3) x 10$^{-3}$ \\mu m$^2$/s, (mean $\\pm$ SD). Driven motion in the blastoderm cells was also observed with an average velocity of 0.13 $\\pm$ 0.10 \\mu m/s (mean $\\pm$ SD) \\mu m/s and an average applied force of 0.07 $\\pm$ 0.05 pN (mean $\\pm$ SD). Nanodiamonds in the periplasm between the nuclei and yolk were also...

  5. Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Rosas-Arellano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. We concentrated on the intestine, where the ferritin induction process can be controlled experimentally by dietary iron manipulation. We showed that the expression pattern of Fer2LCH-Gal4 lines recapitulated iron-dependent endogenous expression of the ferritin subunits and used these lines to drive expression from UAS-mCherry-Fer2LCH transgenes. We found that the Gal4-mediated induction of mCherry-Fer2LCH subunits was too slow to effectively introduce them into newly formed ferritin complexes. Endogenous Fer2LCH and Fer1HCH assembled and stored excess dietary iron, instead. In contrast, when flies were genetically manipulated to co-express Fer2LCH and mCherry-Fer2LCH simultaneously, both subunits were incorporated with Fer1HCH in iron-loaded ferritin complexes. Our study provides fresh evidence that, in insects, ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo are tightly regulated.

  6. The effect of developmental nutrition on life span and fecundity depends on the adult reproductive environment in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, C.M.; Doroszuk, A.; Zwaan, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Both developmental nutrition and adult nutrition affect life-history traits; however, little is known about whether the effect of developmental nutrition depends on the adult environment experienced. We used the fruit fly to determine whether life-history traits, particularly life span and fecundity

  7. Genome-wide analysis of promoter architecture in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Landolin, Jane M.; Brown, James B.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Takahashi, Hazuki; Lassmann, Timo; Yu, Charles; Booth, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Dayu; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Boley, Nathan; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Bickel, Peter J.; Carninci, Piero; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-10-20

    Core promoters are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. However, the boundaries of promoter regions, the relative rates of initiation at the transcription start sites (TSSs) distributed within them, and the functional significance of promoter architecture remain poorly understood. We produced a high-resolution map of promoters active in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo by integrating data from three independent and complementary methods: 21 million cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) tags, 1.2 million RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLMRACE) reads, and 50,000 cap-trapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We defined 12,454 promoters of 8037 genes. Our analysis indicates that, due to non-promoter-associated RNA background signal, previous studies have likely overestimated the number of promoter-associated CAGE clusters by fivefold. We show that TSS distributions form a complex continuum of shapes, and that promoters active in the embryo and adult have highly similar shapes in 95% of cases. This suggests that these distributions are generally determined by static elements such as local DNA sequence and are not modulated by dynamic signals such as histone modifications. Transcription factor binding motifs are differentially enriched as a function of promoter shape, and peaked promoter shape is correlated with both temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression. Our results contribute to the emerging view that core promoters are functionally diverse and control patterning of gene expression in Drosophila and mammals.

  8. Rearing the Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster Under Axenic and Gnotobiotic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyle, Melinda L; Veloz, Madeline; Judd, Alec M; Wong, Adam C-N; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E; Chaston, John M

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbes on myriad animal traits and behaviors has been increasingly recognized in recent years. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model for understanding microbial interactions with animal hosts, facilitated by approaches to rear large sample sizes of Drosophila under microorganism-free (axenic) conditions, or with defined microbial communities (gnotobiotic). This work outlines a method for collection of Drosophila embryos, hypochlorite dechorionation and sterilization, and transfer to sterile diet. Sterilized embryos are transferred to sterile diet in 50 ml centrifuge tubes, and developing larvae and adults remain free of any exogenous microbes until the vials are opened. Alternatively, flies with a defined microbiota can be reared by inoculating sterile diet and embryos with microbial species of interest. We describe the introduction of 4 bacterial species to establish a representative gnotobiotic microbiota in Drosophila. Finally, we describe approaches for confirming bacterial community composition, including testing if axenic Drosophila remain bacteria-free into adulthood. PMID:27500374

  9. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah gene: a novel gene with ancient functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Araújo

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth, has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila, a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general.

  10. Heat shock protection against cold stress of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, V; Mitchell, H K; Young, P.; Petersen, N S

    1988-01-01

    Heat shock protein synthesis can be induced during recovery from cold treatment of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Survival of larvae after a cold treatment is dramatically improved by a mild heat shock just before the cold shock. The conditions which induce tolerance to cold are similar to those which confer tolerance to heat.

  11. The olfactory circuit of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The olfactory circuit of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged in recent years as an excellent paradigm for studying the principles and mechanisms of information processing in neuronal circuits. We discuss here the organizational principles of the olfactory circuit that make it an attractive model for experimental manipulations, the lessons that have been learned, and future challenges.

  12. The metabolic profile of long-lived Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Pedersen, Simon Metz; Nielsen, Niels Christian;

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the age-related changes in the metabolic profile of male Drosophila melanogaster and compared the metabolic profile of flies selected for increased longevity to that of control flies of equal age. We found clear differences in metabolite composition between selection regimes and a...

  13. Drosophila melanogaster larvae make nutritional choices that minimize developmental time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marisa A; Martins, Nelson E; Balancé, Lara F; Broom, Lara N; Dias, António J S; Fernandes, Ana Sofia D; Rodrigues, Fábio; Sucena, Élio; Mirth, Christen K

    2015-10-01

    Organisms from slime moulds to humans carefully regulate their macronutrient intake to optimize a wide range of life history characters including survival, stress resistance, and reproductive success. However, life history characters often differ in their response to nutrition, forcing organisms to make foraging decisions while balancing the trade-offs between these effects. To date, we have a limited understanding of how the nutritional environment shapes the relationship between life history characters and foraging decisions. To gain insight into the problem, we used a geometric framework for nutrition to assess how the protein and carbohydrate content of the larval diet affected key life history traits in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In no-choice assays, survival from egg to pupae, female and male body size, and ovariole number - a proxy for female fecundity - were maximized at the highest protein to carbohydrate (P:C) ratio (1.5:1). In contrast, development time was minimized at intermediate P:C ratios, around 1:2. Next, we subjected larvae to two-choice tests to determine how they regulated their protein and carbohydrate intake in relation to these life history traits. Our results show that larvae targeted their consumption to P:C ratios that minimized development time. Finally, we examined whether adult females also chose to lay their eggs in the P:C ratios that minimized developmental time. Using a three-choice assay, we found that adult females preferentially laid their eggs in food P:C ratios that were suboptimal for all larval life history traits. Our results demonstrate that D. melanogaster larvae make foraging decisions that trade-off developmental time with body size, ovariole number, and survival. In addition, adult females make oviposition decisions that do not appear to benefit the larvae. We propose that these decisions may reflect the living nature of the larval nutritional environment in rotting fruit. These studies illustrate the

  14. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastien eLebreton; Peter eWitzgall; Marie eOlsson; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies ...

  15. Effects of arsenic upon the no-disyuntion and X chromosome loss mechanisms in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present investigation we make the analysis of the effect of the sodium arsenite chemistry in concentration 0.2 m M over the events of no-disyuntion and chromosome loss X in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster. The Drosophila lineages used for this assay were: females (y2 wa / y2 wa ; e/e) and males (XC2 yf bb- / Bs Y y+). Those lineages were propagated and isolated for to be used after in the assays. Subsequently these, we make some links types with these individuals with the object to observed the effects of the oral administration of sodium arsenite in the adult individuals, in each one, we induce a damage in the sperm of the male with gamma radiation (25 Gy) and was observed immediately the results of the different assay applied in the first generation (F1). Finally, we analyze and compare the results in contrast with and other investigation we find that the chemistry cause a significant increment in the chromosome loss X either the No-disyuntion was not significative. Also, the arsenite sodium increment the male descendant productivity, so, we deduced that the sodium arsenite do not cause an inhibition of the reparation mechanisms present in the Drosophila melanogaster female ovocites, but the chemistry operated like a modulator of this mechanisms, and prevent an increment of the damage provoked for the gamma radiation over the Drosophila melanogaster male sperm. (Author)

  16. Metabolic Activity of Radish Sprouts Derived Isothiocyanates in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves Baenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study the absorption, metabolism and potential health benefits of plant bioactives derived from radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus cv. Rambo, a Brassicaceae species rich in glucosinolates and other phytochemicals. Flies were subjected to a diet supplemented with lyophilized radish sprouts (10.6 g/L for 10 days, containing high amounts of glucoraphenin and glucoraphasatin, which can be hydrolyzed by myrosinase to the isothiocyanates sulforaphene and raphasatin, respectively. We demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster takes up and metabolizes isothiocyanates from radish sprouts through the detection of the metabolite sulforaphane-cysteine in fly homogenates. Moreover, we report a decrease in the glucose content of flies, an upregulation of spargel expression, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PPARγ-coactivator 1 α, as well as the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. Overall, we show that the consumption of radish sprouts affects energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster which is reflected by lower glucose levels and an increased expression of spargel, a central player in mitochondrial biogenesis. These processes are often affected in chronic diseases associated with aging, including type II diabetes mellitus.

  17. Metabolic Activity of Radish Sprouts Derived Isothiocyanates in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenas, Nieves; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Schloesser, Anke; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Wagner, Anika E

    2016-02-18

    We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study the absorption, metabolism and potential health benefits of plant bioactives derived from radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus cv. Rambo), a Brassicaceae species rich in glucosinolates and other phytochemicals. Flies were subjected to a diet supplemented with lyophilized radish sprouts (10.6 g/L) for 10 days, containing high amounts of glucoraphenin and glucoraphasatin, which can be hydrolyzed by myrosinase to the isothiocyanates sulforaphene and raphasatin, respectively. We demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster takes up and metabolizes isothiocyanates from radish sprouts through the detection of the metabolite sulforaphane-cysteine in fly homogenates. Moreover, we report a decrease in the glucose content of flies, an upregulation of spargel expression, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PPARγ-coactivator 1 α, as well as the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. Overall, we show that the consumption of radish sprouts affects energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster which is reflected by lower glucose levels and an increased expression of spargel, a central player in mitochondrial biogenesis. These processes are often affected in chronic diseases associated with aging, including type II diabetes mellitus.

  18. Aggregation tendency in small groups of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Solar Osses Eduardo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was made of the spatial pattern of the progeny produced in boxes with 25 oviposition tubes, by groups of six Drosophila melanogaster females during 24, 72 and 216 h. Each female was fertilized by a male carrier of a dominant mutation in such a manner that the behavior of each female of the group as well as that of each group could be determined by a study of their progeny. The pattern of spatial distribution of the progeny was aggregated, reaching its highest value at 72 h. Gregarious behavior of individuals was defined by the number of sites among which they disseminated their progeny in a 24 h-cycle; while for groups it was estimated by the variance/mean ratio. The fertility, egg-adult development time and mortality rate were recorded. Comparisons between the tubes showed statistically significant differences in the number of individuals and of phenotypical composition. These gregarious distributions could contribute to local genetic differentiation.

  19. Flexible origin of hydrocarbon/pheromone precursors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker-Thomas, Claude; Garrido, Damien; Bontonou, Gwénaëlle; Napal, Laura; Mazuras, Nicolas; Denis, Béatrice; Rubin, Thomas; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Montagne, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    In terrestrial insects, cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) provide protection from desiccation. Specific CHCs can also act as pheromones, which are important for successful mating. Oenocytes are abdominal cells thought to act as specialized units for CHC biogenesis that consists of long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) synthesis, optional desaturation(s), elongation to very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), and removal of the carboxyl group. By investigating CHC biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, we showed that VLCFA synthesis takes place only within the oenocytes. Conversely, several pathways, which may compensate for one another, can feed the oenocyte pool of LCFAs, suggesting that this step is a critical node for regulating CHC synthesis. Importantly, flies deficient in LCFA synthesis sacrificed their triacylglycerol stores while maintaining some CHC production. Moreover, pheromone production was lower in adult flies that emerged from larvae that were fed excess dietary lipids, and their mating success was lower. Further, we showed that pheromone production in the oenocytes depends on lipid metabolism in the fat tissue and that fatty acid transport protein, a bipartite acyl-CoA synthase (ACS)/FA transporter, likely acts through its ACS domain in the oenocyte pathway of CHC biogenesis. Our study highlights the importance of environmental and physiological inputs in regulating LCFA synthesis to eventually control sexual communication in a polyphagous animal.

  20. A histochemical study of the muscles of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, I I

    1977-08-01

    The thoracic muscles of Drosophila melanogaster can be classified into two classes, the fibrillar and the tubular muscles, on morphological grounds. Histochemical techniques were used to characterize these two classes of muscle according to their content of various enzymes (alpha-glycerophosphate, NAD-dependent isocitrate, malate and succinate dehydrogenases, fumarase, acid phosphatase, adenosine triphosphatase and acetylcholinesterase) and of glycogen. These investigations showed that the two muslces types are histochemically very different and, further, that the morphologically similar tubular muscles are heterogeneous with respect to their enzyme content. In particular, the tergal depressor of the trochanter of the second leg, the largest of the tubular muslces, has considerably less of all the enzymes studied, with the exception of acetylcholinesterase, than all the other tubular muscles examined. The histochemical techniqes were also used to follow the changes in enzyme levels that occur during development of the indirect flight muscle fibres. All the enzymes that are present in adult flight muslces showed an increase in staining intensity throughout muscle development. Some minor differences were observed in the time of appearance and rate of increase of intensity of the different enzymes. PMID:142843

  1. Modeling dietary influences on offspring metabolic programming in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookheart, Rita T; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    The influence of nutrition on offspring metabolism has become a hot topic in recent years owing to the growing prevalence of maternal and childhood obesity. Studies in mammals have identified several factors correlating with parental and early offspring dietary influences on progeny health; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these factors remain undiscovered. Mammalian metabolic tissues and pathways are heavily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster, making the fly an invaluable genetic model organism for studying metabolism. In this review, we discuss the metabolic similarities between mammals and Drosophila and present evidence supporting its use as an emerging model of metabolic programming. PMID:27450801

  2. Isolation of protease-free alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Drosophila simulans and several homozygous and heterozygous Drosophila melanogaster variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilda, T; Lamme, DA; Collu, G; Jekel, PA; Reinders, P; Beintema, JJ

    1998-01-01

    The enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from several naturally occurring ADH variants of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans Lc,as isolated. Affinity chromatography with the ligand Cibacron Blue and elution with NAD(+) showed similar behavior for D. melanogaster ADH-FF, ADH-71k, and D. si

  3. Organically Grown Food Provides Health Benefits to Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Chhabra, Ria; Kolli, Santharam; Bauer, Johannes H.

    2013-01-01

    The “organic food” market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas...

  4. Genetic approaches to study aging in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Poirier, Luc; Seroude, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    The process of aging can be described as a progressive decline in an organism's function that invariably results in death. This decline results from the activities of intrinsic genetic factors within an organism. The relative contributions of the biological and environmental components to senescence are hard to measure, however different strategies have been devised in Drosophila melanogaster to isolate and identify genetic influences on aging. These strategies include selective breeding, qua...

  5. Organically Grown Food Provides Health Benefits to Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Ria Chhabra; Santharam Kolli; Bauer, Johannes H.

    2013-01-01

    The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas...

  6. Genetic Differentiation between Geographically Distant Populations of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    OpenAIRE

    Rama S Singh; Hickey, Donal A; David, Jean

    1982-01-01

    We have studied allozyme variation at 26 gene loci in nine populations of Drosophila melanogaster originating on five different continents. The distant populations show significant genetic differentiation. However, only half of the loci studied have contributed to this differentiation; the other half show identical patterns in all populations. The genetic differentiation in North American, European and African populations is correlated with the major climatic differences between north and sou...

  7. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Werner Paulus; Astrid Jeibmann

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases...

  8. Drosophila melanogaster as a model for basal body research

    OpenAIRE

    Jana, Swadhin Chandra; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica; Durand, Bénédicte; Timothy L. Megraw

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is one of the most extensively studied organisms in biological research and has centrioles/basal bodies and cilia that can be modelled to investigate their functions in animals generally. Centrioles are nine-fold symmetrical microtubule-based cylindrical structures required to form centrosomes and also to nucleate the formation of cilia and flagella. When they function to template cilia, centrioles transition into basal bodies. The fruit fly has various...

  9. spenito is required for sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Dong; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Sex determination is a fundamental biological problem faced by all metazoans. To understand the sex determination pathway, it is important to identify all the genes involved in this process. In this study, we have identified a novel gene, spenito (nito), which is required for sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster. Loss of nito function in the soma transforms female tissues to male, and loss of nito function in female germ-line stem cells changes their sexual identity and prevents them ...

  10. Physiological homology between Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cardiovascular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Choma

    2011-05-01

    The physiology of the Drosophila melanogaster cardiovascular system remains poorly characterized compared with its vertebrate counterparts. Basic measures of physiological performance remain unknown. It also is unclear whether subtle physiological defects observed in the human cardiovascular system can be reproduced in D. melanogaster. Here we characterize the cardiovascular physiology of D. melanogaster in its pre-pupal stage by using high-speed dye angiography and optical coherence tomography. The heart has vigorous pulsatile contractions that drive intracardiac, aortic and extracellular-extravascular hemolymph flow. Several physiological measures, including weight-adjusted cardiac output, body-length-adjusted aortic velocities and intracardiac shear forces, are similar to those in the closed vertebrate cardiovascular systems, including that of humans. Extracellular-extravascular flow in the pre-pupal D. melanogaster circulation drives convection-limited fluid transport. To demonstrate homology in heart dysfunction, we showed that, at the pre-pupal stage, a troponin I mutant, held-up2 (hdp2, has impaired systolic and diastolic heart wall velocities. Impaired heart wall velocities occur in the context of a non-dilated phenotype with a mildly depressed fractional shortening. We additionally derive receiver operating characteristic curves showing that heart wall velocity is a potentially powerful discriminator of systolic heart dysfunction. Our results demonstrate physiological homology and support the use of D. melanogaster as an animal model of complex cardiovascular disease.

  11. Radiation effects on the drosophila melanogaster genoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When DNA of living beings has been damaged, the cells show different responses depending on their physiological state. Repair mechanisms can be classified into two groups: constitutive which are always present in the cells and inductible, which must be stimulated to show themselves. It is suggested that a repair mechanism exists in the drosophila ovules which act upon the damage present in mature spermatozoids. Our aim is to verify whether or not a radiation dosis applied to the female drosophila will modify the frequency of individuals which have lost the paternal sex chromosomes. YW/YW virgin females and XEZ males and fbb-/bS Y y+ y were mated for two days in order to collect radiation treated spermatozoids. The results were consistent as to the parameters being evaluated and lead one to suppose that the radiation applied to the female drosophila produced some changes in the ovule metabolism which reduced the frequency of individuals with lost chromosomes. It is believed that ionizing radiation interferes with the repair mechanisms that are existent and constitutive, retarding and hindering the restoration of chromosome fragments and this brings about death of the zygote or death of the eggs which lessens the frequencies of individuals carriers of chromosomic aberrations. Ionizing radiations applied to the female drosophila modifies the frequency of loss of patternal chromosomes and comes about when the radiation dose to the female is 700 rad. (Author)

  12. Organization of descending neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cynthia T; Bhandawat, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing in the brain controls behavior through descending neurons (DNs) - neurons which carry signals from the brain to the spinal cord (or thoracic ganglia in insects). Because DNs arise from multiple circuits in the brain, the numerical simplicity and availability of genetic tools make Drosophila a tractable model for understanding descending motor control. As a first step towards a comprehensive study of descending motor control, here we estimate the number and distribution of DNs in the Drosophila brain. We labeled DNs by backfilling them with dextran dye applied to the neck connective and estimated that there are ~1100 DNs distributed in 6 clusters in Drosophila. To assess the distribution of DNs by neurotransmitters, we labeled DNs in flies in which neurons expressing the major neurotransmitters were also labeled. We found DNs belonging to every neurotransmitter class we tested: acetylcholine, GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine and octopamine. Both the major excitatory neurotransmitter (acetylcholine) and the major inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA) are employed equally; this stands in contrast to vertebrate DNs which are predominantly excitatory. By comparing the distribution of DNs in Drosophila to those reported previously in other insects, we conclude that the organization of DNs in insects is highly conserved. PMID:26837716

  13. Dynamics of Wolbachia pipientis Gene Expression Across the Drosophila melanogaster Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Florence; Carmo, Catarina R; Miller, Danny E; Rice, Danny W; Newton, Irene L G; Hawley, R Scott; Teixeira, Luis; Bergman, Casey M

    2015-10-23

    Symbiotic interactions between microbes and their multicellular hosts have manifold biological consequences. To better understand how bacteria maintain symbiotic associations with animal hosts, we analyzed genome-wide gene expression for the endosymbiotic α-proteobacteria Wolbachia pipientis across the entire life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster. We found that the majority of Wolbachia genes are expressed stably across the D. melanogaster life cycle, but that 7.8% of Wolbachia genes exhibit robust stage- or sex-specific expression differences when studied in the whole-organism context. Differentially-expressed Wolbachia genes are typically up-regulated after Drosophila embryogenesis and include many bacterial membrane, secretion system, and ankyrin repeat-containing proteins. Sex-biased genes are often organized as small operons of uncharacterized genes and are mainly up-regulated in adult Drosophila males in an age-dependent manner. We also systematically investigated expression levels of previously-reported candidate genes thought to be involved in host-microbe interaction, including those in the WO-A and WO-B prophages and in the Octomom region, which has been implicated in regulating bacterial titer and pathogenicity. Our work provides comprehensive insight into the developmental dynamics of gene expression for a widespread endosymbiont in its natural host context, and shows that public gene expression data harbor rich resources to probe the functional basis of the Wolbachia-Drosophila symbiosis and annotate the transcriptional outputs of the Wolbachia genome.

  14. Inositols affect the mating circadian rhythm of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki eSakata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that the molecular circadian clock underlies the mating behavior of D. melanogaster. However, information about which food components affect circadian mating behavior is scant. The ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum has recently become a popular functional food. Here, we showed that the close-proximity (CP rhythm of Drosophila melanogaster courtship behavior was damped under low-nutrient conditions, but significantly enhanced by feeding the flies with powdered ice plant. Among various components of ice plants, we found that myo-inositol increased the amplitude and slightly shortened the period of the CP rhythm. Real-time reporter assays showed that myo-inositol and D-pinitol shortened the period of the circadian reporter gene Per2-luc in NIH 3T3 cells. These data suggest that the ice plant is a useful functional food and that the ability of inositols to shorten rhythms is a general phenomenon in insects as well as mammals.

  15. Comparative population genomics of latitudinal variation in Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Heather E; Bergland, Alan O; O'Brien, Katherine R; Behrman, Emily L; Schmidt, Paul S; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    Examples of clinal variation in phenotypes and genotypes across latitudinal transects have served as important models for understanding how spatially varying selection and demographic forces shape variation within species. Here, we examine the selective and demographic contributions to latitudinal variation through the largest comparative genomic study to date of Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster, with genomic sequence data from 382 individual fruit flies, collected across a spatial transect of 19 degrees latitude and at multiple time points over 2 years. Consistent with phenotypic studies, we find less clinal variation in D. simulans than D. melanogaster, particularly for the autosomes. Moreover, we find that clinally varying loci in D. simulans are less stable over multiple years than comparable clines in D. melanogaster. D. simulans shows a significantly weaker pattern of isolation by distance than D. melanogaster and we find evidence for a stronger contribution of migration to D. simulans population genetic structure. While population bottlenecks and migration can plausibly explain the differences in stability of clinal variation between the two species, we also observe a significant enrichment of shared clinal genes, suggesting that the selective forces associated with climate are acting on the same genes and phenotypes in D. simulans and D. melanogaster. PMID:26523848

  16. Performance of the Cas9 Nickase System in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Xingjie; Yang, Zhihao; Mao, Decai; Chang, Zai; Qiao, Huan-Huan; Wang, Xia; Sun, Jin; Hu, Qun; Cui, Yan; Liu, Lu-Ping; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Xu, Jiang; Ni, Jian-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of the Cas9/sgRNA system in Drosophila melanogaster genome editing have opened new opportunities to generate site-specific mutant collections in a high-throughput manner. However, off-target effects of the system are still a major concern when analyzing mutant phenotypes. Mutations converting Cas9 to a DNA nickase have great potential for reducing off-target effects in vitro. Here, we demonstrated that injection of two plasmids encoding neighboring offset sgRNAs into transgenic...

  17. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Paulus

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, metabolic diseases such as Leigh disease, Niemann-Pick disease and ceroid lipofuscinoses, tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy as well as CNS injury. It is to be expected that genetic tools in Drosophila will reveal new pathways and interactions, which hopefully will result in molecular based therapy approaches.

  18. Immune stimulation reduces sleep and memory ability in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn B. Mallon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroimmunology studies the increasing number of connections between neurobiology, immunology and behaviour. We demonstrate the effects of the immune response on two fundamental behaviours: sleep and memory ability in Drosophila melanogaster. We used the Geneswitch system to upregulate peptidoglycan receptor protein (PGRP expression, thereby stimulating the immune system in the absence of infection. Geneswitch was activated by feeding the steroid RU486, to the flies. We used an aversive classical conditioning paradigm to quantify memory and measures of activity to infer sleep. Immune stimulated flies exhibited reduced levels of sleep, which could not be explained by a generalised increase in waking activity. Immune stimulated flies also showed a reduction in memory abilities. These results lend support to Drosophila as a model for immune–neural interactions and provide a possible role for sleep in the interplay between the immune response and memory.

  19. Dietary protein content affects evolution for body size, body fat and viability in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten N; Overgaard, Johannes; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2011-01-01

    The ability to use different food sources is likely to be under strong selection if organisms are faced with natural variation in macro-nutrient (protein, carbohydrate and lipid) availabilities. Here, we use experimental evolution to study how variable dietary protein content affects adult body...... composition and developmental success in Drosophila melanogaster. We reared flies on either a standard diet or a protein-enriched diet for 17 generations before testing them on both diet types. Flies from lines selected on protein-rich diet produced phenotypes with higher total body mass and relative lipid...

  20. Assessing population and environmental effects on thermal resistance in Drosophila melanogaster using ecologically relevant assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Hoffmann, Ary A; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2011-01-01

    To make laboratory studies of thermal resistance in ectotherms more ecologically relevant, temperature changes that reflect conditions experienced by individuals in nature should be used. Here we describe an assay that is useful for quantifying multiple measures of thermal resistance of individual...... thermal environments have wider thermal limits compared to those from the less variable tropics, at least when flies were reared under constant temperature conditions and (4) demonstrate that different measures of cold resistance are often not strongly correlated. Based on our findings, we suggest...... adult flies. We use this approach to assess upper and lower thermal limits and functional thermal scope for Drosophila melanogaster and also show that the method can be used to (1) detect a previously described latitudinal cline for cold tolerance in D. melanogaster populations collected along the east...

  1. Compensatory evolution of a precursor messenger RNA secondary structure in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for the evolutionary maintenance of a hairpin structure possibly involved in intron processing had been found in intron 1 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) in diverse Drosophila species. In this study, the putative hairpin structure was evaluated systematically in Drosophila melanogaster by elimination of either side of the stem using site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these mutations and the compensatory double mutant on intron splicing efficiency and ADH protein production were assayed in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider L2 cells and germ-line transformed adult flies. Mutations that disrupt the putative hairpin structure right upstream of the intron branch point were found to cause a significant reduction in both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. In contrast, the compensatory double mutant that restores the putative hairpin structure was indistinguishable from the WT in both splicing efficiency and ADH level. It was also observed by mutational analysis that a more stable secondary structure (with a longer stem) in this intron decreases both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. Implications for RNA secondary structure and intron evolution are discussed. PMID:12972637

  2. Large-scale discovery of promoter motifs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Down

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A key step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the repertoire of transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs that form the building blocks of promoters and other regulatory elements. Identifying these experimentally is very laborious, and the number of TFBMs discovered remains relatively small, especially when compared with the hundreds of transcription factor genes predicted in metazoan genomes. We have used a recently developed statistical motif discovery approach, NestedMICA, to detect candidate TFBMs from a large set of Drosophila melanogaster promoter regions. Of the 120 motifs inferred in our initial analysis, 25 were statistically significant matches to previously reported motifs, while 87 appeared to be novel. Analysis of sequence conservation and motif positioning suggested that the great majority of these discovered motifs are predictive of functional elements in the genome. Many motifs showed associations with specific patterns of gene expression in the D. melanogaster embryo, and we were able to obtain confident annotation of expression patterns for 25 of our motifs, including eight of the novel motifs. The motifs are available through Tiffin, a new database of DNA sequence motifs. We have discovered many new motifs that are overrepresented in D. melanogaster promoter regions, and offer several independent lines of evidence that these are novel TFBMs. Our motif dictionary provides a solid foundation for further investigation of regulatory elements in Drosophila, and demonstrates techniques that should be applicable in other species. We suggest that further improvements in computational motif discovery should narrow the gap between the set of known motifs and the total number of transcription factors in metazoan genomes.

  3. Fine-Tuning of PI3K/AKT Signalling by the Tumour Suppressor PTEN Is Required for Maintenance of Flight Muscle Function and Mitochondrial Integrity in Ageing Adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence B Mensah

    Full Text Available Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS, acting primarily through the PI3-kinase (PI3K/AKT kinase signalling cassette, plays key evolutionarily conserved regulatory roles in nutrient homeostasis, growth, ageing and longevity. The dysfunction of this pathway has been linked to several age-related human diseases including cancer, Type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains unclear whether minor defects in IIS can independently induce the age-dependent functional decline in cells that accompany some of these diseases or whether IIS alters the sensitivity to other aberrant signalling. We identified a novel hypomorphic allele of PI3K's direct antagonist, Phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (Pten, in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Adults carrying combinations of this allele, Pten5, combined with strong loss-of-function Pten mutations exhibit subtle or no increase in mass, but are highly susceptible to a wide range of stresses. They also exhibit dramatic upregulation of the oxidative stress response gene, GstD1, and a progressive loss of motor function that ultimately leads to defects in climbing and flight ability. The latter phenotype is associated with mitochondrial disruption in indirect flight muscles, although overall muscle structure appears to be maintained. We show that the phenotype is partially rescued by muscle-specific expression of the Bcl-2 homologue Buffy, which in flies, maintains mitochondrial integrity, modulates energy homeostasis and suppresses cell death. The flightless phenotype is also suppressed by mutations in downstream IIS signalling components, including those in the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 pathway, suggesting that elevated IIS is responsible for functional decline in flight muscle. Our data demonstrate that IIS levels must be precisely regulated by Pten in adults to maintain the function of the highly metabolically active indirect flight

  4. Lethality and developmental delay in Drosophila melanogaster larvae after ingestion of selected Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika H Olcott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a well-established model organism for probing the molecular and cellular basis of physiological and immune system responses of adults or late stage larvae to bacterial challenge. However, very little is known about the consequences of bacterial infections that occur in earlier stages of development. We have infected mid-second instar larvae with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens to determine how infection alters the ability of larvae to survive and complete development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We mimicked natural routes of infection using a non-invasive feeding procedure to study the toxicity of the three sequenced P. fluorescens strains (Pf0-1, SBW25, and Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae fed with the three strains of P. fluorescens showed distinct differences in developmental trajectory and survival. Treatment with SBW25 caused a subset of insects to die concomitant with a systemic melanization reaction at larval, pupal or adult stages. Larvae fed with Pf-5 died in a dose-dependent manner with adult survivors showing eye and wing morphological defects. In addition, larvae in the Pf-5 treatment groups showed a dose-dependent delay in the onset of metamorphosis relative to control-, Pf0-1-, and SBW25-treated larvae. A functional gacA gene is required for the toxic properties of wild-type Pf-5 bacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments are the first to demonstrate that ingestion of P. fluorescens bacteria by D. melanogaster larvae causes both lethal and non-lethal phenotypes, including delay in the onset of metamorphosis and morphological defects in surviving adult flies, which can be decoupled.

  5. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Kis

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets (LDs are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain's LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp, as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain.

  6. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  7. The Sleeping Beauty: How Reproductive Diapause Affects Hormone Signaling, Metabolism, Immune Response and Somatic Maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Kubrak, Olga I.; Lucie Kučerová; Ulrich Theopold; Nässel, Dick R.

    2014-01-01

    Some organisms can adapt to seasonal and other environmental challenges by entering a state of dormancy, diapause. Thus, insects exposed to decreased temperature and short photoperiod enter a state of arrested development, lowered metabolism, and increased stress resistance. Drosophila melanogaster females can enter a shallow reproductive diapause in the adult stage, which drastically reduces organismal senescence, but little is known about the physiology and endocrinology associated with thi...

  8. Social experience modifies pheromone expression and mating behavior in male Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krupp, Joshua J; Kent, Clement; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Azanchi, Reza; So, Anthony K-C; Schonfeld, Julia A; Smith, Benjamin P; Lucas, Christophe; Levine, Joel D

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The social life of animals depends on communication between individuals. Recent studies in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrate that various behaviors are influenced by social interactions. For example, courtship is a social interaction mediated by pheromonal signaling that occurs more fr

  9. Genetic effects induced by neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster I. Determination of absorbed dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfin, A; Paredes, L C; Zambrano, F; Guzmán-Rincón, J; Ureña-Nuñez, F

    2001-12-01

    A method to obtain the absorbed dose in Drosophila melanogaster irradiated in the thermal column facility of the Triga Mark III Reactor has been developed. The method is based on the measurements of neutron activation of gold foils produced by neutron capture to obtain the neutron fluxes. These fluxes, combined with the calculations of kinetic energy released per unit mass, enables one to obtain the absorbed doses in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:11761104

  10. Sexual activity increases resistance against Pseudomonas entomophila in male Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Vanika; Ali, Zeeshan S; Prasad, Nagaraj G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Maintenance and deployment cost of immunity is high, therefore, it is expected to trade-off with other high cost traits like sexual activity. Previous studies with Drosophila melanogaster show that male’s ability to clear bacteria decreases with increase in sexual activity. We subjected this idea to test using two pathogens (Pseudomonas entomophila and Staphylococcus succinus) and three different populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Results We found that sexual activity enhanced...

  11. Genetic Analysis of the Hairy Locus in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    OpenAIRE

    Ingham, P W; Pinchin, S M; Howard, K.R.; Ish-Horowicz, D.

    1985-01-01

    Mutations of the hairy locus in Drosophila may affect both adult chaeta differentiation and embryonic segmentation. In an effort to understand this phenotypic complexity, we have analyzed 30 mutant alleles of the locus. We find that the alleles fall into four groups according to their complementation properties, suggesting a structurally complex locus in which two distinct functions share a common coding region.

  12. Estimating spontaneous mutation rates at enzyme loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous mutations were accumulated for 1,620,826 allele-generations on chromosomes that originated from six stem second chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster. Only null-electromorph mutations were detected. Band-electromorph mutations were not found. The average rate of null-electromorph mutations was 2.71 x 10-5 per locus per generation. The 95% confidence interval (μn) was 1.97 x 10-5 n -5 per locus per generation. The upper 95% confidence limit of the band-electromorph mutation rate (μB) was 2.28 x 10-6 per locus per generation. It appeared that null mutations were induced by movable genetic elements and that the mutation rates were different from chromosome to chromosome. (author)

  13. In vivo super-resolution RESOLFT microscopy of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorrenberg, Sebastian; Grotjohann, Tim; Vorbrüggen, Gerd; Herzig, Alf; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in diffraction unlimited super-resolution microscopy, in vivo nanoscopy of tissues and model organisms is still not satisfactorily established and rarely realized. RESOLFT nanoscopy is particularly suited for live cell imaging because it requires relatively low light levels to overcome the diffraction barrier. Previously, we introduced the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2, which facilitated fast RESOLFT nanoscopy (Grotjohann et al., 2012). In that study, as in most other nanoscopy studies, only cultivated single cells were analyzed. Here, we report on the use of rsEGFP2 for live-cell RESOLFT nanoscopy of sub-cellular structures of intact Drosophila melanogaster larvae and of resected tissues. We generated flies expressing fusion proteins of alpha-tubulin and rsEGFP2 highlighting the microtubule cytoskeleton in all cells. By focusing through the intact larval cuticle, we achieved lateral resolution of. PMID:27355614

  14. Gustatory receptors required for sensing umbelliferone in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Seeta; Kim, Yunjung; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Youngseok

    2015-11-01

    Studies of taste modality using the animal model Drosophila melanogaster have elucidated a number of uncharacterized mechanisms of sensory responses. Gustatory receptors expressed in taste organs are not only responsible for the acceptance and rejection of different foods, but are also involved in the process of selecting an oviposition site. This contact-chemosensation is essential for animals to discriminate between nutritious and contaminated foods. In this study, we characterized the function of gustatory receptors that play a dual role in feeding and oviposition using the plant metabolite umbelliferone. The combined electrophysiological and behavioral evidence demonstrated that two broadly tuned gustatory receptors, GR33a and GR66a, and one narrowly tuned gustatory receptor, GR93a, are all required to generate a functional umbelliferone receptor. PMID:26524963

  15. Hygienic grooming is induced by contact chemicals in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya eYanagawa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In social insects, grooming is considered as a behavioral defense against pathogen and parasite infections since it contributes to remove microbes from their cuticle. However, stimuli which trigger this behavior are not well characterized yet. We examined if activating contact chemoreceptive sensilla could trigger grooming activities in Drosophila melanogaster. We monitored the grooming responses of decapitated flies to compounds known to activate the immune system e.g. dead Escherichia coli (Ec and lipopolysaccharides (LPS, and to tastants such as quinine, sucrose, and salt. LPS, quinine and Ec were quite effective in triggering grooming movements when touching the distal border of the wings and the legs, while sucrose had no effect. Contact chemoreceptors are necessary and sufficient to elicit such responses, as grooming could not be elicited by LPS in poxn mutants deprived of external taste sensilla, and as grooming was elicited by light when a channel rhodopsin receptor was expressed in bitter-sensitive cells expressing Gr33a. Contact chemoreceptors distributed along the distal border of the wings respond to these tastants by an increased spiking activity, in response to quinine, Ec, LPS, sucrose and KCl. These results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial compounds trigger grooming activities in D. melanogaster, and indicate that contact chemoreceptors located on the wings participate to the detection of such chemicals.

  16. Variation in male mate choice in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic A Edward

    Full Text Available Male mate choice has been reported in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, even though males of this species were previously thought to maximise their fitness by mating with all available females. To understand the evolution of male mate choice it is important to understand variation in male mating preferences. Two studies, using different stock populations and different methods, have reported contrasting patterns of variation in male mate choice in D. melanogaster. Two possible explanations are that there are evolved differences in each stock population or that the methods used to measure choice could have biased the results. We investigated these hypotheses here by repeating the methods used in one study in which variable male mate choice was found, using the stock population from the other study in which choice was not variable. The results showed a significant resource-independent male preference for less fecund, smaller females, which contrasts with previous observations of male mate choice. This indicates that different selection pressures between populations have resulted in evolved differences in the expression of male mate choice. It also reveals phenotypic plasticity in male mate choice in response to cues encountered in each choice environment. The results highlight the importance of variation in male mate choice, and of identifying mechanisms in order to understand the evolution of mate choice under varying ecological conditions.

  17. Sexual experience enhances Drosophila melanogaster male mating behavior and success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehresh Saleem

    Full Text Available Competition for mates is a wide-spread phenomenon affecting individual reproductive success. The ability of animals to adjust their behaviors in response to changing social environment is important and well documented. Drosophila melanogaster males compete with one another for matings with females and modify their reproductive behaviors based on prior social interactions. However, it remains to be determined how male social experience that culminates in mating with a female impacts subsequent male reproductive behaviors and mating success. Here we show that sexual experience enhances future mating success. Previously mated D. melanogaster males adjust their courtship behaviors and out-compete sexually inexperienced males for copulations. Interestingly, courtship experience alone is not sufficient in providing this competitive advantage, indicating that copulation plays a role in reinforcing this social learning. We also show that females use their sense of hearing to preferentially mate with experienced males when given a choice. Our results demonstrate the ability of previously mated males to learn from their positive sexual experiences and adjust their behaviors to gain a mating advantage. These experienced-based changes in behavior reveal strategies that animals likely use to increase their fecundity in natural competitive environments.

  18. Variation in male mate choice in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Dominic A; Chapman, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    Male mate choice has been reported in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, even though males of this species were previously thought to maximise their fitness by mating with all available females. To understand the evolution of male mate choice it is important to understand variation in male mating preferences. Two studies, using different stock populations and different methods, have reported contrasting patterns of variation in male mate choice in D. melanogaster. Two possible explanations are that there are evolved differences in each stock population or that the methods used to measure choice could have biased the results. We investigated these hypotheses here by repeating the methods used in one study in which variable male mate choice was found, using the stock population from the other study in which choice was not variable. The results showed a significant resource-independent male preference for less fecund, smaller females, which contrasts with previous observations of male mate choice. This indicates that different selection pressures between populations have resulted in evolved differences in the expression of male mate choice. It also reveals phenotypic plasticity in male mate choice in response to cues encountered in each choice environment. The results highlight the importance of variation in male mate choice, and of identifying mechanisms in order to understand the evolution of mate choice under varying ecological conditions.

  19. Desiccation stress induces developmental heterochrony in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LEENA THORAT; DASHARATH P OULKAR; KAUSHIK BANERJEE; BIMALENDU B NATH

    2016-09-01

    Stressful environments are known to perturb developmental patterns in insects. In the purview of desiccation as astressor, relatively little is known about the developmental consequences linked with desiccation tolerance. In thisstudy, we have particularly focused on the exploration of the temporal profile of postembryonic development inresponse to desiccation exposure in Drosophila melanogaster and the associated trade-offs. We document a correlationbetween variations in 20-hydroxyecdysone levels and the altered timing of metamorphic events during the lifecycle. Following desiccation, we observed an extension in the larval longevity whereas the duration of the pupal andadult stages was significantly shortened. Alternately, feeding of 20-hydroxyecdysone apparently led to the restorationof the normal temporal pattern of development in the desiccated group. In spite of the desiccation-responsiveheterochronic shifts in development, the overall lifespan post recovery remained almost unaltered among thedesiccated and undesiccated groups suggesting plasticity in developmental control. This observation reminisces ‘canalization-like’ phenomenon that buffers alterations in the overall lifespan. We thus identified a desiccation responsiveperiod in the lifespan of D. melanogaster during which variations in ecdysone levels are capable to alter thetemporal course of development.

  20. Effects of the isoflavone prunetin on gut health and stress response in male Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Piegholdt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Asian diet is rich in fruits, vegetables and soy, the latter representing a significant source of dietary isoflavones. The isoflavone prunetin was recently identified to improve intestinal epithelial barrier function in vitro and to ameliorate general survival and overall health state in vivo in male Drosophila melanogaster. However, the prunetin-mediated health benefits in the fruit fly were ascertained under standard living conditions. As the loss of intestinal integrity is closely related to a reduction in Drosophila lifespan and barrier dysfunction increases with age, effects on prunetin-modulated gut health under oxidative or pathogenic stress provocation remain to be elucidated. In this study, male adult D. melanogaster were administered either a prunetin or a control diet. Gut-derived junction protein expression and pathogen-induced antimicrobial peptide expressions as well as the stem cell proliferation in the gut were evaluated. Furthermore, survival following exposure to hydrogen peroxide was assessed. Prunetin ingestion did not attenuate bacterial infection and did not protect flies from oxidative stress. Intestinal mRNA expression levels of adherence and septate junction proteins as well as the stem cell proliferation were not altered by prunetin intake. Prunetin does not improve the resistance of flies against severe injuring, exogenous stress and therefore seems to function in a preventive rather than a therapeutic approach since the health-promoting benefits appear to be exclusively restricted to normal living circumstances.

  1. Effects of the isoflavone prunetin on gut health and stress response in male Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rimbach, Gerald; Wagner, Anika E

    2016-08-01

    The traditional Asian diet is rich in fruits, vegetables and soy, the latter representing a significant source of dietary isoflavones. The isoflavone prunetin was recently identified to improve intestinal epithelial barrier function in vitro and to ameliorate general survival and overall health state in vivo in male Drosophila melanogaster. However, the prunetin-mediated health benefits in the fruit fly were ascertained under standard living conditions. As the loss of intestinal integrity is closely related to a reduction in Drosophila lifespan and barrier dysfunction increases with age, effects on prunetin-modulated gut health under oxidative or pathogenic stress provocation remain to be elucidated. In this study, male adult D. melanogaster were administered either a prunetin or a control diet. Gut-derived junction protein expression and pathogen-induced antimicrobial peptide expressions as well as the stem cell proliferation in the gut were evaluated. Furthermore, survival following exposure to hydrogen peroxide was assessed. Prunetin ingestion did not attenuate bacterial infection and did not protect flies from oxidative stress. Intestinal mRNA expression levels of adherence and septate junction proteins as well as the stem cell proliferation were not altered by prunetin intake. Prunetin does not improve the resistance of flies against severe injuring, exogenous stress and therefore seems to function in a preventive rather than a therapeutic approach since the health-promoting benefits appear to be exclusively restricted to normal living circumstances. PMID:26774080

  2. Impact of the resident microbiota on the nutritional phenotype of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma V Ridley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals are chronically infected by benign and beneficial microorganisms that generally promote animal health through their effects on the nutrition, immune function and other physiological systems of the host. Insight into the host-microbial interactions can be obtained by comparing the traits of animals experimentally deprived of their microbiota and untreated animals. Drosophila melanogaster is an experimentally tractable system to study host-microbial interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The nutritional significance of the microbiota was investigated in D. melanogaster bearing unmanipulated microbiota, demonstrated by 454 sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons to be dominated by the α-proteobacterium Acetobacter, and experimentally deprived of the microbiota by egg dechorionation (conventional and axenic flies, respectively. In axenic flies, larval development rate was depressed with no effect on adult size relative to conventional flies, indicating that the microbiota promotes larval growth rates. Female fecundity did not differ significantly between conventional and axenic flies, but axenic flies had significantly reduced metabolic rate and altered carbohydrate allocation, including elevated glucose levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have shown that elimination of the resident microbiota extends larval development and perturbs energy homeostasis and carbohydrate allocation patterns of of D. melanogaster. Our results indicate that the resident microbiota promotes host nutrition and interacts with the regulation of host metabolism.

  3. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  4. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Chhabra

    Full Text Available The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans. Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health.

  5. Locus Adh of Drosophila melanogaster under selection for delayed senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaustova, N.D. [Odessa State Univ. (Ukraine)

    1995-05-01

    Dynamics of the Adh activity and frequencies of alleles Adh{sup F} and Adh{sup S} were analyzed under selection for delayed senescence. The experiments were performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Lines Adh{sup S}cn and Adh{sup F}vg and experimental populations cn` and vg`, selected for an increased duration of reproductive period (late oviposition) were used. Analysis of fertility, longevity, viability and resistance to starvation showed that selection for late oviposition resulted in delayed senescence of flies of the experimental populations. Genetic structure of population vg` changed considerably with regard to the Adh locus. This was confirmed by parameters of activity, thermostability, and electrophoretic mobility of the enzyme isolated from flies after 30 generations of selection. Analysis of frequencies of the Adh alleles showed that in both selected populations, which initially had different genetic composition, accumulated allele Adh{sup S}, which encodes the isozyme that is less active but more resistant to inactivation. Genetic mechanism of delayed senescence in Drosophila is assumed to involve selection at vitally important enzyme loci, including Adh. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  6. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prud`homme, N.; Gans, M.; Masson, M.; Terzian, C.; Bucheton, A. [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is table and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovo{sup D1} female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovo{sup D1} reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. 40 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, N; Gans, M; Masson, M; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is stable and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovoD1 female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovoD1 reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. PMID:7713426

  8. Sex-specific weight loss mediates sexual size dimorphism in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Testa

    Full Text Available The selective pressures leading to the evolution of Sexual Size Dimorphism (SSD have been well studied in many organisms, yet, the underlying developmental mechanisms are poorly understood. By generating a complete growth profile by sex in Drosophila melanogaster, we describe the sex-specific pattern of growth responsible for SSD. Growth rate and critical size for pupariation significantly contributed to adult SSD, whereas duration of growth did not. Surprisingly, SSD at peak larval mass was twice that of the uneclosed adult SSD with weight loss between peak larval mass and pupariation playing an important role in generating the final SSD. Our finding that weight loss is an important regulator of SSD adds additional complexity to our understanding of how body size is regulated in different sexes. Collectively, these data allow for the elucidation of the molecular-genetic mechanisms that generate SSD, an important component of understanding how SSD evolves.

  9. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Coelho

    Full Text Available Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine, an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents. A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects.

  10. Regulation of Sleep by Neuropeptide Y-Like System in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Chunxia He; Yunyan Yang; Mingming Zhang; Price, Jeffrey L.; Zhangwu Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is important for maintenance of normal physiology in animals. In mammals, neuropeptide Y (NPY), a homolog of Drosophila neuropeptide F (NPF), is involved in sleep regulation, with different effects in human and rat. However, the function of NPF on sleep in Drosophila melanogaster has not yet been described. In this study, we investigated the effects of NPF and its receptor-neuropeptide F receptor (NPFR1) on Drosophila sleep. Male flies over-expressing NPF or NPFR1 exhibited increased sl...

  11. Modeling glial contributions to seizures and epileptogenesis: cation-chloride cotransporters in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid M Rusan

    Full Text Available Flies carrying a kcc loss-of-function mutation are more seizure-susceptible than wild-type flies. The kcc gene is the highly conserved Drosophila melanogaster ortholog of K+/Cl- cotransporter genes thought to be expressed in all animal cell types. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal requirements for kcc loss-of-function to modify seizure-susceptibility in flies. Targeted RNA interference (RNAi of kcc in various sets of neurons was sufficient to induce severe seizure-sensitivity. Interestingly, kcc RNAi in glia was particularly effective in causing seizure-sensitivity. Knockdown of kcc in glia or neurons during development caused a reduction in seizure induction threshold, cell swelling, and brain volume increase in 24-48 hour old adult flies. Third instar larval peripheral nerves were enlarged when kcc RNAi was expressed in neurons or glia. Results suggest that a threshold of K+/Cl- cotransport dysfunction in the nervous system during development is an important determinant of seizure-susceptibility in Drosophila. The findings presented are the first attributing a causative role for glial cation-chloride cotransporters in seizures and epileptogenesis. The importance of elucidating glial cell contributions to seizure disorders and the utility of Drosophila models is discussed.

  12. The Lantibiotic NAI-107 Efficiently Rescues Drosophila melanogaster from Infection with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Cruz, João C. S.; Donadio, Stefano; Jenssen, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    We used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a cost-effective in vivo model to evaluate the efficacy of novel antibacterial peptides and peptoids for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. A panel of peptides with known antibacterial activity in vitro and/or in vivo was tested in Drosophila. Although most peptides and peptoids that were effective in vitro failed to rescue lethal effects of S. aureus infections in vivo, we found that two lantibiotics, nisin and NAI-107, rescued adult flies from fatal infections. Furthermore, NAI-107 rescued mortality of infection with the MRSA strain USA300 with an efficacy equivalent to that of vancomycin, a widely applied antibiotic for the treatment of serious MRSA infections. These results establish Drosophila as a useful model for in vivo drug evaluation of antibacterial peptides. PMID:27381394

  13. Heavy metals effect in Drosophila melanogaster germinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy metals occur naturally and some of them are very important in cellular metabolism. Industrial development has increased metal concentration in the environment and in the living organisms tissues. This increase promotes the human risk to suffer teratogenesis, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. Different biological systems have been used to proof the genetic effect of heavy metals including Drosophila. In the present work chromium, cadmium, lead, zinc and arsenic salts were administered to Drosophila females and males adults in order to determine the genetic effect produced by these compounds, in both femenine and masculine germinal cells. The mating system used (''Oster males'' and y2wsup(a)/y2wsup(a); e/e females) permited to determine among two succesive generations, the mutagenic effects produced by heavy metals in Drosophila. The salts administration to adult flies was made by injection. Non-disjunction, X-chromosome loss, and sex linked recessive lethals frequency was increased by heavy metals. It was observed a fertility disminution between F 1 descendants from individuals treated with the metalic salts. It was demonstrated that heavy metals can interact with genetic material at different levels in the two types of gametic cells to produce genetic damage. (author)

  14. The effects of inbreeding and heat stress on male sterility in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Dybdahl; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Bijlsma, Kuke;

    2011-01-01

    have demonstrated inbreeding depression for most life-cycle components, both in laboratory populations and in the wild. Although male fertility is known to be sensitive to temperature extremes, few studies have focused on this life-cycle component. We studied the effects of inbreeding on male sterility...... in benign and stressful environments using Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. Male sterility was compared in 21 inbred lines and five non-inbred control lines at 25.0 and 29.0 °C. The effect of inbreeding on sterility was significant only at 29.0 °C. This stress-induced increase in sterility...... indicates an interaction between the effects of inbreeding and high-temperature stress on male sterility. In addition, the stress-induced temporary and permanent sterility showed significant positive correlation, as did stress-induced sterility and the decrease in egg-to-adult viability. This suggests...

  15. Modification of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila melanogaster male germ cells by butylated hydroxytoluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation were studied in post-meiotic male cells of Drosophila melanogaster. Prior to submitting Samarkand males to 2 krad of X-rays, BHT was administered (a) with the food (0.2 per cent final concentration) from emergence of the imago for 7 days or (b) by intra-abdominal injection (0.05 per cent) to 7-day-old adults. Dominant lethality (embryonic and total), II-III translocations and sex-linked recessive lethals were recorded. The only effect of BHT observed was a decrease in the frequency of recessive lethals induced, detected in early spermatids. Since oxygen plays an important role in the high radiosensitivity of these cells, it is suggested that the sparing action of BHT was due to its antioxidative and radical scavenging properties. (U.K.)

  16. Effects of mutations at the stambh A locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Kumar; Minu Joseph; Shanti Chandrashekaran

    2001-08-01

    We report novel findings on the cytogenetic location, functional complexity and maternal and germline roles of the stambh A locus of Drosophila melanogaster. stmA is localized to polytene bands 44D1.2 on 2R. stmA mutations are of two types: temperature-sensitive (ts) adult and larval paralytic or unconditional embryonic or larval lethal. Twelve alleles reported in this study fall into two intragenic complementing groups suggesting that stmA is a complex locus with more than one functional domain. Some unconditional embryonic lethal alleles show a ‘neurogenic’ phenotype of cuticle loss accompanied by neural hypertrophy. It is shown that embryos of ts paralytic alleles also show mild neural hypertrophy at permissive temperatures while short exposure to heat induces severe cuticle loss in these embryos. stmA exerts a maternal influence over heat-induced cuticle loss. Unconditional embryonic lethal alleles of stmA are also germline lethal.

  17. INFLUENCE OF AMYLOSE STARCH ON DEVELOPMENT AND LIFESPAN OF FRUIT FLY DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandra Abrat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Last years, the concept of resistant starch (RS has evoked a new interest in researchers in the context of bioavailability of starch and its use as a source of dietary fiber. Based on clinical and animal research, RS has been proposed to be the most potentially beneficial starch fraction for human health. In this study, the effects of amylose starch as a fraction of RS on development and lifespan of fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were investigated. In both Canton S and w1118 strains, the diet with 20% amylose RS delayed fly development, increased triacylglyceride level in the body of adult insects and reduced their lifespan compared to the diet with 4% amylose starch. Thus, our data clearly demonstrate that amylose starch at high concentrations may negatively affect fruit fly.

  18. Effects of acclimation temperature on thermal tolerance and membrane phospholipid composition in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Tomcala, Ales; Sørensen, Jesper G;

    2008-01-01

    and the composition of membrane GPLs in adult Drosophila melanogaster. Long-term cold survival was significantly improved by low acclimation temperature. After 60h at 0 degrees C, more than 80% of the 15 degrees C-acclimated flies survived while none of the 25 degrees C-acclimated flies survived. Cold shock tolerance...... acclimation was associated with the increase in proportion of ethanolamine (from 52.7% to 58.5% in 25 degrees C-acclimated versus 15 degrees C-acclimated flies, respectively) at the expense of choline in GPLs. Relatively small, but statistically significant changes in lipid molecular composition were observed...... acclimation temperature and correlated with the changes in GPL composition in membranes of adult D. melanogaster. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  19. Candidate transcriptomic sources of inbreeding depression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Garcia

    Full Text Available The genomic causes of inbreeding depression are poorly known. Several studies have found widespread transcriptomic alterations in inbred organisms, but it remains unclear which of these alterations are causes of the depression and which are mere responses to the ensuing physiological stress induced by increased homozygosity due to inbreeding. Attempting to differentiate causes from responses, we made a c-DNA microarray analysis of inbreeding depression in Drosophila melanogaster. The rationale of the experiment was that, while depression is a general phenomenon involving reductions in fitness in different inbred lines, its first genetic causes would be different for each inbred line, as they are expected to be caused by the fixation of rare deleterious genes. We took four sets of inbred sublines, each set descending from a different founding pair obtained from a large outbred stock, and compared the expression of the three most depressed sublines and the three least depressed sublines from each set. Many changes in expression were common to all sets, but fourteen genes, grouped in four expression clusters, showed strong set-specific changes, and were therefore possible candidates to be sources of the inbreeding depression observed.

  20. In vivo super-resolution RESOLFT microscopy of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorrenberg, Sebastian; Grotjohann, Tim; Vorbrüggen, Gerd; Herzig, Alf; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in diffraction unlimited super-resolution microscopy, in vivo nanoscopy of tissues and model organisms is still not satisfactorily established and rarely realized. RESOLFT nanoscopy is particularly suited for live cell imaging because it requires relatively low light levels to overcome the diffraction barrier. Previously, we introduced the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2, which facilitated fast RESOLFT nanoscopy (Grotjohann et al., 2012). In that study, as in most other nanoscopy studies, only cultivated single cells were analyzed. Here, we report on the use of rsEGFP2 for live-cell RESOLFT nanoscopy of sub-cellular structures of intact Drosophila melanogaster larvae and of resected tissues. We generated flies expressing fusion proteins of alpha-tubulin and rsEGFP2 highlighting the microtubule cytoskeleton in all cells. By focusing through the intact larval cuticle, we achieved lateral resolution of <60 nm. RESOLFT nanoscopy enabled time-lapse recordings comprising 40 images and facilitated recordings 40 µm deep within fly tissues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15567.001 PMID:27355614

  1. Image enhancement for tracking the translucent larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukant Khurana

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster larvae are model systems for studies of development, synaptic transmission, sensory physiology, locomotion, drug discovery, and learning and memory. A detailed behavioral understanding of larvae can advance all these fields of neuroscience. Automated tracking can expand fine-grained behavioral analysis, yet its full potential remains to be implemented for the larvae. All published methods are unable to track the larvae near high contrast objects, including the petri-dish edges encountered in many behavioral paradigms. To alleviate these issues, we enhanced the larval contrast to obtain complete tracks. Our method employed a dual approach of optical-contrast boosting and post-hoc image processing for contrast enhancement. We reared larvae on black food media to enhance their optical contrast through darkening of their digestive tracts. For image processing we performed Frame Averaging followed by Subtraction then Thresholding (FAST. This algorithm can remove all static objects from the movie, including petri-dish edges prior to processing by the image-tracking module. This dual approach for contrast enhancement also succeeded in overcoming fluctuations in illumination caused by the alternating current power source. Our tracking method yields complete tracks, including at the edges of the behavioral arena and is computationally fast, hence suitable for high-throughput fine-grained behavioral measurements.

  2. [PIWI protein as a nucleolus visitor in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaleva, E A; Iakushev, E Iu; Stoliarenko, A D; Klenov, M S; Pozovskiĭ, Ia M; Gvozdev, V A

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved nuclear Piwi protein of Drosophila melanogaster is a representative of the Argonaute small RNA binding protein family. Guided by small piRNAs, Piwi functions in transposon silencing in somatic and germ cells of the gonad. We found that in ovarian somatic and germ cells, as well as in the established ovarian somatic cell line, Piwi is concentrated predominantly in the nucleolus--the main nuclear compartment, participating not only in rRNA synthesis, but also in various cell stress responses. We demonstrated the colocalization of Piwi with nucleolar marker proteins--fibrillarin and Nopp140. A mutation preventing Piwi transport to the nucleus and disturbing transposon silencing (piwi(Nt)) leads to 6-8-fold upregulation of rRNA genes expression, as evaluated by the level of transcripts of transposon insertions in 28S rRNA genes. RNase treatment of live cultured ovarian somatic cells depletes Piwi from the nucleolus. The same effect is observed upon inhibiting RNA polymerase I which transcribes rRNA, but not RNA polymerase II. In contrast, upon heat shock Piwi is concentrated in the nucleolus and is depleted from the nucleoplasm. These results implicate Piwi in RNA polymerase activity modulation and stress response in the nucleolus. We discuss possible noncanonical Piwi functions along with its canonical role in transposon silencing by piRNAs.

  3. Rhythmic Changes in Synapse Numbers in Drosophila melanogaster Motor Terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Santiago; Ferreiro, Maria Jose; Menhert, Kerstin I.; Casanova, Gabriela; Olivera, Alvaro; Cantera, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the morphology of the neuromuscular junction of the flight motor neuron MN5 in Drosophila melanogaster undergoes daily rhythmical changes, with smaller synaptic boutons during the night, when the fly is resting, than during the day, when the fly is active. With electron microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, we searched for a rhythmic change in synapse numbers in this neuron, both under light:darkness (LD) cycles and constant darkness (DD). We expected the number of synapses to increase during the morning, when the fly has an intense phase of locomotion activity under LD and DD. Surprisingly, only our DD data were consistent with this hypothesis. In LD, we found more synapses at midnight than at midday. We propose that under LD conditions, there is a daily rhythm of formation of new synapses in the dark phase, when the fly is resting, and disassembly over the light phase, when the fly is active. Several parameters appeared to be light dependent, since they were affected differently under LD or DD. The great majority of boutons containing synapses had only one and very few had either two or more, with a 70∶25∶5 ratio (one, two and three or more synapses) in LD and 75∶20∶5 in DD. Given the maintenance of this proportion even when both bouton and synapse numbers changed with time, we suggest that there is a homeostatic mechanism regulating synapse distribution among MN5 boutons. PMID:23840613

  4. Rhythmic changes in synapse numbers in Drosophila melanogaster motor terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Ruiz

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the morphology of the neuromuscular junction of the flight motor neuron MN5 in Drosophila melanogaster undergoes daily rhythmical changes, with smaller synaptic boutons during the night, when the fly is resting, than during the day, when the fly is active. With electron microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, we searched for a rhythmic change in synapse numbers in this neuron, both under light:darkness (LD cycles and constant darkness (DD. We expected the number of synapses to increase during the morning, when the fly has an intense phase of locomotion activity under LD and DD. Surprisingly, only our DD data were consistent with this hypothesis. In LD, we found more synapses at midnight than at midday. We propose that under LD conditions, there is a daily rhythm of formation of new synapses in the dark phase, when the fly is resting, and disassembly over the light phase, when the fly is active. Several parameters appeared to be light dependent, since they were affected differently under LD or DD. The great majority of boutons containing synapses had only one and very few had either two or more, with a 70∶25∶5 ratio (one, two and three or more synapses in LD and 75∶20∶5 in DD. Given the maintenance of this proportion even when both bouton and synapse numbers changed with time, we suggest that there is a homeostatic mechanism regulating synapse distribution among MN5 boutons.

  5. No apparent cost of evolved immune response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vanika; Venkatesan, Saudamini; Chatterjee, Martik; Syed, Zeeshan A; Nivsarkar, Vaishnavi; Prasad, Nagaraj G

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance and deployment of the immune system are costly and are hence predicted to trade-off with other resource-demanding traits, such as reproduction. We subjected this longstanding idea to test using laboratory experimental evolution approach. In the present study, replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster were subjected to three selection regimes-I (Infection with Pseudomonas entomophila), S (Sham-infection with MgSO4 ), and U (Unhandled Control). After 30 generations of selection flies from the I regime had evolved better survivorship upon infection with P. entomophila compared to flies from U and S regimes. However, contrary to expectations and previous reports, we did not find any evidence of trade-offs between immunity and other life history related traits, such as longevity, fecundity, egg hatchability, or development time. After 45 generations of selection, the selection was relaxed for a set of populations. Even after 15 generations, the postinfection survivorship of populations under relaxed selection regime did not decline. We speculate that either there is a negligible cost to the evolved immune response or that trade-offs occur on traits such as reproductive behavior or other immune mechanisms that we have not investigated in this study. Our research suggests that at least under certain conditions, life-history trade-offs might play little role in maintaining variation in immunity. PMID:26932243

  6. Plasticity of the chemoreceptor repertoire in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available For most organisms, chemosensation is critical for survival and is mediated by large families of chemoreceptor proteins, whose expression must be tuned appropriately to changes in the chemical environment. We asked whether expression of chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome would be regulated independently; whether expression of certain chemoreceptor genes would be especially sensitive to environmental changes; whether groups of chemoreceptor genes undergo coordinated rexpression; and how plastic the expression of chemoreceptor genes is with regard to sex, development, reproductive state, and social context. To answer these questions we used Drosophila melanogaster, because its chemosensory systems are well characterized and both the genotype and environment can be controlled precisely. Using customized cDNA microarrays, we showed that chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome undergo independent transcriptional regulation at different developmental stages and between sexes. Expression of distinct subgroups of chemoreceptor genes is sensitive to reproductive state and social interactions. Furthermore, exposure of flies only to odor of the opposite sex results in altered transcript abundance of chemoreceptor genes. These genes are distinct from those that show transcriptional plasticity when flies are allowed physical contact with same or opposite sex members. We analyzed covariance in transcript abundance of chemosensory genes across all environmental conditions and found that they segregated into 20 relatively small, biologically relevant modules of highly correlated transcripts. This finely pixilated modular organization of the chemosensory subgenome enables fine tuning of the expression of the chemoreceptor repertoire in response to ecologically relevant environmental and physiological conditions.

  7. Foraging Path-length Protocol for Drosophila melanogaster Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anreiter, Ina; Vasquez, Oscar E; Allen, Aaron M; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2016-04-23

    The Drosophila melanogaster larval path-length phenotype is an established measure used to study the genetic and environmental contributions to behavioral variation. The larval path-length assay was developed to measure individual differences in foraging behavior that were later linked to the foraging gene. Larval path-length is an easily scored trait that facilitates the collection of large sample sizes, at minimal cost, for genetic screens. Here we provide a detailed description of the current protocol for the larval path-length assay first used by Sokolowski. The protocol details how to reproducibly handle test animals, perform the behavioral assay and analyze the data. An example of how the assay can be used to measure behavioral plasticity in response to environmental change, by manipulating feeding environment prior to performing the assay, is also provided. Finally, appropriate test design as well as environmental factors that can modify larval path-length such as food quality, developmental age and day effects are discussed.

  8. ON THE DEVELOPMENTAL THEORY OF AGING .1. STARVATION RESISTANCE AND LONGEVITY IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER IN RELATION TO PRE-ADULT BREEDING CONDITIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZWAAN, BJ; BIJLSMA, R; HOEKSTRA, RF

    1991-01-01

    The developmental theory of ageing predicts a positive correlation between developmental time and adult longevity. Experiments that vary larval density and food level have been carried out to test this prediction. The results show differences in viability, developmental time, starvation resistance a

  9. Short-term exposure to predation affects body elemental composition, climbing speed and survival ability in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler Inwood, Sarah; Trakimas, Giedrius; Krams, Ronalds; Burghardt, Gordon M.; Butler, David M.; Luoto, Severi; Krama, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Factors such as temperature, habitat, larval density, food availability and food quality substantially affect organismal development. In addition, risk of predation has a complex impact on the behavioural and morphological life history responses of prey. Responses to predation risk seem to be mediated by physiological stress, which is an adaptation for maintaining homeostasis and improving survivorship during life-threatening situations. We tested whether predator exposure during the larval phase of development has any influence on body elemental composition, energy reserves, body size, climbing speed and survival ability of adult Drosophila melanogaster. Fruit fly larvae were exposed to predation by jumping spiders (Phidippus apacheanus), and the percentage of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, extracted lipids, escape response and survival were measured from predator-exposed and control adult flies. The results revealed predation as an important determinant of adult phenotype formation and survival ability. D. melanogaster reared together with spiders had a higher concentration of body N (but equal body C), a lower body mass and lipid reserves, a higher climbing speed and improved adult survival ability. The results suggest that the potential of predators to affect the development and the adult phenotype of D. melanogaster is high enough to use predators as a more natural stimulus in laboratory experiments when testing, for example, fruit fly memory and learning ability, or when comparing natural populations living under different predation pressures. PMID:27602281

  10. Atrazine exposure affects longevity, development time and body size in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sarah R; Fiumera, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine is the one of the most widely used herbicides in the United States and non-target organisms may encounter it in the environment. Atrazine is known to affect male reproduction in both vertebrates and invertebrates but less is known about its effects on other fitness traits. Here we assessed the effects of five different chronic exposure levels on a variety of fitness traits in Drosophila melanogaster. We measured male and female longevity, development time, proportion pupated, proportion emerged, body size, female mating rate, fertility and fecundity. Atrazine exposure decreased the proportion pupated, the proportion emerged and adult survival. Development time was also affected by atrazine and exposed flies pupated and emerged earlier than controls. Although development time was accelerated, body size was actually larger in some of the exposures. Atrazine exposure had no effect on female mating rate and the effects on female fertility and fecundity were only observed in one of the two independent experimental blocks. Many of the traits showed non-monotonic dose response curves, where the intermediate concentrations showed the largest effects. Overall this study shows that atrazine influences a variety of life history traits in the model genetic system, D. melanogaster, and future studies should aim to identify the molecular mechanisms of toxicity. PMID:27317622

  11. Quantitative profiling of Drosophila melanogaster Dscam1 isoforms reveals no changes in splicing after bacterial exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A O Armitage

    Full Text Available The hypervariable Dscam1 (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 gene can produce thousands of different ectodomain isoforms via mutually exclusive alternative splicing. Dscam1 appears to be involved in the immune response of some insects and crustaceans. It has been proposed that the diverse isoforms may be involved in the recognition of, or the defence against, diverse parasite epitopes, although evidence to support this is sparse. A prediction that can be generated from this hypothesis is that the gene expression of specific exons and/or isoforms is influenced by exposure to an immune elicitor. To test this hypothesis, we for the first time, use a long read RNA sequencing method to directly investigate the Dscam1 splicing pattern after exposing adult Drosophila melanogaster and a S2 cell line to live Escherichia coli. After bacterial exposure both models showed increased expression of immune-related genes, indicating that the immune system had been activated. However there were no changes in total Dscam1 mRNA expression. RNA sequencing further showed that there were no significant changes in individual exon expression and no changes in isoform splicing patterns in response to bacterial exposure. Therefore our studies do not support a change of D. melanogaster Dscam1 isoform diversity in response to live E. coli. Nevertheless, in future this approach could be used to identify potentially immune-related Dscam1 splicing regulation in other host species or in response to other pathogens.

  12. An ongoing role for structural sarcomeric components in maintaining Drosophila melanogaster muscle function and structure.

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    Alexander D Perkins

    Full Text Available Animal muscles must maintain their function while bearing substantial mechanical loads. How muscles withstand persistent mechanical strain is presently not well understood. The basic unit of muscle is the sarcomere, which is primarily composed of cytoskeletal proteins. We hypothesized that cytoskeletal protein turnover is required to maintain muscle function. Using the flight muscles of Drosophila melanogaster, we confirmed that the sarcomeric cytoskeleton undergoes turnover throughout adult life. To uncover which cytoskeletal components are required to maintain adult muscle function, we performed an RNAi-mediated knockdown screen targeting the entire fly cytoskeleton and associated proteins. Gene knockdown was restricted to adult flies and muscle function was analyzed with behavioural assays. Here we analyze the results of that screen and characterize the specific muscle maintenance role for several hits. The screen identified 46 genes required for muscle maintenance: 40 of which had no previously known role in this process. Bioinformatic analysis highlighted the structural sarcomeric proteins as a candidate group for further analysis. Detailed confocal and electron microscopic analysis showed that while muscle architecture was maintained after candidate gene knockdown, sarcomere length was disrupted. Specifically, we found that ongoing synthesis and turnover of the key sarcomere structural components Projectin, Myosin and Actin are required to maintain correct sarcomere length and thin filament length. Our results provide in vivo evidence of adult muscle protein turnover and uncover specific functional defects associated with reduced expression of a subset of cytoskeletal proteins in the adult animal.

  13. Latitudinal clines in Drosophila melanogaster: body size, allozyme frequencies, inversion frequencies, and the insulin-signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gerdien De Jong; Zoltán Bochdanovits

    2003-12-01

    Many latitudinal clines exist in Drosophila melanogaster: in adult body size, in allele frequency at allozyme loci, and in frequencies of common cosmopolitan inversions. The question is raised whether these latitudinal clines are causally related. This review aims to connect data from two very different fields of study, evolutionary biology and cell biology, in explaining such natural genetic variation in D. melanogaster body size and development time. It is argued that adult body size clines, inversion frequency clines, and clines in allele frequency at loci involved in glycolysis and glycogen storage are part of the same adaptive strategy. Selection pressure is expected to differ at opposite ends of the clines. At high latitudes, selection on D. melanogaster would favour high larval growth rate at low temperatures, and resource storage in adults to survive winter. At low latitudes selection would favour lower larval critical size to survive crowding, and increased male activity leading to high male reproductive success. Studies of the insulin-signalling pathway in D. melanogaster point to the involvement of this pathway in metabolism and adult body size. The genes involved in the insulin-signalling pathway are associated with common cosmopolitan inversions that show latitudinal clines. Each chromosome region connected with a large common cosmopolitan inversion possesses a gene of the insulin transmembrane complex, a gene of the intermediate pathway and a gene of the TOR branch. The hypothesis is presented that temperate D. melanogaster populations have a higher frequency of a ‘thrifty’ genotype corresponding to high insulin level or high signal level, while tropical populations possess a more ‘spendthrift’ genotype corresponding to low insulin or low signal level.

  14. Exposure-dependent variation in cryolite induced lethality in the non-target insect, Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Sayanti; Roy, Sumedha

    2014-03-01

    The starting point of toxicity testing of any chemical in an organism is the determination of its Lethal Concentration 50 (LC50). In the present study, LC50 of a fluorinated insecticide cryolite is determined in a non-target insect model, Drosophila melanogaster. Interestingly, the result shows that acute LC50 of cryolite was much greater in comparison to the chronic one in case of Drosophila larvae. Larvae which were exposed to 65,000 to 70,000 µg/ml cryolite through food showed 50% mortality after 18 hours of acute exposure, whereas only 150 to 160 µg/ml cryolite was sufficient to cause 50% mortality in case of chronic exposure. Thus cryolite in a small amount when applied once cannot produce noticeable changes in Drosophila, whereas the same amount when used continuously can be fatal. The non-feeding pupal stage was also seen to be affected by chemical treatment. This suggests that the test chemical affects the developmental fate and results in failure of adult emergence. Absence of chemical-induced mortality in adults assumes that the toxicity of cryolite might be restricted to the preimaginal stages of the organism. Reduction in body size of larvae after ingestion of cryolite (with food) in acute treatment schedule is another interesting finding of this study. Some individuals consuming cryolite containing food cannot survive whereas the few survivors manifest a significant growth retardation which might be due to a tendency of refusal in feeding. Hence the present findings provide a scope of assessment of risk of other similar non-target groups.

  15. Genomic Evidence for Adaptive Inversion Clines in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapun, Martin; Fabian, Daniel K; Goudet, Jérôme; Flatt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Clines in chromosomal inversion polymorphisms-presumably driven by climatic gradients-are common but there is surprisingly little evidence for selection acting on them. Here we address this long-standing issue in Drosophila melanogaster by using diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to estimate inversion frequencies from 28 whole-genome Pool-seq samples collected from 10 populations along the North American east coast. Inversions In(3L)P, In(3R)Mo, and In(3R)Payne showed clear latitudinal clines, and for In(2L)t, In(2R)NS, and In(3R)Payne the steepness of the clinal slopes changed between summer and fall. Consistent with an effect of seasonality on inversion frequencies, we detected small but stable seasonal fluctuations of In(2R)NS and In(3R)Payne in a temperate Pennsylvanian population over 4 years. In support of spatially varying selection, we observed that the cline in In(3R)Payne has remained stable for >40 years and that the frequencies of In(2L)t and In(3R)Payne are strongly correlated with climatic factors that vary latitudinally, independent of population structure. To test whether these patterns are adaptive, we compared the amount of genetic differentiation of inversions versus neutral SNPs and found that the clines in In(2L)t and In(3R)Payne are maintained nonneutrally and independent of admixture. We also identified numerous clinal inversion-associated SNPs, many of which exhibit parallel differentiation along the Australian cline and reside in genes known to affect fitness-related traits. Together, our results provide strong evidence that inversion clines are maintained by spatially-and perhaps also temporally-varying selection. We interpret our data in light of current hypotheses about how inversions are established and maintained. PMID:26796550

  16. Courtship initiation is stimulated by acoustic signals in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Ejima

    Full Text Available Finding a mating partner is a critical task for many organisms. It is in the interest of males to employ multiple sensory modalities to search for females. In Drosophila melanogaster, vision is thought to be the most important courtship stimulating cue at long distance, while chemosensory cues are used at relatively short distance. In this report, we show that when visual cues are not available, sounds produced by the female allow the male to detect her presence in a large arena. When the target female was artificially immobilized, the male spent a prolonged time searching before starting courtship. This delay in courtship initiation was completely rescued by playing either white noise or recorded fly movement sounds to the male, indicating that the acoustic and/or seismic stimulus produced by movement stimulates courtship initiation, most likely by increasing the general arousal state of the male. Mutant males expressing tetanus toxin (TNT under the control of Gr68a-GAL4 had a defect in finding active females and a delay in courtship initiation in a large arena, but not in a small arena. Gr68a-GAL4 was found to be expressed pleiotropically not only in putative gustatory pheromone receptor neurons but also in mechanosensory neurons, suggesting that Gr68a-positive mechanosensory neurons, not gustatory neurons, provide motion detection necessary for courtship initiation. TNT/Gr68a males were capable of discriminating the copulation status and age of target females in courtship conditioning, indicating that female discrimination and formation of olfactory courtship memory are independent of the Gr68a-expressing neurons that subserve gustation and mechanosensation. This study suggests for the first time that mechanical signals generated by a female fly have a prominent effect on males' courtship in the dark and leads the way to studying how multimodal sensory information and arousal are integrated in behavioral decision making.

  17. Pomegranate juice enhances healthy lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy eVenkatasubramanian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Exploring innovative ways to ensure healthy ageing of populations is a pre-requisite to contain rising healthcare costs. Scientific research into the principles and practices of traditional medicines can provide new insights and simple solutions to lead a healthy life. Rasayana is a dedicated branch of Ayurveda (an Indian medicine that deals with methods to increase vitality and delay aging through the use of diet, herbal supplements and other lifestyle practices. The life-span and health-span enhancing actions of the fruits of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L., a well-known Rasayana, were tested on Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly model. Supplementation of standard corn meal with 10% (v/v pomegranate juice (PJ extended the life-span of male and female flies by 18% and 8% respectively. When male and female flies were mixed and reared together, there was 19% increase in the longevity of PJ fed flies, as assessed by MSD, the median survival day (24.8. MSD for control and resveratrol (RV groups was at 20.8 and 23.1 days respectively. A two-fold enhancement in fecundity, improved resistance to oxidative stress (H2O2 and paraquat induced and to Candida albicans infection were observed in PJ fed flies. Further, the flies in the PJ fed group were physically active over an extended period of time, as assessed by the climbing assay. PJ thus outperformed both control and RV groups in the life-span and health-span parameters tested. This study provides the scope to explore the potential of PJ as a nutraceutical to improve health span and lifespan in humans.

  18. NF-κB/Rel Proteins and the Humoral Immune Responses of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan, Sandhya; Aggarwal, Kamna; Paquette, Nicholas; Silverman, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB)/Rel transcription factors form an integral part of innate immune defenses and are conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Studying the function, mechanism of activation and regulation of these factors is crucial for understanding host responses to microbial infections. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has proved to be a valuable model system to study these evolutionarily conserved NF-κB mediated immune responses. Drosophila combats pathogens through humoral and...

  19. Acid sensing by sweet and bitter taste neurons in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Charlu, Sandhya; Wisotsky, Zev; Medina, Adriana; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster can taste various compounds and separate them into few basic categories such as sweet, bitter and salt taste. Here we investigate mechanisms underlying acid detection in Drosophila and report that the fly displays strong taste aversion to common carboxylic acids. We find that acid tastants act by the activation of a subset of bitter neurons and inhibition of sweet neurons. Bitter neurons begin to respond at pH 5 and show an increase in spike frequency as the extracellu...

  20. Detection of Volatile Indicators of Illicit Substances by the Olfactory Receptors of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Brenton; Coral G Warr; de Bruyne, Marien

    2010-01-01

    Insects can detect a large range of odors with a numerically simple olfactory system that delivers high sensitivity and accurate discrimination. Therefore, insect olfactory receptors hold great promise as biosensors for detection of volatile organic chemicals in a range of applications. The array of olfactory receptor neurons of Drosophila melanogaster is rapidly becoming the best-characterized natural nose. We have investigated the suitability of Drosophila receptors as detectors for volatil...

  1. Effective but costly, evolved mechanisms of defense against a virulent opportunistic pathogen in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Yixin H Ye; Chenoweth, Stephen F.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila harbor substantial genetic variation for antibacterial defense, and investment in immunity is thought to involve a costly trade-off with life history traits, including development, life span, and reproduction. To understand the way in which insects invest in fighting bacterial infection, we selected for survival following systemic infection with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster over 10 generations. We then examined genome-wide...

  2. Retired flies, hidden plateaus, and the evolution of senescence in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtsinger, James W

    2016-06-01

    Late-life plateaus in age-specific mortality have been an evolutionary and biodemographic puzzle for decades. Although classic theory on the evolution of senescence predicts late-life walls of death, observations in experimental organisms document the opposite trend: a slowing in the rate of increase of mortality at advanced ages. Here, I analyze published life-history data on individual Drosophila melanogaster females and argue for a fundamental change in our understanding of mortality in this important model system. Mortality plateaus are not, as widely assumed, exclusive to late life, and are not explained by population heterogeneity-they are intimately connected to individual fecundity. Female flies begin adult life in the working stage, a period of active oviposition and low but accelerating mortality. Later they transition to the retired stage, a terminal period characterized by limited fecundity and relatively constant mortality. Because ages of transition differ between flies, age-synchronized cohorts contain a mix of working and retired flies. Early- and mid-life plateaus are obscured by the presence of working flies, but can be detected when cohorts are stratified by retirement status. Stage-specificity may be an important component of Drosophila life-history evolution. PMID:27166620

  3. Edge detection depends on achromatic channel in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanqiong; Ji, Xiaoxiao; Gong, Haiyun; Gong, Zhefeng; Liu, Li

    2012-10-01

    Edges represent important information in object recognition, and thus edge detection is crucial for animal survival. Various types of edges result from visual contrast, such as luminance contrast and color contrast. So far, the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying edge detection and the relationship between different edge information-processing pathways have been largely undemonstrated. In the present study, using a color light-emitting-diode-based Buridan's paradigm, we demonstrated that a blue/green demarcation is able to generate edge-orientation behavior in the adult fly. There is a blue/green intensity ratio, the so-called point of equal luminance, at which wild-type flies did not show obvious orientation behavior towards edges. This suggests that orientation behavior towards edges is dependent on luminance contrast in Drosophila. The results of mutants ninaE(17) and sev(LY3);rh5(2);rh6(1) demonstrated that achromatic R1-R6 photoreceptor cells, but not chromatic R7/R8 photoreceptor cells, were necessary for orientation behavior towards edges. Moreover, ectopic expression of rhodopsin 4 (Rh4), Rh5 or Rh6 could efficiently restore the edge-orientation defect in the ninaE(17) mutant. Altogether, our results show that R1-R6 photoreceptor cells are both necessary and sufficient for orientation behavior towards edges in Drosophila. PMID:22735352

  4. An integrated optical coherence microscopy imaging and optical stimulation system for optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is the clinical standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling cardiac rhythm, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its applications. Optogenetic pacing of the heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids the shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Drosophila melanogaster, which is a powerful model organism with orthologs of nearly 75% of human disease genes, has not been studied for optogenetic pacing in the heart. Here, we developed a non-invasive integrated optical pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging system to control the heart rhythm of Drosophila at different developmental stages using light. The OCM system is capable of providing high imaging speed (130 frames/s) and ultrahigh imaging resolutions (1.5 μm and 3.9 μm for axial and transverse resolutions, respectively). A light-sensitive pacemaker was developed in Drosophila by specifically expressing the light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in transgenic Drosophila heart. We achieved non-invasive and specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm throughout the fly's life cycle (larva, pupa, and adult) by stimulating the heart with 475 nm pulsed laser light. Heart response to stimulation pulses was monitored non-invasively with OCM. This integrated non-invasive optogenetic control and in vivo imaging technique provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology.

  5. EFFECTS ON ADH ACTIVITY AND DISTRIBUTION, FOLLOWING SELECTION FOR TOLERANCE TO ETHANOL IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KERVER, JWM; WOLF, W; KAMPING, A; VANDELDEN, W

    1992-01-01

    Strains of Drosophila melanogaster homozygous for either the Adh(F) or the Adh(S) allele were kept on food supplemented with ethanol for 20 generations. These strains (FE and SE) were tested for tolerance to ethanol and compared with control strains (FN and SN). The E strains showed increased tolera

  6. Components of Genetic Variation Associated with Second and Third Chromosome Gene Arrangements in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of naturally occuring combinations of second and third chromosome gene arrangements of Drosophila melanogaster on two quantitative traits were partitioned into parameters of additive, dominance and interaction components of genetic variation. Development time and preadult survival of the gene arrangement genotypes were measured under four experimental conditions. Gene arrangement effects, when significant, were predominantly additive under all conditions. Experimental conditions, ...

  7. Consistent effects of a major QTL for thermal resistance in field-released Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Norry, Fabian M

    2011-01-01

    Molecular genetic markers can be used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for thermal resistance and this has allowed characterization of a major QTL for knockdown resistance to high temperature in Drosophila melanogaster. The QTL showed trade-off associations with cold resistance under lab...

  8. CHANGES IN RELATIVE FITNESS WITH TEMPERATURE AMONG 2ND CHROMOSOME ARRANGEMENTS IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A

    1991-01-01

    Development time and body weight of In(2L)t, R (a putative short inversion on the left arm of the second chromosome) and ST (standard) karyotypes of Drosophila melanogaster were measured at different temperatures. Frequency changes were followed in populations polymorphic for In(2L)t and ST and kept

  9. A Novel Cell Death Gene Acts to Repair Patterning Defects in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kentaro M.; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development.

  10. Three Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens Exhibit Differential Toxicity Against Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were tested for toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster in an insect feeding assay. Insect eggs were placed on the surface of a non-nutritive agar plate supplemented with a food source that was non-inoculated or inoculated with P. fluorescens Pf0-1, SBW25, or Pf-...

  11. Lethality and Developmental Delay of Drosophila melanogaster Following Ingestion of Selected Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens secretes antimicrobial compounds that promote plant health and provide protection from pathogens. We used a non-invasive feeding assay to study the toxicity of P. fluorescens strains Pf0-1, SBW25, and Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains of P. fluorescens varie...

  12. Metabolomic profiling of rapid cold hardening and cold shock in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    study used untargeted (1)H NMR metabolomic profiling to examine the metabolomic response in Drosophila melanogaster during the 72 h following RCH and cold shock treatment. These findings are discussed in relation to the costs and benefits of RCH that are measured in terms of survival and reproductive...

  13. Nutritional Geometric Profiles of Insulin/IGF Expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Stephanie; Tatar, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) in Drosophila melanogaster is propagated by eight Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dilps) and is regulated by nutrition. To understand how dietary protein and sugar affect dilp expression, we followed the analytical concepts of the Nutritional Geometric Framework, feeding Drosophila adults media comprised of seven protein-to-carbohydrate ratios at four caloric concentrations. Transcript levels of all dilps and three IIS-regulated genes were measured. Each dilp presented a unique pattern upon a bivariate plot of sugar and protein. Dilp2 expression was greatest upon diets with low protein-to-carbohydrate ratio regardless of total caloric value. Dilp5 expression was highly expressed at approximately a 1:2 protein-to-carbohydrate ratio and its level increased with diet caloric content. Regression analysis revealed that protein-to-carbohydrate ratio and the interaction between this ratio and caloric content significantly affects dilp expression. The IIS-regulated transcripts 4eBP and InR showed strikingly different responses to diet composition: 4eBP was minimally expressed except when elevated at low caloric diets. InR expression increased with protein level, independent of caloric content. Values of published life history traits measured on similar diets revealed correlations between egg production and the expression of dilp8 4eBP, while low protein-to-carbohydrate ratio diets associated with long lifespan correlated with elevated dilp2. Analyzing how nutient composition associates with dilp expression and IIS reveals that nutritional status is modulated by different combinations of insulin-like peptides, and these features variously correlate to IIS-regulated life history traits. PMID:27171400

  14. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Ryan

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  15. Nutritional Geometric Profiles of Insulin/IGF Expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Post

    Full Text Available Insulin/IGF signaling (IIS in Drosophila melanogaster is propagated by eight Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dilps and is regulated by nutrition. To understand how dietary protein and sugar affect dilp expression, we followed the analytical concepts of the Nutritional Geometric Framework, feeding Drosophila adults media comprised of seven protein-to-carbohydrate ratios at four caloric concentrations. Transcript levels of all dilps and three IIS-regulated genes were measured. Each dilp presented a unique pattern upon a bivariate plot of sugar and protein. Dilp2 expression was greatest upon diets with low protein-to-carbohydrate ratio regardless of total caloric value. Dilp5 expression was highly expressed at approximately a 1:2 protein-to-carbohydrate ratio and its level increased with diet caloric content. Regression analysis revealed that protein-to-carbohydrate ratio and the interaction between this ratio and caloric content significantly affects dilp expression. The IIS-regulated transcripts 4eBP and InR showed strikingly different responses to diet composition: 4eBP was minimally expressed except when elevated at low caloric diets. InR expression increased with protein level, independent of caloric content. Values of published life history traits measured on similar diets revealed correlations between egg production and the expression of dilp8 4eBP, while low protein-to-carbohydrate ratio diets associated with long lifespan correlated with elevated dilp2. Analyzing how nutient composition associates with dilp expression and IIS reveals that nutritional status is modulated by different combinations of insulin-like peptides, and these features variously correlate to IIS-regulated life history traits.

  16. Conserved role of Drosophila melanogaster FoxP in motor coordination and courtship song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Kristy J; Wassmer, Taryn L; Deitcher, David L

    2014-07-15

    FoxP2 is a highly conserved vertebrate transcription factor known for its importance in human speech and language production. Disruption of FoxP2 in several vertebrate models indicates a conserved functional role for this gene in both sound production and motor coordination. Although FoxP2 is known to be strongly expressed in brain regions important for motor coordination, little is known about FoxP2's role in the nervous system. The recent discovery of the well-conserved Drosophila melanogaster homolog, FoxP, provides an opportunity to study the role of this crucial gene in an invertebrate model. We hypothesized that, like FoxP2, Drosophila FoxP is important for behaviors requiring fine motor coordination. We used targeted RNA interference to reduce expression of FoxP and assayed the effects on a variety of adult behaviors. Male flies with reduced FoxP expression exhibit decreased levels of courtship behavior, altered pulse-song structure, and sex-specific motor impairments in walking and flight. Acute disruption of synaptic activity in FoxP expressing neurons using a temperature-sensitive shibire allele dramatically impaired motor coordination. Utilizing a GFP reporter to visualize FoxP in the fly brain reveals expression in relatively few neurons in distributed clusters within the larval and adult CNS, including distinct labeling of the adult protocerebral bridge - a section of the insect central complex known to be important for motor coordination and thought to be homologous to areas of the vertebrate basal ganglia. Our results establish the necessity of this gene in motor coordination in an invertebrate model and suggest a functional homology with vertebrate FoxP2. PMID:24747661

  17. Radiation tolerance in the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster - effects of laboratory culturing and stages in life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced damages are due to direct effect of radiation energy or through free radical generation. Recent studies suggest Drosophila to be a good animal model to study radiation tolerance. The present study on female Drosophila melanogaster was conducted to observe 1. Variations in larval and adult radiation tolerance 2. Variations in laboratory culture and field populations of Drosophila. Third instar larvae were exposed to gamma radiation of 6, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy in gamma chamber GC 5000 (BRT, India). Larvae of flies collected from the field were reared for two generations in the lab before irradiation. The laboratory cultured files were from stocks that were maintained for more than 1000 generations. The larvae of field populations had higher survival rate at 51% as compared to 43% in case of cultured flies and thus more resistant. The III instar larval stage (lab culture) had a LD50 of 26 Gy as compared to LD 50 of 928 Gy in case of adult flies have ∼ 160 times higher tolerance compared to humans. Prolonged rearing comparable to 'domestication' might have induced reduction in tolerance. Larval stages have a lower tolerance than adults possibly due to higher metabolic rate. Adults are post-mitotic in nature with very low rate of cell division. This may contribute to higher tolerance. This however is in contradiction to studies of midge (Chironomous) where larvae also have higher tolerance. (author)

  18. The mechanisms underlying α-amanitin resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: a microarray analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea L Mitchell

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of toxin resistance in animals has important consequences for the ecology of species and our economy. Pesticide resistance in insects has been a subject of intensive study; however, very little is known about how Drosophila species became resistant to natural toxins with ecological relevance, such as α-amanitin that is produced in deadly poisonous mushrooms. Here we performed a microarray study to elucidate the genes, chromosomal loci, molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components that contribute to the α-amanitin resistance phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster. We suggest that toxin entry blockage through the cuticle, phase I and II detoxification, sequestration in lipid particles, and proteolytic cleavage of α-amanitin contribute in concert to this quantitative trait. We speculate that the resistance to mushroom toxins in D. melanogaster and perhaps in mycophagous Drosophila species has evolved as cross-resistance to pesticides, other xenobiotic substances, or environmental stress factors.

  19. Trichostatin A Extends the Lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster by Elevating hsp22 Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan TAO; Jun LU; Hui SUN; Yan-Mei ZHAO; Zhi-Gen YUAN; Xiao-Xue LI; Bai-Qu HUANG

    2004-01-01

    The level of acetylation of histones in nucleosomes is related to the longevity of yeast and animals. However, the mechanisms by which acetylation and deacetylation affect longevity remain unclear.In present study, we investigated the influence of histone acetylation modification on the expression of hsp22gene and the lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA). The results showed that TSA could extend the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore,TSA significantly promoted the hsp22 gene transcription, and affected the chromatin morphology at the locus of hsp22 gene along the polytene chromosome. Present data implicate that TSA may affect the lifespan of Drosophila through changing the level of histone acetylation and influencing the expression of hsp22 gene that is related to aging.

  20. Stage-specific effects of candidate heterochronic genes on variation in developmental time along an altitudinal cline of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Mensch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previously, we have shown there is clinal variation for egg-to-adult developmental time along geographic gradients in Drosophila melanogaster. Further, we also have identified mutations in genes involved in metabolic and neurogenic pathways that affect development time (heterochronic genes. However, we do not know whether these loci affect variation in developmental time in natural populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we constructed second chromosome substitution lines from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster from an altitudinal cline, and measured egg-adult development time for each line. We found not only a large amount of genetic variation for developmental time, but also positive associations of the development time with thermal amplitude and altitude. We performed genetic complementation tests using substitution lines with the longest and shortest developmental times and heterochronic mutations. We identified segregating variation for neurogenic and metabolic genes that largely affected the duration of the larval stages but had no impact on the timing of metamorphosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altitudinal clinal variation in developmental time for natural chromosome substitution lines provides a unique opportunity to dissect the response of heterochronic genes to environmental gradients. Ontogenetic stage-specific variation in invected, mastermind, cricklet and CG14591 may affect natural variation in development time and thermal evolution.

  1. Analysis of Amyloid Precursor Protein Function in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Marlène; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2016-01-01

    The Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment. Although these fragments have received much less attention than Aβ, a picture about their function is finally emerging. In contrast to mammals, which express three APP family members, Drosophila expresses only one APP protein called APP-like or APPL. Therefore APPL functions can be studied in flies without the complication that other APP family members may have redundant functions. Flies lacking APPL are viable but show defects in neuronal outgrowth in the central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) in addition to synaptic changes. Furthermore, APPL has been connected with axonal transport functions. In the adult nervous system, APPL, and more specifically its secreted fragments, can protect neurons from degeneration. APPL cleavage also prevents glial death. Lastly, APPL was found to be involved in behavioral deficits and in regulating sleep/activity patterns. This review, will describe the role of APPL in neuronal development and maintenance and briefly touch on its emerging function in circadian rhythms while an accompanying review will focus on its role in learning and memory formation. PMID:27507933

  2. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eLebreton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males.

  3. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Olsson, Marie; Becher, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor (InR) did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males. PMID:25566097

  4. Parallel Evolution of Copy-Number Variation across Continents in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrider, Daniel R; Hahn, Matthew W; Begun, David J

    2016-05-01

    Genetic differentiation across populations that is maintained in the presence of gene flow is a hallmark of spatially varying selection. In Drosophila melanogaster, the latitudinal clines across the eastern coasts of Australia and North America appear to be examples of this type of selection, with recent studies showing that a substantial portion of the D. melanogaster genome exhibits allele frequency differentiation with respect to latitude on both continents. As of yet there has been no genome-wide examination of differentiated copy-number variants (CNVs) in these geographic regions, despite their potential importance for phenotypic variation in Drosophila and other taxa. Here, we present an analysis of geographic variation in CNVs in D. melanogaster. We also present the first genomic analysis of geographic variation for copy-number variation in the sister species, D. simulans, in order to investigate patterns of parallel evolution in these close relatives. In D. melanogaster we find hundreds of CNVs, many of which show parallel patterns of geographic variation on both continents, lending support to the idea that they are influenced by spatially varying selection. These findings support the idea that polymorphic CNVs contribute to local adaptation in D. melanogaster In contrast, we find very few CNVs in D. simulans that are geographically differentiated in parallel on both continents, consistent with earlier work suggesting that clinal patterns are weaker in this species. PMID:26809315

  5. Mechanisms underlying hypoxia tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster: hairy as a metabolic switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhou

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-induced cell injury has been related to multiple pathological conditions. In order to render hypoxia-sensitive cells and tissues resistant to low O2 environment, in this current study, we used Drosophila melanogaster as a model to dissect the mechanisms underlying hypoxia-tolerance. A D. melanogaster strain that lives perpetually in an extremely low-oxygen environment (4% O2, an oxygen level that is equivalent to that over about 4,000 m above Mt. Everest was generated through laboratory selection pressure using a continuing reduction of O2 over many generations. This phenotype is genetically stable since selected flies, after several generations in room air, survive at this low O2 level. Gene expression profiling showed striking differences between tolerant and naïve flies, in larvae and adults, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Up-regulated genes in the tolerant flies included signal transduction pathways (e.g., Notch and Toll/Imd pathways, but metabolic genes were remarkably down-regulated in the larvae. Furthermore, a different allelic frequency and enzymatic activity of the triose phosphate isomerase (TPI was present in the tolerant versus naïve flies. The transcriptional suppressor, hairy, was up-regulated in the microarrays and its binding elements were present in the regulatory region of the specifically down-regulated metabolic genes but not others, and mutations in hairy significantly reduced hypoxia tolerance. We conclude that, the hypoxia-selected flies: (a altered their gene expression and genetic code, and (b coordinated their metabolic suppression, especially during development, with hairy acting as a metabolic switch, thus playing a crucial role in hypoxia-tolerance.

  6. Developmental Environment Effects on Sexual Selection in Male and Female Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Juliano; Pizzari, Tommaso; Wigby, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The developmental environment can potentially alter the adult social environment and influence traits targeted by sexual selection such as body size. In this study, we manipulated larval density in male and female Drosophila melanogaster, which results in distinct adult size phenotypes-high (low) densities for small (large) adults-and measured sexual selection in experimental groups consisting of adult males and females from high, low, or a mixture of low and high larval densities. Overall, large adult females (those reared at low larval density) had more matings, more mates and produced more offspring than small females (those reared at high larval density). The number of offspring produced by females was positively associated with their number of mates (i.e. there was a positive female Bateman gradient) in social groups where female size was experimentally varied, likely due to the covariance between female productivity and mating rate. For males, we found evidence that the larval environment affected the relative importance of sexual selection via mate number (Bateman gradients), mate productivity, paternity share, and their covariances. Mate number and mate productivity were significantly reduced for small males in social environments where males were of mixed sizes, versus social environments where all males were small, suggesting that social heterogeneity altered selection on this subset of males. Males are commonly assumed to benefit from mating with large females, but in contrast to expectations we found that in groups where both the male and female size varied, males did not gain more offspring per mating with large females. Collectively, our results indicate sex-specific effects of the developmental environment on the operation of sexual selection, via both the phenotype of individuals, and the phenotype of their competitors and mates. PMID:27167120

  7. Regulation of the Drosophila melanogaster Protein, Enhancer of Rudimentary, by Casein Kinase II

    OpenAIRE

    Gelsthorpe, Mark E.; Tan, Zehui; Phillips, Anthony; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Miller, Ashley; Wallace, Janell; Tsubota, Stuart I.

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gene enhancer of rudimentary, e(r), encodes a conserved protein, ER. Most ER homologs share two casein kinase II (CKII) target sites. In D. melanogaster, these sites are T18 and S24. A third CKII site, T63, has been seen only in drosophilids. The conservation of these CKII sites, particularly T18 and S24, suggests a role for these residues in the function of the protein. To test this hypothesis, these positions were mutated either to alanine as a nonphosphorylated ...

  8. Reduced glutathione biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster causes neuronal defects linked to copper deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Stephen W; La Fontaine, Sharon; Warr, Coral G; Burke, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide often considered to be the master antioxidant in cells. GSH plays an integral role in cellular redox regulation and is also known to have a role in mammalian copper homeostasis. In vitro evidence suggests that GSH is involved in copper uptake, sequestration and efflux. This study was undertaken to further investigate the roles that GSH plays in neuronal copper homeostasis in vivo, using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the Glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit gene (Gclc) that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis was utilised to genetically deplete GSH levels. When Gclc was knocked down in all neurons, this caused lethality, which was partially rescued by copper supplementation and was exacerbated by additional knockdown of the copper uptake transporter Ctr1A, or over-expression of the copper efflux transporter ATP7. Furthermore, when Gclc was knocked down in a subset of neuropeptide-producing cells, this resulted in adult progeny with unexpanded wings, a phenotype previously associated with copper dyshomeostasis. In these cells, Gclc suppression caused a decrease in axon branching, a phenotype further enhanced by ATP7 over-expression. Therefore, we conclude that GSH may play an important role in regulating neuronal copper levels and that reduction in GSH may lead to functional copper deficiency in neurons in vivo. We provide genetic evidence that glutathione (GSH) levels influence Cu content or distribution in vivo, in Drosophila neurons. GSH could be required for binding Cu imported by Ctr1A and distributing it to chaperones, such as Mtn, CCS and Atox1. Alternatively, GSH could modify the copper-binding and transport activities of Atox1 and the ATP7 efflux protein via glutathionylation of copper-binding cysteines.

  9. Mutations in ash1 and trx enhance P-element-dependent silencing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Allen; Locke, John

    2016-08-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mini-w(+) transgene in Pci is normally expressed throughout the adult eye; however, when other P or KP elements are present, a variegated-eye phenotype results, indicating random w(+) silencing during development called P-element-dependent silencing (PDS). Mutant Su(var)205 and Su(var)3-7 alleles act as haplo-suppressors/triplo-enhancers of this variegated phenotype, indicating that these heterochromatic modifiers act dose dependently in PDS. Previously, we recovered a spontaneous mutation of P{lacW}ci(Dplac) called P{lacW}ci(DplacE1) (E1) that variegated in the absence of P elements, presumably due to the insertion of an adjacent gypsy element. From a screen for genetic modifiers of E1 variegation, we describe here the isolation of five mutations in ash1 and three in trx that enhance the E1 variegated phenotype in a dose-dependent and cumulative manner. These mutant alleles enhance PDS at E1, and in E1/P{lacW}ci(Dplac), but suppress position effect variegation (PEV) at In(1)w(m)(4). This opposite action is consistent with a model where ASH1 and TRX mark transcriptionally active chromatin domains. If ASH1 or TRX function is lost or reduced, heterochromatin can spread into these domains creating a sink that diverts heterochromatic proteins from other variegating locations, which then may express a suppressed phenotype. PMID:27373142

  10. High sucrose consumption promotes obesity whereas its low consumption induces oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenko, Bohdana M; Kubrak, Olga I; Gospodaryov, Dmytro V; Perkhulyn, Natalia V; Yurkevych, Ihor S; Sanz, Alberto; Lushchak, Oleh V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2015-08-01

    The effects of sucrose in varied concentrations (0.25-20%) with constant amount of yeasts in larval diet on development and metabolic parameters of adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were studied. Larvae consumed more food at low sucrose diet, overeating with yeast. On high sucrose diet, larvae ingested more carbohydrates, despite consuming less food and obtaining less protein derived from yeast. High sucrose diet slowed down pupation and increased pupa mortality, enhanced levels of lipids and glycogen, increased dry body mass, decreased water content, i.e. resulted in obese phenotype. Furthermore, it suppressed reactive oxygen species-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase. The activity of catalase was gender-related. In males, at all sucrose concentrations used catalase activity was higher than at its concentration of 0.25%, whereas in females sucrose concentration virtually did not influence the activity. High sucrose diet increased content of protein thiols and the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The increase in sucrose concentration also enhanced uric acid level in females, but caused opposite effects in males. Development on high sucrose diets was accompanied by elevated steady-state insulin-like peptide 3 mRNA level. Finally, carbohydrate starvation at yeast overfeeding on low sucrose diets resulted in oxidative stress reflected by higher levels of oxidized lipids and proteins accompanied by increased superoxide dismutase activity. Potential mechanisms involved in regulation of redox processes by carbohydrates are discussed.

  11. Diflubenzuron inhibits reproduction of d-fferent strains of Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zbigniew Adamski; Jerzy Bloszyk; Jakub Musial; Marta Lysiak; Lech Urbaniak; Kazimierz Ziemnicki

    2009-01-01

    The effect of(1-(4-chlorophcnyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea)insecticide-diflubenzuron-on wild type and white type fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster(Meigen,1830)was studicd.Adult insects were placed in vials with different concentrations of the insecticide in the nutrient(from 0.048 to 48 mg of diflubenzuron per 1 cm3 of the nutrient).In each case,the insects showed some mortality,which was concentration-dependant.When comparingboth strains,we could observe different acute toxicities,with wild type being more resistant to diflubenzuron.However,subaeute toxicity was similar within both strains.In both strains the prolonged exposure led to the extinction of the majority of the populations(>70%).Although imagoes could freelycopulate,we did not observe copulating fruit fies,and we did not find either eggs or larvae in any of the exposed groups.These results indicate that genetic mutation which leads to different eye colour can also affect resistance and survival of insects in pesticide-exposed areas.

  12. Evidence for an essential deglycosylation-independent activity of PNGase in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Funakoshi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase is an enzyme which releases N-linked glycans from glycopeptides/glycoproteins. This enzyme plays a role in the ER-associated degradation (ERAD pathway in yeast and mice, but the biological importance of this activity remains unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we characterized the ortholog of cytoplasmic PNGases, PNGase-like (Pngl, in Drosophila melanogaster. Pngl was found to have a molecular weight of approximately 74K and was mainly localized in the cytosol. Pngl lacks a CXXC motif that is critical for enzymatic activity in other species and accordingly did not appear to possess PNGase activity, though it still retains carbohydrate-binding activity. We generated microdeletions in the Pngl locus in order to investigate the functional importance of this protein in vivo. Elimination of Pngl led to a serious developmental delay or arrest during the larval and pupal stages, and surviving mutant adult males and females were frequently sterile. Most importantly, these phenotypes were rescued by ubiquitous expression of Pngl, clearly indicating that those phenotypic consequences were indeed due to the lack of functional Pngl. Interestingly, a putative "catalytic-inactive" mutant could not rescue the growth-delay phenotype, indicating that a biochemical activity of this protein is important for its biological function. CONCLUSION: Pngl was shown to be inevitable for the proper developmental transition and the biochemical properties other than deglycosylation activity is important for its biological function.

  13. High sucrose consumption promotes obesity whereas its low consumption induces oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenko, Bohdana M; Kubrak, Olga I; Gospodaryov, Dmytro V; Perkhulyn, Natalia V; Yurkevych, Ihor S; Sanz, Alberto; Lushchak, Oleh V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2015-08-01

    The effects of sucrose in varied concentrations (0.25-20%) with constant amount of yeasts in larval diet on development and metabolic parameters of adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were studied. Larvae consumed more food at low sucrose diet, overeating with yeast. On high sucrose diet, larvae ingested more carbohydrates, despite consuming less food and obtaining less protein derived from yeast. High sucrose diet slowed down pupation and increased pupa mortality, enhanced levels of lipids and glycogen, increased dry body mass, decreased water content, i.e. resulted in obese phenotype. Furthermore, it suppressed reactive oxygen species-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase. The activity of catalase was gender-related. In males, at all sucrose concentrations used catalase activity was higher than at its concentration of 0.25%, whereas in females sucrose concentration virtually did not influence the activity. High sucrose diet increased content of protein thiols and the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The increase in sucrose concentration also enhanced uric acid level in females, but caused opposite effects in males. Development on high sucrose diets was accompanied by elevated steady-state insulin-like peptide 3 mRNA level. Finally, carbohydrate starvation at yeast overfeeding on low sucrose diets resulted in oxidative stress reflected by higher levels of oxidized lipids and proteins accompanied by increased superoxide dismutase activity. Potential mechanisms involved in regulation of redox processes by carbohydrates are discussed. PMID:26050918

  14. Comprehensive assessment of geographic variation in heat tolerance and hardening capacity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgro, Carla M.; Overgaard, Johannes; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård;

    2010-01-01

    (static) heat knockdown temperature increased towards temperate latitudes, probably reflecting a greater capacity of temperate flies to withstand sudden temperature increases during summer in temperate Australia. Larval viability showed a quadratic association with latitude under heat stress. Thus......We examined latitudinal variation in adult and larval heat tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia. Adults were assessed using static and ramping assays. Basal and hardened static heat knockdown time showed significant linear clines; heat tolerance increased towards the tropics......, particularly for hardened flies, suggesting that tropical populations have a greater hardening response. A similar pattern was evident for ramping heat knockdown time at 0.06 degrees C min-1 increase. There was no cline for ramping heat knockdown temperature (CTmax) at 0.1 degrees C min-1 increase. Acute...

  15. A comprehensive assessment of geographic variation in heat tolerance and hardening capacity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgrò, C M; Overgaard, J; Kristensen, T N;

    2010-01-01

    knockdown temperature increased towards temperate latitudes, probably reflecting a greater capacity of temperate flies to withstand sudden temperature increases during summer in temperate Australia. Larval viability showed a quadratic association with latitude under heat stress. Thus, patterns of heat......We examined latitudinal variation in adult and larval heat tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia. Adults were assessed using static and ramping assays. Basal and hardened static heat knockdown time showed significant linear clines; heat tolerance increased towards the tropics......, particularly for hardened flies, suggesting that tropical populations have a greater hardening response. A similar pattern was evident for ramping heat knockdown time at 0.06 °C min-1 increase. There was no cline for ramping heat knockdown temperature (CTmax) at 0.1 °C min-1 increase. Acute (static) heat...

  16. Metabolomic analysis of the selection response of Drosophila melanogaster to environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Overgaard, Johannes;

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the global metabolite response to artificial selection for tolerance to stressful conditions such as cold, heat, starvation, and desiccation, and for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Our findings were compared to data from other levels of biological organization, including ge....... The results highlight the extreme complexity of environmental stress adaptation and the difficulty of extrapolating and interpreting responses across levels of biological organization.......We investigated the global metabolite response to artificial selection for tolerance to stressful conditions such as cold, heat, starvation, and desiccation, and for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Our findings were compared to data from other levels of biological organization, including gene...... expression, physiological traits, and organismal stress tolerance phenotype. Overall, we found that selection for environmental stress tolerance changes the metabolomic (1)H NMR fingerprint largely in a similar manner independent of the trait selected for, indicating that experimental evolution led...

  17. Versatile P(acman) BAC Libraries for Transgenesis Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venken, Koen J.T.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Schulze, Karen L.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Spokony, Rebecca; Wan, Kenneth H.; Koriabine, Maxim; de Jong, Pieter J.; White, Kevin P.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2009-04-21

    We constructed Drosophila melanogaster BAC libraries with 21-kb and 83-kb inserts in the P(acman) system. Clones representing 12-fold coverage and encompassing more than 95percent of annotated genes were mapped onto the reference genome. These clones can be integrated into predetermined attP sites in the genome using Phi C31 integrase to rescue mutations. They can be modified through recombineering, for example to incorporate protein tags and assess expression patterns.

  18. Cerebrolysin Accelerates Metamorphosis and Attenuates Aging-Accelerating Effect of High Temperature in Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Navrotskaya, V.; Oxenkrug, G.; Vorobyova, L.; Sharma, H.; Muresanu, D.; Summergrad, P.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrolysin® (CBL) is a neuroprotective drug used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. CBL’s mechanisms of action remain unclear. Involvement of tryptophan (TRP)–kynurenine (KYN) pathway in neuroprotective effect of CBL might be suggested considering that modulation of KYN pathway of TRP metabolism by CBL, and protection against eclosion defect and prolongation of life span of Drosophila melanogaster with pharmacologically or genetically-induced down-regulation of TRP conversion ...

  19. The banana code – Natural blend processing in the olfactory circuitry of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    SilkeSachse; MarcoSchubert

    2014-01-01

    Odor information is predominantly perceived as complex odor blends. For Drosophila melanogaster one of the most attractive blends is emitted by an over-ripe banana. To analyze how the fly’s olfactory system processes natural blends we combined the experimental advantages of gas chromatography and functional imaging (GC-I). In this way, natural banana compounds were presented successively to the fly antenna in close to natural occurring concentrations. This technique allowed us to identify the...

  20. The banana code—natural blend processing in the olfactory circuitry of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, Marco; Hansson, Bill S.; Sachse, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Odor information is predominantly perceived as complex odor blends. For Drosophila melanogaster one of the most attractive blends is emitted by an over-ripe banana. To analyze how the fly's olfactory system processes natural blends we combined the experimental advantages of gas chromatography and functional imaging (GC-I). In this way, natural banana compounds were presented successively to the fly antenna in close to natural occurring concentrations. This technique allowed us to identify the...

  1. Mitochondrial Transcription Factor B2 Is Essential for Metabolic Function in Drosophila melanogaster Development*

    OpenAIRE

    Adán, Cristina; Matsushima, Yuichi; Hernández-Sierra, Rosana; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; González-Vioque, Emiliano; Calleja, Manuel; Aragón, Juan J.; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Garesse, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of the basal transcription machinery of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is critical to understand mitochondrial pathophysiology. In mammalian in vitro systems, mtDNA transcription requires mtRNA polymerase, transcription factor A (TFAM), and either transcription factor B1 (TFB1M) or B2 (TFB2M). We have silenced the expression of TFB2M by RNA interference in Drosophila melanogaster. RNA interference knockdown of TF2BM causes lethality by arrest of larval deve...

  2. Berberine Prolongs Life Span and Stimulates Locomotor Activity of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Navrotskaya, V. V.; Oxenkrug, G.; Vorobyova, L. I.; Summergrad, P.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster mutants with deficient kynurenine (KYN) formation from tryptophan (TRP) have longer life span than wild type flies. Administration of alpha-methyl-TRP and 5-methyl-TRY, the inhibitors of TRP-KYN metabolism, prolonged life span in wild-type flies. Both inhibitors are not available for human use. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Berberis aristata, is known as the herb widely used in traditional Chinese and Indian medicine. Berberin is a strong inhibitor ...

  3. Measurement of Fitness and Its Components in Six Laboratory Strains of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Tsuneyuki

    1984-01-01

    Six laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster were used to measure "net fitness" and its components by interspecific competition with D. hydei using 100 experimental populations. The "total competitive ability," an estimate of net fitness measured in these competition experiments, was tightly correlated with another measure of net fitness, the population size, in single-species experiments (phenotypic correlation rp = 0.675 and genotypic correlation rg = 0.997). Other components of fitnes...

  4. Adaptation to larval malnutrition does not affect fluctuating asymmetry in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Vijendravarma R.K.; Narasimha S.; Kawecki T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Both stress during development and response to directional selection were proposed to lead to reduced developmental stability of an organism, commonly measured as fluctuating asymmetry. Here, we investigated the direct physiological (plastic) effect of larval malnutrition and the effect of evolutionary adaptation to this form of stress on developmental stability, measured as fluctuating asymmetry of several wing measurements. The measurements were made on female Drosophila melanogaster from p...

  5. Genome-wide patterns of latitudinal differentiation among populations of Drosophila melanogaster from North America

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, Daniel K; Kapun, Martin; Nolte, Viola; Kofler, Robert; Schmidt, Paul S; Schlötterer, Christian; Flatt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the genetic underpinnings of adaptive change is a fundamental but largely unresolved problem in evolutionary biology. Drosophila melanogaster, an ancestrally tropical insect that has spread to temperate regions and become cosmopolitan, offers a powerful opportunity for identifying the molecular polymorphisms underlying clinal adaptation. Here, we use genome-wide next-generation sequencing of DNA pools ('pool-seq') from three populations collected along the North America...

  6. Clinal variation for amino acid polymorphisms at the Pgm locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Verrelli, B C; Eanes, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    Clinal variation is common for enzymes in the glycolytic pathway for Drosophila melanogaster and is generally accepted as an adaptive response to different climates. Although the enzyme phosphoglucomutase (PGM) possesses several allozyme polymorphisms, it is unique in that it had been reported to show no clinal variation. Our recent DNA sequence investigation of Pgm found extensive cryptic amino acid polymorphism segregating with the allozyme alleles. In this study, we characterize the geogra...

  7. Heritability of Two Morphological Characters within and among Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Coyne, Jerry A; Beecham, Edward

    1987-01-01

    Heritabilities of wing length and abdominal bristle number, as well as genetic correlations between these characters, were determined within and among populations of Drosophila melanogaster in nature. Substantial "natural" heritabilities were found when wild-caught flies from one population were compared to their laboratory-reared offspring. Natural heritabilities of bristle number approximated those derived from laboratory-raised parents and offspring, but wing length heritability was signif...

  8. Characterization of components of Z-bands in the fibrillar flight muscle of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Twelve monoclonal antibodies have been raised against proteins in preparations of Z-disks isolated from Drosophila melanogaster flight muscle. The monoclonal antibodies that recognized Z-band components were identified by immunofluorescence microscopy of flight muscle myofibrils. These antibodies have identified three Z-disk antigens on immunoblots of myofibrillar proteins. Monoclonal antibodies alpha:1-4 recognize a 90-100-kD protein which we identify as alpha-actinin on the basis of cross-r...

  9. [Retrotransposon MDG4 and its role in genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubomirskaia, N V; Kim, A I; Il'in, Iu V

    2003-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a ten-year study of genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster caused by transposition of the gypsy retrotransposon. The results of other authors working with an analogous system are analyzed. Possible mechanisms are suggested for the interaction of gypsy with the cell gene flamenco that participates in transposition control of this mobile element. PMID:12669411

  10. The Ash-1, Ash-2 and Trithorax Genes of Drosophila Melanogaster Are Functionally Related

    OpenAIRE

    Shearn, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mutations in the ash-1 and ash-2 genes of Drosophila melanogaster cause a wide variety of homeotic transformations that are similar to the transformations caused by mutations in the trithorax gene. Based on this similar variety of transformations, it was hypothesized that these genes are members of a functionally related set. Three genetic tests were employed here to evaluate that hypothesis. The first test was to examine interactions of ash-1, ash-2 and trithorax mutations with each other. D...

  11. A directed mutagenesis screen in Drosophila melanogaster reveals new mutants that influence hedgehog signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, N; van den Heuvel, M

    2000-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway has been recognized as essential for patterning processes in development of metazoan animal species. The signaling pathway is, however, not entirely understood. To start to address this problem, we set out to isolate new mutations that influence Hedgehog signaling. We performed a mutagenesis screen for mutations that dominantly suppress Hedgehog overexpression phenotypes in the Drosophila melanogaster wing. We isolated four mutations that influence Hedgehog sign...

  12. E(var)3-9 of Drosophila melanogaster Encodes a Zinc Finger Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Weiler, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of a gene's natural chromatin environment for its normal expression is poignantly illustrated when a change in chromosome position results in variable gene repression, such as is observed in position effect variegation (PEV) when the Drosophila melanogaster white (w) gene is juxtaposed with heterochromatin. The Enhancer of variegation 3-9 [E(var)3-9] gene was one of over a hundred loci identified in screens for mutations that dominantly modify PEV. Haploinsufficiency for E(var)...

  13. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Progress report, 1978-1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current progress in studies on the mutagenic effect of 3H incorporated into the DNA of Drosophila melanogaster is reported. It was shown that selected 3H precursors incorporated into DNA are metabolized. The forms (metabolites) of tritium found in the DNA molecules and the mutation frequencies resulting therefrom were identified. An alcohol dehydrogenase system was developed for recovering mutations that is capable of distinguishing between base changes and chain breakage events that may lead to the formation of deletions

  14. Effects of the isoflavone prunetin on gut health and stress response in male Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Piegholdt; Gerald Rimbach; Anika E. Wagner

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Asian diet is rich in fruits, vegetables and soy, the latter representing a significant source of dietary isoflavones. The isoflavone prunetin was recently identified to improve intestinal epithelial barrier function in vitro and to ameliorate general survival and overall health state in vivo in male Drosophila melanogaster. However, the prunetin-mediated health benefits in the fruit fly were ascertained under standard living conditions. As the loss of intestinal integrity is ...

  15. Drosophila melanogaster larvae control amylase secretion according to the hardness of food

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, Honami; Suzuki, Masataka G.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae excrete amylase and perform external digestion of their food. In this study, to investigate whether their external digestion ability varies in response to changes in the external environment, we measured the relative amount of amylase excreted by larvae using a new method: the iodine starch agar method (ISAM). Analysis using this method revealed that the amount of amylase excreted by larvae increased in accordance with the increase in the agar concentration. In ...

  16. A novel cell death gene acts to repair patterning defects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development. PMID:24671768

  17. S elements: A family of Tc1-like transposons in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merriman, P.J.; Grimes, C.D.; Ambroziak, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The S elements form a diverse family of long-inverted-repeat transposons within the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. These elements very in size and sequence, the longest consisting of 1736 bp with 234-bp inverted terminal repeats. The longest open reading frame in an intact S element could encode a 345-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide is homologous to the transposases of the mariner-Tc1 superfamily of transposable elements. S elements are ubiquitous in D. melanogaster populations and also appear to be present in the genomes of two sibling species; however, they seem to be absent from 17 other Drosophila species that were examined. Within D. melanogaster strains, there are, on average, 37.4 cytologically detectable S elements per diploid genome. These elements are scattered throughout the chromosomes, but several sites in both the euchromatin and {beta} heterochromatin are consistently occupied. The discovery of an S-element-insertion mutation and a reversion of this mutation indicates that S elements are at least occasionally mobile in the D. melanogaster genome. These elements seem to insert at an AT dinucleotide within a short palindrome and apparently duplicate that dinucleotide upon insertion. 44 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Edible bird's nest enhances antioxidant capacity and increases lifespan in Drosophila Melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q; Li, G; Yao, H; He, S; Li, H; Liu, S; Wu, Y; Lai, X

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aims to investigate the effects of edible bird's nest (EBN) on anti-aging efficacy. In order to investigate lifespan and mortality rate of flies, we treated flies with various doses of EBN. Besides, fecundity, water content and food are determined and heat-stress test is conducted after flies treating with different medium. Effects of EBN on total antioxidant activity (T-AOC), super-oxide dismutase activity (SOD), catalase activity (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined in drosophila melanogaster. Results indicated that flies in EBN treated group illustrated significantly lower mortality rates and longer median and maximum lifespan compared to control group (P<0.05). The fecundity in EBN-treated group was increased compared to control group. SOD levels and CAT activity were significantly increased, and MDA levels decreased in EBN-treated group compared to control group (P<0.01). In conclusion, EBN can extend lifespan, decrease mortality rate and increase survival rate in heat-stress test, and which can also promote SOD and CAT activity and reduce MDA levels. EBN is able to delay drosophila melanogaster aging, attributing to the increasing antioxidant enzyme activities and decreasing content of lipid peroxidation products in drosophila melanogaster. PMID:27188745

  19. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  20. Acute and chronic metal exposure impairs locomotion activity in Drosophila melanogaster: a model to study Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Ramirez, Leonardo; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    The biometals iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and copper (Cu) have been associated to Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinsonism. In this work, we report for the first time that acute (15 mM for up to 5 days) or chronic (0.5 mM for up to 15 days) Fe, Mn and Cu exposure significantly reduced life span and locomotor activity (i.e. climbing capabilities) in Drosophila melanogaster. It is shown that the concentration of those biometals dramatically increase in Drosophila's brain acutely or chronically fed with metal. We demonstrate that the metal accumulation in the fly's head is associated with the neurodegeneration of several dopaminergic neuronal clusters. Interestingly, it is found that the PPL2ab DAergic neuronal cluster was erode by the three metals in acute and chronic metal exposure and the PPL3 DAergic cluster was also erode by the three metals but in acute metal exposure only. Furthermore, we found that the chelator desferoxamine, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and D: -penicillamine were able to protect but not rescue D. melanogaster against metal intoxication. Taken together these data suggest that iron, manganese and copper are capable to destroy DAergic neurons in the fly's brain, thereby impairing their movement capabilities. This work provides for the first time metal-induced Parkinson-like symptoms in D. melanogaster. Understanding therefore the effects of biometals in the Drosophila model may provide insights into the toxic effect of metal ions and more effective therapeutic approaches to Parkinsonism. PMID:21594680

  1. Studien der Genexpressionsänderung während der Entwicklung von Drosophila melanogaster mittels DNA-Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Beckmann, Boris

    2003-01-01

    Die Fruchtfliege Drosophila melanogaster ist einer der am besten untersuchten Modellorganismen in der Entwicklungsbiologie. Die Kenntnis des Genoms und die Zahl der annotierten protein-kodierenden Gene von Drosophila sind jedoch Schwankungen unterworfen, da sie meist auf Computerberechnungen bereits bekannter Gene und nur teilweise auf experimentellen Nachweisen beruhen. Um das Transkriptom von Drosophila im Verlauf der Entwicklung zu untersuchen und neue potentielle Gene zu identifizieren wu...

  2. A high-quality catalog of the Drosophila melanogaster proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Erich; Ahrens, Christian H.; Mohanty, Sonaly;

    2007-01-01

    Understanding how proteins and their complex interaction networks convert the genomic information into a dynamic living organism is a fundamental challenge in biological sciences. As an important step towards understanding the systems biology of a complex eukaryote, we cataloged 63...... matching approximately 50% of D. melanogaster gene models. This library of proteotypic peptides should enable fast, targeted and quantitative proteomic studies to elucidate the systems biology of this model organism....

  3. Identification of common excitatory motoneurons in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Eiji; Komatsu, Akira; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2007-05-01

    In insects, four types of motoneurons have long been known, including fast motoneurons, slow motoneurons, common inhibitory motoneurons, and DUM neurons. They innervate the same muscle and control its contraction together. Recent studies in Drosophila have suggested the existence of another type of motoneuron, the common excitatory motoneuron. Here, we found that shakB-GAL4 produced by labels this type of motoneuron in Drosophila larvae. We found that Drosophila larvae have two common excitatory motoneurons in each abdominal segment, RP2 for dorsal muscles and MNSNb/d-Is for ventral muscles. They innervate most of the internal longitudinal or oblique muscles on the dorsal or ventral body wall with type-Is terminals and use glutamate as a transmitter. Electrophysiological recording indicated that stimulation of the RP2 axon evoked excitatory junctional potential in a dorsal muscle. PMID:17867850

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of Drosophila melanogaster and vector mosquito developmental genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing projects have presented the opportunity for analysis of developmental genes in three vector mosquito species: Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles gambiae. A comparative genomic analysis of developmental genes in Drosophila melanogaster and these three important vectors of human disease was performed in this investigation. While the study was comprehensive, special emphasis centered on genes that 1 are components of developmental signaling pathways, 2 regulate fundamental developmental processes, 3 are critical for the development of tissues of vector importance, 4 function in developmental processes known to have diverged within insects, and 5 encode microRNAs (miRNAs that regulate developmental transcripts in Drosophila. While most fruit fly developmental genes are conserved in the three vector mosquito species, several genes known to be critical for Drosophila development were not identified in one or more mosquito genomes. In other cases, mosquito lineage-specific gene gains with respect to D. melanogaster were noted. Sequence analyses also revealed that numerous repetitive sequences are a common structural feature of Drosophila and mosquito developmental genes. Finally, analysis of predicted miRNA binding sites in fruit fly and mosquito developmental genes suggests that the repertoire of developmental genes targeted by miRNAs is species-specific. The results of this study provide insight into the evolution of developmental genes and processes in dipterans and other arthropods, serve as a resource for those pursuing analysis of mosquito development, and will promote the design and refinement of functional analysis experiments.

  5. Tequila Regulates Insulin-Like Signaling and Extends Life Span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wen; Wang, Horng-Dar; Bai, Hua; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Yen, Jui-Hung; Tatar, Marc; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    The aging process is a universal phenomenon shared by all living organisms. The identification of longevity genes is important in that the study of these genes is likely to yield significant insights into human senescence. In this study, we have identified Tequila as a novel candidate gene involved in the regulation of longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that a hypomorphic mutation of Tequila (Teq(f01792)), as well as cell-specific downregulation of Tequila in insulin-producing neurons of the fly, significantly extends life span. Tequila deficiency-induced life-span extension is likely to be associated with reduced insulin-like signaling, because Tequila mutant flies display several common phenotypes of insulin dysregulation, including reduced circulating Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2), reduced Akt phosphorylation, reduced body size, and altered glucose homeostasis. These observations suggest that Tequila may confer life-span extension by acting as a modulator of Drosophila insulin-like signaling.

  6. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model for Lead Neurotoxicology and Toxicogenomics Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Mark Ruden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model animal for studying the neurotoxicology of lead. It has been known since ancient Roman times that long-term exposure to low levels of lead results in behavioral abnormalities, such as what is now known as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Because lead alters mechanisms that underlie developmental neuronal plasticity, chronic exposure of children, even at blood lead levels below the current CDC community action level (10 µg/dl, can result in reduced cognitive ability, increased likelihood of delinquency, behaviors associated with ADHD, changes in activity level, altered sensory function, delayed onset of sexual maturity in girls, and changes in immune function. In order to better understand how lead affects neuronal plasticity, we will describe recent findings from a Drosophila behavioral genetics laboratory, a Drosophila neurophysiology laboratory, and a Drosophila quantitative genetics laboratory who have joined forces to study the effects of lead on the Drosophila nervous system. Studying the effects of lead on Drosophila nervous system development will give us a better understanding of the mechanisms of Pb neurotoxicity in the developing human nervous system.

  7. Dynamics of genetic rescue in inbred Drosophila melanogaster populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, R.; Westerhof, M. D. D.; Roekx, L. P.; Pen, I.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic rescue has been proposed as a management strategy to improve the fitness of genetically eroded populations by alleviating inbreeding depression. We studied the dynamics of genetic rescue in inbred populations of Drosophila. Using balancer chromosomes, we show that the force of heterosis that

  8. Development of three Drosophila melanogaster strains with different sensitivity to volatile anesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin; HU Zhao-yang; YE Qi-quan; DAI Shuo-hua

    2009-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of action for volatile anesthetics remain unknown for centuries partly owing to the insufficient or ineffective research models. We designed this study to develop three strains derived from a wild-type Drosophila melanogaster with different sensitivities to volatile anesthetics, which may ultimately facilitate molecular and genetic studies of the mechanism involved.Methods Median effective doses (ED50) of sevoflurane in seven-day-old virgin female and male wild-type Drosophila melanogaster were determined. The sensitive males and females of percentile 6-10 were cultured for breeding sensitive offspring (S1). So did median ones of percentile 48-52 for breeding median offspring (M1), resistant ones of percentile 91-95 for breeding resistant offspring (R1). Process was repeated through 31 generations, in the 37th generation, S37,M37 and R37 were used to determine ED50 for enflurane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, halothane, methoxyflurane,chloroform and trichloroethylene, then ED50 values were correlated with minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values in human.Results From a wild-type Drosophila melanogaster we were able to breed three strains with high, median and low sevoflurane requirements. The ratio of sevoflurane requirements of three strains were 1.20:1.00:0.53 for females and 1.22:1.00:0.72 for males. Strains sensitive, median and resistant to sevoflurane were also sensitive, median and resistant to other volatile anesthetics. For eight anesthetics, ED50 values in three strains correlated directly with MAC values in human.Conclusions Three Drosophila me/anogaster strains with high, median and low sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, but with same hereditary background were developed. The ED50 are directly correlated with MAC in human for eight volatile anesthetics.

  9. Role of adipokinetic hormone and adenosine in the anti-stress response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanová, Milada; Stašková, Tereza; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The role of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and adenosine in the anti-stress response was studied in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults carrying a mutation in the Akh gene (Akh(1)), the adenosine receptor gene (AdoR(1)), or in both of these genes (Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant). Stress was induced by starvation or by the addition of an oxidative stressor paraquat (PQ) to food. Mortality tests revealed that the Akh(1) mutant was the most resistant to starvation, while the AdoR(1) mutant was the most sensitive. Conversely, the Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant was more sensitive to PQ toxicity than either of the single mutants. Administration of PQ significantly increased the Drome-AKH level in w(1118) and AdoR(1) larvae; however, this was not accompanied by a simultaneous increase in Akh gene expression. In contrast, PQ significantly increased the expression of the glutathione S-transferase D1 (GstD1) gene. The presence of both a functional adenosine receptor and AKH seem to be important for the proper control of GstD1 gene expression under oxidative stress, however, the latter appears to play more dominant role. On the other hand, differences in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity among the strains, and between untreated and PQ-treated groups were minimal. In addition, the glutathione level was significantly lower in all untreated AKH- or AdoR-deficient mutant flies as compared with the untreated control w(1118) flies and further declined following treatment with PQ. All oxidative stress characteristics modified by mutations in Akh gene were restored or even improved by 'rescue' mutation in flies which ectopically express Akh. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrate the important roles of AKH and adenosine in the anti-stress response elicited by PQ in a D. melanogaster model, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of adenosine in the anti-oxidative stress response in insects. PMID:27374982

  10. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  11. Identification of three novel noncoding RNAs from Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hualiang; ZHOU Hui; XIAO Zhendong; ZENG Xianfen; CHEN Junyu; ZHENG Tao; QU Lianghu

    2006-01-01

    Three novel small noncoding RNAs were identified from the conserved intronic regions of D. melanogaster by using comparative genomics method and molecular biology approach. One is a novel snoRNA in a combinated way, which displays structural features typical of C/D box snoRNA family and possesses a 10-nt-long rRNA antisense element for guiding the 2′-O-methylation of the D. melanogaster 28S rRNA at C2673. The other two are miRNAs whose predicted precursors adopt a stemloop structure characteristic of known miRNA. The two miRNAs genes appear to have ubiquitous expression profiles with ~23-nt RNA transcripts detected by Northern blotting. Our study revealed 396multi-species intronic conserved sequences (MCIS)that nested in the introns with a length from 100 to 500 bp. In addition to small RNA coding, the MCIS might function as cis-acting elements involved in gene transcription or post-transcriptional processing.

  12. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity.

  13. Gender based disruptive selection maintains body size polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaya Handa; K T Chandrashekara; Khushboo Kashyap; Geetanjali Sageena; Mallikarjun N Shakarad

    2014-09-01

    Darwinian fitness in holometabolous insects like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is reported to be positively correlated with body size. If large individuals in a population have higher fitness, then one would expect directional selection to operate leading to uniformly large individuals. However, size polymorphism persists in nature and needs further probing. We assessed the effect of body size on some of the fitness and fitness-related traits in replicate populations of genotypically large, genotypically small and phenotypically small D. melanogaster flies. In this study, the time taken to attain reproductive maturity and copulation duration were independent of fly size. Fecundity and longevity of large females were significantly higher when they partnered genotypically small males than when they were with genotypically larger or phenotypically small males. The increased female longevity when in association with genotypically small males was not due to selective early death of males that would release the female partner from presumed cost of persistent courtship. On the contrary, the genotypically as well as phenotypically small males had significantly higher longevity than large males. The virility of the genotypically small males was not significantly different from that of genotypically large males. Our results clearly show that selection on body size operates in the opposite direction (disruptive selection) for the two genders, thus explaining the persistence of size polymorphisms in the holometabolous insect, Drosophila melanogaster.

  14. Cas9-Mediated Genome Engineering in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for genome engineering has revolutionized our ability to modify the endogenous DNA sequence of many organisms, including Drosophila This system allows alteration of DNA sequences in situ with single base-pair precision and is now being used for a wide variety of applications. To use the CRISPR system effectively, various design parameters must be considered, including single guide RNA target site selection and identification of successful editing events. Here, we review recent advances in CRISPR methodology in Drosophila and introduce protocols for some of the more difficult aspects of CRISPR implementation: designing and generating CRISPR reagents and detecting indel mutations by high-resolution melt analysis. PMID:27587786

  15. Minocycline Effect on Life and Health Span of Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Oxenkrug, Gregory; Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Up-regulation of kynurenine (KYN) pathway of tryptophan (TRP) was suggested as one of the mechanisms of aging and aging-associated disorders. Genetic and pharmacological impairment of TRP – KYN metabolism resulted in prolongation of life span in Drosophila models. Minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective properties independent of its antibacterial activity, inhibited KYN formation from TRP. Since minocycline is the only FDA approved for human use medi...

  16. Odour avoidance learning in the larva of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sukant Khurana; Mohammed Bin AbuBaker; Obaid Siddiqi

    2009-10-01

    Drosophila larvae can be trained to avoid odours associated with electric shock. We describe here, an improved method of aversive conditioning and a procedure for decomposing learning retention curve that enables us to do a quantitative analysis of memory phases, short term (STM), middle term (MTM) and long term (LTM) as a function of training cycles. The same method of analysis when applied to learning mutants dunce, amnesiac, rutabaga and radish reveals memory deficits characteristic of the mutant strains.

  17. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translat...

  18. Arginine and proline applied as food additives stimulate high freeze tolerance in larvae of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Moos, Martin; Šimek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an insect of tropical origin. Its larval stage is evolutionarily adapted for rapid growth and development under warm conditions and shows high sensitivity to cold. In this study, we further developed an optimal acclimation and freezing protocol that significantly improves larval freeze tolerance (an ability to survive at -5°C when most of the freezable fraction of water is converted to ice). Using the optimal protocol, freeze survival to adult stage increased from 0.7% to 12.6% in the larvae fed standard diet (agar, sugar, yeast, cornmeal). Next, we fed the larvae diets augmented with 31 different amino compounds, administered in different concentrations, and observed their effects on larval metabolomic composition, viability, rate of development and freeze tolerance. While some diet additives were toxic, others showed positive effects on freeze tolerance. Statistical correlation revealed tight association between high freeze tolerance and high levels of amino compounds involved in arginine and proline metabolism. Proline- and arginine-augmented diets showed the highest potential, improving freeze survival to 42.1% and 50.6%, respectively. Two plausible mechanisms by which high concentrations of proline and arginine might stimulate high freeze tolerance are discussed: (i) proline, probably in combination with trehalose, could reduce partial unfolding of proteins and prevent membrane fusions in the larvae exposed to thermal stress (prior to freezing) or during freeze dehydration; (ii) both arginine and proline are exceptional among amino compounds in their ability to form supramolecular aggregates which probably bind partially unfolded proteins and inhibit their aggregation under increasing freeze dehydration. PMID:27489218

  19. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Sebald

    Full Text Available The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

  20. Molecular Analysis of an Allozyme Cline: Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Drosophila Melanogaster on the East Coast of North America

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, A.; Kreitman, M

    1993-01-01

    Clines may either be selectively maintained or be the by-product of nonadaptive processes related to population structure and history. Drosophila melanogaster populations on the east coast of North America show a latitudinal cline in the frequencies of two common electrophoretically distinguishable alleles at the alcohol dehydrogenase locus (Adh), designated Adh-S and Adh-F. This cline may either be adaptive or an artifact of a possible recent dual founding of North American D. melanogaster p...

  1. Somatic mutation and recombination induced with reactor thermal neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster; Mutacion y recombinacion somaticas inducidas con neutrones termicos de reactor en Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The SMART test of Drosophila melanogaster was used to quantify the effect over the somatic mutation and recombination induced by thermal and fast neutrons at the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the ININ at the power of 300 k W for times of 30, 60 and 120 minutes with total equivalent doses respectively of 20.8, 41.6 and 83.2 Sv. A linear relation between the radiation equivalent dose and the frequency of the genetic effects such as mutation and recombination was observed. The obtained results allow to conclude that SMART is a sensitive system to the induced damage by neutrons, so this can be used for studying its biological effects. (Author)

  2. Simulating Evolution of Drosophila melanogaster Ebony Mutants Using a Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Glennie

    2009-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are generally quite easy to understand and work with, and they are a popular choice in many cases. One area in which genetic algorithms are widely and successfully used is artificial life where they are used to simulate evolution of artificial creatures. However, despite...... their suggestive name, simplicity and popularity in artificial life, they do not seem to have gained a footing within the field of population genetics to simulate evolution of real organisms --- possibly because genetic algorithms are based on a rather crude simplification of the evolutionary mechanisms known...... today. However, in this paper we report how a standard genetic algorithm is used to successfully simulate evolution of ebony mutants in a population of Drosophila melanogaster (D.melanogaster). The results show a remarkable resemblance to the evolution observed in real biological experiments with ebony...

  3. Revisiting classic clines in Drosophila melanogaster in the age of genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrion, Jeffrey R; Hahn, Matthew W; Cooper, Brandon S

    2015-08-01

    Adaptation to spatially varying environments has been studied for decades, but advances in sequencing technology are now enabling researchers to investigate the landscape of genetic variation underlying this adaptation genome wide. In this review we highlight some of the decades-long research on local adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster from well-studied clines in North America and Australia. We explore the evidence for parallel adaptation and identify commonalities in the genes responding to clinal selection across continents as well as discussing instances where patterns differ among clines. We also investigate recent studies utilizing whole-genome data to identify clines in D. melanogaster and several other systems. Although connecting segregating genomic variation to variation in phenotypes and fitness remains challenging, clinal genomics is poised to increase our understanding of local adaptation and the selective pressures that drive the extensive phenotypic diversity observed in nature. PMID:26072452

  4. Extensive local adaptation within the chemosensory system following Drosophila melanogaster's global expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguello, J Roman; Cardoso-Moreira, Margarida; Grenier, Jennifer K; Gottipati, Srikanth; Clark, Andrew G; Benton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    How organisms adapt to new environments is of fundamental biological interest, but poorly understood at the genetic level. Chemosensory systems provide attractive models to address this problem, because they lie between external environmental signals and internal physiological responses. To investigate how selection has shaped the well-characterized chemosensory system of Drosophila melanogaster, we have analysed genome-wide data from five diverse populations. By couching population genomic analyses of chemosensory protein families within parallel analyses of other large families, we demonstrate that chemosensory proteins are not outliers for adaptive divergence between species. However, chemosensory families often display the strongest genome-wide signals of recent selection within D. melanogaster. We show that recent adaptation has operated almost exclusively on standing variation, and that patterns of adaptive mutations predict diverse effects on protein function. Finally, we provide evidence that chemosensory proteins have experienced relaxed constraint, and argue that this has been important for their rapid adaptation over short timescales. PMID:27292132

  5. Genetic Analysis of Micro-environmental Plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgante, Fabio; Sorensen, Daniel A; Sørensen, Peter;

    be genetically variable. This study utilized the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to accurately estimate the genetic variance of micro-environmental plasticity for chill coma recovery time and startle response. Estimates of broad sense heritabilities for both traits are substantial (from 0......Quantitative genetic models recognize the potential for genotype by environment interaction, whereby different genotypes have different plastic responses to changes in macro-environmental conditions. Recently, it has been recognized that micro-environmental plasticity (‘residual’ variance) may also...

  6. Variation in adult life history and stress resistance across five species of Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. Sharmila Bharathi; N. G. Prasad; Mallikarjun Shakarad; Amitabh Joshi

    2003-12-01

    Dry weight at eclosion, adult lifespan, lifetime fecundity, lipid and carbohydrate content at eclosion, and starvation and desiccation resistance at eclosion were assayed on a long-term laboratory population of Drosophila melanogaster, and one recently wild-caught population each of four other species of Drosophila, two from the melanogaster and two from the immigrans species group. The relationships among trait means across the five species did not conform to expectations based on correlations among these traits inferred from selection studies on D. melanogaster. In particular, the expected positive relationships between fecundity and size/lipid content, lipid content and starvation resistance, carbohydrate (glycogen) content and desiccation resistance, and the expected negative relationship between lifespan and fecundity were not observed. Most traits were strongly positively correlated between sexes across species, except for fractional lipid content and starvation resistance per microgram lipid. For most traits, there was evidence for significant sexual dimorphism but the degree of dimorphism did not vary across species except in the case of adult lifespan, starvation resistance per microgram lipid, and desiccation resistance per microgram carbohydrate. Overall, D. nasuta nasuta and D. sulfurigaster neonasuta (immigrans group) were heavier at eclosion than the melanogaster group species, and tended to have somewhat higher absolute lipid content and starvation resistance. Yet, these two immigrans group species were shorter-lived and had lower average daily fecundity than the melanogaster group species. The smallest species, D. malerkotliana (melanogaster group), had relatively high daily fecundity, intermediate lifespan and high fractional lipid content, especially in females. D. ananassae (melanogaster group) had the highest absolute and fractional carbohydrate content, but its desiccation resistance per microgram carbohydrate was the lowest among the five

  7. Persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in Drosophila melanogaster and the possible role of reproductive dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriesner, Peter; Conner, William R; Weeks, Andrew R; Turelli, Michael; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2016-05-01

    Field populations of arthropods are often polymorphic for Wolbachia but the factors maintaining intermediate Wolbachia frequencies are generally not understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia frequencies are highly variable across the globe. We document the persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in D. melanogaster populations from eastern Australia across at least 20 years, with frequencies generally high in the tropics but lower in cool temperate regions. The results are interpreted using a model of frequency dynamics incorporating cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), imperfect maternal transmission and Wolbachia effects on fitness. Clinal variation is less pronounced in eastern North America which may reflect annual recolonization at higher latitudes. Limited samples from Africa from latitudes matching our tropical and subtropical samples from Australia and North America show comparably high infection frequencies, but some equatorial samples show lower frequencies. Adult dormancy across cold periods may contribute to the Australian Wolbachia cline. Infected flies exposed to cold conditions for an extended period had reduced fecundity and viability, an effect not evident in unexposed controls. These fitness costs may contribute to the relatively low Wolbachia frequencies in Australian temperate areas; whereas different processes, including CI induced by young males, may contribute to higher frequencies in tropical locations. PMID:27076356

  8. [Mutation of Indy(p115) increases the life expectancy of imago of Drosophila melanogaster depending on sex and genetic background].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, N A; Trunova, S A; Omel'ianchuk, L V

    2004-04-01

    The Indyp115 allele in heterozygous state almost doubles the life span of adult Drosophila melanogaster, and this effect largely depends on the strain used for obtaining heterozygotes. Male and female life span depends on Indyp115 to a different degree. Apart from Indyp115 heterozygotes, sexual dimorphism for life span was also observed in strain Hikone-AW, but not in OregonR and TM3 balancer. In heterozygotes Indyp115/OR, both the average life span and female reproductive period increased as compared to OR control. No substantial increase in female reproductive period in Indyp115/Hk heterozygotes was found. In homozygotes for allele Indyp115, we have previously revealed two phases of embryotic lethality and lethality at the larval and pupa stages. Thus, allele Indyp115 has a double and opposite effect on Drosophila viability. On the one hand, it extends the life span of adult flies, on the other, decreases survival at preimaginal stages. PMID:15174281

  9. Label-free in vivo imaging of Drosophila melanogaster by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiao-Ying; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Chii-Wann; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most valuable organisms in genetic and developmental biology studies. Drosophila is a small organism with a short life cycle, and is inexpensive and easy to maintain. The entire genome of Drosophila has recently been sequenced (cite the reference). These advantages make fruit fly an attractive model organism for biomedical researches. Unlike humans, Drosophila can be subjected to genetic manipulation with relative ease. Originally, Drosophila was mostly used in classical genetics studies. In the model era of molecular biology, the fruit fly has become a model organ for developmental biology researches. In the past, numerous molecularly modified mutants with well defined genetic defects affecting different aspects of the developmental processes have been identified and studied. However, traditionally, the developmental defects of the mutant flies are mostly examined in isolated fixed tissues which preclude the observation of the dynamic interaction of the different cell types and the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the ability to image different organelles of the fruit fly without extrinsic labeling is invaluable for Drosophila biology. In this work, we successfully acquire in vivo images of both developing muscles and axons of motor neurons in the three larval stages by using the minimially invasive imaging modality of multiphoton (SHG) microscopy. We found that while SHG imaging is useful in revealing the muscular architecture of the developing larva, it is the autofluorescence signal that allows label-free imaging of various organelles to be achieved. Our results demonstrate that multiphoton imaging is a powerful technique for investigation the development of Drosophila.

  10. Control of dendritic morphogenesis by Trio in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Shivalkar

    Full Text Available Abl tyrosine kinase and its effectors among the Rho family of GTPases each act to control dendritic morphogenesis in Drosophila. It has not been established, however, which of the many GTPase regulators in the cell link these signaling molecules in the dendrite. In axons, the bifunctional guanine exchange factor, Trio, is an essential link between the Abl tyrosine kinase signaling pathway and Rho GTPases, particularly Rac, allowing these systems to act coordinately to control actin organization. In dendritic morphogenesis, however, Abl and Rac have contrary rather than reinforcing effects, raising the question of whether Trio is involved, and if so, whether it acts through Rac, Rho or both. We now find that Trio is expressed in sensory neurons of the Drosophila embryo and regulates their dendritic arborization. trio mutants display a reduction in dendritic branching and increase in average branch length, whereas over-expression of trio has the opposite effect. We further show that it is the Rac GEF domain of Trio, and not its Rho GEF domain that is primarily responsible for the dendritic function of Trio. Thus, Trio shapes the complexity of dendritic arbors and does so in a way that mimics the effects of its target, Rac.

  11. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  12. The Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster as a Model System to Study Cholesterol Metabolism and Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Niwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol has long been recognized for its versatile roles in influencing the biophysical properties of cell membranes and for serving as a precursor of steroid hormones. While many aspects of cholesterol biosynthesis are well understood, little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms of cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis. Recently, genetic approaches in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have been successfully used for the analysis of molecular mechanisms that regulate cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis. This paper summarizes the recent studies on genes that regulate cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis, including neverland, Niemann Pick type C(NPC disease genes, and DHR96.

  13. Circadian Consequence of Socio-Sexual Interactions in Fruit Flies Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Shahnaz Rahman Lone; Vijay Kumar Sharma

    2011-01-01

    In fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster, courtship is an elaborate ritual comprising chasing, dancing and singing by males to lure females for mating. Courtship interactions peak in the night and heterosexual couples display enhanced nighttime activity. What we do not know is if such socio-sexual interactions (SSI) leave long-lasting after-effects on circadian clock(s). Here we report the results of our study aimed at examining the after-effects of SSI (as a result of co-habitation of males an...

  14. Pleiotropic actions of the male pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Ejima, Aki

    2015-01-01

    The male-specific lipid, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) has multiple functions in intra-species communication in Drosophila melanogaster. The presence of cVA in a male suppresses courtship motivation of other males and averts male–male courtship. Meanwhile, aggression behaviors between males are promoted by a high amount of cVA caused by increased densities of male flies. cVA also works as a modifier of courtship memory, which is suppressed courtship motivation driven by previous unsuccessful cou...

  15. Proteomic Characterization of Inbreeding-Related Cold Sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, C.J.; Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie; Beck, Hans C.;

    2013-01-01

    Inbreeding depression is a widespread phenomenon of central importance to agriculture, medicine, conservation biology and evolutionary biology. Although the population genetic principles of inbreeding depression are well understood, we know little about its functional genomic causes. To provide...... insight into the molecular interplay between intrinsic stress responses, inbreeding depression and temperature tolerance, we performed a proteomic characterization of a well-defined conditional inbreeding effect in a single line of Drosophila melanogaster, which suffers from extreme cold sensitivity and...... differentially expressed proteins in our study appear to be involved in cold tolerance in non-inbred individuals. This suggest the conditional inbreeding effect to be caused by misregulation of physiological cold tolerance mechanisms....

  16. Asparagine deamidation reduces DNA-binding affinity of the Drosophila melanogaster Scr homeodomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Nichole E; Lelli, Katherine; Mann, Richard S; Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-10-24

    Spontaneous deamidation of asparagine is a non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins. Residue Asn 321 is the main site of deamidation of the Drosophila melanogaster Hox transcription factor Sex Combs Reduced (Scr). Formation of iso-aspartate, the major deamidation product, is detected by HNCACB triple-resonance NMR spectroscopy. The rate of deamidation is quantified by fitting the decay of Asn NH2 side-chain signals in a time-series of (15)N-(1)H HSQC NMR spectra. The deamidated form of Scr binds to specific DNA target sequences with reduced affinity as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay.

  17. The sleeping beauty: how reproductive diapause affects hormone signaling, metabolism, immune response and somatic maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrak, Olga I; Kučerová, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich; Nässel, Dick R

    2014-01-01

    Some organisms can adapt to seasonal and other environmental challenges by entering a state of dormancy, diapause. Thus, insects exposed to decreased temperature and short photoperiod enter a state of arrested development, lowered metabolism, and increased stress resistance. Drosophila melanogaster females can enter a shallow reproductive diapause in the adult stage, which drastically reduces organismal senescence, but little is known about the physiology and endocrinology associated with this dormancy, and the genes involved in its regulation. We induced diapause in D. melanogaster and monitored effects over 12 weeks on dynamics of ovary development, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as expression of genes involved in endocrine signaling, metabolism and innate immunity. During diapause food intake diminishes drastically, but circulating and stored carbohydrates and lipids are elevated. Gene transcripts of glucagon- and insulin-like peptides increase, and expression of several target genes of these peptides also change. Four key genes in innate immunity can be induced by infection in diapausing flies, and two of these, drosomycin and cecropin A1, are upregulated by diapause independently of infection. Diapausing flies display very low mortality, extended lifespan and decreased aging of the intestinal epithelium. Many phenotypes induced by diapause are reversed after one week of recovery from diapause conditions. Furthermore, mutant flies lacking specific insulin-like peptides (dilp5 and dilp2-3) display increased diapause incidence. Our study provides a first comprehensive characterization of reproductive diapause in D. melanogaster, and evidence that glucagon- and insulin-like signaling are among the key regulators of the altered physiology during this dormancy. PMID:25393614

  18. The Sleeping Beauty: How Reproductive Diapause Affects Hormone Signaling, Metabolism, Immune Response and Somatic Maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrak, Olga I.; Kučerová, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich; Nässel, Dick R.

    2014-01-01

    Some organisms can adapt to seasonal and other environmental challenges by entering a state of dormancy, diapause. Thus, insects exposed to decreased temperature and short photoperiod enter a state of arrested development, lowered metabolism, and increased stress resistance. Drosophila melanogaster females can enter a shallow reproductive diapause in the adult stage, which drastically reduces organismal senescence, but little is known about the physiology and endocrinology associated with this dormancy, and the genes involved in its regulation. We induced diapause in D. melanogaster and monitored effects over 12 weeks on dynamics of ovary development, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as expression of genes involved in endocrine signaling, metabolism and innate immunity. During diapause food intake diminishes drastically, but circulating and stored carbohydrates and lipids are elevated. Gene transcripts of glucagon- and insulin-like peptides increase, and expression of several target genes of these peptides also change. Four key genes in innate immunity can be induced by infection in diapausing flies, and two of these, drosomycin and cecropin A1, are upregulated by diapause independently of infection. Diapausing flies display very low mortality, extended lifespan and decreased aging of the intestinal epithelium. Many phenotypes induced by diapause are reversed after one week of recovery from diapause conditions. Furthermore, mutant flies lacking specific insulin-like peptides (dilp5 and dilp2-3) display increased diapause incidence. Our study provides a first comprehensive characterization of reproductive diapause in D. melanogaster, and evidence that glucagon- and insulin-like signaling are among the key regulators of the altered physiology during this dormancy. PMID:25393614

  19. The sleeping beauty: how reproductive diapause affects hormone signaling, metabolism, immune response and somatic maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga I Kubrak

    Full Text Available Some organisms can adapt to seasonal and other environmental challenges by entering a state of dormancy, diapause. Thus, insects exposed to decreased temperature and short photoperiod enter a state of arrested development, lowered metabolism, and increased stress resistance. Drosophila melanogaster females can enter a shallow reproductive diapause in the adult stage, which drastically reduces organismal senescence, but little is known about the physiology and endocrinology associated with this dormancy, and the genes involved in its regulation. We induced diapause in D. melanogaster and monitored effects over 12 weeks on dynamics of ovary development, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as expression of genes involved in endocrine signaling, metabolism and innate immunity. During diapause food intake diminishes drastically, but circulating and stored carbohydrates and lipids are elevated. Gene transcripts of glucagon- and insulin-like peptides increase, and expression of several target genes of these peptides also change. Four key genes in innate immunity can be induced by infection in diapausing flies, and two of these, drosomycin and cecropin A1, are upregulated by diapause independently of infection. Diapausing flies display very low mortality, extended lifespan and decreased aging of the intestinal epithelium. Many phenotypes induced by diapause are reversed after one week of recovery from diapause conditions. Furthermore, mutant flies lacking specific insulin-like peptides (dilp5 and dilp2-3 display increased diapause incidence. Our study provides a first comprehensive characterization of reproductive diapause in D. melanogaster, and evidence that glucagon- and insulin-like signaling are among the key regulators of the altered physiology during this dormancy.

  20. Altered expression of CG5961, a putative Drosophila melanogaster homologue of FBXO9, provides a new model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzetti, E M; Staveley, B E

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins act as the protein recognition component of the Skp-Cul-F-box class of ubiquitin ligases. Two members of a gene sub-family encoding these proteins, FBXO7 and FBXO32, have been implicated in the onset and progression of degenerative disease. FBXO7 is responsible for rare genetic forms of Parkinson disease, while FBXO32 has been implicated in muscle wasting. The third gene in this family, FBXO9, is related to growth signaling, but the role of this gene in degenerative disease pathways has not been thoroughly investigated. Characterizing the putative Drosophila melanogaster homologue of this gene, CG5961, enables modeling and analysis of the consequence of targeted alteration of gene function and the effects on the overall health of the organism. Comparison of the protein domains of Homo sapiens FBXO9 and the putative D. melanogaster homologue CG5961 revealed a high degree of conservation between the protein domains. Directed expression of CG5961 (via CG5961(EP)) and inhibition of CG5961 (through a stable RNAi transgene) in the developing D. melanogaster eye caused abnormalities in adult structures (ommatidia and inter-ommatidial bristles). Directed expression of either CG5961 or CG5961-RNAi in the dopaminergic neurons led to a reduced lifespan compared to that in lacZ controls. We showed that protein structures of CG5961 and FBXO9 are highly similar and studied the effects of altered expression of CG5961 in neuron-rich tissues. Our results suggest that CG5961 activity is necessary for the proper formation of neuronal tissue and that targeted alteration of gene expression in dopaminergic neurons leads to a reduced lifespan. PMID:27173356

  1. Toxicology and cytogenetic analysis of a Drosophila melanogaster mutant resistant to Imidacloprid and DDT

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    Kalajdžić Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to all major insecticide classes has developed in numerous and diverse insect field populations. Imidacloprid, the worldwide most used neonicotinoid, has been extensively applied during the last decade for the control of different insect pests. Lately, cases of sporadic resistance also to neonicotinoids, including Imidacloprid, have been reported. Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most popular model organisms in biology and, although not a pest species, a promising model system for insecticide resistance research. In this study, we present a toxicological and karyotypic analysis of a Drosophila mutant (MiT[w-]3R2 resistant to Imidacloprid and cross-resistant to DDT. Karyotype analysis of polytene chromosome of MiT[w-]3R2 flies did not identify any apparent structural change of the polytene chromosome linked with the resistance phenotype. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173012

  2. [Mobile genetic element MDG4 (gypsy) in Drosophila melanogaster. Features of structure and regulation of transposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusulidu, L K; Karpova, N N; Razorenova, O V; Glukhov, I A; Kim, A I; Liubomirskaia, N V; Il'in, Iu V

    2001-12-01

    Distribution of two structural functional variants of the MDG4 (gypsy) mobile genetic element was examined in 44 strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The results obtained suggest that less transpositionally active MDG4 variant is more ancient component of the Drosophila genome. Using Southern blotting, five strains characterized by increased copy number of MDG4 with significant prevalence of the active variant over the less active one were selected for further analysis. Genetic analysis of these strains led to the suggestion that some of them carry factors that mobilize MDG4 independently from the cellular flamenco gene known to be responsible for transposition of this element. Other strains probably contained a suppressor of the flam- mutant allele causing active transpositions of the MDG4. Thus, the material for studying poorly examined relationships between the retrovirus and the host cell genome was obtained. PMID:11785284

  3. Identifying neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors in Drosophila melanogaster by exploiting genomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Frank; Williamson, Michael; Cazzamali, Giuseppe;

    2006-01-01

    Most neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors belong to the large superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These cell membrane proteins steer many important processes such as development, reproduction, homeostasis and behaviour when activated by their corresponding ligands. The first...... insect genome, that of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, was sequenced in 2000, and about 200 GPCRs have been annnotated in this model insect. About 50 of these receptors were predicted to have neuropeptides or protein hormones as their ligands. Since 2000, the cDNAs of most of these candidate...... receptors have been cloned and for many receptors the endogenous ligand has been identified. In this review, we will give an update about the current knowledge of all Drosophila neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors, and discuss their phylogenetic relationships. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Feb...

  4. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen. PMID:26431585

  5. Genetic Analysis of Micro-environmental Plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgante, Fabio; Sorensen, Daniel A; Sørensen, Peter;

    Quantitative genetic models recognize the potential for genotype by environment interaction, whereby different genotypes have different plastic responses to changes in macro-environmental conditions. Recently, it has been recognized that micro-environmental plasticity (‘residual’ variance) may also...... be genetically variable. This study utilized the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to accurately estimate the genetic variance of micro-environmental plasticity for chill coma recovery time and startle response. Estimates of broad sense heritabilities for both traits are substantial (from 0.51 to 0.......77), of the same order as the heritability at the level of the trait mean for startle response and even larger for chill coma recovery. Genome wide association analyses identified molecular variants (from 15 to 31 depending on the sex and the trait) associated with micro-environmental plasticity. These findings...

  6. TRII: A Probabilistic Scoring of Drosophila melanogaster Translation Initiation Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Relative individual information is a measurement that scores the quality of DNA- and RNA-binding sites for biological machines. The development of analytical approaches to increase the power of this scoring method will improve its utility in evaluating the functions of motifs. In this study, the scoring method was applied to potential translation initiation sites in Drosophila to compute Translation Relative Individual Information (TRII scores. The weight matrix at the core of the scoring method was optimized based on high-confidence translation initiation sites identified by using a progressive partitioning approach. Comparing the distributions of TRII scores for sites of interest with those for high-confidence translation initiation sites and random sequences provides a new methodology for assessing the quality of translation initiation sites. The optimized weight matrices can also be used to describe the consensus at translation initiation sites, providing a quantitative measure of preferred and avoided nucleotides at each position.

  7. [The Effect of Transcription on Enhancer Activity in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, M M; Davydova, A I; Lomaev, D V; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the level of gene transcription is under the control of DNA regulatory elements, such as promoter, from which transcription is initiated with the participation of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors, as well as the enhancer, which increase the rate of transcription with the involvement of activator proteins and cofactors. It was demonstrated that enhancers are often located in the transcribed regions of the genome. We showed earlier that transcription negatively affected the activity of enhancers in Drosophila in model transgenic systems. In this study, we tested the effect of the distance between the leading promoter, enhancer, and target promoter on the inhibitory effect of transcriptions of different strengths. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of transcription remained, but weakened with increased distance between the leading promoter and enhancer and with decreased distance between the enhancer and target promoter. Thus, transcription can modulate the activity of enhancers by controlling its maximum level.

  8. Postponed reproduction as an adaptation to winter conditions in Drosophila melanogaster: evidence for clinal variation under semi-natural conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrovski, P.; Hoffmann, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Patterns of climatic adaptation in drosophila and other insects have largely been inferred from laboratory comparisons of traits that vary clinally. Here, we extend this research to comparisons under semi-natural conditions. To test for clinal variation in reproductive patterns and survival over winter, Drosophila melanogaster populations were initiated from seven collection sites along the eastern coast of Australia, ranging from tropical to temperate regions. The fecundity and survival of t...

  9. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan, E-mail: rbwagner@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Pittendrigh, Barry R. [Department of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign (United States); Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 {mu}m long, 0.5-1 {mu}m diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m{sup 2}, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  10. Crystal structure of Diedel, a marker of the immune response of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Coste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila melanogaster gene CG11501 is up regulated after a septic injury and was proposed to act as a negative regulator of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. Diedel, the CG11501 gene product, is a small protein of 115 residues with 10 cysteines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have produced Diedel in Drosophila S2 cells as an extra cellular protein thanks to its own signal peptide and solved its crystal structure at 1.15 Å resolution by SIRAS using an iodo derivative. Diedel is composed of two sub domains SD1 and SD2. SD1 is made of an antiparallel β-sheet covered by an α-helix and displays a ferredoxin-like fold. SD2 reveals a new protein fold made of loops connected by four disulfide bridges. Further structural analysis identified conserved hydrophobic residues on the surface of Diedel that may constitute a potential binding site. The existence of two conformations, cis and trans, for the proline 52 may be of interest as prolyl peptidyl isomerisation has been shown to play a role in several physiological mechanisms. The genome of D. melanogaster contains two other genes coding for proteins homologous to Diedel, namely CG43228 and CG34329. Strikingly, apart from Drosophila and the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, Diedel-related sequences were exclusively identified in a few insect DNA viruses of the Baculoviridae and Ascoviridae families. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Diedel, a marker of the Drosophila antimicrobial/antiviral response, is a member of a small family of proteins present in drosophilids, aphids and DNA viruses infecting lepidopterans. Diedel is an extracellular protein composed of two sub-domains. Two special structural features (hydrophobic surface patch and cis/trans conformation for proline 52 may indicate a putative interaction site, and support an extra cellular signaling function for Diedel, which is in accordance with its proposed role as negative regulator of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

  11. Functional significance of amylase polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster. III. Ontogeny of amylase and some alpha-glucosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorn, A J; Scharloo, W

    1980-02-01

    Changes in amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.1), maltase (E.C. 3.2.1.20), sucrase, and PNPGase activities in relation to changes in wet weight and protein content were studied during the development of larvae and adult flies from two strains of Drosophila melanogaster, homozygous for different amylase alleles. All alpha-glucosidase activities increase exponentially during a large part of larval development, parallel to the increase in weight, and drop at the end of the third instar. Amylase activity of the Amy1 strain follows the same pattern. In contrast, amylase activity of the Amy4,6 strain continues its exponential increase longer. In the third larval instar amylase activity in the Amy4,6 strain becomes much higher than in the Amy1 strain. During the first hours of adult life amylase activity of the two strains does not differ. Then Amy4,6 activity starts to rise and becomes much higher (4-5 times) than Amy1 amylase activity, which remains approximately constant. All adult enzyme activities are much higher than in larvae. Comparison of enzyme activity of amylase and alpha-glucosidases in larvae and adults confirms that differences in amylase activities can become important only when starch is a limiting factor in the food.

  12. An experimental test for indirect benefits in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ödeen Anders

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite much empirical attention, tests for indirect benefits of mate choice have rarely considered the major components of sexual and nonsexual offspring fitness relevant to a population. Here we use a novel experimental design to test for the existence of any indirect benefits in a laboratory adapted population of D. melanogaster. Our experiment compared the fitness (mating success, longevity, and productivity of individuals possessing genomes that derived two generations previously from males that were either entirely successful (studs or wholly unsuccessful (duds at achieving mates in three subsequent rounds of mating trials. Results Males from the stud treatment were 30% more successful on average at securing mates than males from the dud treatment. In contrast, we found no difference between treatments in measures of productivity or of longevity when measured in a mixed-sex environment. In the absence of females, however, males in the stud treatment outlived males in the dud treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that mating with successful males in this population provides an indirect benefit to females and that, at least in this environment, the benefit arises primarily through the production of more attractive male offspring. However, it is unclear whether this represents solely a traditional sexy sons benefit or whether there is an additional good genes component (with male offspring simply allocating their surplus condition to traits that enhance their mating success. The lack of any detectable differences in female fitness between the two treatments suggests the former, although the longevity advantage of males in the stud treatment when females were absent is consistent with the latter. Determining the effect of this indirect benefit on the evolution of female mate preferences (or resistance will require comparable data on the direct costs of mating with various males, and an understanding of how these costs

  13. Calmodulin affects sensitization of Drosophila melanogaster odorant receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha eMukunda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flying insects have developed a remarkably sensitive olfactory system to detect faint and turbulent odor traces. This ability is linked to the olfactory receptors class of odorant receptors (ORs, occurring exclusively in winged insects. ORs form heteromeric complexes of an odorant specific receptor protein (OrX and a highly conserved co-receptor protein (Orco. The ORs form ligand gated ion channels that are tuned by intracellular signaling systems. Repetitive subthreshold odor stimulation of olfactory sensory neurons sensitizes insect ORs. This OR sensitization process requires Orco activity. In the present study we first asked whether OR sensitization can be monitored with heterologously expressed OR proteins. Using electrophysiological and calcium imaging methods we demonstrate that D. melanogaster OR proteins expressed in CHO cells show sensitization upon repeated weak stimulation. This was found for OR channels formed by Orco as well as by Or22a or Or56a and Orco. Moreover, we show that inhibition of calmodulin (CaM action on OR proteins, expressed in CHO cells, abolishes any sensitization. Finally, we investigated the sensitization phenomenon using an ex vivo preparation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs expressing Or22a inside the fly’s antenna. Using calcium imaging, we observed sensitization in the dendrites as well as in the soma. Inhibition of calmodulin with W7 disrupted the sensitization within the outer dendritic shaft, whereas the sensitization remained in the other OSN compartments. Taken together, our results suggest that CaM action is involved in sensitizing the OR complex and that this mechanisms accounts for the sensitization in the outer dendrites, whereas further mechanisms contribute to the sensitization observed in the other OSN compartments. The use of heterologously expressed OR proteins appears to be suitable for further investigations on the mechanistic basis of OR sensitization, while investigations on native

  14. Distinct mechanisms underlying tolerance to intermittent and constant hypoxia in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Azad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Constant hypoxia (CH and intermittent hypoxia (IH occur during several pathological conditions such as asthma and obstructive sleep apnea. Our research is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to injury or adaptation to hypoxic stress using Drosophila as a model system. Our current genome-wide study is designed to investigate gene expression changes and identify protective mechanism(s in D. melanogaster after exposure to severe (1% O(2 intermittent or constant hypoxia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our microarray analysis has identified multiple gene families that are up- or down-regulated in response to acute CH or IH. We observed distinct responses to IH and CH in gene expression that varied in the number of genes and type of gene families. We then studied the role of candidate genes (up-or down-regulated in hypoxia tolerance (adult survival for longer periods (CH-7 days, IH-10 days under severe CH or IH. Heat shock proteins up-regulation (specifically Hsp23 and Hsp70 led to a significant increase in adult survival (as compared to controls of P-element lines during CH. In contrast, during IH treatment the up-regulation of Mdr49 and l(208717 genes (P-element lines provided survival advantage over controls. This suggests that the increased transcript levels following treatment with either paradigm play an important role in tolerance to severe hypoxia. Furthermore, by over-expressing Hsp70 in specific tissues, we found that up-regulation of Hsp70 in heart and brain play critical role in tolerance to CH in flies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We observed that the gene expression response to IH or CH is specific and paradigm-dependent. We have identified several genes Hsp23, Hsp70, CG1600, l(208717 and Mdr49 that play an important role in hypoxia tolerance whether it is in CH or IH. These data provide further clues about the mechanisms by which IH or CH lead to cell injury and morbidity or adaptation and survival.

  15. Characterization of the flamenco region of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, V; Prud'homme, N; Kim, A; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    2001-06-01

    The flamenco gene, located at 20A1-3 in the beta-heterochromatin of the Drosophila X chromosome, is a major regulator of the gypsy/mdg4 endogenous retrovirus. As a first step to characterize this gene, approximately 100 kb of genomic DNA flanking a P-element-induced mutation of flamenco was isolated. This DNA is located in a sequencing gap of the Celera Genomics project, i.e., one of those parts of the genome in which the "shotgun" sequence could not be assembled, probably because it contains long stretches of repetitive DNA, especially on the proximal side of the P insertion point. Deficiency mapping indicated that sequences required for the normal flamenco function are located >130 kb proximal to the insertion site. The distal part of the cloned DNA does, nevertheless, contain several unique sequences, including at least four different transcription units. Dip1, the closest one to the P-element insertion point, might be a good candidate for a gypsy regulator, since it putatively encodes a nuclear protein containing two double-stranded RNA-binding domains. However, transgenes containing dip1 genomic DNA were not able to rescue flamenco mutant flies. The possible nature of the missing flamenco sequences is discussed. PMID:11404334

  16. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues.

  17. Effects of human food grade titanium dioxide nanoparticle dietary exposure on Drosophila melanogaster survival, fecundity, pupation and expression of antioxidant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Boris; Cvetković, Vladimir J; Mitrović, Tatjana Lj

    2016-02-01

    The fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster was exposed to the human food grade of E171 titanium dioxide (TiO2). This is a special grade of TiO2 which is frequently omitted in nanotoxicology studies dealing with TiO2, yet it is the most relevant grade regarding oral exposure of humans. D. melanogaster larvae were exposed to 0.002 mg mL(-1), 0.02 mg mL(-1), 0.2 mg mL(-1), and 2 mg mL(-1) of TiO2 in feeding medium, and the survival, fecundity, pupation time, and expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response were monitored. TiO2 did not affect survival but significantly increased time to pupation (p < 0.001). Fecundity of D. melanogaster was unaffected by the treatment. Expression of the gene for catalase was markedly downregulated by the treatment, while the effect on the downregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 was less pronounced. After four days of dietary exposure TiO2 was present in a significant amount in larvae, but was not transferred to adults during metamorphosis. Two individuals with aberrant phenotype similar to previously described gold nanoparticles induced mutant phenotypes were detected in the group exposed to TiO2. In general, TiO2 showed little toxicity toward D. melanogaster at concentrations relevant to oral exposure of humans.

  18. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Murdock, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant–insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology. PMID:27594789

  19. Determination of methyl methanesulfonate pretreatment effect in Drosophila melanogaster larvaes upon repair mechanisms in somatic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To make evident the existence of SOS repair mecanism in somatic cells, larvaes of drosophila melanogaster with MWH markers for females and FLR markers for males were used. This larvaes received a pretreatment with MMS at concentrations of 0.0007% and 0.0014% during 24 hours and latter a treatment with gamma rays at different dosis. SMART program was used to make stastistical evaluations. Small spots were observed which can have two origins. First could be damage in the last part of third stage in which cells are in last divisions and second could be the damage to larvaes in early stages in shich pretreatment with MMS cause lesions which prevent the reproduction of the cells. Also big spots were observed which presence is due to recombination. It was detected than the bigger the concentration of MMS and radiation dose, the bigger the induced damage. In some groups such observation was impossible may be to technical problems as relative humidity, out of phase in the growth of larvaes giving place that treatment were given in three stages. For this reasons it was impossible to discriminate if drosophila melanogaster is wheter or not capable to induce a repair mechanism (Author)

  20. Recognition and Detoxification of the Insecticide DDT by Drosophila melanogaster Glutathione S-Transferase D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, Wai Yee; Feil, Susanne C.; Ng, Hooi Ling; Gorman, Michael A.; Morton, Craig J.; Pyke, James; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bieri, Michael; Mok, Yee-Foong; Robin, Charles; Gooley, Paul R.; Parker, Michael W.; Batterham, Philip (SVIMR-A); (Melbourne)

    2010-06-14

    GSTD1 is one of several insect glutathione S-transferases capable of metabolizing the insecticide DDT. Here we use crystallography and NMR to elucidate the binding of DDT and glutathione to GSTD1. The crystal structure of Drosophila melanogaster GSTD1 has been determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution, which reveals that the enzyme adopts the canonical GST fold but with a partially occluded active site caused by the packing of a C-terminal helix against one wall of the binding site for substrates. This helix would need to unwind or be displaced to enable catalysis. When the C-terminal helix is removed from the model of the crystal structure, DDT can be computationally docked into the active site in an orientation favoring catalysis. Two-dimensional {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence NMR experiments of GSTD1 indicate that conformational changes occur upon glutathione and DDT binding and the residues that broaden upon DDT binding support the predicted binding site. We also show that the ancestral GSTD1 is likely to have possessed DDT dehydrochlorinase activity because both GSTD1 from D. melanogaster and its sibling species, Drosophila simulans, have this activity.

  1. MitoDrome: a database of Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes encoding proteins targeted to the mitochondrion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiello, Marco; Licciulli, Flavio; Catalano, Domenico; Attimonelli, Marcella; Caggese, Corrado

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles present in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells; although they have their own DNA, the majority of the proteins necessary for a functional mitochondrion are coded by the nuclear DNA and only after transcription and translation they are imported in the mitochondrion as proteins. The primary role of the mitochondrion is electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. Although it has been studied for a long time, the interest of researchers in mitochondria is still alive thanks to the discovery of mitochondrial role in apoptosis, aging and cancer. Aim of the MitoDrome database is to annotate the Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in order to contribute to the functional characterization of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins and to knowledge of gene diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunctions. Indeed D. melanogaster is one of the most studied organisms and a model for the Human genome. Data are derived from the comparison of Human mitochondrial proteins versus the Drosophila genome, ESTs and cDNA sequence data available in the FlyBase database. Links from the MitoDrome entries to the related homologous entries available in MitoNuC will be soon imple-mented. The MitoDrome database is available at http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/BIG/MitoDrome. Data are organised in a flat-file format and can be retrieved using the SRS system. PMID:12520013

  2. Regulated protein depletion by the auxin-inducible degradation system in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Martina; Blattner, Ariane C; Lehner, Christian F

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of consequences resulting after experimental elimination of gene function has been and will continue to be an extremely successful strategy in biological research. Mutational elimination of gene function has been widely used in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. RNA interference is used extensively as well. In the fly, exceptionally precise temporal and spatial control over elimination of gene function can be achieved in combination with sophisticated transgenic approaches and clonal analyses. However, the methods that act at the gene and transcript level cannot eliminate protein products which are already present at the time when mutant cells are generated or RNA interference is started. Targeted inducible protein degradation is therefore of considerable interest for controlled rapid elimination of gene function. To this end, a degradation system was developed in yeast exploiting TIR1, a plant F box protein, which can recruit proteins with an auxin-inducible degron to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, but only in the presence of the phytohormone auxin. Here we demonstrate that the auxin-inducible degradation system functions efficiently also in Drosophila melanogaster. Neither auxin nor TIR1 expression have obvious toxic effects in this organism, and in combination they result in rapid degradation of a target protein fused to the auxin-inducible degron. PMID:27010248

  3. Nora Virus Transmission in "Drosophila Melanogaster": An Investigation to Teach Viral Infection and Prophylaxis to Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherred, Wayland; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    Proper hand hygiene accompanied with environmental surface disinfection provides a comprehensive approach to control and prevent respiratory and gastrointestinal illness in schools, hospitals, work environments, and the home. The persistent non-pathogenic Nora virus common in "Drosophila melanogaster" provides a horizontally transmitted…

  4. ADH enzyme activity and Adh gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster lines differentially selected for increased alcohol tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malherbe, Y.; Kamping, Albert; van Delden, W.; van de Zande, L.

    2005-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity is essential for ethanol tolerance, but its role may not be restricted to alcohol metabolism alone. Here we describe ADH activity and Adh expression level upon selection for increased alcohol tolerance in different life-stages of D. me

  5. STARVATION RESISTANCE IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER IN RELATION TO THE POLYMORPHISMS AT THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    1994-01-01

    In view of the world-wide latitudinal cline of the Adh and alpha Gpdh allozyme frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster and the interactions between these loci, experiments were performed to study the phenotypic effects of these loci. Starvation resistance, oxygen consumption, body weight, protein con

  6. Activity of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Affects Sucrose Responsiveness and Habituation in "Drosophila melanogaster"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Ricarda; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Erber, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) has many cellular functions in vertebrates and insects that affect complex behaviors such as locomotion and foraging. The "foraging" ("for") gene encodes a PKG in "Drosophila melanogaster." Here, we demonstrate a function for the "for" gene in sensory responsiveness and nonassociative learning. Larvae of the…

  7. Působení extracelulárního adenosinu na buňky \\kur{Drosophila melanogaster}

    OpenAIRE

    HOLÁ, Hana

    2009-01-01

    The effects of extracellular adenosine on Drosophila melanogaster cell lines Cl.8+, Mbn-2, S2 were examined. The cells were grown in the complete medium and tested for growth rate with in presence or absence of adenosine, dipyridamole, uridine and deoxycoformycin. The S2 cells were tested for cAMP production in presence or absence of adenosine.

  8. Arm-Gal4 inheritance influences development and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, F A; Staveley, B E

    2015-01-01

    The UAS-Gal4 ectopic expression system is a widely used and highly valued tool that allows specific gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster. Yeast transcription factor Gal4 can be directed using D. melanogaster transcriptional control elements, and is often assumed to have little effect on the organism. By evaluation of the consequences of maternal and paternal inheritance of a Gal4 transgene under the transcriptional regulation of armadillo control elements (arm-Gal4), we demonstrated that Gal4 expression could be detrimental to development and longevity. Male progeny expressing arm-Gal4 in the presence of UAS-lacZ transgene had reduced numbers and size of ommatidia, compared to flies expressing UAS-lacZ transgene under the control of other Gal4 transgenes. Aged at 25°C, the median life span of male flies with maternally inherited elav-Gal4 was 70 days, without a responding transgene or with UAS-lacZ. The median life span of maternally inherited arm-Gal4 male flies without a responding transgene was 48 days, and 40 days with the UAS-lacZ transgene. A partial rescue of this phenotype was observed with the expression of UAS-lacZ under paternal arm-Gal4 control, having an average median lifespan of 60 days. This data suggests that arm-Gal4 has detrimental effects on Drosophila development and lifespan that are directly dependent upon parental inheritance, and that the benign responder and reporter gene UAS-lacZ may influence D. melanogaster development. These findings should be taken into consideration during the design and execution of UAS-Gal4 expression experiments. PMID:26505429

  9. Gene Expression Divergence and Evolutionary Analysis of the Drosomycin Gene Family in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Juan Deng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Drosomycin (Drs encoding an inducible 44-residue antifungal peptide is clustered with six additional genes, Dro1, Dro2, Dro3, Dro4, Dro5, and Dro6, forming a multigene family on the 3L chromosome arm in Drosophila melanogaster. To get further insight into the regulation of each member of the drosomycin gene family, here we investigated gene expression patterns of this family by either microbe-free injury or microbial challenges using real time RT-PCR. The results indicated that among the seven drosomycin genes, Drs, Dro2, Dro3, Dro4, and Dro5 showed constitutive expressions. Three out of five, Dro2, Dro3, and Dro5, were able to be upregulated by simple injury. Interestingly, Drs is an only gene strongly upregulated when Drosophila was infected with microbes. In contrast to these five genes, Dro1 and Dro6 were not transcribed at all in either noninfected or infected flies. Furthermore, by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends, two transcription start sites were identified in Drs and Dro2, and one in Dro3, Dro4, and Dro5. In addition, NF-κB binding sites were found in promoter regions of Drs, Dro2, Dro3, and Dro5, indicating the importance of NF-κB binding sites for the inducibility of drosomycin genes. Based on the analyses of flanking sequences of each gene in D. melanogaster and phylogenetic relationship of drosomycins in D. melanogaster species-group, we concluded that gene duplications were involved in the formation of the drosomycin gene family. The possible evolutionary fates of drosomycin genes were discussed according to the combining analysis of gene expression pattern, gene structure, and functional divergence of these genes.

  10. Menin links the stress response to genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Papaconstantinou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The multiple endocrine neoplasia type I gene functions as a tumor suppressor gene in humans and mouse models. In Drosophila melanogaster, mutants of the menin gene (Mnn1 are hypersensitive to mutagens or gamma irradiation and have profound defects in the response to several stresses including heat shock, hypoxia, hyperosmolarity and oxidative stress. However, it is not known if the function of menin in the stress response contributes to genome stability. The objective of this study was to examine the role of menin in the control of the stress response and genome stability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a test of loss-of-heterozygosity, we show that Drosophila strains lacking a functional Mnn1 gene or expressing a Mnn1 dsRNA display increased genome instability in response to non-lethal heat shock or hypoxia treatments. This is also true for strains lacking all Hsp70 genes, implying that a precise control of the stress response is required for genome stability. While menin is required for Hsp70 expression, the results of epistatic studies indicate that the increase in genome instability observed in Mnn1 lack-of-function mutants cannot be accounted for by mis-expression of Hsp70. Therefore, menin may promote genome stability by controlling the expression of other stress-responsive genes. In agreement with this notion, gene profiling reveals that Mnn1 is required for sustained expression of all heat shock protein genes but is dispensable for early induction of the heat shock response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mutants of the Mnn1 gene are hypersensitive to several stresses and display increased genome instability when subjected to conditions, such as heat shock, generally regarded as non-genotoxic. In this report, we describe a role for menin as a global regulator of heat shock gene expression and critical factor in the maintenance of genome integrity. Therefore, menin links the stress response to the control of genome stability

  11. Drosophila melanogaster as an animal model for the study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3 demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo.

  12. Systems genetics analysis of body weight and energy metabolism traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Katherine W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and phenotypic traits associated with this condition exhibit significant heritability in natural populations of most organisms. While a number of genes and genetic pathways have been implicated to play a role in obesity associated traits, the genetic architecture that underlies the natural variation in these traits is largely unknown. Here, we used 40 wild-derived inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster to quantify genetic variation in body weight, the content of three major metabolites (glycogen, triacylglycerol, and glycerol associated with obesity, and metabolic rate in young flies. We chose these lines because they were previously screened for variation in whole-genome transcript abundance and in several adult life-history traits, including longevity, resistance to starvation stress, chill-coma recovery, mating behavior, and competitive fitness. This enabled us not only to identify candidate genes and transcriptional networks that might explain variation for energy metabolism traits, but also to investigate the genetic interrelationships among energy metabolism, behavioral, and life-history traits that have evolved in natural populations. Results We found significant genetically based variation in all traits. Using a genome-wide association screen for single feature polymorphisms and quantitative trait transcripts, we identified 337, 211, 237, 553, and 152 novel candidate genes associated with body weight, glycogen content, triacylglycerol storage, glycerol levels, and metabolic rate, respectively. Weighted gene co-expression analyses grouped transcripts associated with each trait in significant modules of co-expressed genes and we interpreted these modules in terms of their gene enrichment based on Gene Ontology analysis. Comparison of gene co-expression modules for traits in this study with previously determined modules for life-history traits identified significant modular pleiotropy between glycogen content

  13. A comparative analysis of the amounts and dynamics of transposable elements in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes are important in defining genetic variability, but they do not constitute the largest component of genomes, which in most organisms contain large amounts of various repeated sequences including transposable elements (TEs), which have been shown to account for most of the genome size. TEs contribute to genetic diversity by their mutational potential as a result of their ability to insert into genes or gene regulator regions, to promote chromosomal rearrangements, and to interfere with gene networks. Also, TEs may be activated by environmental stresses (such as temperature or radiation) that interfere with epigenetic regulation systems, and makes them powerful mutation agents in nature. To understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype, we need to analyze the portions of the genome corresponding to TEs in great detail, and to decipher their relationships with the genes. For this purpose, we carried out comparative analyses of various natural populations of the closely-related species Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans, which differ with regard to their TE amounts as well as their ecology and population size. - Highlights: ► Transposable elements (TE) are source of genetic novelty and affect genome regulation. ► Environment can affect regulation of TE and thus have an impact on genome. ► Natural populations are natural laboratories to measure the impact of environment.

  14. Relationship between organization and function of ribosomal genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpen, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    In most eukaryotic organisms, the genes that encode the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNAs (rDNA genes) are tandemly repeated, and are located in constitutive heterochromatin and/or centromeric or telomeric regions. P-element mediated transformation was used to investigate the relationship between rDNA organization and function in Drosophila melanogaster. Tritiated-uridine incorporation under heat shock conditions and in situ hybridization to rRNA were used to demonstrate that a single rDNA gene inserted into euchromatin can be transcribed at a high rate, in polytene nuclei. P-element-mediated transformation of a single Drosophila rDNA gene was also utilized to investigate the ability of ribosomal DNA to organize a nucleolus. Cytological approaches demonstrated that structures resembling the endogenous nucleoli were preferentially associated with four different sites of rDNA insertion, in polytene nuclei. These mini-nucleoli also contained components specific to the nucleolus, as shown by in situ hybridization to rRNA and indirect immunofluorescence with an antibody that binds to Drosophila nucleoli. The transformed genes were able to partially rescue mutant phenotypes due to a deficiency of rDNA, indicating that the mini-nucleoli were functional.

  15. A molecularly defined duplication set for the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venken, Koen J. T.; Popodi, Ellen; Holtzman, Stacy L.; Schulze, Karen L.; Park, Soo; Carlson, Joseph W.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    2010-07-22

    We describe a molecularly defined duplication kit for the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. A set of 408 overlapping P[acman] BAC clones was used to create small duplications (average length 88 kb) covering the 22-Mb sequenced portion of the chromosome. The BAC clones were inserted into an attP docking site on chromosome 3L using C31 integrase, allowing direct comparison of different transgenes. The insertions complement 92% of the essential and viable mutations and deletions tested, demonstrating that almost all Drosophila genes are compact and that the current annotations of the genome are reasonably accurate. Moreover, almost all genes are tolerated at twice the normal dosage. Finally, we more precisely mapped two regions at which duplications cause diplo-lethality in males. This collection comprises the first molecularly defined duplication set to cover a whole chromosome in a multicellular organism. The work presented removes a long-standing barrier to genetic analysis of the Drosophila X chromosome, will greatly facilitate functional assays of X-linked genes in vivo, and provides a model for functional analyses of entire chromosomes in other species.

  16. Effective but costly, evolved mechanisms of defense against a virulent opportunistic pathogen in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin H Ye

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila harbor substantial genetic variation for antibacterial defense, and investment in immunity is thought to involve a costly trade-off with life history traits, including development, life span, and reproduction. To understand the way in which insects invest in fighting bacterial infection, we selected for survival following systemic infection with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster over 10 generations. We then examined genome-wide changes in expression in the selected flies relative to unselected controls, both of which had been infected with the pathogen. This powerful combination of techniques allowed us to specifically identify the genetic basis of the evolved immune response. In response to selection, population-level survivorship to infection increased from 15% to 70%. The evolved capacity for defense was costly, however, as evidenced by reduced longevity and larval viability and a rapid loss of the trait once selection pressure was removed. Counter to expectation, we observed more rapid developmental rates in the selected flies. Selection-associated changes in expression of genes with dual involvement in developmental and immune pathways suggest pleiotropy as a possible mechanism for the positive correlation. We also found that both the Toll and the Imd pathways work synergistically to limit infectivity and that cellular immunity plays a more critical role in overcoming P. aeruginosa infection than previously reported. This work reveals novel pathways by which Drosophila can survive infection with a virulent pathogen that may be rare in wild populations, however, due to their cost.

  17. Telomeric trans-silencing in Drosophila melanogaster: tissue specificity, development and functional interactions between non-homologous telomeres.

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    Thibaut Josse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study of P element repression in Drosophila melanogaster led to the discovery of the telomeric Trans-Silencing Effect (TSE, a homology-dependent repression mechanism by which a P-transgene inserted in subtelomeric heterochromatin (Telomeric Associated Sequences, "TAS" has the capacity to repress in trans, in the female germline, a homologous P-lacZ transgene located in euchromatin. TSE can show variegation in ovaries, displays a maternal effect as well as an epigenetic transmission through meiosis and involves heterochromatin and RNA silencing pathways. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we analyze phenotypic and genetic properties of TSE. We report that TSE does not occur in the soma at the adult stage, but appears restricted to the female germline. It is detectable during development at the third instar larvae where it presents the same tissue specificity and maternal effect as in adults. Transgenes located in TAS at the telomeres of the main chromosomes can be silencers which in each case show the maternal effect. Silencers located at non-homologous telomeres functionally interact since they stimulate each other via the maternally-transmitted component. All germinally-expressed euchromatic transgenes tested, located on all major chromosomes, were found to be repressed by a telomeric silencer: thus we detected no TSE escaper. The presence of the euchromatic target transgene is not necessary to establish the maternal inheritance of TSE, responsible for its epigenetic behavior. A single telomeric silencer locus can simultaneously repress two P-lacZ targets located on different chromosomal arms. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Therefore TSE appears to be a widespread phenomenon which can involve different telomeres and work across the genome. It can explain the P cytotype establishment by telomeric P elements in natural Drosophila populations.

  18. Genetic effects of radon 222 in a population of Drosophila melanogaster chronically exposed; Efectos geneticos del radon 222 en una poblacion de Drosophila melanogaster cronicamente expuesta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Dept. de Biologia

    1997-07-01

    It was investigated the mutagenic effect of Radon 222 during a experimental period of 11 generations. In this lapse Drosophila melanogaster larvae line Canton-S were maintained in a radon atmosphere. In each test generation had been extracted males, consequently exposed to radiation which were subjected to a crossing series with a bearer marker genes of according to the Wallace experimental design (1956). Due to the experimental conditions it only was determined the recessive lethal mutations frequency for the second chromosome in the 1,4,7 and 11 generations. Of all study it was conduced in parallel way a non-treated witness population. The concentrations at which was subjected the experimental population varied of generation to generation from 12 {+-} 2 to 43 {+-} 5 kBq/m{sup 3}. Our analysis correspond to lethality determination in 1182 second chromosomes distributed between two populations and the different exposition generations. The study allow to determine the respective frequencies of recessive lethal genes varying according to the population and/or generation between 10.53 and 22.02%. The statistical analysis of data did not show significant differences among the different populations. (Author)

  19. Effect on the viability in populations of Drosophila Melanogaster chronically exposed to Radon; Efecto sobre la viabilidad en poblaciones de Drosophila melanogaster cronicamente expuestas a Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M. [Depto. de Biologia, ININ, Km.36.5 Carr. Mexico-Toluca, Salazar, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: vmss@nuclear. inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    A four generations population of Drosophila melanogaster chronically subjected to the following radon concentrations were analyzed: 30 {+-} 7, 12 {+-} 2, 43 {+-} 5, 25 {+-} 7, 14 {+-} 2, 6 {+-} 2, 78 {+-} 1, 58 {+-} 5 and 74 {+-} 7 k B/m{sup 3} with estimated doses of 1.209, 0.1, 2.088, 0.869, 0.156, 0.03, 3.18, 2.12 and 2.878 mGy by generation and their respective ones witness, in order to determine the effect of the radiation in the induction of detrimental genes, also measuring the effect of the viability with regard to the fecundity and the differential viability in categories of genes with smaller effects. So much the induction of detrimental genes like the distribution of the viability with regard to the fecundity for categories they did not show inductor effect due to the treatment with radon. Notwithstanding, the changes caused by the relating treatment to the fecundity they caused in three of the four comparisons possible significant results in the production of descendants, improving the adaptation of the populations, like it has been demonstrated by other authors.

  20. Golgi analysis of tangential neurons in the lobula plate of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Rajashekhar; V R Shamprasad

    2004-03-01

    The lobula plate (LP), which is the third order optic neuropil of flies, houses wide-field neurons which are exquisitely sensitive to motion. Among Diptera, motion-sensitive neurons of larger flies have been studied at the anatomical and physiological levels. However, the neurons of Drosophila lobula plate are relatively less explored. As Drosophila permits a genetic analysis of neural functions, we have analysed the organization of lobula plate of Drosophila melanogaster. Neurons belonging to eight anatomical classes have been observed in the present study. Three neurons of the horizontal system (HS) have been visualized. The HS north (HSN) neuron, occupying the dorsal lobula plate is stunted in its geometry compared to that of larger flies. Associated with the HS neurons, thinner horizontal elements known as h-cells have also been visualized in the present study. Five of the six known neurons of the vertical system (VS) have been visualized. Three additional neurons in the proximal LP comparable in anatomy to VS system have been stained. We have termed them as additional VS (AVS)-like neurons. Three thinner tangential cells that are comparable to VS neurons, which are elements of twin vertical system (tvs); and two cells with wide dendritic fields comparable to CH neurons of Diptera have been also observed. Neurons comparable to VS cells but with ‘tufted’ dendrites have been stained. The HSN and VS1-VS2 neurons are dorsally stunted. This is possibly due to the shape of the compound eye of Drosophila which is reduced in the fronto-dorsal region as compared to larger flies.

  1. Wolbachia utilize host actin for efficient maternal transmission in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene L G Newton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis is a ubiquitous, maternally transmitted bacterium that infects the germline of insect hosts. Estimates are that Wolbachia infect nearly 40% of insect species on the planet, making it the most prevalent infection on Earth. The bacterium, infamous for the reproductive phenotypes it induces in arthropod hosts, has risen to recent prominence due to its use in vector control. Wolbachia infection prevents the colonization of vectors by RNA viruses, including Drosophila C virus and important human pathogens such as Dengue and Chikungunya. Here we present data indicating that Wolbachia utilize the host actin cytoskeleton during oogenesis for persistence within and transmission between Drosophila melanogaster generations. We show that phenotypically wild type flies heterozygous for cytoskeletal mutations in Drosophila profilin (chic(221/+ and chic(1320/+ or villin (qua(6-396/+ either clear a Wolbachia infection, or result in significantly reduced infection levels. This reduction of Wolbachia is supported by PCR evidence, Western blot results and cytological examination. This phenotype is unlikely to be the result of maternal loading defects, defects in oocyte polarization, or germline stem cell proliferation, as the flies are phenotypically wild type in egg size, shape, and number. Importantly, however, heterozygous mutant flies exhibit decreased total G-actin in the ovary, compared to control flies and chic(221 heterozygous mutants exhibit decreased expression of profilin. Additionally, RNAi knockdown of profilin during development decreases Wolbachia titers. We analyze evidence in support of alternative theories to explain this Wolbachia phenotype and conclude that our results support the hypothesis that Wolbachia utilize the actin skeleton for efficient transmission and maintenance within Drosophila.

  2. Wolbachia utilize host actin for efficient maternal transmission in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Irene L G; Savytskyy, Oleksandr; Sheehan, Kathy B

    2015-04-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is a ubiquitous, maternally transmitted bacterium that infects the germline of insect hosts. Estimates are that Wolbachia infect nearly 40% of insect species on the planet, making it the most prevalent infection on Earth. The bacterium, infamous for the reproductive phenotypes it induces in arthropod hosts, has risen to recent prominence due to its use in vector control. Wolbachia infection prevents the colonization of vectors by RNA viruses, including Drosophila C virus and important human pathogens such as Dengue and Chikungunya. Here we present data indicating that Wolbachia utilize the host actin cytoskeleton during oogenesis for persistence within and transmission between Drosophila melanogaster generations. We show that phenotypically wild type flies heterozygous for cytoskeletal mutations in Drosophila profilin (chic(221/+) and chic(1320/+)) or villin (qua(6-396/+)) either clear a Wolbachia infection, or result in significantly reduced infection levels. This reduction of Wolbachia is supported by PCR evidence, Western blot results and cytological examination. This phenotype is unlikely to be the result of maternal loading defects, defects in oocyte polarization, or germline stem cell proliferation, as the flies are phenotypically wild type in egg size, shape, and number. Importantly, however, heterozygous mutant flies exhibit decreased total G-actin in the ovary, compared to control flies and chic(221) heterozygous mutants exhibit decreased expression of profilin. Additionally, RNAi knockdown of profilin during development decreases Wolbachia titers. We analyze evidence in support of alternative theories to explain this Wolbachia phenotype and conclude that our results support the hypothesis that Wolbachia utilize the actin skeleton for efficient transmission and maintenance within Drosophila.

  3. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herranz Raul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. Results We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM. We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Conclusions Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  4. Growth inhibition and differences in protein profiles in azadirachtin-treated Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Lai, Duo; Yuan, Mei; Xu, Hanhong

    2014-04-01

    Azadirachtin A is a very effective biopesticide widely used in insect pest control. It has strong antifeeding and growth inhibitory activity against most insects, however, its mode of action is still unclear. Proteomic experiments using 2DE indicate significant effects of Azadirachtin A on the amount of proteins related to growth inhibition in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Twenty-one spots with different intensity in azadirachtin-treated larvae were identified. These proteins are involved in cytoskeletal organization, transcription and translation, hormonal regulation, and energy metabolism. Protein network analysis reveals heat shock protein 23 to be a potential target of azadirachtin. These results provide new insights into understanding the mechanism of growth inhibition in insects in response to azadirachtin. PMID:24458307

  5. A study on anti-stress property of Nardostachys jatamamsi on stress induced Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpashree R.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a feeling that’s created when we react to particular events. It s the body’s way of rising to a challenge and preparing to meet a tough situation with focus, strength, stamina, and heightened alertness. As a result of the stress immune system can be suppressed by chronic stress opening to increased infections and increasing the risk of autoimmune diseases. So one has to learn away to overcome stress. Here is an attempt made to overcome the stress induced in Drosophila melanogaster a model organism, in this study. Methotrexate is used to induce the stress at different concentration taking different group of flies and a Nardostachys jatamamsi plant extract having antistress property is used to relieve the stress induced. This stress relieve measured by the various stress related enzymes like catalase and Superoxide dismutase by this antistress property of the plant Nardostachys jatamamsi was shown.

  6. MAGPIE/EGRET Annotation of the 2.9-Mb Drosophila melanogaster Adh Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaasterland, Terry; Sczyrba, Alexander; Thomas, Elizabeth; Aytekin-Kurban, Gulriz; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2000-01-01

    Our challenge in annotating the 2.91-Mb Adh region of the Drosophila melanogaster genome was to identify genetic and genomic features automatically, completely, and precisely within a 6-week period. To do so, we augmented the MAGPIE microbial genome annotation system to handle eukaryotic genomic sequence data. The new configuration required the integration of eukaryotic gene-finding tools and DNA repeat tools into the automatic data collection module. It also required us to define in MAGPIE new strategies to combine data about eukaryotic exon predictions with functional data to refine the exon predictions. At the heart of the resulting new eukaryotic genome annotation system is a reverse comparison of public protein and complementary DNA sequences against the input genome to identify missing exons and to refine exon boundaries. The software modules that add eukaryotic genome annotation capability to MAGPIE are available as EGRET (Eukaryotic Genome Rapid Evaluation Tool). PMID:10779489

  7. Sexual conflict is not counterbalanced by good genes in the laboratory Drosophila melanogaster model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A D; Hannes, A M; Mirzatuny, A; Rice, W R

    2008-11-01

    Sexual conflict theory is based on the observation that females of many species are harmed through their interactions with males. Direct harm to females, however, can potentially be counterbalanced by indirect genetic benefits, where females make up for a reduction in offspring quantity by an increase in offspring quality through a generic increase in offspring fitness (good genes) and/or one restricted to the context of sexual selection (sexy sons). Here, we quantify the magnitude of the good genes mechanism of indirect benefits in a laboratory-adapted population of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that despite high-standing genetic variance for fitness, females gain at most only a modest benefit through the good genes form of indirect benefits--far too little to counterbalance the direct cost of male-induced harm. PMID:18681915

  8. Environment-influenced expression of polygene mutations isolated from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J N; Jeung, M; Thoday, J M

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting sternopleural bristle number in Drosophila melanogaster have been mapped using phenotypic markers and progeny testing. The loci were found on four of the third chromosomes isolated from a natural population. All four loci showed large effects at the standard 25 degrees C culture temperature, but they responded in different ways when developmental temperature was lowered or raised. These data support the hypothesis that genotype x environment interactions have important influences on polygene expression, and some loci might be silent, or phenotypically neutral, under some conditions but play a large phenotypic role under others. Thus, a full cataloging of the loci contributing to mutational variance for QTLs cannot be done at just a single, controlled environmental condition.

  9. Spatial differences in patterns of modification: selection on hairy in Drosophila melanogaster wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, R B; Thompson, J N

    2000-01-01

    Artificial selection was carried out for over 45 generations to enhance and suppress expression of the mutation hairy on the Drosophila melanogaster wing. Whole chromosome mapping of X-linked and autosomal modifiers of sense organ number displayed regional differences in magnitude and direction of their effects. Regional specificity of modifier effects was also seen in some interchromosomal interactions. Scanning electron microscopy allowed precise measurement of sense organ size and position along the L3 longitudinal wing vein. Sense organ size varied in a predictable fashion along the proximal-distal axis, and the dorsal pattern differed from the ventral pattern. The high and low selection lines differed most in the proximal portion of the L3 vein. Extra sense organs in the High line were often associated with vein fragments at locations predicted from ancestral vein patterns. Thus, regional specificity of polygenic or quantitative trait locus modifier effects was identified in several different parts of the wing.

  10. Investigating inbreeding depression for heat stress tolerance in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie; Pedersen, Louise Dybdahl; Sørensen, Anders Christian;

    2012-01-01

    -year university students and discuss learning outcomes of the exercise as an example of inquiry-based science teaching. We use the model organism Drosophila melanogaster to test the ability of inbred and control (non-inbred) females to survive heat stress exposure. Flies were anaesthetised and collected...... the students to central topics in population genetics and demonstrates potential consequences of inbreeding and environmental stress on fitness. Furthermore, the practical gives insight into how to design, analyse, and interpret the results of a scientific study....... into vials before exposure to 38°C heat stress in a water bath for 1 h. Half an hour later the number of comatose inbred and control flies were scored and chi-square statistic procedures were used to test for different degrees of heat stress tolerance between the two lines of flies. The practical introduces...

  11. [Some behavioral features in Drosophila melanogaster lines carrying a flamenco gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, L G; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2001-11-01

    Olfactory sensitivity and locomotor activity was assayed in Drosophila melanogaster strains carrying a mutation of the flamenco gene, which controls transposition of the mobile genetic element 4 (MGE4) retrotransposon the gypsy mobile element. A change in olfactory sensitivity was detected. The reaction to the odor of acetic acid was inverted in flies of the mutator strain (MS), which carried the flam mutation and active MGE4 copies and were characterized by genetic instability. Flies of the genetically unstable strains displayed a lower locomotor activity. The behavioral changes in MS flies can be explained by the pleiotropic effect of the flam mutation or by insertion mutations which arise in behavior genes as a result of genome destabilization by MGE4. PMID:11771305

  12. [Mating success and courtship ritual in strains of Drosophila melanogaster carrying mutation flamenco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, L G; Romanova, N I; Subocheva, E A; Kim, A I

    2000-04-01

    Mating success was examined in groups of Drosophila melanogaster carrying mutation flamMS (SS, MSn1-2, and MSn1-3) and in wild-type flies. The proportion of normally copulating males was significantly lower in the mutant strains. The reduction in mating efficiency was caused by changes in male behavior rather than in female attractiveness. Individual analyses showed that male mating behavior in strains carrying flamMS was qualitatively and quantitatively different from that in the wild-type strain Canton S. The proportion of males that performed consecutive courtship stages was significantly lower in the mutant strains. The sequence and duration of some courtship stages (in particular, orientation and wing vibration) in mutant flies was shown to be altered. The significance of the flamenco locus in regulation of processes occurring at the organismal level are discussed. PMID:10822811

  13. Functions and Mechanisms of Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Arno J. Müller

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular signalling via growth factors plays an important role in controlling cell differentiation and cell movements during the development of multicellular animals. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF signalling induces changes in cellular behaviour allowing cells in the embryo to move, to survive, to divide or to differentiate. Several examples argue that FGF signalling is used in multi-step morphogenetic processes to achieve and maintain a transitional state of the cells required for the control of cell fate. In the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, FGF signalling via the receptor tyrosine kinases Heartless (Htl and Breathless (Btl is particularly well studied. These FGF receptors affect gene expression, cell shape and cell–cell interactions during mesoderm layer formation, caudal visceral muscle (CVM formation, tracheal morphogenesis and glia differentiation. Here, we will address the current knowledge of the biological functions of FGF signalling in the fly on the tissue, at a cellular and molecular level.

  14. QTL mapping of inbreeding-related cold sensitivity and conditional lethality in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    . Whenever the expression of deleterious alleles is conditional, this can result in extreme environmental sensitivity in certain inbred lineages. Analysis of conditional lethal effects can reveal some of the loci that are sensitive to inbreeding. We performed a QTL (quantitative trait locus) mapping study...... of inbreeding-related and conditionally expressed lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. The lethal effect was triggered by exposure to a cold shock. We used a North Carolina crossing Design 3 to establish the mapping population, as well as to estimate the average dominance ratio and heritability. We found two...... QTL on the major autosomes carrying recessive lethals that caused male mortality, one of which also affected female mortality. More detailed study of these loci will provide information on the mechanistic basis and environmental sensitivity of inbreeding depression....

  15. Metabolomic signatures of inbreeding at benign and stressful temperatures in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2008-01-01

    and five inbred lines were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy after exposure to benign temperature, heat stress, or cold stress. In both the absence and the presence of temperature stress, metabolite levels were significantly different among inbred and outbred lines. The major effect...... of inbreeding was increased levels of maltose and decreased levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine and a galactoside [1-O-(4-O-(2-aminoethyl phosphate)-beta-d-galactopyranosyl)-x-glycerol] synthesized exclusively in the paragonial glands of Drosophila species, including D. melanogaster. The metabolomic effect...... of inbreeding at the benign temperature was related to gene expression data from the same inbred and outbred lines. Both gene expression and metabolite data indicate that fundamental metabolic processes are changed or modified by inbreeding. Apart from affecting mean metabolite levels, inbreeding led...

  16. Recovery of locomotion after injury in Drosophila melanogaster depends on proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Alexander; Buchanan, Sean M; Sullivan, Brian; Ramachandran, Akshitha; Chapman, Joshua K S; Lu, Edward S; Mahadevan, L; de Bivort, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Locomotion is necessary for survival in most animal species. However, injuries to the appendages mediating locomotion are common. We assess the recovery of walking in Drosophila melanogaster following leg amputation. Whereas flies pre-amputation explore open arenas in a symmetric fashion on average, foreleg amputation induces a strong turning bias away from the side of the amputation. However, we find that unbiased walking behavior returns over time in wild-type flies, while recovery is significantly impaired in proprioceptive mutants. To identify the biomechanical basis of this locomotor impairment and recovery, we then examine individual leg motion (gait) at a fine scale. A minimal mathematical model that links neurodynamics to body mechanics during walking shows that redistributing leg forces between the right and left side enables the observed recovery. Altogether, our study suggests that proprioceptive input from the intact limbs plays a crucial role in the behavioral plasticity associated with locomotor recovery after injury. PMID:26994176

  17. Comparative functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine P Schrimpf

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a popular model system in genetics, not least because a majority of human disease genes are conserved in C. elegans. To generate a comprehensive inventory of its expressed proteome, we performed extensive shotgun proteomics and identified more than half of all predicted C. elegans proteins. This allowed us to confirm and extend genome annotations, characterize the role of operons in C. elegans, and semiquantitatively infer abundance levels for thousands of proteins. Furthermore, for the first time to our knowledge, we were able to compare two animal proteomes (C. elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We found that the abundances of orthologous proteins in metazoans correlate remarkably well, better than protein abundance versus transcript abundance within each organism or transcript abundances across organisms; this suggests that changes in transcript abundance may have been partially offset during evolution by opposing changes in protein abundance.

  18. Somatic mutation and recombination induced with reactor thermal neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SMART test of Drosophila melanogaster was used to quantify the effect over the somatic mutation and recombination induced by thermal and fast neutrons at the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the ININ at the power of 300 k W for times of 30, 60 and 120 minutes with total equivalent doses respectively of 20.8, 41.6 and 83.2 Sv. A linear relation between the radiation equivalent dose and the frequency of the genetic effects such as mutation and recombination was observed. The obtained results allow to conclude that SMART is a sensitive system to the induced damage by neutrons, so this can be used for studying its biological effects. (Author)

  19. Gustatory Receptors Required for Avoiding the Toxic Compound Coumarin in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Seeta; Lee, Youngseok

    2016-04-30

    Coumarin is a phenolic compound that mainly affects the liver due to its metabolization into a toxic compound. The deterrent and ovicidal activities of coumarin in insect models such as Drosophila melanogaster have been reported. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which these insects protect themselves and their eggs from this toxic plant metabolite. Coumarin was fatal to the flies in a dosage-dependent manner. However, coumarin feeding could be inhibited through activation of the aversive gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs), but not the olfactory receptor neurons. Furthermore, three gustatory receptors, GR33a, GR66a, and GR93a, functioned together in coumarin detection by the proboscis. However, GR33a, but not GR66a and GR93a, was required to avoid coumarin during oviposition, with a choice of the same substrates provided as in binary food choice assay. Taken together, these findings suggest that anti-feeding activity and oviposition to avoid coumarin occur via separate mechanisms.

  20. Effect of a standardised dietary restriction protocol on multiple laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Grandison

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outcomes of lifespan studies in model organisms are particularly susceptible to variations in technical procedures. This is especially true of dietary restriction, which is implemented in many different ways among laboratories. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have examined the effect of laboratory stock maintenance, genotype differences and microbial infection on the ability of dietary restriction (DR to extend life in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. None of these factors block the DR effect. CONCLUSIONS: These data lend support to the idea that nutrient restriction genuinely extends lifespan in flies, and that any mechanistic discoveries made with this model are of potential relevance to the determinants of lifespan in other organisms.

  1. Structural basis for the changed substrate specificity of Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase mutant N64D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welin, M.; Skovgaard, T.; Knecht, Wolfgang;

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) double mutant N45D/N64D was identified during a previous directed evolution study. This mutant enzyme had a decreased activity towards the natural substrates and decreased feedback inhibition with dTTP, whereas the activity with 3......'-modified nucleoside analogs like 3'-azidothymidine ( AZT) was nearly unchanged. Here, we identify the mutation N64D as being responsible for these changes. Furthermore, we crystallized the mutant enzyme in the presence of one of its substrates, thymidine, and the feedback inhibitor, dTTP. The introduction...... of the charged Asp residue appears to destabilize the LID region (residues 167-176) of the enzyme by electrostatic repulsion and no hydrogen bond to the 3'-OH is made in the substrate complex by Glu172 of the LID region. This provides a binding space for more bulky 3'-substituents like the azido group in AZT...

  2. Proteomic characterization of a temperature-sensitive conditional lethal in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie; Codrea, M.C; Vermeulen, Corneel;

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation that is expressed only under specific environmental conditions can contribute to additional adverse effects of inbreeding if environmental conditions change. We present a proteomic characterization of a conditional lethal found in an inbred line of Drosophila melanogaster. The l......-line in response to the restrictive temperature, supporting phenotypic observations of moribund muscle hyper-contraction........ The lethal effect is apparent as a large increase in early mortality at the restrictive temperature (29 °C) as opposed to normal survival at the permissive temperature (20 °C). The increased mortality in response to the restrictive temperature is probably caused by a single recessive major locus....... A quantitative trait locus (QTL) region segregating variation affecting the lethal effect has been identified, allowing for a separation of primary/causal effects and secondary consequences in the proteome expression patterns observed. In this study, the proteomic response to the restrictive temperature...

  3. Expression and Purification of Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor A from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, John P; Arnold, Jamie J; Salminen, Tiina S; Kaguni, Laurie S; Cameron, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is essential in all organisms. Our understanding of mitochondrial transcription on a biochemical level has been limited by the inability to purify the individual protein components involved in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, new systems have been identified that permit purification of these proteins from bacteria. However, the generalizability of these systems is not clear. Here, we have applied the technology from the Cameron lab to express and purify mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor A from Drosophila melanogaster. We show that the use of SUMO system to produce SUMO fusion proteins in bacteria is effective not only for the human and mouse proteins, but also for the fly proteins. The application of this system to produce the mitochondrial proteins from other organisms should permit detailed understanding of mitochondrial transcription from any organism.

  4. Natural variation in genome architecture among 205 Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Massouras, Andreas; Inoue, Yutaka; Peiffer, Jason; Ràmia, Miquel; Tarone, Aaron M; Turlapati, Lavanya; Zichner, Thomas; Zhu, Dianhui; Lyman, Richard F; Magwire, Michael M; Blankenburg, Kerstin; Carbone, Mary Anna; Chang, Kyle; Ellis, Lisa L; Fernandez, Sonia; Han, Yi; Highnam, Gareth; Hjelmen, Carl E; Jack, John R; Javaid, Mehwish; Jayaseelan, Joy; Kalra, Divya; Lee, Sandy; Lewis, Lora; Munidasa, Mala; Ongeri, Fiona; Patel, Shohba; Perales, Lora; Perez, Agapito; Pu, LingLing; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Ruth, Robert; Saada, Nehad; Warner, Crystal; Williams, Aneisa; Wu, Yuan-Qing; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Zhang, Yiqing; Zhu, Yiming; Anholt, Robert R H; Korbel, Jan O; Mittelman, David; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Barbadilla, Antonio; Johnston, J Spencer; Stone, Eric A; Richards, Stephen; Deplancke, Bart; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2014-07-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a community resource of 205 sequenced inbred lines, derived to improve our understanding of the effects of naturally occurring genetic variation on molecular and organismal phenotypes. We used an integrated genotyping strategy to identify 4,853,802 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,296,080 non-SNP variants. Our molecular population genomic analyses show higher deletion than insertion mutation rates and stronger purifying selection on deletions. Weaker selection on insertions than deletions is consistent with our observed distribution of genome size determined by flow cytometry, which is skewed toward larger genomes. Insertion/deletion and single nucleotide polymorphisms are positively correlated with each other and with local recombination, suggesting that their nonrandom distributions are due to hitchhiking and background selection. Our cytogenetic analysis identified 16 polymorphic inversions in the DGRP. Common inverted and standard karyotypes are genetically divergent and account for most of the variation in relatedness among the DGRP lines. Intriguingly, variation in genome size and many quantitative traits are significantly associated with inversions. Approximately 50% of the DGRP lines are infected with Wolbachia, and four lines have germline insertions of Wolbachia sequences, but effects of Wolbachia infection on quantitative traits are rarely significant. The DGRP complements ongoing efforts to functionally annotate the Drosophila genome. Indeed, 15% of all D. melanogaster genes segregate for potentially damaged proteins in the DGRP, and genome-wide analyses of quantitative traits identify novel candidate genes. The DGRP lines, sequence data, genotypes, quality scores, phenotypes, and analysis and visualization tools are publicly available.

  5. Contrasting infection strategies in generalist and specialist wasp parasitoids of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Schlenke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Although host-parasitoid interactions are becoming well characterized at the organismal and cellular levels, much remains to be understood of the molecular bases for the host immune response and the parasitoids' ability to defeat this immune response. Leptopilina boulardi and L. heterotoma, two closely related, highly infectious natural parasitoids of Drosophila melanogaster, appear to use very different infection strategies at the cellular level. Here, we further characterize cellular level differences in the infection characteristics of these two wasp species using newly derived, virulent inbred strains, and then use whole genome microarrays to compare the transcriptional response of Drosophila to each. While flies attacked by the melanogaster group specialist L. boulardi (strain Lb17 up-regulate numerous genes encoding proteolytic enzymes, components of the Toll and JAK/STAT pathways, and the melanization cascade as part of a combined cellular and humoral innate immune response, flies attacked by the generalist L. heterotoma (strain Lh14 do not appear to initiate an immune transcriptional response at the time points post-infection we assayed, perhaps due to the rapid venom-mediated lysis of host hemocytes (blood cells. Thus, the specialist parasitoid appears to invoke a full-blown immune response in the host, but suppresses and/or evades downstream components of this response. Given that activation of the host immune response likely depletes the energetic resources of the host, the specialist's infection strategy seems relatively disadvantageous. However, we uncover the mechanism for one potentially important fitness tradeoff of the generalist's highly immune suppressive infection strategy.

  6. Within-population Y-linked genetic variation for lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, R M; Le Gall, D; Schielzeth, H; Friberg, U

    2015-11-01

    The view that the Y chromosome is of little importance for phenotypic evolution stems from early studies of Drosophila melanogaster. This species' Y chromosome contains only 13 protein-coding genes, is almost entirely heterochromatic and is not necessary for male viability. Population genetic theory further suggests that non-neutral variation can only be maintained at the Y chromosome under special circumstances. Yet, recent studies suggest that the D. melanogaster Y chromosome trans-regulates hundreds to thousands of X and autosomal genes. This finding suggests that the Y chromosome may play a far more active role in adaptive evolution than has previously been assumed. To evaluate the potential for the Y chromosome to contribute to phenotypic evolution from standing genetic variation, we test for Y-linked variation in lifespan within a population of D. melanogaster. Assessing variation for lifespan provides a powerful test because lifespan (i) shows sexual dimorphism, which the Y is primarily predicted to contribute to, (ii) is influenced by many genes, which provides the Y with many potential regulatory targets and (iii) is sensitive to heterochromatin remodelling, a mechanism through which the Y chromosome is believed to regulate gene expression. Our results show a small but significant effect of the Y chromosome and thus suggest that the Y chromosome has the potential to respond to selection from standing genetic variation. Despite its small effect size, Y-linked variation may still be important, in particular when evolution of sexual dimorphism is genetically constrained elsewhere in the genome.

  7. Lack of phenotypic and evolutionary cross-resistance against parasitoids and pathogens in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex R Kraaijeveld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When organisms are attacked by multiple natural enemies, the evolution of a resistance mechanism to one natural enemy will be influenced by the degree of cross-resistance to another natural enemy. Cross-resistance can be positive, when a resistance mechanism against one natural enemy also offers resistance to another; or negative, in the form of a trade-off, when an increase in resistance against one natural enemy results in a decrease in resistance against another. Using Drosophila melanogaster, an important model system for the evolution of invertebrate immunity, we test for the existence of cross-resistance against parasites and pathogens, at both a phenotypic and evolutionary level. METHODS: We used a field strain of D. melanogaster to test whether surviving parasitism by the parasitoid Asobara tabida has an effect on the resistance against Beauveria bassiana, an entomopathogenic fungus; and whether infection with the microsporidian Tubulinosema kingi has an effect on the resistance against A. tabida. We used lines selected for increased resistance to A. tabida to test whether increased parasitoid resistance has an effect on resistance against B. bassiana and T. kingi. We used lines selected for increased tolerance against B. bassiana to test whether increased fungal resistance has an effect on resistance against A. tabida. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: We found no positive cross-resistance or trade-offs in the resistance to parasites and pathogens. This is an important finding, given the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the evolution of invertebrate immunity. The lack of any cross-resistance to parasites and pathogens, at both the phenotypic and the evolutionary level, suggests that evolution of resistance against one class of natural enemies is largely independent of evolution of resistance against the other.

  8. Genotoxicity of neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster. Somatic mutation and recombination induced by reactor neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Rincón, J; Delfín-Loya, A; Ureña-Núñez, F; Paredes, L C; Zambrano-Achirica, F; Graf, U

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the observation of a direct relationship between the absorbed doses of neutrons and the frequencies of somatic mutation and recombination using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of Drosophila melanogaster. This test was used for evaluating the biological effects induced by neutrons from the Triga Mark III reactor of Mexico. Two different reactor power levels were used, 300 and 1000 kW, and two absorbed doses were tested for each power level: 1.6 and 3.2 Gy for 300 kW and 0.84 and 1.7 Gy for 1000 kW. A linear relationship was observed between the absorbed dose and the somatic mutation and recombination frequencies. Furthermore, these frequencies were dependent on larval age: In 96-h-old larvae, the frequencies were increased considerably but the sizes of the spots were smaller than in 72-h-old larvae. The analysis of the balancer-heterozygous progeny showed a linear absorbed dose- response relationship, although the responses were clearly lower than found in the marker-trans-heterozygous flies. Approximately 65% of the genotoxicity observed is due to recombinational events. The results of the study indicate that thermal and fast neutrons are both mutagenic and recombinagenic in the D. melanogaster wing SMART, and that the frequencies are dependent on neutron dose, reactor power, and the age of the treated larvae. PMID:16038586

  9. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  10. Age-specific patterns of genetic variance in Drosophila melanogaster. I. Mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Promislow, D.E.L.; Tatar, M.; Curtsinger, J.W. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Peter Medawar proposed that senescence arises from an age-related decline in the force of selection, which allows late-acting deleterious mutations to accumulate. Subsequent workers have suggested that mutation accumulation could produce an age-related increase in additive genetic variance (V{sub A}) for fitness traits, as recently found in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report results from a genetic analysis of mortality in 65,134 D. melanogaster. Additive genetic variance for female mortality rates increases from 0.007 in the first week of life to 0.325 by the third week, and then declines to 0.002 by the seventh week. Males show a similar pattern, though total variance is lower than in females. In contrast to a predicted divergence in mortality curves, mortality curves of different genotypes are roughly parallel. Using a three-parameter model, we find significant V{sub A} for the slope and constant term of the curve describing age-specific mortality rates, and also for the rate at which mortality decelerates late in life. These results fail to support a prediction derived from Medawar`s {open_quotes}mutation accumulation{close_quotes} theory for the evolution of senescence. However, our results could be consistent with alternative interpretations of evolutionary models of aging. 65 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Phenotypic and genetic effects of contrasting ethanol environments on physiological and developmental traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E Castañeda

    Full Text Available A central problem in evolutionary physiology is to understand the relationship between energy metabolism and fitness-related traits. Most attempts to do so have been based on phenotypic correlations that are not informative for the evolutionary potential of natural populations. Here, we explored the effect of contrasting ethanol environments on physiological and developmental traits, their genetic (covariances and genetic architecture in Drosophila melanogaster. Phenotypic and genetic parameters were estimated in two populations (San Fernando and Valdivia, Chile, using a half-sib family design where broods were split into ethanol-free and ethanol-supplemented conditions. Our findings show that metabolic rate, body mass and development times were sensitive (i.e., phenotypic plasticity to ethanol conditions and dependent on population origin. Significant heritabilities were found for all traits, while significant genetic correlations were only found between larval and total development time and between development time and metabolic rate for flies of the San Fernando population developed in ethanol-free conditions. Posterior analyses indicated that the G matrices differed between ethanol conditions for the San Fernando population (mainly explained by differences in genetic (covariances of developmental traits, whereas the Valdivia population exhibited similar G matrices between ethanol conditions. Our findings suggest that ethanol-free environment increases the energy available to reduce development time. Therefore, our results indicate that environmental ethanol could modify the process of energy allocation, which could have consequences on the evolutionary response of natural populations of D. melanogaster.

  12. Relative effectiveness of mating success and sperm competition at eliminating deleterious mutations in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C A Clark

    Full Text Available Condition-dependence theory predicts that sexual selection will facilitate adaptation by selecting against deleterious mutations that affect the expression of sexually selected traits indirectly via condition. Recent empirical studies have provided support for this prediction; however, their results do not elucidate the relative effects of pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection on deleterious mutations. We used the Drosophila melanogaster model system to discern the relative contributions of pre- and postcopulatory processes to selection against deleterious mutations. To assess second-male ejaculate competition success (P2; measured as the proportion of offspring attributable to the experimental male and mating success, mutant and wild-type male D. melanogaster were given the opportunity to mate with females that were previously mated to a standard competitor male. This process was repeated for males subjected to a diet quality manipulation to test for effects of environmentally-manipulated condition on P2 and mating success. While none of the tested mutations affected P2, there was a clear effect of condition. Conversely, several of the mutations affected mating success, while condition showed no effect. Our results suggest that precopulatory selection may be more effective than postcopulatory selection at removing deleterious mutations. The opposite result obtained for our diet manipulation points to an interesting discrepancy between environmental and genetic manipulations of condition, which may be explained by the multidimensionality of condition. Establishing whether the various stages of sexual selection affect deleterious mutations differently, and to what extent, remains an important issue to resolve.

  13. Evolution of eye morphology and rhodopsin expression in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Posnien

    Full Text Available A striking diversity of compound eye size and shape has evolved among insects. The number of ommatidia and their size are major determinants of the visual sensitivity and acuity of the compound eye. Each ommatidium is composed of eight photoreceptor cells that facilitate the discrimination of different colours via the expression of various light sensitive Rhodopsin proteins. It follows that variation in eye size, shape, and opsin composition is likely to directly influence vision. We analyzed variation in these three traits in D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. mauritiana. We show that D. mauritiana generally has larger eyes than its sibling species, which is due to a combination of larger ommatidia and more ommatidia. In addition, intra- and inter-specific differences in eye size among D. simulans and D. melanogaster strains are mainly caused by variation in ommatidia number. By applying a geometric morphometrics approach to assess whether the formation of larger eyes influences other parts of the head capsule, we found that an increase in eye size is associated with a reduction in the adjacent face cuticle. Our shape analysis also demonstrates that D. mauritiana eyes are specifically enlarged in the dorsal region. Intriguingly, this dorsal enlargement is associated with enhanced expression of rhodopsin 3 in D. mauritiana. In summary, our data suggests that the morphology and functional properties of the compound eyes vary considerably within and among these closely related Drosophila species and may be part of coordinated morphological changes affecting the head capsule.

  14. The impacts of Wolbachia and the microbiome on mate choice in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuthnott, D; Levin, T C; Promislow, D E L

    2016-02-01

    Symbionts and parasites can manipulate their hosts' reproduction to their own benefit, profoundly influencing patterns of mate choice and evolution of the host population. Wolbachia is one of the most widespread symbionts among arthropods, and one that alters its hosts' reproduction in diverse and dramatic ways. While we are beginning to appreciate how Wolbachia's extreme manipulations of host reproduction can influence species diversification and reproductive isolation, we understand little about how symbionts and Wolbachia, in particular, may affect intrapopulation processes of mate choice. We hypothesized that the maternally transmitted Wolbachia would increase the attractiveness of its female hosts to further its own spread. We therefore tested the effects of Wolbachia removal and microbiome disruption on female attractiveness and male mate choice among ten isofemale lines of Drosophila melanogaster. We found variable effects of general microbiome disruption on female attractiveness, with indications that bacteria interact with hosts in a line-specific manner to affect female attractiveness. However, we found no evidence that Wolbachia influence female attractiveness or male mate choice among these lines. Although the endosymbiont Wolbachia can greatly alter the reproduction of their hosts in many species, there is no indication that they alter mate choice behaviours in D. melanogaster.

  15. Positive effect of porphyrans on the lifespan and vitality of Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effects of degraded porphyran (P1) and natural porphyran (P) on the lifespan and vitality of Drosophila melanogaster are studied. The porphyrans, added daily to the food medium at 0.2% and 1% concentrations, can significantly increase the lifespan in average of 55.79 and 58.23 d in 0.2% P1 diet females and 1% P1 diet_males, extending by 12.29% and 8.60% over the corresponding controls,respectively. The effects of porphyrans on D. melanogaster in heat-stress condition were also examined,and found a remarkable increase in survival time. The results which are consistently associated with the use of porphyrans are related to their free radical scavenger action. Considerable increase in vitality demonstrated that vitalities of middle-aged fly (assessed by measuring their mating capacity) was observed after porphyrans addition. Therefore, porphyrans are effective in reducing the rate of aging, and P1 in low molecular weight is better than natural P.

  16. Nucleotide variation at the dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) gene in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrey Tatarenkov; Francisco J. Ayala

    2007-08-01

    We studied nucleotide sequence variation at the gene coding for dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) in seven populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Strength and pattern of linkage disequilibrium are somewhat distinct in the extensively sampled Spanish and Raleigh populations. In the Spanish population, a few sites are in strong positive association, whereas a large number of sites in the Raleigh population are associated nonrandomly but the association is not strong. Linkage disequilibrium analysis shows presence of two groups of haplotypes in the populations, each of which is fairly diverged, suggesting epistasis or inversion polymorphism. There is evidence of two forms of natural selection acting on Ddc. The McDonald–Kreitman test indicates a deficit of fixed amino acid differences between D. melanogaster and D. simulans, which may be due to negative selection. An excess of derived alleles at high frequency, significant according to the -test, is consistent with the effect of hitchhiking. The hitchhiking may have been caused by directional selection downstream of the locus studied, as suggested by a gradual decrease of the polymorphism-to-divergence ratio. Altogether, the Ddc locus exhibits a complicated pattern of variation apparently due to several evolutionary forces. Such a complex pattern may be a result of an unusually high density of functionally important genes.

  17. The relative roles of vision and chemosensation in mate recognition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sweta; Safarik, Steve; Dickinson, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Animals rely on sensory cues to classify objects in their environment and respond appropriately. However, the spatial structure of those sensory cues can greatly impact when, where and how they are perceived. In this study, we examined the relative roles of visual and chemosensory cues in the mate recognition behavior of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) using a robotic fly dummy that was programmed to interact with individual males. By pairing male flies with dummies of various shapes, sizes and speeds, or coated with different pheromones, we determined that visual and chemical cues play specific roles at different points in the courtship sequence. Vision is essential for determining whether to approach a moving object and initiate courtship, and males were more likely to begin chasing objects with the same approximate dimensions as another fly. However, whereas males were less likely to begin chasing larger dummies, once started, they would continue chasing for a similar length of time regardless of the dummy's shape. The presence of female pheromones on the moving dummy did not affect the probability that males would initiate a chase, but did influence how long they would continue chasing. Male pheromone both inhibits chase initiation and shortens chase duration. Collectively, these results suggest that male D. melanogaster use different sensory cues to progress through the courtship sequence: visual cues are dominant when deciding whether to approach an object whereas chemosensory cues determine how long the male pursues its target. PMID:24902744

  18. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22: a mitochondrial small heat shock protein influencing the aging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve eMorrow

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in many key cellular processes and therefore need to rely on good protein quality control (PQC. Three types of mechanisms are in place to insure mitochondrial protein integrity: reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging by anti-oxidant enzymes, protein folding/degradation by molecular chaperones and proteases and clearance of defective mitochondria by mitophagy. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22 is part of the molecular chaperone axis of the PQC and is characterized by its intra-mitochondrial localization and preferential expression during aging. As a stress biomarker, the level of its expression during aging has been shown to partially predict the remaining lifespan of flies. Since over-expression of this small heat shock protein (sHSP increases lifespan and resistance to stress, Hsp22 most likely has a positive effect on mitochondrial integrity. Accordingly, Hsp22 has recently been implicated in the mitochondrial unfolding protein response (mtUPR of flies. This review will summarize the key findings on D. melanogaster Hsp22 and emphasis on its links with the aging process.

  19. What have two decades of laboratory life-history evolution studies on Drosophila melanogaster taught us?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. G. Prasad; Amitabh Joshi

    2003-04-01

    A series of laboratory selection experiments on Drosophila melanogaster over the past two decades has provided insights into the specifics of life-history tradeoffs in the species and greatly refined our understanding of how ecology and genetics interact in life-history evolution. Much of what has been learnt from these studies about the subtlety of the microevolutionary process also has significant implications for experimental design and inference in organismal biology beyond life-history evolution, as well as for studies of evolution in the wild. Here we review work on the ecology and evolution of life-histories in laboratory populations of D. melanogaster, emphasizing how environmental effects on life-history-related traits can influence evolutionary change. We discuss life-history tradeoffs—many unexpected—revealed by selection experiments, and also highlight recent work that underscores the importance to life-history evolution of cross-generation and cross-life-stage effects and interactions, sexual antagonism and sexual dimorphism, population dynamics, and the possible role of biological clocks in timing life-history events. Finally, we discuss some of the limitations of typical selection experiments, and how these limitations might be transcended in the future by a combination of more elaborate and realistic selection experiments, developmental evolutionary biology, and the emerging discipline of phenomics.

  20. FB-NOF is a non-autonomous transposable element, expressed in Drosophila melanogaster and present only in the melanogaster group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Martí; Xamena, Noel; Cabré, Oriol

    2013-09-10

    Most foldback elements are defective due to the lack of coding sequences but some are associated with coding sequences and may represent the entire element. This is the case of the NOF sequences found in the FB of Drosophila melanogaster, formerly considered as an autonomous TE and currently proposed as part of the so-called FB-NOF element, the transposon that would be complete and fully functional. NOF is always associated with FB and never seen apart from the FB inverted repeats (IR). This is the reason why the FB-NOF composite element can be considered the complete element. At least one of its ORFs encodes a protein that has always been considered its transposase, but no detailed studies have been carried out to verify this. In this work we test the hypothesis that FB-NOF is an active transposon nowadays. We search for its expression product, obtaining its cDNA, and propose the ORF and the sequence of its potential protein. We found that the NOF protein is not a transposase as it lacks any of the motifs of known transposases and also shows structural homology with hydrolases, therefore FB-NOF cannot belong to the superfamily MuDR/foldback, as up to now it has been classified, and can be considered as a non-autonomous transposable element. The alignment with the published genomes of 12 Drosophila species shows that NOF presence is restricted only to the 6 Drosophila species belonging to the melanogaster group.

  1. Neurodegeneration in drop-dead mutant drosophila melanogaster is associated with the respiratory system but not with Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Lynn Sansone

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene drop-dead (drd cause diverse phenotypes in adult Drosophila melanogaster including early lethality, neurodegeneration, tracheal defects, gut dysfunction, reduced body mass, and female sterility. Despite the identification of the drd gene itself, the causes of early lethality and neurodegeneration in the mutant flies remain unknown. To determine the pattern of drd expression associated with the neurodegenerative phenotype, knockdown of drd with various Gal4 drivers was performed. Early adult lethality and neurodegeneration were observed upon knockdown of drd in the tracheal system with two independent insertions of the breathless-Gal4 driver and upon knockdown in the tracheal system and elsewhere with the DJ717-Gal4 driver. Surprisingly, rescue of drd expression exclusively in the tracheae in otherwise mutant flies rescued the neurodegenerative phenotype but not adult lethality. Gut dysfunction, as measured by defecation rate, was not rescued in these flies, and gut function appeared normal upon tracheal-specific knockdown of drd. Finally, the hypothesis that tracheal dysfunction in drd mutants results in hypoxia was tested. Hypoxia-sensitive reporter transgenes (LDH-Gal4 and LDH-LacZ were placed on a drd mutant background, but enhanced expression of these reporters was not observed. In addition, manipulation of drd expression in the tracheae did not affect expression of the hypoxia-induced genes LDH, tango, and similar. Overall, these results indicate that there are at least two causes of adult lethality in drd mutants, that gut dysfunction and neurodegeneration are independent phenotypes, and that neurodegeneration is associated with tracheal expression of drd but not with hypoxia.

  2. Neurodegeneration in drop-dead mutant drosophila melanogaster is associated with the respiratory system but not with Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Christine Lynn; Blumenthal, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene drop-dead (drd) cause diverse phenotypes in adult Drosophila melanogaster including early lethality, neurodegeneration, tracheal defects, gut dysfunction, reduced body mass, and female sterility. Despite the identification of the drd gene itself, the causes of early lethality and neurodegeneration in the mutant flies remain unknown. To determine the pattern of drd expression associated with the neurodegenerative phenotype, knockdown of drd with various Gal4 drivers was performed. Early adult lethality and neurodegeneration were observed upon knockdown of drd in the tracheal system with two independent insertions of the breathless-Gal4 driver and upon knockdown in the tracheal system and elsewhere with the DJ717-Gal4 driver. Surprisingly, rescue of drd expression exclusively in the tracheae in otherwise mutant flies rescued the neurodegenerative phenotype but not adult lethality. Gut dysfunction, as measured by defecation rate, was not rescued in these flies, and gut function appeared normal upon tracheal-specific knockdown of drd. Finally, the hypothesis that tracheal dysfunction in drd mutants results in hypoxia was tested. Hypoxia-sensitive reporter transgenes (LDH-Gal4 and LDH-LacZ) were placed on a drd mutant background, but enhanced expression of these reporters was not observed. In addition, manipulation of drd expression in the tracheae did not affect expression of the hypoxia-induced genes LDH, tango, and similar. Overall, these results indicate that there are at least two causes of adult lethality in drd mutants, that gut dysfunction and neurodegeneration are independent phenotypes, and that neurodegeneration is associated with tracheal expression of drd but not with hypoxia. PMID:23874488

  3. Evolution of increased larval competitive ability in Drosophila melanogaster without increased larval feeding rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANASWINI SARANGI; ARCHANA NAGARAJAN; SNIGDHADIP DEY; JOY BOSE; AMITABH JOSHI

    2016-09-01

    Multiple experimental evolution studies on Drosophila melanogasterin the 1980s and 1990s indicated that enhanced competitive ability evolved primarily through increased larval tolerance to nitrogenous wastes and increased larval feeding and foraging rate, at the cost of efficiency of food conversion to biomass, and this became the widely accepted view of how adaptation to larval crowding evolves in fruitflies. We recently showed that populations of D. ananassaeand D. n. nasuta subjected to extreme larval crowding evolved greater competitive ability without evolving higher feeding rates, primarily through acombination of reduced larval duration, faster attainment of minimum critical size for pupation, greater efficiency of food conversion to biomass, increased pupation height and, perhaps, greater urea/ammonia tolerance. This was a very differentsuite of traits than that seen to evolve under similar selection in D. melanogasterand was closer to the expectations from the theory of K-selection. At that time, we suggested two possible reasons for the differences in the phenotypic correlates ofgreater competitive ability seen in the studies with D. melanogaster and the other two species. First, that D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta had a very different genetic architecture of traits affecting competitive ability compared to the long-term labora-tory populations of D. melanogaster used in the earlier studies, either because the populations of the former two species were relatively recently wild-caught, or by virtue of being different species. Second, that the different evolutionary trajectories in D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta versus D. melanogaster were a reflection of differences in the manner in which larval crowding was imposed in the two sets of selection experiments. The D. melanogaster studies used a higher absolute density of eggs per unit volume of food, and a substantially larger total volume of food, than the studies on D. ananassae and D. n. nasuta. Here, we

  4. Paucity of chimeric gene-transposable element transcripts in the Drosophila melanogaster genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Dmitri A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent analysis of the human and mouse genomes has shown that a substantial proportion of protein coding genes and cis-regulatory elements contain transposable element (TE sequences, implicating TE domestication as a mechanism for the origin of genetic novelty. To understand the general role of TE domestication in eukaryotic genome evolution, it is important to assess the acquisition of functional TE sequences by host genomes in a variety of different species, and to understand in greater depth the population dynamics of these mutational events. Results Using an in silico screen for host genes that contain TE sequences, we identified a set of 63 mature "chimeric" transcripts supported by expressed sequence tag (EST evidence in the Drosophila melanogaster genome. We found a paucity of chimeric TEs relative to expectations derived from non-chimeric TEs, indicating that the majority (~80% of TEs that generate chimeric transcripts are deleterious and are not observed in the genome sequence. Using a pooled-PCR strategy to assay the presence of gene-TE chimeras in wild strains, we found that over half of the observed chimeric TE insertions are restricted to the sequenced strain, and ~15% are found at high frequencies in North American D. melanogaster populations. Estimated population frequencies of chimeric TEs did not differ significantly from non-chimeric TEs, suggesting that the distribution of fitness effects for the observed subset of chimeric TEs is indistinguishable from the general set of TEs in the genome sequence. Conclusion In contrast to mammalian genomes, we found that fewer than 1% of Drosophila genes produce mRNAs that include bona fide TE sequences. This observation can be explained by the results of our population genomic analysis, which indicates that most potential chimeric TEs in D. melanogaster are deleterious but that a small proportion may contribute to the evolution of novel gene sequences such as nested or

  5. Culex tarsalis vitellogenin gene promoters investigated in silico and in vivo using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Genetic modification, or transgenesis, is a powerful technique to investigate the molecular interactions between vector-borne pathogens and their arthropod hosts, as well as a potential novel approach for vector-borne disease control. Transgenesis requires the use of specific regulatory regions, or promoters, to drive expression of genes of interest in desired target tissues. In mosquitoes, the vast majority of described promoters are from Anopheles and Aedes mosquitoes. RESULTS: Culex tarsalis is one of the most important vectors of arboviruses (including West Nile virus in North America, yet it has not been the subject of molecular genetic study. In order to facilitate molecular genetic work in this important vector species, we isolated four fat body-specific promoter sequences located upstream of the Cx. tarsalis vitellogenin genes (Vg1a, Vg1b, Vg2a and Vg2b. Sequences were analyzed in silico to identify requisite cis-acting elements. The ability for promoter sequences to drive expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP in vivo was investigated using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster. All four promoters were able to drive GFP expression but there was dramatic variation between promoters and between individual Drosophila lines, indicating significant position effects. The highest expression was observed in line Vg2bL3, which was >300-fold higher than the lowest line Vg1aL2. CONCLUSIONS: These new promoters will be useful for driving expression of genes of interest in transgenic Cx. tarsalis and perhaps other insects.

  6. Genotoxic effects of eugenol, isoeugenol and safrole in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munerato, Maria Cristina; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Reguly, Maria Luíza; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2005-04-01

    In the present study, the phenolic compounds eugenol, isoeugenol and safrole were investigated for genotoxicity in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster. The Drosophila wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) provides a rapid means to evaluate agents able to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations, as well as rearrangements related to mitotic recombination. We applied the SMART in its standard version with normal bioactivation and in its variant with increased cytochrome P450-dependent biotransformation capacity. Eugenol and safrole produced a positive recombinagenic response only in the improved assay, which was related to a high CYP450-dependent activation capacity. This suggests, as previously reported, the involvement of this family of enzymes in the activation of eugenol and safrole rather than in its detoxification. On the contrary, isoeugenol was clearly non-genotoxic at the same millimolar concentrations as used for eugenol in both the crosses. The responsiveness of SMART assays to recombinagenic compounds, as well as the reactive metabolites from eugenol and safrole were considered responsible for the genotoxicity observed.

  7. Confocal Analysis of Nuclear Lamina Behavior during Male Meiosis and Spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Fabbretti

    Full Text Available Lamin family proteins are structural components of a filamentous framework, the nuclear lamina (NL, underlying the inner membrane of nuclear envelope. The NL not only plays a role in nucleus mechanical support and nuclear shaping, but is also involved in many cellular processes including DNA replication, gene expression and chromatin positioning. Spermatogenesis is a very complex differentiation process in which each stage is characterized by nuclear architecture dramatic changes, from the early mitotic stage to the sperm differentiation final stage. Nevertheless, very few data are present in the literature on the NL behavior during this process. Here we show the first and complete description of NL behavior during meiosis and spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. By confocal imaging, we characterized the NL modifications from mitotic stages, through meiotic divisions to sperm differentiation with an anti-laminDm0 antibody against the major component of the Drosophila NL. We observed that continuous changes in the NL structure occurred in parallel with chromatin reorganization throughout the whole process and that meiotic divisions occurred in a closed context. Finally, we analyzed NL in solofuso meiotic mutant, where chromatin segregation is severely affected, and found the strict correlation between the presence of chromatin and that of NL.

  8. The effect of environmental temperature on olfactory perception in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveron, Jacob; Boto, Tamara; Alcorta, Esther

    2009-10-01

    Olfaction provides chemical information to an animal about its environment. When environmental conditions change, individuals should be able to adequately maintain function. Temperature may influence olfaction in a double manner, as it modifies the concentrations of gaseous compounds and affects biological processes. Here, we address acclimatization to environmental temperature in the olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster using heat and cold treatments. Because the consequences of temperature shifts persist for some time after the treatment's end, comparison of olfactory behaviors at the same temperature in treated and untreated flies allows us to infer the biological effects of temperature in olfaction. At intermediate odorant concentrations heat always generates a reduction of olfactory sensitivity, as they would be expected to compensate for the increase of volatiles in the air. Cold produces the opposite effect. These changes are observed in both sexes and in natural populations as well as in standard laboratory stocks. Short applications suffice to cause detectable olfactory perception changes, but even prolonged temperature treatments have only a transitory effect. Together, these results suggest that olfaction in Drosophila underlies acclimatization to environmental temperature. However, sensitivity changes are not immediate and may cause imperfect adjustment of olfactory function for short time periods.

  9. Lipoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster--assembly, function, and influence on tissue lipid composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Palm

    Full Text Available Interorgan lipid transport occurs via lipoproteins, and altered lipoprotein levels correlate with metabolic disease. However, precisely how lipoproteins affect tissue lipid composition has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we identify the major lipoproteins of Drosophila melanogaster and use genetics and mass spectrometry to study their assembly, interorgan trafficking, and influence on tissue lipids. The apoB-family lipoprotein Lipophorin (Lpp is the major hemolymph lipid carrier. It is produced as a phospholipid-rich particle by the fat body, and its secretion requires Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein (MTP. Lpp acquires sterols and most diacylglycerol (DAG at the gut via Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP, another fat body-derived apoB-family lipoprotein. The gut, like the fat body, is a lipogenic organ, incorporating both de novo-synthesized and dietary fatty acids into DAG for export. We identify distinct requirements for LTP and Lpp-dependent lipid mobilization in contributing to the neutral and polar lipid composition of the brain and wing imaginal disc. These studies define major routes of interorgan lipid transport in Drosophila and uncover surprising tissue-specific differences in lipoprotein lipid utilization.

  10. [Male reproductive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster strains with different alleles of the flamenco gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, N I; Karpova, N N; Iuneva, A O; Kim, A I

    2003-05-01

    The allelic state of gene flamenco has been determined in a number of Drosophila melanogaster strains using the ovoD test. The presence of an active copy of gypsy in these strains was detected by restriction analysis. Then male reproduction behavior was studied in the strains carrying a mutation in gene flamenco. In these experiments mating success has been experimentally estimated in groups of flies. It has been demonstrated that the presence of mutant allele flamMS decreases male mating activity irrespective of the presence or absence of mutation white. The active copy of gypsy does not affect mating activity in the absence of the mutation in gene flamenco. Individual analysis has demonstrated that that mutation flamMS results in characteristic changes in courtship: flamMS males exhibit a delay in the transition from the orientation stage to the vibration stage (the so-called vibration delay). The role of locus flamenco in the formation of male mating behavior in Drosophila is discussed. PMID:12838614

  11. DNA damage protective effect of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Robson Alves da; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Dias, Lucas Pinheiro; Costa, Maiane Papke; Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas de; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Lehmann, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Fruits and derivatives, such as juices, are complex mixtures of chemicals, some of which may have mutagenic and/or carcinogenic potential, while others may have antimutagenic and/or anticancer activities. The modulating effects of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar (HSCAN), on somatic mutation and recombination induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) were evaluated with the wing spot test in Drosophila melanogaster using co- and post-treatment protocols. Additionally, the antimutagenic activity of two HSCAN components, cashew apple pulp and honey, in MMC-induced DNA damage was also investigated. HSCAN reduced the mutagenic activity of both EMS and MMC in the co-treatment protocol, but had a co-mutagenic effect when post-administered. Similar results were also observed with honey on MMC mutagenic activity. Cashew apple pulp was effective in exerting protective or enhancing effects on the MMC mutagenicity, depending on the administration protocol and concentration used. Overall, these results indicate that HSCAN, cashew apple and honey seem capable of modulating not only the events that precede the induced DNA damages, but also the Drosophila DNA repair processes involved in the correction of EMS and MMC-induced damages. PMID:27560988

  12. Using whole-genome sequence data to predict quantitative trait phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Ober

    Full Text Available Predicting organismal phenotypes from genotype data is important for plant and animal breeding, medicine, and evolutionary biology. Genomic-based phenotype prediction has been applied for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping platforms, but not using complete genome sequences. Here, we report genomic prediction for starvation stress resistance and startle response in Drosophila melanogaster, using ∼2.5 million SNPs determined by sequencing the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel population of inbred lines. We constructed a genomic relationship matrix from the SNP data and used it in a genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP model. We assessed predictive ability as the correlation between predicted genetic values and observed phenotypes by cross-validation, and found a predictive ability of 0.239±0.008 (0.230±0.012 for starvation resistance (startle response. The predictive ability of BayesB, a Bayesian method with internal SNP selection, was not greater than GBLUP. Selection of the 5% SNPs with either the highest absolute effect or variance explained did not improve predictive ability. Predictive ability decreased only when fewer than 150,000 SNPs were used to construct the genomic relationship matrix. We hypothesize that predictive power in this population stems from the SNP-based modeling of the subtle relationship structure caused by long-range linkage disequilibrium and not from population structure or SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with causal variants. We discuss the implications of these results for genomic prediction in other organisms.

  13. The effect of engineered disulfide bonds on the stability of Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamouroux Lucille

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Acetylcholinesterase is irreversibly inhibited by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides allowing its use in biosensors for detection of these insecticides. Drosophila acetylcholinesterase is the most sensitive enzyme known and has been improved by in vitro mutagenesis. However, its stability has to be improved for extensive utilization. Results To create a disulfide bond that could increase the stability of the Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase, we selected seven positions taking into account first the distance between Cβ of two residues, in which newly introduced cysteines will form the new disulfide bond and second the conservation of the residues in the cholinesterase family. Most disulfide bonds tested did not increase and even decreased the stability of the protein. However, one engineered disulfide bridge, I327C/D375C showed significant stability increase toward denaturation by temperature (170 fold at 50°C, urea, organic solvent and provided resistance to protease degradation. The new disulfide bridge links the N-terminal domain (first 356 aa to the C-terminal domain. The quantities produced by this mutant were the same as in wild-type flies. Conclusion Addition of a disulfide bridge may either stabilize or unstabilize proteins. One bond out of the 7 tested provided significant stabilisation.

  14. The iFly Tracking System for an Automated Locomotor and Behavioural Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhoff, Kai J.; Jahn, Thomas R.; Lomas, David A.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Crowther, Damian C.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The use of animal models in medical research provides insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of human disease, and helps identify and test novel therapeutic strategies. Drosophila melanogaster – the common fruit fly – is one of the most established model organisms, as its study can be performed more readily and with far less expense than for other model animal systems, such as mice, fish, or indeed primates. In the case of fruit flies, standard assays are based on the analysis of longevity and basic locomotor functions. Here we present the iFly tracking system, which enables to increase the amount of quantitative information that can be extracted from these studies, and to reduce significantly the duration and costs associated with them. The iFly system uses a single camera to simultaneously track the trajectories of up to 20 individual flies with about 100μm spatial and 33ms temporal resolution. The statistical analysis of fly movements recorded with such accuracy makes it possible to perform a rapid and fully automated quantitative analysis of locomotor changes in response to a range of different stimuli. We anticipate that the iFly method will reduce very considerably the costs and the duration of the testing of genetic and pharmacological interventions in Drosophila models, including an earlier detection of behavioural changes and a large increase in throughput compared to current longevity and locomotor assays. PMID:21698336

  15. Variable sexually dimorphic gene expression in laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dow Julian AT

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wild-type laboratory strains of model organisms are typically kept in isolation for many years, with the action of genetic drift and selection on mutational variation causing lineages to diverge with time. Natural populations from which such strains are established, show that gender-specific interactions in particular drive many aspects of sequence level and transcriptional level variation. Here, our goal was to identify genes that display transcriptional variation between laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster, and to explore evidence of gender-biased interactions underlying that variability. Results Transcriptional variation among the laboratory genotypes studied occurs more frequently in males than in females. Qualitative differences are also apparent to suggest that genes within particular functional classes disproportionately display variation in gene expression. Our analysis indicates that genes with reproductive functions are most often divergent between genotypes in both sexes, however a large proportion of female variation can also be attributed to genes without expression in the ovaries. Conclusion The present study clearly shows that transcriptional variation between common laboratory strains of Drosophila can differ dramatically due to sexual dimorphism. Much of this variation reflects sex-specific challenges associated with divergent physiological trade-offs, morphology and regulatory pathways operating within males and females.

  16. Epigallocatechin gallate affects glucose metabolism and increases fitness and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anika E; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rabe, Doerte; Baenas, Nieves; Schloesser, Anke; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Stocker, Achim; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-10-13

    In this study, we tested whether a standardized epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) rich green tea extract (comprising > 90% EGCG) affects fitness and lifespan as well as parameters of glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Following the application of the green tea extract a significant increase in the mean lifespan (+ 3.3 days) and the 50% survival (+ 4.3 days) as well as improved fitness was detected. These effects went along an increased expression of Spargel, the homolog of mammalian PGC1α, which has been reported to affect lifespan in flies. Intriguingly, in flies, treatment with the green tea extract decreased glucose concentrations, which were accompanied by an inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. Computational docking analysis proved the potential of EGCG to dock into the substrate binding pocket of α-amylase and to a greater extent into α-glucosidase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EGCG downregulates insulin-like peptide 5 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, major regulators of glucose metabolism, as well as the Drosophila homolog of leptin, unpaired 2. We propose that a decrease in glucose metabolism in connection with an upregulated expression of Spargel contribute to the better fitness and the extended lifespan in EGCG-treated flies.

  17. Effects of methylmercury and alcohol exposure in Drosophila melanogaster: Potential risks in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ved; Chauhan, Abha

    2016-06-01

    Extensive evidence suggests the role of oxidative stress in autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. In this study, we investigated whether methylmercury (MeHg) and/or alcohol exposure has deleterious effects in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies). A diet containing different concentrations of MeHg in Drosophila induced free radical generation and increased lipid peroxidation (markers of oxidative stress) in a dose-dependent manner. This effect of MeHg on oxidative stress was enhanced by further exposure to alcohol. It was observed that alcohol alone could also induce free radical generation in flies. After alcohol exposure, MeHg did not affect the immobilization of flies, but it increased the recovery time in a concentration-dependent manner. MeHg significantly inhibited the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in a dose-dependent manner. Linear regression analysis showed a significant negative correlation between ADH activity and recovery time upon alcohol exposure in the flies fed a diet with MeHg. This relationship between ADH activity and recovery time after alcohol exposure was confirmed by adding 4-methyl pyrazole (an inhibitor of ADH) to the diet for the flies. These results suggest that consumption of alcohol by pregnant mothers who are exposed to MeHg may lead to increased oxidative stress and to increased length of time for alcohol clearance, which may have a direct impact on the development of the fetus, thereby increasing the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27151262

  18. The interplay between intestinal bacteria and host metabolism in health and disease: lessons from Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. N. Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available All higher organisms negotiate a truce with their commensal microbes and battle pathogenic microbes on a daily basis. Much attention has been given to the role of the innate immune system in controlling intestinal microbes and to the strategies used by intestinal microbes to overcome the host immune response. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the metabolisms of intestinal microbes and their hosts are linked and that this interaction is equally important for host health and well-being. For instance, an individual's array of commensal microbes can influence their predisposition to chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of host–microbe metabolic interactions is important in defining the molecular bases of these disorders and could potentially lead to new therapeutic avenues. Key advances in this area have been made using Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we review studies that have explored the impact of both commensal and pathogenic intestinal microbes on Drosophila carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These studies have helped to elucidate the metabolites produced by intestinal microbes, the intestinal receptors that sense these metabolites, and the signaling pathways through which these metabolites manipulate host metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that targeting microbial metabolism could represent an effective therapeutic strategy for human metabolic diseases and intestinal infection.

  19. REML estimates of genetic parameters of sexual dimorphism for wing and thorax length in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandrine Mignon-Grasteau; Jean David; Patricia Gibert; Hélène Legout; Georges Pétavy; Brigitte Moreteau; Catherine Beaumont

    2004-08-01

    Restricted maximum likelihood was used to estimate genetic parameters of male and female wing and thorax length in isofemale lines of Drosophila melanogaster, and results compared to estimates obtained earlier with the classical analysis of variance approach. As parents within an isofemale line were unknown, a total of 500 parental pedigrees were simulated and mean estimates computed. Full and half sibs were distinguished, in contrast to usual isofemale studies in which animals were all treated as half sibs and hence heritability was overestimated. Heritability was thus estimated at 0.33, 0.38, 0.30 and 0.33 for male and female wing length and male and female thorax length, respectively, whereas corresponding estimates obtained using analysis of variance were 0.46, 0.54, 0.35 and 0.38. Genetic correlations between male and female traits were 0.85 and 0.62 for wing and thorax length, respectively. Sexual dimorphism and the ratio of female to male traits were moderately heritable (0.30 and 0.23 for wing length, 0.38 and 0.23 for thorax length). Both were moderately and positively correlated with female traits, and weakly and negatively correlated with male traits. Such heritabilities confirmed that sexual dimorphism might be a fast evolving trait in Drosophila.

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of UBE3A is not imprinted in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Kevin A.; LeDoux, Mark S.; Reiter, Lawrence T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In mammals, expression of UBE3A is epigenetically regulated in neurons and expression is restricted to the maternal copy of UBE3A. A recent report claimed that Drosophila melanogaster UBE3A homolog (Dube3a) is preferentially expressed from the maternal allele in fly brain, inferring an imprinting mechanism. However, complex epigenetic regulatory features of the mammalian imprinting center are not present in Drosophila, and allele specific expression of Dube3a has not been documented. We used behavioral and electrophysiological analysis of the Dube3a loss-of-function allele (Dube3a15b) to investigate Dube3a imprinting in fly neurons. We found that motor impairment (climbing ability) and a newly-characterized defect in synaptic transmission are independent of parental inheritance of the Dube3a15b allele. Furthermore, expression analysis of coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Dube3a did not reveal allele specific expression differences among reciprocal crosses. These data indicate that Dube3a is neither imprinted nor preferentially expressed from the maternal allele in fly neurons. PMID:27599063

  1. DNA damage protective effect of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Robson Alves da; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Dias, Lucas Pinheiro; Costa, Maiane Papke; Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas de; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Lehmann, Mauricio

    2016-07-25

    Fruits and derivatives, such as juices, are complex mixtures of chemicals, some of which may have mutagenic and/or carcinogenic potential, while others may have antimutagenic and/or anticancer activities. The modulating effects of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar (HSCAN), on somatic mutation and recombination induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) were evaluated with the wing spot test in Drosophila melanogaster using co- and post-treatment protocols. Additionally, the antimutagenic activity of two HSCAN components, cashew apple pulp and honey, in MMC-induced DNA damage was also investigated. HSCAN reduced the mutagenic activity of both EMS and MMC in the co-treatment protocol, but had a co-mutagenic effect when post-administered. Similar results were also observed with honey on MMC mutagenic activity. Cashew apple pulp was effective in exerting protective or enhancing effects on the MMC mutagenicity, depending on the administration protocol and concentration used. Overall, these results indicate that HSCAN, cashew apple and honey seem capable of modulating not only the events that precede the induced DNA damages, but also the Drosophila DNA repair processes involved in the correction of EMS and MMC-induced damages. PMID:27459259

  2. Regulation of the activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN by thioredoxin in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human Thioredoxin-1 (hTrx-1) is a small redox protein with a molecular weight of 12 kDa that contains two cysteine residues found in its catalytic site. HTrx-1 plays an important role in cell growth, apoptosis, and cancer patient prognosis. Recently, we have demonstrated that hTrx-1 binds to the C2 domain of the human tumor suppressor, PTEN, in a redox dependent manner. This binding leads to the inhibition of PTEN lipid phosphatase activity in mammalian tissue culture systems. In this study, we show that over-expression of hTrx-1 in Drosophila melanogaster promotes cell growth and proliferation during eye development as measured by eye size and ommatidia size. Furthermore, hTrx-1 rescues the small eye phenotype induced by the over-expression of PTEN. We demonstrate that this rescue of the PTEN-induced eye size phenotype requires cysteine-218 in the C2 domain of PTEN. We also show that hTrx-1 over-expression results in increased Akt phosphorylation in fly head extracts supporting our observations that the hTrx-1-induced eye size increase results from the inhibition of PTEN activity. Our study confirms the redox regulation of PTEN through disulfide bond formation with the hTrx-1 in Drosophila and suggests conserved mechanisms for thioredoxins and their interactions with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling pathway in humans and fruit flies

  3. No evidence for heritability of male mating latency or copulation duration across social environments in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Taylor

    Full Text Available A key assumption underpinning major models of sexual selection is the expectation that male sexual attractiveness is heritable. Surprisingly, however, empirical tests of this assumption are relatively scarce. Here we use a paternal full-sib/half-sib breeding design to examine genetic and environmental variation in male mating latency (a proxy for sexual attractiveness and copulation duration in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. As our experimental design also involved the manipulation of the social environment within each full-sibling family, we were able to further test for the presence of genotype-by-environment interactions (GEIs in these traits, which have the potential to compromise mate choice for genetic benefits. Our experimental manipulation of the social environment revealed plastic expression of both traits; males exposed to a rival male during the sensitive period of adult sexual maturation exhibited shorter mating latencies and longer copulation durations than those who matured in isolation. However, we found no evidence for GEIs, and no significant additive genetic variation underlying these traits in either environment. These results undermine the notion that the evolution of female choice rests on covariance between female preference and male displays, an expectation that underpins indirect benefit models such as the good genes and sexy sons hypotheses. However, our results may also indicate depletion of genetic variance in these traits in the natural population studied, thus supporting the expectation that traits closely aligned with reproductive fitness can exhibit low levels of additive genetic variance.

  4. In vivo Toxicity Assessment of Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs LR14) Derived from Lactobacillus plantarum Strain LR/14 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchi; Sarkar, Surajit; Srivastava, Sheela

    2014-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are known to produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as bacteriocins which can be employed to control pathogens and food spoilage microorganisms. However, their possible role as toxic agents against a eukaryotic system still remains unexplored. The present study deals with the in vivo evaluation of acute toxic effect of AMPs LR14, a mixture of AMPs isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum LR/14 on Drosophila melanogaster. The fly was used as a model system to measure the extent of toxicity of these peptides. The results showed that concentrations below 10 mg/ml are not significantly effective. When exposed to 10 mg/ml of AMPs LR14, acute toxic effect and a significant delay in the developmental cycle of the fly could be observed. Also, the weight and size of the flies were significantly reduced upon ingestion of these peptides. Higher concentrations (beyond 15 mg/ml) exerted a strong larvicidal effect. Detailed analysis on larval tissues and adult germ cells of the insect revealed deformity in cellular architecture, DNA fragmentation, and premature apoptosis, confirming that the peptides have a dose-dependent toxic property. Our studies provide the first information on the role of AMPs LR14 as an insecticidal agent.

  5. No evidence for heritability of male mating latency or copulation duration across social environments in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michelle L; Evans, Jonathan P; Garcia-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    A key assumption underpinning major models of sexual selection is the expectation that male sexual attractiveness is heritable. Surprisingly, however, empirical tests of this assumption are relatively scarce. Here we use a paternal full-sib/half-sib breeding design to examine genetic and environmental variation in male mating latency (a proxy for sexual attractiveness) and copulation duration in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster. As our experimental design also involved the manipulation of the social environment within each full-sibling family, we were able to further test for the presence of genotype-by-environment interactions (GEIs) in these traits, which have the potential to compromise mate choice for genetic benefits. Our experimental manipulation of the social environment revealed plastic expression of both traits; males exposed to a rival male during the sensitive period of adult sexual maturation exhibited shorter mating latencies and longer copulation durations than those who matured in isolation. However, we found no evidence for GEIs, and no significant additive genetic variation underlying these traits in either environment. These results undermine the notion that the evolution of female choice rests on covariance between female preference and male displays, an expectation that underpins indirect benefit models such as the good genes and sexy sons hypotheses. However, our results may also indicate depletion of genetic variance in these traits in the natural population studied, thus supporting the expectation that traits closely aligned with reproductive fitness can exhibit low levels of additive genetic variance. PMID:24155948

  6. [Analysis of the structure and expression of the DIP1 gene in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, L N; Potanova, M V; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2009-02-01

    DIP1 gene transcription was analyzed with the use of RT-PCR in three Drosophila melanogaster strains with the flamenco- phenotype (flam(SS), flam(MS), and flam(Ore)) and in one flamenco+ strain at the stages of embryos (0-24 h), third-instar larvae, and adult flies. The mutant strains flam(SS) and flam(Ore) lack an active copy of transposon gypsy. Theflam(MS) strain was obtained by introducing an active copy of gypsy in flies of theflam(SS) strain and is characterized by a high rate of gypsy transpositions. The experiments showed that at least five forms of DIP1 gene transcripts are produced. The form of cDNA corresponding to CDS DIP1-d was discovered only in embryos. It was found that DIP1 gene transcription depends on the age of flies: at the larval stage the level of transcription is significantly reduced. However, no reduction of gene transcription is observed in theflam(Ore) strain. These results suggest that the flamenco- phenotype may be associated with an alteration of DIP1 gene transcription, as in differentflamenco- strains the DIP1 gene expression is changed differently. PMID:19334614

  7. Cellular basis of morphological variation and temperature-related plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster strains with divergent wing shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, Libéria Souza; Mattos, Daniel; Matta, Bruna Palma; Bitner-Mathé, Blanche Christine

    2014-12-01

    Organ shape evolves through cross-generational changes in developmental patterns at cellular and/or tissue levels that ultimately alter tissue dimensions and final adult proportions. Here, we investigated the cellular basis of an artificially selected divergence in the outline shape of Drosophila melanogaster wings, by comparing flies with elongated or rounded wing shapes but with remarkably similar wing sizes. We also tested whether cellular plasticity in response to developmental temperature was altered by such selection. Results show that variation in cellular traits is associated with wing shape differences, and that cell number may play an important role in wing shape response to selection. Regarding the effects of developmental temperature, a size-related plastic response was observed, in that flies reared at 16 °C developed larger wings with larger and more numerous cells across all intervein regions relative to flies reared at 25 °C. Nevertheless, no conclusive indication of altered phenotypic plasticity was found between selection strains for any wing or cellular trait. We also described how cell area is distributed across different intervein regions. It follows that cell area tends to decrease along the anterior wing compartment and increase along the posterior one. Remarkably, such pattern was observed not only in the selected strains but also in the natural baseline population, suggesting that it might be canalized during development and was not altered by the intense program of artificial selection for divergent wing shapes.

  8. Body-weight and chromosome aberrations induced by X-rays in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Body-weight has been shown to influence the final expression of genetic damage by X-rays in Drosophila melanogaster. If larvae of Drosophila were raised up to the third instar in media containing different amounts of the same nutrient and in different conditions of crowding a positive correlation was observed between body-weight and frequency of chromosome aberrations induced by a given dose of X-rays in the somatic cells of their nerve ganglia. This effect, present in both sexes, is most plausibly attributed to a different capacity of big and small larvae for repairing radiation damage. (orig.)

  9. Grasping at molecular interactions and genetic networks in Drosophila melanogaster using FlyNets, an Internet database.

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, C; Lachaize, C; Janody, F; Bellon, B; Röder, L; Euzenat, J.; Rechenmann, F; Jacq, B

    1999-01-01

    FlyNets (http://gifts.univ-mrs.fr/FlyNets/FlyNets_home_page.++ +html) is a WWW database describing molecular interactions (protein-DNA, protein-RNA and protein-protein) in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. It is composed of two parts, as follows. (i) FlyNets-base is a specialized database which focuses on molecular interactions involved in Drosophila development. The information content of FlyNets-base is distributed among several specific lines arranged according to a GenBank-like format and ...

  10. Comparative transcriptome analysis among parental inbred and crosses reveals the role of dominance gene expression in heterosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianwen; Li, Rongni; Li, Qianqian; Bao, Haigang; Wu, Changxin

    2016-01-01

    We observed heteroses for body weight in Drosophila melanogaster after generating hybrids from three inbred lines. To better understand the mechanism for this phenomenon at the mRNA level, we compared the mRNA profiles of the parental and hybrid lines using high-throughput RNA-seq. A total of 5877 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found and about 92% of these exhibited parental expression level dominance. Genes in the dominance category were functionally characterized using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and the gene classifications offered by the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium. The analysis identified genes associated with crucial processes such as development and growth in all three crosses. Functional assignments involving aminoglycan metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, and galactose metabolism are significantly overrepresented amongst the 215 common dominance DEGs. We conclude that dominance DEGs are important in heteroses in Drosophila melanogaster and contribute specifically to body weight heterosis. PMID:26928435

  11. The skeletomuscular system of the larva of Drosophila melanogaster (Drosophilidae, Diptera): a contribution to the morphology of a model organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfler, Benjamin; Schneeberg, Katharina; Löffler, Andreas; Hünefeld, Frank; Meier, Rudolf; Beutel, Rolf G

    2013-01-01

    The morphological features of the third instar larva of the most important insect model, Drosophila melanogaster, are documented for the first time using a broad spectrum of modern morphological techniques. External structures of the body wall, the cephaloskeleton, and the musculature are described and illustrated. Additional information about other internal organs is provided. The systematic implications of the findings are discussed briefly. Internal apomorphic features of Brachycera and Cyclorrhapha are confirmed for Drosophila. Despite the intensive investigations of the phylogeny of the megadiverse Diptera, evolutionary reconstructions are still impeded by the scarcity of anatomical data for brachyceran larvae. The available morphological information for the life stages of three insect model organisms -D. melanogaster (Diptera, Drosophilidae), Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) - is addressed briefly. The usefulness of a combination of traditional and innovative techniques for an optimized acquisition of anatomical data for different life stages is highlighted. PMID:23010508

  12. Are larger and/or more symmetrical Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera, Drosophilidae males more successful in matings in nature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofija Pavković-Lučić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Are larger and/or more symmetrical Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera, Drosophilidae males more successful in matings in nature? Sexual selection in Drosophila melanogaster, related to body size and fluctuating asymmetry in wing length and number of sex comb teeth in males, was tested in natural conditions. Males collected in copula were significantly larger than those collected as a single, while no difference in mean number of sex comb teeth between copulating and single males was observed. On the other hand, single males had greater asymmetry both for wing length and number of sex comb teeth than their mating counterparts. It looks like that symmetry of these bilateral traits also may play a role in sexual selection in this dipteran species in nature.

  13. Phenotypic Plasticity through Transcriptional Regulation of the Evolutionary Hotspot Gene tan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Jean-Michel; Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle; De Castro, Sandra; Peronnet, Frédérique

    2016-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a given genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to distinct environmental conditions. Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive. Furthermore, it is thought to facilitate evolution. Although phenotypic plasticity is a widespread phenomenon, its molecular mechanisms are only beginning to be unravelled. Environmental conditions can affect gene expression through modification of chromatin structure, mainly via histone modifications, nucleosome remodelling or DNA methylation, suggesting that phenotypic plasticity might partly be due to chromatin plasticity. As a model of phenotypic plasticity, we study abdominal pigmentation of Drosophila melanogaster females, which is temperature sensitive. Abdominal pigmentation is indeed darker in females grown at 18°C than at 29°C. This phenomenon is thought to be adaptive as the dark pigmentation produced at lower temperature increases body temperature. We show here that temperature modulates the expression of tan (t), a pigmentation gene involved in melanin production. t is expressed 7 times more at 18°C than at 29°C in female abdominal epidermis. Genetic experiments show that modulation of t expression by temperature is essential for female abdominal pigmentation plasticity. Temperature modulates the activity of an enhancer of t without modifying compaction of its chromatin or level of the active histone mark H3K27ac. By contrast, the active mark H3K4me3 on the t promoter is strongly modulated by temperature. The H3K4 methyl-transferase involved in this process is likely Trithorax, as we show that it regulates t expression and the H3K4me3 level on the t promoter and also participates in female pigmentation and its plasticity. Interestingly, t was previously shown to be involved in inter-individual variation of female abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster, and in abdominal pigmentation divergence between Drosophila species. Sensitivity of t expression to

  14. Investigating the effects of nanoparticles on reproduction and development in Drosophila melanogaster and CD-1 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrook, Nicola Anne

    Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) are a class of small (≤ 100 nm) materials that are being used for a variety of purposes, including industrial lubricants, food additives, antibacterial agents, as well as delivery systems for drug and gene therapies. Their unique characteristics due to their small size as well as their parent materials allow them to be exploited in convenience applications; however, some of these properties also allow them to interact with and invade biological systems. Few studies have been performed to determine the potential harm that NPs can inflict on reproductive and developmental processes in organisms. In this study, Drosophila melanogaster and CD-1 mice were orally exposed to varying doses of titanium dioxide (TiO 2) NPs, silver (Ag) NPs, or hydroxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes (fCNTs) and Drosophila were also exposed to microparticles (MPs) as a control for particle size. The subsequent effect of these materials on reproduction and development were evaluated. Strikingly, each type of NP studied negatively affected either reproduction or development in one or both of the two model systems. TiO2 NPs significantly negative effected both CD-1 mouse development (100 mg/kg or 1000 mg/kg) as well as Drosophila female fecundity (0.005%-0.5% w/v). Ag NPs significantly reduced mouse fetus viability after prenatal exposure to10 mg/kg. Ag NPs also significantly decreased the developmental success of Drosophila when they were directly exposed to these NPs (0.05% - 0.5% w/v) compared to both the vehicle and MP controls. fCNTs significantly increased the presence of morphological defects, resorptions and skeletal abnormalities in CD-1 mice, but had little effect on Drosophila. We speculate that the differences seen in the effects of NP types may be partially due to differences in reproductive physiology as well as each organism's ability to internalize these NPs. Whereas the differing response of each organism to a NP type was likely due in part to

  15. Circadian plasticity in photoreceptor cells controls visual coding efficiency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Barth

    Full Text Available In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, neuronal plasticity of synaptic terminals in the first optic neuropil, or lamina, depends on early visual experience within a critical period after eclosion. The current study revealed two additional and parallel mechanisms involved in this type of synaptic terminal plasticity. First, an endogenous circadian rhythm causes daily oscillations in the volume of photoreceptor cell terminals. Second, daily visual experience precisely modulates the circadian time course and amplitude of the volume oscillations that the photoreceptor-cell terminals undergo. Both mechanisms are separable in their molecular basis. We suggest that the described neuronal plasticity in Drosophila ensures continuous optimal performance of the visual system over the course of a 24 h-day. Moreover, the sensory system of Drosophila cannot only account for predictable, but also for acute, environmental changes. The volumetric changes in the synaptic terminals of photoreceptor cells are accompanied by circadian and light-induced changes of presynaptic ribbons as well as extensions of epithelial glial cells into the photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that the architecture of the lamina is altered by both visual exposure and the circadian clock. Clock-mutant analysis and the rescue of PER protein rhythmicity exclusively in all R1-6 cells revealed that photoreceptor-cell plasticity is autonomous and sufficient to control visual behavior. The strength of a visually guided behavior, the optomotor turning response, co-varies with synaptic-terminal volume oscillations of photoreceptor cells when elicited at low light levels. Our results show that behaviorally relevant adaptive processing of visual information is performed, in part, at the level of visual input level.

  16. Direct estimation of the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Haag-Liautard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variants are widely used in evolutionary genetics as markers for population history and to estimate divergence times among taxa. Inferences of species history are generally based on phylogenetic comparisons, which assume that molecular evolution is clock-like. Between-species comparisons have also been used to estimate the mutation rate, using sites that are thought to evolve neutrally. We directly estimated the mtDNA mutation rate by scanning the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster lines that had undergone approximately 200 generations of spontaneous mutation accumulation (MA. We detected a total of 28 point mutations and eight insertion-deletion (indel mutations, yielding an estimate for the single-nucleotide mutation rate of 6.2 x 10(-8 per site per fly generation. Most mutations were heteroplasmic within a line, and their frequency distribution suggests that the effective number of mitochondrial genomes transmitted per female per generation is about 30. We observed repeated occurrences of some indel mutations, suggesting that indel mutational hotspots are common. Among the point mutations, there is a large excess of G-->A mutations on the major strand (the sense strand for the majority of mitochondrial genes. These mutations tend to occur at nonsynonymous sites of protein-coding genes, and they are expected to be deleterious, so do not become fixed between species. The overall mtDNA mutation rate per base pair per fly generation in Drosophila is estimated to be about 10x higher than the nuclear mutation rate, but the mitochondrial major strand G-->A mutation rate is about 70x higher than the nuclear rate. Silent sites are substantially more strongly biased towards A and T than nonsynonymous sites, consistent with the extreme mutation bias towards A+T. Strand-asymmetric mutation bias, coupled with selection to maintain specific nonsynonymous bases, therefore provides an explanation for the extreme base

  17. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia P. Jumbo-Lucioni

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT. Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and, by

  18. Uptake of the necrotic serpin in Drosophila melanogaster via the lipophorin receptor-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fausia Soukup

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The humoral response to fungal and Gram-positive infections is regulated by the serpin-family inhibitor, Necrotic. Following immune-challenge, a proteolytic cascade is activated which signals through the Toll receptor. Toll activation results in a range of antibiotic peptides being synthesised in the fat-body and exported to the haemolymph. As with mammalian serpins, Necrotic turnover in Drosophila is rapid. This serpin is synthesised in the fat-body, but its site of degradation has been unclear. By "freezing" endocytosis with a temperature sensitive Dynamin mutation, we demonstrate that Necrotic is removed from the haemolymph in two groups of giant cells: the garland and pericardial athrocytes. Necrotic uptake responds rapidly to infection, being visibly increased after 30 mins and peaking at 6-8 hours. Co-localisation of anti-Nec with anti-AP50, Rab5, and Rab7 antibodies establishes that the serpin is processed through multi-vesicular bodies and delivered to the lysosome, where it co-localises with the ubiquitin-binding protein, HRS. Nec does not co-localise with Rab11, indicating that the serpin is not re-exported from athrocytes. Instead, mutations which block late endosome/lysosome fusion (dor, hk, and car cause accumulation of Necrotic-positive endosomes, even in the absence of infection. Knockdown of the 6 Drosophila orthologues of the mammalian LDL receptor family with dsRNA identifies LpR1 as an enhancer of the immune response. Uptake of Necrotic from the haemolymph is blocked by a chromosomal deletion of LpR1. In conclusion, we identify the cells and the receptor molecule responsible for the uptake and degradation of the Necrotic serpin in Drosophila melanogaster. The scavenging of serpin/proteinase complexes may be a critical step in the regulation of proteolytic cascades.

  19. Regulation of sleep by neuropeptide Y-like system in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxia He

    Full Text Available Sleep is important for maintenance of normal physiology in animals. In mammals, neuropeptide Y (NPY, a homolog of Drosophila neuropeptide F (NPF, is involved in sleep regulation, with different effects in human and rat. However, the function of NPF on sleep in Drosophila melanogaster has not yet been described. In this study, we investigated the effects of NPF and its receptor-neuropeptide F receptor (NPFR1 on Drosophila sleep. Male flies over-expressing NPF or NPFR1 exhibited increased sleep during the nighttime. Further analysis demonstrated that sleep episode duration during nighttime was greatly increased and sleep latency was significantly reduced, indicating that NPF and NPFR1 promote sleep quality, and their action on sleep is not because of an impact of the NPF signal system on development. Moreover, the homeostatic regulation of flies after sleep deprivation was disrupted by altered NPF signaling, since sleep deprivation decreased transcription of NPF in control flies, and there were less sleep loss during sleep deprivation and less sleep gain after sleep deprivation in flies overexpressing NPF and NPFR1 than in control flies, suggesting that NPF system auto-regulation plays an important role in sleep homeostasis. However, these effects did not occur in females, suggesting a sex-dependent regulatory function in sleep for NPF and NPFR1. NPF in D1 brain neurons showed male-specific expression, providing the cellular locus for male-specific regulation of sleep by NPF and NPFR1. This study brings a new understanding into sleep studies of a sexually dimorphic regulatory mode in female and male flies.

  20. Effector caspase Dcp-1 and IAP protein Bruce regulate starvation-induced autophagy during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Ying-Chen Claire; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Barbosa, Sharon González; McCall, Kimberly; Gorski, Sharon M.

    2008-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between autophagy and apoptosis, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying their interactions are largely unknown. We conducted a systematic study of Drosophila melanogaster cell death–related genes to determine their requirement in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. We discovered that six cell death genes—death caspase-1 (Dcp-1), hid, Bruce, Buffy, debcl, and p53—as well as Ras–Raf–mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway components had a r...

  1. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways w...

  2. Biogenic Amines in Microdissected Brain Regions of Drosophila melanogaster Measured with Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography – Electrochemical Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Kuklinski, Nicholas J.; Berglund, E. Carina; Engelbrektsson, Johan; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Micellar electrokinetic chromatography with electrochemical detection has been used to quantify biogenic amines in microdissected Drosophila melanogaster brains and brain regions. The effects of pigment from the relatively large fly eyes on the separation have been examined to find that the red pigment from the compound eye masks much of the signal from biogenic amines. The brains of white mutant flies, which have characteristically low pigment in the eyes, have a significantly simplified sep...

  3. Spatially varying selection shapes life history clines among populations of Drosophila melanogaster from sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, Daniel K; Lack, Justin B.; Mathur, Vinayak; Schlötterer, Christian; Schmidt, Paul S; Pool, John E.; Flatt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Clines in life history traits, presumably driven by spatially varying selection, are widespread. Major latitudinal clines have been observed, for example, in Drosophila melanogaster, an ancestrally tropical insect from Africa that has colonized temperate habitats on multiple continents. Yet, how geographic factors other than latitude, such as altitude or longitude, affect life history in this species remains poorly understood. Moreover, most previous work has been performed on derived Europea...

  4. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure and Wolbachia Infection Status in a Worldwide Sample of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Verspoor, Rudi L.; Haddrill, Penelope R

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster and its close relatives have been extremely important model species in the development of population genetic models that serve to explain patterns of diversity in natural populations, a major goal of evolutionary biology. A detailed picture of the evolutionary history of these species is beginning to emerge, as the relative importance of forces including demographic changes and natural selection is established. A continuing aim is to characterise levels of genetic dive...

  5. Dominant lethal mutations in Drosophila melanogaster natural populations flown on board ISS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    The resistance to mutagenic impacts represents an important issue of manned space missions. However the reasons of its individual variability as well as the factors which could induce mutations in space flight are not fully understood. Drosophila studies accomplished by several research teams at real space flights, revealed pronounced increase of mutations in somatic and reproductive cells, nonetheless, quite an opposite spaceflight effects also occurred, i.e., mei-41 laboratory strain showed postflight mutation rates lower than that in ground control. In order to monitor the influence of space flight on the mutational process, 4 series of space experiment with D. melanogaster wild type populations were performed at International Space Station (ISS). The appliance “Drosophila-2” used for breeding of drosophila in spaceflight conditions, enabled to conduct synchronous studies with two samples of fly populations. First instar drosophila larvae were placed into the experimental appliance 12 hours before the start of transport spacecraft. The duration of experiments was 7.9 through 19.7 days. In 19.7-day experiment, two generations of the flies were raised during the space flight, and then delivered to the earth. The frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) was evaluated as the percentage of embryonic death in the progeny of experimental drosophila samples. DLM tests in VV-09 and Chas-09 natural populations, performed after the exposure to 10.9-day flight, showed the increase of DLM rate in Chas-09 (0.077 in flight series vs. 0.43 in earth-based control) while post-flight DLM value in VV-09 did not diverge from on-earth sample (0.025 and 0.027 correspondingly). The same results for VV-09 were obtained after the 14.7-day and 7.9-day flights with the only exception: 7.9-day flight experiment employed DLM measurements in two VV-09 spaceflight samples, differing by the age of the flies, and the above DLM rates were detected in “younger” VV-09 sample only. DLM

  6. Effects of polygamy on the activity/rest rhythm of male fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Vivek Rohidas; Varma, Vishwanath; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Although polygamy is common in insects, its extent varies enormously among natural populations. Mating systems influence the evolution of reproductive traits and the difference in extent of polygamy between males and females may be a key factor in determining traits which come under the influence of sexual selection. Fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster are promiscuous as both males and females mate with multiple partners. Mating has severe consequences on the physiology and behaviour of flies, and it affects their activity/rest rhythm in a sex-specific manner. In this study, we attempted to discern the effects of mating with multiple partners as opposed to a single partner, or of remaining unmated, on the activity/rest rhythm of flies under cyclic semi-natural (SN) and constant dark (DD) conditions. The results revealed that while evening activity of mated flies was significantly reduced compared to virgins, polygamous males showed a more severe reduction compared to monogamous males. In contrast, though mated females showed reduction in evening activity compared to virgins, activity levels were not different between polygamous and monogamous females. Although there was no detectable effect of mating on clock period, power of the activity/rest rhythm was significantly reduced in mated females with no difference seen between polygamous and monogamous individuals. These results suggest that courtship motivation, represented by evening activity, is successively reduced in males due to mating with one or more partners, while in females, it does not depend on the number of mating partners. Based on these results we conclude that polygamy affects the activity/rest rhythm of fruit flies D. melanogaster in a sex-dependent manner.

  7. Glyphosate-based herbicide exposure causes antioxidant defence responses in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Lais Mattos; Figueira, Fernanda Hernandes; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; da Rosa, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective and post-emergent herbicide that affects plant growth. Animal exposure to this herbicide can lead to adverse effects, such as endocrine disruption, oxidative stress and behavioural disorders. Drosophilids have been utilized previously as an effective tool in toxicological tests. In the present study, the effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup [Original]) were investigated regarding oxidative stress, the antioxidant defence system and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in Drosophila melanogaster. Flies (of both genders) that were 1 to 3days old were exposed to different glyphosate concentrations (0.0mg/L=control, 1.0mg/L, 2.0mg/L, 5.0mg/L and 10.0mg/L) in the diet for 24h and 96h. After the exposure periods, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were quantified. In addition, the mRNA expression of antioxidant genes (i.e., keap1, sod, sod2, cat, irc, gclc, gclm, gss, trxt, trxr-1 and trxr-2) was evaluated via RT-PCR. Additionally, AChE activity was evaluated only after the 96h exposure period. The results indicated that Roundup exposure leads to a reduction in ROS levels in flies exposed for 96h. ACAP levels and gene expression of the antioxidant defence system exhibited an increase from 24h, while LPO did not show any significant alterations in both exposure periods. AChE activity was not affected following Roundup exposure. Our data suggest that Roundup exposure causes an early activation of the antioxidant defence system in D. melanogaster, and this can prevent subsequent damage caused by ROS. PMID:26980113

  8. Effects of polygamy on the activity/rest rhythm of male fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Vivek Rohidas; Varma, Vishwanath; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Although polygamy is common in insects, its extent varies enormously among natural populations. Mating systems influence the evolution of reproductive traits and the difference in extent of polygamy between males and females may be a key factor in determining traits which come under the influence of sexual selection. Fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster are promiscuous as both males and females mate with multiple partners. Mating has severe consequences on the physiology and behaviour of flies, and it affects their activity/rest rhythm in a sex-specific manner. In this study, we attempted to discern the effects of mating with multiple partners as opposed to a single partner, or of remaining unmated, on the activity/rest rhythm of flies under cyclic semi-natural (SN) and constant dark (DD) conditions. The results revealed that while evening activity of mated flies was significantly reduced compared to virgins, polygamous males showed a more severe reduction compared to monogamous males. In contrast, though mated females showed reduction in evening activity compared to virgins, activity levels were not different between polygamous and monogamous females. Although there was no detectable effect of mating on clock period, power of the activity/rest rhythm was significantly reduced in mated females with no difference seen between polygamous and monogamous individuals. These results suggest that courtship motivation, represented by evening activity, is successively reduced in males due to mating with one or more partners, while in females, it does not depend on the number of mating partners. Based on these results we conclude that polygamy affects the activity/rest rhythm of fruit flies D. melanogaster in a sex-dependent manner.

  9. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Valeria Paula; Mensch, Julián; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may interact

  10. Population Genomics of sub-saharan Drosophila melanogaster: African diversity and non-African admixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Pool

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster has played a pivotal role in the development of modern population genetics. However, many basic questions regarding the demographic and adaptive history of this species remain unresolved. We report the genome sequencing of 139 wild-derived strains of D. melanogaster, representing 22 population samples from the sub-Saharan ancestral range of this species, along with one European population. Most genomes were sequenced above 25X depth from haploid embryos. Results indicated a pervasive influence of non-African admixture in many African populations, motivating the development and application of a novel admixture detection method. Admixture proportions varied among populations, with greater admixture in urban locations. Admixture levels also varied across the genome, with localized peaks and valleys suggestive of a non-neutral introgression process. Genomes from the same location differed starkly in ancestry, suggesting that isolation mechanisms may exist within African populations. After removing putatively admixed genomic segments, the greatest genetic diversity was observed in southern Africa (e.g. Zambia, while diversity in other populations was largely consistent with a geographic expansion from this potentially ancestral region. The European population showed different levels of diversity reduction on each chromosome arm, and some African populations displayed chromosome arm-specific diversity reductions. Inversions in the European sample were associated with strong elevations in diversity across chromosome arms. Genomic scans were conducted to identify loci that may represent targets of positive selection within an African population, between African populations, and between European and African populations. A disproportionate number of candidate selective sweep regions were located near genes with varied roles in gene regulation. Outliers for Europe-Africa F(ST were found to be enriched in genomic regions of locally

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study on Male Genital Shape and Size in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baku Takahara

    Full Text Available Male genital morphology of animals with internal fertilization and promiscuous mating systems have been one of the most diverse and rapidly evolving morphological traits. The male genital morphology in general is known to have low phenotypic and genetic variations, but the genetic basis of the male genital variation remains unclear. Drosophila melanogaster and its closely related species are morphologically very similar, but the shapes of the posterior lobe, a cuticular projection on the male genital arch are distinct from each other, representing a model system for studying the genetic basis of male genital morphology. In this study, we used highly inbred whole genome sequenced strains of D. melanogaster to perform genome wide association analysis on posterior lobe morphology. We quantified the outline shape of posterior lobes with Fourier coefficients obtained from elliptic Fourier analysis and performed principal component analysis, and posterior lobe size. The first and second principal components (PC1 and PC2 explained approximately 88% of the total variation of the posterior lobe shape. We then examined the association between the principal component scores and posterior lobe size and 1902142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. As a result, we obtained 15, 14 and 15 SNPs for PC1, PC2 and posterior lobe size with P-values smaller than 10(-5. Based on the location of the SNPs, 13, 13 and six protein coding genes were identified as potential candidates for PC1, PC2 and posterior lobe size, respectively. In addition to the previous findings showing that the intraspecific posterior shape variation are regulated by multiple QTL with strong effects, the present study suggests that the intraspecific variation may be under polygenic regulation with a number of loci with small effects. Further studies are required for investigating whether these candidate genes are responsible for the intraspecific posterior lobe shape variation.

  12. Developmental regulation and complex organization of the promoter of the non-coding hsr gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Lakhotia; T K Rajendra; K V Prasanth

    2001-03-01

    The nucleus-limited large non-coding hsrω-n RNA product of the 93D or the hsrω gene of Drosophila melanogaster binds to a variety of RNA-binding proteins involved in nuclear RNA processing. We examined the developmental and heat shock induced expression of this gene by in situ hybridization of nonradioactively labelled riboprobe to cellular transcripts in intact embryos, larval and adult somatic tissues of wild type and an enhancer-trap line carrying the hsrω05241 allele due to insertion of a P-LacZ-rosy+ transposon at — 130 bp position of the hsrω promoter. We also examined LacZ expression in the enhancer-trap line and in two transgenic lines carrying different lengths of the hsrω promoter upstream of the LacZ reporter. The hsrω gene is expressed widely at all developmental stages; in later embryonic stages, its expression in the developing central nervous system was prominent. In spite of insertion of a big transposon in the promoter, expression of the hsrω05241 allele in the enhancer-trap line, as revealed by in situ hybridization to hsrω transcripts in cells, was similar to that of the wild type allele in all the embryonic, larval and adult somatic tissues examined. Expression of the LacZ gene in this enhancer-trap line was similar to that of the hsrω RNA in all diploid cell types in embryos and larvae but in the polytene cells, the LacZ gene did not express at all, neither during normal development nor after heat shock. Comparison of the expression patterns of hsrω gene and those of the LacZ reporter gene under its various promoter regions in the enhancer-trap and transgenic lines revealed a complex pattern of regulation, which seems to be essential for its dynamically varying expression in diverse cell types.

  13. Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) mediates juvenile hormone action during metamorphosis of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakuchi, Chieka; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Riddiford, Lynn M

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) given at pupariation inhibits bristle formation and causes pupal cuticle formation in the abdomen of Drosophila melanogaster due to its prolongation of expression of the transcription factor Broad (BR). In a microarray analysis of JH-induced gene expression in abdominal integument, we found that Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) was up-regulated during most of adult development. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that Kr-h1 up-regulation began at 10h after puparium formation (APF), and Kr-h1 up-regulation occurred in imaginal epidermal cells, persisting larval muscles, and larval oenocytes. Ectopic expression of Kr-h1 in abdominal epidermis using T155-Gal4 to drive UAS-Kr-h1 resulted in missing or short bristles in the dorsal midline. This phenotype was similar to that seen after a low dose of JH or after misexpression of br between 21 and 30 h APF. Ectopic expression of Kr-h1 prolonged the expression of BR protein in the pleura and the dorsal tergite. No Kr-h1 was seen after misexpression of br. Thus, Kr-h1 mediates some of the JH signaling in the adult abdominal epidermis and is upstream of br in this pathway. We also show for the first time that the JH-mediated maintenance of br expression in this epidermis is patterned and that JH delays the fusion of the imaginal cells and the disappearance of Dpp in the dorsal midline.

  14. Recent Advances in the Use of Drosophila melanogaster as a Model to Study Immunopathogenesis of Medically Important Filamentous Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Hamilos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne opportunistic fungi, including Aspergillus and other less common saprophytic molds, have recently emerged as important causes of mortality in immunocompromised individuals. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of host-fungal interplay in robust experimental pathosystems is becoming a research priority for development of novel therapeutics to combat these devastating infections. Over the past decade, invertebrate hosts with evolutionarily conserved innate immune signaling pathways and powerful genetics, such as Drosophila melanogaster, have been employed as a means to overcome logistic restrains associated with the use mammalian models of fungal infections. Recent studies in Drosophila models of filamentous fungi demonstrated that several genes implicated in fungal virulence in mammals also play a similarly important pathogenic role in fruit flies, and important host-related aspects in fungal pathogenesis are evolutionarily conserved. In view of recent advances in Drosophila genetics, fruit flies will become an invaluable surrogate model to study immunopathogenesis of fungal diseases.

  15. Genetic structure of populations of Drosophila melanogaster natives from Laguna Verde, Veracruz; Estructura genetica de poblaciones de Drosophila melanogaster originarias de Laguna Verde, Veracruz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: vmss@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The genetic variability hidden present in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster, it has been broadly analyzed, and it is a tool that allows to detect differences among the different populations of this species, so much of natural nature as experimental. In this occasion we use it to see if differences exist in two neighboring populations inside the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, Veracruz, and this way to suggest, of having differences in the mount of the relative frequencies of lethal genes, semi lethals and normal, be due to the radioactive emanations product of the reactors operation of the plant. Its were took samples of flies in both towns during three successive seasons and they were transported to the laboratory of the ININ where they were carried out the tests to determine the frequency of the different types of genes. This was made by means of the denominated technique C y L / Pm that allows by means of a cross series with a stump marker to obtain, in the third generation, in isolated form the different types of genes and this way to calculate their relative frequencies. The study understands the analysis of 299 chromosomes extracted from the populations, of those that 95 correspond at the control population and 204 to the experimental one. As a result of the analysis we find that 30.52 percent of the genes of the population witness contains detrimental genes (sum of the lethal plus the semi lethal genes) as long as in the experimental population this value corresponds to 23.03 percent. In accordance with this information was not significant difference among the studied populations. A similar analysis, but now comparing the seasons, (summer against winter), it showed significant difference to 5% with regard to the lethal genes frequency only in the population witness. These results indicate the absence of damage, however it is necessary to consider that this can be due to that indeed there is not him or that the investigation protocol is not

  16. Predictive Models of Recombination Rate Variation across the Drosophila melanogaster Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Andrew B.; Corchado, Johnny Cruz; Comeron, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    In all eukaryotic species examined, meiotic recombination, and crossovers in particular, occur non‐randomly along chromosomes. The cause for this non-random distribution remains poorly understood but some specific DNA sequence motifs have been shown to be enriched near crossover hotspots in a number of species. We present analyses using machine learning algorithms to investigate whether DNA motif distribution across the genome can be used to predict crossover variation in Drosophila melanogaster, a species without hotspots. Our study exposes a combinatorial non-linear influence of motif presence able to account for a significant fraction of the genome-wide variation in crossover rates at all genomic scales investigated, from 20% at 5-kb to almost 70% at 2,500-kb scale. The models are particularly predictive for regions with the highest and lowest crossover rates and remain highly informative after removing sub-telomeric and -centromeric regions known to have strongly reduced crossover rates. Transcriptional activity during early meiosis and differences in motif use between autosomes and the X chromosome add to the predictive power of the models. Moreover, we show that population-specific differences in crossover rates can be partly explained by differences in motif presence. Our results suggest that crossover distribution in Drosophila is influenced by both meiosis-specific chromatin dynamics and very local constitutive open chromatin associated with DNA motifs that prevent nucleosome stabilization. These findings provide new information on the genetic factors influencing variation in recombination rates and a baseline to study epigenetic mechanisms responsible for plastic recombination as response to different biotic and abiotic conditions and stresses. PMID:27492232

  17. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes.

  18. The banana code – Natural blend processing in the olfactory circuitry of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eSchubert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Odor information is predominantly perceived as complex odor blends. For Drosophila melanogaster one of the most attractive blends is emitted by an over-ripe banana. To analyze how the fly’s olfactory system processes natural blends we combined the experimental advantages of gas chromatography and functional imaging (GC-I. In this way, natural banana compounds were presented successively to the fly antenna in close to natural occurring concentrations. This technique allowed us to identify the active odor components, use these compounds as stimuli and measure odor-induced Ca2+ signals in input and output neurons of the Drosophila antennal lobe (AL, the first olfactory neuropil. We demonstrate that mixture interactions of a natural blend are very rare and occur only at the AL output level resulting in a surprisingly linear blend representation. However, the information regarding single components is strongly modulated by the olfactory circuitry within the AL leading to a higher similarity between the representation of individual components and the banana blend. This observed modulation might tune the olfactory system in a way to distinctively categorize odor components and improve the detection of suitable food sources. Functional GC-I thus enables analysis of virtually any unknown natural odorant blend and its components in their relative occurring concentrations and allows characterization of neuronal responses of complete neural assemblies. This technique can be seen as a valuable complementary method to classical GC/electrophysiology techniques, and will be a highly useful tool in future investigations of insect-insect and insect-plant chemical interactions.

  19. Insights from the reconstitution of the divergent outer kinetochore of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahui; Petrovic, Arsen; Rombaut, Pascaline; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Keller, Jenny; Raunser, Stefan; Herzog, Franz; Musacchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis is crucial for cellular and organismal viability. Kinetochores connect chromosomes with spindle microtubules and are essential for chromosome segregation. These large protein scaffolds emerge from the centromere, a specialized region of the chromosome enriched with the histone H3 variant CENP-A. In most eukaryotes, the kinetochore core consists of the centromere-proximal constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN), which binds CENP-A and contains 16 subunits, and of the centromere-distal Knl1 complex, Mis12 complex, Ndc80 complex (KMN) network, which binds microtubules and contains 10 subunits. In the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, the kinetochore underwent remarkable simplifications. All CCAN subunits, with the exception of centromeric protein C (CENP-C), and two KMN subunits, Dsn1 and Zwint, cannot be identified in this organism. In addition, two paralogues of the KMN subunit Nnf1 (Nnf1a and Nnf1b) are present. Finally, the Spc105R subunit, homologous to human Knl1/CASC5, underwent considerable sequence changes in comparison with other organisms. We combined biochemical reconstitution with biophysical and structural methods to investigate how these changes reflect on the organization of the Drosophila KMN network. We demonstrate that the Nnf1a and Nnf1b paralogues are subunits of distinct complexes, both of which interact directly with Spc105R and with CENP-C, for the latter of which we identify a binding site on the Mis12 subunit. Our studies shed light on the structural and functional organization of a highly divergent kinetochore particle. PMID:26911624

  20. Genome-wide association analysis of oxidative stress resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L Weber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aerobic organisms are susceptible to damage by reactive oxygen species. Oxidative stress resistance is a quantitative trait with population variation attributable to the interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Drosophila melanogaster provides an ideal system to study the genetics of variation for resistance to oxidative stress. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used 167 wild-derived inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel for a genome-wide association study of acute oxidative stress resistance to two oxidizing agents, paraquat and menadione sodium bisulfite. We found significant genetic variation for both stressors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with variation in oxidative stress resistance were often sex-specific and agent-dependent, with a small subset common for both sexes or treatments. Associated SNPs had moderately large effects, with an inverse relationship between effect size and allele frequency. Linear models with up to 12 SNPs explained 67-79% and 56-66% of the phenotypic variance for resistance to paraquat and menadione sodium bisulfite, respectively. Many genes implicated were novel with no known role in oxidative stress resistance. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a cellular network comprising DNA metabolism and neuronal development, consistent with targets of oxidative stress-inducing agents. We confirmed associations of seven candidate genes associated with natural variation in oxidative stress resistance through mutational analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We identified novel candidate genes associated with variation in resistance to oxidative stress that have context-dependent effects. These results form the basis for future translational studies to identify oxidative stress susceptibility/resistance genes that are evolutionary conserved and might play a role in human disease.

  1. Identifying candidate genes affecting developmental time in Drosophila melanogaster: pervasive pleiotropy and gene-by-environment interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasson Esteban

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genetic architecture of ecologically relevant adaptive traits requires the contribution of developmental and evolutionary biology. The time to reach the age of reproduction is a complex life history trait commonly known as developmental time. In particular, in holometabolous insects that occupy ephemeral habitats, like fruit flies, the impact of developmental time on fitness is further exaggerated. The present work is one of the first systematic studies of the genetic basis of developmental time, in which we also evaluate the impact of environmental variation on the expression of the trait. Results We analyzed 179 co-isogenic single P[GT1]-element insertion lines of Drosophila melanogaster to identify novel genes affecting developmental time in flies reared at 25°C. Sixty percent of the lines showed a heterochronic phenotype, suggesting that a large number of genes affect this trait. Mutant lines for the genes Merlin and Karl showed the most extreme phenotypes exhibiting a developmental time reduction and increase, respectively, of over 2 days and 4 days relative to the control (a co-isogenic P-element insertion free line. In addition, a subset of 42 lines selected at random from the initial set of 179 lines was screened at 17°C. Interestingly, the gene-by-environment interaction accounted for 52% of total phenotypic variance. Plastic reaction norms were found for a large number of developmental time candidate genes. Conclusion We identified components of several integrated time-dependent pathways affecting egg-to-adult developmental time in Drosophila. At the same time, we also show that many heterochronic phenotypes may arise from changes in genes involved in several developmental mechanisms that do not explicitly control the timing of specific events. We also demonstrate that many developmental time genes have pleiotropic effects on several adult traits and that the action of most of them is sensitive

  2. Dietary alpha-ketoglutarate increases cold tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster and enhances protein pool and antioxidant defense in sex-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, Maria M; Lylyk, Maria P; Shmihel, Halyna V; Sorochynska, Oksana M; Manyukh, Oksana V; Pierzynowski, Stefan G; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) is an important intermediate in Krebs cycle which bridges the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates. Its effects as a dietary supplement on cold tolerance were studied in Drosophila melanogaster Canton S. Two-day-old adult flies fed at larval and adult stages with AKG at moderate concentrations (5-10mM) recovered faster from chill coma (0°C for 15min or 3h) than control ones. The beneficial effect of AKG on chill coma recovery was not found at its higher concentrations, which suggests hormetic like action of this keto acid. Time of 50% observed mortality after 2h recovery from continuous cold exposure (-1°C for 3-31h) (LTi50) was higher for flies reared on 10mM AKG compared with control ones, showing that the diet with AKG enhanced insect cold tolerance. In parallel with enhancement of cold tolerance, dietary AKG improved fly locomotor activity. Metabolic effects of AKG differed partly in males and females. In males fed on AKG, there were no differences in total protein and free amino acid levels, but the total antioxidant capacity, catalase activity and low molecular mass thiol content were higher than in control animals. In females, dietary AKG promoted higher total antioxidant capacity and higher levels of proteins, total amino acids, proline and low molecular mass thiols. The levels of lipid peroxides were lower in both fly sexes reared on AKG as compared with control ones. We conclude that both enhancement of antioxidant system capacity and synthesis of amino acids can be important for AKG-promoted cold tolerance in D. melanogaster. The involvement of AKG in metabolic pathways of Drosophila males and females is discussed. PMID:27503710

  3. The molecular analyses of an antimorphic mutation of Drosophila melanogaster, Scutoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, S; Chia, W; Karp, R; Ashburner, M

    1988-07-01

    A dominant mutation of Drosophila melanogaster, Scutoid (Sco), acts as an antimorphic allele of the no-ocelli (noc) gene. In Sco the noc region has been transposed from 35B to 35D on chromosome arm 2L and the noc gene is now adjacent to snail (sna). Induced revertants of Sco are frequently mutant for sna or are aberrations broken very close to sna. A molecular analysis of the Sco chromosome has confirmed that noc is transposed and fused to the sna region. However, only part of the noc region is included within the transposition. The breakpoints of 19 chromosomally aberrant Sco revertants have been mapped at the molecular level. Fourteen of these breakpoints map to the noc region, spread over about 80 kb of DNA. The breakpoints of the remaining five are not within the DNA of the noc region and appear to map within sequences from the sna region. This has been shown directly for three of these, those associated with T(2;3)ScoR+13, In(2L)ScoR+24 and In(2L)ScoR+26. Thus mutation of either noc or sna, genes which are apparently unrelated in their wild-type functions, can revert the antimorphic phenotype of Sco.

  4. Surface display of recombinant Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase for detection of organic phosphorus and carbamate pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingquan Li

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is commonly used for the detection of organophosphate (OP and carbamate (CB insecticides. However, the cost of this commercially available enzyme is high, making high-throughput insecticide detection improbable. In this study we constructed a new AChE yeast expression system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the expression of a highly reactive recombinant AChE originating from Drosophila melanogaster (DmAChE. Specifically, the coding sequence of DmAChE was fused with the 3'-terminal half of an α-agglutinin anchor region, along with an antigen tag for the detection of the recombinant protein. The target sequence was cloned into the yeast expression vector pYes-DEST52, and the signal peptide sequence was replaced with a glucoamylase secretion region for induced expression. The resultant engineered vector was transformed into S. cerevisiae. DmAChE was expressed and displayed on the cell surface after galactose induction. Our results showed that the recombinant protein displayed activity comparable to the commercial enzyme. We also detected different types of OP and CB insecticides through enzyme inhibition assays, with the expressed DmAChE showing high sensitivity. These results show the construction of a new yeast expression system for DmAChE, which can subsequently be used for detecting OP and CB insecticides with reduced economic costs.

  5. Transgenerational interactions involving parental age and immune status affect female reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrand, M; Dowling, D K

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that the parental phenotype can influence offspring phenotypic expression, independent of the effects of the offspring's own genotype. Nonetheless, the evolutionary implications of such parental effects remain unclear, partly because previous studies have generally overlooked the potential for interactions between parental sources of non-genetic variance to influence patterns of offspring phenotypic expression. We tested for such interactions, subjecting male and female Drosophila melanogaster of two different age classes to an immune activation challenge or a control treatment. Flies were then crossed in all age and immune status combinations, and the reproductive success of their immune- and control-treated daughters measured. We found that daughters produced by two younger parents exhibited reduced reproductive success relative to those of other parental age combinations. Furthermore, immune-challenged daughters exhibited higher reproductive success when produced by immune-challenged relative to control-treated mothers, a pattern consistent with transgenerational immune priming. Finally, a complex interplay between paternal age and parental immune statuses influenced daughter's reproductive success. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of age- and immune-mediated parental effects, traceable to both parents, and regulated by interactions between parents and between parents and offspring.

  6. Genetic effects of radon 222 in a population of Drosophila melanogaster chronically exposed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was investigated the mutagenic effect of Radon 222 during a experimental period of 11 generations. In this lapse Drosophila melanogaster larvae line Canton-S were maintained in a radon atmosphere. In each test generation had been extracted males, consequently exposed to radiation which were subjected to a crossing series with a bearer marker genes of according to the Wallace experimental design (1956). Due to the experimental conditions it only was determined the recessive lethal mutations frequency for the second chromosome in the 1,4,7 and 11 generations. Of all study it was conduced in parallel way a non-treated witness population. The concentrations at which was subjected the experimental population varied of generation to generation from 12 ± 2 to 43 ± 5 kBq/m3. Our analysis correspond to lethality determination in 1182 second chromosomes distributed between two populations and the different exposition generations. The study allow to determine the respective frequencies of recessive lethal genes varying according to the population and/or generation between 10.53 and 22.02%. The statistical analysis of data did not show significant differences among the different populations. (Author)

  7. Quantitative genetics of functional characters in Drosophila melanogaster populations subjected to laboratory selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Henrique Teotónio; Margarida Matos; Michael R. Rose

    2004-12-01

    What are the genetics of phenotypes other than fitness, in outbred populations? To answer this question, the quantitative-genetic basis of divergence was characterized for outbred Drosophila melanogaster populations that had previously undergone selection to enhance characters related to fitness. Line-cross analysis using first-generation and second-generation hybrids from reciprocal crosses was conducted for two types of cross, each replicated fivefold. One type of cross was between representatives of the ancestral population, a set of five populations maintained for several hundred generations on a two-week discrete-generation life cycle and a set of five populations adapted to starvation stress. The other type of cross was between the same set of ancestral-representative populations and another set of five populations selected for accelerated development from egg to egg. Developmental time from egg to eclosion, starvation resistance, dry body weight and fecundity at day 14 from egg were fit to regression models estimating single-locus additive and dominant effects, maternal and paternal effects, and digenic additive and dominance epistatic effects. Additive genetic variation explained most of the differences between populations, with additive maternal and cytoplasmic effects also commonly found. Both within-locus and between-locus dominance effects were inferred in some cases, as well as one instance of additive epistasis. Some of these effects may have been caused by linkage disequilibrium. We conclude with a brief discussion concerning the relationship of the genetics of population differentiation to adaptation.

  8. Recombinagenic activity of integerrimine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid from Senecio brasiliensis, in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campesato, V R; Graf, U; Reguly, M L; de Andrade, H H

    1997-01-01

    Integerrimine (ITR), a pyrrolizidine alkaloid from Senecio brasiliensis, was tested for genotoxicity using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. The compound was administered by chronic feeding (48 hours) of 3-day-old larvae. Two different crosses involving the markers flare (flr) and multiple wing hairs (mwh) were used, that is, the standard (ST) cross and the high bioactivation (HB) cross, which has a high cytochrome P450-dependent bioactivation capacity. In both crosses, the wings of two types of progeny were analyzed, that is, inversion-free marker heterozygotes and balancer heterozygotes carrying multiple inversions. ITR was found to be equally potent in inducing spots in a dose-related manner in the marker heterozygotes of both crosses. This indicates that the bioactivation capacity present in larvae of the ST cross is sufficient to reveal the genotoxic activity of ITR. In the balancer heterozygotes of both crosses, where all recombinational events are eliminated due to the inversions, the frequencies of induced spots were considerably reduced which documents the recombinagenic activity of ITR. Linear regression analysis of the dose response relationships for both genotypes shows that 85% to 90% of the wing spots are due to mitotic recombination. PMID:9020312

  9. Genes involved in sex pheromone discrimination in Drosophila melanogaster and their background-dependent effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Houot

    Full Text Available Mate choice is based on the comparison of the sensory quality of potential mating partners, and sex pheromones play an important role in this process. In Drosophila melanogaster, contact pheromones differ between male and female in their content and in their effects on male courtship, both inhibitory and stimulatory. To investigate the genetic basis of sex pheromone discrimination, we experimentally selected males showing either a higher or lower ability to discriminate sex pheromones over 20 generations. This experimental selection was carried out in parallel on two different genetic backgrounds: wild-type and desat1 mutant, in which parental males showed high and low sex pheromone discrimination ability respectively. Male perception of male and female pheromones was separately affected during the process of selection. A comparison of transcriptomic activity between high and low discrimination lines revealed genes not only that varied according to the starting genetic background, but varied reciprocally. Mutants in two of these genes, Shaker and quick-to-court, were capable of producing similar effects on discrimination on their own, in some instances mimicking the selected lines, in others not. This suggests that discrimination of sex pheromones depends on genes whose activity is sensitive to genetic context and provides a rare, genetically defined example of the phenomenon known as "allele flips," in which interactions have reciprocal effects on different genetic backgrounds.

  10. Peripheral, central and behavioral responses to the cuticular pheromone bouquet in Drosophila melanogaster males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Inoshita

    Full Text Available Pheromonal communication is crucial with regard to mate choice in many animals including insects. Drosophila melanogaster flies produce a pheromonal bouquet with many cuticular hydrocarbons some of which diverge between the sexes and differently affect male courtship behavior. Cuticular pheromones have a relatively high weight and are thought to be -- mostly but not only -- detected by gustatory contact. However, the response of the peripheral and central gustatory systems to these substances remains poorly explored. We measured the effect induced by pheromonal cuticular mixtures on (i the electrophysiological response of peripheral gustatory receptor neurons, (ii the calcium variation in brain centers receiving these gustatory inputs and (iii the behavioral reaction induced in control males and in mutant desat1 males, which show abnormal pheromone production and perception. While male and female pheromones induced inhibitory-like effects on taste receptor neurons, the contact of male pheromones on male fore-tarsi elicits a long-lasting response of higher intensity in the dedicated gustatory brain center. We found that the behavior of control males was more strongly inhibited by male pheromones than by female pheromones, but this difference disappeared in anosmic males. Mutant desat1 males showed an increased sensitivity of their peripheral gustatory neurons to contact pheromones and a behavioral incapacity to discriminate sex pheromones. Together our data indicate that cuticular hydrocarbons induce long-lasting inhibitory effects on the relevant taste pathway which may interact with the olfactory pathway to modulate pheromonal perception.

  11. Population genetic evidence for cold adaptation in European Drosophila melanogaster populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božičević, Vedran; Hutter, Stephan; Stephan, Wolfgang; Wollstein, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We studied Drosophila melanogaster populations from Europe (the Netherlands and France) and Africa (Rwanda and Zambia) to uncover genetic evidence of adaptation to cold. We present here four lines of evidence for genes involved in cold adaptation from four perspectives: (i) the frequency of SNPs at genes previously known to be associated with chill-coma recovery time (CCRT), startle reflex (SR) and resistance to starvation stress (RSS) vary along environmental gradients and therefore among populations; (ii) SNPs of genes that correlate significantly with latitude and altitude in African and European populations overlap with SNPs that correlate with a latitudinal cline from North America; (iii) at the genomewide level, the top candidate genes are enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms that are related to cold tolerance; (iv) GO enriched terms from North American clinal genes overlap significantly with those from Africa and Europe. Each SNP was tested in 10 independent runs of Bayenv2, using the median Bayes factors to ascertain candidate genes. None of the candidate genes were found close to the breakpoints of cosmopolitan inversions, and only four candidate genes were linked to QTLs related to CCRT. To overcome the limitation that we used only four populations to test correlations with environmental gradients, we performed simulations to estimate the power of our approach for detecting selection. Based on our results, we propose a novel network of genes that is involved in cold adaptation. PMID:26558479

  12. Similarities and differences in altitudinal versus latitudinal variation for morphological traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepsatel, Peter; Gáliková, Martina; Huber, Christian D; Flatt, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how natural environments shape phenotypic variation is a major aim in evolutionary biology. Here, we have examined clinal, likely genetically based variation in morphology among 19 populations of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) from Africa and Europe, spanning a range from sea level to 3000 m altitude and including locations approximating the southern and northern range limit. We were interested in testing whether latitude and altitude have similar phenotypic effects, as has often been postulated. Both latitude and altitude were positively correlated with wing area, ovariole number, and cell number. In contrast, latitude and altitude had opposite effects on the ratio between ovariole number and body size, which was negatively correlated with egg production rate per ovariole. We also used transgenic manipulation to examine how increased cell number affects morphology and found that larger transgenic flies, due to a higher number of cells, had more ovarioles, larger wings, and, unlike flies from natural populations, increased wing loading. Clinal patterns in morphology are thus not a simple function of changes in body size; instead, each trait might be subject to different selection pressures. Together, our results provide compelling evidence for profound similarities as well as differences between phenotypic effects of latitude and altitude. PMID:24410363

  13. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories. PMID:27605506

  14. Dynamic, mating-induced gene expression changes in female head and brain tissues of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirling Emma J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila melanogaster females show changes in behavior and physiology after mating that are thought to maximize the number of progeny resulting from the most recent copulation. Sperm and seminal fluid proteins induce post-mating changes in females, however, very little is known about the resulting gene expression changes in female head and central nervous system tissues that contribute to the post-mating response. Results We determined the temporal gene expression changes in female head tissues 0-2, 24, 48 and 72 hours after mating. Females from each time point had a unique post-mating gene expression response, with 72 hours post-mating having the largest number of genes with significant changes in expression. At most time points, genes expressed in the head fat body that encode products involved in metabolism showed a marked change in expression. Additional analysis of gene expression changes in dissected brain tissues 24 hours post-mating revealed changes in transcript abundance of many genes, notably, the reduced transcript abundance of genes that encode ion channels. Conclusions Substantial changes occur in the regulation of many genes in female head tissues after mating, which might underlie aspects of the female post-mating response. These results provide new insights into the physiological and metabolic changes that accompany changes in female behaviors.

  15. Rapid evolution of the intersexual genetic correlation for fitness in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Julie M; Fuentes, Sara; Hesketh, Jack; Hill, Mark S; Innocenti, Paolo; Morrow, Edward H; Fowler, Kevin; Reuter, Max

    2016-04-01

    Sexual antagonism (SA) arises when male and female phenotypes are under opposing selection, yet genetically correlated. Until resolved, antagonism limits evolution toward optimal sex-specific phenotypes. Despite its importance for sex-specific adaptation and existing theory, the dynamics of SA resolution are not well understood empirically. Here, we present data from Drosophila melanogaster, compatible with a resolution of SA. We compared two independent replicates of the "LHM " population in which SA had previously been described. Both had been maintained under identical, controlled conditions, and separated for around 200 generations. Although heritabilities of male and female fitness were similar, the intersexual genetic correlation differed significantly, being negative in one replicate (indicating SA) but close to zero in the other. Using population sequencing, we show that phenotypic differences were associated with population divergence in allele frequencies at nonrandom loci across the genome. Large frequency changes were more prevalent in the population without SA and were enriched at loci mapping to genes previously shown to have sexually antagonistic relationships between expression and fitness. Our data suggest that rapid evolution toward SA resolution has occurred in one of the populations and open avenues toward studying the genetics of SA and its resolution.

  16. Direct and correlated effects of selection on flight after exposure to thermal stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Robert A; Thompson, Kimberly A

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate how insects may adapt to ecologically relevant levels of heat stress, we performed artificial selection on the ability of Drosophila melanogaster to fly after an exposure to a high but non-lethal thermal stress. Both tolerance and intolerance to heat stress arose very quickly, as only a few generations of selection were necessary to cause significant separation between high and low lines for heat tolerance. Estimates of heritability based on the lines artificially selected for increased flight ability ranged from 0.024 to 0.052, while estimates of heritability based on the lines selected for the inability to fly after heat stress varied between 0.035 and 0.091. Reciprocal F1 crosses among these lines revealed strong additive effects of one or more autosomes and a weaker X-chromosome effect. This variation apparently affected flight specifically; neither survival to a more extreme stress nor knockdown by high temperature changed between lines selected for high and low heat tolerance as measured by flight ability. As the well-studied heat-shock response is associated with heat tolerance as measured by survival and knockdown, the aspects of the stress physiology that actually affect flight ability remains unknown.

  17. Heritability, evolvability, phenotypic plasticity and temporal variation in sperm-competition success of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, R; Reinhardt, K

    2016-05-01

    Sperm-competition success (SCS) is seen as centrally important for evolutionary change: superior fathers sire superior sons and thereby inherit the traits that make them superior. Additional hypotheses, that phenotypic plasticity in SCS and sperm ageing explain variation in paternity, are less considered. Even though various alleles have individually been shown to be correlated with variation in SCS, few studies have addressed the heritability, or evolvability, of overall SCS. Those studies that have addressed found low or no heritability and have not examined evolvability. They have further not excluded phenotypic plasticity, and temporal effects on SCS, despite their known dramatic effects on sperm function. In Drosophila melanogaster, we found that both standard components of sperm competition, sperm defence and sperm offence, showed nonsignificant heritability across several offspring cohorts. Instead, our analysis revealed, for the first time, the existence of phenotypic plasticity in SCS across an extreme environment (5% CO2 ), and an influence of sperm ageing. Evolvability of SCS was substantial for sperm defence but weak for sperm offence. Our results suggest that the paradigm of explaining evolution by sperm competition is more complex and will benefit from further experimental work on the heritability or evolvability of SCS, measuring phenotypic plasticity, and separating the effects of sperm competition and sperm ageing. PMID:26990919

  18. Heritability and inter-population differences in lipid profiles of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia J F Scheitz

    Full Text Available Characterizing and understanding the complex spectrum of lipids in higher organisms lags far behind our analysis of genome and transcriptome sequences. Here we generate and evaluate comprehensive lipid profiles (>200 lipids of 92 inbred lines from five different Drosophila melanogaster populations. We find that the majority of lipid species are highly heritable, and even lipids with odd-chain fatty acids, which cannot be generated by the fly itself, also have high heritabilities. Abundance of the endosymbiont Wolbachia, a potential provider of odd-chained lipids, was positively correlated with this group of lipids. Additionally, we show that despite years of laboratory rearing on the same medium, the lipid profiles of the five geographic populations are sufficiently distinct for population discrimination. Our data predicts a strikingly different membrane fluidity for flies from the Netherlands, which is supported by their increased ethanol tolerance. We find that 18% of lipids show strong concentration differences between males and females. Through an analysis of the correlation structure of the lipid classes, we find modules of co-regulated lipids and begin to associate these with metabolic constraints. Our data provide a foundation for developing associations between variation in lipid composition with variation in other metabolic attributes, with genome-wide variation, and with metrics of health and overall reproductive fitness.

  19. Topological Properties of Protein-Protein and Metabolic Interaction Networks of Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thanigaimani Rajarathinam; Yen-Han Lin

    2006-01-01

    The underlying principle governing the natural phenomena of life is one of the critical issues receiving due importance in recent years. A key feature of the scale-free architecture is the vitality of the most connected nodes (hubs). The major objective of this article was to analyze the protein-protein and metabolic interaction networks of Drosophila melanogaster by considering the architectural patterns and the consequence of removal of hubs on the topological parameter of the two interaction systems. Analysis showed that both interaction networks follow a scale-free model, establishing the fact that most real world networks,from varied situations, conform to the small world pattern. The average path length showed a two-fold and a three-fold increase (changing from 9.42 to 20.93 and from 5.29 to 17.75, respectively) for the protein-protein and metabolic interaction networks, respectively, due to the deletion of hubs. On the contrary, the arbitrary elimination of nodes did not show any remarkable disparity in the topological parameter of the protein-protein and metabolic interaction networks (average path length: 9.42±0.02 and 5.27±0.01, respectively). This aberrant behavior for the two cases underscores the significance of the most linked nodes to the natural topology of the networks.

  20. Comparative genome and proteome analysis of Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdobnov, Evgeny M; von Mering, Christian; Letunic, Ivica; Torrents, David; Suyama, Mikita; Copley, Richard R; Christophides, George K; Thomasova, Dana; Holt, Robert A; Subramanian, G Mani; Mueller, Hans-Michael; Dimopoulos, George; Law, John H; Wells, Michael A; Birney, Ewan; Charlab, Rosane; Halpern, Aaron L; Kokoza, Elena; Kraft, Cheryl L; Lai, Zhongwu; Lewis, Suzanna; Louis, Christos; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Nusskern, Deborah; Rubin, Gerald M; Salzberg, Steven L; Sutton, Granger G; Topalis, Pantelis; Wides, Ron; Wincker, Patrick; Yandell, Mark; Collins, Frank H; Ribeiro, Jose; Gelbart, William M; Kafatos, Fotis C; Bork, Peer

    2002-10-01

    Comparison of the genomes and proteomes of the two diptera Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster, which diverged about 250 million years ago, reveals considerable similarities. However, numerous differences are also observed; some of these must reflect the selection and subsequent adaptation associated with different ecologies and life strategies. Almost half of the genes in both genomes are interpreted as orthologs and show an average sequence identity of about 56%, which is slightly lower than that observed between the orthologs of the pufferfish and human (diverged about 450 million years ago). This indicates that these two insects diverged considerably faster than vertebrates. Aligned sequences reveal that orthologous genes have retained only half of their intron/exon structure, indicating that intron gains or losses have occurred at a rate of about one per gene per 125 million years. Chromosomal arms exhibit significant remnants of homology between the two species, although only 34% of the genes colocalize in small "microsyntenic" clusters, and major interarm transfers as well as intra-arm shuffling of gene order are detected. PMID:12364792

  1. Age- and temperature-dependent somatic mutation accumulation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Garcia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a transgenic mouse model harboring a mutation reporter gene that can be efficiently recovered from genomic DNA, we previously demonstrated that mutations accumulate in aging mice in a tissue-specific manner. Applying a recently developed, similar reporter-based assay in Drosophila melanogaster, we now show that the mutation frequency at the lacZ locus in somatic tissue of flies is about three times as high as in mouse tissues, with a much higher fraction of large genome rearrangements. Similar to mice, somatic mutations in the fly also accumulate as a function of age, but they do so much more quickly at higher temperature, a condition which in invertebrates is associated with decreased life span. Most mutations were found to accumulate in the thorax and less in abdomen, suggesting the highly oxidative flight muscles as a possible source of genotoxic stress. These results show that somatic mutation loads in short-lived flies are much more severe than in the much longer-lived mice, with the mutation rate in flies proportional to biological rather than chronological aging.

  2. Editing Transgenic DNA Components by Inducible Gene Replacement in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Chieh; Potter, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Gene conversions occur when genomic double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) trigger unidirectional transfer of genetic material from a homologous template sequence. Exogenous or mutated sequence can be introduced through this homology-directed repair (HDR). We leveraged gene conversion to develop a method for genomic editing of existing transgenic insertions in Drosophila melanogaster The clustered regularly-interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system is used in the H: omology A: ssisted C: RISPR K: nock-in (HACK) method to induce DSBs in a GAL4 transgene, which is repaired by a single-genomic transgenic construct containing GAL4 homologous sequences flanking a T2A-QF2 cassette. With two crosses, this technique converts existing GAL4 lines, including enhancer traps, into functional QF2 expressing lines. We used HACK to convert the most commonly-used GAL4 lines (labeling tissues such as neurons, fat, glia, muscle, and hemocytes) to QF2 lines. We also identified regions of the genome that exhibited differential efficiencies of HDR. The HACK technique is robust and readily adaptable for targeting and replacement of other genomic sequences, and could be a useful approach to repurpose existing transgenes as new genetic reagents become available.

  3. The genetic basis for variation in olfactory behavior in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Gunjan H; Magwire, Michael M; Huang, Wen; Serrano-Negron, Yazmin L; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2015-05-01

    The genetic underpinnings that contribute to variation in olfactory perception are not fully understood. To explore the genetic basis of variation in olfactory perception, we measured behavioral responses to 14 chemically diverse naturally occurring odorants in 260400 flies from 186 lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, a population of inbred wild-derived lines with sequenced genomes. We observed variation in olfactory behavior for all odorants. Low to moderate broad-sense heritabilities and the large number of tests for genotype-olfactory phenotype association performed precluded any individual variant from reaching formal significance. However, the top variants (nominal P behavioral trait. Further, pathway enrichment analyses showed that genes tagged by the top variants included components of networks centered on cyclic guanosine monophosphate and inositol triphosphate signaling, growth factor signaling, Rho signaling, axon guidance, and regulation of neural connectivity. Functional validation with RNAi and mutations showed that 15 out of 17 genes tested indeed affect olfactory behavior. Our results show that in addition to chemoreceptors, variation in olfactory perception depends on polymorphisms that can result in subtle variations in synaptic connectivity within the nervous system.

  4. Antimutagenic effect of sage tea in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenkovic, Aleksandra; Stamenkovic-Radak, Marina; Banjanac, Tijana; Andjelkovic, Marko

    2009-01-01

    The present study assayed the antimutagenic potential of Salvia officinalis (sage) in the form of tea infusion, by the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) on Drosophila melanogaster. The use of herbal infusions is much common in the human diet, so the aim of the present study was to estimate the antimutagenic effects of the S. officinalis tea rather than essential oils. Methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) was used as the mutagen and positive control. Several types of treatment were performed: short acute treatment with sage infusion or MMS, longer (chronic) treatment with sage solution or MMS, and two combined treatments, i.e. short treatment with sage followed by a longer treatment with MMS and vice versa. Sage infusion used in our experiments showed a clear antimutagenic effect, reducing the frequency of mutations induced by MMS. The inhibition effect of sage tea is obtained and confirmed when pre- or post-treatments with mutagen were used. The results indicate that although sage in this regime decreases the number of mutation events, it is not efficient enough in case of the 2 h sage pre-treatment. Antioxidant activity, suppression of metabolic activation, could be mechanisms through which sage or some of its components act as desmutagen.

  5. Antimutagenic and antirecombinagenic activities of noni fruit juice in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEONARDO P. FRANCHI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Noni, a Hawaiian name for the fruit of Morinda citrifolia L., is a traditional medicinal plant from Polynesia widely used for the treatment of many diseases including arthritis, diabetes, asthma, hypertension and cancer. Here, a commercial noni juice (TNJ was evaluated for its protective activities against the lesions induced by mitomycin C (MMC and doxorrubicin (DXR using the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART in Drosophila melanogaster. Three-day-old larvae, trans-heterozygous for two genetic markers (mwh and flr3 , were co-treated with TNJ plus MMC or DXR. We have observed a reduction in genotoxic effects of MMC and DXR caused by the juice. TNJ provoked a marked decrease in all kinds of MMC- and DXR-induced mutant spots, mainly due to its antirecombinagenic activity. The TNJ protective effects were concentration-dependent, indicating a dose-response correlation, that can be attributed to a powerful antioxidant and/or free radical scavenger ability of TNJ.

  6. Dopamine modulates the rest period length without perturbation of its power law distribution in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available We analyzed the effects of dopamine signaling on the temporal organization of rest and activity in Drosophila melanogaster. Locomotor behaviors were recorded using a video-monitoring system, and the amounts of movements were quantified by using an image processing program. We, first, confirmed that rest bout durations followed long-tailed (i.e., power-law distributions, whereas activity bout durations did not with a strict method described by Clauset et al. We also studied the effects of circadian rhythm and ambient temperature on rest bouts and activity bouts. The fraction of activity significantly increased during subjective day and at high temperature, but the power-law exponent of the rest bout distribution was not affected. The reduction in rest was realized by reduction in long rest bouts. The distribution of activity bouts did not change drastically under the above mentioned conditions. We then assessed the effects of dopamine. The distribution of rest bouts became less long-tailed and the time spent in activity significantly increased after the augmentation of dopamine signaling. Administration of a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor yielded the opposite effects. However, the distribution of activity bouts did not contribute to the changes. These results suggest that the modulation of locomotor behavior by dopamine is predominantly controlled by changing the duration of rest bouts, rather than the duration of activity bouts.

  7. Dynamics of nuclear matrix proteome during embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parul Varma; Rakesh K Mishra

    2011-08-01

    Embryonic development is a complex and dynamic process that involves spatiotemporal expression of genes in a highly coordinated manner. Multiple levels of nuclear architecture maintain the fidelity of gene expression programme. One of the components of nuclear architecture, which is believed to play an important role in regulation of gene expression, is the nuclear matrix (NuMat). Many studies over the past few years have tried to analyse the components of this non-chromatin scaffolding of the nucleus and have provided evidences of its structural and functional complexity. However, the relationship of NuMat with the process of embryonic development still remains poorly understood. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the NuMat proteomes of early and late stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos and show that 65% of the NuMat proteome is dynamic during development. Our study establishes links between the dynamics of nuclear architecture and embryonic development and provides tools to further understand the process such as cellular differentiation in the context of higher-order nuclear organization.

  8. Assessment of genotoxic potential of two mycotoxins in the wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüzel, Mehmet; Uysal, Handan; Kızılet, Halit

    2015-03-01

    Mycotoxins, the toxic products of molds, exposure causes serious adverse health problems in human, animals, and crops. Determining the potential genotoxic effects of these substances is, therefore, of great importance. We have evaluated the genotoxic toxicity of two trichothecenes--diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and T-2 toxin--using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. The SMART is based on the principle that the loss of heterozygosis of recessive markers located on the left arm of chromosome 3--multiple wing hairs (mwh) at the map position 0.3 and flare-3 (flr3) at the map position 38.8--may occur through various mechanisms such as mitotic recombination, mutation, deletion, half-translocation, chromosome loss, and nondisjunction. Both the mycotoxins were administered to third instar larvae (72 ± 4 h old) at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 μM. Based on our results, DAS and T-2 toxins does not exert genotoxic effects up to a concentration of 40 μM.

  9. A biomechanical analysis of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Conte

    Full Text Available The article provides a biomechanical analysis of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. Ventral furrow formation is the first large-scale morphogenetic movement in the fly embryo. It involves deformation of a uniform cellular monolayer formed following cellularisation, and has therefore long been used as a simple system in which to explore the role of mechanics in force generation. Here we use a quantitative framework to carry out a systematic perturbation analysis to determine the role of each of the active forces observed. The analysis confirms that ventral furrow invagination arises from a combination of apical constriction and apical-basal shortening forces in the mesoderm, together with a combination of ectodermal forces. We show that the mesodermal forces are crucial for invagination: the loss of apical constriction leads to a loss of the furrow, while the mesodermal radial shortening forces are the primary cause of the internalisation of the future mesoderm as the furrow rises. Ectodermal forces play a minor but significant role in furrow formation: without ectodermal forces the furrow is slower to form, does not close properly and has an aberrant morphology. Nevertheless, despite changes in the active mesodermal and ectodermal forces lead to changes in the timing and extent of furrow, invagination is eventually achieved in most cases, implying that the system is robust to perturbation and therefore over-determined.

  10. DEDB: a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons in splicing graph form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Tin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wealth of quality genomic and mRNA/EST sequences in recent years has provided the data required for large-scale genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing. We have capitalized on this by constructing a database that contains alternative splicing information organized as splicing graphs, where all transcripts arising from a single gene are collected, organized and classified. The splicing graph then serves as the basis for the classification of the various types of alternative splicing events. Description DEDB http://proline.bic.nus.edu.sg/dedb/index.html is a database of Drosophila melanogaster exons obtained from FlyBase arranged in a splicing graph form that permits the creation of simple rules allowing for the classification of alternative splicing events. Pfam domains were also mapped onto the protein sequences allowing users to access the impact of alternative splicing events on domain organization. Conclusions DEDB's catalogue of splicing graphs facilitates genome-wide classification of alternative splicing events for genome analysis. The splicing graph viewer brings together genome, transcript, protein and domain information to facilitate biologists in understanding the implications of alternative splicing.

  11. Whole genome resequencing reveals natural target site preferences of transposable elements in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel S Linheiro

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are mobile DNA sequences that integrate into host genomes using diverse mechanisms with varying degrees of target site specificity. While the target site preferences of some engineered transposable elements are well studied, the natural target preferences of most transposable elements are poorly characterized. Using population genomic resequencing data from 166 strains of Drosophila melanogaster, we identified over 8,000 new insertion sites not present in the reference genome sequence that we used to decode the natural target preferences of 22 families of transposable element in this species. We found that terminal inverted repeat transposon and long terminal repeat retrotransposon families present clade-specific target site duplications and target site sequence motifs. Additionally, we found that the sequence motifs at transposable element target sites are always palindromes that extend beyond the target site duplication. Our results demonstrate the utility of population genomics data for high-throughput inference of transposable element targeting preferences in the wild and establish general rules for terminal inverted repeat transposon and long terminal repeat retrotransposon target site selection in eukaryotic genomes.

  12. Insulin signalling mediates the response to male-induced harm in female Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepil, Irem; Carazo, Pau; Perry, Jennifer C; Wigby, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Genetic manipulations in nutrient-sensing pathways are known to both extend lifespan and modify responses to environmental stressors (e.g., starvation, oxidative and thermal stresses), suggesting that similar mechanisms regulate lifespan and stress resistance. However, despite being a key factor reducing female lifespan and affecting female fitness, male-induced harm has rarely been considered as a stressor mediated by nutrient sensing pathways. We explored whether a lifespan-extending manipulation also modifies female resistance to male-induced harm. To do so, we used long-lived female Drosophila melanogaster that had their insulin signalling pathway downregulated by genetically ablating the median neurosecretory cells (mNSC). We varied the level of exposure to males for control and ablated females and tested for interacting effects on female lifespan and fitness. As expected, we found that lifespan significantly declined with exposure to males. However, mNSC-ablated females maintained significantly increased lifespan across all male exposure treatments. Furthermore, lifespan extension and relative fitness of mNSC-ablated females were maximized under intermediate exposure to males, and minimized under low and high exposure to males. Overall, our results suggest that wild-type levels of insulin signalling reduce female susceptibility to male-induced harm under intense sexual conflict, and may also protect females when mating opportunities are sub-optimally low. PMID:27457757

  13. Modulation of feeding behavior by odorant-binding proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Shilpa; Morozova, Tatiana V; Sridhar, Sruthipriya; Nokes, Michael; Anholt, Robert R H

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient intake and avoidance of toxins are essential for survival and controlled by attractive and aversive feeding responses. Drosophila melanogaster presents one of the best characterized systems for studies on chemosensation, which is mediated by multigene families of chemoreceptors, including olfactory receptors, gustatory receptors, and odorant-binding proteins (OBPs). Although the response profiles of gustatory receptors have been well studied, the contribution of OBPs to food intake is largely unknown. As most aversive ("bitter") tastants are hydrophobic, we hypothesized that OBPs may fulfill an essential function in transporting bitter tastants to gustatory receptors to modulate feeding behavior. Here, we used 16 RNAi lines that inhibit expression of individual target Obp genes and show that OBPs modulate sucrose intake in response to a panel of nine bitter compounds. Similar to their function in olfaction, OBPs appear to interact with bitter compounds in a combinatorial and sex-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated reduction in expression of individual Obp genes resulted either in enhanced or reduced intake of sucrose in the presence of bitter compounds, consistent with roles for OBPs in transporting tastants to bitter taste receptors, sequestering them to limit their access to these receptors, or interacting directly with gustatory neurons that respond to sucrose. PMID:24302688

  14. Effects of five Ayurvedic herbs on locomotor behaviour in a Drosophila melanogaster Parkinson's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, R L M; Brogan, B; Whitworth, A J; Okello, E J

    2014-12-01

    Current conventional treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at symptom management, as there is currently no known cure or treatment that can slow down its progression. Ayurveda, the ancient medical system of India, uses a combination of herbs to combat the disease. Herbs commonly used for this purpose are Zandopa (containing Mucuna pruriens), Withania somnifera, Centella asiatica, Sida cordifolia and Bacopa monnieri. In this study, these herbs were tested for their potential ability to improve climbing ability of a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) PD model based on loss of function of phosphatase and tensin-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). Fruit flies were cultured on food containing individual herbs or herbal formulations, a combination of all five herbs, levodopa (positive control) or no treatment (negative control). Tests were performed in both PINK1 mutant flies and healthy wild-type (WT) flies. A significant improvement in climbing ability was observed in flies treated with B. monnieri compared with untreated PINK1 mutant flies. However, a significant decrease in climbing ability was observed in WT flies for the same herb. Centella asiatica also significantly decreased climbing ability in WT flies. No significant effects were observed with any of the other herbs in either PINK1 or WT flies compared with untreated flies. PMID:25091506

  15. Multiple genetic control of acetate-induced olfactory responses in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, M; Dannet, F

    1994-10-01

    Behavioural responses of Drosophila melanogaster larvae were measured in response to olfactory stimulation with an homologous series of eight aliphatic n-acetates (methyl ... octyl acetate) and with cis-vaccenyl acetate. Larvae tended to be attracted to short-chain acetates (methyl ... pentyl) and repelled by longer chain acetates (hexyl, heptyl and octyl acetate). All larvae were strongly attracted to propyl acetate, irrespective of the dose studied. Larval olfactory responses generally declined with age. Two geographical strains showed specific anosmias. Katsunuma (Japan) larvae showed no response to hexyl acetate; chromosome substitution showed this behaviour to be controlled by genes on chromosome II. Tai (Ivory Coast) larvae showed no response to pentyl acetate; chromosome substitution showed that two genetic factors were primarily involved, on the X chromosome and chromosome III. The response was modulated by chromosome II. No effect of the Y chromosome was found. Two olfactory mutants were studied, olfC (X chromosome) and Indf (chromosome III); both mutants showed abnormal responses to certain acetates. The results are discussed in terms of various models of olfactory processing and the implications of these models for the number of genes involved in olfaction. PMID:7989222

  16. Transvection and silencing of the Scr homeotic gene of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southworth, Jeffrey W; Kennison, James A

    2002-06-01

    The Sex combs reduced (Scr) gene specifies the identities of the labial and first thoracic segments in Drosophila melanogaster. In imaginal cells, some Scr mutations allow cis-regulatory elements on one chromosome to stimulate expression of the promoter on the homolog, a phenomenon that was named transvection by Ed Lewis in 1954. Transvection at the Scr gene is blocked by rearrangements that disrupt pairing, but is zeste independent. Silencing of the Scr gene in the second and third thoracic segments, which requires the Polycomb group proteins, is disrupted by most chromosomal aberrations within the Scr gene. Some chromosomal aberrations completely derepress Scr even in the presence of normal levels of all Polycomb group proteins. On the basis of the pattern of chromosomal aberrations that disrupt Scr gene silencing, we propose a model in which two cis-regulatory elements interact to stabilize silencing of any promoter or cis-regulatory element physically between them. This model also explains the anomalous behavior of the Scx allele of the flanking homeotic gene, Antennapedia. This allele, which is associated with an insertion near the Antennapedia P1 promoter, inactivates the Antennapedia P1 and P2 promoters in cis and derepresses the Scr promoters both in cis and on the homologous chromosome.

  17. Genetics of hybrid inviability and sterility in Drosophila: dissection of introgression of D. simulans genes in D. melanogaster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Kyoichi; Karr, Timothy L; Yamamoto, Masa-Toshi

    2004-03-01

    Interspecific crosses between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans usually produce sterile unisexual hybrids. The barrier preventing genetic analysis of hybrid inviability and sterility has been taken away by the discovery of a D. simulans strain which produces fertile female hybrids. D. simulans genes in the cytological locations of 21A1 to 22C1-23B1 and 30F3-31C5 to 36A2-7 have been introgressed into the D. melanogaster genetic background by consecutive backcrosses. Flies heterozygous for the introgression are fertile, while homozygotes are sterile both in females and males. The genes responsible for the sterility have been mapped in the introgression. The male sterility is caused by the synergistic effect of multiple genes, while the female sterility genes have been localized to a 170 kb region (32D2 to 32E4) containing 20 open reading frames. Thus, the female sterility might be attributed to a single gene with a large effect. We have also found that the Lethal hybrid rescue mutation which prevents the inviability of male hybrids from the cross of D. melanogaster females and D. simulans males cannot rescue those carrying the introgression, suggesting that D. simulans genes maybe non-functional in this hybrid genotype. The genes responsible for the inviability have not been separated from the female sterility genes by recombination.

  18. Similar rates of protein adaptation in Drosophila miranda and D. melanogaster, two species with different current effective population sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachtrog Doris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adaptive protein evolution is common in several Drosophila species investigated. Some studies point to very weak selection operating on amino-acid mutations, with average selection intensities on the order of Nes ~ 5 in D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Species with lower effective population sizes should undergo less adaptation since they generate fewer mutations and selection is ineffective on a greater proportion of beneficial mutations. Results Here I study patterns of polymorphism and divergence at 91 X-linked loci in D. miranda, a species with a roughly 5-fold smaller effective population size than D. melanogaster. Surprisingly, I find a similar fraction of amino-acid mutations being driven to fixation by positive selection in D. miranda and D. melanogaster. Genes with higher rates of amino-acid evolution show lower levels of neutral diversity, a pattern predicted by recurrent adaptive protein evolution. I fit a hitchhiking model to patterns of polymorphism in D. miranda and D. melanogaster and estimate an order of magnitude higher selection coefficients for beneficial mutations in D. miranda. Conclusion This analysis suggests that effective population size may not be a major determinant in rates of protein adaptation. Instead, adaptation may not be mutation-limited, or the distribution of fitness effects for beneficial mutations might differ vastly between different species or populations. Alternative explanation such as biases in estimating the fraction of beneficial mutations or slightly deleterious mutation models are also discussed.

  19. Mechanism of Notch Pathway Activation and Its Role in the Regulation of Olfactory Plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Simon; Lieber, Toby

    2016-01-01

    The neural plasticity of sensory systems is being increasingly recognized as playing a role in learning and memory. We have previously shown that Notch, part of an evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathway, is required in adult Drosophila melanogaster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) for the structural and functional plasticity of olfactory glomeruli that is induced by chronic odor exposure. In this paper we address how long-term exposure to odor activates Notch and how Notch in conjunction with chronic odor mediates olfactory plasticity. We show that upon chronic odor exposure a non-canonical Notch pathway mediates an increase in the volume of glomeruli by a mechanism that is autonomous to ORNs. In addition to activating a pathway that is autonomous to ORNs, chronic odor exposure also activates the Notch ligand Delta in second order projection neurons (PNs), but this does not appear to require acetylcholine receptor activation in PNs. Delta on PNs then feeds back to activate canonical Notch signaling in ORNs, which restricts the extent of the odor induced increase in glomerular volume. Surprisingly, even though the pathway that mediates the increase in glomerular volume is autonomous to ORNs, nonproductive transsynaptic Delta/Notch interactions that do not activate the canonical pathway can block the increase in volume. In conjunction with chronic odor, the canonical Notch pathway also enhances cholinergic activation of PNs. We present evidence suggesting that this is due to increased acetylcholine release from ORNs. In regulating physiological plasticity, Notch functions solely by the canonical pathway, suggesting that there is no direct connection between morphological and physiological plasticity. PMID:26986723

  20. Purification and partial characterization of three forms of alpha-glucosidase from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, T; Kitamura, K; Fukuda, T; Kikuchi, T

    1979-01-01

    Three forms of alpha-glucosidase, I, II, and III, have been purified from the whole body extract of adult flies of Drosophila melanogaster in yields of 2.1, 5.3, and 6.7%, respectively. The purification procedures involved ammonium sulfate fractionation, Con A-Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B ion exchange chromatography, Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration, and preparative gel electrophoresis. Each purified enzyme showed a single band on polyacrylamide gel on both protein and enzyme activity staining. The molecular weights of alpha-glucosidases I, II, and III were estimated to be 200,000, 56,000, and 76,000, respectively, by gel filtration. SDS gels indicated that alpha-glucosidases II and III were each composed of a single polypeptide chain, whereas alpha-glucosidase I was composed of two identical subunits. Both alpha-glucosidases II and III hydrolyzed sucrose and p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucoside (PNPG), but alpha-glucosidase I hydrolyzed PNPG to a much lesser extent than sucrose. For sucrose the pH optima of alpha-glucosidases I, II, and III were pH 6.0, 5.0, and 6.0 and the Km values were 13.1, 8.9, and 10 mM, respectively. For PNPG the pH optima of alpha-glucosidases II and III were pH 5.5 and 6.5 and the Km values were 0.77 and 0.21 mM, respectively.

  1. Sensory mother cell division is specifically affected in a Cyclin-A mutant of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, R; Togashi, S; Takahisa, M; Tsurumura, S; Mikuni, M; Kondo, K.(Yamagata University, Yamagata, 992-8510, Japan); Miyake, T

    1992-01-01

    Cyclin proteins are one of the important components of the mechanism regulating mitosis in eukaryotic cells. We isolated a Drosophila Cyclin-A mutant in which the progenitor cells of the peripheral nervous system (the sensory mother cells) do not divide properly, causing the loss and other abnormalities of mechanosensory organs in the adult fly. Sequence analysis of the mutant genome reveals that a P element is inserted into the first intron of the Cyclin-A gene. A 13 kb wild-type genomic DNA...

  2. Ultrastructural findings in the brain of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) and mice exposed to high-energy particle radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amelio, F.; Kraft, L.M.; D' Antoni-D' Amelio, E.; Benton, E.V.; Miquel, J.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of high energy, heavy particle (HZE) radiation were studied in the brain of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) exposed to argon (40Ar) or krypton (84Kr) ions. In the flies exposed to argon the fluence ranged from 6 X 10(4) to 8 X 10(7) particles/cm2. The insects were killed 35 days after exposure. Extensive tissue fragmentation was observed at the higher fluence employed. At fluences ranging from 5 X 10(6) (one hit/two cell bodies) to 9 X 10(4) (one hit/90 cell bodies) particles/cm2, swelling of the neuronal cytoplasm and focally fragmented membranes was observed. Marked increase of glial lamellae around nerve cell processes was seen at fluences ranging from one hit/six to one hit/135 cell bodies. In the flies irradiated with krypton, the fluences employed were 5.8 X 10(3) and 2.2 X 10(6) particles/cm2. Acute and late effects were evaluated. In the flies killed 36 hours after exposure (acute effects) to either fluence, glycogen particles were found in the neuroglial compartment. The granules were no longer present in flies killed 35 days later (late effects). From these studies it appears that the Drosophila brain is a useful model to investigate radiation damage to mature neurons, neuroglia, and therefore, to the glio-neuronal metabolic unit. In a separate study, the synaptic profiles of the neuropil in layers II-III of the frontal cerebral cortex of anesthesized adult LAFl mice were quantitatively appraised after exposure to argon (40Ar) particles. The absorbed dose ranged from 0.05 to 5 gray (Gy) plateau. It was determined that the sodium pentobarbital anesthesia per se results in a significant decrease in synaptic profile length one day after anesthetization, with return to normal values after 2-28 days. Irradiation with 0.05-5 Gy argon particles significantly inhibited the synaptic shortening effect of anesthesia at one day after exposure.

  3. [Study of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, L N; Urusov, F A; Romanova, N I; Shmel'kova, A O; Kim, A I

    2012-11-01

    Transpositions of the gypsy retrotransposon in the Drosophila melanogaster genome are controlled by the flamenco locus, which is represented as an accumulation of defective copies of transposable elements. In the present work, genetic control by the flamenco locus of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon from the gypsy group was studied. Tissue-specific expression of Tirant was detected in the tissues of ovaries in a strain mutant for the flamenco locus. Tirant was found to be transpositionally active in isogenic D. melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus. The sites of two new insertions have been localized by the method of subtractive hybridization. It has been concluded from the results obtained that the flamenco locus is involved in the genetic control of Tirant transpositions. PMID:23297482

  4. [Ecological and biological characteristics of Drosophila melanogaster features depending on the dose of electromagnetic radiation of various types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babkina, V V; Chernova, G V; Allenova, E A; Endebera, O P; Naumkina, E N

    2013-01-01

    Biological effects of exposure to red light (lambda = 660 +/- 10 nm) on the viability and morphophysiological characteristics of Drosophila melanogaster have been studied. The ability of this physical agent to modify these features is shown. The degree of expression and impact of biological effects depend on the dose, functional and genetic status of the organism. The study of the life expectancy of the exposed to EHF and white light D. melanogaster has revealed that expression of the features depends on the radiation doses, genotype, sex, the nature of the position of wings and lighting conditions. It has been found that the dark mode (24 h-night) is more favorable than the artificial lighting. Individuals with the left wing at the top are more sensitive to the external factors.

  5. Effects of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf and bloom head extracts on chemically induced DNA lesions in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacociunas, Laura Vicedo; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio; de Barros Falcão Ferraz, Alexandre; Richter, Marc François; da Silva, Juliana; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The genotoxicity of bloom head (BHE) and leaf (LE) extracts from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.), and their ability to modulate the mutagenicity and recombinogenicity of two alkylating agents (ethyl methanesulfonate – EMS and mitomycin C – MMC) and the intercalating agent bleomycin (BLM), were examined using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. Neither the mutagenicity nor the recombinogenicity of BLM or MMC was modified by co- or post-treatment with BHE or LE. In contrast, co-treatment with BHE significantly enhanced the EMS-induced genotoxicity involving mutagenic and/or recombinant events. Co-treatment with LE did not alter the genotoxicity of EMS whereas post-treatment with the highest dose of LE significantly increased this genotoxicity. This enhancement included a synergistic increase restricted to somatic recombination. These results show that artichoke extracts promote homologous recombination in proliferative cells of D. melanogaster. PMID:24688296

  6. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: ► The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. ► Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). ► EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. ► Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  7. Multiple Roles of the Y Chromosome in the Biology of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Piergentili

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster were the first examples of chromosomes associated with genetic information. Thanks to the serendipitous discovery of a male with white eyes in 1910, T.H. Morgan was able to associate the X chromosome of the fruit fly with a phenotypic character (the eye color for the first time. A few years later, his student, C.B. Bridges, demonstrated that X0 males, although phenotypically normal, are completely sterile. This means that the X chromosome, like the autosomes, harbors genes that control several phenotypic traits, while the Y chromosome is important for male fertility only. Notwithstanding its long history – almost 100 years in terms of genetic studies – most of the features of the Y chromosome are still a mystery. This is due to the intrinsic nature of this genetic element, namely, (1 its molecular composition (mainly transposable elements and satellite DNA, (2 its genetic inertia (lack of recombination due to its heterochromatic nature, (3 the absence of homology with the X (with the only exception of the nucleolar organizer, (4 the lack of visible phenotypes when it is missing (indeed, except for their sterility, X0 flies are normal males, and (5 its low density as for protein-coding sequences (to date, only 13 genes out of approximately 14,000 have been mapped on this chromosome in D. melanogaster, i.e., ~0.1% of the total. Nonetheless, a more accurate analysis reveals that this chromosome can influence several complex phenotypes: (1 it has a role in the fertility of both sexes and viability of males when over-represented; (2 it can unbalance the intracellular nucleotide pool; (3 it can interfere with the gene expression either by recruiting proteins involved in chromatin remodeling (PEV or, to a higher extent, by influencing the expression of up to 1,000 different genes, probably by changing the availability of transcription factors; (4 it plays a major role (up to 50% in the resistance

  8. Funktion von SWI/SNF in der Regulation der prämRNA-Prozessierung in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, Anu

    2012-01-01

    ATP abhängige Chromatin Remodelling Komplexe bestehen aus diversen Faktoren, welche die bei der Umsetzung von ATP freiwerdende Energie dazu nutzen, die Chromatinstruktur neu zu ordnen. Diese Veränderungen führen zu einer Zu- bzw. Abnahme in der Zugänglichkeit der DNA. Ein Beispiel dafür ist der SWI/SNF-Komplex, der sowohl in die Aktivierung als auch die Inhibierung der Transkription involviert ist. Die ATPase-Untereinheit von SWI/SNF heißt in Hefe SWI2/SNF2 und in Drosophila melanogaster Brah...

  9. Fumigant Activity of the Psidium guajava Var. Pomifera (Myrtaceae) Essential Oil in Drosophila melanogaster by Means of Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Ivanildo Pinho; Gabriel Luz Wallau; Mauro Eugenio Medina Nunes; Nadghia Figueiredo Leite; Saulo Relison Tintino; Litiele Cezar da Cruz; Francisco Assis Bezerra da Cunha; José Galberto Martins da Costa; Henrique Douglas Melo Coutinho; Thais Posser; Jeferson Luis Franco

    2014-01-01

    The guava fruit, Psidium guajava var. pomifera (Myrtaceae family), is a native plant from South America. Its leaves and fruits are widely used in popular medicine in tropical and subtropical countries. Drosophila melanogaster has been used as one of the main model organisms in genetic studies since the 1900s. The extensive knowledge about this species makes it one of the most suitable organisms to study many aspects of toxic compound effects. Due to the lack of studies on the effects of the b...

  10. DNA Repair Dependence of Somatic Mutagenesis of Transposon-Caused WHITE Alleles in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER after Treatment with Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Sohei

    1986-01-01

    DNA repair-defective alleles of the mei-9, mei-41, mus-104 and mus-101 loci of Drosophila melanogaster were introduced into stocks bearing the UZ and SZ marker sets. Males with the UZ marker set, z1 (zeste allele) and w+(TE) (genetically unstable white allele presumably caused by a transposable element), or the SZ marker set, z1 and w+R (semistable white allele caused by partial duplication of the w+ locus plus transposon insert), were exposed to EMS at the first instar. After emergence, a...

  11. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for innate immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cole R. Spresser; Sarah E. Marshall; Kimberly A. Carlson

    2008-08-01

    OTK18 is a human transcriptional suppressor implicated in the regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type-one infection of mononuclear phagocytes. It is ubiquitously expressed in all normal tissues, but its normal homeostatic function is yet to be characterized. One hypothesis is that OTK18 aids in the regulation of the innate immune system. To test this hypothesis, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the total RNA extracted from Drosophila melanogaster embryonic Schneider 2 (S2) cells transfected with either pEGFP-OTK18 (enhanced green fluorescent protein) or empty vector controls (pEGFP-N3) for 6, 12 and 24 h. cDNA microarray analysis revealed differential expression of genes known to be important in regulation of Drosophila innate immunity. The expression levels of two genes, Metchnikowin and CG16708 were verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. These results suggest a role for OTK18 in innate immunity.

  12. Molecular analysis of the Adh region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, W; Karp, R; McGill, S; Ashburner, M

    1985-12-20

    A small region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been cloned in a series of overlapping phage. A length of 165 X 10(3) base-pairs of contiguous DNA that spans polytene chromosome region 35A4 to 35B1 and includes the structural gene for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) as well as at least two other genes, outspread (osp) and no-ocelli (noc), has been characterized by mapping chromosome aberrations to the DNA. The relationship between osp and Adh is surprising: of nine osp alleles associated with chromosome breakpoints, five map distal (i.e. 5') to Adh and four map proximal (i.e. 3') to this gene. None affects the expression of Adh. As defined by these and other breakpoints, the osp gene spans at least 52 X 10(3) base-pairs and overlaps the Adh gene. The noc gene, as defined by the mapping of nearly 30 breakpoints, is at least 50 X 10(3) base-pairs in size. Alleles of noc and noc- deletions show either of two kinds of interaction with the recessive lethality of l(2)br29ScoR+1, a lethal that maps immediately distal to noc. One class of noc allele is viable when heterozygous with ScoR+1, while the other class is lethal or semi-lethal. Both classes, however, are homozygous or hemizygous viable. The locations of these two classes of noc allele on the DNA fall into two clusters, with those that are viable with ScoR+1 located proximal to those that are not. The physical boundary between these classes lies at a site just distal to that of the breakpoint of the inversion associated with ScoR+1 itself.

  13. Purple sweet potato anthocyanin attenuates fat-induced mortality in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Yuk Man; Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaobo; Ma, Ka Ying; Zhang, Chengnan; Zhu, Hanyue; Zhao, Yimin; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2016-09-01

    A high fat diet induces the accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides (LPO), accelerates the ageing process and causes a greater mortality in Drosophila melanogaster. Purple sweet potato is rich in antioxidant anthocyanin. The purpose of the present study was to examine if supplementation of purple sweet potato anthocyanin (PSPA) could reduce the mortality of fruit flies fed a high-fat diet. Results showed that the mean lifespan of fruit flies was shortened from 56 to 35days in a dose-dependent manner when lard in the diet increased from 0% to 20%. PSPA supplementation partially attenuated the lard-induced mortality. The maximum lifespan and 50% survival time were 49 and 27days, respectively, for the 10% lard control flies, in contrast, these parameters increased to 57 and 30days in the PSPA-supplemented fruit flies. Similarly, addition of lard into diet increased the total body LPO, while addition of PSPA partially attenuated its increase. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that PSPA-supplemented diet significantly up-regulated the mRNA of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and Rpn11, compared with the control lard diet. The western blot analysis also demonstrated that PSPA supplementation was associated with up-regulation protein mass of SOD1, SOD2, and CAT. In addition, PSPA supplementation could restore the climbing ability of fruit flies fed a 10% lard diet. We could conclude that the lifespan-prolonging activity of PSPA was potentially mediated by modulating the genes of SOD, CAT and Rpn11. PMID:27329928

  14. Factors affecting mito-nuclear codon usage interactions in the OXPHOS system of Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Codon usage bias varies considerably among genomes and even within the genes of the same genome.In eukaryotic organisms,energy production in the form of oxidative phosphorylation(OXPHOS)is the only process under control of both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes.Although factors affecting codon usage in a single genome have been studied,this has not occurred when both interactional genomes are involved.Consequently, we investigated whether or not other factors influence codon usage of coevolved genes.We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism.Our χ2 test on the number of codons of nuclear and mitochondrial genes involved in the OXPHOS system was significantly different (χ2=7945.16,P<0.01).A plot of effective number of codons against GC3s content of nuclear genes showed that few genes lie on the expected curve,indicating that codon usage was random.Correspondence analysis indicated a significant correlation between axis 1 and codon adaptation index(R=0.947,P<0.01)in every nuclear gene sequence.Thus,codon usage bias of nuclear genes appeared to be affected by translational selection.Correlation between axis 1 coordinates and GC content(R=0.814.P<0.01)indicated that the codon usage of nuclear genes was also affected by GC composition.Analysis of mitochondrial genes did not reveal a significant correlation between axis 1 and any parameter.Statistical analyses indicated that codon usages of both nDNA and mtDNA were subjected to context-dependent mutations.

  15. A Comprehensive Toolbox for Genome Editing in Cultured Drosophila melanogaster Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, Stefan; Böttcher, Romy; Schmidts, Ines; Förstemann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Custom genome editing has become an essential element of molecular biology. In particular, the generation of fusion constructs with epitope tags or fluorescent proteins at the genomic locus facilitates the analysis of protein expression, localization, and interaction partners at physiologic levels. Following up on our initial publication, we now describe a considerably simplified, more efficient, and readily scalable experimental workflow for PCR-based genome editing in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells. Our analysis at the act5C locus suggests that PCR-based homology arms of 60 bp are sufficient to reach targeting efficiencies of up to 80% after selection; extension to 80 bp (PCR) or 500 bp (targeting vector) did not further improve the yield. We have expanded our targeting system to N-terminal epitope tags; this also allows the generation of cell populations with heterologous expression control of the tagged locus via the copper-inducible mtnDE promoter. We present detailed, quantitative data on editing efficiencies for several genomic loci that may serve as positive controls or benchmarks in other laboratories. While our first PCR-based editing approach offered only blasticidin-resistance for selection, we now introduce puromycin-resistance as a second, independent selection marker; it is thus possible to edit two loci (e.g., for coimmunoprecipitation) without marker removal. Finally, we describe a modified FLP recombinase expression plasmid that improves the efficiency of marker cassette FLP-out. In summary, our technique and reagents enable a flexible, robust, and cloning-free genome editing approach that can be parallelized for scale-up. PMID:27172193

  16. A Comprehensive Toolbox for Genome Editing in Cultured Drosophila melanogaster Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kunzelmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Custom genome editing has become an essential element of molecular biology. In particular, the generation of fusion constructs with epitope tags or fluorescent proteins at the genomic locus facilitates the analysis of protein expression, localization, and interaction partners at physiologic levels. Following up on our initial publication, we now describe a considerably simplified, more efficient, and readily scalable experimental workflow for PCR-based genome editing in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells. Our analysis at the act5C locus suggests that PCR-based homology arms of 60 bp are sufficient to reach targeting efficiencies of up to 80% after selection; extension to 80 bp (PCR or 500 bp (targeting vector did not further improve the yield. We have expanded our targeting system to N-terminal epitope tags; this also allows the generation of cell populations with heterologous expression control of the tagged locus via the copper-inducible mtnDE promoter. We present detailed, quantitative data on editing efficiencies for several genomic loci that may serve as positive controls or benchmarks in other laboratories. While our first PCR-based editing approach offered only blasticidin-resistance for selection, we now introduce puromycin-resistance as a second, independent selection marker; it is thus possible to edit two loci (e.g., for coimmunoprecipitation without marker removal. Finally, we describe a modified FLP recombinase expression plasmid that improves the efficiency of marker cassette FLP-out. In summary, our technique and reagents enable a flexible, robust, and cloning-free genome editing approach that can be parallelized for scale-up.

  17. Remating and sperm competition in replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster adapted to alternative environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin Arbuthnott

    Full Text Available The prevalence of sexual conflict in nature, as well as the supposedly arbitrary direction of the resulting coevolutionary trajectories, suggests that it may be an important driver of phenotypic divergence even in a constant environment. However, natural selection has long been central to the operation of sexual conflict within populations and may therefore constrain or otherwise direct divergence among populations. Ecological context may therefore matter with respect to the diversification of traits involved in sexual conflict, and if natural selection is sufficiently strong, such traits may evolve in correlation with environment, generating a pattern of ecologically-dependent parallel evolution. In this study we assess among-population divergence both within and between environments for several traits involved in sexual conflict. Using eight replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster from a long-term evolution experiment, we measured remating rates and subsequent offspring production of females when housed with two separate males in sequence. We found no evidence of any variation in male reproductive traits (offense or defense. However, the propensity of females to remate diverged significantly among the eight populations with no evidence of any environmental effect, consistent with sexual conflict promoting diversification even in the absence of ecological differences. On the other hand, females adapted to one environment (ethanol tended to produce a higher proportion of offspring sired by their first mate as compared to those adapted to the other (cadmium environment, suggesting ecologically-based divergence of this conflict phenotype. Because we find evidence for both stochastic population divergence operating outside of an ecological context and environment-dependent divergence of traits under sexual conflict, the interaction of these two processes is an important topic for future work.

  18. Molecular population genetics of the -esterase gene cluster of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evgeniy S. Balakirev; Francisco J. Ayala

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated nucleotide polymorphism at the -esterase gene cluster including the Est-6 gene and Est-6 putative pseudogene in four samples of Drosophila melanogaster derived from natural populations of southern Africa (Zimbabwe), Europe (Spain), North America (USA: California), and South America (Venezuela). A complex haplo-type structure is revealed in both Est-6 and Est-6. Total nucleotide diversity is twice in Est-6 as in Est-6; diversity is higher in the African sample than in the non-African ones. Strong linkage disequilibrium occurs within the -esterase gene cluster in non-African samples, but not in the African one. Intragenic gene conversion events are detected within Est-6 and, to a much greater extent, within Est-6; intergenic gene conversion events are rare. Tests of neutrality with recombination are significant for the -esterase gene cluster in the non-African samples but not significant in the African one. We suggest that the demographic history (bottleneck and admixture of genetically differentiated populations) is the major factor shaping the pattern of nucleotide polymorphism in the -esterase gene cluster. However there are some ‘footprints’ of directional and balancing selection shaping specific distribution of nucleotide polymorphism within the cluster. Intergenic epistatic selection between Est-6 and Est-6 may play an important role in the evolution of the -esterase gene cluster preserving the putative pseudogene from degenerative destruction and reflecting possible functional interaction between the functional gene and the putative pseudogene. Est-6 and Est-6 may represent an indivisible intergenic complex (‘intergene’) in which each single component (Est-6 or Est-6) cannot separately carry out the full functional role.

  19. Canalization and control in automata networks: body segmentation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Marques-Pita

    Full Text Available We present schema redescription as a methodology to characterize canalization in automata networks used to model biochemical regulation and signalling. In our formulation, canalization becomes synonymous with redundancy present in the logic of automata. This results in straightforward measures to quantify canalization in an automaton (micro-level, which is in turn integrated into a highly scalable framework to characterize the collective dynamics of large-scale automata networks (macro-level. This way, our approach provides a method to link micro- to macro-level dynamics--a crux of complexity. Several new results ensue from this methodology: uncovering of dynamical modularity (modules in the dynamics rather than in the structure of networks, identification of minimal conditions and critical nodes to control the convergence to attractors, simulation of dynamical behaviour from incomplete information about initial conditions, and measures of macro-level canalization and robustness to perturbations. We exemplify our methodology with a well-known model of the intra- and inter cellular genetic regulation of body segmentation in Drosophila melanogaster. We use this model to show that our analysis does not contradict any previous findings. But we also obtain new knowledge about its behaviour: a better understanding of the size of its wild-type attractor basin (larger than previously thought, the identification of novel minimal conditions and critical nodes that control wild-type behaviour, and the resilience of these to stochastic interventions. Our methodology is applicable to any complex network that can be modelled using automata, but we focus on biochemical regulation and signalling, towards a better understanding of the (decentralized control that orchestrates cellular activity--with the ultimate goal of explaining how do cells and tissues 'compute'.

  20. Generation of New Hairless Alleles by Genomic Engineering at the Hairless Locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praxenthaler, Heiko; Smylla, Thomas K.; Nagel, Anja C.; Preiss, Anette; Maier, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Hairless (H) is the major antagonist within the Notch signalling pathway of Drosophila melanogaster. By binding to Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] and two co-repressors, H induces silencing of Notch target genes in the absence of Notch signals. We have applied genomic engineering to create several new H alleles. To this end the endogenous H locus was replaced with an attP site by homologous recombination, serving as a landing platform for subsequent site directed integration of different H constructs. This way we generated a complete H knock out allele HattP, reintroduced a wild type H genomic and a cDNA-construct (Hgwt, Hcwt) as well as two constructs encoding H proteins defective of Su(H) binding (HLD, HiD). Phenotypes regarding viability, bristle and wing development were recorded, and the expression of Notch target genes wingless and cut was analysed in mutant wing discs or in mutant cell clones. Moreover, genetic interactions with Notch (N5419) and Delta (DlB2) mutants were addressed. Overall, phenotypes were largely as expected: both HLD and HiD were similar to the HattP null allele, indicating that most of H activity requires the binding of Su(H). Both rescue constructs Hgwt and Hcwt were homozygous viable without phenotype. Unexpectedly, the hemizygous condition uncovered that they were not identical to the wild type allele: notably Hcwt showed a markedly reduced activity, suggesting the presence of as yet unidentified regulatory or stabilizing elements in untranslated regions of the H gene. Interestingly, Hgwt homozygous cells expressed higher levels of H protein, perhaps unravelling gene-by-environment interactions. PMID:26448463

  1. Proteomic characterization of inbreeding-related cold sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis J Vermeulen

    Full Text Available Inbreeding depression is a widespread phenomenon of central importance to agriculture, medicine, conservation biology and evolutionary biology. Although the population genetic principles of inbreeding depression are well understood, we know little about its functional genomic causes. To provide insight into the molecular interplay between intrinsic stress responses, inbreeding depression and temperature tolerance, we performed a proteomic characterization of a well-defined conditional inbreeding effect in a single line of Drosophila melanogaster, which suffers from extreme cold sensitivity and lethality. We identified 48 differentially expressed proteins in a conditional lethal line as compared to two control lines. These proteins were enriched for proteins involved in hexose metabolism, in particular pyruvate metabolism, and many were found to be associated with lipid particles. These processes can be linked to known cold tolerance mechanisms, such as the production of cryoprotectants, membrane remodeling and the build-up of energy reserves. We checked mRNA-expression of seven genes with large differential protein expression. Although protein expression poorly correlated with gene expression, we found a single gene (CG18067 that, after cold shock, was upregulated in the conditional lethal line both at the mRNA and protein level. Expression of CG18067 also increased in control flies after cold shock, and has previously been linked to cold exposure and chill coma recovery time. Many differentially expressed proteins in our study appear to be involved in cold tolerance in non-inbred individuals. This suggest the conditional inbreeding effect to be caused by misregulation of physiological cold tolerance mechanisms.

  2. The effects of host age, host nuclear background and temperature on phenotypic effects of the virulent Wolbachia strain popcorn in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, K Tracy; Thomson, Linda J; Ary A Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    Because of their obligate endosymbiotic nature, Wolbachia strains by necessity are defined by their phenotypic effects upon their host. Nevertheless, studies on the influence of host background and environmental conditions upon the manifestation of Wolbachia effects are relatively uncommon. Here we examine the behavior of the overreplicating Wolbachia strain popcorn in four different Drosophila melanogaster backgrounds at two temperatures. Unlike other strains of Wolbachia in Drosophila, popc...

  3. A mathematical model; Un modelo matematico para el comportamiento de la radiosensibilidad medida con la viabilidad huevo-adulto de Drosophila melanogaster y D. simulans de Laguna Verde, Veracruz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo M, J.A.; Pimentel P, A.E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    This work presents the results to define the adult egg viability behavior (VHA) of two species, Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans obtained with the mathematical model proposed, as well as the respective curves. The data are the VHA result of both species coming from the vicinity of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant (CNLV) comprise a 10 years collect period starting from 1987 until 1997. Each collect includes four series of data which are the VHA result obtained after treatment with 0, 4, 6 and 8 Gy of gamma rays. (Author)

  4. Action of the chlorophyllin (CHLN) on the double breaking induced by gamma radiation in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster; Accion de la clorofilina (CHLN) sobre los dobles rompimientos inducidos por radiacion gamma en celulas germinales de Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno M, A

    2005-07-01

    The chlorophyllin (CHLN) is a derived of the chlorophyll in the one which the atom of Mg is replaced by Cu. It has been broadly used as preservative in those foods, and in the treatment of geriatric patients. The results using different test systems have demonstrated that the CHLN reduces the DNA damage caused by different physical agents or chemical of direct action or insinuation. Another of the properties of the CHLN is it anti carcinogenic action, because it has been that inhibits the carcinogen activity of B1 (AFB1) aflatoxin and it diminishes the incidence of tumors caused for 2-amine-3-methylimidazo [4- 5f] quinoline (IQ) and it inhibits the development of colon cancer during the post-initiation phase. Recently the reports of the activity promoter of the CHLN have been increased on the genetic damage. This effect observed in Salmonella and later on in Drosophila melanogaster using, physical and chemical agents. Presently study determines the action of the CHLN before the genetic effect induced in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster by means of the test of the lost one of the X chromosome in ring using two protocols; the first one consisted on pretreatment with CHLN to the male ones and later on to irradiate them and in the second protocol the pretreatment with CHLN administers to the females, in both protocols its were used a litter systems. (Author)

  5. Drosophila melanogaster Meigen: 3. sensibilidade ao carbofuran e biomonitoramento de seus resíduos em repolho Drosophila melanogaster Meigen: 3. susceptibility to carbofuran and biomonitoring of its residues in cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Rodrigues de Almeida

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of Drosophila melanogaster to carbofuran and the use of this organism in biomonitoring residues of the insecticide in cabbage was evaluated. Under the conditions of the bioassay, residues-film bioassay in Petri dish, carbofuran degraded depending on the temperature and time of exposure. Bioassays conducted with D. melanogaster showed that its toxicity increases with temperature (20 to 35 °C. LC50 values, calculated as a function of temperature, ranged from 3.6 to 10.5 mg/g body weight (bw for males and from 2.9 to 8.7 mg/g bw for females. The formulated product Furadan® G was applied on cabbage (Brassica oleracea, var. capitata and the residues of carbofuran were determined by bioassay. The determination limit of the bioassay was 0.1 mg/kg and the method presented reproducibility with coefficient variation of 17 %. The validation of the bioassay by high performance liquid chromatography confirms the viability of the bioassay with D. melanogaster in monitoring the residues of carbofuran in cabbage.

  6. Total cysteine and glutathione determination in hemolymph of individual adult D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borra, Srivani, E-mail: sborra3@uic.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 West Taylor Street, 4323 SES, MC 111, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Featherstone, David E., E-mail: def@uic.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 840 West Taylor Street, SEL 4311, M/C 067, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Laboratory of Integrative Neuroscience, University of Illinois at Chicago, 840 West Taylor Street, SEL 4311, M/C 067, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Shippy, Scott A., E-mail: sshippy@uic.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 West Taylor Street, 5417 SES, MC 111, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Laboratory of Integrative Neuroscience, University of Illinois at Chicago, 840 West Taylor Street, SEL 4311, M/C 067, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Method for highly volume variant, nL sample assay of biological relevant thiols. • Defined capillary lengths used to deliver nL sample and reagent volumes. • Optimized reagent concentrations, reaction times and temperatures for thiol assay. • Total cysteine and glutathione measured from hemolymph of individual fruit flies. - Abstract: Determination of thiols, glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (Cys) are important due to their roles in oxidative stress and aging. Oxidants such as soluble O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} promote oxidation of thiols to disulfide (-S-S-) bonded dimers affecting quantitation accuracy. The method presented here reduces disulfide-bonded species followed by fluorescence labelling of the 29.5 (±18.2) nL hemolymph volumes of individual adult Drosophila Melanogaster. The availability of only tens of nanoliter (nL) samples that are also highly volume variant requires efficient sample handling to improve thiol measurements while minimizing sample dilution. The optimized method presented here utilizes defined lengths of capillaries to meter tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine reducing reagent and monobromobimane derivatizing reagent volumes enabling Cys and GSH quantitation with only 20-fold dilution. The nL assay developed here was optimized with respect to reagent concentrations, sample dilution, reaction times and temperatures. Separation and identification of the nL thiol mixtures were obtained with capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence. To demonstrate the capability of this method total Cys and total GSH were measured in the hemolymph collected from individual adult D. Melanogaster. The thiol measurements were used to compare a mutant fly strain with a non-functional cystine–glutamate transporter (xCT) to its background control. The mutant fly, genderblind (gb), carries a non-functional gene for a protein similar to mammalian xCT whose function is not fully understood. Average concentrations obtained for mutant

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster PeptideAtlas facilitates the use of peptide data for improved fly proteomics and genome annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nichole L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crucial foundations of any quantitative systems biology experiment are correct genome and proteome annotations. Protein databases compiled from high quality empirical protein identifications that are in turn based on correct gene models increase the correctness, sensitivity, and quantitative accuracy of systems biology genome-scale experiments. Results In this manuscript, we present the Drosophila melanogaster PeptideAtlas, a fly proteomics and genomics resource of unsurpassed depth. Based on peptide mass spectrometry data collected in our laboratory the portal http://www.drosophila-peptideatlas.org allows querying fly protein data observed with respect to gene model confirmation and splice site verification as well as for the identification of proteotypic peptides suited for targeted proteomics studies. Additionally, the database provides consensus mass spectra for observed peptides along with qualitative and quantitative information about the number of observations of a particular peptide and the sample(s in which it was observed. Conclusion PeptideAtlas is an open access database for the Drosophila community that has several features and applications that support (1 reduction of the complexity inherently associated with performing targeted proteomic studies, (2 designing and accelerating shotgun proteomics experiments, (3 confirming or questioning gene models, and (4 adjusting gene models such that they are in line with observed Drosophila peptides. While the database consists of proteomic data it is not required that the user is a proteomics expert.

  8. Insulin stimulates translocation of human GLUT4 to the membrane in fat bodies of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Crivat

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for studies of genes controlling development and disease. However, its applicability to physiological systems is less clear because of metabolic differences between insects and mammals. Insulin signaling has been studied in mammals because of relevance to diabetes and other diseases but there are many parallels between mammalian and insect pathways. For example, deletion of Drosophila Insulin-Like Peptides resulted in 'diabetic' flies with elevated circulating sugar levels. Whether this situation reflects failure of sugar uptake into peripheral tissues as seen in mammals is unclear and depends upon whether flies harbor the machinery to mount mammalian-like insulin-dependent sugar uptake responses. Here we asked whether Drosophila fat cells are competent to respond to insulin with mammalian-like regulated trafficking of sugar transporters. Transgenic Drosophila expressing human glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4, the sugar transporter expressed primarily in insulin-responsive tissues, were generated. After expression in fat bodies, GLUT4 intracellular trafficking and localization were monitored by confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM. We found that fat body cells responded to insulin with increased GLUT4 trafficking and translocation to the plasma membrane. While the amplitude of these responses was relatively weak in animals reared on a standard diet, it was greatly enhanced in animals reared on sugar-restricted diets, suggesting that flies fed standard diets are insulin resistant. Our findings demonstrate that flies are competent to mobilize translocation of sugar transporters to the cell surface in response to insulin. They suggest that Drosophila fat cells are primed for a response to insulin and that these pathways are down-regulated when animals are exposed to constant, high levels of sugar. Finally, these studies are the first to use TIRFM to

  9. EGFR signaling regulates the proliferation of Drosophila adult midgut progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    In holometabolous insects, the adult appendages and internal organs form anew from larval progenitor cells during metamorphosis. As described here, the adult Drosophila midgut, including intestinal stem cells (ISCs), develops from adult midgut progenitor cells (AMPs) that proliferate during larval development in two phases. Dividing AMPs first disperse, but later proliferate within distinct islands, forming large cell clusters that eventually fuse during metamorphosis ...

  10. Action of the chlorophyllin (CHLN) on the double breaking induced by gamma radiation in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chlorophyllin (CHLN) is a derived of the chlorophyll in the one which the atom of Mg is replaced by Cu. It has been broadly used as preservative in those foods, and in the treatment of geriatric patients. The results using different test systems have demonstrated that the CHLN reduces the DNA damage caused by different physical agents or chemical of direct action or insinuation. Another of the properties of the CHLN is it anti carcinogenic action, because it has been that inhibits the carcinogen activity of B1 (AFB1) aflatoxin and it diminishes the incidence of tumors caused for 2-amine-3-methylimidazo [4- 5f] quinoline (IQ) and it inhibits the development of colon cancer during the post-initiation phase. Recently the reports of the activity promoter of the CHLN have been increased on the genetic damage. This effect observed in Salmonella and later on in Drosophila melanogaster using, physical and chemical agents. Presently study determines the action of the CHLN before the genetic effect induced in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster by means of the test of the lost one of the X chromosome in ring using two protocols; the first one consisted on pretreatment with CHLN to the male ones and later on to irradiate them and in the second protocol the pretreatment with CHLN administers to the females, in both protocols its were used a litter systems. (Author)

  11. Effector caspase Dcp-1 and IAP protein Bruce regulate starvation-induced autophagy during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Chen Claire; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Barbosa, Sharon González; McCall, Kimberly; Gorski, Sharon M

    2008-09-22

    A complex relationship exists between autophagy and apoptosis, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying their interactions are largely unknown. We conducted a systematic study of Drosophila melanogaster cell death-related genes to determine their requirement in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. We discovered that six cell death genes--death caspase-1 (Dcp-1), hid, Bruce, Buffy, debcl, and p53-as well as Ras-Raf-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway components had a role in autophagy regulation in D. melanogaster cultured cells. During D. melanogaster oogenesis, we found that autophagy is induced at two nutrient status checkpoints: germarium and mid-oogenesis. At these two stages, the effector caspase Dcp-1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Bruce function to regulate both autophagy and starvation-induced cell death. Mutations in Atg1 and Atg7 resulted in reduced DNA fragmentation in degenerating midstage egg chambers but did not appear to affect nuclear condensation, which indicates that autophagy contributes in part to cell death in the ovary. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that coordinately regulate autophagic and apoptotic events in vivo. PMID:18794330

  12. Genetic diversity, population structure and Wolbachia infection status in a worldwide sample of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi L Verspoor

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster and its close relatives have been extremely important model species in the development of population genetic models that serve to explain patterns of diversity in natural populations, a major goal of evolutionary biology. A detailed picture of the evolutionary history of these species is beginning to emerge, as the relative importance of forces including demographic changes and natural selection is established. A continuing aim is to characterise levels of genetic diversity in a large number of populations of these species, covering a wide geographic area. We have used collections from five previously un-sampled wild populations of D. melanogaster and two of D. simulans, across three continents. We estimated levels of genetic diversity within, and divergence between, these populations, and looked for evidence of genetic structure both between ancestral and derived populations, and amongst derived populations. We also investigated the prevalence of infection with the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia. We found that D. melanogaster populations from Sub-Saharan Africa are the most diverse, and that divergence is highest between these and non-Sub-Saharan populations. There is strong evidence for structuring of populations between Sub-Saharan Africa and the rest of the world, and some evidence for weak structure amongst derived populations. Populations from Sub-Saharan Africa also differ in the prevalence of Wolbachia infection, with very low levels of infection compared to populations from the rest of the world.

  13. The Drosophila melanogaster Apaf-1 homologue ARK is required for most, but not all, programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathryn; Daish, Tasman; Harvey, Kieran F; Pfleger, Cathie M; Hariharan, Iswar K; Kumar, Sharad

    2006-03-13

    The Apaf-1 protein is essential for cytochrome c-mediated caspase-9 activation in the intrinsic mammalian pathway of apoptosis. Although Apaf-1 is the only known mammalian homologue of the Caenorhabditis elegans CED-4 protein, the deficiency of apaf-1 in cells or in mice results in a limited cell survival phenotype, suggesting that alternative mechanisms of caspase activation and apoptosis exist in mammals. In Drosophila melanogaster, the only Apaf-1/CED-4 homologue, ARK, is required for the activation of the caspase-9/CED-3-like caspase DRONC. Using specific mutants that are deficient for ark function, we demonstrate that ARK is essential for most programmed cell death (PCD) during D. melanogaster development, as well as for radiation-induced apoptosis. ark mutant embryos have extra cells, and tissues such as brain lobes and wing discs are enlarged. These tissues from ark mutant larvae lack detectable PCD. During metamorphosis, larval salivary gland removal was severely delayed in ark mutants. However, PCD occurred normally in the larval midgut, suggesting that ARK-independent cell death pathways also exist in D. melanogaster.

  14. Effector caspase Dcp-1 and IAP protein Bruce regulate starvation-induced autophagy during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Chen Claire; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Barbosa, Sharon González; McCall, Kimberly; Gorski, Sharon M

    2008-09-22

    A complex relationship exists between autophagy and apoptosis, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying their interactions are largely unknown. We conducted a systematic study of Drosophila melanogaster cell death-related genes to determine their requirement in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy. We discovered that six cell death genes--death caspase-1 (Dcp-1), hid, Bruce, Buffy, debcl, and p53-as well as Ras-Raf-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway components had a role in autophagy regulation in D. melanogaster cultured cells. During D. melanogaster oogenesis, we found that autophagy is induced at two nutrient status checkpoints: germarium and mid-oogenesis. At these two stages, the effector caspase Dcp-1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein Bruce function to regulate both autophagy and starvation-induced cell death. Mutations in Atg1 and Atg7 resulted in reduced DNA fragmentation in degenerating midstage egg chambers but did not appear to affect nuclear condensation, which indicates that autophagy contributes in part to cell death in the ovary. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that coordinately regulate autophagic and apoptotic events in vivo.

  15. Positive Selection of Iris, a Retroviral Envelope-Derived Host Gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B. Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana, a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene

  16. The effect of royal sun agaricus, agaricus brasiliensis S. Wasser et al., Extract on methyl Methanesulfonate caused genotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savic, T.; Patenkovic, A.; Sokovic, M.; Glamoclija, J.; Andjelkovic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of culinary-medicinal Royal Sun Agaricus (Agaricus brasiliensis) hot water extract on methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) induced mutagenicity/genotoxity in Drosophila melanogaster was studied using a quick and broadly applicable in vivo assay, i.e., the wing somatic mutation and recombination

  17. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: The Adh region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashburner, M.; Misra, S.; Roote, J.; Lewis, S.E.; Blazej, R.; Davis, T.; Doyle, C.; Galle, R.; George, R.; Harris, N.; Hartzell, G.; Harvey, D.; Hong, L.; Houston, K.; Hoskins, R.; Johnson, G.; Martin, C.; Moshrefi, A.; Palazzolo, M.; Reese, M.G.; Spradling, A.; Tsang, G.; Wan, K.; Whitelaw, K.; Kimmel, B.; Celniker, S.; Rubin, G.M.

    1999-03-24

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized

  18. POLYMORPHISM AT THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER - EFFECTS OF REARING TEMPERATURE ON DEVELOPMENTAL RATE, BODY-WEIGHT, AND SOME BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    1991-01-01

    The role of developmental time in the world-wide cline of Adh and alpha-Gpdh allele frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster, and the relationship with weight and some biochemical characters, were investigated. Experimental strains were constructed with different combinations of Adh and alpha-Gpdh all

  19. Effects of body-size variation on flight-related traits in latitudinal populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, Veer; Parkash, Ravi; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis whether flight-related traits such as wing area, flight-muscle ratio, wing loading and dispersal yield evidence of geographical variation in nine wild-collected as well as laboratory-reared (at 21°C) latitudinal populations of Drosophila melanogaster from the Indian subcontinent. We observed positive clinal variation in the wing-thorax ratio, wing aspect ratio and wing area, along a latitudinal gradient for both the sexes. In contrast, geographical changes in three parameters of flight ability, i.e. flight-muscle ratio, wing loading and dispersal, showed negative correlation with latitude. On the basis of isofemale line variability, we observed positive correlation of wing loading with flight-muscle ratio as well as dispersal behaviour in both the sexes. We also found positive correlation between duration of development and wing area. Interestingly, southern populations of D. melanogaster from warm and humid habitats exhibited higher flight-muscle ratio as well as the higher wing loading than northern populations which occur in cooler and drier climatic conditions. Laboratory tests for dispersal-related walking behaviour showed significantly higher values for southern populations compared with northern populations of D. melanogaster. Multiple regression analysis of geographical changes in flight-muscle ratio, wing loading as well as walking behaviour as a function of average temperature and relative humidity of the origin of populations in wild-collected flies have suggested adaptive changes in flight-related traits in response to steeper gradients of climatic factors in the Indian subcontinent. Finally, adaptive latitudinal variations in flight-related traits in D. melanogaster are consistent with results of other studies from different continents despite differences due to specific climatic conditions in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:24840827

  20. Effects of body-size variation on flight-related traits in latitudinal populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veer Bhan; Ravi Parkash; Dau Dayal Aggarwal

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis whether flight-related traits such as wing area, flight-muscle ratio, wing loading and dispersal yield evidence of geographical variation in nine wild-collected as well as laboratory-reared (at 21°C) latitudinal populations of Drosophila melanogaster from the Indian subcontinent. We observed positive clinal variation in the wing–thorax ratio, wing aspect ratio and wing area, along a latitudinal gradient for both the sexes. In contrast, geographical changes in three parameters of flight ability, i.e. flight-muscle ratio, wing loading and dispersal, showed negative correlation with latitude. On the basis of isofemale line variability, we observed positive correlation of wing loading with flight-muscle ratio as well as dispersal behaviour in both the sexes. We also found positive correlation between duration of development and wing area. Interestingly, southern populations of D. melanogaster from warm and humid habitats exhibited higher flight-muscle ratio as well as the higher wing loading than northern populations which occur in cooler and drier climatic conditions. Laboratory tests for dispersal-related walking behaviour showed significantly higher values for southern populations compared with northern populations of D. melanogaster. Multiple regression analysis of geographical changes in flight-muscle ratio, wing loading as well as walking behaviour as a function of average temperature and relative humidity of the origin of populations in wild-collected flies have suggested adaptive changes in flight-related traits in response to steeper gradients of climatic factors in the Indian subcontinent. Finally, adaptive latitudinal variations in flight-related traits in D. melanogaster are consistent with results of other studies from different continents despite differences due to specific climatic conditions in the Indian subcontinent.

  1. yellow0, a marker for low body weight in Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li XinHai; Deng XueMei

    2009-01-01

    Marker-asaisted selection (MAS) is an important modern breeding technique, but it has been found that the effect of the markers for quantitative trait loci (QTL) is inconsistent, leading in some cases to MAS failure and raising doubts about its effectiveness. Here the model organism Drosophila melanogaster was employed to study whether an effective marker could be found and applied to MAS. We crossed the stock carrying the y0 marker (a recessive mutation allele of the yellow gene on the X chromosome)with three other stocks carrying corresponding wild-type markers in an F2 design, and found that the y0 marker was in significant association with low body weight (P<0.001). This association was consistent across different backgrounds and the marker effects in female and male were approximately 0.95 σrp(phenotypic standard deviation) and 0.68 σp, respectively. We next introgressed a fragment via the y0marker into a wild stock background over 20 generations of marker-assisted introgression (MAI), and constructed the introgression stock y0(OR)20 in which body weight decreased by 13% and 7%, in female and male, respectively, compared to the wild stock (P<0.0001). This indicated that there must be a single QTL for low body weight that is tightly linked to the y0 marker. We then shortened the introgressed fragment to less than 1.5 cM by a deeper MAI using the y0 marker and the white marker. This narrower fragment also resulted in a similar decrease in body weight to that induced by y0(OR)20, indicating that the QTL for low body weight is located within this less-than-1.5 cM interval. Molecular characteristics of the y0 marker by PCR amplification and Southern blotting revealed that yellow gene was deficient in the y0 stock, leading to disappearance of melanin from the cuticle and probably influencing the developmental process. The above results confirmed the existence of effective QTL markers applicable to MAS breeding schemes, and their potential application in breeding

  2. yellow~0,a marker for low body weight in Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Marker-assisted selection(MAS) is an important modern breeding technique,but it has been found that the effect of the markers for quantitative trait loci(QTL) is inconsistent,leading in some cases to MAS failure and raising doubts about its effectiveness.Here the model organism Drosophila melanogaster was employed to study whether an effective marker could be found and applied to MAS.We crossed the stock carrying the y0 marker(a recessive mutation allele of the yellow gene on the X chromosome) with three other stocks carrying corresponding wild-type markers in an F2 design,and found that the y0 marker was in significant association with low body weight(P<0.001).This association was consistent across different backgrounds and the marker effects in female and male were approximately 0.95 σP(phenotypic standard deviation) and 0.68 σP,respectively.We next introgressed a fragment via the y0 marker into a wild stock background over 20 generations of marker-assisted introgression(MAI),and constructed the introgression stock y0(OR)20 in which body weight decreased by 13% and 7%,in female and male,respectively,compared to the wild stock(P<0.0001).This indicated that there must be a single QTL for low body weight that is tightly linked to the y0 marker.We then shortened the introgressed fragment to less than 1.5 cM by a deeper MAI using the y0 marker and the white marker.This narrower fragment also resulted in a similar decrease in body weight to that induced by y0(OR)20,indicating that the QTL for low body weight is located within this less-than-1.5 cM interval.Molecular characteristics of the y0 marker by PCR amplification and Southern blotting revealed that yellow gene was deficient in the y0 stock,leading to disappearance of melanin from the cuticle and probably influencing the developmental process.The above results confirmed the existence of effective QTL markers applicable to MAS breeding schemes,and their potential application in breeding new stocks.

  3. DmTTF, a novel mitochondrial transcription termination factor that recognises two sequences of Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Marina; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Bruni, Francesco; Musicco, Clara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2003-01-01

    Using a combination of bioinformatic and molecular biology approaches a Drosophila melanogaster protein, DmTTF, has been identified, which exhibits sequence and structural similarity with two mitochondrial transcription termination factors, mTERF (human) and mtDBP (sea urchin). Import/processing assays indicate that DmTTF is synthesised as a precursor of 410 amino acids and is imported into mitochondria, giving rise to a mature product of 366 residues. Band-shift and DNase I protection experiments show that DmTTF binds two homologous, short, non-coding sequences of Drosophila mitochondrial DNA, located at the 3′ end of blocks of genes transcribed on opposite strands. The location of the target sequences coincides with that of two of the putative transcription termination sites previously hypothesised. These results indicate that DmTTF is the termination factor of mitochondrial transcription in Drosophila. The existence of two DmTTF binding sites might serve not only to stop transcription but also to control the overlapping of a large number of transcripts generated by the peculiar transcription mechanism operating in this organism. PMID:12626700

  4. Restless led syndrome model Drosophila melanogaster show successful olfactory learning and 1-day retention of the acquired memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika F. Asaba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS is a prevalent but poorly understood disorder that ischaracterized by uncontrollable movements during sleep, resulting in sleep disturbance.Olfactory memory in Drosophila melanogaster has proven to be a useful tool for the study ofcognitive deficits caused by sleep disturbances, such as those seen in RLS. A recently generatedDrosophila model of RLS exhibited disturbed sleep patterns similar to those seen in humans withRLS. This research seeks to improve understanding of the relationship between cognitivefunctioning and sleep disturbances in a new model for RLS. Here, we tested learning andmemory in wild type and dBTBD9 mutant flies by Pavlovian olfactory conditioning, duringwhich a shock was paired with one of two odors. Flies were then placed in a T-maze with oneodor on either side, and successful associative learning was recorded when the flies chose theside with the unpaired odor. We hypothesized that due to disrupted sleep patterns, dBTBD9mutant flies would be unable to learn the shock-odor association. However, the current studyreports that the recently generated Drosophila model of RLS shows successful olfactorylearning, despite disturbed sleep patterns, with learning performance levels matching or betterthan wild type flies.

  5. The behaviour of Drosophila adult hindgut stem cells is controlled by Wnt and Hh signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Shigeo; Mkrtchyan, Marianna; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Merriam, John R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2008-07-31

    The intestinal tract maintains proper function by replacing aged cells with freshly produced cells that arise from a population of self-renewing intestinal stem cells (ISCs). In the mammalian intestine, ISC self renewal, amplification and differentiation take place along the crypt-villus axis, and are controlled by the Wnt and hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathways. However, little is known about the mechanisms that specify ISCs within the developing intestinal epithelium, or about the signalling centres that help maintain them in their self-renewing stem cell state. Here we show that in adult Drosophila melanogaster, ISCs of the posterior intestine (hindgut) are confined to an anterior narrow segment, which we name the hindgut proliferation zone (HPZ). Within the HPZ, self renewal of ISCs, as well as subsequent proliferation and differentiation of ISC descendants, are controlled by locally emanating Wingless (Wg, a Drosophila Wnt homologue) and Hh signals. The anteriorly restricted expression of Wg in the HPZ acts as a niche signal that maintains cells in a slow-cycling, self-renewing mode. As cells divide and move posteriorly away from the Wg source, they enter a phase of rapid proliferation. During this phase, Hh signal is required for exiting the cell cycle and the onset of differentiation. The HPZ, with its characteristic proliferation dynamics and signalling properties, is set up during the embryonic phase and becomes active in the larva, where it generates all adult hindgut cells including ISCs. The mechanism and genetic control of cell renewal in the Drosophila HPZ exhibits a large degree of similarity with what is seen in the mammalian intestine. Our analysis of the Drosophila HPZ provides an insight into the specification and control of stem cells, highlighting the way in which the spatial pattern of signals that promote self renewal, growth and differentiation is set up within a genetically tractable model system. PMID:18633350

  6. Drosophila melanogaster lipins are tissue-regulated and developmentally regulated and present specific subcellular distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Valeria; Maia, Rafaela Martins; Vianna, Murilo Carlos Bizam; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa

    2010-11-01

    Lipins constitute a novel family of Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidate phosphatases that catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to yield diacylglycerol, an important intermediate in lipid metabolism and cell signaling. Whereas a single lipin is detected in less complex organisms, in mammals there are distinct lipin isoforms and paralogs that are differentially expressed among tissues. Compatible with organism tissue complexity, we show that the single Drosophila Lpin1 ortholog (CG8709, here named DmLpin) expresses at least three isoforms (DmLpinA, DmLpinK and DmLpinJ) in a temporal and spatially regulated manner. The highest levels of lipin in the fat body, where DmLpinA and DmLpinK are expressed, correlate with the highest levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) measured in this tissue. DmLpinK is the most abundant isoform in the central nervous system, where TAG levels are significantly lower than in the fat body. In the testis, where TAG levels are even lower, DmLpinJ is the predominant isoform. Together, these data suggest that DmLpinA might be the isoform that is mainly involved in TAG production, and that DmLpinK and DmLpinJ could perform other cellular functions. In addition, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence that lipins are most strongly labeled in the perinuclear region of the fat body and ventral ganglion cells. In visceral muscles of the larval midgut and adult testis, lipins present a sarcomeric distribution. In the ovary chamber, the lipin signal is concentrated in the internal rim of the ring canal. These specific subcellular localizations of the Drosophila lipins provide the basis for future investigations on putative novel cellular functions of this protein family. PMID:20977671

  7. Neurons That Underlie Drosophila melanogaster Reproductive Behaviors: Detection of a Large Male-Bias in Gene Expression in fruitless-Expressing Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole R. Newell

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Male and female reproductive behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster are vastly different, but neurons that express sex-specifically spliced fruitless transcripts (fru P1 underlie these behaviors in both sexes. How this set of neurons can generate such different behaviors between the two sexes is an unresolved question. A particular challenge is that fru P1-expressing neurons comprise only 2–5% of the adult nervous system, and so studies of adult head tissue or whole brain may not reveal crucial differences. Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP identifies the actively translated pool of mRNAs from fru P1-expressing neurons, allowing a sensitive, cell-type-specific assay. We find four times more male-biased than female-biased genes in TRAP mRNAs from fru P1-expressing neurons. This suggests a potential mechanism to generate dimorphism in behavior. The male-biased genes may direct male behaviors by establishing cell fate in a similar context of gene expression observed in females. These results suggest a possible global mechanism for how distinct behaviors can arise from a shared set of neurons.

  8. Neurons That Underlie Drosophila melanogaster Reproductive Behaviors: Detection of a Large Male-Bias in Gene Expression in fruitless-Expressing Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Nicole R.; New, Felicia N.; Dalton, Justin E.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Arbeitman, Michelle N.

    2016-01-01

    Male and female reproductive behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster are vastly different, but neurons that express sex-specifically spliced fruitless transcripts (fru P1) underlie these behaviors in both sexes. How this set of neurons can generate such different behaviors between the two sexes is an unresolved question. A particular challenge is that fru P1-expressing neurons comprise only 2–5% of the adult nervous system, and so studies of adult head tissue or whole brain may not reveal crucial differences. Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP) identifies the actively translated pool of mRNAs from fru P1-expressing neurons, allowing a sensitive, cell-type-specific assay. We find four times more male-biased than female-biased genes in TRAP mRNAs from fru P1-expressing neurons. This suggests a potential mechanism to generate dimorphism in behavior. The male-biased genes may direct male behaviors by establishing cell fate in a similar context of gene expression observed in females. These results suggest a possible global mechanism for how distinct behaviors can arise from a shared set of neurons. PMID:27247289

  9. Neurons That Underlie Drosophila melanogaster Reproductive Behaviors: Detection of a Large Male-Bias in Gene Expression in fruitless-Expressing Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Nicole R; New, Felicia N; Dalton, Justin E; McIntyre, Lauren M; Arbeitman, Michelle N

    2016-01-01

    Male and female reproductive behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster are vastly different, but neurons that express sex-specifically spliced fruitless transcripts (fru P1) underlie these behaviors in both sexes. How this set of neurons can generate such different behaviors between the two sexes is an unresolved question. A particular challenge is that fru P1-expressing neurons comprise only 2-5% of the adult nervous system, and so studies of adult head tissue or whole brain may not reveal crucial differences. Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP) identifies the actively translated pool of mRNAs from fru P1-expressing neurons, allowing a sensitive, cell-type-specific assay. We find four times more male-biased than female-biased genes in TRAP mRNAs from fru P1-expressing neurons. This suggests a potential mechanism to generate dimorphism in behavior. The male-biased genes may direct male behaviors by establishing cell fate in a similar context of gene expression observed in females. These results suggest a possible global mechanism for how distinct behaviors can arise from a shared set of neurons. PMID:27247289

  10. Ethyl acetate:an alternative to ether in anesthetizing Drosophila melanogaster%乙酸乙酯对果蝇(Drosophila melanogaster)的麻醉效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐静音; 王子琪; 许雅丽; 张一丁; 任碧杰; 杨大祥

    2011-01-01

    麻醉是果蝇实验中最基本的操作,乙醚是最常用的麻醉剂.但因为乙醚是二类易制毒化学品而被国家控制使用.报道一种容易获得的试剂--乙酸乙酯对果蝇的麻醉效果.实验采用的麻醉室大小为125cm2,每处理20~30只果蝇,乙酸乙酯剂量为40、80、120uL,以同等剂量的乙醚为对照,每个实验重复4次,用所有果蝇完全麻醉后20min及120min时的未苏醒率为指标评估麻醉效果及安全性.结果表明:乙酸乙酯对果蝇具有麻醉作用;麻醉时乙酸乙酯开始起效应的时间略晚于同等剂量的乙醚,但使果蝇完全麻醉的时间却比同等剂量的乙醚略短或相接近;麻醉持续的时间则长于同等剂量的乙醚.乙酸乙酯麻醉的果蝇,90%以上的果蝇均在120min内苏醒,表明在这些剂量范围内是安全的.乙酸乙酯完全可以替代乙醚用于果蝇的麻醉.%In biology class, diethyl ether is the most commonly used anaesthetic in Drosophila melanogaster anesthetizing. However,the availability and use of the ether is strictly controlled by law in China. Here we reported that ethyl acetate , an effective asphyxiant used in insect collecting and study, can be used as a substitute for ether in Drosophila melanogaster anesthetizing. For each trial, 20 -30 wild-type flies were randomly selected from culture vials , and were anesthetized in a container ( 125 cm3) with 40 , 80, 120 μl ethyl acetate or diethyl ether ( CK) , each trial was replicated four times. The percentage of unaroused flies 20min and 120min after fully anesthetized were counted for estimating the effect and safety of ethyl acetate. The results indicated that ethyl acetate can be used to anesthetize Drosophila melanogaster; the time for ethyl acetate effect is longer than that of ether; however, the time at which the flies were fully anesthetized by ethyl acetate was shorter than or similar to that by corresponding ether control; the anesthesia time of ethyl acetate is

  11. Immunological evidence for structural homology between Drosophila melanogaster (S14), rabbit liver (S12), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S25), Bacillus subtilis (S6), and Escherichia coli (S6) ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, W Y; Otaka, E

    1984-11-01

    Specific antibodies directed against Drosophila melanogaster acidic ribosomal protein S14 were used in a comparative study of eucaryotic and procaryotic ribosomes by immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Common antigenic determinants and, thus, structural homology were found between D. melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S25), rabbit liver (S12), Bacillus subtilis (S6), and Escherichia coli (S6) ribosomes.

  12. Identification of Mob2, a novel regulator of larval neuromuscular junction morphology, in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Megan; Ganetzky, Barry

    2013-11-01

    Although evolutionary changes must take place in neural connectivity and synaptic architecture as nervous systems become more complex, we lack understanding of the general principles and specific mechanisms by which these changes occur. Previously, we found that morphology of the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) varies extensively among different species of Drosophila but is relatively conserved within a species. To identify specific genes as candidates that might underlie phenotypic differences in NMJ morphology among Drosophila species, we performed a genetic analysis on one of two phenotypic variants we found among 20 natural isolates of Drosophila melanogaster. We discovered genetic polymorphisms for both positive and negative regulators of NMJ growth segregating within the variant line. Focusing on one subline, that displayed NMJ overgrowth, we mapped the phenotype to Mob2 [Monopolar spindle (Mps) one binding protein 2)], a gene encoding a Nuclear Dbf2 (Dumbbell formation 2)-Related (NDR) kinase activator. We confirmed this identification by transformation rescue experiments and showed that presynaptic expression of Mob2 is necessary and sufficient to regulate NMJ growth. Mob2 interacts in a dominant, dose-dependent manner with tricornered but not with warts, to cause NMJ overgrowth, suggesting that Mob2 specifically functions in combination with the former NDR kinase to regulate NMJ development. These results demonstrate the feasibility and utility of identifying genetic variants affecting NMJ morphology in natural populations of Drosophila. These variants can lead to discovery of new genes and molecular mechanisms that regulate NMJ development while also providing new information that can advance our understanding of mechanisms that underlie nervous system evolution. PMID:23979583

  13. Phylogenetic analyses and characterization of RNase X25 from Drosophila melanogaster suggest a conserved housekeeping role and additional functions for RNase T2 enzymes in protostomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ambrosio

    Full Text Available Ribonucleases belonging to the RNase T2 family are enzymes associated with the secretory pathway that are almost absolutely conserved in all eukaryotes. Studies in plants and vertebrates suggest they have an important housekeeping function in rRNA recycling. However, little is known about this family of enzymes in protostomes. We characterized RNase X25, the only RNase T2 enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that RNase X25 is the major contributor of ribonuclease activity in flies as detected by in gel assays, and has an acidic pH preference. Gene expression analyses showed that the RNase X25 transcript is present in all adult tissues and developmental stages. RNase X25 expression is elevated in response to nutritional stresses; consistent with the hypothesis that this enzyme has a housekeeping role in recycling RNA. A correlation between induction of RNase X25 expression and autophagy was observed. Moreover, induction of gene expression was triggered by oxidative stress suggesting that RNase X25 may have additional roles in stress responses. Phylogenetic analyses of this family in protostomes showed that RNase T2 genes have undergone duplication events followed by divergence in several phyla, including the loss of catalytic residues, and suggest that RNase T2 proteins have acquired novel functions. Among those, it is likely that a role in host immunosuppression evolved independently in several groups, including parasitic Platyhelminthes and parasitoid wasps. The presence of only one RNase T2 gene in the D. melanogaster genome, without any other evident secretory RNase activity detected, makes this organism an ideal system to study the cellular functions of RNase T2 proteins associated with RNA recycling and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. On the other hand, the discovery of gene duplications in several protostome genomes also presents interesting new avenues to study additional biological functions of this ancient family of proteins.

  14. An Intronic Polymorphism in couch potato Is Not Distributed Clinally in European Drosophila melanogaster Populations nor Does It Affect Diapause Inducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonato, Valeria; Fedele, Giorgio; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2016-01-01

    couch potato (cpo) encodes an RNA binding protein that has been reported to be expressed in the peripheral and central nervous system of embryos, larvae and adults, including the major endocrine organ, the ring gland. A polymorphism in the D. melanogaster cpo gene coding region displays a latitudinal cline in frequency in North American populations, but as cpo lies within the inversion In(3R)Payne, which is at high frequencies and itself shows a strong cline on this continent, interpretation of the cpo cline is not straightforward. A second downstream SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with the first has been claimed to be primarily responsible for the latitudinal cline in diapause incidence in USA populations.Here, we investigate the frequencies of these two cpo SNPs in populations of Drosophila throughout continental Europe. The advantage of studying cpo variation in Europe is the very low frequency of In(3R)Payne, which we reveal here, does not appear to be clinally distributed. We observe a very different geographical scenario for cpo variation from the one in North America, suggesting that the downstream SNP does not play a role in diapause. In an attempt to verify whether the SNPs influence diapause we subsequently generated lines with different combinations of the two cpo SNPs on known timeless (tim) genetic backgrounds, because polymorphism in the clock gene tim plays a significant role in diapause inducibility. Our results reveal that the downstream cpo SNP does not seem to play any role in diapause induction in European populations in contrast to the upstream coding cpo SNP. Consequently, all future diapause studies on strains of D. melanogaster should initially determine their tim and cpo status. PMID:27598401

  15. Mutant human torsinA, responsible for early-onset dystonia, dominantly suppresses GTPCH expression, dopamine levels and locomotion in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Wakabayashi-Ito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans with over 20 genetic loci identified. TOR1A (DYT1, the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. Most cases of DYT1 dystonia are caused by a 3 bp (ΔGAG deletion that results in the loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE302/303 in the carboxyl terminal region of torsinA. This torsinAΔE mutant protein has been speculated to act in a dominant-negative manner to decrease activity of wild type torsinA. Drosophila melanogaster has a single torsin-related gene, dtorsin. Null mutants of dtorsin exhibited locomotion defects in third instar larvae. Levels of dopamine and GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH proteins were severely reduced in dtorsin-null brains. Further, the locomotion defect was rescued by the expression of human torsinA or feeding with dopamine. Here, we demonstrate that human torsinAΔE dominantly inhibited locomotion in larvae and adults when expressed in neurons using a pan-neuronal promoter Elav. Dopamine and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4 levels were significantly reduced in larval brains and the expression level of GTPCH protein was severely impaired in adult and larval brains. When human torsinA and torsinAΔE were co-expressed in neurons in dtorsin-null larvae and adults, the locomotion rates and the expression levels of GTPCH protein were severely reduced. These results support the hypothesis that torsinAΔE inhibits wild type torsinA activity. Similarly, neuronal expression of a Drosophila DtorsinΔE equivalent mutation dominantly inhibited larval locomotion and GTPCH protein expression. These results indicate that both torsinAΔE and DtorsinΔE act in a dominant-negative manner. We also demonstrate that Dtorsin regulates GTPCH expression at the post-transcriptional level. This Drosophila model of DYT1 dystonia provides an important tool for studying the differences in the molecular function between the

  16. Complex genetic interactions govern the temporal effects of Antennapedia on antenna-to-leg transformations in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ian Dworkin; Wendy Lee; Fiona Mccloskey; Ellen Larsen

    2007-08-01

    The putative regulatory relationships between Antennapedia (Antp), spalt major (salm) and homothorax (hth) are tested with regard to the sensitive period of antenna-to-leg transformations. Although Antp expression repressed hth as predicted, contrary to expectations, hth did not show increased repression at higher Antp doses, whereas salm, a gene downstream of hth, did show such a dose response. Loss of hth allowed antenna-to-leg transformations but the relative timing of proximal–distal transformations was reversed, relative to transformations induced by ectopic Antp. Finally, overexpression of Hth was only partially able to rescue transformations induced by ectopic Antp. These results indicate that there may be additional molecules involved in antenna/leg identity and that spatial, temporal and dosage relationships are more subtle than suspected and must be part of a robust understanding of molecular network behaviour involved in determining appendage identity in Drosophila melanogaster.

  17. Mutagenic effect of radionuclides incorporated into DNA of Drosophila melanogaster. Technical progress report, December 15, 1985-July 15, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project compares the mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation from tritium to that of x-ray. Mutants are described at the molecular level after having been characterized by classical genetic techniques in Drosophila melanogaster, therefore tying together the molecular studies with previous work in mutagenesis. The objectives of this project are to analyze x-ray and tritium induced mutants by ''walking down'' the chromosomes and studying the frequency of breaks that are not associated with the gene used in screening for the mutants, to study the molecular effect of these mutants in heterozygotes with the aim of developing methods of detecting mutants in heterozygotes that may be applicable to human populations, and to induce mutants from tritium beta radiation and analyze them at the molecular level. 9 refs., 4 figs

  18. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  19. [Interlineage distribution and characteristics of the structure of two subfamilies of Drosophila melanogaster MDG4 (gypsy) retrotransposon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razorenova, O V; Karpova, N N; Smirnova, Iu B; Kusulidu, L K; Reneva, N K; Subocheva, E A; Kim, A I; Liubomirskaia, N V; Il'in, Iu V

    2001-02-01

    The distribution of two variants of MDG4 (gypsy) was analyzed in several Drosophila melanogaster strains. Southern blot hybridization revealed the inactive variant of MDG4 in all strains examined and active MDG4 only in some of them. Most of the strains harboring the active MDG4 variant were recently isolated from natural populations. It is of interest that the active MDG4 prevailed over the inactive one only in strains carrying the mutant flamenco gene. Several lines were analyzed in more detail. The number of MDG4 sites on salivary-gland polytene chromosomes was established via in situ hybridization, and MDG4 was tested for transposition using the ovoD test. PMID:11253423

  20. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coline eGoriaux

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of transposable elements (TEs in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flam an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets.

  1. From the back or front: the courtship position is a matter of smell and sight in Drosophila melanogaster males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ken-ichi; Sato, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    During courtship, Drosophila melanogaster males usually position themselves behind the target female. To decipher the sensory cues that guide the males to the courting position, we quantitatively analyzed male locomotion traces within a circular observation chamber, at the center of which an immobilized virgin female was placed as a courtship target. Wild-type males preferentially stayed behind the female under not only daylight but also dark conditions, indicating that vision is dispensable for orientation by males. By contrast, olfaction-defective Or83b2 homozygous males often positioned themselves in front of a female to court under dark but not daylight conditions. We conclude that vision and olfaction redundantly guide the male fly to move behind the female to perform courtship actions. The visual and olfactory features that provide a male with cues for differentiating between the front and back end of a female are yet to be determined.

  2. Genetically controlled environmental variance for sternopleural bristles in Drosophila melanogaster - an experimental test of a heterogeneous variance model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Christian; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the environmental variance of sternopleural bristle number in Drosophila melanogaster is partly under genetic control. We used data from 20 inbred lines and 10 control lines to test this hypothesis. Two models were used: a standard...... quantitative genetics model based on the infinitesimal model, and an extension of this model. In the extended model it is assumed that each individual has its own environmental variance and that this heterogeneity of variance has a genetic component. The heterogeneous variance model was favoured by the data......, indicating that the environmental variance is partly under genetic control. If this heterogeneous variance model also applies to livestock, it would be possible to select for animals with a higher uniformity of products across environmental regimes. Also for evolutionary biology the results are of interest...

  3. Secondary contact and local adaptation contribute to genome-wide patterns of clinal variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergland, Alan O; Tobler, Ray; González, Josefa; Schmidt, Paul; Petrov, Dmitri

    2016-03-01

    Populations arrayed along broad latitudinal gradients often show patterns of clinal variation in phenotype and genotype. Such population differentiation can be generated and maintained by both historical demographic events and local adaptation. These evolutionary forces are not mutually exclusive and can in some cases produce nearly identical patterns of genetic differentiation among populations. Here, we investigate the evolutionary forces that generated and maintain clinal variation genome-wide among populations of Drosophila melanogaster sampled in North America and Australia. We contrast patterns of clinal variation in these continents with patterns of differentiation among ancestral European and African populations. Using established and novel methods we derive here, we show that recently derived North America and Australia populations were likely founded by both European and African lineages and that this hybridization event likely contributed to genome-wide patterns of parallel clinal variation between continents. The pervasive effects of admixture mean that differentiation at only several hundred loci can be attributed to the operation of spatially varying selection using an FST outlier approach. Our results provide novel insight into the well-studied system of clinal differentiation in D. melanogaster and provide a context for future studies seeking to identify loci contributing to local adaptation in a wide variety of organisms, including other invasive species as well as temperate endemics. PMID:26547394

  4. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja E. Menger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT, to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  5. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  6. Inference of chromosomal inversion dynamics from Pool-Seq data in natural and laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapun, Martin; van Schalkwyk, Hester; McAllister, Bryant; Flatt, Thomas; Schlötterer, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Sequencing of pools of individuals (Pool-Seq) represents a reliable and cost-effective approach for estimating genome-wide SNP and transposable element insertion frequencies. However, Pool-Seq does not provide direct information on haplotypes so that, for example, obtaining inversion frequencies has not been possible until now. Here, we have developed a new set of diagnostic marker SNPs for seven cosmopolitan inversions in Drosophila melanogaster that can be used to infer inversion frequencies from Pool-Seq data. We applied our novel marker set to Pool-Seq data from an experimental evolution study and from North American and Australian latitudinal clines. In the experimental evolution data, we find evidence that positive selection has driven the frequencies of In(3R)C and In(3R)Mo to increase over time. In the clinal data, we confirm the existence of frequency clines for In(2L)t, In(3L)P and In(3R)Payne in both North America and Australia and detect a previously unknown latitudinal cline for In(3R)Mo in North America. The inversion markers developed here provide a versatile and robust tool for characterizing inversion frequencies and their dynamics in Pool-Seq data from diverse D. melanogaster populations. PMID:24372777

  7. Effects of dietary folic acid level and symbiotic folate production on fitness and development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatch, Sydella A; Meyer, Kyle W; Harrison, Jon F

    2010-01-01

    Folic acid is a vitamin for probably all animals. When converted to folate forms, it is used in DNA synthesis and amino acid metabolism. Literature suggests insects must consume folates, folates do not affect others, is a toxin for some, and that a few insects synthesize it. It has been reported that Drosophila melanogaster does not consistently need dietary folate because it can synthesize it. This seems unlikely since animals generally lack this ability. More likely, folates thought to have been made by the fly came from microbial symbionts. We aimed to clarify how dietary folic acid affects fitness and development in fruit flies and whether flies may receive folates from microbial symbionts. We found larvae were more viable and developed faster with increasing dietary folic acid, with the surprising exception that larvae fed nearly-zero folic acid developed faster. Their body folate levels did not significantly differ from those that consumed up to 600 times more folic acid. However, these flies fed little folate only achieved normal body folate levels and development times when antibiotics were excluded from the diet. When flies consumed near-zero folates with antibiotics, their body folate levels decreased and development was prolonged. An assay for the endosymbiont Wolbachia in flies used to generate the experimental flies did not show presence of these bacteria. Our data suggest D. melanogaster can harbor unknown bacterial symbiont(s) that provide essential folates to their host when it is scarce in the diet, allowing the fruit fly to maintain growth and development.

  8. Modulatory effects of the antioxidant ascorbic acid on the direct genotoxicity of doxorubicin in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson José Fragiorge

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study two different crosses involving the wing cell markers mwh and flr³ (standard (ST cross and high bioactivation (HB cross, the latter being characterized by a high constitutive level of cytochrome P450 which leads to an increased sensitivity to a number of promutagens and procarcinogens were used to investigate the modulatory effects of ascorbic acid (AA combined with the antitumor agent doxorubicin (DXR in Drosophila melanogaster. We observed that the two different concentrations of AA (50 or 100 mM had no effect on spots frequencies, while DXR treatments (0.2 or 0.4 mM gave positive results for all types of spots, when compared to negative control. For marker-heterozygous (MH flies, a protective effect was observed with the lower concentration of AA (50 mM that was able to statistically decrease the frequency of spots induced by DXR (0.2 mM, while an enhanced frequency of spots induced by DXR was observed with the higher concentration of AA (100 mM, when compared to DXR treatment (p < 0.05. These results suggest that AA may interfere with free radicals generated by DXR and with other possible reactive metabolites. The efficiency of AA in protecting the somatic cells of D. melanogaster against mutation and recombination induced by DXR is dependent on the dose used and the protection is directly related to the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes.

  9. Myofilament proteins in the synchronous flight muscles of Manduca sexta show both similarities and differences to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayme-Southgate, Agnes; Feldman, Samuel; Fulmer, Diana

    2015-07-01

    Insect flight muscles have been classified as either synchronous or asynchronous based on the coupling between excitation and contraction. In the moth Manduca sexta, the flight muscles are synchronous and do not display stretch activation, which is a property of asynchronous muscles. We annotated the M. sexta genes encoding the major myofibrillar proteins and analyzed their isoform pattern and expression. Comparison with the homologous genes in Drosophila melanogaster indicates both difference and similarities. For proteins such as myosin heavy chain, tropomyosin, and troponin I the availability and number of potential variants generated by alternative spicing is mostly conserved between the two insects. The exon usage associated with flight muscles indicates that some exon sets are similarly used in the two insects, whereas others diverge. For actin the number of individual genes is different and there is no evidence for a flight muscle specific isoform. In contrast for troponin C, the number of genes is similar, as well as the isoform composition in flight muscles despite the different calcium regulation. Both troponin I and tropomyosin can include COOH-terminal hydrophobic extensions similar to tropomyosinH and troponinH found in D. melanogaster and the honeybee respectively. PMID:25797474

  10. Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy (mdg4): structural and functional differences, and distribution in fly stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubomirskaya, N V; Smirnova, J B; Razorenova, O V; Karpova, N N; Surkov, S A; Avedisov, S N; Kim, A I; Ilyin, Y V

    2001-04-01

    Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy were subjected to detailed structural and functional analysis. A series of hybrid constructs containing various combinations of "active" and "inactive" gypsy copies were tested for their ability to produce new DNA copies in cultured cells by means of reverse transcription. It was shown that the previously demonstrated variations in retrotranspositional activity are associated with either one or both of two amino acid substitutions at the beginning of ORF2. The first substitution is located at the boundary between the putative protease and reverse transcriptase domains and, hence, may influence the processing of the polyprotein. The other substitution may alter reverse transcriptase activity since it is located in the second of the seven conserved domains of the RT gene. To address the question of the evolutionary relationship between the two gypsy variants, their distribution was analyzed in among various fly stocks. Southern analysis revealed that all D. melanogaster strains studied so far contain the "inactive" gypsy variant, while the "active" copies are present only in some strains; most of the latter were established from flies recently isolated from natural populations. Finally, in stocks carrying the flamenco mutation the "active" gypsy variant is much more abundant than the "inactive" form. Possible scenarios for the orgin of the "active" form of gypsy are discussed. PMID:11361349

  11. Genotoxic valuation of Zinalco, a zinc base alloy, by the mutation and somatic recombination test in Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinalco is an eutectoid alloy made of zinc, aluminium and copper (78% , 20% and 2%), because of its physical, chemical and mechanical characteristics, it has been established as a structural material and valued as a feasible bio material. Previous authors have studies on the cytotoxic effect of Zinalco, so for concluded that it is harmless to the organism. However, was considered necessary to evaluate its potential genotoxicity. The present work was done with the fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster. The objectives were: to determine the administered particle size, to evaluate its ingestion zinalco and to score the genotoxic effect by means of the SMART test in wing cells of D. Melanogaster. The protocol consisted of an oral chronic treatment, to groups of 72th age larvae, with concentrations of 0,1,2,4,8 and 16 mg of zinalco in ml of water on 1.5 g of synthetic medium. Statistical analysis was done through the SMART program. The results obtained showed an average particle size of 16 m long x 5.9 m wide. The normal amount of the alloy elements in the larvae was increased and finally, no genotoxicity at any of the administered doses could be detected. (Author)

  12. Population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations reveals the genetic basis of body size variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Turner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Body size is a classic quantitative trait with evolutionarily significant variation within many species. Locating the alleles responsible for this variation would help understand the maintenance of variation in body size in particular, as well as quantitative traits in general. However, successful genome-wide association of genotype and phenotype may require very large sample sizes if alleles have low population frequencies or modest effects. As a complementary approach, we propose that population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations allows for considerable power to map functional variation. Here, we use this technique to investigate the genetic basis of natural variation in body size in Drosophila melanogaster. Significant differentiation of hundreds of loci in replicate selection populations supports the hypothesis that the genetic basis of body size variation is very polygenic in D. melanogaster. Significantly differentiated variants are limited to single genes at some loci, allowing precise hypotheses to be formed regarding causal polymorphisms, while other significant regions are large and contain many genes. By using significantly associated polymorphisms as a priori candidates in follow-up studies, these data are expected to provide considerable power to determine the genetic basis of natural variation in body size.

  13. Circadian clocks and life-history related traits: is pupation height affected by circadian organization in Drosophila melanogaster?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhanashree A. Paranjpe; D. Anitha; Vijay Kumar Sharma; Amitabh Joshi

    2004-04-01

    In D. melanogaster, the observation of greater pupation height under constant darkness than under constant light has been explained by the hypothesis that light has an inhibitory effect on larval wandering behaviour, preventing larvae from crawling higher up the walls of culture vials prior to pupation. If this is the only role of light in affecting pupation height, then various light : dark regimes would be predicted to yield pupation heights intermediate between those seen in constant light and constant darkness. We tested this hypothesis by measuring pupation height under various light : dark regimes in four laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Pupation height was the greatest in constant darkness, intermediate in constant light, and the least in a light / dark regime of LD 14:14 h. The results clearly suggest that there is more to light regime effects on pupation height than mere behavioural inhibition of wandering larvae, and that circadian organization may play some role in determining pupation height, although the details of this role are not yet clear. We briefly discuss these results in the context of the possible involvement of circadian clocks in life-history evolution.

  14. Quantitative morphometrical analysis of a North African population of Drosophila melanogaster: sexual dimorphism, and comparison with European populations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Chakir; H. Negoua; B. Moreteau; J. R. David

    2008-12-01

    Genetic variability of quantitative traits was investigated in aMoroccan population of Drosophila melanogaster, with an isofemale line design. Results were compared with data previously obtained from French populations. Although the environmental and thermal conditions are very different in France and Morocco, only two significant differences were observed: a shorter wing and a lighter abdomen pigmentation in Morocco. It is, therefore, concluded that Moroccan D. melanogaster are quite typical temperate flies, belonging to the Palaearctic region, and very different from the ancestral Afrotropical populations. Almost all traits were genetically variable, as shown by significant intraclass correlations among lines. Genetic correlations were highly significant among three size-related traits, while much lower between size and bristle numbers. Fluctuating asymmetry was greater for abdominal bristles than for sternopleural bristles. Sex dimorphism, analysed as a female/male ratio, was identical in French and Moroccan populations. Examination of the thorax length/thorax width ratio showed that the thorax is more elongated in females. Sexual dimorphism of wing length was significantly more correlated to thorax width than to thorax length. The results illustrate the value of measuring numerous quantitative traits on the same flies for characterizing the genetic architecture of a natural population. In several cases, and especially for genetic correlations, some interesting suggestions could be made, which should be confirmed, or invalidated, by more extensive investigations.

  15. Fumigant Activity of the Psidium guajava Var. Pomifera (Myrtaceae Essential Oil in Drosophila melanogaster by Means of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ivanildo Pinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guava fruit, Psidium guajava var. pomifera (Myrtaceae family, is a native plant from South America. Its leaves and fruits are widely used in popular medicine in tropical and subtropical countries. Drosophila melanogaster has been used as one of the main model organisms in genetic studies since the 1900s. The extensive knowledge about this species makes it one of the most suitable organisms to study many aspects of toxic compound effects. Due to the lack of studies on the effects of the bioactive compounds present in the P. guajava var. pomifera essential oil, we performed a phytochemical characterization by CG-MS and evaluated the toxicity induced by the essential oil in the D. melanogaster insect model. In order to understand the biochemical mechanisms of toxicity, changes on the Nrf2 signaling as well as hallmarks of oxidative stress response were followed in the exposed flies. Our results showed that exposure of insects to the P. guajava oil increased mortality and locomotor deficits in parallel with an oxidative stress response signaling. Therefore, it suggested a bioinsecticidal activity for P. guajava volatile compounds by means of oxidative stress. Further studies are ongoing to identify which oil compounds are responsible for such effect.

  16. [Transcriptional analysis of the Grp gene, a genomic homolog of the retrotransposon gypsy gag gene, in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, L N; Kuz'min, I V; Burmistrova, D A; Rezazadekh, S; Kim, A I

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, we studied the Grp gene (CG4680, Gag related protein) expression at the transcriptional level. It was found that at the embryonic and larval stages of D. melanogaster development the Grp expression proceeds at a low level, but it significantly increases at the adult stage. Adult individuals display a tissue-specific expression: an eleveated level of transcription is observed in the gut tissues, but not in the chitin carcass, head, and gonads. Since the gut may potentially be a primary barrier for the penetration of a viral infection, we conducted a comparative analysis of Grp gene transcription in D. melanogaster strains differing in the presence of active copies of the gypsy errantivirus and in the status of the flamenco gene controlling sensitivity to errantiviral infections. No noticeable differences in the level of Grp gene transcription were revealed. Thus, the Grp gene is not a pseudogene, but it is a functional gene of the D. melanogaster genome whose role remains to be elucidated. PMID:21954611

  17. Non-apoptotic function of apoptotic proteins in the development of Malpighian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu G Tapadia; Naveen K Gautam

    2011-08-01

    Drosophila metamorphosis is characterized by the histolysis of larval structures by programmed cell death, which paves the way for the establishment of adult-specific structures under the influence of the steroid hormone ecdysone. Malpighian tubules function as an excretory system and are one of the larval structures that are not destroyed during metamorphosis and are carried over to adulthood. The pupal Malpighian tubules evade destruction in spite of expressing apoptotic proteins, Reaper, Hid, Grim, Dronc and Drice. Here we show that in the Malpighian tubules expression of apoptotic proteins commences right from embryonic development and continues throughout the larval stages. Overexpression of these proteins in the Malpighian tubules causes larval lethality resulting in malformed tubules. The number and regular organization of principal and stellate cells of Malpighian tubules is disturbed, in turn disrupting the physiological functioning of the tubules as well. Strikingly, the localization of -tubulin, F-actin and Disclarge (Dlg) is also disrupted. These results suggest that the apoptotic proteins could be having non-apoptotic function in the development of Malpighian tubules.

  18. Muscle structure and innervation are affected by loss of Dorsal in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantera, R; Kozlova, T; Barillas-Mury, C; Kafatos, F C

    1999-02-01

    In Drosophila, the Rel-protein Dorsal and its inhibitor, Cactus, act in signal transduction pathways that control the establishment of dorsoventral polarity during embryogenesis and the immune response during postembryonic life. Here we present data indicating that Dorsal is also involved in the control of development and maintenance of innervation in somatic muscles. Dorsal and Cactus are colocalized in all somatic muscles during postembryonic development. In larvae and adults, these proteins are distributed at low levels in the cytoplasm and nuclei and at much higher levels in the postsynaptic component of glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions. Absence of Dorsal, in homozygous dorsal mutant larvae results in muscle misinsertions, duplications, nuclear hypotrophy, disorganization of actin bundles, and altered subcellular distribution of Cactus. Some muscles show very abnormal neuromuscular junctions, and some motor axon terminals are transformed into growth cone-like structures embedded in synaptotagmin-enriched vesicles. The detailed phenotype suggests a role of Dorsal signalling in the maintenance and plasticity of the NMJ. PMID:10192771

  19. Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Production from Radiolabeled Substrates in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    The power of Drosophila genetics is increasingly being applied to questions of hormone signaling and metabolism and to the development of models of human disease in this organism. Sensitive methods for measurements of parameters such as metabolic rates are needed to drive the understanding of physiology and disease in small animals such as the fruit fly. The method described here assesses fuel oxidation in small numbers of adult flies fed food containing trace amounts of (14)C-labeled substrates such as glucose or fatty acid. After the feeding period and any additional experimental manipulations, flies are transferred to short tubes capped with mesh, which are then placed in glass vials containing KOH-saturated filter paper that traps exhaled, radiolabeled CO2 generated from oxidation of radiolabeled substrates as potassium bicarbonate, KHCO3. This radiolabeled bicarbonate is measured by scintillation counting. This is a quantitative, reproducible, and simple approach for the study of fuel oxidation. The use of radiolabeled glucose, fatty acids, or amino acids allows determination of the contribution of these different fuel sources to energy metabolism under different conditions such as feeding and fasting and in different genetic backgrounds. This complements other approaches used to measure in vivo energy metabolism and should further the understanding of metabolic regulation. PMID:27404635

  20. Regulation of dopamine release by CASK-β modulates locomotor initiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin eSlawson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available CASK is an evolutionarily conserved scaffolding protein that has roles in many cell types. In Drosophila, loss of the entire CASK gene or just the CASK-β transcript causes a complex set of adult locomotor defects. In this study, we show that the motor initiation component of this phenotype is due to loss of CASK-β in dopaminergic neurons and can be specifically rescued by expression of CASK-β within this subset of neurons. Functional imaging demonstrates that mutation of CASK-β disrupts coupling of neuronal activity to vesicle fusion. Consistent with this, locomotor initiation can be rescued by artificially driving activity in dopaminergic neurons. The molecular mechanism underlying this role of CASK-β in dopaminergic neurons involves interaction with Hsc70-4, a molecular chaperone previously shown to regulate calcium-dependent vesicle fusion. These data suggest that there is a novel CASK-β-dependent regulatory complex in dopaminergic neurons that serves to link activity and neurotransmitter release.