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Sample records for adult dentate gyrus

  1. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

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    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  2. Adult neurogenesis modifies excitability of the dentate gyrus

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    Taruna eIkrar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult-born dentate granule neurons contribute to memory encoding functions of the dentate gyrus (DG such as pattern separation. However, local circuit-mechanisms by which adult-born neurons partake in this process are poorly understood. Computational, neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that sparseness of activation in the granule cell layer (GCL is conducive for pattern separation. A sparse coding scheme is thought to facilitate the distribution of similar entorhinal inputs across the GCL to decorrelate overlapping representations and minimize interference. Here we used fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging combined with laser photostimulation and electrical stimulation to examine how selectively increasing adult DG neurogenesis influences local circuit activity and excitability. We show that DG of mice with more adult-born neurons exhibits decreased strength of neuronal activation and more restricted excitation spread in GCL while maintaining effective output to CA3c. Conversely, blockade of adult hippocampal neurogenesis changed excitability of the DG in the opposite direction. Analysis of GABAergic inhibition onto mature dentate granule neurons in the DG of mice with more adult-born neurons shows a modest readjustment of perisomatic inhibitory synaptic gain without changes in overall inhibitory tone, presynaptic properties or GABAergic innervation pattern. Retroviral labeling of connectivity in mice with more adult-born neurons showed increased number of excitatory synaptic contacts of adult-born neurons onto hilar interneurons. Together, these studies demonstrate that adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies excitability of mature dentate granule neurons and that this non-cell autonomous effect may be mediated by local circuit mechanisms such as excitatory drive onto hilar interneurons. Modulation of DG excitability by adult-born dentate granule neurons may enhance sparse coding in the GCL to influence pattern

  3. Effects of NOS inhibitor on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury in the adult rats

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    SunLi-Sha; XuJiang-ping

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury (DBI) in the adult rat brain. Methods Adult male SD rats were subjected to diffuse brain injury (DBI) model. By using systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells, we compared the proliferation rate of

  4. JAGGED1 IS NECESSARY FOR POSTNATAL AND ADULT NEUROGENESIS IN THE DENTATE GYRUS

    OpenAIRE

    Lavado, Alfonso; Oliver, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the maintenance of neural stem cells is crucial for the study of neurogenesis. In the brain, granule cell neurogenesis occurs during development and adulthood, and the generation of new neurons in the adult subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus contributes to learning. Notch signaling plays an important role during postnatal and adult subgranular zone neurogenesis, and it has been suggested as a potential candidate to couple cell proliferation with st...

  5. Inverse relationship between adult hippocampal cell proliferation and synaptic rewiring in the dentate gyrus.

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    Butz, Markus; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Grafen, Keren; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2008-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is a key feature of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Neurogenesis is accompanied by synaptogenesis as new cells become integrated into the circuitry of the hippocampus. However, little is known to what extent the embedding of new neurons rewires the pre-existing network. Here we investigate synaptic rewiring in the DG of gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) under different rates of adult cell proliferation caused by different rearing conditions as well as juvenile methamphetamine treatment. Surprisingly, we found that an increased cell proliferation reduced the amount of synaptic rewiring. To help explain this unexpected finding, we developed a novel model of dentate network formation incorporating neurogenesis and activity-dependent synapse formation and remodelling. In the model, we show that homeostasis of neuronal activity can account for the inverse relationship between cell proliferation and synaptic rewiring. PMID:18481284

  6. Doublecortin (DCX) is not Essential for Survival and Differentiation of Newborn Neurons in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus

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    Dhaliwal, Jagroop; Xi, Yanwei; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Germain, Johanne; Francis, Fiona; Lagace, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    In the adult brain, expression of the microtubule-associated protein Doublecortin (DCX) is associated with neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that give rise to new neurons in the dentate gyrus. Many studies quantify the number of DCX-expressing cells as a proxy for the level of adult neurogenesis, yet no study has determined the effect of removing DCX from adult hippocampal NPCs. Here, we use a retroviral and inducible mouse transgenic approach to either knockdown or knockout DCX from adult NPCs in the dentate gyrus and examine how this affects cell survival and neuronal maturation. Our results demonstrate that shRNA-mediated knockdown of DCX or Cre-mediated recombination in floxed DCX mice does not alter hippocampal neurogenesis and does not change the neuronal fate of the NPCs. Together these findings show that the survival and maturation of adult-generated hippocampal neurons does not require DCX. PMID:26793044

  7. Regrowing the adult brain: NF-κB controls functional circuit formation and tissue homeostasis in the dentate gyrus.

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    Yvonne Imielski

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders.

  8. Functional Analysis of Neurovascular Adaptations to Exercise in the Dentate Gyrus of Young Adult Mice Associated With Cognitive Gain

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    Clark, Peter J.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Puchalski, Emily K.; Krone, David A.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that aerobic exercise increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and can enhance cognitive performance holds promise as a model for regenerative medicine. This study adds two new pieces of information to the rapidly growing field. First, we tested whether exercise increases vascular density in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus, whole hippocampus, and striatum in C57BL/6J mice known to display procognitive effects of exercise. Second, we determined the extent to which new neu...

  9. Analyzing dendritic growth in a population of immature neurons in the adult dentate gyrus using laminar quantification of disjointed dendrites

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    ShiraRosenzweig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, new granule neurons are continuously produced throughout adult life. A prerequisite for the successful synaptic integration of these neurons is the sprouting and extension of dendrites into the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Thus, studies aimed at investigating the developmental stages of adult neurogenesis often use dendritic growth as an important indicator of neuronal health and maturity. Based on the known topography of the dentate gyrus, characterized by distinct laminar arrangement of granule neurons and their extensions, we have developed a new method for analysis of dendritic growth in immature adult-born granule neurons. The method is comprised of laminar quantification of cell bodies, primary, secondary and tertiary dendrites separately and independently from each other. In contrast to most existing methods, laminar quantification of dendrites does not require the use of exogenous markers and does not involve arbitrary selection of individual neurons. The new method relies on immonuhistochemical detection of endogenous markers such as doublecortin to perform a comprehensive analysis of a sub-population of immature neurons. Disjointed, “orphan” dendrites that often appear in the thin histological sections are taken into account. Using several experimental groups of rats and mice, we demonstrate here the suitable techniques for quantifying neurons and dendrites, and explain how the ratios between the quantified values can be used in a comparative analysis to indicate variations in dendritic growth and complexity.

  10. Dynamics of cell proliferation in the adult dentate gyrus of two inbred strains of mice

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    Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    The output potential of proliferating populations in either the developing or the adult nervous system is critically dependent on the length of the cell cycle (T(c)) and the size of the proliferating population. We developed a new approach for analyzing the cell cycle, the 'Saturate and Survive Method' (SSM), that also reveals the dynamic behaviors in the proliferative population and estimates of the size of the proliferating population. We used this method to analyze the proliferating population of the adult dentate gyrus in 60 day old mice of two inbred strains, C57BL/6J and BALB/cByJ. The results show that the number of cells labeled by exposure to BUdR changes dramatically with time as a function of the number of proliferating cells in the population, the length of the S-phase, cell division, the length of the cell cycle, dilution of the S-phase label, and cell death. The major difference between C57BL/6J and BALB/cByJ mice is the size of the proliferating population, which differs by a factor of two; the lengths of the cell cycle and the S-phase and the probability that a newly produced cell will die within the first 10 days do not differ in these two strains. This indicates that genetic regulation of the size of the proliferating population is independent of the genetic regulation of cell death among those newly produced cells. The dynamic changes in the number of labeled cells as revealed by the SSM protocol also indicate that neither single nor repeated daily injections of BUdR accurately measure 'proliferation.'.

  11. Dentate Gyrus-Specific Knockdown of Adult Neurogenesis Impairs Spatial and Object Recognition Memory in Adult Rats

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    Jessberger, Sebastian; Clark, Robert E.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Clemenson, Gregory D., Jr.; Consiglio, Antonella; Lie, D. Chichung; Squire, Larry R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    New granule cells are born throughout life in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Given the fundamental role of the hippocampus in processes underlying certain forms of learning and memory, it has been speculated that newborn granule cells contribute to cognition. However, previous strategies aiming to causally link newborn neurons…

  12. Lentiviral Silencing of GSK-3β in Adult Dentate Gyrus Impairs Contextual Fear Memory and Synaptic Plasticity

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    Benjamin eChew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Attempts have been made to use glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β inhibitors for prophylactic treatment of neurocognitive conditions. However the use of lithium, a non-specific inhibitor of GSK3β results in mild cognitive impairment in humans. The effects of global GSK3β inhibition or knockout on learning and memory in healthy adult mice are also inconclusive. Our study aims to better understand the role of GSK3β in learning and memory through a more regionally, targeted approach, specifically performing lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GSK3β within the dentate gyrus (DG. DG-GSK3β-silenced mice showed impaired contextual fear memory retrieval. However, cue fear memory, spatial memory, locomotor activity and anxiety levels were similar to control. These GSK3β-silenced mice also showed increased induction and maintenance of dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (DG-LTP compared to control animals. Thus, this region-specific, targeted knockdown of GSK3β in the DG provides better understanding on the role of GSK3β in learning and memory.

  13. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

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    Friederike Klempin

    Full Text Available The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise, also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  14. Effects of hypothyroidism upon the granular layer of the dentate gyrus in male and female adult rats: a morphometric study.

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    Madeira, M D; Cadete-Leite, A; Andrade, J P; Paula-Barbosa, M M

    1991-12-01

    The effects of hypothyroidism upon the structure of the central nervous system of adult rats are poorly understood in spite of evidence that the mature brain is vulnerable to this condition. Existing developmental studies show that the morphological changes induced by thyroid hormone deficiency are related to alterations in neurogenesis. We studied the granular layer of the dentate gyrus under different experimental conditions of hypothyroidism, because in rodents the neurogenesis of the granule cells continues during adulthood. The following groups of rats were analysed: 1) control; 2) hypothyroid from day 0 until day 180 (hypothyroid group); 3) hypothyroid until day 30 and henceforth maintained euthyroid (recovery group); and 4) hypothyroid since day 30 (adult hypothyroid group). Groups of 6 male rats and 6 female rats were analysed separately. The volume of the dentate gyrus granular layer and the numerical density of its neurons were evaluated, so we were able to estimate the total number of granule cells. Because in the experimental groups the volume of the granular layer and the numerical density of its neurons were reduced, the total number of granule cells was decreased. In the hypothyroid and recovery groups the alterations were identical and more striking than in the adult hypothyroid groups. The total number of granule cells displayed sexual differences in all groups studied except in the hypothyroid groups. The present results support the view that thyroid hormone deficiency interferes with the process of cell acquisition by reducing neuronal proliferation and that it also leads to increased cell death. These events underlie the irreversible morphological changes observed in the brain of hypothyroid rats, either during development or at maturity. The referred structural alterations are probably related to the functional deficits observed in this condition. PMID:1797872

  15. Impaired adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    José J Rodríguez

    Full Text Available It has become generally accepted that new neurones are added and integrated mainly in two areas of the mammalian CNS, the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, which is of central importance in learning and memory. The newly generated cells display neuronal morphology, are able to generate action potentials and receive functional synaptic inputs, i.e. their properties are similar to those found in mature neurones. Alzheimer's disease (AD is the primary and widespread cause of dementia and is an age-related, progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease that deteriorates cognitive functions. Here, we have used male and female triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD harbouring three mutant genes (beta-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin-1 and tau and their respective non-transgenic (non-Tg controls at 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months of age to establish the link between AD and neurogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry we determined the area density of proliferating cells within the SGZ of the DG, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3, and their possible co-localisation with GFAP to exclude a glial phenotype. Less than 1% of the HH3 labeled cells co-localised with GFAP. Both non-Tg and 3xTg-AD showed an age-dependent decrease in neurogenesis. However, male 3xTg-AD mice demonstrated a further reduction in the production of new neurones from 9 months of age (73% decrease and a complete depletion at 12 months, when compared to controls. In addition, female 3xTg-AD mice showed an earlier but equivalent decrease in neurogenesis at 4 months (reduction of 63% with an almost inexistent rate at 12 months (88% decrease compared to controls. This reduction in neurogenesis was directly associated with the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and an increase in the number of beta-amyloid containing neurones in the hippocampus; which in the case of 3xgTg females was directly correlated. These

  16. GDNF facilitates differentiation of the adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells into astrocytes via STAT3

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    Boku, Shuken, E-mail: shuboku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nakagawa, Shin [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takamura, Naoki [Pharmaceutical Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Kato, Akiko [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takebayashi, Minoru [Department of Psychiatry, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center, Kure (Japan); Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue [Department of Pharmacology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Omiya, Yuki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kusumi, Ichiro [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •GDNF has no effect on ADP proliferation and apoptosis. •GDNF increases ADP differentiation into astrocyte. •A specific inhibitor of STAT3 decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •STAT3 knockdown by lentiviral shRNA vector also decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •GDNF increases the phosphorylation of STAT3. -- Abstract: While the pro-neurogenic actions of antidepressants in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) are thought to be one of the mechanisms through which antidepressants exert their therapeutic actions, antidepressants do not increase proliferation of neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Because previous studies showed that antidepressants increase the expression and secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in C6 glioma cells derived from rat astrocytes and GDNF increases neurogenesis in adult DG in vivo, we investigated the effects of GDNF on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cultured neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Data showed that GDNF facilitated the differentiation of neural precursor cells into astrocytes but had no effect on their proliferation or apoptosis. Moreover, GDNF increased the phosphorylation of STAT3, and both a specific inhibitor of STAT3 and lentiviral shRNA for STAT3 decreased their differentiation into astrocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that GDNF facilitates astrogliogenesis from neural precursor cells in adult DG through activating STAT3 and that this action might indirectly affect neurogenesis.

  17. GDNF facilitates differentiation of the adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells into astrocytes via STAT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •GDNF has no effect on ADP proliferation and apoptosis. •GDNF increases ADP differentiation into astrocyte. •A specific inhibitor of STAT3 decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •STAT3 knockdown by lentiviral shRNA vector also decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •GDNF increases the phosphorylation of STAT3. -- Abstract: While the pro-neurogenic actions of antidepressants in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) are thought to be one of the mechanisms through which antidepressants exert their therapeutic actions, antidepressants do not increase proliferation of neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Because previous studies showed that antidepressants increase the expression and secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in C6 glioma cells derived from rat astrocytes and GDNF increases neurogenesis in adult DG in vivo, we investigated the effects of GDNF on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cultured neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Data showed that GDNF facilitated the differentiation of neural precursor cells into astrocytes but had no effect on their proliferation or apoptosis. Moreover, GDNF increased the phosphorylation of STAT3, and both a specific inhibitor of STAT3 and lentiviral shRNA for STAT3 decreased their differentiation into astrocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that GDNF facilitates astrogliogenesis from neural precursor cells in adult DG through activating STAT3 and that this action might indirectly affect neurogenesis

  18. In Vivo Targeting of Adult Neural Stem Cells in the Dentate Gyrus by a Split-Cre Approach

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    Ruth Beckervordersandforth; Aditi Deshpande; Iris Schäffner; Hagen B. Huttner; Alexandra Lepier; Dieter Chichung Lie; Magdalena Götz

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the labeling of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in the mouse and human dentate gyrus (DG) by the combinatorial expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Prominin1, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. Split-Cre-based genetic fate mapping of these double-positive cells in the adult murine DG reveals their NSC identity, as they are self-renewing and contribute to neurogenesis over several months. Their progeny reacts to stimuli such as voluntary exercise with ...

  19. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

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    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex. PMID:26179319

  20. Usp9x-deficiency disrupts the morphological development of the postnatal hippocampal dentate gyrus.

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    Oishi, Sabrina; Premarathne, Susitha; Harvey, Tracey J; Iyer, Swati; Dixon, Chantelle; Alexander, Suzanne; Burne, Thomas H J; Wood, Stephen A; Piper, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Within the adult mammalian brain, neurogenesis persists within two main discrete locations, the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles, and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Neurogenesis within the adult dentate gyrus contributes to learning and memory, and deficiencies in neurogenesis have been linked to cognitive decline. Neural stem cells within the adult dentate gyrus reside within the subgranular zone (SGZ), and proteins intrinsic to stem cells, and factors within the niche microenvironment, are critical determinants for development and maintenance of this structure. Our understanding of the repertoire of these factors, however, remains limited. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP9X has recently emerged as a mediator of neural stem cell identity. Furthermore, mice lacking Usp9x exhibit a striking reduction in the overall size of the adult dentate gyrus. Here we reveal that the development of the postnatal SGZ is abnormal in mice lacking Usp9x. Usp9x conditional knockout mice exhibit a smaller hippocampus and shortened dentate gyrus blades from as early as P7. Moreover, the analysis of cellular populations within the dentate gyrus revealed reduced stem cell, neuroblast and neuronal numbers and abnormal neuroblast morphology. Collectively, these findings highlight the critical role played by USP9X in the normal morphological development of the postnatal dentate gyrus. PMID:27181636

  1. Fine processes of Nestin-GFP-positive radial glia-like stem cells in the adult dentate gyrus ensheathe local synapses and vasculature.

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    Moss, Jonathan; Gebara, Elias; Bushong, Eric A; Sánchez-Pascual, Irene; O'Laoi, Ruadhan; El M'Ghari, Imane; Kocher-Braissant, Jacqueline; Ellisman, Mark H; Toni, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis relies on the activation of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus, their division, and differentiation of their progeny into mature granule neurons. The complex morphology of radial glia-like (RGL) stem cells suggests that these cells establish numerous contacts with the cellular components of the neurogenic niche that may play a crucial role in the regulation of RGL stem cell activity. However, the morphology of RGL stem cells remains poorly described. Here, we used light microscopy and electron microscopy to examine Nestin-GFP transgenic mice and provide a detailed ultrastructural reconstruction analysis of Nestin-GFP-positive RGL cells of the dentate gyrus. We show that their primary processes follow a tortuous path from the subgranular zone through the granule cell layer and ensheathe local synapses and vasculature in the inner molecular layer. They share the ensheathing of synapses and vasculature with astrocytic processes and adhere to the adjacent processes of astrocytes. This extensive interaction of processes with their local environment could allow them to be uniquely receptive to signals from local neurons, glia, and vasculature, which may regulate their fate. PMID:27091993

  2. Involvement of over-expressed BMP4 in pentylenetetrazol kindling-induced cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult rats

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    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is one of a few regions in the adult mammalian brain characterized by ongoing neurogenesis. Proliferation of neural precursors in the granule cell layer of the DG has been identified in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) kindling epilepsy model, however, little is known about the molecular mechanism. We previously reported that the expression pattern of bone morphogenetic proteins-4 (BMP4) mRNA in the hippocampus was developmentally regulated and mainly localized in the DG of the adult. To explore the role of BMP4 in epileptic activity, we detected BMP4 expression in the DG during PTZ kindling process and explore its correlation with cell proliferation combined with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling technique. We found that dynamic changes in BMP4 level and BrdU labeled cells dependent on the kindling stage of PTZ induced seizure-prone state. The number of BMP4 mRNA-positive cells and BrdU labeled cells reached the top level 1 day after PTZ kindled, then declined to base level 2 months later. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between increased BMP4 mRNA expression and increased number of BrdU labeled cells. After effectively blocked expression of BMP4 with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(ASODN), the BrdU labeled cells in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone(DG-SGZ) and hilus were significantly decreased 16d after First PTZ injection and 1, 3, 7, 14d after kindled respectively. These findings suggest that increased proliferation in the DG of the hippocampus resulted from kindling epilepsy elicited by PTZ maybe be modulated by BMP4 over-expression

  3. Early natural stimulation through environmental enrichment accelerates neuronal development in the mouse dentate gyrus.

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    Na Liu

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus is the primary afferent into the hippocampal formation, with important functions in learning and memory. Granule cells, the principle neuronal type in the dentate gyrus, are mostly formed postnatally, in a process that continues into adulthood. External stimuli, including environmental enrichment, voluntary exercise and learning, have been shown to significantly accelerate the generation and maturation of dentate granule cells in adult rodents. Whether, and to what extent, such environmental stimuli regulate the development and maturation of dentate granule cells during early postnatal development is largely unknown. Furthermore, whether natural stimuli affect the synaptic properties of granule cells had been investigated neither in newborn neurons of the adult nor during early development. To examine the effect of natural sensory stimulation on the dentate gyrus, we reared newborn mice in an enriched environment (EE. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that dentate granule cells from EE-reared mice exhibited earlier morphological maturation, manifested as faster peaking of doublecortin expression and elevated expression of mature neuronal markers (including NeuN, calbindin and MAP2 at the end of the second postnatal week. Also at the end of the second postnatal week, we found increased density of dendritic spines across the entire dentate gyrus, together with elevated levels of postsynaptic scaffold (post-synaptic density 95 and receptor proteins (GluR2 and GABA(ARγ2 of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Furthermore, dentate granule cells of P14 EE-reared mice had lower input resistances and increased glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. Together, our results demonstrate that EE-rearing promotes morphological and electrophysiological maturation of dentate granule cells, underscoring the importance of natural environmental stimulation on development of the dentate gyrus.

  4. Protease-activated receptor-1 negatively regulates proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells derived from the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the adult mouse.

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    Tanaka, Masayuki; Yoneyama, Masanori; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Taro; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2016-07-01

    Thrombin-activated protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 regulates the proliferation of neural cells following brain injury. To elucidate the involvement of PAR-1 in the neurogenesis that occurs in the adult hippocampus, we examined whether PAR-1 regulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the murine hippocampal dentate gyrus. NPC cultures expressed PAR-1 protein and mRNA encoding all subtypes of PAR. Direct exposure of the cells to thrombin dramatically attenuated the cell proliferation without causing cell damage. This thrombin-induced attenuation was almost completely abolished by the PAR antagonist RWJ 56110, as well as by dabigatran and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF), which are selective and non-selective thrombin inhibitors, respectively. Expectedly, the PAR-1 agonist peptide (AP) SFLLR-NH2 also attenuated the cell proliferation. The cell proliferation was not affected by the PAR-1 negative control peptide RLLFT-NH2, which is an inactive peptide for PAR-1. Independently, we determined the effect of in vivo treatment with AEBSF or AP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mouse. The administration of AEBSF, but not that of AP, significantly increased the number of newly-generated cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone. These data suggest that PAR-1 negatively regulated adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus by inhibiting the proliferative activity of the NPCs. PMID:27426918

  5. Microglia engulf viable newborn cells in the epileptic dentate gyrus.

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    Luo, Cong; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Microglia, which are the brain's resident immune cells, engulf dead neural progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG). The number of newborn cells in the SGZ increases significantly after status epilepticus (SE), but whether and how microglia regulate the number of newborn cells after SE remain unclear. Here, we show that microglia rapidly eliminate newborn cells after SE by primary phagocytosis, a process by which viable cells are engulfed, thereby regulating the number of newborn cells that are incorporated into the DG. The number of newborn cells in the DG was increased at 5 days after SE in the adult mouse brain but rapidly decreased to the control levels within a week. During this period, microglia in the DG were highly active and engulfed newborn cells. We found that the majority of engulfed newborn cells were caspase-negative viable cells. Finally, inactivation of microglia with minocycline maintained the increase in the number of newborn cells after SE. Furthermore, minocycline treatment after SE induced the emergence of hilar ectopic granule cells. Thus, our findings suggest that microglia may contribute to homeostasis of the dentate neurogenic niche by eliminating excess newborn cells after SE via primary phagocytosis. GLIA 2016;64:1508-1517. PMID:27301702

  6. Effects of exercise on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and ability of learning and memory after hippocampus lesion in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin CHEN; Shan GONG; Li-Dong SHAN; Wei-Ping XU; Yue-Jin ZHANG; Shi-Yu GUO; Tadashi Hisamitsu; Qi-Zhang YIN; Xing-Hong JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of exercise on dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis and the ability of learning and memory in hippocampus-lesioned adult rats. Methods Hippocampus lesion was produced by intrahippocampal microinjection of kainic acid (KA). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label dividing cells. Y maze test was used to evaluate the ability of learning and memory. Exercise was conducted in the form of forced running in a motor-driven running wheel. The speed of wheel revolution was regulated at 3 kinds of intensity: lightly running, moderately running, or heavily running. Results Hippocampus lesion could increase the number of BrdU-labeled DG cells, moderately running after lesion could further enhance the number of BrdU-labeled cells and decrease the error number (EN) in Y maze test,while neither lightly running, nor heavily running had such effects. There was a negative correlation between the number of DG BrdU-labeled cells and the EN in the Y maze test after running. Conclusion Moderate exercise could enhance the DG neurogenesis and ameliorate the ability of learning and memory in hippocampus-lesioned rats.

  7. Comparison of the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and intestinal crypt of adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study compared the dose-response curves for the frequency of apoptosis in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and intestinal crypt using whole-body gamma irradiation. The incidence of gamma-ray-induced apoptosis was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end-labelling (TUNEL) method. TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei in the DG and intestinal crypt were increased in a dose-dependent pattern (0-2 Gy). The dose-response curves were linear-quadratic, with a significant relationship between the appearance of apoptosis and irradiation dose. The slopes of the dose-response curves in the DG were much steeper (∼5-6-fold) than those in the intestinal crypt within the range of 0-1 Gy exposure. Hippocampal DG might be a more effective and sensitive evaluation structure than the intestinal crypt to estimate the degree of radiation exposure in damaged organs of adult mice exposed to low irradiation dose. copy; The Author 2011. Published by Oxford Univ. Press. All rights reserved. (authors)

  8. Potential implications of a monosynaptic pathway from mossy cells to adult-born granule cells of the dentate gyrus.

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    Helen Scharfman

    2015-08-01

    Here we first review fundamental information about MCs and the current hypotheses for their role in the normal DG and in diseases that involve the DG. Then we review previously published data which suggest that MCs are a source of input to a subset of GCs that are born in adulthood (adult-born GCs. In addition, we discuss the evidence that adult-born GCs may support the normal inhibitory 'gate' functions of the DG, where the GCs are a filter or gate for information from the entorhinal cortical input to area CA3. The implications are then discussed in the context of seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. In TLE, it has been suggested that the DG inhibitory gate is weak or broken and MC loss leads to insufficient activation of inhibitory neurons, causing hyperexcitability. That idea was called the “dormant basket cell hypothesis.” Recent data suggest that loss of normal adult-born GCs may also cause disinhibition, and seizure susceptibility. Therefore, we propose a reconsideration of the dormant basket cell hypothesis with an intervening adult-born GC between the MC and basket cell and call this hypothesis the “dormant immature granule cell hypothesis.”

  9. Lithium, but Not Fluoxetine or the Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor 1 Receptor Antagonist R121919, Increases Cell Proliferation in the Adult Dentate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Nicola D; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Owens, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Several antidepressant drugs have previously been reported to increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in laboratory animals. We found no effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine or the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist R121919 [3-[6-(dimethylamino)-4-methylpyridin-3-yl]-2,5-dimethyl-N,N-dipropyl-1H-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-8-ium-7-amine] on the rate of cell proliferation or hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRN...

  10. Seipin knockout in mice impairs stem cell proliferation and progenitor cell differentiation in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus via reduced levels of PPARγ

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    Guoxi Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The seipin gene (BSCL2 was originally identified in humans as a loss-of-function gene associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 2 (CGL2. Neuronal seipin-knockout (seipin-nKO mice display a depression-like phenotype with a reduced level of hippocampal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. The present study investigated the influence of seipin deficiency on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and the underlying mechanisms of the effects. We show that the proliferative capability of stem cells in seipin-nKO mice was substantially reduced compared to in wild-type (WT mice, and that this could be rescued by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (rosi. In seipin-nKO mice, neuronal differentiation of progenitor cells was inhibited, with the enhancement of astrogliogenesis; both of these effects were recovered by rosi treatment during early stages of progenitor cell differentiation. In addition, rosi treatment could correct the decline in hippocampal ERK2 phosphorylation and cyclin A mRNA level in seipin-nKO mice. The MEK inhibitor U0126 abolished the rosi-rescued cell proliferation and cyclin A expression in seipin-nKO mice. In seipin-nKO mice, the hippocampal Wnt3 protein level was less than that in WT mice, and there was a reduction of neurogenin 1 (Neurog1 and neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD1 mRNA, levels of which were corrected by rosi treatment. STAT3 phosphorylation (Tyr705 was enhanced in seipin-nKO mice, and was further elevated by rosi treatment. Finally, rosi treatment for 10 days could alleviate the depression-like phenotype in seipin-nKO mice, and this alleviation was blocked by the MEK inhibitor U0126. The results indicate that, by reducing PPARγ, seipin deficiency impairs proliferation and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells, respectively, in the adult DG, which might be responsible for the production of the depression-like phenotype in seipin-nKO mice.

  11. Brief Novelty Exposure Facilitates Dentate Gyrus LTP in Aged Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra-Mercado, Demetrio; Dieguez, Dario; Barea-Rodriguez, Edwin J.

    2008-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decreased capacity for dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell depolarization as well as reduced perforant path activation. Although it is well established that the maintenance of DG long-term potentiation (LTP) over days is impaired in aged, as compared to young animals, the threshold for inducing this LTP has never been investigated in aged, awake animals. In addition, although exposure to novelty prior to θ-burst stimulation (TBS) increases both the induction and longevi...

  12. Hilar mossy cells of the dentate gyrus: a historical perspective

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    Helen E Scharfman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The circuitry of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is unique compared to other hippocampal subfields because there are two glutamatergic principal cells instead of one: granule cells, which are the vast majority of the cells in the dentate gyrus, and the so-called ‘mossy cells.’ The distinctive appearance of mossy cells, the extensive divergence of their axons, and their vulnerability to excitotoxicity relative to granule cells has led to a great deal of interest in mossy cells. Nevertheless, there is no consensus about the normal functions of mossy cells and the implications of their vulnerability. There even seems to be some ambiguity about exactly what mossy cells are. Here we review initial studies of mossy cells, characteristics that define them, and suggest a practical definition to allow investigators to distinguish mossy cells from other hilar neurons even if all morphological and physiological information is unavailable due to technical limitations of their experiments. In addition, hypotheses are discussed about the role of mossy cells in the dentate gyrus network, reasons for their vulnerability and their implications for disease.

  13. Postnatal changes in glucose transporter 3 expression in the dentate gyrus of the C57BL/6 mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyo Young; Yim, Hee Sun; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Chung, Jin Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Kim, Dae Won

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we observed the ontogenetic changes in glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) immunoreactivity, a major neuronal GLUT, in the dentate gyrus of mouse brains at various ages: postnatal day (P) 1, 7, 14, 28, and 56. At P1, cresyl violet staining showed abundant neurons in the dentate gyrus, whereas the granule cell layer was ill-defined. At P7, the granule cell layer was observed, and cresyl violet-positive cells were dispersed throughout the polymorphic layer. At P14, the granule cell layer was well-defined, and cresyl violet positive cells were detected abundantly in the polymorphic layer. At P28 and P56, cresyl violet-positive cells were observed in the granule cell layer, as well as in the polymorphic layer. At P1, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was detected in the dentate gyrus. At P7, GLUT3 immunoreactive cells were scattered in the polymorphic and molecular layer. However, at P14, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was observed in the polymorphic layer as well as subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. At P28, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was detected in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus. At P56, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was observed predominantly in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. GLUT3 immunoreactive cells were mainly colocalized with doublecortin, which is a marker for differentiated neuroblasts, in the polymorphic layer and subgranular zone of dentate gyrus at P14 and P56. These results suggest that the expression of GLUT3 is closely associated with postnatal development of the dentate gyrus and adult neurogenesis. PMID:27051437

  14. Ablation of hippocampal neurogenesis impairs contextual fear conditioning and synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Saxe, Michael D.; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Jing-wen; Malleret, Gael; David, Denis J.; Monckton, James E.; Garcia, A. Denise R.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Kandel, Eric R.; Santarelli, Luca; Hen, René; Drew, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Although hippocampal neurogenesis has been described in many adult mammals, the functional impact of this process on physiology and behavior remains unclear. In the present study, we used two independent methods to ablate hippocampal neurogenesis and found that each procedure caused a limited behavioral deficit and a loss of synaptic plasticity within the dentate gyrus. Specifically, focal X irradiation of the hippocampus or genetic ablation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive neural ...

  15. Protracted postnatal neurogenesis and radiosensitivity in the rabbit's dentate gyrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hippocampal formation of a 3-month-old rabbit submitted to a 4.5 Gy gamma irradiation a cytologic study with light and electron microscopy allowed us to make clear the dentate gyrus particular radiosensitivity as soon as the first hours after irradiation. The pycnosis lesion observed in the subgranular zone has drawn our attention in particular. We apply ourselves to describe and precise the lesion and its evolution; thanks to an autoradiographic study, we have shown its link with late postnatal neurogenesis which goes on in this zone and at last we have used the subgranular cells 'radiosensitivity as a biological test allowing to compare the various rays' effects (gamma and neutron rays). In the brain of a one-month-old monkey submitted to a 4 Gy total irradiation the same pycnotic lesion is observed: 1) in the dentate gyrus's subgranular zone and 2) in the cerebellum's outer granular layer. These two postnatal proliferative zones remain particularly sensitive to ionizing radiations. (orig.)

  16. Molecular and functional characterization of GAD67-expressing, newborn granule cells in mouse dentate gyrus

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    Carolina eCabezas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs have been suggested to synthesize both GABA and glutamate immediately after birth and under pathological conditions in the adult. Expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67 by GCs during the first few weeks of postnatal development may then allow for transient GABA synthesis and synaptic release from these cells. Here, using the GAD67-EGFP transgenic strain G42, we explored the phenotype of GAD67-expressing GCs in the mouse dentate gyrus. We report a transient, GAD67-driven EGFP expression in differentiating GCs throughout ontogenesis. EGFP expression correlates with the expression of GAD and molecular markers of GABA release and uptake in 2-4 weeks postmitotic GCs. These rather immature cells are able to fire action potentials and are synaptically integrated in the hippocampal network. Yet they show physiological properties that differentiate them from mature GCs. Finally, GAD67-expressing GCs express a specific complement of GABAA receptor subunits as well as distinctive features of synaptic and tonic GABA signaling. Our results reveal that GAD67 expression in dentate gyrus granule cells is a transient marker of late differentiation that persists throughout life and the G42 strain may be used to visualize newborn GCs at a specific, well-defined differentiation stage.

  17. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  18. TIME COURSE AND DISTRIBUTION OF NEURONAL DEGENERATION IN THE DENTATE GYRUS OF RAT AFTER ADRENALECTOMY - A SILVER IMPREGNATION STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, D; POSTEMA, F; KORF, J

    1992-01-01

    Recently, Sloviter et al. reported that adrenalectomy (ADX) of young adult rats after 3 months led to a selective loss of granule neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) and that this loss could be prevented by low doses of corticosterone. In the present study, the ADX-induced neuronal degeneration was in

  19. Ramipril mitigates radiation-induced impairment of neurogenesis in the rat dentate gyrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublethal doses of whole brain irradiation (WBI) are commonly administered therapeutically and frequently result in late delayed radiation injuries, manifesting as severe and irreversible cognitive impairment. Neural progenitors within the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus are among the most radiosensitive cell types in the adult brain and are known to participate in hippocampal plasticity and normal cognitive function. These progenitors and the specialized SZG microenvironment required for neuronal differentiation are the source of neurogenic potential in the adult dentate gyrus, and provide a continuous supply of immature neurons which may then migrate into the adjacent granule cell layer to become mature granule cell neurons. The extreme radiosensitivity of these progenitors and the SGZ microenvironment suggests the hippocampus as a prime target for radiation-induced cognitive impairment. The brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has previously been implicated as a potent modulator of neurogenesis within the SGZ and selective RAS inhibitors have been implicated as mitigators of radiation brain injury. Here we investigate the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramipril, as a mitigator of radiation injury in this context. Adult male Fisher 344 rats received WBI at doses of 10 Gy and 15 Gy. Ramipril was administered beginning 24 hours post-WBI and maintained continuously for 12 weeks. Ramipril produced small but significant reductions in the deleterious effects of radiation on progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the rat dentate gyrus following 10 Gy-WBI, but was not effective following 15 Gy-WBI. Ramipril also reduced the basal rate of neurogenesis within the SGZ in unirradiated control rats. Our results indicate that chronic ACE inhibition with ramipril, initiated 24 hours post-irradiation, may reduce apoptosis among SGZ progenitors and/or inflammatory disruption of neurogenic signaling within SGZ microenvironment, and

  20. EARLY EFFECTS OF TRIMETHYLTIN ON THE DENTATE GYRUS BASKET CELLS: A MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrophysiological evidence for reduction of recurrent inhibition in the dentate gyrus in animals exposed to trimethyltin (TMT) suggested alterations in the inhibitory neurons (basket cells) by TMT. The present study was designed to investigate the morphology of basket cells af...

  1. Suspension of Mitotic Activity in Dentate Gyrus of the Hibernating Ground Squirrel

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    Victor I. Popov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4–6°C permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  2. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network. PMID:26391451

  3. The lysine acetyltransferase activator Brpf1 governs dentate gyrus development through neural stem cells and progenitors.

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    Linya You

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1 is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.

  4. Mature granule cells of the dentate gyrus-Passive bystanders or principal performers in hippocampal function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rojas, Jeffrey; Kreutz, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    The dentate gyrus is the main entrance of highly processed information to the hippocampus which derives from associative cortices and it is one of the few privileged areas in the brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. This creates the unique situation that neurons of diverse maturation stages are part of one neuronal network at any given point in life. While recently adult-born cells have a low induction threshold for long-term potentiation several studies suggest that following maturation granule cells are poorly excitable and they exhibit reduced Hebbian synaptic plasticity to an extent that it was even suggested that they functionally retire. Here, we review the functional properties of mature granule cells and discuss how plasticity of intrinsic excitability and alterations in excitation-inhibition balance might impact on their role in hippocampal information processing. PMID:26949226

  5. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  6. Specific radiosensitivy and postnatal neurogenesis of the dentate gyrus of rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult and young rabbits were delivered a gamma exposure of 4.5 Gy. A light and electron microscope cytological investigation of the hippocampal region in the early hours following the exposure showed the particular radiosensitivity of the dentate gyrus which was demonstrated by: 1) pycnotic cells to be found at the basis of the granular cell layer (subgranular zone) exclusively; 2) a more discrete injury of the granular layer where most nuclei showed a lighter chromatin appearing as ''light spots''. Both radioinduced injuries are described, especially their kinetics, importance, and the effects of dose and age of the animal. The presence of pycnotic cells in the subgranular zone was related to the late postnatal neurogenesis occurring in this zone. The pattern and chronology of this late postnatal neurogenesis was investigated by autoradiography following 3H thymidine injection. Finally, two series of investigations combining autoradiography and irradiation brought further data on the radiosensitivity and radioresistance of the dental gyrus cells and demonstrated the recovery capacity of the subgranular zone

  7. Evaluation of Spirulina Supplementation on Intermittent Binge Ethanol - Induced Neurotoxicity in Dentate Gyrus of Rats

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    M A Asari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Spirulina is a widely used nutritional supplement which is rich in antioxidants and proteins.  Studies have shown that intermittent binge-like ethanol consumption during adolescent period caused neuronal damage in specific parts of the brain, including the dentate gyrus. It has been suggested that antioxidant therapy may provide some level of protection against neurotoxicity of ethanol at cellular level. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the preventive effects of spirulina supplementation on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in the dentate gyrus of adolescent rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given ethanol (10 g/kg/day, intermittent binge model, or spirulina platensis (1000 mg/kg/day or both from postnatal day 30 for two weeks duration. The cerebral hemispheres were processed for routine histological staining and immunohistochemistry with anti-GFAP antibody.  Ethanol-treated group showed significant deficit in the numbers of granule cells and hilar neurons of the dentate gyrus when compared to the control group. Spirulina supplementation failed to provide protection against ethanol-induced neuronal loss. Spirulina supplementation also failed to alter increased expression of GFAP immunoreactivity induced by ethanol exposure. In conclusion, these findings indicate that spirulina supplementation is not effective in reducing the ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in the dentate gyrus of adolescent rats. Industrial Relevance. Spirulina is one of the widely used nutritional supplements particularly in Asian population. Being a strong antioxidant, spirulina has been shown to have many therapeutic effects in human. However, the question of whether spirulina supplementation is able to mitigate the effect of ethanol neurotoxicity is largely unknown. Therefore, the study was undertaken to investigate the possibility that spirulina supplementation is able to provide some protection against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a rat model

  8. Increases in Doublecortin Immunoreactivity in the Dentate Gyrus following Extinction of Heroin-Seeking Behavior

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    Megan P. Hicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus play a role in various forms of learning and memory. However, adult born neurons in the DG, while still at an immature stage, exhibit unique electrophysiological properties and are also functionally implicated in learning and memory processes. We investigated the effects of extinction of drug-seeking behavior on the formation of immature neurons in the DG as assessed by quantification of doublecortin (DCX immunoreactivity. Rats were allowed to self-administer heroin (0.03 mg/kg/infusion for 12 days and then subjected either to 10 days of extinction training or forced abstinence. We also examined extinction responding patterns following heroin self-administration in glial fibrillary acidic protein thymidine kinase (GFAP-tk transgenic mice, which have been previously demonstrated to show reduced formation of immature and mature neurons in the DG following treatment with ganciclovir (GCV. We found that extinction training increased DCX immunoreactivity in the dorsal DG as compared with animals undergoing forced abstinence, and that GCV-treated GFAP-tk mice displayed impaired extinction learning as compared to saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that extinction of drug-seeking behavior increases the formation of immature neurons in the DG and that these neurons may play a functional role in extinction learning.

  9. Blockade of intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus erases recognition memory via impairment of maintained LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Haruna; Minamino, Tatsuya; Fujii, Hiroaki; Takada, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ando, Masaki; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    There is no evidence on the precise role of synaptic Zn2+ signaling on the retention and recall of recognition memory. On the basis of the findings that intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition, short-term memory, the present study deals with the effect of spatiotemporally blocking Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus after LTP induction and learning. Three-day-maintained LTP was impaired 1 day after injection of clioquinol into the dentate gyrus, which transiently reduced intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus. The irreversible impairment was rescued not only by co-injection of ZnCl2 , which ameliorated the loss of Zn2+ signaling, but also by pre-injection of Jasplakinolide, a stabilizer of F-actin, prior to clioquinol injection. Simultaneously, 3-day-old space recognition memory was impaired 1 day after injection of clioquinol into the dentate gyrus, but not by pre-injection of Jasplakinolide. Jasplakinolide also rescued both impairments of 3-day-maintained LTP and 3-day-old memory after injection of ZnAF-2DA into the dentate gyrus, which blocked intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus. The present paper indicates that the blockade and/or loss of intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus coincidently impair maintained LTP and recognition memory. The mechanism maintaining LTP via intracellular Zn2+ signaling in dentate granule cells, which may be involved in the formation of F-actin, may retain space recognition memory. PMID:25603776

  10. SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY IN THE DENTATE GYRUS OF AGED RATS IS ALTERED AFTER CHRONIC NIMODIPINE APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    deJong, GI; Buwalda, B.; Schuurman, T.; Luiten, PGM

    1992-01-01

    We examined ultrastructural correlates of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of young (3 months) vs aged (30 months) Wistar rats and established the effects of the calcium antagonist nimodipine in animals chronically treated from 24 to 30 months. The effects of nimodipine was studied since this compound improves hippocampal neuronal physiology and enhances cognitive function during aging. In the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus we found a 24% decrease in synaptic density (Nv) in a...

  11. The immature dentate gyrus represents a shared phenotype of mouse models of epilepsy and psychiatric disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Rick; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Hagihara, Hideo; Kogan, Jeffrey H.; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Walton, Noah M.; Gross, Adam K; Heusner, Carrie L.; Chen, Qian; Tamura, Kouichi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is accumulating evidence to suggest psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, share common etiologies, pathophysiologies, genetics, and drug responses with many of the epilepsies. Here, we explored overlaps in cellular/molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotypes between putative mouse models of bipolar disorder/schizophrenia and epilepsy. We tested the hypothesis that an immature dentate gyrus (iDG), whose association with psychosis in ...

  12. Adolescent development of neuron structure in dentate gyrus granule cells of male Syrian hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Zehr, Julia L.; Nichols, Liana R.; Schulz, Kalynn M.; Sisk, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    Hippocampal function, including spatial cognition and stress responses, matures during adolescence. In addition, hippocampal neuron structure is modified by gonadal steroid hormones, which increase dramatically at this time. This study investigated pubertal changes in dendritic complexity of dentate gyrus neurons. Dendrites, spines, and cell bodies of Golgiimpregnated neurons from the granule cell layer were traced in pre-, mid-, and late pubertal male Syrian hamsters (21, 35, and 49 days of ...

  13. Apoptosis and autophagy control cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus following hippocampal lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Zhou; Wei Peng; Qi Zhu; Shan Gong; Lidong Shan; Tadashi Hisamitsu; Shiyu Guo; Xinghong Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Brain injuries often result in the promotion of cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus(DG),but the number of newborn cells declines with time.However,the cause of this decline remains poorly understood.Elucidation of the fate of these newborn cells will further the understanding of the pathological process and treatment of brain injury.In the present study,the number of newborn cells was quantitatively analyzed using an unbiased stereological method following hippocampal lesion by kainic acid,in combination with detection of apoptosis and autophagy.Results revealed that hippocampal lesion resulted in a significantly increased number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine(BrdU)-positive cells in the DG,which subsequently decreased with time.BrdU/cleaved caspase-3 double-labeled cells were detected in the granular cell layer and hilus of DG.However,expressions of LC3-11,Beclin 1,and p53 were upregulated,and pro-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were downregulated.Results indicated that hippocampal lesion in adult rats resulted in significant cell proliferation in the DG,which subsequently reduced with time.In addition,results suggested that apoptosis and autophagic processes could regulate cell proliferation in the DG following hippocampal lesion.

  14. Estradiol rapidly modulates spinogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus: Involvement of kinase networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Yasushi; Munetomo, Arisa; Mukai, Hideo; Ikeda, Muneki; Sato, Rei; Hatanaka, Yusuke; Murakami, Gen; Komatsuzaki, Yoshimasa; Kimoto, Tetsuya; Kawato, Suguru

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Estradiol (E2) is locally synthesized within the hippocampus and the gonads. Rapid modulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by E2 is essential for synaptic regulation. The molecular mechanisms of modulation through the synaptic estrogen receptor (ER) and its downstream signaling, however, are largely unknown in the dentate gyrus (DG). We investigated the E2-induced modulation of dendritic spines in male adult rat hippocampal slices by imaging Lucifer Yellow-injected DG granule cells. Treatments with 1 nM E2 increased the density of spines by approximately 1.4-fold within 2h. Spine head diameter analysis showed that the density of middle-head spines (0.4-0.5 μm) was significantly increased. The E2-induced spine density increase was suppressed by blocking Erk MAPK, PKA, PKC and LIMK. These suppressive effects by kinase inhibitors are not non-specific ones because the GSK-3β antagonist did not inhibit E2-induced spine increase. The ER antagonist ICI 182,780 also blocked the E2-induced spine increase. Taken together, these results suggest that E2 rapidly increases the density of spines through kinase networks that are driven by synaptic ER. PMID:26122288

  15. Enhanced Synaptic Connectivity in the Dentate Gyrus during Epileptiform Activity: Network Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keite Lira de Almeida França

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural rearrangement of the dentate gyrus has been described as the underlying cause of many types of epilepsies, particularly temporal lobe epilepsy. It is said to occur when aberrant connections are established in the damaged hippocampus, as described in human epilepsy and experimental models. Computer modelling of the dentate gyrus circuitry and the corresponding structural changes has been used to understand how abnormal mossy fibre sprouting can subserve seizure generation observed in experimental models when epileptogenesis is induced by status epilepticus. The model follows the McCulloch-Pitts formalism including the representation of the nonsynaptic mechanisms. The neuronal network comprised granule cells, mossy cells, and interneurons. The compensation theory and the Hebbian and anti-Hebbian rules were used to describe the structural rearrangement including the effects of the nonsynaptic mechanisms on the neuronal activity. The simulations were based on neuroanatomic data and on the connectivity pattern between the cells represented. The results suggest that there is a joint action of the compensation theory and Hebbian rules during the inflammatory process that accompanies the status epilepticus. The structural rearrangement simulated for the dentate gyrus circuitry promotes speculation about the formation of the abnormal mossy fiber sprouting and its role in epileptic seizures.

  16. Synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex of mice: effects of deprived rearing and voluntary running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefers, Andrea T U; Grafen, Keren; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud; Winter, York

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal cell proliferation is strongly increased and synaptic turnover decreased after rearing under social and physical deprivation in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). We examined if a similar epigenetic effect of rearing environment on adult neuroplastic responses can be found in mice (Mus musculus). We examined synaptic turnover rates in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. No direct effects of deprived rearing on rates of synaptic turnover were found in any of the studied regions. However, adult wheel running had the effect of leveling layer-specific differences in synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, but not in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum of animals of both rearing treatments. Epigenetic effects during juvenile development affected adult neural plasticity in mice, but seemed to be less pronounced than in gerbils. PMID:20508828

  17. Synaptic Remodeling in the Dentate Gyrus, CA3, CA1, Subiculum, and Entorhinal Cortex of Mice: Effects of Deprived Rearing and Voluntary Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea T. U. Schaefers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal cell proliferation is strongly increased and synaptic turnover decreased after rearing under social and physical deprivation in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus. We examined if a similar epigenetic effect of rearing environment on adult neuroplastic responses can be found in mice (Mus musculus. We examined synaptic turnover rates in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. No direct effects of deprived rearing on rates of synaptic turnover were found in any of the studied regions. However, adult wheel running had the effect of leveling layer-specific differences in synaptic remodeling in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, but not in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum of animals of both rearing treatments. Epigenetic effects during juvenile development affected adult neural plasticity in mice, but seemed to be less pronounced than in gerbils.

  18. Ketamine Affects the Neurogenesis of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus in 7-Day-Old Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Liu, Cun-Ming; Sun, Jie; Hao, Ting; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has been reported to cause neonatal neurotoxicity via a neuronal apoptosis mechanism; however, no in vivo research has reported whether ketamine could affect postnatal neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). A growing number of experiments suggest that postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis is the foundation of maintaining normal hippocampus function into adulthood. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of ketamine on hippocampal neurogenesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: the control group (equal volume of normal saline), and the ketamine-anesthesia group (40 mg/kg ketamine in four injections at 1 h intervals). The S-phase marker 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered after ketamine exposure to postnatal day 7 (PND-7) rats, and the neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG was assessed using single- or double-immunofluorescence staining. The expression of GFAP in the hippocampal DG was measured by western blot analysis. Spatial reference memory was tested by Morris water maze at 2 months after PND-7 rats exposed to ketamine treatment. The present results showed that neonatal ketamine exposure significantly inhibited neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, decreased astrocytic differentiation, and markedly enhanced neuronal differentiation. The disruptive effect of ketamine on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs lasted at least 1 week and disappeared by 2 weeks after ketamine exposure. Moreover, the migration of newborn neurons in the granule cell layer and the growth of astrocytes in the hippocampal DG were inhibited by ketamine on PND-37 and PND-44. Finally, ketamine caused a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory tasks at 2 months old. Our results suggested that ketamine may interfere with hippocampal neurogenesis and long-term neurocognitive function in PND-7 rats. These findings may provide a new perspective to explain the adult neurocognitive dysfunction induced by neonatal

  19. Methamphetamine decreases dentate gyrus stem cell self-renewal and shifts the differentiation towards neuronal fate

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Baptista; Charlène Lasgi; Caroline Benstaali; Nuno Milhazes; Fernanda Borges; Carlos Fontes-Ribeiro; Fabienne Agasse; Ana Paula Silva

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse that negatively interferes with neurogenesis. In fact, we have previously shown that METH triggers stem/progenitor cell death and decreases neuronal differentiation in the dentate gyrus (DG). Still, little is known regarding its effect on DG stem cell properties. Herein, we investigate the impact of METH on mice DG stem/progenitor cell self-renewal functions. METH (10 nM) decreased DG stem cell self-renewal, while 1 nM...

  20. Role of hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons in the protective effects of heat shock factor 1 on working memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Peng; Xiongzhao Zhu; Ming Cheng; Xiangyi Chen; Shuqiao Yao

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that heat shock factor 1 exerts endogenous protective effects on working memory under conditions of chronic psychological stress. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study examined the protective factors affecting working memory in heat shock transcription factor 1 gene knockout mice. The results indicated that the number of correct T maze alternations decreased following mild chronic psychological stress in knockout mice. This change was accompanied by a decrease in neurogenesis and an increase in neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The number of correct T maze alternations was positively correlated with neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus, and negatively correlated with neuronal apoptosis. In wild type mice, no significant difference was detected in the number of correct T maze alternations or neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results indicate that the heat shock factor 1 gene has an endogenous protective role in working memory during mild chronic psychological stress associated with dentate gyrus neuronal apoptosis.Moreover, dentate gyrus neurogenesis appears to participate in the protective mechanism.

  1. Effect of intrauterine hypoxia and Angelica sinensis injection on dentate gyrus neurons and learning and memory in juvenile rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zhao; Yi Han; Jing Ma; Hong Yu; Yan He; Xiaoming Zhong

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study analyzed the effect of 3 days (2 h/d) intrauterine hypoxia on learning and memory in juvenile rats, as well as the therapeutic effects of Angelica sinensis on dentate gyrus neurons, as well as learning and memory.OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of intrauterine hypoxia on hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons, as well as learning and memory, in juvenile rats; to explore N-methyI-D-aspartate receptor-1 (NMDAR1) expression in the dentate gyrus of neonatal rats following intrauterine hypoxia, as well as prolonged hypoxia; to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of Angelica sinensis.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized and controlled experiment based on developmental neurobiology was performed at the Department of Histology and Embryology in Luzhou Medical College from October 2007 to October 2008.MATERIALS: Angelica sinensis solution (250 g/L) was obtained from Central South Hospital of Wuhan University, China. Neuron-specific enolase and NMDAR1 mRNA in situ hybridization reagents were provided by Wuhan Boster Biological Technology, China. Image-Pro Plus 6.0 analysis system was purchased from Media Cybernetics, USA.METHODS: Healthy pregnant Sprague Dawley rats (n = 30) were randomly divided into control (n = 10), hypoxia (n = 10), and Angelica (n = 10) groups. The Angelica and hypoxia pregnant rats were placed in a three-gas incubator (oxygen concentration: 13%) starting with day 14 of pregnancy for 2 hours/day for 5 consecutive days to establish a fetal rat intrauterine hypoxia model. One hour prior to modeling, the pregnant rats from the Angelica and hypoxia groups received Angelica sinensis and normal saline (8 mL/kg) injections, respectively, through the caudal vein. The control group procedures were identical to the hypoxia group, but lacked the hypoxic conditions.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain tissues of neonatal rats were used to detect expression of NMDAR1 mRNA, and brain tissues of juvenile rats aged 30 days were used to determine

  2. Effects of rapamycin treatment after controlled cortical impact injury on neurogenesis and synaptic reorganization in the mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A Boychuk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE is one consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI. A prominent cell signaling pathway activated in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has shown promise as a potential modulator of epileptogenesis in several animal models of epilepsy, but cellular mechanisms linking mTOR expression and epileptogenesis are unclear. In this study, the role of mTOR in modifying functional hippocampal circuit reorganization after focal TBI induced by controlled cortical impact was investigated. Rapamycin (3 or 10 mg/kg, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, was administered by intraperitoneal injection beginning on the day of injury and continued daily until tissue collection. Relative to controls, rapamycin treatment reduced dentate granule cell area in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury two weeks post-injury. Brain injury resulted in a significant increase in doublecortin immunolabeling in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, indicating increased neurogenesis shortly after TBI. Rapamycin treatment prevented the increase in doublecortin labeling, with no overall effect on Fluoro-Jade B staining in the ipsilateral hemisphere, suggesting that rapamycin treatment reduced posttraumatic neurogenesis but did not prevent cell loss after injury. At later times post-injury (8-13 weeks, evidence of mossy fiber sprouting and increased recurrent excitation of dentate granule cells was detected, which were attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin treatment also diminished seizure prevalence relative to vehicle-treated controls after TBI. Collectively, these results support a role for adult neurogenesis in PTE development and suggest that suppression of epileptogenesis by mTOR inhibition includes effects on post-injury neurogenesis.

  3. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 as Predictor of Body Mass Index and Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis: Neuroplasticity and the Metabolic Milieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Coplan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 regulates carbohydrate metabolism and promotes neurogenesis. We reported an inverse correlation between adult body mass and neurogenesis in nonhuman primates. Here we examine relationships between physiological levels of the neurotrophic incretin, plasma GLP-1 (pGLP-1, and body mass index (BMI in adolescence to adult neurogenesis and associations with a diabesity diathesis and infant stress. Morphometry, fasting pGLP-1, insulin resistance, and lipid profiles were measured in early adolescence in 10 stressed and 4 unstressed male bonnet macaques. As adults, dentate gyrus neurogenesis was assessed by doublecortin staining. High pGLP-1, low body weight, and low central adiposity, yet peripheral insulin resistance and high plasma lipids, during adolescence were associated with relatively high adult neurogenesis rates. High pGLP-1 also predicted low body weight with, paradoxically, insulin resistance and high plasma lipids. No rearing effects for neurogenesis rates were observed. We replicated an inverse relationship between BMI and neurogenesis. Adolescent pGLP-1 directly predicted adult neurogenesis. Two divergent processes relevant to human diabesity emerge—high BMI, low pGLP-1, and low neurogenesis and low BMI, high pGLP-1, high neurogenesis, insulin resistance, and lipid elevations. Diabesity markers putatively reflect high nutrient levels necessary for neurogenesis at the expense of peripheral tissues.

  4. Functional interactions between dentate gyrus, striatum and anterior thalamic nuclei on spatial memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Couz, M; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Arias, J L

    2015-04-24

    The standard model of memory system consolidation supports the temporal reorganization of brain circuits underlying long-term memory storage, including interactions between the dorsal hippocampus and extra-hippocampal structures. In addition, several brain regions have been suggested to be involved in the retrieval of spatial memory. In particular, several authors reported a possible role of the ventral portion of the hippocampus together with the thalamus or the striatum in the persistence of this type of memory. Accordingly, the present study aimed to evaluate the contribution of different cortical and subcortical brain regions, and neural networks involved in spatial memory retrieval. For this purpose, we used cytochrome c oxidase quantitative histochemistry as a reliable method to measure brain oxidative metabolism. Animals were trained in a hidden platform task and tested for memory retention immediately after the last training session; one week after completing the task, they were also tested in a memory retrieval probe. Results showed that retrieval of the previously learned task was associated with increased levels of oxidative metabolism in the prefrontal cortex, the dorsal and ventral striatum, the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus and the dentate gyrus of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. The analysis of functional interactions between brain regions suggest that the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus could be involved in spatial memory retrieval. In addition, the results highlight the key role of the extended hippocampal system, thalamus and striatum in this process. Our study agrees with previous ones reporting interactions between the dorsal hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex during spatial memory retrieval. Furthermore, novel activation patterns of brain networks involving the aforementioned regions were found. These functional brain networks could underlie spatial memory retrieval evaluated in the Morris water maze task. PMID:25680583

  5. Ethanol extract ofOenanthe javanica increases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the adolescent rat dentate gyrus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Hui Chen; Jae Chul Lee; Eun Joo Bae; Yun Lyul Lee; Jong Dai Kim; Moo-Ho Won; Il Jun Kang; Joon Ha Park; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Bich Na Shin; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Seok Joon Hwang; Bing Chun Yan; Hyun Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Oenanthe javanica is an aquatic perennial herb that belongs to theOenanthe genus in Apiaceae family, and it displays well-known medicinal properties such as protective effects against glu-tamate-induced neurotoxicity. However, few studies regarding effects ofOenanthe javanica on neurogenesis in the brain have been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of a normal diet and a diet containing ethanol extract ofOenanthe javanica on cell proliferation and neu-roblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adolescent rats using Ki-67 (an endogenous marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for neuroblast). Our results showed thatOenanthe javanica extract signiifcantly increased the number of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells and doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adolescent rats. In addition, the immunoreactivity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was signiifcantly increased in the dentate gyrus of theOe-nanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. However, we did not ifnd that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was increased in theOenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. These results indicate thatOenanthe javanica extract improves cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by increasing brain-de-rived neurotrophic factor immunoreactivity in the rat dentate gyrus.

  6. D1/D5 Receptors and Histone Deacetylation Mediate the Gateway Effect of LTP in Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-You; Lavine, Amir; Kandel, Denise B.; Yin, Deqi; Colnaghi, Luca; Drisaldi, Bettina; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is critical for spatial memory and is also thought to be involved in the formation of drug-related associative memory. Here, we attempt to test an aspect of the Gateway Hypothesis, by studying the effect of consecutive exposure to nicotine and cocaine on long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) in the DG. We…

  7. Ethanol extract of Oenanthe javanica increases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the adolescent rat dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Hui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oenanthe javanica is an aquatic perennial herb that belongs to the Oenanthe genus in Apiaceae family, and it displays well-known medicinal properties such as protective effects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. However, few studies regarding effects of Oenanthe javanica on neurogenesis in the brain have been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of a normal diet and a diet containing ethanol extract of Oenanthe javanica on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adolescent rats using Ki-67 (an endogenous marker for cell proliferation and doublecortin (a marker for neuroblast. Our results showed that Oenanthe javanica extract significantly increased the number of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells and doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adolescent rats. In addition, the immunoreactivity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of the Oenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. However, we did not find that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was increased in the Oenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. These results indicate that Oenanthe javanica extract improves cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor immunoreactivity in the rat dentate gyrus.

  8. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya E Chorna

    Full Text Available Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN, the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  9. The neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide FGL facilitates long-term plasticity in the dentate gyrus in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallérac, Glenn; Zerwas, Meike; Novikova, Tatiana;

    2011-01-01

    beneficial impact on normal memory functioning, as well as to rescue some pathological cognitive impairments. Whether its facilitating impact may be mediated through promoting neuronal plasticity is not known. The present study was therefore designed to test whether FGL modulates the induction and...... maintenance of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus (DG) in vivo. For this, we first assessed the effect of the FGL peptide on synaptic functions at perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses in the anesthetized rat. FGL, or its control inactive peptide, was injected locally 60 min before applying high......-frequency stimulation (HFS) to the medial perforant path. The results suggest that although FGL did not alter basal synaptic transmission, it facilitated both the induction and maintenance of LTP. Interestingly, FGL also modified the heterosynaptic plasticity observed at the neighboring lateral perforant path synapses...

  10. Transcriptional effects of glucocorticoid receptors in the dentate gyrus increase anxiety-related behaviors.

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    Nadège Sarrazin

    Full Text Available The Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR is a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in the brain. Activation of brain GRs by high levels of glucocorticoid (GC hormones modifies a large variety of physiological and pathological-related behaviors. Unfortunately the specific cellular targets of GR-mediated behavioral effects of GC are still largely unknown. To address this issue, we generated a mutated form of the GR called DeltaGR. DeltaGR is a constitutively transcriptionally active form of the GR that is localized in the nuclei and activates transcription without binding to glucocorticoids. Using the tetracycline-regulated system (Tet-OFF, we developed an inducible transgenic approach that allows the expression of the DeltaGR in specific brain areas. We focused our study on a mouse line that expressed DeltaGR almost selectively in the glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus. This restricted expression of the DeltaGR increased anxiety-related behaviors without affecting other behaviors that could indirectly influence performance in anxiety-related tests. This behavioral phenotype was also associated with an up-regulation of the MAPK signaling pathway and Egr-1 protein in the DG. These findings identify glutamatergic neurons in the DG as one of the cellular substrate of stress-related pathologies.

  11. The high dosage of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Bing Chun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Won, Moo-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Earthworm extract has shown anticancer characteristics. In the present study, we examined the effect of chronic treatment with a high dose of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract (EE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of 3-week-old mice using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry for neuroblast differentiation, respectively. BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-i...

  12. Modulation by group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors of depotentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Alexander; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2008-01-01

    In the hippocampus, synaptic depression of potentiated synapses in the form of depotentiation, or of naive synapses in the form of long-term depression (LTD) is mediated by distinct molecular mechanisms. Activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) is critically required for both hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD in vivo, but their involvement in depotentiation is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether this class of mGluRs contributes to depotentiation in freely moving rats. Male adult Wistar rats underwent chronic implantation of stimulating and recording electrodes in the perforant path and dentate gyrus granule cell layer, respectively, as well as an injection cannula in the ipsilateral cerebral ventricle. Robust LTP which endured for over 24 h, was induced by high frequency tetanization (HFT, 200 Hz). Depotentiation was induced with LFS (5 Hz, 600 pulses) given 5 min after the LTP-inducing tetanus was applied. The selective group 1 mGluR antagonists, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine and (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid significantly inhibited both depotentiation and LTP. Activation of group I mGluRs leads to changes in postsynaptic intracellular calcium levels. These findings suggest that activation of group I mGluRs mediate thresholds for depotentiation and for persistent LTP. Effects may be linked to the intensity and duration of the calcium signal elicited by LFS and HFT. PMID:17924526

  13. Role of the group III metabotropic glutamate receptor in LTP, depotentiation and LTD in dentate gyrus of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausnitzer, J; Kulla, A; Manahan-Vaughan, D

    2004-02-01

    We investigated whether group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are critically involved in the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP), depotentiation, or long-term depression (LTD) in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats. Male Wistar rats (7 8 weeks) underwent implantation of stimulating and recording electrodes in the medial perforant path and dentate gyrus granule cell layer, respectively. A cannula was permanently implanted into the ipsilateral cerebral ventricle to enable drug administration. Intracerebral injection of the group III mGlu receptor agonist, L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (AP4), significantly inhibited LTP at a concentration which unaffects basal synaptic transmission. Depotentiation. short-term depression (STD) and LTDwere unaffected by the agonist. The antagonist. (R.S)-r-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG), inhibited agonist effects. but had no independent effects on basal synaptic transmission. CPPG did not affect the profile of LTP, depotentiation or STD elicited by low frequency stimulation (LFS) at 0.5 or 3 Hz. but significantly impaired LTD expression (at I Hz) and STD elicited at 5 Hz. These findings suggest that activation of group III mGlu receptors is critically required for LTD. but not LTP or depotentiation in the dentate gyrus and provide evidence for the involvement of separate mechanisms underlying LTD and depotentiation. PMID:15080077

  14. Effects of bone morphogenetic protein-4 on spatial memory and cholinergic expression in the dentate gyrus after fornix-fimbria transection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Liu; Yilong Xue; Jingkun Pan; Yazhuo Hu; Yuhong Gao; Yun Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous experiments have confirmed bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) upregulate cholinergic expression in neurons isolated from the embryonic rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Therefore, BMPs could be useful for treating Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. OBJECTIVE: BMP-4 was infused into the hippocampal dentate gyrus of fornix-fimbria transected rats to test the effects of BMP-4 on cholinergic expression in dentate gyrus neurons, and to observe changes in spatial memory behavior. DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery and Laboratory for Cell Biology, Institute of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-seven healthy adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 250-300 g, were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of the General Hospital of Chinese PLA. Reagents: BMP-4 (B-2680, Sigma Company) and choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) antibody (AB5042, Chemicon Company) were used in this study. Equipments: a rat stereotaxic instrument (type: SN-2N, Narushige Group, Japan) and Image-prog-plus image analysis software (Media Cybernetics company, USA) were used in this study. The protocol was carried out in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.METHODS: This experiment was performed in the Institute of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA between July 2004 and March 2005. Rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Alzheimer's disease group (n = 7), normal control group (n = 5), BMP-4-Alzheimer's disease group (n = 8), and model group (n = 7). In the Alzheimer's disease group, the left hippocampal fornix-fimbria of rats was transected to mimic Alzheimer's disease symptoms. In the BMP-4-Alzheimer's disease group, 1 μL BMP-4 (10 mg/L) was perfused into the left dentate gyrus with a microinjector at 1 μL/min. In the model group, 1 μL saline was perfused into the same position by the same method. Twenty-eight days after injection

  15. Exercise improves cognitive responses to psychological stress through enhancement of epigenetic mechanisms and gene expression in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have shown previously that exercise benefits stress resistance and stress coping capabilities. Furthermore, we reported recently that epigenetic changes related to gene transcription are involved in memory formation of stressful events. In view of the enhanced coping capabilities in exercised subjects we investigated epigenetic, gene expression and behavioral changes in 4-weeks voluntarily exercised rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exercised and control rats coped differently when exposed to a novel environment. Whereas the control rats explored the new cage for the complete 30-min period, exercised animals only did so during the first 15 min after which they returned to sleeping or resting behavior. Both groups of animals showed similar behavioral responses in the initial forced swim session. When re-tested 24 h later however the exercised rats showed significantly more immobility behavior and less struggling and swimming. If rats were killed at 2 h after novelty or the initial swim test, i.e. at the peak of histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction, then the exercised rats showed a significantly higher number of dentate granule neurons expressing the histone modifications and immediate-early gene induction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, irrespective of the behavioral response in the novel cage or initial forced swim session, the impact of the event at the dentate gyrus level was greater in exercised rats than in control animals. Furthermore, in view of our concept that the neuronal response in the dentate gyrus after forced swimming is involved in memory formation of the stressful event, the observations in exercised rats of enhanced neuronal responses as well as higher immobility responses in the re-test are consistent with the reportedly improved cognitive performance in these animals. Thus, improved stress coping in exercised subjects seems to involve enhanced cognitive capabilities possibly resulting from

  16. Dentate gyrus network dysfunctions precede the symptomatic phase in a genetic mouse model of seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana eToader

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuit disturbances that lead to hyperexcitability in the cortico-hippocampal network are one of the landmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy. The dentate gyrus (DG network plays an important role in regulating the excitability of the entire hippocampus by filtering and integrating information received via the perforant path. Here, we investigated possible epileptogenic abnormalities in the function of the DG neuronal network in the Synapsin II (Syn II knockout mouse (Syn II-/-, a genetic mouse model of epilepsy. Syn II is a presynaptic protein whose deletion in mice reproducibly leads to generalized seizures starting at the age of two months. We made use of a high-resolution microelectrode array (4096 electrodes and patch-clamp recordings, and found that in acute hippocampal slices of young pre-symptomatic (3-6 weeks-old Syn II-/- mice excitatory synaptic output of the mossy fibers is reduced. Moreover, we showed that the main excitatory neurons present in the polymorphic layer of the DG, hilar mossy cells, display a reduced excitability. We also provide evidence of a predominantly inhibitory regulatory output from mossy cells to granule cells, through feed-forward inhibition, and show that the excitatory-inhibitory ratio is increased in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic Syn II-/- mice. These results support the key role of the hilar mossy neurons in maintaining the normal excitability of the hippocampal network and show that the late epileptic phenotype of the Syn II-/- mice is preceded by neuronal circuitry dysfunctions. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in the Syn II-/- mice and open the possibility for early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions.

  17. Calcium channel blockade attenuates abnormal synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus elicited by entorhinal amyloidopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami Pourbadie, Hamid; Naderi, Nima; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2016-10-01

    Entorhinal-hippocampal network is one of the earliest circuits which is affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). There are numerous data providing the evidence of synaptic deficit in the dentate gyrus (DG) of AD animal model. However, there is little known about how entorhinal cortex (EC) amyloidophaty affects each excitatory and/or inhibitory transmission in the early stage of AD. On the other hand, it is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis has a critical role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on excitatory or inhibitory post synaptic currents (EPSC and IPSC, respectively) in the DG granule cells and then the possible neuroprotective action of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs), nimodipine and isradipine, were examined. The amyloid beta (Aβ) 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, synaptic currents in the DG granule cells were assessed by whole cell patch clamp. EPSCs were evoked by stimulating the perforant pathway. Voltage clamp recording showed profound decrease of evoked EPSC amplitude and paired pulse facilitation in the DG granule cells of Aβ treated rats. Furthermore, AMPA/NMDA ratio was significantly decreased in the Aβ treated animals. On the other hand, amplitude of IPSC currents was significantly increased in the DG granule cells of these animals. These modifications of synaptic currents were partially reversed by daily intracerebroventricular administration of isradipine or nimodipine. In conclusion, our results suggest that Aβ in the EC triggers decreased excitatory transmission in the DG with substantial decrement in AMPA currents, leading to a prominent activity of inhibitory circuits and increased inhibition of granule cells which may contribute to the development of AD-related neurological deficits in AD and treatment by CCBs could preserve normal synaptic transmission against Aβ toxicity. PMID:27240164

  18. Alpha-CaMKII deficiency causes immature dentate gyrus, a novel candidate endophenotype of psychiatric disorders

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    Yamasaki Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elucidating the neural and genetic factors underlying psychiatric illness is hampered by current methods of clinical diagnosis. The identification and investigation of clinical endophenotypes may be one solution, but represents a considerable challenge in human subjects. Here we report that mice heterozygous for a null mutation of the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII+/- have profoundly dysregulated behaviours and impaired neuronal development in the dentate gyrus (DG. The behavioral abnormalities include a severe working memory deficit and an exaggerated infradian rhythm, which are similar to symptoms seen in schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric disorders. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus of these mutants revealed that the expression levels of more than 2000 genes were significantly changed. Strikingly, among the 20 most downregulated genes, 5 had highly selective expression in the DG. Whereas BrdU incorporated cells in the mutant mouse DG was increased by more than 50 percent, the number of mature neurons in the DG was dramatically decreased. Morphological and physiological features of the DG neurons in the mutants were strikingly similar to those of immature DG neurons in normal rodents. Moreover, c-Fos expression in the DG after electric footshock was almost completely and selectively abolished in the mutants. Statistical clustering of human post-mortem brains using 10 genes differentially-expressed in the mutant mice were used to classify individuals into two clusters, one of which contained 16 of 18 schizophrenic patients. Nearly half of the differentially-expressed probes in the schizophrenia-enriched cluster encoded genes that are involved in neurogenesis or in neuronal migration/maturation, including calbindin, a marker for mature DG neurons. Based on these results, we propose that an "immature DG" in adulthood might induce alterations in behavior and

  19. A computational model of pattern separation efficiency in the dentate gyrus with implications in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Information processing in the hippocampus begins by transferring spiking activity of the entorhinal cortex (EC) into the dentate gyrus (DG). Activity pattern in the EC is separated by the DG such that it plays an important role in hippocampal functions including memory. The structural and physiological parameters of these neural networks enable the hippocampus to be efficient in encoding a large number of inputs that animals receive and process in their life time. The neural encoding capacity of the DG depends on its single neurons encoding and pattern separation efficiency. In this study, encoding by the DG is modeled such that single neurons and pattern separation efficiency are measured using simulations of different parameter values. For this purpose, a probabilistic model of single neurons efficiency is presented to study the role of structural and physiological parameters. Known neurons number of the EC and the DG is used to construct a neural network by electrophysiological features of granule cells of the DG. Separated inputs as activated neurons in the EC with different firing probabilities are presented into the DG. For different connectivity rates between the EC and DG, pattern separation efficiency of the DG is measured. The results show that in the absence of feedback inhibition on the DG neurons, the DG demonstrates low separation efficiency and high firing frequency. Feedback inhibition can increase separation efficiency while resulting in very low single neuron’s encoding efficiency in the DG and very low firing frequency of neurons in the DG (sparse spiking). This work presents a mechanistic explanation for experimental observations in the hippocampus, in combination with theoretical measures. Moreover, the model predicts a critical role for impaired inhibitory neurons in schizophrenia where deficiency in pattern separation of the DG has been observed. PMID:25859189

  20. A Computational Model of Pattern Separation Efficiency in the Dentate Gyrus with Implications in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Faghihi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Information processing in the hippocampus begins by transferring spiking activity of the Entorhinal Cortex (EC into the Dentate Gyrus (DG. Activity pattern in the EC is separated by the DG such that it plays an important role in hippocampal functions including memory. The structural and physiological parameters of these neural networks enable the hippocampus to be efficient in encoding a large number of inputs that animals receive and process in their life time. The neural encoding capacity of the DG depends on its single neurons encoding and pattern separation efficiency. In this study, encoding by the DG is modelled such that single neurons and pattern separation efficiency are measured using simulations of different parameter values. For this purpose, a probabilistic model of single neurons efficiency is presented to study the role of structural and physiological parameters. Known neurons number of the EC and the DG is used to construct a neural network by electrophysiological features of neuron in the DG. Separated inputs as activated neurons in the EC with different firing probabilities are presented into the DG. For different connectivity rates between the EC and DG, pattern separation efficiency of the DG is measured. The results show that in the absence of feedback inhibition on the DG neurons, the DG demonstrates low separation efficiency and high firing frequency. Feedback inhibition can increase separation efficiency while resulting in very low single neuron’s encoding efficiency in the DG and very low firing frequency of neurons in the DG (sparse spiking. This work presents a mechanistic explanation for experimental observations in the hippocampus, in combination with theoretical measures. Moreover, the model predicts a critical role for impaired inhibitory neurons in schizophrenia where deficiency in pattern separation of the DG has been observed.

  1. Methamphetamine decreases dentate gyrus stem cell self-renewal and shifts the differentiation towards neuronal fate

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    Sofia Baptista

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse that negatively interferes with neurogenesis. In fact, we have previously shown that METH triggers stem/progenitor cell death and decreases neuronal differentiation in the dentate gyrus (DG. Still, little is known regarding its effect on DG stem cell properties. Herein, we investigate the impact of METH on mice DG stem/progenitor cell self-renewal functions. METH (10 nM decreased DG stem cell self-renewal, while 1 nM delayed cell cycle in the G0/G1-to-S phase transition and increased the number of quiescent cells (G0 phase, which correlated with a decrease in cyclin E, pEGFR and pERK1/2 protein levels. Importantly, both drug concentrations (1 or 10 nM did not induce cell death. In accordance with the impairment of self-renewal capacity, METH (10 nM decreased Sox2+/Sox2+ while increased Sox2−/Sox2− pairs of daughter cells. This effect relied on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA signaling, which was prevented by the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (10 μM. Moreover, METH (10 nM increased doublecortin (DCX protein levels consistent with neuronal differentiation. In conclusion, METH alters DG stem cell properties by delaying cell cycle and decreasing self-renewal capacities, mechanisms that may contribute to DG neurogenesis impairment followed by cognitive deficits verified in METH consumers.

  2. Entorhinal theta-frequency input to the dentate gyrus trisynaptically evokes hippocampal CA1 LTP

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    Jens eStepan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There exists substantial evidence that some forms of explicit learning in mammals require long-term potentiation (LTP at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. While CA1 LTP has been well characterized at the monosynaptic level, it still remains unclear how the afferent systems to the hippocampus can initiate formation of this neuroplastic phenomenon. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in a mouse brain slice preparation, we show that evoked entorhinal cortical (EC theta-frequency input to the dentate gyrus highly effectively generates waves of neuronal activity which propagate through the entire trisynaptic circuit of the hippocampus (‘HTC-Waves’. This flow of activity, which we also demonstrate in vivo, critically depends on frequency facilitation of mossy fiber to CA3 synaptic transmission. The HTC-Waves are rapidly boosted by the cognitive enhancer caffeine (5 µM and the stress hormone corticosterone (100 nM. They precisely follow the rhythm of the EC input, involve high-frequency firing (>100 Hz of CA3 pyramidal neurons, and induce NMDA receptor-dependent CA1 LTP within a few seconds. Our study provides the first experimental evidence that synchronous theta-rhythmical spiking of EC stellate cells, as occurring during EC theta oscillations, has the capacity to drive induction of CA1 LTP via the hippocampal trisynaptic pathway. Moreover, we present data pointing to a basic filter mechanism of the hippocampus regarding EC inputs and describe a methodology to reveal alterations in the ‘input-output relationship’ of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit.

  3. Neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Gun Lee; In Koo Hwang; Seung Myung Moon; Dae Young Yoo; Hyo Young Jung; Sung Min Nam; Jong Whi Kim; Jung Hoon Choi; Sun Shin Yi; Moo-Ho Won; Yeo Sung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes on antioxi-dant-like protein-1 immunoreactivity, protein carbonyl levels, and malondialdehyde formation, a marker for lipid peroxidation, in the hippocampus. For this study, streptozotocin (75 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected into adult rats to induce type 1 diabetes. The three experimental pa-rameters were determined at 2, 3, 4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment. Fasting blood glucose levels signiifcantly increased by 20.7–21.9 mM after streptozotocin treatment. The number of antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactive neurons signiifcantly decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, 3 weeks after streptozotocin treatment compared to the control group. Malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which are modiifed by oxidative stress, signiifcantly increased with a peak at 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment, and then decreased 4 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment. These results suggest that neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment.

  4. Neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Gun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes on antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactivity, protein carbonyl levels, and malondialdehyde formation, a marker for lipid peroxidation, in the hippocampus. For this study, streptozotocin (75 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected into adult rats to induce type 1 diabetes. The three experimental parameters were determined at 2, 3, 4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment. Fasting blood glucose levels significantly increased by 20.7-21.9 mM after streptozotocin treatment. The number of antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactive neurons significantly decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, 3 weeks after streptozotocin treatment compared to the control group. Malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which are modified by oxidative stress, significantly increased with a peak at 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment, and then decreased 4 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment. These results suggest that neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment.

  5. Neuronal apoptosis and synaptic density in the dentate gyrus of ischemic rats' response to chronic mild stress and the effects of Notch signaling.

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    Shaohua Wang

    Full Text Available Our previous research highlighted an inconsistency with Notch1 signaling-related compensatory neurogenesis after chronic mild stress (CMS in rodents suffering from cerebral ischemia, which continue to display post-stroke depressive symptoms. Here, we hypothesize that CMS aggrandized ischemia-related apoptosis injury and worsened synaptic integrity via gamma secretase-meditated Notch1 signaling. Adult rats were exposed to a CMS paradigm after left middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Open-field and sucrose consumption testing were employed to assess depression-like behavior. Gene expression of pro-apoptotic Bax, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and synaptic density-related synaptophysin were measured by western blotting and real-time PCR on Day 28 after MCAO surgery. CMS induced depressive behaviors in ischemic rats, which was accompanied by an elevation in Bax/bcl-2 ratio, TUNEL staining in neurons and reduced synaptophysin expression in the dentate gyrus. These collective effects were reversed by the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT (N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl]-S-phenyl-glycine t-butyl ester. We found that post-stroke stressors made neurons in the dentate gyrus vulnerable to apoptosis, which supports a putative role for Notch signaling in neural integrity, potentially in newborn cells' synaptic deficit with regard to preexisting cells. These findings suggest that post-stroke depression therapeutically benefits from blocking gamma secretase mediated Notch signaling, and whether this signaling pathway could be a therapeutic target needs to be further investigated.

  6. 胎次、性别对成年小鼠海马齿状回神经发生及学习记忆的影响%Effects of parity and gender on neurogenesis of hippocampal dentate gyrus and learning and memory ability in adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁艳平; 邵宝平; 董辉; 刘知东; 赵倩楠

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of parity and gender on neurogenesis of hippocampal dentate gyrus and the ability of learning and memory of adult mice.Methods Morris water maze test was used to assess the differences of learning and memory ability between the adult mice born in the first to third parities.The differences of neurogenesis were examined with BrdU-labeled hippocampual dentate gyrus of the adult mice.Results (1) The learning and memory ability (LMA) of mice born in the 2nd parity was significantly higher than that of the 1 st and 3rd parity (P < 0.05) in the same sex,that was LMA2 > LMA1 > LMA3.Besides,female mice had better learning and memory ability than the male mice,(P > 0.05).(2) The number of BrdU-positive hippocampal cells of the mice born in the 2nd parity was higher than that of the 1 st and 3rd parity in the same sex,but the difference was non-significant (P > 0.05),and BrdU-positive cells of the female mice was higher than that in the male mice,but also with a non-significant difference.Conclusions There are essential differences in the neurogenesis of hippocampal dentate gyrus and the learning and memory ability in adult mice of different gender and born in different parities.Therefore,it should be considered to use mice of the same gender and born at the same parity in relevant experimental studies.%目的 探讨胎次、性别是否对成年小鼠海马齿状回神经发生及学习记忆产生影响.方法 运用Morris水迷宫系统检测第1~3胎成年小鼠的学习记忆能力,腹腔注射BrdU,标记神经干细胞,检测不同胎次、性别小鼠海马齿状回中的神经发生的差异.结果 (1)在同性别、不同胎次成年小鼠间,第2胎的学习记忆能力(LMA)均显著地高于第1、3胎的,其影响规律为LMA2>LMA1>LMA3,且P<0.05;在同胎次、不同性别成年小鼠间,雌性小鼠的LMA均高于雄性小鼠的,但其差异无显著性(P>0.05).(2)在同性别、

  7. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:26788851

  8. Regulation of the ERK pathway in the dentate gyrus by in vivo dopamine D1 receptor stimulation requires glutamatergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    Acute systemic administration of the dopamine D1/D5 receptors (D1Rs) agonist, SKF81297, activates the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) pathway selectively in the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. In this study, we examined the mechanisms involved in this regulation and investigated the molecular components that could promote ERK-dependent transcription and translation. SKF81297 induced phosphorylation of ERK and histone H3 required intact glutamatergic transmission. Blockade of glutamate release achieved by the mGluR2/3 agonist, LY354740 or the selective adenosine A1R agonist, CCPA as well as neurotoxic lesions of lateral entorhinal cortex reduced the ability of SKF81297 to induce ERK activation in the dentate gyrus. This activation required the combined stimulation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, mGluR1 and mGluR5. SKF81297 evoked phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) selectively at the Ser235/236 site while the Ser240/244 site remains unchanged. The SKF81297 induced increased phosphorylation of rpS6 was dependent on PKC and ERK/p90RSK activation. Surprisingly, administration of D1Rs agonist suppressed mTORC1/p70S6K pathway suggesting an mTOR-independent regulation of rpS6 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results show that intact glutamatergic transmission plays a major role in the regulation of ERK-dependent phosphorylation of histone H3 and rpS6 observed in the mouse dentate gyrus after systemic administration of SKF81297. PMID:22796106

  9. D1/D5 receptors and histone deacetylation mediate the Gateway Effect of LTP in hippocampal dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yan-You; Levine, Amir; Kandel, Denise B.; Yin, Deqi; Colnaghi, Luca; Drisaldi, Bettina; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is critical for spatial memory and is also thought to be involved in the formation of drug-related associative memory. Here, we attempt to test an aspect of the Gateway Hypothesis, by studying the effect of consecutive exposure to nicotine and cocaine on long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) in the DG. We find that a single injection of cocaine does not alter LTP. However, pretreatment with nicotine followed by a single injection of cocaine causes a s...

  10. A Computational Model Of Episodic Memory Encoding In Dentate Gyrus Hippocampus Sub Region As Pattern Separator Using ART Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational model of encoding and separation of episodic events via Dentate Gyrus sub region of hippocampus. The proposed model is implemented using adaptive resonance theory (ART neural network. The model incorporates the proposed method encoding of episodes in binary patterns. The proposed model is capable of achieving high level of pattern encoding and separation. The separation achieved for different episodes and events shown by the results are very good depending upon the vigilance parameter of the model. Vigilance parameter is assumed to be correlated to attention attribute while perceiving an episode of an event.

  11. Running rewires the neuronal network of adult-born dentate granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivar, Carmen; Peterson, Benjamin D; van Praag, Henriette

    2016-05-01

    Exercise improves cognition in humans and animals. Running increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a brain area important for learning and memory. It is unclear how running modifies the circuitry of new dentate gyrus neurons to support their role in memory function. Here we combine retroviral labeling with rabies virus mediated trans-synaptic retrograde tracing to define and quantify new neuron afferent inputs in young adult male C57Bl/6 mice, housed with or without a running wheel for one month. Exercise resulted in a shift in new neuron networks that may promote sparse encoding and pattern separation. Neurogenesis increased in the dorsal, but not the ventral, dentate gyrus by three-fold, whereas afferent traced cell labeling doubled in number. Regional analysis indicated that running differentially affected specific inputs. Within the hippocampus the ratio of innervation from inhibitory interneurons and glutamatergic mossy cells to new neurons was reduced. Distal traced cells were located in sub-cortical and cortical regions, including perirhinal, entorhinal and sensory cortices. Innervation from entorhinal cortex (EC) was augmented, in proportion to the running-induced enhancement of adult neurogenesis. Within EC afferent input and short-term synaptic plasticity from lateral entorhinal cortex, considered to convey contextual information to the hippocampus was increased. Furthermore, running upregulated innervation from regions important for spatial memory and theta rhythm generation, including caudo-medial entorhinal cortex and subcortical medial septum, supra- and medial mammillary nuclei. Altogether, running may facilitate contextual, spatial and temporal information encoding by increasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis and by reorganization of new neuron circuitry. PMID:26589333

  12. Exposure to Forced Swim Stress Alters Local Circuit Activity and Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus

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    Orli Yarom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that, depending on its severity and context, stress can affect neural plasticity. Most related studies focused on synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP of principle cells. However, evidence suggests that following high-frequency stimulation, which induces LTP in principal cells, modifications also take place at the level of complex interactions with interneurons within the dentate gyrus, that is, at the local circuit level. So far, the possible effects of stress on local circuit activity and plasticity were not studied. Therefore, we set out to examine the possible alterations in local circuit activity and plasticity following exposure to stress. Local circuit activity and plasticity were measured by using frequency dependant inhibition (FDI and commissural modulation protocols following exposure to a 15 minute-forced swim trial. Exposure to stress did not alter FDI. The application of theta-burst stimulation (TBS reduced FDI in both control and stressed rats, but this type of plasticity was greater in stressed rats. Commissural-induced inhibition was significantly higher in stressed rats both before and after applying theta-burst stimulation. These findings indicate that the exposure to acute stress affects aspects of local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus. It is possible that these alterations underlie some of the behavioral consequences of the stress experience.

  13. Melatonin restores normal Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in pinealectomized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengchang Zhang; Shuang Zhao; Lu Bai; Mingming Guan; Jielin Mo; Ling Lan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we sought to elucidate the effects of melatonin on learning and memory as well as apoptosis and expression of the Bax or Bcl-2 proteins in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in pinealectomized rats. Using the Morris water maze and the olfactory memory tests, we found that the average escape latency in pinealectomized rats was clearly increased compared with sham-operated rats. Moreover, the average escape latency in the melatonin-treated and pinealectomized rats was longer than that in the sham-operated rats and shorter than that in the pinealectomized and untreated rats. Immunohistochemistry and terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) showed that there were fewer Bax immunoreactive cells and TUNEL-positive (apoptotic) cells but more Bcl-2 immunoreactive cells in the melatonin-treated rats compared with the pinealectomized rats. The sham-operated rats showed numbers of these cells similar to the melatonin-treated rats. These experimental findings demonstrate that melatonin treatment may reduce abnormal apoptosis by promoting gene expression of Bax and suppressing gene expression of Bcl-2 in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in pinealectomized rats. These effects appear to result in the inhibition of cellular apoptosis and the improvement of spatial learning and memory in pinealectomized rats.

  14. Neurotensinergic Excitation of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells via Gαq-Coupled Inhibition of TASK-3 Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haopeng; Dong, Hailong; Cilz, Nicholas I; Kurada, Lalitha; Hu, Binqi; Wada, Etsuko; Bayliss, Douglas A; Porter, James E; Lei, Saobo

    2016-03-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a 13-amino acid peptide and serves as a neuromodulator in the brain. Whereas NT has been implicated in learning and memory, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are ill-defined. Because the dentate gyrus receives profound innervation of fibers containing NT and expresses high density of NT receptors, we examined the effects of NT on the excitability of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs). Our results showed that NT concentration dependently increased action potential (AP) firing frequency of the GCs by the activation of NTS1 receptors resulting in the depolarization of the GCs. NT-induced enhancement of AP firing frequency was not caused indirectly by releasing glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, or dopamine, but due to the inhibition of TASK-3 K(+) channels. NT-mediated excitation of the GCs was G protein dependent, but independent of phospholipase C, intracellular Ca(2+) release, and protein kinase C. Immunoprecipitation experiment demonstrates that the activation of NTS1 receptors induced the association of Gαq/11 and TASK-3 channels suggesting a direct coupling of Gαq/11 to TASK-3 channels. Endogenously released NT facilitated the excitability of the GCs contributing to the induction of long-term potentiation at the perforant path-GC synapses. Our results provide a cellular mechanism that helps to explain the roles of NT in learning and memory. PMID:25405940

  15. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine increases excitability in the dentate gyrus: role of 5HT2A receptor-induced PGE2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stuart A; Huff, Courtney; Chiaia, Nicolas; Gudelsky, Gary A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2016-03-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a widely abused psychostimulant, which causes release of serotonin in various forebrain regions. Recently, we reported that MDMA increases extracellular glutamate concentrations in the dentate gyrus, via activation of 5HT2A receptors. We examined the role of prostaglandin signaling in mediating the effects of 5HT2A receptor activation on the increases in extracellular glutamate and the subsequent long-term loss of parvalbumin interneurons in the dentate gyrus caused by MDMA. Administration of MDMA into the dentate gyrus of rats increased PGE2 concentrations which was prevented by coadministration of MDL100907, a 5HT2A receptor antagonist. MDMA-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were inhibited by local administration of SC-51089, an inhibitor of the EP1 prostaglandin receptor. Systemic administration of SC-51089 during injections of MDMA prevented the decreases in parvalbumin interneurons observed 10 days later. The loss of parvalbumin immunoreactivity after MDMA exposure coincided with a decrease in paired-pulse inhibition and afterdischarge threshold in the dentate gyrus. These changes were prevented by inhibition of EP1 and 5HT2A receptors during MDMA. Additional experiments revealed an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures in MDMA-treated rats, which could be prevented with SC51089 treatments during MDMA exposure. Overall, these findings suggest that 5HT2A receptors mediate MDMA-induced PGE2 signaling and subsequent increases in glutamate. This signaling mediates parvalbumin cell losses as well as physiologic changes in the dentate gyrus, suggesting that the lack of the inhibition provided by these neurons increases the excitability within the dentate gyrus of MDMA-treated rats. We hypothesized that the widely abused psychostimulant MDMA causes a loss of parvalbumin (PV) cells and increases excitability in the dentate gyrus. MDMA increases serotonin (5HT) release and activates 5HT2A

  16. Prolonged induction of c-fos in neuropeptide Y- and somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons of the rat dentate gyrus after electroconvulsive stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, D P; Greisen, M H; Bolwig, T G;

    1996-01-01

    Induction of c-fos mRNA and Fos was studied in the hilus and granular layer of the dentate gyrus at various times up to 24 h after single electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. In both areas of the dentate gyrus, a prominent induction of c-fos m....../or somatostatin (SS). Using double-labelling immunocytochemistry, we examined to what extent Fos was induced in these hilar neurons after ECS. Although a minor population of non-NPY non-SS cells displayed Fos induction early after ECS, prolonged induction of Fos almost exclusively occurred in NPY or SS neurons...

  17. The contrasting effects of dendrotoxins and other potassium channel blockers in the CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of rat hippocampal slices

    OpenAIRE

    Southan, A P; Owen, D. G.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of potassium channel blocking compounds on synaptic transmission in the CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of the rat hippocampus were examined by means of simultaneous field potential recording techniques in brain slices.4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) enhanced the excitatory postsynaptic potential (e.p.s.p.) and induced multiple population spike responses in both regions. EC50 values were 6.7 μM in the CA1 (n=5) and 161.7 μM (n=5) in the dentate gyrus.Tetraethylammonium (TEA) increased the am...

  18. A STEREOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF EARLY POSTNATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE ON NEURONAL NUMBERS IN RAT DENTATE GYRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Miki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Maternal ethanol ingestion during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS in their offspring. Among the symptoms of FAS, damage to the central nervous system has emerged as one of the most serious problems. We have previously shown that a relatively high dose of ethanol exposure during early postnatal life can cause alterations in spatial learning ability. This ability is controlled, at least in part, by the hippocampal formation. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether exposure of rat pups to ethanol during early postnatal life had effects on the total number of the dentate gyrus neurons. Wistar rats were exposed to a relatively high daily dose of ethanol between postnatal days 10 to 15. Ethanol exposure was achieved by placing rat pups in a chamber containing ethanol vapour for 3 hours a day. The blood ethanol concentration was found to be about 430 mg/dL at the end of the exposure period. Groups of ethanol treated (ET, separation controls (SC and mother reared controls (MRC were anaesthetised and killed at 16-days-of-age by perfusion with phosphate-buffered 2.5% glutaraldehyde. The Cavalieri principle was used to determine the volume of subdivisions of the dentate gyrus, and the physical disector method was used to estimate the numerical densities of neurons within each subdivision. The total number of neurons was calculated by multiplying estimates of the numerical density with the volume. There was, on average, about 421,000 granule cells in all three treatment groups. In the hilus region, ET rats had about 27,000 neuronal cells. This value was significantly smaller than the average of 38,000 such neurons estimated to be present in both MRC and SC animals. It is concluded that neurons in the hilus region of the dentate gyrus may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of a high dose of ethanol exposure during PND 10-15. It is likely that this deficit was due to neuronal death induced by some mechanisms related to

  19. Alzheimer's disease is associated with disordered localization of ganglioside GM1 molecular species in the human dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano-Sakamaki, Wakako; Sugiyama, Eiji; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Ravid, Rivka; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Taki, Takao

    2015-11-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia associated with loss of memory and cognitive dysfunction. In a previous study, we demonstrated a decrease in b-series gangliosides along with a change in ganglioside molecular species in the hippocampal grey matter of patients with AD. The present study demonstrates the use of imaging mass spectrometry for analyzing the spatial arrangement of ganglioside GM1 (GM1) molecular species in the hippocampus. In AD patients, we found a decrease in the ratio of GM1(d20:1/C18:0) to GM1 d18:1/C18:0) in the outer molecular layer (ML) of the dentate gyrus. Because the outer ML is the region of main input into the hippocampus, our findings may have a direct relationship to the mechanism of dysfunction in AD. PMID:26484596

  20. Neuronal Number, Volume, and Apoptosis of the Left Dentate Gyrus of Chronically Stressed Pigs Correlate Negatively With Basal Saliva Cortisol Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van der E.M.; Wiegant, V.M.; Schouten, W.G.P.; Eerdenburg, van F.J.C.M.; Loijens, L.W.S.; Plas, C.; Benning, M.A.; Vries, de H.; Kloet, de E.R.; Lucassen, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Although the consequences of stress and hypercortisolemia for the rodent hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) are well known, little is known about other species. For pigs, tethered housing represents a well-established chronic stressor that shares many similarities with restraint paradigms, as evidenced

  1. Effect of topiramate on partial excitatory amino acids in hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats after alcohol withdrawal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Yang; Guang Wu; Haiying Jiang; Yuanzhe Jin; Songbiao Cui

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many researches have indicated that the imbalances of various amino acid transmitters and neurotransmitters in brain are involved in the formation of alcohol withdrawal, especially that glutamic acid is one of the important transmitters for alcohol tolerance in central nervous system.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of excitatory amino acids in hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats with long-term alcohol drinking after withdrawal under consciousness, and investigate the therapeutic effect of topiramate on alcohol withdrawal.DESIGN: A randomized control animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Yanbian University.MATERIALS: Thirty male Wistar rats of 4 months old, weighing 300-350 g, were purchased from the Experimental Animal Department, Medical College of Yanbian University. Topiramate was produced by Swish Cilag Company, and the batch number was 02CS063.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Physiology, Medical College of Yanbian University from August 2005 to February 2006. ① The rats were divided randomly into three groups: control group (n=10), alcohol group (n=10) and topiramate-treated group (n=10). Rats in the alcohol group and topiramate-treated group were given intragastric perfusion of 500 g/L alcohol (10 mL/kg), once a day for 4 weeks successively, and then those in the topiramate-treated group were treated with 80 mg/kg topiramate at 24 hours after the last perfusion of alcohol, once a day for 3 days successively. Rats in the control group were intragastricly given isovolume saline. ② The withdrawal symptoms were assessed at 6, 30, 48 and 72 hours after the last perfusion of alcohol by using the withdrawal rating scale set by Erden et al,which had four observational indexes of stereotyped behaviors, agitation, tail stiffness and abnormal posture,each index was scored by 5 points, the higher the score, the more obvious the symptoms. ③ The contents of aspartic acid and glutamic acid

  2. NR2B受体拮抗剂抑制成年大鼠齿状回新生神经元诱导的长时程增强%NR2B receptor antagonist Ro25-6981 inhibits newborn neuron induced long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文平; 张亘瑷; 仇玉兰; 张策

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newborn neurons have bean shown to induce long-term potentiation (LTP). Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit NR2B plays an important role in mature neurons-induced LTP. But there have been no reports addressing on the effects of NR2B activation on newborn neuron-induced LTP.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of NR2B receptor antagonist Ro25-6981 on LTP induced by newborn neurons in adult rat dentate gyrus.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An electrophysiological recording trial was performed at the Department of Neuroblology,Shanxi Medical University from February to June 2007.MATERIALS: Twenty-six male Wistar rats, aged 3 months, were provided by Laboratory Animal Center, Shanxi Medical University.METHODS: Following sacrifice for brain harvesting under anesthesia, the hippocempus was taken to preparation of 400 μ mol/L brain slices. Using extracellular field potential recordings, low-frequency stimulation was performed in the medial molecular layer of dentate gyrus with insulated bipolar tungsten electrodes. After having stable recordings, LTP was induced under high-frequency tetanic stimulation. LTP was induced with a protocol developed previously (4 trains, 500 ms each, 100 Hz within the train, repeated every 20 s). Only those slices which produced the field excitatory postsynaptic potential of 1 mV or cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF)-induced LTP (ACSF-LTP): brain slices were divided into 2 groups: ACSF group, in which, slices were continuously perfused using ACSF bubbled with 95% O2 and 5% CO2; ACSF+ Ro25-6981 group: a 10-minute treatment with 3μ mol/L Ro25-6981 was performed prior to tetanic stimulation, and the remaining procedures were the same as ACSF divided into 2 groups: BIC group: a 10-minute treatment with 10 μmol/L BIC was performed prior to titanic stimulation; BIC+Ro25-6981 group: 3μ mol/L Ro25-6981 and 10μ mol/L BIC were simultaneously perfused 10 minutes prior to tetanic stimulation.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: LTP

  3. Depotentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats is modulated by D1/D5 dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, A; Manahan-Vaughan, D

    2000-06-01

    Hippocampal depotentiation comprises a reversal of tetanization- induced long-term potentiation (LTP) which occurs following low-frequency stimulation. In the CA1 region, it has been reported that agonist activation of D1/D5 dopamine receptors enhances LTP expression and inhibits depotentiation. The role of these receptors in synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus (DG) has not been characterized. This study therefore investigated the role of D1/D5 receptors in LTP and depotentiation in the DG of freely moving rats. Male Wistar rats underwent chronic implantation of a recording electrode in the DG granule cell layer, a bipolar stimulating electrode in the medial perforant path and a cannula in the ipsilateral cerebral ventricle (to enable drug administration). The D1/D5 agonist Chloro-PB dose-dependently inhibited depotentation in the DG. This effect was prevented by the D1/D5 antagonist SCH 23390. Neither D1/D5 agonist nor antagonist had an effect on LTP expression or basal synaptic transmission. These results highlight differences between D1/D5 receptor-involvement in LTP and depotentiation in the CA1 region and DG, and indicate that whereas D1/D5 receptor activation may not be a critical factor in LTP induction in the DG, a differential role for these receptors in the expression of depotentiation, in this hippocampal subfield, may exist. PMID:10859139

  4. Decreased Myelinated Fibers in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lin; Chao, Feng-Lei; Luo, Yan-min; Xiao, Qian; Gu, Heng-Wei; Jiang, Rong; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by deficits in cognition and memory. Although amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is known to be the earliest pathological event that triggers subsequent neurodegeneration, how Aβ accumulation causes behavioral deficits remains incompletely understood. In this study, using the Morris water maze test, ELISA and stereological methods, we examined spatial learning and memory performance, the soluble Aβ concentration and the myelination of fibers in the hippocampus of 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-month-old Tg2576 AD model mice. Our results showed that spatial learning and memory performance was significantly impaired in the Tg2576 mice compared to the wild type (WT) controls and that the myelinated fiber length in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was markedly decreased from 0.33 ± 0.03 km in the WT controls to 0.17 ± 0.02 km in the Tg2576 mice at 10 months of age. However, the concentrations of soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 were significantly increased as early as 4-6 months of age. The decreased myelinated fiber length in the DG may contribute to the spatial learning and memory deficits of Tg2576 mice. Therefore, we suggest that the significant accumulation of soluble Aβ may serve as a preclinical biomarker for AD diagnosis and that protecting myelinated fibers may represent a novel strategy for delaying the progression of early-stage AD. PMID:26971933

  5. Running Exercise Reduces Myelinated Fiber Loss in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fenglei; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Yanmin; Xiao, Qian; Lv, Fulin; He, Qi; Zhou, Chunni; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Lin; Jiang, Rong; Gu, Hengwei; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of running exercise on myelinated fibers in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus during Alzheimer's disease (AD), 6-month-old male APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to control or running groups. The running group mice were subjected to a running protocol for four months. The behaviors of the mice from both group mice were then assessed using the Morris water maze, and the total volume of the DG and the related quantitative parameters with characteristics of the myelinated nerve fiber and the myelin sheath in the DG were investigated using unbiased stereological techniques and electron microscopy. Learning and spatial memory performances were both significantly increased in the running group compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in the gratio of the myelinated axons between the two groups. However, the DG volume, the myelinated fiber length and volume in the DG, and the myelin sheath volume and thickness in the DG were all significantly increased in the running group mice compared with the control group mice. These results indicated that running exercise was able to prevent DG atrophy and delay the progression of the myelinated fiber loss and the demyelination of the myelin sheaths in the DG in an AD mouse model, which may underlie the running-induced improvement in learning and spatial memory. Taken together, these results demonstrated that running exercise could delay the progression of AD. PMID:25817255

  6. Naringin attenuates granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hannah; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Morphological abnormalities of the dentate gyrus (DG) are an important phenotype in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We recently reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, exerts beneficial effects in the kainic acid (KA) mouse model of epilepsy. We found that naringin treatment reduced seizure activities and decreased autophagic stress and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus following in vivo lesion with KA. However, it remains unclear whether naringin may also attenuate seizure-induced morphological changes in the DG, collectively known as granule cell dispersion (GCD). To clarify whether naringin treatment reduces GCD, we evaluated the effects of intraperitoneal injection of naringin on GCD and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), an important regulator of GCD, following intrahippocampal injection of KA. Our results showed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which was confirmed by assessing the phosphorylated form of the mTORC1 substrate, 4E-BP1, in the hippocampus. These results suggest that naringin treatment may help prevent epilepsy-induced hippocampal injury by inhibiting mTORC1 activation and thereby reducing GCD in the hippocampus in vivo. PMID:27040812

  7. The high dosage of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing Chun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Earthworm extract has shown anticancer characteristics. In the present study, we examined the effect of chronic treatment with a high dose of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract (EE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of 3-week-old mice using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry for neuroblast differentiation, respectively. BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells were easily detected in the subgranular zone of the DG in vehicle (saline)-treated mice. However, BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells in the 500 mg/kg EE-treated mice decreased distinctively compared to those in the vehicle-treated mice. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity and its protein level decreased markedly in the DG of the EE-treated group compared to those in the vehicle-treated group. These results indicate that chronic treatment with high dose EE decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, and that BDNF immunoreactivity decreased in the DG of EE-treated mice. PMID:22025974

  8. Low-frequency stimulation induces long-term depression and slow onset long-term potentiation at perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Jossina; Isaiah S Morales; Villarreal, Desiree M.; Derrick, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    The expression of homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) is thought to mediate a crucial role in sustaining memory function. Our in vivo investigations of LTD expression at lateral (LPP) and medial perforant path (MPP) synapses in the dentate gyrus (DG) corroborate prior demonstrations that PP-DG LTD is difficult to induce in intact animals. In freely moving animals, LTD expression occurred inconsistently among LPP-DG and MPP-DG responses. Interestingly, following acute electrode implantatio...

  9. An increased expression of the mGlu5 receptor protein following LTP induction at the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapse in freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan-Vaughan, D; Ngomba, R T; Storto, M; Kulla, A; Catania, M V; Chiechio, S; Rampello, L; Passarelli, F; Capece, A; Reymann, K G; Nicoletti, F

    2003-01-01

    The involvement of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo has been consistently documented. We have investigated whether LTP induction in the dentate gyrus of rats leads to changes in expression of mGlu2/3 or -5 receptor subtypes in the hippocampus. LTP was induced at the medial perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses, and mGlu receptor expression was examined by Western blot or in situ hybridization. An up-regulation of mGlu5 receptors was observed in the hippocampus both 24 and 48 h following LTP induction. This effect was restricted to the dentate gyrus and CA1 region, whereas no changes in mGlu5 receptor protein (but an increase in mRNA levels) were observed in the CA3 region. The increased expression of mGlu5 receptors was directly related to the induction of LTP, because it was not observed when tetanic stimulation was carried out in animals treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5). Western blot analysis also showed a reduced expression of mGlu2/3 receptors in the whole hippocampus 24 h after LTP induction, indicating that the increased expression of mGlu5 receptors was specific. These data suggest that an up-regulation of mGlu5 receptors is a component of the plastic changes that follow the induction of LTP at the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapse. PMID:12559118

  10. Improved spatial learning and memory by perilla diet is correlated with immunoreactivities to neurofilament and α-synuclein in hilus of dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jinwoo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perilla (Perilla frutescens oil is very rich in α-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid. As it is widely reported that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improves cognitive function in children and adults, feeding rats with perilla diets followed by analysis of proteomic changes in the hippocampus can provide valuable information on the mechanism of learning and memory at the molecular level. To identify proteins playing roles in learning and memory, differentially expressed proteins in the hippocampus of the 5 week old rats fed perilla diets for 3 weeks or 3 months were identified by proteomic analysis and validated by immunological assays. Results The perilla diet groups showed improved spatial learning and memory performances in a T-maze test. They also displayed elevated level of 22:6n-3 fatty acid, an omega-3 fatty acid (p Conclusion Improved cognitive function upon administration of n-3 fatty acid-rich perilla diet is associated with the differential expression of hippocampal proteins related to cytoskeleton, energy metabolism, transport, neuro-projection, and apoptosis. Particularly, the enhanced immunoreactivities to α-synuclein and neurofilament in the hilus of dentate gyrus suggest that perilla diet supplementation promotes neuronal signaling and alters synaptic plasticity for improved learning and memory.

  11. Evaluation of the protective effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil on the dentate gyrus following chronic restraint stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Bhari Talip

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic restraint stress has been shown to cause a number of morphological changes in the hippocampal formation of rats. Tocotrienol, an isoform of vitamin E, exhibits numerous health benefits, different from those of tocopherol. Recent studies have demonstrated that tocotrienol prevents stress-induced changes in the gastric mucosa, thus indicating that it may also protect other organs such as the brain from the damaging effects of stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF extracted from palm oil on the dentate gyrus of rats following exposure to chronic restraint stress. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control, stress, tocotrienol and combination of stress and tocotrienol. Animals were stressed by restraining them for 5 hours every day for 21 consecutive days. TRF was administered via oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. Our results showed that the plasma corticosterone level was significantly increased in response to stress, compared to the control. The results confirmed previous findings that chronic restraint stress suppresses cellular proliferation and reduces granule cell number in the dentate gyrus. However, TRF supplementation failed to prevent or minimize these stress-induced changes. Therefore, we conclude that TRF at the current dosage is not effective in preventing the morphological changes in the dentate gyrus induced by chronic restraint stress.

  12. Modulation by serotonin 5-HT(4) receptors of long-term potentiation and depotentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Alexander; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2002-02-01

    Tetanization-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus can be depotentiated by low-frequency stimulation. 5-HT(4) receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and are suggested to be involved in hippocampus-dependent cognitive processes. Since the role of these receptors in the dentate gyrus has yet not been characterized, this study investigated the effects of 5-HT(4) receptors on basal synaptic transmission, LTP and depotentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats. Male Wistar rats were chronically implanted with a recording electrode in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, a stimulation electrode in the medial perforant path and a cannula for drug administration in the ipsilateral ventricle. The 5-HT(4) agonist methoxytryptamine dose-dependently inhibited basal synaptic transmission and LTP. Priming of receptors by a dose of this agonist which elicited no significant change of basal synaptic transmission inhibited depotentiation. These effects could be prevented by the 5-HT(4) antagonist RS 39604, which did not produce independent effects on synaptic transmission, LTP or depotentiation. The effects of methoxytryptamine were confirmed with the highly selective 5-HT(4) agonist, RS 67333. These results strongly support a role for 5-HT(4) receptors in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and provide an important link to findings with regard to the involvement of 5-HT in processes related to learning and memory. PMID:11739263

  13. Stem- and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Dentate Gyrus of the Reeler Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjam Sibbe; Emanuel Kuner; Daniel Althof; Michael Frotscher

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been implicated in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Furthermore, the decline of neurogenesis accompanying aging could be involved in age-related cognitive deficits. It is believed that the neural stem cell niche comprises a specialized microenvironment regulating stem cell activation and maintenance. However, little is known about the significance of the extracellular matrix in controlling adult stem cells. Reelin is a large glycoprotein of the ext...

  14. ISX-9 can potentiate cell proliferation and neuronal commitment in the rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettio, Luis E B; Patten, Anna R; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; O'Rourke, Natasha F; Hanley, Ronan P; Kennedy, Samantha; Gopalakrishnan, Karthik; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Wulff, Jeremy; Christie, Brian R

    2016-09-22

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis can be modulated by various physiological and pathological conditions, including stress, affective disorders, and several neurological conditions. Given the proposed role of this form of structural plasticity in the functioning of the hippocampus (namely learning and memory and affective behaviors), it is believed that alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis might underlie some of the behavioral deficits associated with these psychiatric and neurological conditions. Thus, the search for compounds that can reverse these deficits with minimal side effects has become a recognized priority. In the present study we tested the pro-neurogenic effects of isoxazole 9 (Isx-9), a small synthetic molecule that has been recently identified through the screening of chemical libraries in stem cell-based assays. We found that administration of Isx-9 for 14days was able to potentiate cell proliferation and increase the number of immature neurons in the hippocampal DG of adult rats. In addition, Isx-9 treatment was able to completely reverse the marked reduction in these initial stages of the neurogenic process observed in vehicle-treated animals (which were submitted to repeated handling and exposure to daily intraperitoneal injections). Based on these results, we recommend that future neurogenesis studies that require repeated handling and manipulation of animals should include a naïve (non-manipulated) control to determine the baseline levels of hippocampal cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Overall, these findings demonstrate that Isx-9 is a promising synthetic compound for the mitigation of stress-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Future studies are thus warranted to evaluate the pro-neurogenic properties of Isx-9 in animal models of affective and neurological disorders associated with impaired hippocampal structural plasticity. PMID:27373772

  15. Effects of Ginko biloba leaf extract on the neurogenesis of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the elderly mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Noura M S; Amer, Ayman S; Abdelwahab, Soha

    2016-06-01

    Aging is associated with reduced hippocampal neurogenesis, which may in turn contribute to cognitive impairment. We assessed the effect of Ginkgo biloba (Gb) on hippocampal neurogenesis in elderly male mice using immunohistochemistry. We used anti-caspase-3 as a marker of apoptosis, anti-GFAP as a marker of neural stem cells, anti-Ki-67 as a specific marker for cellular proliferation and anti-doublecortin (DCX) to detect newly born neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of aged male mice. The 24-month-old male mice were divided into two groups: a control group treated with distilled water and a group fed with Gb at a dose of 100 mg/kg once daily for 28 days. A sharp decrease in apoptotic cells in Gb-treated compared to nontreated mice was observed by anti-csapase-3 immunostaining. A large number of GFAP+ve cells was found in the subgranular zone of the DG of Gb-treated mice, suggesting an increase in the pool of neural stem cells by Gb treatment. There was also an increase in Ki-67 immunoreactive cells, indicating increased cell proliferation in the DG in the Gb-treated compared to nontreated group. A significant increase in newborn DCX+ve neurons with well-developed tertiary dendrites was also found in the Gb-treated compared to nontreated group. Using Western blot analysis, the expression of DCX protein in the Gb group was also significantly increased compared to the control. The results support a beneficial role of Gb on hippocampal neurogenesis in the context of brain aging. PMID:26297531

  16. Different susceptibility to neurodegeneration of dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus: a study with transgenic mice overexpressing GSK3β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Fuster-Matanzo

    Full Text Available Dorsal hippocampal regions are involved in memory and learning processes, while ventral areas are related to emotional and anxiety processes. Hippocampal dependent memory and behaviour alterations do not always come out in neurodegenerative diseases at the same time. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus (DG regions respond in a different manner to increased glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β levels in GSK3β transgenic mice, a genetic model of neurodegeneration. Reactive astrocytosis indicate tissue stress in dorsal DG, while ventral area does not show that marker. These changes occurred with a significant reduction of total cell number and with a significantly higher level of cell death in dorsal area than in ventral one as measured by fractin-positive cells. Biochemistry analysis showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β in those residues that inactivate the enzyme in hippocampal ventral areas compared with dorsal area suggesting that the observed susceptibility is in part due to different GSK3 regulation. Previous studies carried out with this animal model had demonstrated impairment in Morris Water Maze and Object recognition tests point out to dorsal hippocampal atrophy. Here, we show that two tests used to evaluate emotional status, the light-dark box and the novelty suppressed feeding test, suggest that GSK3β mice do not show any anxiety-related disorder. Thus, our results demonstrate that in vivo overexpression of GSK3β results in dorsal but not ventral hippocampal DG neurodegeneration and suggest that both areas do not behave in a similar manner in neurodegenerative processes.

  17. Effects of formaldehyde exposure on granule cell number and volume of dentate gyrus: a histopathological and stereological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Huseyin; Songur, Ahmet; Tunc, Ayten Turkkani; Ozen, Oguz Aslan; Bas, Orhan; Yagmurca, Murat; Turgut, Mehmet; Sarsilmaz, Mustafa; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2006-11-29

    The hippocampal formation is a complex region of the brain related to memory and learning. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether exposure of neonatal rats to formaldehyde (FA) had either early or delayed effects on the numbers of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG). After birth, the neonatal male Wistar rats were exposed throughout a 30-day period to various concentrations of FA: 0 (control group), 6 ppm (low concentration group) and 12 ppm (high concentration group). This was done by placing them for 6 h/day and 5 days per week in a glass chamber containing FA vapor. Then, five animals from each group were anesthetized and decapitated on postnatal day (PND) 30, and the remaining five animals were sacrificed on PND 90 by intracardiac perfusion using 10% neutral buffered FA solution. The Cavalieri principle of stereological approaches was used to determine the volume of the DG in these sections. The optical fractionator counting method was used to estimate the total number of granule cells in the DG. The appearance of granule cells was normal under light microscopy in all PND 30 and PND 90 groups. There were significant age-related reductions in the volume of the DG at PND 90 irrespective of which group was examined. Significant age-related neuron loss was also determined at PND 90 compared to that at PND 30. Rats treated with a high concentration FA were found to have fewer granule cells than either the animals treated with a low concentration FA or the control group (pcells in the DG may be vulnerable to stress and the concentration of FA to which they are exposed during early postnatal life, and also that a neurotoxic effect of high dose FA on cell number is only seen after a long time period. These results may explain why some disorders do not appear until later life. PMID:17011527

  18. Effects of Habitat and Social Complexity on Brain Size, Brain Asymmetry and Dentate Gyrus Morphology in Two Octodontid Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrero, Raúl; Fernández-Aburto, Pedro; Ly-Prieto, Álvaro; Delgado, Scarlett E; Mpodozis, Jorge; Ebensperger, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Navigational and social challenges due to habitat conditions and sociality are known to influence dentate gyrus (DG) morphology, yet the relative importance of these factors remains unclear. Thus, we studied three natural populations of O. lunatus (Los Molles) and Octodon degus (El Salitre and Rinconada), two caviomorph species that differ in the extent of sociality and with contrasting vegetation cover of habitat used. The brains and DG of male and female breeding degus with simultaneous information on their physical and social environments were examined. The extent of sociality was quantified from total group size and range area overlap. O. degus at El Salitre was more social than at Rinconada and than O. lunatus from Los Molles. The use of transects to quantify cover of vegetation (and other physical objects in the habitat) and measures of the spatial behavior of animals indicated animal navigation based on unique cues or global landmarks is more cognitively challenging to O. lunatus. During lactation, female O. lunatus had larger brains than males. Relative DG volume was similar across sexes and populations. The right hemisphere of male and female O. lunatus had more cells than the left hemisphere, with DG directional asymmetry not found in O. degus. Degu population differences in brain size and DG cell number seemed more responsive to differences in habitat than to differences in sociality. Yet, large-sized O. degus (but not O. lunatus) that ranged over larger areas and were members of larger social groups had more DG cells per hemisphere. Thus, within-population variation in DG cell number by hemisphere was consistent with a joint influence of habitat and sociality in O. degus at El Salitre. PMID:27045373

  19. Shifts in excitatory/inhibitory balance by juvenile stress: A role for neuron-astrocyte interaction in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Anne; Ivens, Sebastian; Papageorgiou, Ismini E; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Saiepour, Nasrin; Brück, Wolfgang; Richter-Levin, Gal; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Childhood trauma is a well-described risk factor for the development of stress-related psychopathology such as posttraumatic stress disorder or depression later in life. Childhood adversity can be modeled in rodents by juvenile stress (JS) protocols, resulting in impaired coping with stressful challenges in adulthood. In the current study, we investigated the long-lasting impact of JS on the expression of molecular factors for glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake and turnover in sublayers of the dentate gyrus (DG) using laser microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We observed reduced mRNA expression levels after JS for factors mediating astrocytic glutamate and GABA uptake and degradation. These alterations were prominently observed in the dorsal but not ventral DG granule cell layer, indicating a lasting change in astrocytic GABA and glutamate metabolism that may affect dorsal DG network activity. Indeed, we observed increased inhibition and a lack of facilitation in response to paired-pulse stimulation at short interstimulus intervals in the dorsal DG after JS, while no alterations were evident in basal synaptic transmission or forms of long-term plasticity. The shift in paired-pulse response was mimicked by pharmacologically blocking the astrocytic GABA transporter GAT-3 in naïve animals. Accordingly, reduced expression levels of GAT-3 were confirmed at the protein level in the dorsal granule cell layer of rats stressed in juvenility. Together, these data demonstrate a lasting shift in the excitatory/inhibitory balance of dorsal DG network activity by JS that appears to be mediated by decreased GABA uptake into astrocytes. GLIA 2016;64:911-922. PMID:26875694

  20. Different patterns of amygdala priming differentially affect dentate gyrus plasticity and corticosterone, but not CA1 plasticity.

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    Rose-Marie eVouimba

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced activation of the amygdala is involved in the modulation of memory processes in the hippocampus. However, stress effects on amygdala and memory remain complex. The activation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA was found to modulate plasticity in other brain areas, including the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated a differential effect of BLA priming on LTP in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG. While BLA priming suppressed long term potentiation (LTP in CA1, it was found to enhance it in the DG. However, since the amygdala itself is amenable to experience-induced plasticity it is thus conceivable that when activity within the amygdala is modified this will have impact on the way the amygdala modulates activity and plasticity in other brain areas. In the current study we examined the effects of different patterns of BLA activation on the modulation of LTP in the DG and CA1, as well as on serum corticosterone (CORT. In CA1, BLA priming impaired LTP induction as was reported before. In contrast, in the DG, varying BLA stimulation intensity and frequency resulted in differential effects on LTP, ranging from no effect to strong impairment or enhancement. Varying BLA stimulation patterns resulted in also differential alterations in Serum CORT, leading to higher CORT levels being positively correlated with LTP magnitude in DG but not in CA1.The results support the notion of a differential role for the DG in aspects of memory, and add to this view the possibility that DG-associated aspects of memory will be enhanced under more emotional or stressful conditions. It is interesting to think of BLA patterns of activation and the differential levels of circulating CORT as two arms of the emotional and stress response that attempt to synchronize brain activity to best meet the challenge. It is foreseeable to think of abnormal such synchronization under extreme conditions, which would lead to the development of maladaptive behavior.

  1. Oxytocin depolarizes fast-spiking hilar interneurons and induces GABA release onto mossy cells of the rat dentate gyrus.

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    Harden, Scott W; Frazier, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    Delivery of exogenous oxytocin (OXT) to central oxytocin receptors (OXT-Rs) is currently being investigated as a potential treatment for conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, social anxiety, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Despite significant research implicating central OXT signaling in modulation of mood, affect, social behavior, and stress response, relatively little is known about the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying these complex actions, particularly in brain regions which express the OXT-R but lie outside of the hypothalamus (where OXT-synthesizing neurons reside). We report that bath application of low concentrations of the selective OXT-R agonist Thr4,Gly7-OXT (TGOT) reliably and robustly drives GABA release in the dentate gyrus in an action potential dependent manner. Additional experiments led to identification of a small subset of small hilar interneurons that are directly depolarized by acute application of TGOT. From a physiological perspective, TGOT-responsive hilar interneurons have high input resistance, rapid repolarization velocity during an action potential, and a robust afterhyperpolarization. Further, they fire irregularly (or stutter) in response to moderate depolarization, and fire quickly with minimal spike frequency accommodation in response to large current injections. From an anatomical perspective, TGOT responsive hilar interneurons have dense axonal arborizations in the hilus that were found in close proximity with mossy cell somata and/or proximal dendrites, and also invade the granule cell layer. Further, they have primary dendrites that always extend into the granule cell layer, and sometimes have clear arborizations in the molecular layer. Overall, these data reveal a novel site of action for OXT in an important limbic circuit, and represent a significant step towards better understanding how endogenous OXT may modulate flow of information in hippocampal networks. © 2016 Wiley

  2. Inhibition of injury-induced cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus impairs spontaneous cognitive recovery after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong; Daniels, Teresa E; Rolfe, Andrew; Waters, Michael; Hamm, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Neurogenesis persists throughout life in the neurogenic regions of the mature mammalian brain, and this response is enhanced after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the hippocampus, adult neurogenesis plays an important role in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory functions and is thought to contribute to the spontaneous cognitive recovery observed after TBI. Utilizing an antimitotic agent, arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C), the current study investigated the direct association of injury-induced hippocampal neurogenesis with cognitive recovery. In this study, adult rats received a moderate lateral fluid percussion injury followed by a 7-day intraventricular infusion of 2% Ara-C or vehicle. To examine the effect of Ara-C on cell proliferation, animals received intraperitoneal injections of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), to label dividing cells, and were sacrificed at 7 days after injury. Brain sections were immunostained for BrdU or doublecortin (DCX), and the total number of BrdU(+) or DCX(+) cells in the hippocampus was quantified. To examine the outcome of inhibiting the injury-induced cell proliferative response on cognitive recovery, animals were assessed on Morris water maze (MWM) tasks at 21-25 or 56-60 days postinjury. We found that a 7-day infusion of Ara-C significantly reduced the total number of BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) in both hemispheres. Moreover, inhibition of the injury-induced cell proliferative response in the DG completely abolished the innate cognitive recovery on MWM performance at 56-60 days postinjury. These results support the causal relationship of injury-induced hippocampal neurogenesis on cognitive functional recovery and suggest the importance of this endogenous repair mechanism on restoration of hippocampal function. PMID:25242459

  3. Sustained lentiviral-mediated overexpression of microRNA124a in the dentate gyrus exacerbates anxiety- and autism-like behaviors associated with neonatal isolation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Amine

    2016-09-15

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are highly disabling psychiatric disorders. Despite a strong genetic etiology, there are no efficient therapeutic interventions that target the core symptoms of ASD. Emerging evidence suggests that dysfunction of microRNA (miR) machinery may contribute to the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in ASD. Here, we report a stress model demonstrating that neonatal isolation-induced long-lasting hippocampal elevation of miR124a was associated with reduced expression of its target BDNF mRNA. In addition, we investigated the impact of lentiviral-mediated overexpression of miR124a into the dentate gyrus (DG) on social interaction, repetitive- and anxiety-like behaviors in the neonatal isolation (Iso) model of autism. Rats isolated from the dams on PND 1 to PND 11 were assessed for their social interaction, marble burying test (MBT) and repetitive self-grooming behaviors as adults following miR124a overexpression. Also, anxiety-like behavior and locomotion were evaluated in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. Results show that, consistent with previously published reports, Iso rats displayed decreased social interaction contacts but increased repetitive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Interestingly, across both autism- and anxiety-like behavioral assays, miR124a overexpression in the DG significantly exacerbated repetitive behaviors, social impairments and anxiety with no effect on locomotor activity. Our novel findings attribute neonatal isolation-inducible cognitive impairments to induction of miR124a and consequently suppressed BDNF mRNA, opening venues for intercepting these miR124a-mediated damages. They also highlight the importance of studying microRNAs in the context of ASD and identify miR124a as a novel potential therapeutic target for improving mood disorders. PMID:27211062

  4. Prevention by Regular Exercise of Acute Sleep Deprivation-Induced Impairment of Late Phase LTP and Related Signaling Molecules in the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaar, Munder A; Dao, An T; Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2016-07-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 regions of the hippocampus are intimately related physically and functionally, yet they react differently to insults. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of regular treadmill exercise on late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and its signaling cascade in the DG region of the hippocampus of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-deprived rats. Adult Wistar rats ran on treadmills for 4 weeks then were acutely sleep deprived for 24 h using the modified multiple platform method. After sleep deprivation, the rats were anesthetized and L-LTP was induced in the DG region. Extracellular field potentials from the DG were recorded in vivo, and levels of L-LTP-related signaling proteins were assessed both before and after L-LTP expression using immunoblot analysis. Sleep deprivation reduced the basal levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (P-CREB) as well as other upstream modulators including calcium/calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the DG of the hippocampus. Regular exercise prevented impairment of the basal levels of P-CREB and total CREB as well as those of CaMKIV in sleep-deprived animals. Furthermore, regular exercise prevented sleep deprivation-induced inhibition of L-LTP and post-L-LTP downregulation of P-CREB and BDNF levels in the DG. The current findings show that our exercise regimen prevents sleep deprivation-induced deficits in L-LTP as well as the basal and poststimulation levels of key signaling molecules. PMID:25902862

  5. Effect of electroacupuncture on synaptic transmission in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cerebral ischemic injured rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibo Yu; Zhuoxin Yang; Ling Wang; Min Pi; Jiawei Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some studies suggest that the long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission may be the basis for the neural synaptic plasticity of hippocampus, but can be evoked by various factors including electroacupuncture.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture on the activities of basic synaptic transmission in dentate gyrus of hippocampus and the changes of high frequency stimulation (HFS) induced activity of synaptic transmission in cerebral ischemic injured rats.DESIGN: A randomized control trial.SETTING: Shenzhen Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated to Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS: Sixty healthy male Wistar rats, weighing 150-250 g, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The experiment began after adaptation of environment for 1 week under standard experimental environment. The main experimental instruments included the programming electrical acupuncture apparatus (PCEA, product of the Institute of Acupuncture and Meridians, Anhui College of Traditional Chinese Medicine) and multichannel physiologic recorder (RM-86, Nihon Konden).METHODS: The experiment was carried out in Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine between July 2003 and July 2004. ① Embedding of brain electrodes: In reference of the Pellegrino's rat brain atlas, the bipolar electrode stimulator was embedded into the perforant path (PP) anterior to the entorhinal area with location coordinates of AP 7.5 mm, L 4.2 mm and H 3.0 mm, that is, 7.5 mm posterior to the anterior fontanelle, 4.2 mm laterally on the right side and 3.0 mm under the subcortex. The subcortex recorder electrode coordinates are AP 3.8 mm, L 2.5 mm and H 3.5 mm, located in the granular cell layer of the unilateral dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus, at the site of which an opening with the diameter of 1.5 mm was drilled for the purpose of embedding of the stimulating and recording

  6. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs and local calcium signals that they trigger are fundamental for dendritic functions. Here we addressed the question what extent the changes of local dendritic membrane properties can contribute to the shaping of the coupling between dendritic action potentials and the local calcium responses. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiological and confocal imaging techniques we found that activation of dendritic GIRK channels via mGlu2 or GABAB receptors enhanced the bAP¬-triggered calcium signals in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs. The enhancement of calcium signals was significant only in those dendritic regions, where these receptors are predominantly expressed. Similarly to GIRK channel activation, somatic hyperpolarization by DC current injection (from -64 mV to -77 mV, significantly increased bAP-associated calcium signals in the proximal dendrites. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in the input resistance due to the rectification of the membrane potential of GCs. The effect of hyperpolarization on the calcium signals was maintained when T-type calcium currents were blocked but it decreased when GIRK channels were inhibited. Simultaneous dual somato-dendritic recordings from GCs showed that somatic hyperpolarization accelerated the repolarization phase of dendritic bAP in the proximal region whereas the rising phase and peak amplitude was not affected. We hypothesize that the larger driving force for calcium ions during the faster repolarization can contribute to the increasing in calcium signals. Employment of previously recorded dendritic bAP waveforms from hyperpolarized membrane potential as voltage command evoked larger calcium currents in nucleated patches compared to bAP waveform from the same recording at depolarized membrane potential. Furthermore, addition of native, high-voltage activated, inactivating potassium conductance by somatic dynamic clamp

  7. Involvement of dopamine D1 receptors of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in spatial learning and memory deficits in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, P; Wang, S; Zhang, Y; Lv, J; Jin, Q H

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the involvement of dopamine (DA) and its D1 receptors of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) in spatial learning and memory deficits in a rat model of vascular dementia (VD) established by permanent bilateral carotid occlusion. Spatial learning and memory abilities of rats were measured by Morris water maze, and extracellular concentrations of DA in the DG were determined by in vivo microdialysis. The DA concentrations in the DG decreased in the VD rats compared with sham-operated group. Microinjection of SFK38393 (D1 receptor agonist) into the DG attenuates spatial learning and memory deficits in the VD rats. PMID:25272945

  8. A cell adhesion molecule mimetic, FGL peptide, induces alterations in synapse and dendritic spine structure in the dentate gyrus of aged rats: a three-dimensional ultrastructural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popov, Victor I; Medvedev, Nikolay I; Kraev, Igor V;

    2008-01-01

    100 serial ultrathin sections. FGL affected neither hippocampal volume nor spine or synaptic density in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, it increased the ratio of mushroom to thin spines, number of multivesicular bodies and also increased the frequency of appearance of coated...... pits. Three-dimensional analysis showed a significant decrease in both post-synaptic density and apposition zone curvature of mushroom spines following FGL treatment, whereas for thin spines the convexity of the apposition zone increased. These data indicate that FGL induces large changes in the fine...

  9. Redistribution of ionotropic glutamate receptors detected by laser microdissection of the rat dentate gyrus 48 h following LTP induction in vivo.

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    Jeremy T T Kennard

    Full Text Available The persistence and input specificity of long-term potentiation (LTP make it attractive as a mechanism of information storage. In its initial phase, both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that LTP is associated with increased membrane localization of AMPA receptor subunits, but the molecular basis of LTP maintenance over the long-term is still unclear. We have previously shown that expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits is elevated in whole homogenates prepared from dentate gyrus 48 h after LTP induction in vivo. In the present study, we utilized laser microdissection (LMD techniques to determine whether AMPA and NMDA receptor upregulation occurs specifically in the stimulated regions of the dentate gyrus dendritic arbor. Receptor proteins GluN1, GluA1 and GluA2, as well as postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa and tubulin were detected by Western blot analysis in microdissected samples. Gradients of expression were observed for GluN1 and GluA2, decreasing from the inner to the outer zones of the molecular layer, and were independent of LTP. When induced at medial perforant path synapses, LTP was associated with an apparent specific redistribution of GluA1 and GluN1 to the middle molecular layer that contains these synapses. These data indicate that glutamate receptor proteins are delivered specifically to dendritic regions possessing LTP-expressing synapses, and that these changes are preserved for at least 48 h.

  10. Two-Stage Translational Control of Dentate Gyrus LTP Consolidation Is Mediated by Sustained BDNF-TrkB Signaling to MNK

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    Debabrata Panja

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BDNF signaling contributes to protein-synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity, but the dynamics of TrkB signaling and mechanisms of translation have not been defined. Here, we show that long-term potentiation (LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus of live rodents requires sustained (hours BDNF-TrkB signaling. Surprisingly, this sustained activation maintains an otherwise labile signaling pathway from TrkB to MAP-kinase-interacting kinase (MNK. MNK activity promotes eIF4F translation initiation complex formation and protein synthesis in mechanistically distinct early and late stages. In early-stage translation, MNK triggers release of the CYFIP1/FMRP repressor complex from the 5′-mRNA cap. In late-stage translation, MNK regulates the canonical translational repressor 4E-BP2 in a synapse-compartment-specific manner. This late stage is coupled to MNK-dependent enhanced dendritic mRNA translation. We conclude that LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus is mediated by sustained BDNF signaling to MNK and MNK-dependent regulation of translation in two functionally and mechanistically distinct stages.

  11. Beneficial effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on spatial learning and the dendritic tree of dentate gyrus granule cells in aged rats

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    Mohammad Hosseini-Sharifabad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hippocampal formation, particularly the dentate gyrus (DG, shows age-related morphological changes that could cause memory decline. It is indicated that Boswellia resins attenuates memory deficits and the major component of Boswellia serrata (Bs gum resin, beta boswellic acid increased neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Boswellia treatment on spatial learning performance and the morphology of dentate granule cells in aged rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male Wistar rats (24 months old were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was intragastrically administered with the aqueous extract of Bs (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks and control group received a similar volume of water. Spatial learning performance of rats was tested using Morris water maze task. At the end of experiment, the brain was removed and the right hippocampus was serially sectioned for morphometric analysis. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volume of the DG. A quantitative Golgi study was used to analyze the dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. Results: Chronic treatment with Bs improved spatial learning capability during the three acquisition days. Comparisons also revealed that Bs-treated aged rat had greater DG with increased dendritic complexity in the dentate granule cells than control rats. Hippocampal granule cells of Bs-treated aged rats had more dendritic segments, larger arbors, more numerical branching density and more dendritic spines in comparison to control animals. Conclusion: This study provided a neuro-anatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with Bs.

  12. Effects of unpredictable chronic stress on behavior and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in CA3 subfield and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in different aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; JI Yong-juan; JIANG Hong; LIU De-xiang; ZHANG Qian; FAN Shu-jian; PAN Fang

    2009-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a stress-responsive intercellular messenger modifying hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The interaction between stress and age in BDNF expression is currently not fully understood. This study was conducted to observe unpredictable stress effect on behavior and BDNF expression in CA3 subfield (CA3) and dentate gyrus of hippocampus in different aged rats. Methods Forty-eight Wistar rats of two different ages (2 months and 15 months) were randomly assigned to six groups: two control groups and four stress groups. The rats in the stress group received three weeks of unpredictable mild stress. The depression state and the stress level of the animals were determined by sucrose preference test and observation of exploratory behavior in an open field (OF) test. The expressions of BDNF in CA3 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were measured using immunohistochemistry. Results Age and stress had different effects on the behavior of different aged animals (age: F=6.173, P <0.05, stress: F=6.056, P <0.05). Stress was the main factor affecting sucrose preference (F=123.608, P <0.05). Decreased sucrose preference and suppressed behavior emerged directly following stress, lasting to at least the eighth day after stress in young animals (P <0.05). The older stress rats showed a lower sucrose preference than young stress rats (P <0.05). Older control rats behaved differently from the younger control animals in the OF test, spending more time in the central square (P <0.05), exhibiting fewer vertical movements (P <0.05) and less grooming (P <0.05). Following exposure to stress, older-aged rats showed no obvious changes in vertical movement and grooming. This indicates that aged rats were in an unexcited state before the stress period, and responded less to stressful stimuli than younger rats. There was significantly lower BDNF expression in the CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus following stress

  13. Bumetanide promotes neural precursor cell regeneration and dendritic development in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia

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    Wang-shu Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bumetanide has been shown to lessen cerebral edema and reduce the infarct area in the acute stage of cerebral ischemia. Few studies focus on the effects of bumetanide on neuroprotection and neurogenesis in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. We established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by injecting endothelin-1 in the left cortical motor area and left corpus striatum. Seven days later, bumetanide 200 µg/kg/day was injected into the lateral ventricle for 21 consecutive days with a mini-osmotic pump. Results demonstrated that the number of neuroblasts cells and the total length of dendrites increased, escape latency reduced, and the number of platform crossings increased in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. These findings suggest that bumetanide promoted neural precursor cell regeneration, dendritic development and the recovery of cognitive function, and protected brain tissue in the chronic stage of ischemia.

  14. Excitotoxic median raphe lesions aggravate working memory storage performance deficits caused by scopolamine infusion into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the inhibitory avoidance task in rats

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    Babar E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the median raphe nucleus (MRN serotonergic system and the septohippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system in the modulation of immediate working memory storage performance were investigated. Rats with sham or ibotenic acid lesions of the MRN were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and tested in a light/dark step-through inhibitory avoidance task in which response latency to enter the dark compartment immediately after the shock served as a measure of immediate working memory storage. MRN lesion per se did not alter response latency. Post-training intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion (2 and 4 µg/side produced a more marked reduction in response latencies in the lesioned animals compared to the sham-lesioned rats. Results suggest that the immediate working memory storage performance is modulated by synergistic interactions between serotonergic projections of the MRN and the muscarinic cholinergic system of the hippocampus.

  15. Bumetanide promotes neural precursor cell regeneration and dendritic development in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang-shu; Sun, Xuan; Song, Cheng-guang; Mu, Xiao-peng; Ma, Wen-ping; Zhang, Xing-hu; Zhao, Chuan-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Bumetanide has been shown to lessen cerebral edema and reduce the infarct area in the acute stage of cerebral ischemia. Few studies focus on the effects of bumetanide on neuroprotection and neurogenesis in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. We established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by injecting endothelin-1 in the left cortical motor area and left corpus striatum. Seven days later, bumetanide 200 µg/kg/day was injected into the lateral ventricle for 21 consecutive days with a mini-osmotic pump. Results demonstrated that the number of neuroblasts cells and the total length of dendrites increased, escape latency reduced, and the number of platform crossings increased in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. These findings suggest that bumetanide promoted neural precursor cell regeneration, dendritic development and the recovery of cognitive function, and protected brain tissue in the chronic stage of ischemia.

  16. Time-dependent induction of depotentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats: involvement of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, A; Reymann, K G; Manahan-Vaughan, D

    1999-11-01

    Depotentiation comprises a reversal of tetanization-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) which occurs following low-frequency stimulation (LFS) in the hippocampus in vivo. Although depotentiation has been consistently demonstrated in the CA1 region, no positive reports of the existence of depotentiation in the dentate gyrus in vivo have occurred. This study therefore investigated whether depotentiation is possible in the dentate gyrus in vivo. We found that depotentiation can be induced, but it is very tightly dependent on the interval between tetanization and LFS. Thus, LFS given 2 or 5 min following tetanization produced significant depotentiation, whereas LFS given 10-30 min following tetanization had no significant effect on the expression of LTP. Depotentiation occurred in two phases: a transient depression of evoked responses to below pre-tetanization values, which occurred in the first 60 min following LFS, and a recovery of this response to a stable level of synaptic transmission which comprised a significant reduction in the magnitude of LTP. Group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) play an important role in the expression of long-term depression in vivo. We therefore investigated whether group 2 mGluRs contribute to depotentiation. The group 2 antagonist (2S)-alpha-ethylglutamic acid (EGLU) inhibited the early transient depression at a concentration which inhibits LTD in vivo, but did not block the expression of depotentiation. EGLU also inhibited the transient depression induced by 5 Hz given alone. Increasing the concentration of EGLU prevented depotentiation, however. The group 2 agonist (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenyl- glycine (4C3HPG) inhibited LTP and enhanced depotentiation. These data suggest a role for group 2 mGluRs in depotentiation. PMID:10583475

  17. Defective synaptic transmission and structure in the dentate gyrus and selective fear memory impairment in the Rsk2 mutant mouse model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, Elise; Farley, Séverine; Poirier, Roseline; Dallerac, Glenn; Chagneau, Carine; Pannetier, Solange; Hanauer, André; Davis, Sabrina; Vaillend, Cyrille; Laroche, Serge

    2013-10-01

    The Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a syndromic form of intellectual disability caused by loss-of-function of the RSK2 serine/threonine kinase encoded by the rsk2 gene. Rsk2 knockout mice, a murine model of CLS, exhibit spatial learning and memory impairments, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we examined the performance of Rsk2 knockout mice in cued, trace and contextual fear memory paradigms and identified selective deficits in the consolidation and reconsolidation of hippocampal-dependent fear memories as task difficulty and hippocampal demand increase. Electrophysiological, biochemical and electron microscopy analyses were carried out in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus to explore potential alterations in neuronal functions and structure. In vivo and in vitro electrophysiology revealed impaired synaptic transmission, decreased network excitability and reduced AMPA and NMDA conductance in Rsk2 knockout mice. In the absence of RSK2, standard measures of short-term and long-term potentiation (LTP) were normal, however LTP-induced CREB phosphorylation and expression of the transcription factors EGR1/ZIF268 were reduced and that of the scaffolding protein SHANK3 was blocked, indicating impaired activity-dependent gene regulation. At the structural level, the density of perforated and non-perforated synapses and of multiple spine boutons was not altered, however, a clear enlargement of spine neck width and post-synaptic densities indicates altered synapse ultrastructure. These findings show that RSK2 loss-of-function is associated in the dentate gyrus with multi-level alterations that encompass modifications of glutamate receptor channel properties, synaptic transmission, plasticity-associated gene expression and spine morphology, providing novel insights into the mechanisms contributing to cognitive impairments in CLS. PMID:23742761

  18. Low-frequency stimulation induces long-term depression and slow onset long-term potentiation at perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jossina; Morales, Isaiah S; Villarreal, Desiree M; Derrick, Brian E

    2014-03-01

    The expression of homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) is thought to mediate a crucial role in sustaining memory function. Our in vivo investigations of LTD expression at lateral (LPP) and medial perforant path (MPP) synapses in the dentate gyrus (DG) corroborate prior demonstrations that PP-DG LTD is difficult to induce in intact animals. In freely moving animals, LTD expression occurred inconsistently among LPP-DG and MPP-DG responses. Interestingly, following acute electrode implantation in anesthetized rats, low-frequency stimulation (LFS; 900 pulses, 1 Hz) promotes slow-onset LTP at both MPP-DG and LPP-DG synapses that utilize distinct induction mechanisms. Systemic administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (+/-)-cyclopiperidine-6-piperiperenzine (CPP; 10 mg/kg) 90 min before LFS selectively blocked MPP-DG but not LPP-DG slow onset LTP, suggesting MPP-DG synapses express a NMDA receptor-dependent slow onset LTP whereas LPP-DG slow onset LTP induction is NMDA receptor independent. In experiments where paired-pulse LFS (900 paired pulses, 200-ms paired-pulse interval) was used to induce LTD, paired-pulse LFS of the LPP resulted in rapid onset LTP of DG responses, whereas paired-pulse LFS of the MPP induced slow onset LTP of DG responses. Although LTD observations were very rare following acute electrode implantation in anesthetized rats, LPP-DG LTD was demonstrated in some anesthetized rats with previously implanted electrodes. Together, our data indicate in vivo PP-DG LTD expression is an inconsistent phenomenon that is primarily observed in recovered animals, suggesting perturbation of the dentate through surgery-related tissue trauma influences both LTD incidence and LTP induction at PP-DG synapses in vivo. PMID:24335215

  19. Preventing effect of L-type calcium channel blockade on electrophysiological alterations in dentate gyrus granule cells induced by entorhinal amyloid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholami Pourbadie

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD. EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs, nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days, almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Bangle (Zingiber purpureum) Improves Spatial Learning, Reduces Deficits in Memory, and Promotes Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of Senescence-Accelerated Mouse P8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Megumi; Iizuka, Michiro; Matsui, Nobuaki; Hosogi, Kazuko; Imai, Akiko; Abe, Noriaki; Shiraishi, Hisashi; Hirata, Ayumu; Yagi, Yusuke; Jobu, Kohei; Yokota, Junko; Kato, Eishin; Hosoda, Shinya; Yoshioka, Saburo; Harada, Kenichi; Kubo, Miwa; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Bangle (Zingiber purpureum) is a tropical ginger that is used as a spice in Southeast Asia. Phenylbutenoid dimers isolated from Bangle have exhibited neurotrophic effects in primary cultured rat cortical neurons and PC12 cells. Furthermore, chronic treatment with phenylbutenoid dimers enhances hippocampal neurogenesis in olfactory bulbectomized mice. In this study, we investigated the effects of Bangle extract on behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. SAMP8 mice, which are an established model for accelerated aging, with age-related learning and memory impairments, were given a Bangle-containing diet for 1 month, and subsequent behavioral tests and immunohistochemistry for Ki67, a proliferating cell marker, were performed. We found that the Bangle-containing diet improved spatial learning and memory deficits in the Morris water maze and significantly increased the numbers of Ki67-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the SAMP8 mice. In addition, the Bangle extract exhibited a neurotrophin-like activity as indicated by the induction of neurite sprouting in PC12 cells. Our results suggest that Bangle is beneficial for the prevention of age-related progression of cognitive impairment. PMID:26829513

  1. Orexin A-mediated AKT signaling in the dentate gyrus contributes to the acquisition, expression and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sui-Jun; Cui, Yu; Huang, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Jin-Xiang; Xin, Wen-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a critical brain region contributing to learning and memory, is involved in the addiction and relapse to abused drugs. Emerging studies also suggest the role of orexin signaling in the rewarding behavior induced by repeated exposure to opiates. In the present study, we investigated the dynamic adaptation of orexin signaling in the DG and its functional significance in the acquisition, expression, maintenance of and relapse to rewarding behavior induced by morphine. Repeated place conditioning with morphine significantly increased the orexin A content released from the lateral hypothalamic area projecting neurons into the DG. Local infusions of orexin A into the DG sensitized the acquisition of and relapse to the conditioned place preference induced by morphine. The application of the orexin receptor type 1 (OXR1) antagonist SB334867 significantly abolished the acquisition, expression and maintenance of the conditioned place preference induced by repeated exposure to morphine. Furthermore, the significant increase of the phosphorylation of AKT in the DG was associated with preference for the morphine-paired chamber in rats, which was reversed by the local administration of an OXR1 antagonist. Thus, these findings suggested that the dynamic upregulation of orexin A signaling, via the AKT pathway in the DG, may promote the acquisition and maintenance of opioid-induced craving behaviors and may increase sensitivity to the rewarding effect of subsequent opioids. PMID:25757577

  2. Regulation of depotentiation and long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats by dopamine D2-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Kulla, Alexander

    2003-02-01

    Dopamine receptors are significantly involved in hippocampus-based cognitive processes. Whereas the involvement of D1-like receptors in hippocampal plasticity has been described, the role of D2-like receptors remains to be clarified. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of D2-like receptors to synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats. Male Wistar rats underwent chronic implantation of a recording electrode in the granule cell layer, a stimulating electrode in the medial perforant path and a cannula in the ipsilateral cerebral ventricle (to enable drug administration). The D2-like receptor agonists quinpirole and noraporphine dose-dependently inhibited basal synaptic transmission. Agonist priming of D2-like receptors with a drug concentration which had no effect on synaptic transmission inhibited depotentiation but did not affect LTP. The agonist effects on depotentiation were prevented by the D2-like antagonist remoxipride. Remoxipride itself did not influence basal synaptic transmission or depotentiation. Interestingly, 'weak' LTP (24 h) was inhibited by prior application of remoxipride. These results suggest a specific role for dopamine D2-like receptors in the regulation of both depotentiation and LTP in vivo and offer an important and novel insight as to the involvement of these receptors in processes related to learning and memory. PMID:12507943

  3. Repeated stimulation of dopamine D1-like receptor and hyperactivation of mTOR signaling lead to generalized seizures, altered dentate gyrus plasticity, and memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Ceolin, Laura; Paucard, Alexia; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    The acute activation of the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1R) is involved in a plethora of functions ranging from increased locomotor activity to the facilitation of consolidation, storage, and retrieval of memories. Although much less characterized, epileptiform activities, usually triggered by disruption of the glutamate and GABA balance, have also been reported to involve the dopaminergic transmission. Using a combination of biochemical, immunohistochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral approaches we have investigated the consequences of repeated stimulation of D1R using the selective D1R-like agonist SKF81297. Here, we report that repeated systemic administration of SKF81297 induces kindled seizures in mice. These seizure episodes parallel the hyperactivation of the mTOR signaling in the hippocampus, leading to disrupted long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus (DG) and altered recognition memories. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin delays the development of SKF81297-induced kindled seizures, and rescues LTP in the DG and object recognition. Our results show that repeated stimulation of D1R is sufficient to induce generalized seizures leading to the overactivation of mTOR signaling, disrupted hippocampal plasticity, and impaired long-term recognition memories. This work highlights the interest of mTOR inhibitors as therapeutic strategies to reverse plasticity and cognitive deficits. PMID:25044816

  4. Differential long-term depression in CA3 but not in dentate gyrus following low-frequency stimulation of the medial perforant path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Thomas K; Peloquin, Pascal; Wu, Kun; Leung, L Stan

    2011-07-01

    Synaptic plasticity may depend not only on the afferent fibers but also on the recipient structure. The medial perforant path (MPP) from the entorhinalcortex projects to both the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3, resulting in excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in both areas. In this study, we showed that long-term depression (LTD) following low-frequency stimulation of MPP was found only in CA3a, a CA3 subfield, but not in DG. Field potentials were recorded and current source density (CSD) analyzed in CA3a and DG following stimulation of MPP in urethane-anesthetized rats. MPP evoked a short-latency population spike (PS) and EPSP in CA3a, phosphonovaleric acid or a nonselective group I/II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist (RS)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine. We conclude that an NMDAR and mGluR sensitive LTD is induced in CA3 but not in the DG following low-frequency MPP stimulation in vivo, and the bi-directional synaptic plasticity in CA3 may be responsible for its behavioral functions. PMID:21190218

  5. Vanillin and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol promotes cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of mice via the increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin-related kinase B

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; AHN, JI HYEON; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; PARK, SEUNG MIN; AHN, JI YUN; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il-Jun

    2016-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin) and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA) are well-known phenolic compounds, which possess various therapeutic properties and are widely found in a variety of plants. In the present study, the effects of vanillin and 4-HBA were first investigated on cell proliferation, as well as neuronal differentiation and integration of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent mice using Ki-67, doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry and 5-bromo-2′-de-oxyur...

  6. Effects of aluminum on the reduction of neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus of D-galactose-treated mice via increasing oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Jung, Hyo Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) accumulation increases with aging, and long-term exposure to Al is regarded as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of Al and/or D-galactose on neural stem cells, proliferating cells, differentiating neuroblasts, and mature neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. AlCl3 (40 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administered to C57BL/6J mice for 4 weeks. In addition, vehicle (physiological saline) or D-galactose (100 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected to these mice immediately after AlCl3 treatment. Neural stem cells, proliferating cells, differentiating neuroblasts, and mature neurons were detected using the relevant marker for each cell type, including nestin, Ki67, doublecortin, and NeuN, respectively, via immunohistochemistry. Subchronic (4 weeks) exposure to Al in mice reduced neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts without causing any changes to mature neurons. This Al-induced reduction effect was exacerbated in D-galactose-treated mice compared to vehicle-treated adult mice. Moreover, exposure to Al enhanced lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus and expression of antioxidants such as Cu, Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase in D-galactose-treated mice. These results suggest that Al accelerates the reduction of neural stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiating neuroblasts in D-galactose-treated mice via oxidative stress, without inducing loss in mature neurons. PMID:26243606

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 as Predictor of Body Mass Index and Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis: Neuroplasticity and the Metabolic Milieu

    OpenAIRE

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Shariful Syed; Perera, Tarique D.; Sasha L Fulton; Mary Ann Banerji; Dwork, Andrew J.; Kral, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates carbohydrate metabolism and promotes neurogenesis. We reported an inverse correlation between adult body mass and neurogenesis in nonhuman primates. Here we examine relationships between physiological levels of the neurotrophic incretin, plasma GLP-1 (pGLP-1), and body mass index (BMI) in adolescence to adult neurogenesis and associations with a diabesity diathesis and infant stress. Morphometry, fasting pGLP-1, insulin resistance, and lipid profiles ...

  8. Impact of a deletion of the full-length and short isoform of p75NTR on cholinergic innervation and the population of postmitotic doublecortin positive cells in the dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poser, Robert; Dokter, Martin; von Bohlen und Halbach, Viola; Berger, Stefan M.; Busch, Ruben; Baldus, Marian; Unsicker, Klaus; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of mice carrying a deletion of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR have allowed identifying p75NTR as an important structural regulator of the hippocampus. Most of the previous analyses were done using p75NTRExIII knockout mice which still express the short isoform of p75NTR. To scrutinize the role of p75NTR in the hippocampus, we analyzed adult and aged p75NTRExIV knockout mice, in which both, the short and the full-length isoform are deleted. Deletion of these isoforms induced morphological alterations in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), leading to an increase in the thickness of the molecular and granular layer. Based on these observations, we next determined the morphological substrates that might contribute to this phenotype. The cholinergic innervation of the molecular and granular layer of the DG was found to be significantly increased in the knockout mice. Furthermore, adult neurogenesis in the DG was found to be significantly altered with increased numbers of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells and reduced numbers of apoptotic cells in p75NTRExIV knockout mice. However, cell proliferation as measured by phosphohiston H3 (PH3) positive cell numbers was not affected. These morphological alterations (number of DCX-positive cells and increased cholinergic fiber densities) as well as reduced cell death in the DG are likely to contribute to the observed thickening of the granular layer in p75NTRExIV knockout mice. In addition, Sholl-analysis of DCX-positive neurons revealed a higher dendritic complexity and could thus be a possible morphological correlate for the increased thickness of the molecular layer in p75NTR deficient animals. Our data clearly demonstrate that deletion of both, the short and the full-length isoform of p75NTR affects DG morphology, due to alterations of the cholinergic system and an imbalance between neurogenesis and programmed cell death within the subgranular zone. PMID:26074780

  9. Impact of a deletion of the full-length and short isoform of p75NTR on cholinergic innervation and the population of postmitotic doublecortin positive cells in the dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert ePoser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of mice carrying a deletion of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR have allowed identifying p75NTR as an important structural regulator of the hippocampus. Most of the previous analyses were done using p75NTRExIII knockout mice which still express the short isoform of p75NTR. To scrutinize the role of p75NTR in the hippocampus, we analyzed adult and aged p75NTRExIV knockout mice, in which both, the short and the full-length isoform are deleted. Deletion of these isoforms induced morphological alterations in the adult dentate gyrus (DG, leading to an increase in the thickness of the molecular and granular layer. Based on these observations, we next determined the morphological substrates that might contribute to this phenotype. The cholinergic innervation of the molecular and granular layer of the DG was found to be significantly increased in the knockout mice. Furthermore, adult neurogenesis in the DG was found to be significantly altered with increased numbers of doublecortin (DCX positive cells and reduced numbers of apoptotic cells in p75NTRExIV knockout mice. However, cell proliferation as measured by phosphohiston H3 (PH3 positive cell numbers was not affected. These morphological alterations (number of DCX-positive cells and increased cholinergic fiber densities as well as reduced cell death in the DG are likely to contribute to the observed thickening of the granular layer in p75NTRExIV knockout mice. In addition, Sholl-analysis of DCX-positive neurons revealed a higher dendritic complexity and could thus be a possible morphological correlate for the increased thickness of the molecular layer in p75NTR deficient animals. Our data clearly demonstrate that deletion of both, the short and the full-length isoform of p75NTR affects DG morphology, due to alterations of the cholinergic system and an imbalance between neurogenesis and programmed cell death within the subgranular zone.

  10. Prenatal nicotine and maternal deprivation stress de-regulate the development of CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus neurons in hippocampus of infant rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    Full Text Available Adverse experiences by the developing fetus and in early childhood are associated with profound effects on learning, emotional behavior, and cognition as a whole. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure (NIC, postnatal maternal deprivation (MD or the combination of the two (NIC+MD to determine if hippocampal neuron development is modulated by exposure to drugs of abuse and/or stress. Growth of rat offspring exposed to MD alone or NIC+MD was repressed until after weaning. In CA1 but not CA3 of postnatal day 14 (P14 pups, MD increased pyramidal neurons, however, in dentate gyrus (DG, decreased granule neurons. NIC had no effect on neuron number in CA1, CA3 or DG. Unexpectedly, NIC plus MD combined caused a synergistic increase in the number of CA1 or CA3 neurons. Neuron density in CA regions was unaffected by treatment, but in the DG, granule neurons had a looser packing density after NIC, MD or NIC+MD exposure. When septotemporal axes were analyzed, the synergism of stress and drug exposure in CA1 and CA3 was associated with rostral, whereas MD effects were predominantly associated with caudal neurons. TUNEL labeling suggests no active apoptosis at P14, and doublecortin positive neurons and mossy fibers were diminished in NIC+MD relative to controls. The laterality of the effect of nicotine and/or maternal deprivation in right versus left hippocampus was also analyzed and found to be insiginificant. We report for the first time that early life stressors such as postnatal MD and prenatal NIC exposure, when combined, may exhibit synergistic consequences for CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neuron development, and a potential antagonistic influence on developing DG neurons. These results suggest that early stressors may modulate neurogenesis, apoptosis, or maturation of glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus in a region-specific manner during critical periods of neurodevelopment.

  11. Interaction between paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation during the stimulation of the cannabinoid and vanilloid systems in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Lida; Komaki, Alireza; Karamian, Ruhollah; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Komaki, Hamidreza

    2016-07-15

    Synaptic plasticity includes short-term and long-term changes in synaptic strength. Short-term plasticity can be used to assess the site mediating the long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP). The endogenous endocannabinoid systems can modulate LTP, and similarly, the activation of the vanilloid system has been shown to mediate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. In this study, we examined the interaction between short-term and long-term plasticity during the stimulation of the cannabinoid and vanilloid systems in the hippocampus of rats in vivo. Forty male Wistar rats, divided into four groups, were treated with the following compounds: control (saline+dimethyl sulfoxide), WIN55,212-2, capsaicin, and WIN55,212-2+capsaicin. The animals were anesthetized with urethane and then recording and stimulating electrodes were positioned at the dentate gyrus(DG) and perforant pathway(PP), respectively. Population spike (PS) amplitudes were measured before and after the induction of LTP, which was induced with high-frequency stimulation (HFS). The paired-pulse ratio (PPR) was measured before and after the induction of LTP in all groups. We showed that WIN55,212-2 reduced the PS amplitude after HFS, whereas the vanilloid agonist increased the induction of LTP compared with the control treatment. In the present study, we found that in the presence of WIN55,212-2 and capsaicin, the induction of LTP changed the PPR. Additionally, we showed that the co-administration of cannabinoid and vanilloid agonists modulate the PPR. These findings suggest the presynaptic expression of this LTP form, and therefore, this form of LTP is caused by the increase of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27130895

  12. Hippophae rhamnoides L.leaves extract enhances cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation through upregulation of intrinsic factors in the dentate gyrus of the aged gerbil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Hyeon Ahn; Bai Hui Chen; Joon Ha Park; In Hye Kim; Jeong-Hwi Cho; Jae-Chul Lee; Bing Chun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Hippophae rhamnoides L.(HL) exerts antioxidant activities against various oxidative stress conditions.In this study,we investigated effects of extract from HL leaves (HLE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of aged gerbils.Methods Aged gerbils (24 months) were divided into vehicle (saline)-treated-and HLE-treated-groups.The vehicle and HLE were orally administered with 200 mg/kg once a day for 20 days before sacrifice.Cell proliferation and neurobiast differentiation were examined in the DG using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX),respectively.We also observed changes in immunoreactivities of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2),brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF),and phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta (p-GSK-3β) to examine their relation with neurogenesis using immunohistochemistry.Results The administration of HLE significantly increased the number of Ki67-positive cells and DCX-positive neuroblasts with well-developed processes in the SGZ of the DG of the HLE-treated-group.In addition,immunoreactivities of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β were significantly increased in granule and polymorphic cells of the DG in the HLE-treated-group compared with those in the vehicle-treated-group.Conclusions HLE treatment significantly increased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation,showing that immunoreactivities of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β were significantly increased in the DG.These indicate that increased neuroblast differentiation neurogenesis may be closely related to upregulation of SOD1,SOD2,BDNF,and p-GSK-3β in aged gerbils.

  13. Tanshinone I Enhances Neurogenesis in the Mouse Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus via Increasing Wnt-3, Phosphorylated Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and β-Catenin Immunoreactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bai Hui; Park, Joon Ha; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun Jin; Shin, Bich Na; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kang, Il Jun; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul

    2016-08-01

    Tanshinone I (TsI), a lipophilic diterpene extracted from Danshan (Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae), exerts neuroprotection in cerebrovascular diseases including transient ischemic attack. In this study, we examined effects of TsI on cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the mouse dentate gyrus (DG) using Ki-67, BrdU and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry. Mice were treated with 1 and 2 mg/kg TsI for 28 days. In the 1 mg/kg TsI-treated-group, distribution patterns of BrdU, Ki-67 and DCX positive ((+)) cells in the SGZ were similar to those in the vehicle-treated-group. However, in the 2 mg/kg TsI-treated-group, double labeled BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells, which are mature neurons, as well as Ki-67(+), DCX(+) and BrdU(+) cells were significantly increased compared with those in the vehicle-treated-group. On the other hand, immunoreactivities and protein levels of Wnt-3, β-catenin and serine-9-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β), which are related with morphogenesis, were significantly increased in the granule cell layer of the DG only in the 2 mg/kg TsI-treated-group. Therefore, these findings indicate that TsI can promote neurogenesis in the mouse DG and that the neurogenesis is related with increases of Wnt-3, p-GSK-3β and β-catenin immunoreactivities. PMID:27053301

  14. Effects of mild hypothermia on the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 in neurons of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Yang; Feng Zheng; Jiami Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that mild hypothermia can protect against injury to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of mild hypothermia on microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Also, to study neuronal uhrastructural changes in the dentate gyrus to investigate the mechanism of the protection against injury to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion conferred by mild hypothermia.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized grouping, neural cell morphology trial was performed at the Laboratory Animal Center of Yijishan Hospital between March and June 2007.MATERIALS: Eighty-five healthy male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated to three groups: mild hyputhermia (n = 40), normothermia (n = 40), and sham-operated (n = 5).METHODS: Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was induced by the suture method in the mild hypothermia and normothermia groups, with a threading depth of 180.5 mm. In the sham-operated group, the suture was inserted 15 mm, with no vascular ligation, and was followed by reperfusion 2 hours later. In the sham-operated and normothermia groups, the rat rectal temperature was maintained at 36-37℃; in the mild hypothermia group, it was controlled at 32-33 ℃.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The hippocampal dentate gyrus was serially sectioned for hematoxylin-eosin staining and MAP2 immunohistochemistry. Ultrastructural changes and the MAP2 absorbance value of the hippocampal dentate gyrus were examined by transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: The sham-operated group exhibited approximately normal ultrastmcture of neurons in the bilateral hippocampal dentate gyms. In the normothermia group, ischemic hippocampal dentate gyms neurons were found with markedly fewer normal mitochondria, greatly proliferated rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a swollen and dysmorphic Golgi. In the mild hypothermia group, at each corresponding time point, these

  15. Functional and structural deficits of the dentate gyrus network coincide with emerging spontaneous seizures in an Scn1a mutant Dravet Syndrome model during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lee, Meng-Larn; Chang, Chun-Yun; Fan, Hsiang-Hsuan; Yu, I-Shing; Chen, You-Tzung; You, Jhih-Yi; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chang, Fang-Chia; Hsiao, Jane H; Khorkova, Olga; Liou, Horng-Huei; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Li-Jen; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2015-05-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is characterized by severe infant-onset myoclonic epilepsy along with delayed psychomotor development and heightened premature mortality. A primary monogenic cause is mutation of the SCN1A gene, which encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel subunit Nav1.1. The nature and timing of changes caused by SCN1A mutation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) network, a core area for gating major excitatory input to hippocampus and a classic epileptogenic zone, are not well known. In particularly, it is still not clear whether the developmental deficit of this epileptogenic neural network temporally matches with the progress of seizure development. Here, we investigated the emerging functional and structural deficits of the DG network in a novel mouse model (Scn1a(E1099X/+)) that mimics the genetic deficit of human DS. Scn1a(E1099X/+) (Het) mice, similarly to human DS patients, exhibited early spontaneous seizures and were more susceptible to hyperthermia-induced seizures starting at postnatal week (PW) 3, with seizures peaking at PW4. During the same period, the Het DG exhibited a greater reduction of Nav1.1-expressing GABAergic neurons compared to other hippocampal areas. Het DG GABAergic neurons showed altered action potential kinetics, reduced excitability, and generated fewer spontaneous inhibitory inputs into DG granule cells. The effect of reduced inhibitory input to DG granule cells was exacerbated by heightened spontaneous excitatory transmission and elevated excitatory release probability in these cells. In addition to electrophysiological deficit, we observed emerging morphological abnormalities of DG granule cells. Het granule cells exhibited progressively reduced dendritic arborization and excessive spines, which coincided with imbalanced network activity and the developmental onset of spontaneous seizures. Taken together, our results establish the existence of significant structural and functional developmental deficits of the DG network

  16. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) in dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells compared to group-housed (GH) mice. In the present study, together with the SI-induced decrease in plasma concentration of both progesterone and 3α,5α-THP, and an increase in THIP-stimulated GABAergic tonic currents, patch-clamp analysis of DG granule cells revealed a significant decrease in membrane input resistance and action potential (AP) firing rate, in SI compared to GH mice, suggesting that SI exerts an inhibitory action on neuronal excitability of these neurons. Voltage-clamp recordings of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) revealed a SI-associated decrease in frequency as well as a shift from paired-pulse (PP) depression to PP facilitation (PPF) of evoked EPSCs, indicative of a reduced probability of glutamate release. Daily administration of progesterone during isolation reverted the changes in plasma 3α,5α-THP as well as in GABAergic tonic currents and neuronal excitability caused by SI, but it had only a limited effect on the changes in the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Overall, the results obtained in this work, together with those previously published, indicate that exposure of mice to SI during adolescence reduces neuronal excitability of DG granule cells, an effect that may be linked to the increased GABAergic tonic currents as a consequence of the sustained decrease in plasma and hippocampal levels of neurosteroids. All these

  17. Anatomical integration of newly generated dentate granule neurons following traumatic brain injury in adult rats and its association to cognitive recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong; McGinn, Melissa J; Zhou, Zhengwen; Harvey, H Ben; Bullock, M Ross; Colello, Raymond J

    2007-03-01

    The hippocampus is particularly vulnerable to traumatic brain injury (TBI), the consequences of which are manifested as learning and memory deficits. Following injury, substantive spontaneous cognitive recovery occurs, suggesting that innate repair mechanisms exist in the brain. However, the underlying mechanism contributing to this is largely unknown. The existence of neural stem cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and their proliferative response following injury led us to speculate that neurogenesis may contribute to cognitive recovery following TBI. To test this, we first examined the time course of cognitive recovery following lateral fluid percussion injury in rats. Cognitive deficits were tested at 11-15, 26-30 or 56-60 days post-injury using Morris Water Maze. At 11-15 and 26-30 days post-injury, animals displayed significant cognitive deficits, which were no longer apparent at 56-60 days post-TBI, suggesting an innate cognitive recovery at 56-60 days. We next examined the proliferative response, maturational fate and integration of newly generated cells in the DG following injury. Specifically, rats received BrdU at 2-5 days post-injury followed by Fluorogold (FG) injection into the CA3 region at 56 days post-TBI. We found the majority of BrdU+ cells which survived for 10 weeks became dentate granule neurons, as assessed by NeuN and calbindin labeling, approximately 30% being labeled with FG, demonstrating their integration into the hippocampus. Additionally, some BrdU+ cells were synaptophysin-positive, suggesting they received synaptic input. Collectively, our data demonstrate the extensive anatomical integration of new born dentate granule neurons at the time when innate cognitive recovery is observed. PMID:17198703

  18. Association between tongue and lip functions and masticatory performance in young dentate adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, A; Kanazawa, M; Komagamine, Y; Minakuchi, S

    2015-11-01

    Motor functions of masticatory organs such as the tongue, lips, cheeks and mandible are known to deteriorate with age, thereby influencing masticatory performance. However, there are few reports on the relationships between tongue and lip functions and masticatory performance. To investigate the relationship between tongue and lip functions and comprehensive masticatory performance, by evaluating crushing, mixing and shearing abilities in young dentate adults. Participants comprised 51 dentate adults with a mean age of 25 years. Maximum tongue pressure and oral diadochokinesis were measured to evaluate tongue and lip functions. A multiple sieving method using peanuts was performed to evaluate crushing ability. A colour-changeable chewing gum was performed to evaluate mixing ability. A test gummy jelly was performed to evaluate shearing ability. The relationship between tongue and lip functions and each masticatory performance was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficients. In addition, stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of crushing ability. Crushing ability was significantly correlated with maximum tongue pressure and the number of repetitions of the syllables /pa/, /ta/ and /ka/. Maximum tongue pressure and number of repetitions of the syllable /pa/ were identified as significant predictors for crushing ability. Mixing ability was significantly correlated with the number of repetitions of the syllable /pa/. Shearing ability was not significantly correlated with tongue and lip functions. Masticatory performance during the chewing of brittle foods such as peanuts and solid foods such as chewing gum appears to be correlated with tongue and lip functions. PMID:26095117

  19. Convulsant doses of a dopamine D1 receptor agonist result in Erk-dependent increases in Zif268 and Arc/Arg3.1 expression in mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Manuela; O'Sullivan, Gerard J; Dunleavy, Mark; Alcacer, Cristina; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Henshall, David C; Waddington, John L; Valjent, Emmanuel; Fisone, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    Activation of dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) has been shown to induce epileptiform activity. We studied the molecular changes occurring in the hippocampus in response to the administration of the D1-type receptor agonist, SKF 81297. SKF 81297 at 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg induced behavioural seizures. Electrophysiological recordings in the dentate gyrus revealed the presence of epileptiform discharges peaking at 30-45 min post-injection and declining by 60 min. Seizures were prevented by the D1-type receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, or the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, CP 55,940. The effect of SKF 81297 was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK), in the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. This effect was also observed in response to administration of other D1-type receptor agonists, such as SKF83822 and SKF83959. In addition, SKF 81297 increased the phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6 and histone H3, two downstream targets of ERK. These effects were prevented by genetic inactivation of D1Rs, or by pharmacological inhibition of ERK. SKF 81297 was also able to enhance the levels of Zif268 and Arc/Arg3.1, two immediate early genes involved in transcriptional regulation and synaptic plasticity. These changes may be involved in forms of activity-dependent plasticity linked to the manifestation of seizures and to the ability of dopamine to affect learning and memory. PMID:21559295

  20. Aquisição de uma tarefa temporal (DRL por ratos submetidos a lesão seletiva do giro denteado The acquisition of a temporal task (DRL by dentate gyrus-selective colchicine lesioned rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lino Oliveira Bueno

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A lesão seletiva do giro denteado (DG reduz a eficiência do desempenho de ratos treinados pré-operatoriamente em um esquema de reforçamento diferencial de baixas taxas (DRL; embora os animais lesados sejam capazes de suprimir a resposta de pressão na barra por determinado intervalo de tempo após a resposta anterior, eles subestimam esse intervalo, resultando em um desempenho menos eficiente. Como os animais tinham recebido treinamento pré-operatório, não ficou claro se a lesão interfere na aquisição da discriminação temporal. Este estudo avaliou o efeito da lesão do DG na aquisição de uma tarefa de DRL-20 s. Ratos foram submetidos à neurocirurgia e então ao treino na tarefa de DRL-20 s. Os resultados mostraram que embora os animais lesados se beneficiem do treinamento na tarefa, sua aquisição não é tão eficiente quanto a exibida pelos animais controle. Os resultados sugerem ainda que a lesão do giro denteado interfere na acuidade da discriminação temporal.Previous studies have shown that dentate gyrus damage render rats less efficient than sham-operated controls in the performance of a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL-20 s task acquired prior to the lesion; even though the lesioned rats were able to postpone their responses after a previous bar press, they seem to underestimate time relative to sham-operated controls, which interferes with their performance. This study investigated the effects of multiplesite, intradentate, colchicine injections on the acquisition and performance of a DRL-20 s task in rats not exposed to preoperatory training, i.e., trained after the lesion. Results showed that the lesioned rats improved along repetitive training in the DRL-20 s task; however, relative to the sham-operated controls, their acquisition rate was slower and the level of proficiency achieved was poorer, indicating that damage to the dentate gyrus interferes with temporal discrimination.

  1. Blockade of NMDA receptor subtype NR2B prevents seizures but not apoptosis of dentate gyrus neurons in bacterial meningitis in infant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Täuber Martin G

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excitotoxic neuronal injury by action of the glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA subtype have been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis. The most potent and selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit is (R,S-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl-1-piperid inepropanol (RO 25-6981. Here we evaluated the effect of RO 25-6981 on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in an infant rat model of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Animals were randomized for treatment with RO 25-6981 at a dosage of either 0.375 mg (15 mg/kg; n = 28 or 3.75 mg (150 mg/kg; n = 15 every 3 h or an equal volume of sterile saline (250 μl; n = 40 starting at 12 h after infection. Eighteen hours after infection, animals were assessed clinically and seizures were observed for a period of 2 h. At 24 h after infection animals were sacrificed and brains were examined for apoptotic injury to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Results Treatment with RO 25-6981 had no effect on clinical scores, but the incidence of seizures was reduced (P Conclusions Treatment with a highly selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit failed to protect hippocampal neurons from injury in this model of pneumococcal meningitis, while it had some beneficial effect on the incidence of seizures.

  2. Vanillin and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol promotes cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of mice via the increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin-related kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Park, Seung Min; Ahn, Ji Yun; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il-Jun

    2016-04-01

    4-Hydroxy‑3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin) and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA) are well‑known phenolic compounds, which possess various therapeutic properties and are widely found in a variety of plants. In the present study, the effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA were first investigated on cell proliferation, as well as neuronal differentiation and integration of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent mice using Ki‑67, doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry and 5‑bromo‑2'‑deoxyuridine (BrdU)/feminizing Locus on X 3 (NeuN) double immunofluorescence. In both the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups, the number of Ki‑67+ cells, DCX+ neuroblasts and BrdU+/NeuN+ neurons were significantly increased in the subgranular zone of the DG, as compared with the vehicle group. In addition, the levels of brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin‑related kinase B (TrkB), a BDNF receptor, were significantly increased in the DG in the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups compared with the vehicle group. These results indicated that vanillin and 4‑HBA enhanced cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration of granule cells in the DG of adolescent mice . These neurogenic effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA may be closely associated with increases in BDNF and TrkB. PMID:26935641

  3. Seizure induces activation of multiple subtypes of neural progenitors and growth factors in hippocampus with neuronal maturation confined to dentate gyrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indulekha, Chandrasekharan L.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran [Neuro Stem Cell Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurobiology, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 014 (India); Thekkuveettil, Anoopkumar [Molecular Medicine, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); James, Jackson, E-mail: jjames@rgcb.res.in [Neuro Stem Cell Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurobiology, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 014 (India)

    2010-03-19

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is altered in response to different physiological and pathological stimuli. GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve} radial glial like Type-1 progenitors are considered to be the resident stem cell population in adult hippocampus. During neurogenesis these Type-1 progenitors matures to GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve} Type-2 progenitors and then to Type-3 neuroblasts and finally differentiates into granule cell neurons. In our study, using pilocarpine-induced seizure model, we showed that seizure initiated activation of multiple progenitors in the entire hippocampal area such as DG, CA1 and CA3. Seizure induction resulted in activation of two subtypes of Type-1 progenitors, Type-1a (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) and Type-1b (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup -ve}). We showed that majority of Type-1b progenitors were undergoing only a transition from a state of dormancy to activated form immediately after seizures rather than proliferating, whereas Type-1a showed maximum proliferation by 3 days post-seizure induction. Type-2 (GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) progenitors were few compared to Type-1. Type-3 (DCX{sup +ve}) progenitors showed increased expression of immature neurons only in DG region by 3 days after seizure induction indicating maturation of progenitors happens only in microenvironment of DG even though progenitors are activated in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus. Also parallel increase in growth factors expression after seizure induction suggests that microenvironmental niche has a profound effect on stimulation of adult neural progenitors.

  4. Seizure induces activation of multiple subtypes of neural progenitors and growth factors in hippocampus with neuronal maturation confined to dentate gyrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is altered in response to different physiological and pathological stimuli. GFAP+ve/nestin+ve radial glial like Type-1 progenitors are considered to be the resident stem cell population in adult hippocampus. During neurogenesis these Type-1 progenitors matures to GFAP-ve/nestin+ve Type-2 progenitors and then to Type-3 neuroblasts and finally differentiates into granule cell neurons. In our study, using pilocarpine-induced seizure model, we showed that seizure initiated activation of multiple progenitors in the entire hippocampal area such as DG, CA1 and CA3. Seizure induction resulted in activation of two subtypes of Type-1 progenitors, Type-1a (GFAP+ve/nestin+ve/BrdU+ve) and Type-1b (GFAP+ve/nestin+ve/BrdU-ve). We showed that majority of Type-1b progenitors were undergoing only a transition from a state of dormancy to activated form immediately after seizures rather than proliferating, whereas Type-1a showed maximum proliferation by 3 days post-seizure induction. Type-2 (GFAP-ve/nestin+ve/BrdU+ve) progenitors were few compared to Type-1. Type-3 (DCX+ve) progenitors showed increased expression of immature neurons only in DG region by 3 days after seizure induction indicating maturation of progenitors happens only in microenvironment of DG even though progenitors are activated in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus. Also parallel increase in growth factors expression after seizure induction suggests that microenvironmental niche has a profound effect on stimulation of adult neural progenitors.

  5. A novel 2- and 3-choice touchscreen-based continuous trial-unique nonmatching-to-location task (cTUNL) sensitive to functional differences between dentate gyrus and CA3 subregions of the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofink, D; Preusser, F; Mar, AC; Saksida, LM; Bussey, TJ

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The touchscreen continuous trial-unique non-matching to location task (cTUNL) has been developed to optimise a battery of tasks under NEWMEDS (Novel Methods leading to New Medication in Depression and Schizophrenia, http://www.newmeds-europe.com). It offers novel task features of both a practical and a theoretical nature compared to existing touchscreen tasks for spatial working memory. Objectives To determine whether the cTUNL task is sufficiently sensitive to differentiate between dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 hippocampal subregion contributions to performance. Methods The effect of DG and CA3 dysfunction on memory for locations in the cTUNL task was tested. Rats were assessed on versions of the task --2-choice and 3-choice – that differed in memory load. Performance was challenged using manipulations of delay and the spatial separation between target and sample locations. Results Dysfunction of the DG disrupts performance across both delay and spatial separations in 2-choice cTUNL when the delay is variable and unpredictable. Increasing the working memory load (3 stimuli) increases sensitivity to DG dysfunction, with deficits apparent at fixed, short delays. In contrast, CA3 dysfunction did not disrupt performance. Conclusion Acquisition of cTUNL was rapid, and the task was sensitive to manipulations of delays and separations. A 3-choice version of the task was found to be viable. Finally, both the 2- and 3-choice versions of the task were able to differentiate between limited dysfunction to different areas within the hippocampus. DG dysfunction affected performance when using unpredictable task parameters. CA3 dysfunction did not result in impairment, even at the longest delays tested. PMID:26220610

  6. 慢性砷中毒对小鼠齿状回GFAP表达的影响%Effects of chronic arsenic poisoning on GFAP expression in the dentate gyms of adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康朝胜; 孙宝飞; 余资江; 李玉飞

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate activation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the dentate gyrus of adult mice after chronic arsenic poisoning. Methods 80 healthy adult Kunming mice, weighing 20-22g, were divided into four groups: the normal control group, the low-dose group, the medium-dose group and the high-dose group ( 10 males and 10 females in each group). Mice in the four groups were respectively fed with distilled water, 1/5 LD50, 1/10 LD50 and 1/40 LD50 AS2O3 for 3 months, and the dosage was adjusted according to changes of weight. Then ability of learning and memory was tested by a Y-maze, and expression of the GFAP protein in the dentate gyrus by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Ability of learning and memory in the high-dose group was significantly lower than that in the normal control group ( P < 0.05 ). Immunohistochemical results showed that the number of GFAP-positive cells in the dentate gyrus was significantly more increased in the dose groups compared with the normal control group(P<0.01 ), and the average optical density was also increased (P <0.01 ). Western blot results showed the GFAP protein content increased with the dosage increasing (P <0.01 ). Conclusion Chronic arsenic poisoning might damage ability of learning and memory in mice, which may be related to proliferation of astroeytes and expression of GFAP in the dentate gyrus.%目的 研究砷中毒后小鼠齿状回胶质原纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)的变化.方法 选取健康成年昆明小鼠80只,雌雄各半,分为对照组及慢性砷中毒高、中、低剂量组,每组20只,分别以蒸馏水、1/5 LD50、1/10 LD50、1/40LD50 As2O3连续灌胃3个月,根据其体质量变化随时调整用药剂量,采用Y-电迷宫检测各组小鼠学习记忆行为,采用免疫组织化学和蛋白印迹技术检测不同浓度砷中毒对小鼠齿状回部位GFAP表达的影响.结果 与正常对照组比较,高剂量砷中毒组学习、记忆Y-迷

  7. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters synaptic activity of adult hippocampal dentate granule cells under conditions of enriched environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Kenta; Valenzuela, C Fernando; Allan, Andrea M; Ge, Shaoyu; Gu, Yan; Cunningham, Lee Anna

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) results in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), which is characterized by a wide range of cognitive and behavioral deficits that may be linked to impaired hippocampal function and adult neurogenesis. Preclinical studies in mouse models of FASD indicate that PAE markedly attenuates enrichment-mediated increases in the number of adult-generated hippocampal dentate granule cells (aDGCs), but whether synaptic activity is also affected has not been studied. Here, we utilized retroviral birth-dating coupled with whole cell patch electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of PAE on enrichment-mediated changes in excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity as a function of DGC age. We found that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) had no effect on baseline synaptic activity of 4- or 8-week-old aDGCs from control mice, but significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in 8-week-old aDGCs from PAE mice. In contrast, exposure to EE significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in older pre-existing DGCs situated in the outer dentate granule cell layer (i.e., those generated during embryonic development; dDGCs) in control mice, an effect that was blunted in PAE mice. These findings indicate distinct electrophysiological responses of hippocampal DGCs to behavioral challenge based on cellular ontogenetic age, and suggest that PAE disrupts EE-mediated changes in overall hippocampal network activity. These findings may have implications for future therapeutic targeting of hippocampal dentate circuitry in clinical FASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27009742

  8. NTPDase2 and Purinergic Signaling Control Progenitor Cell Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches of the Adult Mouse Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gampe, Kristine; Stefani, Jennifer; Hammer, Klaus; Brendel, Peter; Pötzsch, Alexandra; Enikolopov, Grigori; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Robson, Simon C.; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Nerve cells are continuously generated from stem cells in the adult mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) and hippocampal dentate gyrus. We have previously noted that stem/progenitor cells in the SVZ and the subgranular layer (SGL) of the dentate gyrus express high levels of plasma membrane-bound nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 (NTPDase2), an ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleoside di- and triphosphates. We inferred that deletion of NTPDase2 would increase local extrace...

  9. Reduced cingulate gyrus volume associated with enhanced cortisol awakening response in young healthy adults reporting childhood trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojia Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated the relationship between stress-induced increased cortisol levels and atrophy of specific brain regions, however, this association has been less revealed in clinical samples. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes and associations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity and gray matter volumes in young healthy adults with self-reported childhood trauma exposures. METHODS: Twenty four healthy adults with childhood trauma and 24 age- and gender-matched individuals without childhood trauma were recruited. Each participant collected salivary samples in the morning at four time points: immediately upon awakening, 30, 45, and 60 min after awakening for the assessment of cortisol awakening response (CAR. The 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained on a Philips 3.0 Tesla scanner. Voxel-based morphometry analyses were conducted to compare the gray matter volume between two groups. Correlations of gray matter volume changes with severity of childhood trauma and CAR data were further analyzed. RESULTS: Adults with self-reported childhood trauma showed an enhanced CAR and decreased gray matter volume in the right middle cingulate gyrus. Moreover, a significant association was observed between salivary cortisol secretions after awaking and the right middle cingulate gyrus volume reduction in subjects with childhood trauma. CONCLUSIONS: The present research outcomes suggest that childhood trauma is associated with hyperactivity of the HPA axis and decreased gray matter volume in the right middle cingulate gyrus, which may represent the vulnerability for developing psychosis after childhood trauma experiences. In addition, this study demonstrates that gray matter loss in the cingulate gyrus is related to increased cortisol levels.

  10. Excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells affects object recognition memory via attenuated LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miki; Fujise, Yuki; Tsuchiya, Yuka; Tamano, Haruna; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells is nonessential for dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) and the physiological significance of extracellular Zn(2+) dynamics is unknown in the dentate gyrus. Excess increase in extracellular Zn(2+) in the hippocampal CA1, which is induced with excitation of zincergic neurons, induces memory deficit via excess influx of Zn(2+) into CA1 pyramidal cells. In the present study, it was examined whether extracellular Zn(2+) induces object recognition memory deficit via excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells. KCl (100 mM, 2 µl) was locally injected into the dentate gyrus. The increase in intracellular Zn(2+) in dentate granule cells induced with high K(+) was blocked by co-injection of CaEDTA and CNQX, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator and an AMPA receptor antagonist, respectively, suggesting that high K(+) increases the influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells via AMPA receptor activation. Dentate gyrus LTP induction was attenuated 1 h after KCl injection into the dentate gyrus and also attenuated when KCl was injected 5 min after the induction. Memory deficit was induced when training of object recognition test was performed 1 h after KCl injection into the dentate gyrus and also induced when KCl was injected 5 min after the training. High K(+)-induced impairments of LTP and memory were rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA. These results indicate that excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells via AMPA receptor activation affects object recognition memory via attenuated LTP induction. Even in the dentate gyrus where is scarcely innervated by zincergic neurons, it is likely that extracellular Zn(2+) homeostasis is strictly regulated for cognition. PMID:26044210

  11. New neurons in the adult brain : The role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistiberger, Ralph E.; Jacobs, Barry L.; Heller, H. Craig; McGinty, Dennis; Mistlberger, Ralph E.

    2009-01-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a ma

  12. Effects of proBDNF on cell proliferation and differentiation in hippocampal dentate gyrus in Alzheimer' disease rat model%脑源性神经营养因子前体对阿尔茨海默病大鼠海马齿状回神经元增殖和分化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志强; 李静; 邓娟; 蒋晓江; 周华东

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of proBDNF on cell proliferation and differentiation in hippocampal dentate gyrus in Alzheimer' disease (AD) rat model. Methods The AD rat model was established. Alzet osmotic minipumps were connected to fight hippocampus of AD rat and filled with pmBDNF, sheep antibody to proBDNF or normal sheep serum respectively. Rats received the injection for 14 days at the speed of 0. 5 μ/h. 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU, 50 mg/kg, ip) was injected twice daily for 14 days. BrdU immunohistochemistry was processed to determine the number of newly generated cells. To examine the phenotype of newly generated cells, immunofluorescent triple labeling was conducted to colocalize BrdU-positive cells with rabbit anti-doublecortine (DCX) or mouse anti-glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP). Results proBDNF group had fewer BrdU positive cells in dentate gyrus (P < 0. 01 ), while antiproBDNF group had more BrdU positive cells ( P < 0. 01 ) as compared with control group respectively.Immunofluoresent triple labeling showed that there was no phenotypicdifference of BrdU positive cells between each group. Conclusion proBDNF can suppress the proliferation of hippocampal neuron in dentate gyms in AD rats while antiproBDNF has the opposite effect. These findings suggest that promoting the hippocampal neurogenesis by blocking the functions of endogenous proBDNF may be a potential therapeutic strategy for AD.%目的 观察脑源性神经营养因子前体(pmBDNF)对阿尔茨海默病(AD)大鼠模型海马齿状回神经元增殖和分化的影响.方法 成功建立AD大鼠模型后,采用微量渗透泵连续14 d向右侧海马注射proBDNF、羊抗proBDNF抗体或正常羊血清,浓度均为1μg/μl,速度0.5μ/h,同时给予5-溴-2'-脱氧尿核苷(BrdU)50 ms/kg·体重腹腔注射,每日 2次,持续14 d.免疫组化染色并统计新生细胞数量;应用BrdU与微管相关蛋白Doublecortin抗体/抗胶质纤维酸性蛋白抗体免疫三标记法,鉴

  13. Adult neurogenesis in the four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    OpenAIRE

    Olaleye, Olatunbosun O.; Ihunwo, Amadi O.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated non-captive four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) for evidence that adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain of animal models in natural environment. Ki-67 (a marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for immature neurons) immunostaining confirmed that adult neurogenesis occurs in the active sites of subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle with the migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of t...

  14. Studying the Integration of Adult-born Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Yan; Janoschka, Stephen; Ge, Shaoyu

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in adult mammalian brains in the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and in the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus throughout life. Previous reports have shown that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with diverse brain disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, depression and anxiety (1). Deciphering the process of normal and aberrant adult-born neuron integration may shed light on the etiology of these diseases and inform...

  15. Interleukin-17 inhibits Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang LIU; Xin, Wei; He, Ping; Turner, Dharshaun; Yin, Junxiang; Gan, Yan; Shi, Fu-Dong; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 17(A) (IL-17) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that acts as a central regulator of inflammatory response within the brain, but its physiological roles under non-inflammatory conditions remain elusive. Here we report that endogenous IL-17 ablates neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus. Genetic deletion of IL-17 increased the number of adult-born neurons in the DG. Further, we found that IL-17 deletion altered cytokine network, facilitated basal excitatory ...

  16. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Duarte-Guterman

    Full Text Available Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol's effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized adult female rats received a single injection of either: 17β-estradiol (10 μg, G1 (0.1, 5, 10 μg, G15 (40 μg, G15 and estradiol, or vehicle (oil, DMSO, or oil+DMSO. After 30 min, animals received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and were perfused 24 h later. Acute treatment with estradiol increased, while the GPER agonist G1 (5 μg decreased, the number of BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus relative to controls. The GPER antagonist, G15 increased the number of BrdU+ cells relative to control in the dorsal region and decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in the ventral region. However, G15 treatment in conjunction with estradiol partially eliminated the estradiol-induced increase in cell proliferation in the dorsal dentate gyrus. Furthermore, G1 decreased the expression of GPER in the dentate gyrus but not the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In summary, we found that activation of GPER decreased cell proliferation and GPER expression in the dentate gyrus of young female rats, presenting a potential and novel estrogen-independent role for this receptor in the adult hippocampus.

  17. Transplanted Dentate Progenitor Cells Show Increased Survival in an Enriched Environment But Do Not Exert a Neurotrophic Effect on Spatial Memory Within 2 Weeks of Engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Amanda L; Walker, Tara L; Waber Nguyen, Amanda J; Berman, Robert F; Kempermann, Gerd; Waldau, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin D2 knockout mice show decreased levels of endogenous dentate neurogenesis. We investigated whether transplanted dentate progenitor cells from wild-type mice respond in vivo to an enriched environment and whether they improve deficient dentate neurogenesis through a neurotrophic effect. Adult cyclin D2 knockout mice were transplanted with passaged adult progenitor cells and kept in an enriched environment or under standard housing conditions in isolation. After 1 week, animals living in an enriched environment underwent water maze testing. Progenitor cells grown on a laminin/poly-d-lysine monolayer expressed Sox2 and nestin and could be differentiated in vitro into neurons and astrocytes. After transplantation into the dentate gyrus, cells preferentially survived along the laminin-rich ependymal lining of the basal cistern or basal membrane of capillaries. A subpopulation of transplanted cells migrated into the interstitial space of the hippocampus and was not associated with laminin. Environmental enrichment led to a significant increase in the survival of transplanted progenitor cells on laminin in the dentate gyrus after 2 weeks. However, animals did not show an enhanced performance in the Morris water maze, and transplantation failed to exert a neurotrophic effect on endogenous neurogenesis after 2 weeks. However, a major limitation of the study is the short-term period of investigation, which may have been insufficient to capture functional effects. In conclusion, initial survival of transplanted neural progenitor cells was dependent on the presence of laminin and was significantly enhanced by environmental enrichment. Further studies are needed to address whether an enriched environment continues to promote graft survival over longer periods of time. PMID:25621922

  18. The dentate mossy fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Zimmer, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Hippocampal mossy fibers are the axons of the dentate granule cells and project to hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and mossy cells of the dentate hilus (CA4) as well as a number of interneurons in the two areas. Besides their role in hippocampal function, studies of which are still evolving and t...

  19. Development of neural stem cell in the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xin; Kang, Eunchai; Liu, Cindy Y.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2008-01-01

    New neurons are continuously generated in the dentate gyrus of the mammalian hippocampus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles throughout life. The origin of these new neurons is believed to be from multipotent adult neural stem cells. Aided by new methodologies, significant progress has been made in the characterization of neural stem cells and their development in the adult brain. Recent studies have also begun to reveal essential extrinsic and intrinsic molecular mechani...

  20. Hypothalamic Subependymal Niche: A Novel Site of the Adult Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of undifferentiated, actively proliferating neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mature brain opened a brand new chapter in the contemporary neuroscience. Adult neurogenesis appears to occur in specific brain regions (including hypothalamus) throughout vertebrates’ life, being considered an important player in the processes of memory, learning, and neural plasticity. In the adult mammalian brain, NSCs are located mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus a...

  1. Construction of lentiviral miRNA vector targeting ErbB4 gene and its expression in dentate gyrus of mouse hippocampus%ErbB4基因miRNA慢病毒载体的构建及其在小鼠海马齿状回的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李树玲; 颜慧; 宫泽辉

    2013-01-01

    . Lentivirus was stereotactically micro-infused into the hippocampus dentate gyrus of mice. Six months later, brain cryosections were used to observe gene expression. Immunofluorescence staining of brain sections with antibodies specific for neurons marker neuronal nuclei (NeuN) and astrocytes marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was used to analyze lentivirus transduced cell types. RESULTS Lentiviral miRNA vector targeting ErbB4 was validated by sequencing, showing the correct construction. Lentivirus were harvest and concentrated after packaging in HEK293T cells. After transduction HEK293T cells with 10 -fold serial dilutions of lentivirus stocks, GFP positive cells were detected by flow cytometry and the lentiviral titer was determined to be 1.0 ×1012 transduction units (TU) ·L-1. Lentivirus mediated expression using GFP as a reporter were observed on hippocampus dentate gyrus in mouse brain sections 6 months after stereotactic micro-infusion lentivirus 1.0 ×1012 TU·L-1. In immunofluorescent staining analysis, most GFP positive cells were labelled for NeuN and no cell was double-labelled for GFP and GFAP. CONCLUSION ErbB4 specific lentiviral miRNA vector is successfully constructed. High titer lentiviral stocks are prepared and transduced brain tissue in vivo successfully and stably. Neurons are the primary cell type transduced by lentivirus.

  2. Neurogenesis in the adult peripheral nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Czaja, Krzysztof; Fornaro, Michele; Geuna, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Most researchers believe that neurogenesis in mature mammals is restricted only to the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the central nervous system. In the peripheral nervous system, neurogenesis is thought to be active only during prenatal development, with the exception of the olfactory neuroepithelium. However, sensory ganglia in the adult peripheral nervous system have been reported to contain precursor cells that can proliferate...

  3. Neurons of the dentate molecular layer in the rabbit hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sancho-Bielsa

    Full Text Available The molecular layer of the dentate gyrus appears as the main entrance gate for information into the hippocampus, i.e., where the perforant path axons from the entorhinal cortex synapse onto the spines and dendrites of granule cells. A few dispersed neuronal somata appear intermingled in between and probably control the flow of information in this area. In rabbits, the number of neurons in the molecular layer increases in the first week of postnatal life and then stabilizes to appear permanent and heterogeneous over the individuals' life span, including old animals. By means of Golgi impregnations, NADPH histochemistry, immunocytochemical stainings and intracellular labelings (lucifer yellow and biocytin injections, eight neuronal morphological types have been detected in the molecular layer of developing adult and old rabbits. Six of them appear as interneurons displaying smooth dendrites and GABA immunoreactivity: those here called as globoid, vertical, small horizontal, large horizontal, inverted pyramidal and polymorphic. Additionally there are two GABA negative types: the sarmentous and ectopic granular neurons. The distribution of the somata and dendritic trees of these neurons shows preferences for a definite sublayer of the molecular layer: small horizontal, sarmentous and inverted pyramidal neurons are preferably found in the outer third of the molecular layer; vertical, globoid and polymorph neurons locate the intermediate third, while large horizontal and ectopic granular neurons occupy the inner third or the juxtagranular molecular layer. Our results reveal substantial differences in the morphology and electrophysiological behaviour between each neuronal archetype in the dentate molecular layer, allowing us to propose a new classification for this neural population.

  4. Computational models of adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2005-10-01

    Experimental results in recent years have shown that adult neurogenesis is a significant phenomenon in the mammalian brain. Little is known, however, about the functional role played by the generation and destruction of neurons in the context of an adult brain. Here, we propose two models where new projection neurons are incorporated. We show that in both models, using incorporation and removal of neurons as a computational tool, it is possible to achieve a higher computational efficiency that in purely static, synapse-learning-driven networks. We also discuss the implication for understanding the role of adult neurogenesis in specific brain areas like the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus.

  5. Characterization of the role of adult neurogenesis in touch-screen discrimination learning

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, Alicia A.; Clutton, Jonathan Edward; Chary, Priyanka Kesavan; Cook, Sarah G.; Liu, Grace G.; Drew, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theories posit that adult neurogenesis supports dentate gyrus (DG) pattern separation and is thereby necessary for some types of discrimination learning. Using an inducible transgenic mouse model, we investigated the contribution of adult-born neurons to spatial and nonspatial touch-screen discriminations of varying levels of difficulty. Arresting neurogenesis caused a modest but statistically significant impairment in a position discrimination task. However, the effect was present onl...

  6. New neurons in the adult brain: The role of sleep and consequences of sleep loss

    OpenAIRE

    Meerlo, Peter; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Jacobs, Barry L.; Heller, H Craig; McGinty, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Research over the last few decades has firmly established that new neurons are generated in selected areas of the adult mammalian brain, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. The function of adult-born neurons is still a matter of debate. In the case of the hippocampus, integration of new cells in to the existing neuronal circuitry may be involved in memory processes and the regulation of emotionality. In recent year...

  7. Moderate traumatic brain injury promotes proliferation of quiescent neural progenitors in the adult hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiang; Enikolopov, Grigori; Chen, Jinhui

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that traumatic brain injury (TBI) regulates proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult hippocampus. There are distinct classes of neural stem/progenitor cells in the adult DG, including quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs), which carry stem cell properties, and their progeny, amplifying neural progenitors (ANPs). The response of each class of progenitors to TBI is not clear. We here used a transgenic reporter Nestin-GFP mouse line, in...

  8. Environmental enrichment alters glial antigen expression and neuroimmune function in the adult rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, Lauren L.; Chao, Agnes; Bilbo, Staci D.

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a well-characterized phenomenon within the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult hippocampus. Environmental enrichment (EE) in rodents increases neurogenesis, enhances cognition, and promotes recovery from injury. However, little is known about the effects of EE on glia (astrocytes and microglia). Given their importance in neural repair, we predicted that EE would modulate glial phenotype and/or function within the hippocampus. Adult male rats were housed either 12 h/day in an enric...

  9. Cannabinoids promote embryonic and adult hippocampus neurogenesis and produce anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Yun; Xiao, Lan; Van Cleemput, Jamie; Ji, Shao-Ping; Bai, Guang; Zhang, Xia

    2005-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus in the adult mammalian brain contains neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) capable of generating new neurons, i.e., neurogenesis. Most drugs of abuse examined to date decrease adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of cannabis (marijuana or cannabinoids) on hippocampal neurogenesis remain unknown. This study aimed at investigating the potential regulatory capacity of the potent synthetic cannabinoid HU210 on hippocampal neurogenesis and its possible cor...

  10. Reduced Cingulate Gyrus Volume Associated with Enhanced Cortisol Awakening Response in Young Healthy Adults Reporting Childhood Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Shaojia Lu; Weijia Gao; Zhaoguo Wei; Weiwei Wu; Mei Liao; Yuqiang Ding; Zhijun Zhang; Lingjiang Li

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated the relationship between stress-induced increased cortisol levels and atrophy of specific brain regions, however, this association has been less revealed in clinical samples. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes and associations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and gray matter volumes in young healthy adults with self-reported childhood trauma exposures. METHODS: Twenty four healthy adults with c...

  11. Neurons of the Dentate Molecular Layer in the Rabbit Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Sancho-Bielsa, Francisco J.; Navarro-López, Juan D.; Gregori Alonso-Llosa; Asunción Molowny; Xavier Ponsoda; Javier Yajeya; Carlos López-García

    2012-01-01

    The molecular layer of the dentate gyrus appears as the main entrance gate for information into the hippocampus, i.e., where the perforant path axons from the entorhinal cortex synapse onto the spines and dendrites of granule cells. A few dispersed neuronal somata appear intermingled in between and probably control the flow of information in this area. In rabbits, the number of neurons in the molecular layer increases in the first week of postnatal life and then stabilizes to appear permanent...

  12. Hilar mossy cell circuitry controlling dentate granule cell excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Jinde

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamatergic hilar mossy cells of the dentate gyrus can either excite or inhibit distant granule cells, depending on whether their direct excitatory projections to granule cells or their projections to local inhibitory interneurons dominate. However, it remains controversial whether the net effect of mossy cell loss is granule cell excitation or inhibition. Clarifying this controversy has particular relevance to temporal lobe epilepsy, which is marked by dentate granule cell hyperexcitability and extensive loss of dentate hilar mossy cells. Two diametrically opposed hypotheses have been advanced to explain this granule cell hyperexcitability – the “dormant basket cell” and the “irritable mossy cell” hypotheses. The “dormant basket cell” hypothesis proposes that mossy cells normally exert a net inhibitory effect on granule cells and therefore their loss causes dentate granule cell hyperexcitability. The “irritable mossy cell” hypothesis takes the opposite view that mossy cells normally excite granule cells and that the surviving mossy cells in epilepsy increase their activity, causing granule cell excitation. The inability to eliminate mossy cells selectively has made it difficult to test these two opposing hypotheses. To this end, we developed a transgenic toxin-mediated, mossy cell-ablation mouse line. Using these mutants, we demonstrated that the extensive elimination of hilar mossy cells causes granule cell hyperexcitability, although the mossy cell loss observed appeared insufficient to cause clinical epilepsy. In this review, we focus on this topic and also suggest that different interneuron populations may mediate mossy cell-induced translamellar lateral inhibition and intralamellar recurrent inhibition. These unique local circuits in the dentate hilar region may be centrally involved in the functional organization of the dentate gyrus.

  13. Functional neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Praag, Henriette; Schinder, Alejandro F.; Christie, Brian R.; Toni, Nicolas; Palmer, Theo D.; Gage, Fred H.

    2002-02-01

    There is extensive evidence indicating that new neurons are generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain that is important for learning and memory. However, it is not known whether these new neurons become functional, as the methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited to fixed tissue. We use here a retroviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein that only labels dividing cells, and that can be visualized in live hippocampal slices. We report that newly generated cells in the adult mouse hippocampus have neuronal morphology and can display passive membrane properties, action potentials and functional synaptic inputs similar to those found in mature dentate granule cells. Our findings demonstrate that newly generated cells mature into functional neurons in the adult mammalian brain.

  14. Adult Neurogenesis: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-02-01

    When adult neurogenesis was discovered in the mammalian brain it was often considered an atavism and, even today, many people are convinced that there has been a "phylogenetic reduction" away from lifelong neurogenesis, favoring stability for complex brains. Adult neurogenesis is found throughout the animal kingdom but varies to a large extent. Mammals might have fewer neurogenic zones than, for example, fish, but within their remaining neurogenic zones, the new neurons are highly functional. Especially, humans have very substantial quantities of neurogenesis in their hippocampus. At least for the mammalian dentate gyrus, one can thus argue that there has been evolution toward neurogenesis-based plasticity rather than away from it. PMID:26684183

  15. Time-of-day-dependent enhancement of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

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    So-ichi Tamai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult neurogenesis occurs in specific regions of the mammalian brain such as the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the neurogenic region, neural progenitor cells continuously divide and give birth to new neurons. Although biological properties of neurons and glia in the hippocampus have been demonstrated to fluctuate depending on specific times of the day, it is unclear if neural progenitors and neurogenesis in the adult brain are temporally controlled within the day. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus of the adult mouse hippocampus, the number of M-phase cells shows a day/night variation throughout the day, with a significant increase during the nighttime. The M-phase cell number is constant throughout the day in the subventricular zone of the forebrain, another site of adult neurogenesis, indicating the daily rhythm of progenitor mitosis is region-specific. Importantly, the nighttime enhancement of hippocampal progenitor mitosis is accompanied by a nighttime increase of newborn neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus occurs in a time-of-day-dependent fashion, which may dictate daily modifications of dentate gyrus physiology.

  16. Contribution of constitutively proliferating precursor cell subtypes to dentate neurogenesis after cortical infarcts

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    Oberland Julia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that focal ischemia increases neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation but the cellular mechanisms underlying this proliferative response are only poorly understood. We here investigated whether precursor cells which constitutively proliferate before the ischemic infarct contribute to post-ischemic neurogenesis. To this purpose, transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the nestin promoter received repetitive injections of the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU prior to induction of cortical infarcts. We then immunocytochemically analyzed the fate of these BrdU-positive precursor cell subtypes from day 4 to day 28 after the lesion. Results Quantification of BrdU-expressing precursor cell populations revealed no alteration in number of radial glia-like type 1 cells but a sequential increase of later precursor cell subtypes in lesioned animals (type 2a cells at day 7, type 3 cells/immature neurons at day 14. These alterations result in an enhanced survival of mature neurons 4 weeks postinfarct. Conclusions Focal cortical infarcts recruit dentate precursor cells generated already before the infarct and significantly contribute to an enhanced neurogenesis. Our findings thereby increase our understanding of the complex cellular mechanisms of postlesional neurogenesis.

  17. Long-Term Fate Mapping Using Conditional Lentiviral Vectors Reveals a Continuous Contribution of Radial Glia-Like Cells to Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah-Ann Aelvoet

    Full Text Available Newborn neurons are generated throughout life in two neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Stimulation of adult neurogenesis is considered as an attractive endogenous repair mechanism to treat different neurological disorders. Although tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, important questions remain unanswered, regarding the identity and the behavior of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus. We previously showed that conditional Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors can be used to label neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and to track the migration of their progeny with non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. Here, we applied these Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors to study neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus with bioluminescence imaging and histological techniques. Stereotactic injection of the Cre-Flex vectors into the dentate gyrus of transgenic Nestin-Cre mice resulted in specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells. The labeled cell population could be detected with bioluminescence imaging until 9 months post injection, but no significant increase in the number of labeled cells over time was observed with this imaging technique. Nevertheless, the specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells, combined with histological analysis at different time points, allowed detailed analysis of their neurogenic potential. This long-term fate mapping revealed that a stable pool of labeled nestin-positive neural stem cells continuously contributes to the generation of newborn neurons in the mouse brain until 9 months post injection. In conclusion, the Cre-Flex technology is a valuable tool to address remaining questions regarding neural stem cell identity and behavior in the dentate gyrus.

  18. Influence of superior cervical ganglionectomy on hippocampal neurogenesis and learning and memory in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanping Ding; Baoping Shao; Shiyuan Yu; Shanting Zhao; Jianlin Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus plays an important role in learning and memory. However, studies have not determined whether the superior cervical ganglion or the sympathetic nerve system influences hippocampal neurogenesis or learning and memory in adult rats. OBJECTIVE: To observe differences in dentate gyrus neurogenesis, as well as learning and memory, in adult rats following superior cervical ganglionectomy. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal study was performed at the Immunohistochemistry Laboratory of the School of Life Sciences in Lanzhou University from July 2006 to July 2007.MATERIALS: Doublecortin polyclonal antibody was provided by Santa Cruz Biotechnology, USA;avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex was purchased from Zhongshan Goldenbride Biotechnology, China;Morris water maze was bought from Taimeng Technology, China. METHODS: A total of 20 adult, male, Wistar rats were randomly divided into surgery and control groups, with 10 rats in each group. In the surgery group, the bilateral superior cervical ganglions were transected. In the control group, the superior cervical ganglions were only exposed, but no ganglionectomy was performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: To examine distribution, morphology, and number of newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus using doublecortin immunohistochemistry at 36 days following surgical procedures. To examine ability of learning and memory in adult rats using the Morris water maze at 30 days following surgical procedures. RESULTS: Doublecortin immunohistochemical results showed that a reduction in the number of doublecortin-positive neurons in the surgery group compared to the control group (P<0.05), while the distribution of doublecortin-positive neurons was identical in the two groups. The surgery group exhibited significantly worse performance in learning and spatial memory tasks compared to the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Superior cervical ganglionectomy

  19. Perceived Stress Is Differentially Related to Hippocampal Subfield Volumes among Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Molly E.; Ezzati, Ali; Katz, Mindy J.; Lipton, Michael L; Brickman, Adam M.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic exposure to stress has been shown to impact a wide range of health-related outcomes in older adults. Despite extensive animal literature revealing deleterious effects of biological markers of stress on the dentate gyrus subfield of the hippocampus, links between hippocampal subfields and psychological stress have not been studied in humans. This study examined the relationship between perceived stress and hippocampal subfield volumes among racially/ethnically diverse olde...

  20. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tara L. Walker; Rupert W. Overall; Steffen Vogler; Alex M. Sykes; Susann Ruhwald; Daniela Lasse; Muhammad Ichwan; Klaus Fabel; Gerd Kempermann

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1) is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative pre...

  1. Assigning Function to Adult-Born Neurons: A Theoretical Framework for Characterizing Neural Manipulation of Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hersman, Sarah; Rodriguez Barrera, Vanessa; Fanselow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscientists are concerned with neural processes or computations, but these may not be directly observable. In the field of learning, a behavioral procedure is observed to lead to performance outcomes, but differing inferences on underlying internal processes can lead to difficulties in interpreting conflicting results. An example of this challenge is how many functions have been attributed to adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus. Some of these functions were suggested by computat...

  2. Neural stem cells and the regulation of neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Seri, Bettina; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2002-01-01

    Neurogenesis continues in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult rodents and primates including humans. Neurons are born in the underlying subgranular layer (SGL) and move into the granule cell layer (GCL) to become mature granule neurons. Recent work indicates that the primary precursors for these new neurons correspond to radial astrocytes whose cell body is in the SGL and their processes traverse the GCL. These astrocytes divide to give rise to intermediate precursors, D cells that likely ...

  3. Go/No Go task performance predicts cortical thickness in the caudal inferior frontal gyrus in young adults with and without ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Erik; Jernigan, Terry L; Lisdahl, Krista M; Tamm, Leanne; Tapert, Susan F; Potkin, Steven G; Mathalon, Daniel; Molina, Brooke; Bjork, James; Castellanos, F Xavier; Swanson, James; Kuperman, Joshua M; Bartsch, Hauke; Chen, Chi-Hua; Dale, Anders M; Epstein, Jeffery N; Group, Mta Neuroimaging

    2016-09-01

    Response inhibition deficits are widely believed to be at the core of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Several studies have examined neural architectural correlates of ADHD, but research directly examining structural correlates of response inhibition is lacking. Here we examine the relationship between response inhibition as measured by a Go/No Go task, and cortical surface area and thickness of the caudal inferior frontal gyrus (cIFG), a region implicated in functional imaging studies of response inhibition, in a sample of 114 young adults with and without ADHD diagnosed initially during childhood. We used multiple linear regression models to test the hypothesis that Go/No Go performance would be associated with cIFG surface area or thickness. Results showed that poorer Go/No Go performance was associated with thicker cIFG cortex, and this effect was not mediated by ADHD status or history of substance use. However, independent of Go/No Go performance, persistence of ADHD symptoms and more frequent cannabis use were associated with thinner cIFG. Go/No Go performance was not associated with cortical surface area. The association between poor inhibitory functioning and thicker cIFG suggests that maturation of this region may differ in low performing participants. An independent association of persistent ADHD symptoms and frequent cannabis use with thinner cIFG cortex suggests that distinct neural mechanisms within this region may play a role in inhibitory function, broader ADHD symptomatology, and cannabis use. These results contribute to Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) by revealing novel associations between neural architectural phenotypes and basic neurobehavioral processes measured dimensionally. PMID:26404018

  4. The evidence for increased L1 activity in the site of human adult brain neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A Kurnosov

    Full Text Available Retroelement activity is a common source of polymorphisms in human genome. The mechanism whereby retroelements contribute to the intraindividual genetic heterogeneity by inserting into the DNA of somatic cells is gaining increasing attention. Brain tissues are suspected to accumulate genetic heterogeneity as a result of the retroelements somatic activity. This study aims to expand our understanding of the role retroelements play in generating somatic mosaicism of neural tissues. Whole-genome Alu and L1 profiling of genomic DNA extracted from the cerebellum, frontal cortex, subventricular zone, dentate gyrus, and the myocardium revealed hundreds of somatic insertions in each of the analyzed tissues. Interestingly, the highest concentration of such insertions was detected in the dentate gyrus-the hotspot of adult neurogenesis. Insertions of retroelements and their activity could produce genetically diverse neuronal subsets, which can be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

  5. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    OpenAIRE

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural ste...

  6. BDNF-induced LTP is associated with rapid Arc/Arg3.1-dependent enhancement in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Sjoukje D; Trentani, Andrea; Tiron, Adrian; Mao, Xiaosong; Kuhl, Dietmar; Bramham, Clive R

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a remarkable phenomenon involved in various aspects of learning and memory as well as disease pathophysiology. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) represents a major player in the regulation of this unique form of neuroplasticity, yet the mechanisms underlying its pro-neurogenic actions remain unclear. Here, we examined the effects associated with brief (25 min), unilateral infusion of BDNF in the rat dentate gyrus. Acute BDNF infusion induced long-term potentiation (LTP) of medial perforant path-evoked synaptic transmission and, concomitantly, enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis bilaterally, reflected by increased dentate gyrus BrdU + cell numbers. Importantly, inhibition of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) translation through local, unilateral infusion of anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides (ArcAS) prior to BDNF infusion blocked both BDNF-LTP induction and the associated pro-neurogenic effects. Notably, basal rates of proliferation and newborn cell survival were unaltered in homozygous Arc/Arg3.1 knockout mice. Taken together these findings link the pro-neurogenic effects of acute BDNF infusion to induction of Arc/Arg3.1-dependent LTP in the adult rodent dentate gyrus. PMID:26888068

  7. Role of C/EBPβ transcription factor in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cortes-Canteli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the regions in which neurogenesis takes place in the adult brain. We have previously demonstrated that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ is expressed in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus of the adult mouse hippocampus. Taking into account the important role of C/EBPβ in the consolidation of long term memory, the fact that newborn neurons in the hippocampus contribute to learning and memory processes, and the role of this transcription factor, previously demonstrated by our group, in regulating neuronal differentiation, we speculated that this transcription factor could regulate stem/progenitor cells in this region of the brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show, using C/EBPβ knockout mice, that C/EBPβ expression is observed in the subset of newborn cells that proliferate in the hippocampus of the adult brain. Mice lacking C/EBPβ present reduced survival of newborn cells in the hippocampus, a decrease in the number of these cells that differentiate into neurons and a diminished number of cells that are proliferating in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These results were further confirmed in vitro. Neurosphere cultures from adult mice deficient in C/EBPβ present less proliferation and neuronal differentiation than neurospheres derived from wild type mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, using in vivo and in vitro strategies, we have identified C/EBPβ as a key player in the proliferation and survival of the new neurons produced in the adult mouse hippocampus. Our results support a novel role of C/EBPβ in the processes of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, providing new insights into the mechanisms that control neurogenesis in this region of the brain.

  8. The effect of immature adult-born dentate granule cells on hyponeophagial behavior is related to their roles in learning and memory

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    Wei eDeng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurogenesis hypothesis of depression is based on the correlation between the rate of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the affective status of rodents. However, studies investigating the role of neurogenesis in the causation of mood regulation have reported inconsistent results. Here, we explored whether the affective state can be affected differentially by adult-born neurons with distinctive physiological characteristics at different maturation stages. We revealed that reducing the immature newborn neuron population had no effect on anxiety- or depression-like behaviors in an array of tests; however, it enhanced hyponeophagia in a novelty suppressed feeding test, but only when the novel environment was drastically different from the home cage. We further demonstrated that reducing the immature newborn neuron population led to delayed habituation to a novel environment and impaired contextual learning. Hence, rather than being directly involved in mood regulation, our studies raise the possibility that adult neurogenesis may influence hyponeophagia through its role in mnemonic processing.

  9. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers.

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    Frédéric Levy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the post-partum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the dentate gyrus the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the dentate gyrus. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor.

  10. Period 2 regulates neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the adult hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht Urs; Maquet Pierre; Moonen Gustave; Nguyen Laurent; Vandenbosch Renaud; Beukelaers Pierre; Borgs Laurence; Belachew Shibeshih; Malgrange Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Newborn granule neurons are generated from proliferating neural stem/progenitor cells and integrated into mature synaptic networks in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Since light/dark variations of the mitotic index and DNA synthesis occur in many tissues, we wanted to unravel the role of the clock-controlled Period2 gene (mPer2) in timing cell cycle kinetics and neurogenesis in the adult DG. Results In contrast to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, we observed a non-...

  11. Conditional reduction of adult born doublecortin-positive neurons reversibly impairs selective behaviours

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    Lillian eGarrett

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ along the walls of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. While a burgeoning body of research implicates adult neurogenesis in olfactory bulb (OB - and hippocampal-related behaviors, the precise function continues to elude. To further assess the behavioral importance of adult neurogenesis, we herein generated a novel inducible transgenic mouse model of adult neurogenesis reduction where mice with CreERT2 under doublecortin (DCX promoter control were crossed with mice where diphtheria toxin A (DTA was driven by the Rosa26 promoter. Activation of DTA, through the administration of tamoxifen (TAM, results in a specific reduction of DCX+ immature neurons in both the hippocampal dentate gyrus and OB. We show that the decrease of DCX+ cells causes impaired social discrimination ability in both young adult (from 3 months and middle (from 10 months aged mice. Furthermore, these animals showed an age-independent altered coping behavior in the Forced Swim Test without clear changes in anxiety-related behavior. Notably, these behavior changes were reversible on repopulating the neurogenic zones with DCX+ cells on cessation of the tamoxifen treatment, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Overall, these results support the notion that adult neurogenesis plays a role in social memory and in stress coping but not necessarily in anxiety-related behavior.

  12. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin-specific T cells are normally associated with destruction of myelin and axonal damage. However, in acute MS plaque, remyelination occurs concurrent with T-cell infiltration, which raises the question of whether T cells might stimulate myelin repair. We investiga...... calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  13. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells’ primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human Aβ1-42 and tau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Aβ and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer’s disease. ► Aβ1-42 and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. ► This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. ► This provides a model of an Aβ/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6–24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer’s disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both Aβ1-42 and the mutant human tau protein tauP301L, the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75NTR-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of Aβ1-42 or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of Aβ1-42 and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  14. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  15. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heekyung; Kang, Eunchai; GoodSmith, Douglas; Yoon, Do Yeon; Song, Hongjun; Knierim, James J; Ming, Guo-Li; Christian, Kimberly M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1), the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, soma hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function. PMID:26161071

  16. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heekyung Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1, the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, somatic hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function.

  17. Spatial relational memory requires hippocampal adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dupret

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few regions of the mammalian brain where new neurons are generated throughout adulthood. This adult neurogenesis has been proposed as a novel mechanism that mediates spatial memory. However, data showing a causal relationship between neurogenesis and spatial memory are controversial. Here, we developed an inducible transgenic strategy allowing specific ablation of adult-born hippocampal neurons. This resulted in an impairment of spatial relational memory, which supports a capacity for flexible, inferential memory expression. In contrast, less complex forms of spatial knowledge were unaltered. These findings demonstrate that adult-born neurons are necessary for complex forms of hippocampus-mediated learning.

  18. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jun [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fan, Xiaotang [Department of Histology and Embryology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xu, Haiwei, E-mail: haiweixu2001@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Bai, Yun, E-mail: baiyungene@gmail.com [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  19. Additive effects of physical exercise and environmental enrichment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Fabel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary physical exercise (wheel running, RUN and environmental enrichment (ENR both stimulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis but do so by different mechanisms. RUN induces precursor cell proliferation, whereas ENR exerts a survival-promoting effect on newborn cells. In addition, continued RUN prevented the physiologically occurring age-related decline in precursor cell in the dentate gyrus but did not lead to a corresponding increase in net neurogenesis. We hypothesized that in the absence of appropriate cognitive stimuli the potential for neurogenesis could not be realized but that an increased potential by proliferating precursor cells due to RUN could actually lead to more adult neurogenesis if an appropriate survival-promoting stimulus follows the exercise. We thus asked whether a sequential combination of RUN and ENR (RUNENR would show additive effects that are distinct from the application of either paradigm alone. We found that the effects of 10 days of RUN followed by 35 days of ENR were additive in that the combined stimulation yielded an approximately 30% greater increase in new neurons than either stimulus alone, which also increased neurogenesis. Surprisingly, this result indicates that although overall the amount of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus is poorly predictive of net adult neurogenesis, an increased neurogenic potential nevertheless provides the basis for a greater efficiency of the same survival-promoting stimulus. We thus propose that physical activity can “prime” the neurogenic region of the dentate gyrus for increased neurogenesis in the case the animal is exposed to an additional cognitive stimulus, here represented by the enrichment paradigm.

  20. Functional importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Petrov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is crucial for memory formation and spatial processing. It is no surprise that the discovery of postnatal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus has inspired an extensive amount of research on its functional contribution to the adult brain. Correlational evidence reveals that neurogenesis is a dynamic process subject to modulation by a variety of factors, such as environmental enrichment and learning. Electrophysiological experiments show that young neurons constitute a distinct neuronal population within the dentate gyrus. Unlike mature neurons, they are not inhibited by gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA and require less stimulation to induce long-term potentiation. Furthermore, there is now strong evidence that new neurons can be functionally integrated into memory networks. However, significant debate still persists about the functional necessity of neurogenesis. To resolve this issue, several techniques have been used to ablate neurogenesis, such as X-ray irradiation, administration of anti-proliferative drugs and genetic knockdowns. Unfortunately, these methods are not equally effective, are invasive and can cause adverse physiological effects. This article offers an overview of the functional significance of hippocampal neurogenesis and presents a critical review of current research methodology. Methods of improving traditional techniques of neurogenesis ablation are also explored.

  1. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis inversely correlates with microglia in conditions of voluntary running and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Georges Gebara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis results in the formation of new neurons and is a process of brain plasticity involved in learning and memory. The proliferation of adult neural stem or progenitor cells is regulated by several extrinsic factors such as experience, disease or aging and intrinsic factors originating from the neurogenic niche. Microglia is very abundant in the dentate gyrus and increasing evidence indicates that these cells mediate the inflammation-induced reduction in neurogenesis. However, the role of microglia in neurogenesis in physiological conditions remains poorly understood. In this study, we monitored microglia and the proliferation of adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells in physiological conditions known to increase or decrease adult neurogenesis, voluntary running and aging respectively. We found that the number of microglia in the dentate gyrus was strongly inversely correlated with the number of stem/progenitor cells and cell proliferation in the granule cell layer. Accordingly, co-cultures of decreasing neural progenitor/glia ratio showed that microglia but not astroglia reduced the number of progenitor cells. Together, these results suggest that microglia inhibits the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells despite the absence of inflammatory stimulus.

  2. Low excitatory innervation balances high intrinsic excitability of immature dentate neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieni, Cristina V.; Panichi, Roberto; Aimone, James B.; Kuo, Chay T.; Wadiche, Jacques I.; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus produces immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability and low levels of inhibition that are predicted to be more broadly responsive to afferent activity than mature neurons. Mounting evidence suggests that these immature neurons are necessary for generating distinct neural representations of similar contexts, but it is unclear how broadly responsive neurons help distinguish between similar patterns of afferent activity. Here we show that stimulation of the entorhinal cortex in mouse brain slices paradoxically generates spiking of mature neurons in the absence of immature neuron spiking. Immature neurons with high intrinsic excitability fail to spike due to insufficient excitatory drive that results from low innervation rather than silent synapses or low release probability. Our results suggest that low synaptic connectivity prevents immature neurons from responding broadly to cortical activity, potentially enabling excitable immature neurons to contribute to sparse and orthogonal dentate representations. PMID:27095423

  3. Computational Modeling of Adult Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimone, James B

    2016-01-01

    The restriction of adult neurogenesis to only a handful of regions of the brain is suggestive of some shared requirement for this dramatic form of structural plasticity. However, a common driver across neurogenic regions has not yet been identified. Computational studies have been invaluable in providing insight into the functional role of new neurons; however, researchers have typically focused on specific scales ranging from abstract neural networks to specific neural systems, most commonly the dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus. These studies have yielded a number of diverse potential functions for new neurons, ranging from an impact on pattern separation to the incorporation of time into episodic memories to enabling the forgetting of old information. This review will summarize these past computational efforts and discuss whether these proposed theoretical functions can be unified into a common rationale for why neurogenesis is required in these unique neural circuits. PMID:26933191

  4. Neurogenesis in the adult olfactory bulb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angela Pignatelli; Cristina Gambardella; Ottorino Belluzzi

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis is the process by which cells divide, migrate, and subsequently differentiate into a neuronal phenotype. Significant rates of neurogenesis persist into adulthood in two brain regions, the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Cells of the subventricular zone divide and migrate via the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into granule and periglomerular cells. With the discovery of large-scale neurogenesis in the adult brain, there have been significant efforts to identify the mechanisms that control this process as well as the role of these cells in neuronal functioning. Although many questions remain unanswered, new insights appear daily about adult neurogenesis, regulatory mechanisms, and the fates of the progeny. In this review we highlight the main studies investigating factors that regulate neurogenesis in the subventricular zone, neuronal migration to the olfactory bulb, neuronal integration into the existing bulbar network and shortly discuss the functional meaning of this process.

  5. The impact of adult neurogenesis on olfactory bulb circuits and computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepousez, Gabriel; Valley, Matthew T; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Modern neuroscience has demonstrated how the adult brain has the ability to profoundly remodel its neurons in response to changes in external stimuli or internal states. However, adult brain plasticity, although possible throughout life, remains restricted mostly to subcellular levels rather than affecting the entire cell. New neurons are continuously generated in only a few areas of the adult brain-the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus-where they integrate into already functioning circuitry. In these regions, adult neurogenesis adds another dimension of plasticity that either complements or is redundant to the classical molecular and cellular mechanisms of plasticity. This review extracts clues regarding the contribution of adult-born neurons to the different circuits of the olfactory bulb and specifically how new neurons participate in existing computations and enable new computational functions. PMID:23190074

  6. Development of the adult neurogenic niche in the hippocampus of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeina eNicola

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available When does adult hippocampal neurogenesis begin? We describe the development of the neurogenic niche in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We did so from the perspective of the situation in the adult.Ontogeny of the dentate gyrus is complex and results in an ectopic neurogenic niche that lifelong generates new granule cells. Neurogenesis during the fetal and early postnatal periods builds the dentate gyrus and gives way to activity-dependent adult neurogenesis. We used markers most relevant to adult neurogenesis research to describe this transition: Nestin, Sox2, BLBP, GFAP, Tbr2, Doublecortin (DCX, NeuroD1 and Prox1. We found that massive changes and a local condensation of proliferating precursor cells occurs between postnatal day 7 (P7, near the peak in proliferation, and P14. Before and around P7, the spatial distribution of cells and the co-localization of markers were distinct from the situation in the adult. Unlike the adult SGZ, the marker pair Nestin/Sox2 and the radial glial marker BLBP were not overlapping during embryonic development, presumably indicating different types of radial glia-like cells. Before P7 GFAP-positive cells in the hilus lacked the radial orientation that is characteristic of the adult type-1 cells. DCX, which is concentrated in type-2b and type-3 progenitor cells and early postmitotic neurons in the adult, showed diffuse expression before P7. Intermediate progenitor cell marker Tbr2 became restricted to the SGZ but was found in the granule cell layer and hilus before. Lineage markers NeuroD1 and Prox1 confirmed this pattern.We conclude that the neurogenic niche of adult neurogenesis is in place well before true adulthood. This might indicate that consistent with the hypothesized function of adult neurogenesis in activity-dependent plasticity, the early transition from postnatal neurogenesis to adult neurogenesis coincides with the time, when the young mice start to become active themselves.

  7. Compartment-Specific Modulation of GABAergic Synaptic Transmission by TRPV1 Channels in the Dentate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Chávez, Andrés E.; Hernández, Vivian M.; Rodenas-Ruano, Alma; Chan, C. Savio; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential TRPV1 or vanilloid receptor is a nonselective ligand-gated channel highly expressed in primary sensory neurons where it mediates nociception. TRPV1 is also expressed in the brain where its activation depresses excitatory synaptic transmission. Whether TRPV1 also regulates inhibitory synapses in the brain is unclear. Here, using a combination of pharmacology, electrophysiology, and an in vivo knockdown strategy, we report that TRPV1 activation by capsaicin or b...

  8. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and identification of GABAergic cells in the ischemic rat dentate gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Finsen, Bente; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2006-01-01

    parallel, we investigated the colocalization of the cell death marker Fluorojade B (FJB) with somatostatin- or GAD67-immunoreactivity in hilus of control and ischemic rats. Although the majority of FJB positive cells also contained somatostatin, a small number of GAD67 immunoreactive neurons contained FJB...

  9. EPO induces changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the dentate gyrus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguer-Melian, William; Mercerón-Martínez, Daymara; Delgado-Ocaña, Susana; Pavón-Fuentes, Nancy; Ledón, Nuris; Bergado, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoietin has shown wide physiological effects on the central nervous system in animal models of disease, and in healthy animals. We have recently shown that systemic EPO administration 15 min, but not 5 h, after daily training in a water maze is able to induce the recovery of spatial memory in fimbria-fornix chronic-lesioned animals, suggesting that acute EPO triggers mechanisms which can modulate the active neural plasticity mechanism involved in spatial memory acquisition in lesioned animals. Additionally, this EPO effect is accompanied by the up-regulation of plasticity-related early genes. More remarkably, this time-dependent effects on learning recovery could signify that EPO in nerve system modulate specific living-cellular processes. In the present article, we focus on the question if EPO could modulate the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity like LTP and LTD, which presumably could support our previous published data. Our results show that acute EPO peripheral administration 15 min before the induction of synaptic plasticity is able to increase the magnitude of the LTP (more prominent in PSA than fEPSP-Slope) to facilitate the induction of LTD, and to protect LTP from depotentiation. These findings showing that EPO modulates in vivo synaptic plasticity sustain the assumption that EPO can act not only as a neuroprotective substance, but is also able to modulate transient neural plasticity mechanisms and therefore to promote the recovery of nerve function after an established chronic brain lesion. According to these results, EPO could be use as a molecular tool for neurorestaurative treatments. Synapse 70:240-252, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26860222

  10. Entorhinal theta-frequency input to the dentate gyrus trisynaptically evokes hippocampal CA1 LTP

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Stepan; Matthias Eder

    2012-01-01

    There exists substantial evidence that some forms of explicit learning in mammals require long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. While CA1 LTP has been well characterized at the monosynaptic level, it still remains unclear how the afferent systems to the hippocampus can initiate formation of this neuroplastic phenomenon. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in a mouse brain slice preparation, we show that evoked entorhinal cortical (EC) theta-frequency input to the denta...

  11. Entorhinal theta-frequency input to the dentate gyrus trisynaptically evokes hippocampal CA1 LTP

    OpenAIRE

    Stepan, Jens; Dine, Julien; Fenzl, Thomas; Polta, Stephanie A.; von Wolff, Gregor; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Eder, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    There exists substantial evidence that some forms of explicit learning in mammals require long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. While CA1 LTP has been well characterized at the monosynaptic level, it still remains unclear how the afferent systems to the hippocampus can initiate formation of this neuroplastic phenomenon. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) in a mouse brain slice preparation, we show that evoked entorhinal cortical (EC) theta-frequency input to th...

  12. Adult neurogenesis in the four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olatunbosun O Olaleye; Amadi O Ihunwo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated non-captive four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) for evidence that adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain of animal models in natural environment. Ki-67 (a marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for immature neurons) immunos-taining conifrmed that adult neurogenesis occurs in the active sites of subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle with the migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. No Ki-67 proliferating cells were observed in the striatum substantia nigra, amygdala, cerebral cortex or dorsal vagal complex. Doublecortin-immunore-active cells were observed in the striatum, third ventricle, cerebral cortex, amygdala, olfactory bulb and along the rostral migratory stream but absent in the substantia nigra and dorsal vagal complex. The potential neurogenic sites in the four-striped mouse species could invariably lead to increased neural plasticity.

  13. Adult neurogenesis in the four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Olatunbosun O; Ihunwo, Amadi O

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigated non-captive four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) for evidence that adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain of animal models in natural environment. Ki-67 (a marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for immature neurons) immunostaining confirmed that adult neurogenesis occurs in the active sites of subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle with the migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. No Ki-67 proliferating cells were observed in the striatum substantia nigra, amygdala, cerebral cortex or dorsal vagal complex. Doublecortin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the striatum, third ventricle, cerebral cortex, amygdala, olfactory bulb and along the rostral migratory stream but absent in the substantia nigra and dorsal vagal complex. The potential neurogenic sites in the four-striped mouse species could invariably lead to increased neural plasticity. PMID:25558241

  14. Bi-parental care contributes to sexually dimorphic neural cell genesis in the adult mammalian brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria K Mak

    Full Text Available Early life events can modulate brain development to produce persistent physiological and behavioural phenotypes that are transmissible across generations. However, whether neural precursor cells are altered by early life events, to produce persistent and transmissible behavioural changes, is unknown. Here, we show that bi-parental care, in early life, increases neural cell genesis in the adult rodent brain in a sexually dimorphic manner. Bi-parentally raised male mice display enhanced adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis, which improves hippocampal neurogenesis-dependent learning and memory. Female mice display enhanced adult white matter oligodendrocyte production, which increases proficiency in bilateral motor coordination and preference for social investigation. Surprisingly, single parent-raised male and female offspring, whose fathers and mothers received bi-parental care, respectively, display a similar enhancement in adult neural cell genesis and phenotypic behaviour. Therefore, neural plasticity and behavioural effects due to bi-parental care persist throughout life and are transmitted to the next generation.

  15. Effect of voluntary running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cholinergic lesioned mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawe Gavin S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic neuronal dysfunction of the basal forebrain is observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and has been linked to decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory. Running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. This study aims to address the effect of running on hippocampal neurogenesis in lesioned mice, where septohippocampal cholinergic neurones have been selectively eliminated in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain by infusion of mu-p75-saporin immunotoxin. Results Running increased the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cholinergic denervated mice compared to non-lesioned mice 24 hours after injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Although similar levels of surviving cells were present in cholinergic depleted animals and their respective controls four weeks after injection of BrdU, the majority of progenitors that proliferate in response to the initial period of running were not able to survive beyond one month without cholinergic input. Despite this, the running-induced increase in the number of surviving neurones was not affected by cholinergic depletion. Conclusion The lesion paradigm used here models aspects of the cholinergic deficits associated with Alzheimer's Disease and aging. We showed that running still increased the number of newborn cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in this model of neurodegenerative disease.

  16. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

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    Lorena Varela-Nallar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (ANDRO is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β, a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected.

  17. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Arredondo, Sebastian B.; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Hancke, Juan; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO) is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected. PMID:26798521

  18. Decreased adult neurogenesis in hibernating Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Hernández, Félix; DeFelipe, Javier; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cells occurs in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the lateral walls of the lateral ventricles. In this article, we study the neurogenesis that takes place during the hibernation of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Using a variety of standard neurogenesis markers and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, we describe a preferential decrease in the proliferation of newborn neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the hibernating hamsters (torpor) rather than in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proliferative capacity is recovered after 3-4days of torpor when arousal is triggered under natural conditions (i.e., not artificially provoked). In addition, we show that tau3R, a tau isoform with three microtubule-binding domains, is a suitable marker to study neurogenesis both in the SVZ and subgranular zone (SGZ) of the Syrian hamster brain. PMID:27436535

  19. 3-[3-(3-florophenyl-2-propyn-1-ylthio)-1, 2, 5-thiadiazol-4-yl]-1, 2, 5, 6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine oxalate, a novel xanomeline derivative, improves neural cells proliferation and survival in adult mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gong, Qiang; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Lin; Hu, Yinghe; Shen, Haiming; Dong, Suzhen

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed the influence of 3-[3-(3-florophenyl-2-propyn-1-ylthio)-1, 2, 5-thiadiazol-4-yl]-1, 2, 5, 6-tetrahydro-1-methylpyridine oxalate (EUK1001), a novel xanomeline derivative of the M1/M4 receptor agonist, on hippocampal neurogenesis in adult C57BL6 mice. Results showed that 15-day EUK1001 treatment via intraperitoneal injection promoted neural cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus, although cell differentiation did not change. The majority of bromodeoxyuridine-positive...

  20. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Duarte-Guterman; Lieblich, Stephanie E.; Carmen Chow; Galea, Liisa A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol's effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized ad...

  1. Increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not necessary for wheel running to abolish conditioned place preference for cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustroph, M L; Merritt, J R; Holloway, A L; Pinardo, H; Miller, D S; Kilby, C N; Bucko, P; Wyer, A; Rhodes, J S

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that wheel running can abolish conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine in mice. Running significantly increases the number of new neurons in the hippocampus, and new neurons have been hypothesised to enhance plasticity and behavioral flexibility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that increased neurogenesis was necessary for exercise to abolish cocaine CPP. Male nestin-thymidine kinase transgenic mice were conditioned with cocaine, and then housed with or without running wheels for 32 days. Half of the mice were fed chow containing valganciclovir to induce apoptosis in newly divided neurons, and the other half were fed standard chow. For the first 10 days, mice received daily injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. On the last 4 days, mice were tested for CPP, and then euthanized for measurement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by counting the number of BrdU-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus. Levels of running were similar in mice fed valganciclovir-containing chow and normal chow. Valganciclovir significantly reduced the numbers of neurons (BrdU-positive/NeuN-positive) in the dentate gyrus of both sedentary mice and runner mice. Valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed similar levels of neurogenesis as sedentary, normal-fed controls. However, valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed the same abolishment of CPP as runner mice with intact neurogenesis. The results demonstrate that elevated adult hippocampal neurogenesis resulting from running is not necessary for running to abolish cocaine CPP in mice. PMID:25393660

  2. Temporal features of adult neurogenesis: differences and similarities across mammalian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic eLevy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Production of new neurons continues throughout life in most invertebrates and vertebrates like crustaceans, fishes, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans. Most studies have been carried out on rodent models and demonstrated that adult neurogenesis is located mainly in two structures, the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ. If adult neurogenesis is well preserved throughout evolution, yet there are however some features which differ between species. The present review proposes to target similarities and differences in the mechanism of mammalian adult neurogenesis by comparing selected species including humans. We will highlight the cellular composition and morphological organization of the SVZ in primates which differs from that of rodents and may be of functional relevance. We will particularly focus on the dynamic of neuronal maturation in rodents, primates and humans but also in sheep which appears to be an interesting model due to its similarities with the primate brain.

  3. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. Walker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1 is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative precursor cells suggested immune mechanisms and cytokine signaling as molecular regulators of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation. In addition to LPA1 being a marker of this important stem cell population, we also show that the corresponding ligand LPA is directly involved in the regulation of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis, an effect that can be attributed to LPA signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways.

  4. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate rescues LPS-impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis through suppressing the TLR4-NF-κB signaling pathway in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Kyung-Joo; Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Kook, Min Suk; Ko, Hyun-Mi; Jung, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Won-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal dentate granule neurons are generated from neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mammalian brain, and the fate specification of adult NSCs is precisely controlled by the local niches and environment, such as the subventricular zone (SVZ), dentate gyrus (DG), and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the main polyphenolic flavonoid in green tea that has neuroprotective activities, but there is no clear understanding of the role of EGCG in adult neurogenesis in the DG after neuroinflammation. Here, we investigate the effect and the mechanism of EGCG on adult neurogenesis impaired by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS-induced neuroinflammation inhibited adult neurogenesis by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the DG, which was indicated by the decreased number of Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-, Doublecortin (DCX)- and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN)-positive cells. In addition, microglia were recruited with activatingTLR4-NF-κB signaling in the adult hippocampus by LPS injection. Treating LPS-injured mice with EGCG restored the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs in the DG, which were decreased by LPS, and EGCG treatment also ameliorated the apoptosis of NSCs. Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokine production induced by LPS was attenuated by EGCG treatment through modulating the TLR4-NF-κB pathway. These results illustrate that EGCG has a beneficial effect on impaired adult neurogenesis caused by LPSinduced neuroinflammation, and it may be applicable as a therapeutic agent against neurodegenerative disorders caused by inflammation. PMID:26807022

  6. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs' effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opiate drugs in general cause a loss of newly born neural progenitors in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus, by either modulating proliferation or interfering with differentiation and maturation. We also discuss the consequent impact of regulation of adult neurogenesis in animal's opioid addiction behavior. We further look into the future directions in studying the convergence between the adult neurogenesis field and opioid addiction field, since the adult-born granular cells were shown to play a role in neuroplasticity and may help to reduce the vulnerability to drug craving and relapse. PMID:27127799

  7. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs' effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opiate drugs in general cause a loss of newly born neural progenitors in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus, by either modulating proliferation or interfering with differentiation and maturation. We also discuss the consequent impact of regulation of adult neurogenesis in animal's opioid addiction behavior. We further look into the future directions in studying the convergence between the adult neurogenesis field and opioid addiction field, since the adult-born granular cells were shown to play a role in neuroplasticity and may help to reduce the vulnerability to drug craving and relapse. PMID:27127799

  8. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Fear Generalization, and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Antoine; Sahay, Amar

    2016-01-01

    The generalization of fear is an adaptive, behavioral, and physiological response to the likelihood of threat in the environment. In contrast, the overgeneralization of fear, a cardinal feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), manifests as inappropriate, uncontrollable expression of fear in neutral and safe environments. Overgeneralization of fear stems from impaired discrimination of safe from aversive environments or discernment of unlikely threats from those that are highly probable. In addition, the time-dependent erosion of episodic details of traumatic memories might contribute to their generalization. Understanding the neural mechanisms underlying the overgeneralization of fear will guide development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat PTSD. Here, we conceptualize generalization of fear in terms of resolution of interference between similar memories. We propose a role for a fundamental encoding mechanism, pattern separation, in the dentate gyrus (DG)-CA3 circuit in resolving interference between ambiguous or uncertain threats and in preserving episodic content of remote aversive memories in hippocampal-cortical networks. We invoke cellular-, circuit-, and systems-based mechanisms by which adult-born dentate granule cells (DGCs) modulate pattern separation to influence resolution of interference and maintain precision of remote aversive memories. We discuss evidence for how these mechanisms are affected by stress, a risk factor for PTSD, to increase memory interference and decrease precision. Using this scaffold we ideate strategies to curb overgeneralization of fear in PTSD. PMID:26068726

  9. Cdk5 regulates accurate maturation of newborn granule cells in the adult hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Jessberger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Newborn granule cells become functionally integrated into the synaptic circuitry of the adult dentate gyrus after a morphological and electrophysiological maturation process. The molecular mechanisms by which immature neurons and the neurites extending from them find their appropriate position and target area remain largely unknown. Here we show that single-cell-specific knockdown of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5 activity in newborn cells using a retrovirus-based strategy leads to aberrant growth of dendritic processes, which is associated with an altered migration pattern of newborn cells. Even though spine formation and maturation are reduced in cdk5-deficient cells, aberrant dendrites form ectopic synapses onto hilar neurons. These observations identify cdk5 to be critically involved in the maturation and dendrite extension of newborn neurons in the course of adult neurogenesis. The data presented here also suggest a mechanistic dissociation between accurate dendritic targeting and subsequent synapse formation.

  10. Protein kinase LKB1 regulates polarized dendrite formation of adult hippocampal newborn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; She, Liang; Chang, Xing-ya; Yang, Rong-rong; Wang, Liang; Ji, Hong-bin; Jiao, Jian-wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-01-01

    Adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the rodent hippocampus are important for memory formation and mood regulation, but the cellular mechanism underlying their polarized development, a process critical for their incorporation into functional circuits, remains unknown. We found that deletion of the serine-threonine protein kinase LKB1 or overexpression of dominant-negative LKB1 reduced the polarized initiation of the primary dendrite from the soma and disrupted its oriented growth toward the molecular layer. This abnormality correlated with the dispersion of Golgi apparatus that normally accumulated at the base and within the initial segment of the primary dendrite, and was mimicked by disrupting Golgi organization via altering the expression of Golgi structural proteins GM130 or GRASP65. Thus, besides its known function in axon formation in embryonic pyramidal neurons, LKB1 plays an additional role in regulating polarized dendrite morphogenesis in adult-born granule cells in the hippocampus. PMID:24367100

  11. Neurogenesis in the adult peripheral nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krzysztof Czaja; Michele Fornaro; Stefano Geuna

    2012-01-01

    Most researchers believe that neurogenesis in mature mammals is restricted only to the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the central nervous system. In the peripheral nervous system, neurogenesis is thought to be active only during prenatal development, with the exception of the olfactory neuroepithelium. However, sensory ganglia in the adult peripheral nervous system have been reported to contain precursor cells that can proliferate in vitro and be induced to differentiate into neurons. The occurrence of insult-induced neurogenesis, which has been reported by several investigators in the brain, is limited to a few recent reports for the peripheral nervous system. These reports suggest that damage to the adult nervous system induces mechanisms similar to those that control the generation of new neurons during prenatal development. Understanding conditions under which neurogenesis can be induced in physiologically non-neurogenic regions in adults is one of the major challenges for developing therapeutic strategies to repair neurological damage. However, the induced neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system is still largely unexplored. This review presents the history of research on adult neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system, which dates back more than 100 years and reveals the evidence on the under estimated potential for generation of new neurons in the adult peripheral nervous system.

  12. Adult neurogenesis in a giant otter shrew (Potamogale velox).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzke, N; Kaswera, C; Gilissen, E; Ihunwo, A O; Manger, P R

    2013-05-15

    Adult neurogenesis in mammals is typically observed in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone. We investigated adult neurogenesis in the brain of a giant otter shrew (Potamogale velox), a semi-aquatic, central African rainforest mammal of the family Tenrecidae that belongs to the superorder Afrotheria. We examined neurogenesis immunohistochemically, using the endogenous marker doublecortin (DCX), which stains neuronal precursor cells and immature neurons. Our results revealed densely packed DCX-positive cells in the entire extent of the subventricular zone from where cells migrated along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb. In the olfactory bulb, DCX-expressing cells were primarily present in the granular cell layer with radially orientated dendrites and in the glomerular layer representing periglomerular cells. In the hippocampus, DCX-positive cells were identified in the subgranular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus and strongly labelled DCX-positive processes, presumably dendrites and axons of the newly generated granular cells, were observed in the CA3 regions. In addition, DCX immunoreactive cells were present in the olfactory tubercle, the piriform cortex and the endopiriform nucleus. While DCX-positive fibres have been previously observed in the anterior commissure of the hedgehog and mole, we were able to demonstrate the presence of DCX-positive cells presumably migrating across the anterior commissure. Taken together, the giant otter shrew reveals patterns of neurogenesis similar to that seen in other mammals; however, the appearance of possible neuronal precursor cells in the anterior commissure is a novel observation. PMID:23485806

  13. Cocaine and MDMA Induce Cellular and Molecular Changes in Adult Neurogenic Systems: Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the brain to generate new adult neurons is a recent discovery that challenges the old theory of an immutable adult brain. A new and fascinating field of research now focuses on this regenerative process. The two brain systems that constantly produce new adult neurons, known as the adult neurogenic systems, are the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the lateral ventricules/olfactory bulb system. Both systems are involved in memory and learning processes. Different drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and MDMA, have been shown to produce cellular and molecular changes that affect adult neurogenesis. This review summarizes the effects that these drugs have on the adult neurogenic systems. The functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is obscured by the functions of the systems that integrate adult neurons. Therefore, we explore the effects that cocaine and MDMA produce not only on adult neurogenesis, but also on the DG and olfactory bulbs. Finally, we discuss the possible role of new adult neurons in cocaine- and MDMA-induced impairments. We conclude that, although harmful drug effects are produced at multiple physiological and anatomical levels, the specific consequences of reduced hippocampus neurogenesis are unclear and require further exploration.

  14. Kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to hippocampal dentate granule cells. II. Effects of the NMDA antagonist MK-801.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, G B

    1991-10-18

    The effect of the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 on the early development of kindling-induced potentiation was examined in the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus. MK-801 (0.5 mg\\/kg) was administered 2 h before each daily kindling stimulation was applied to the perforant path. This treatment continued for the first 10 days of kindling. MK-801 depressed the growth of the afterdischarge duration and suppressed development of behavioral seizures. MK-801 did not block kindling-induced potentiation of either the perforant path-dentate granule cell population spike or excitatory postsynaptic potential. Random impulse train stimulation and non-linear systems analytic techniques were used to examine kindling-induced potentiation of presumed GABAergic recurrent inhibitory circuits. Both the magnitude and duration of kindling-induced response inhibition, to the second of each pair of impulses within the train, were reduced in rabbits pretreated with MK-801. These results suggest that MK-801 differentially affects kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory circuits within the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus.

  15. D-serine increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eSultan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis results in the continuous formation of new neurons and is a process of brain plasticity involved in learning and memory. The neurogenic niche regulates the stem cell proliferation and the differentiation and survival of new neurons and a major contributor to the neurogenic niche are astrocytes. Among the molecules secreted by astrocytes, D-serine is an important gliotransmitter and is a co-agonist of the glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor. D-serine has been shown to enhance the proliferation of neural stem cells in vitro, but its effect on adult neurogenesis in vivo is unknown. Here, we tested the effect of exogenous administration of D-serine on adult neurogenesis in the mouse dentate gyrus. We found that 1 week of treatment with D-serine increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro and increased the density of neural stem cells and transit amplifying progenitors. Furthermore, D-serine increased the survival of newborn neurons. Together, these results indicate that D-serine treatment resulted in the improvement of several steps of adult neurogenesis in vivo.

  16. IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, J E; Ramsay, C. R.; Averley, P.; Bonetti, D.; Boyers, D.; L. Campbell; Chadwick, G.R.; Duncan, A; Elders, A.; Gouick, J.; Hall, A.F.; Heasman, L; Heasman, P.A.; Hodge, P.J.; C. Jones

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered ne...

  17. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, Balu, E-mail: Balu.Chakravarthy@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); LaFerla, Frank M. [Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Ito, Shingo [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria [Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Whitfield, James [Human Health Therapeutics, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  18. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  19. Perceived Stress Is Differentially Related to Hippocampal Subfield Volumes among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Molly E.; Ezzati, Ali; Katz, Mindy J.; Lipton, Michael L.; Brickman, Adam M.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic exposure to stress has been shown to impact a wide range of health-related outcomes in older adults. Despite extensive animal literature revealing deleterious effects of biological markers of stress on the dentate gyrus subfield of the hippocampus, links between hippocampal subfields and psychological stress have not been studied in humans. This study examined the relationship between perceived stress and hippocampal subfield volumes among racially/ethnically diverse older adults. Methods and Materials Between July 2011 and March 2014, 116 nondemented participants were consecutively drawn from the Einstein Aging Study, an ongoing community-based sample of individuals over the age of 70 residing in Bronx, New York. All participants completed the Perceived Stress Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale, and underwent 3.0 T MRI. FreeSurfer was used to derive total hippocampal volume, hippocampal subfield volumes (CA1, CA2/CA3, CA4/Dentate Gyrus (CA4/DG), and subiculum), entorhinal cortex volume, whole brain volume, and total intracranial volume. Results Linear regression analyses revealed that higher levels of perceived stress were associated with smaller total hippocampal volume (β = -0.20, t = -2.40, p = 0.02), smaller CA2/CA3 volumes (β = -0.18, t = -2.24, p = 0.03) and smaller CA4/DG volumes (β = -0.19, t = -2.28, p = 0.03) after controlling for total intracranial volume, age, gender, and race. These findings remained unchanged after removal of individuals with clinically significant symptoms of depression. Discussion Our findings provide evidence of a relationship between a direct indicator of psychological stress and specific hippocampal subfield volumes in elderly individuals. These results highlight the importance of clinical screening for chronic stress in otherwise healthy older adults. PMID:27144832

  20. Neural stem cells and the regulation of adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conover Joanne C

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumably, the 'hard-wired' neuronal circuitry of the adult brain dissuades addition of new neurons, which could potentially disrupt existing circuits. This is borne out by the fact that, in general, new neurons are not produced in the mature brain. However, recent studies have established that the adult brain does maintain discrete regions of neurogenesis from which new neurons migrate and become incorporated into the functional circuitry of the brain. These neurogenic zones appear to be vestiges of the original developmental program that initiates brain formation. The largest of these germinal regions in the adult brain is the subventricular zone (SVZ, which lines the lateral walls of the lateral ventricles. Neural stem cells produce neuroblasts that migrate from the SVZ along a discrete pathway, the rostral migratory stream, into the olfactory bulb where they form mature neurons involved in the sense of smell. The subgranular layer (SGL of the hippocampal dentate gyrus is another neurogenic region; new SGL neurons migrate only a short distance and differentiate into hippocampal granule cells. Here, we discuss the surprising finding of neural stem cells in the adult brain and the molecular mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis.

  1. Wnt signaling in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

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    Lorena eVarela-Nallar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the adult brain new neurons are continuously generated mainly in two regions, the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the SGZ, radial neural stem cells give rise to granule cells that integrate into the hippocampal circuitry and are relevant for the plasticity of the hippocampus. Loss of neurogenesis impairs learning and memory, suggesting that this process is important for adult hippocampal function. Adult neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple signaling pathways, including the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. This pathway plays important roles during the development of neuronal circuits and in the adult brain it modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we review current knowledge on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling cascade and the potential mechanisms involved in this regulation. Also we discuss the evidence supporting that the canonical Wnt pathway is part of the signaling mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurogenesis in different physiological conditions. Finally, some unsolved questions regarding the Wnt-mediated regulation of neurogenesis are discussed.

  2. Dentate gyrus progenitor cell proliferation after the onset of spontaneous seizures in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Shtaya, A.B.Y.; Bodansky, D.M.S.; Chang, W.C.; Gray, W.P.; Jefferys, J. G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, Jun 2013 (2013), s. 492-498. ISSN 0969-9961 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : spontaneous seizures * temporal lobe epilepsy * neurogenesis * tetanus toxin * apoptosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.202, year: 2013

  3. Morphological features of microglial cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Gunn rat: a possible schizophrenia animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Liaury Kristian; Miyaoka Tsuyoshi; Tsumori Toshiko; Furuya Motohide; Wake Rei; Ieda Masa; Tsuchie Keiko; Taki Michiyo; Ishihara Kotomi; Tanra Andi; Horiguchi Jun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a debilitating and complex mental disorder whose exact etiology remains unknown. There is growing amount of evidence of a relationship between neuroinflammation, as demonstrated by microglial activation, and schizophrenia. Our previous studies have proposed that hyperbilirubinemia plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Furthermore, we suggested the Gunn rat, an animal model of bilirubin encephalopathy, as a possible animal model of schizophr...

  4. Effects of Antipsychotics on Dentate Gyrus Stem Cell Proliferation and Survival in Animal Models: A Critical Update

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    Gerburg Keilhoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder. Although a number of different hypotheses have been developed to explain its aetiopathogenesis, we are far from understanding it. There is clinical and experimental evidence indicating that neurodevelopmental factors play a major role. Disturbances in neurodevelopment might result in alterations of neuroanatomy and neurochemistry, leading to the typical symptoms observed in schizophrenia. The present paper will critically address the neurodevelopmental models underlying schizophrenia by discussing the effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics in animal models. We will specifically discuss the vitamin D deficiency model, the poly I:C model, the ketamine model, and the postnatal ventral hippocampal lesion model, all of which reflect core neurodevelopmental issues underlying schizophrenia onset.

  5. Effects of Antipsychotics on Dentate Gyrus Stem Cell Proliferation and Survival in Animal Models: A Critical Update

    OpenAIRE

    Gerburg Keilhoff; Paolo Fusar-Poli; Axel Becker

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder. Although a number of different hypotheses have been developed to explain its aetiopathogenesis, we are far from understanding it. There is clinical and experimental evidence indicating that neurodevelopmental factors play a major role. Disturbances in neurodevelopment might result in alterations of neuroanatomy and neurochemistry, leading to the typical symptoms observed in schizophrenia. The present paper will critically address the neurodevel...

  6. PROPYLTHIOURACIL (PTU)-INDUCED HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES FIELD POTENTIAL AMPLITUDE BUT DOES NOT IMPAIR DENTATE GYRUS LTP IN VIVO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental exposure to hypothyroid-inducing agents leads to reductions in body weight, alterations in hippocampal structure, and impaired performance on a variety of behavioral learning tasks. Electrophysiological properties of the hippocampus in hypothyroid animals, however...

  7. Corticosterone time-dependently modulates {beta}-adrenergic effects on long-term potentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Pu; H. Krugers; M. Joëls

    2007-01-01

    Previous experiments in the hippocampal CA1 area have shown that corticosterone can facilitate long-term potentiation (LTP) in a rapid non-genomic fashion, while the same hormone suppresses LTP that is induced several hours after hormone application. Here, we elaborated on this finding by examining

  8. Strain-dependent variations in spatial learning and in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Manahan-Vaughan

    2011-03-01

    These data suggest that strain-dependent variations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity occur in different hippocampal synapses. A clear correlation with differences in spatial learning is not evident however.

  9. Effects of Long-Term Stress and Recovery on the Prefrontal Cortex and Dentate Gyrus in Male and Female Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Yanhua; Westenbroek, Christel; Bakker, Petra; Termeer, Joan; Liu, Aihua; Li, Xuejun; Ter Horst, Gert J.

    2008-01-01

    Women show a higher prevalence for depression than men. However, the biological basis of gender differences in stress response and recovery still remain poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the gender differences in response to acute stress, chronic stress and recovery in

  10. Electrophysiological evidence during episodic prospection implicates medial prefrontal and bilateral middle temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Fen; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S

    2016-08-01

    fMRI studies have implicated the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe, components of the default mode network (DMN), in episodic prospection. This study compared quantitative EEG localized to these DMN regions during prospection and during resting and while waiting for rewards. EEG was recorded in twenty-two adults while they were asked to (i) envision future monetary episodes; (ii) wait for rewards and (iii) rest. Activation sources were localized to core DMN regions. EEG power and phase coherence were compared across conditions. Prospection, compared to resting and waiting, was associated with reduced power in the medial prefrontal gyrus and increased power in the bilateral medial temporal gyrus across frequency bands as well as greater phase synchrony between these regions in the delta band. The current quantitative EEG analysis confirms prior fMRI research suggesting that medial prefrontal and medial temporal gyrus interactions are central to the capacity for episodic prospection. PMID:27026652

  11. Comparative neuroscience of stimulant-induced memory dysfunction: role for neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan J

    2010-09-01

    The discovery that the addictive drugs impair neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has prompted the elaboration of new biological hypotheses to explain addiction and drug-induced cognitive dysfunction. Considerable evidence now implicates the process of adult neurogenesis in at least some critical components of hippocampal-dependent memory function. In experimental models, psychomotor stimulant drugs produce alterations in the rate of birth, survival, maturation and functional integration of adult-born hippocampal neurons. Thus some of the deleterious consequences of drug abuse on memory could result from the neurotoxic actions of drugs on adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In this review, we will first summarize preclinical and clinical literature on the disruptive effects of drugs such as cocaine and ecstasy in the areas of learning, memory and attention. We will also summarize data that document the widespread effects of stimulant drugs on progenitor activity and precursor incorporation in the adult dentate gyrus. Finally, we will examine evidence that supports the involvement of hippocampal neurogenesis in specific aspects of learning and memory function and we will consider critically the hypothesis that some of the negative consequences of drug abuse on cognition might be ascribed to deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Evidence suggests that stimulant abuse impacts negatively on at least four areas of memory/cognitive function that may be influenced by adult hippocampal neurogenesis: contextual memory, spatial memory, working memory and cognitive flexibility. PMID:20700045

  12. Genetic Methods to Identify and Manipulate Newly born Neurons in the Adult Brain

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    Itaru eImayoshi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although mammalian neurogenesis is mostly completed by the perinatal period, new neurons are continuously generated in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Since the discovery of adult neurogenesis, many extensive studies have been performed on various aspects of adult neurogenesis, including proliferation and fate-specification of adult neural stem cells, and the migration, maturation and synaptic integration of newly born neurons. Furthermore, recent research has shed light on the intensive contribution of adult neurogenesis to olfactory-related and hippocampus-mediated brain functions. The field of adult neurogenesis progressed tremendously thanks to technical advances that facilitate the identification and selective manipulation of newly born neurons among billions of pre-existing neurons in the adult central nervous system. In this review, we introduce recent advances in the methodologies for visualizing newly generated neurons and manipulating neurogenesis in the adult brain. Particularly, the application of site-specific recombinases and Tet inducible system in combination with transgenic or gene targeting strategy is discussed in further detail.

  13. Arterial blood architecture of the maxillary sinus in dentate specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Kqiku, Lumnije; Biblekaj, Robert; Weiglein, Andreas H.; Kqiku, Xhylsime; Städtler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Aim To describe vascular anatomy of the maxillary sinus in dentate specimens dissected from human cadavers. Methods Twenty dentate maxillary specimens were dissected, anatomically prepared, and injected with liquid latex for a better visualization of the maxillary sinus artery. Results We found an intraosseous anastomosis in 100% and an extraosseous anastomosis in 90% of the cases. The anterior lateral wall of the maxillary sinus was transversed by two anastomoses between the posterior superi...

  14. Maxillary sinus floor in edentulous and dentate patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba T; Langlais R; Morimoto Y; Tanaka T; Hashimoto K

    2001-01-01

    To compare the depth of the maxillary sinus floor on panoramic radiographs between the edentulous and dentate patients. Thirty panoramic radiographs of edentulous female patients and 47 panoramic radiographs of female dentate patients were used for the sample. To measure the depth of the maxillary sinus floor, the outline of the maxillary sinus on the panoramic radiograph was traced on transparent paper. An apparent difference in depth of the maxillary sinus floor was recognized only in compa...

  15. Seizure-Induced Motility of Differentiated Dentate Granule Cells Is Prevented by the Central Reelin Fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcinha, Catarina; Münzner, Gert; Gerlach, Johannes; Kilias, Antje; Follo, Marie; Egert, Ulrich; Haas, Carola A

    2016-01-01

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) represents a pathological widening of the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus and it is frequently observed in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Recent studies in human MTLE specimens and in animal epilepsy models have shown that a decreased expression and functional inactivation of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin correlates with GCD formation, but causal evidence is still lacking. Here, we used unilateral kainate (KA) injection into the mouse hippocampus, an established MTLE animal model, to precisely map the loss of reelin mRNA-synthesizing neurons in relation to GCD along the septotemporal axis of the epileptic hippocampus. We show that reelin mRNA-producing neurons are mainly lost in the hilus and that this loss precisely correlates with the occurrence of GCD. To monitor GCD formation in real time, we used organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) prepared from mice which express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) primarily in differentiated dentate granule cells. Using life cell microscopy we observed that increasing doses of KA resulted in an enhanced motility of eGFP-positive granule cells. Moreover, KA treatment of OHSC resulted in a rapid loss of Reelin-producing interneurons mainly in the hilus, as observed in vivo. A detailed analysis of the migration behavior of individual eGFP-positive granule cells revealed that the majority of these neurons actively migrate toward the hilar region, where Reelin-producing neurons are lost. Treatment with KA and subsequent addition of the recombinant R3-6 Reelin fragment significantly prevented the movement of eGFP-positive granule cells. Together, these findings suggest that GCD formation is indeed triggered by a loss of Reelin in hilar interneurons. PMID:27516734

  16. Low-intensity treadmill exercise and/or bright light promote neurogenesis in adult rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Jin Kwon; Jeongsook Park; So Yun Park; Kwang Seop Song; Sun Tae Jung; So Bong Jung; Ik Ryeul Park; Wan Sung Choi; Sun Ok Kwon

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is a brain region responsible for learning and memory functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity exercise and bright light exposure on neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in adult rat hippocampus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to control, exercise, light, or exercise + light groups (n = 9 per group). The rats in the exercise group were subjected to treadmill exercise (5 days per week, 30 minutes per day, over a 4-week period), the light group rats were irradiated (5 days per week, 30 minutes per day, 10 000 lx, over a 4-week period), the exercise + light group rats were subjected to treadmill exercise in combination with bright light exposure, and the control group rats remained sedentary over a 4-week period. Compared with the control group, there was a significant increase in neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats in the exercise, light, and exercise + light groups. Moreover, the expression level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly higher in the exercise group and light group than that in the control group. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression between the control group and exercise + light group. These results indicate that low-intensity treadmill exercise (first 5 minutes at a speed of 2 m/min, second 5 minutes at a speed of 5 m/min, and the last 20 minutes at a speed of 8 m/min) or bright-light exposure therapy induces positive biochemical changes in the brain. In view of these findings, we propose that moderate exercise or exposure to sunlight during childhood can be beneficial for neural development.

  17. Precentral gyrus functional connectivity signatures of autism

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    Mary Beth eNebel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Motor impairments are prevalent in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and are perhaps the earliest symptoms to develop. In addition, motor skills relate to the communicative/social deficits at the core of ASD diagnosis, and these behavioral deficits may reflect abnormal connectivity within brain networks underlying motor control and learning. Despite the fact that motor abnormalities in ASD are well-characterized, there remains a fundamental disconnect between the complexity of the clinical presentation of ASD and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms. In this study, we examined connectivity within and between functional subregions of a key component of the motor control network, the precentral gyrus, using resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data collected from a large, heterogeneous sample of individuals with ASD as well as neurotypical controls. We found that the strength of connectivity within and between distinct functional subregions of the precentral gyrus was related to ASD diagnosis and to the severity of ASD traits. In particular, connectivity involving the dorsomedial (lower limb/trunk subregion was abnormal in ASD individuals as predicted by models using a dichotomous variable coding for the presence of ASD, as well as models using symptom severity ratings. These findings provide further support for a link between motor and social/communicative abilities in ASD.

  18. Superior temporal gyrus volume reduction and P300 in schizophrenia prior to treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayasu, Akira; Hokama, Hiroto; Ogura, Chikara; Ohta, Hirokazu; Arakaki, Hajime; Asato, Naohiko; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-07-01

    Authors measured the superior temporal gyrus volume by 3D MRI imaging for the schizophrenics and simultaneously recorded the P300 component during the auditory odd-ball exercise. Subjects were 8 cases of schizophrenics and the sex- and age-matched healthy control adults. In schizophrenics, the superior temporal gyrus volume reduction was found. When the superior temporal gyrus was divided into two parts, the anterior part containing the primary auditory area, and the posterior part containing the planum temporale and the Wernicle speech area, the volume reduction of left side in the posterior part was remarkable. There was no difference in the latent time and the P300 amplitude between schizophrenics and healthy controls, suggesting that the superior temporal gyrus abnormalities will appear prior to P300 abnormalities. We could not find any correlation between findings of MRI and P300 and psychic symptoms. We discuss the possible contribution on the elucidation of the pathogenesis of the schizophrenia by simultaneous recordings of 3D MRI imaging and the event-related potentials. (K.H.)

  19. Superior temporal gyrus volume reduction and P300 in schizophrenia prior to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors measured the superior temporal gyrus volume by 3D MRI imaging for the schizophrenics and simultaneously recorded the P300 component during the auditory odd-ball exercise. Subjects were 8 cases of schizophrenics and the sex- and age-matched healthy control adults. In schizophrenics, the superior temporal gyrus volume reduction was found. When the superior temporal gyrus was divided into two parts, the anterior part containing the primary auditory area, and the posterior part containing the planum temporale and the Wernicle speech area, the volume reduction of left side in the posterior part was remarkable. There was no difference in the latent time and the P300 amplitude between schizophrenics and healthy controls, suggesting that the superior temporal gyrus abnormalities will appear prior to P300 abnormalities. We could not find any correlation between findings of MRI and P300 and psychic symptoms. We discuss the possible contribution on the elucidation of the pathogenesis of the schizophrenia by simultaneous recordings of 3D MRI imaging and the event-related potentials. (K.H.)

  20. Galectin-1 is expressed in early-type neural progenitor cells and down-regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaizumi Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs proliferate in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and generate new neurons throughout life. A multimodal protein, Galectin-1, is expressed in neural progenitor cells (NPCs and implicated in the proliferation of the NPCs in the DG. However, little is known about its detailed expression profile in the NPCs and functions in adult neurogenesis in the DG. Results Our immunohistochemical and morphological analysis showed that Galectin-1 was expressed in the type 1 and 2a cells, which are putative NSCs, in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the adult mouse DG. To study Galectin-1's function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, we made galectin-1 knock-out mice on the C57BL6 background and characterized the effects on neurogenesis. In the SGZ of the galectin-1 knock-out mice, increased numbers of type 1 cells, DCX-positive immature progenitors, and NeuN-positive newborn neurons were observed. Using triple-labeling immunohistochemistry and morphological analyses, we found that the proliferation of the type-1 cells was increased in the SGZ of the galectin-1 knock-out mice, and we propose that this proliferation is the mechanism for the net increase in the adult neurogenesis in these knock-out mice DG. Conclusions Galectin-1 is expressed in the neural stem cells and down-regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

  1. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhakumar, Rachen; Boontem, Parichart; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Mukda, Sujira; Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2015-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, is known to exert neurotoxic effects to the dopaminergic neural system. Long-term METH administration impairs brain functions such as cognition, learning and memory. Newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus play an important role in spatial learning and memory. Previous in vitro studies have shown that METH inhibits cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. On the other hand, melatonin, a major indole secreted by the pineal gland, enhances neurogenesis in both the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus. In this study, adult C57BL/6 mice were used to study the beneficial effects of melatonin on METH-induced alterations in neurogenesis and post-synaptic proteins related to learning and memory functions in the hippocampus. The results showed that METH caused a decrease in neuronal phenotypes as determined by the expressions of nestin, doublecortin (DCX) and beta-III tubulin while causing an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. Moreover, METH inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling activity and altered expression of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B as well as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). These effects could be attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. In conclusion, melatonin prevented the METH-induced reduction in neurogenesis, increase in astrogliogenesis and alteration of NMDA receptor subunit expression. These findings may indicate the beneficial effects of melatonin on the impairment of learning and memory caused by METH. PMID:26366944

  2. Low Proliferation and Differentiation Capacities of Adult Hippocampal Stem Cells Correlate with Memory Dysfunction in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coras, Roland; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.; Pauli, Elisabeth; Huttner, Hagen B.; Njunting, Marleisje; Kobow, Katja; Villmann, Carmen; Hahnen, Eric; Neuhuber, Winfried; Weigel, Daniel; Buchfelder, Michael; Stefan, Hermann; Beck, Heinz; Steindler, Dennis A.; Blumcke, Ingmar

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus maintains its capacity to generate new neurons throughout life. In animal models, hippocampal neurogenesis is increased by cognitive tasks, and experimental ablation of neurogenesis disrupts specific modalities of learning and memory. In humans, the impact of neurogenesis on cognition remains unclear. Here, we…

  3. miR-17-92 Cluster Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Anxiety, and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghee Jin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has shown that noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs, contribute to the pathogenesis of mood and anxiety disorders, although the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that altered levels of miR-17-92 in adult hippocampal neural progenitors have a significant impact on neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in mice. miR-17-92 deletion in adult neural progenitors decreases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, while its overexpression increases neurogenesis. miR-17-92 affects neurogenesis by regulating genes in the glucocorticoid pathway, especially serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (Sgk1. miR-17-92 knockout mice show anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, whereas miR-17-92 overexpressing mice exhibit anxiolytic and antidepression-like behaviors. Furthermore, we show that miR-17-92 expression in the adult mouse hippocampus responds to chronic stress, and miR-17-92 rescues proliferation defects induced by corticosterone in hippocampal neural progenitors. Our study uncovers a crucial role for miR-17-92 in adult neural progenitors through regulation of neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

  4. miR-17-92 Cluster Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Anxiety, and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Junghee; Kim, Seung-Nam; Liu, Xuqing; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Chao; Seo, Ji-Seon; Kim, Yong; Sun, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), contribute to the pathogenesis of mood and anxiety disorders, although the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that altered levels of miR-17-92 in adult hippocampal neural progenitors have a significant impact on neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in mice. miR-17-92 deletion in adult neural progenitors decreases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, while its overexpression increases neurogenesis. miR-17-92 affects neurogenesis by regulating genes in the glucocorticoid pathway, especially serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (Sgk1). miR-17-92 knockout mice show anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, whereas miR-17-92 overexpressing mice exhibit anxiolytic and antidepression-like behaviors. Furthermore, we show that miR-17-92 expression in the adult mouse hippocampus responds to chronic stress, and miR-17-92 rescues proliferation defects induced by corticosterone in hippocampal neural progenitors. Our study uncovers a crucial role for miR-17-92 in adult neural progenitors through regulation of neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. PMID:27477270

  5. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1 at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis K. Politis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation versus differentiation decisions of NSCs, promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibits astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs, differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis.

  6. Sustained Arc expression in adult-generated granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meconi, Alicia; Lui, Erika; Marrone, Diano F

    2015-08-31

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a critical role in memory formation and maintenance. Fitting this specialized role, the DG has many unique characteristics. In addition to being one of the few places in which new neurons are continually added in adulthood, the region also shows a unique long-term sustained transcriptional response of the immediate-early gene Arc to sensory input. Although we know that adult-generated granule cells are reliably recruited into behaviorally-driven neuronal network, it remains unknown whether they display robust late-phase sustained transcription in response to activity like their developmentally-generated counterparts. Since this late-phase of transcription is required for enduring plasticity, knowing if sustained transcription appears as soon as these cells are incorporated provides information on their potential for plasticity. To address this question, adult F344 rats were injected with BrdU (50mg/kg/day for 5 days) and 4 weeks later explored a novel environment. Arc expression in both BrdU- and BrdU+ neurons was determined 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h, 8h, 12h, or 24h following this behavior. Recently-generated granule cells showed a robust sustained Arc expression following a discrete behavioral experience. These data provide information on a potential mechanism to sculpt the representations of events occurring within hours of each other to create uncorrelated representations of episodes despite a highly excitable population of neurons. PMID:26219984

  7. A Sox2 BAC transgenic approach for targeting adult neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfei Kang

    Full Text Available The transcription factor gene Sox2 is expressed in embryonic neural stem/progenitor cells and previous evidence suggests that it is also expressed in adult neural stem cells. To target Sox2-expressing neural stem/progenitor cells in a temporal manner, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mouse line, in which an inducible form of Cre, CreER™, is expressed under Sox2 regulatory elements. Inducible Cre activity in these mice was characterized using floxed reporters. During development, the Sox2-CreER transgenic mice show inducible Cre activity specifically in CNS stem/progenitor cells, making them a useful tool to regulate the expression of floxed genes temporally in embryonic neural stem/progenitor cells. In the adult, we examined the cell-specific expression of Sox2 and performed long-term lineage tracing. Four months after the transient induction of Cre activity, recombined GFAP+ stem-like cells and DCX+ neuroblasts were still abundant in the neurogenic regions including the subventricular zone (SVZ, rostral migratory stream (RMS, and subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus. These results provide definitive in vivo evidence that Sox2 is expressed in neural stem cells (NSC in both the SVZ and SGZ that are capable of self-renewal and long-term neurogenesis. Therefore, Sox2-CreER mice should be useful in targeting floxed genes in adult neural stem cells.

  8. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse. PMID:26792809

  9. Pulse labeling and long-term tracing of newborn neurons in the adult subgranular zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuewen Cheng; Yang Li; Ying Huang; Xiaoyan Feng; Guoping Feng; Zhi-Qi Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Research over the past decades has demonstrated that adult brain produces neural progenitor cells which proliferate and differentiate to newborn neurons that integrate into the existing circuit.However, detailed differentiation processes and underlying mechanisms of newly generated neurons are largely unknown due to the limitation of available methods for labeling and manipulating neural progenitor cells and newborn neurons. In this study, we designed a tightly controlled,noninvasive system based on Cre/loxP recombination to achieve long-term tracing and genetic manipulation of adult neurons in vivo. In this system, tamoxifen-inducible recomumase,CreERT2,was driven by BAC-based promoter of doublecortin(DCX,a marker of newborn neurons).By crossing this Cre line with reporter mouse, we found that newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) could be selectively pulse-labeled by tamoxifeninduced expression of yellow fluorescent protein(YFP).YFP-positive neurons were identified by coimmunostaining with cell type-specific markers and characterized by electrophysiological recording.Furthermore,analysis of the migration of these neurons showed that the majority of these labeled neurons migrated to the inner part of granule cell layer.Moreover,spine growth of inner molecular layer of newborn granule neurons takes a dynamic pattern of invert U-shape,in contrast to the wedge-shaped change in the outer molecular layer.Our transgenic tool provides an efficient way to selectively label and manipulate newborn neuron in adult mouse DG.

  10. A MRI study of fusiform gyrus in schizotypal personality disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Dickey, Chandlee C.; McCarley, Robert W.; Voglmaier, Martina M.; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A.; Seidman, Larry J.; Frumin, Melissa; Toner, Sarah; Demeo, Susan; Martha E. Shenton

    2003-01-01

    The fusiform gyrus is important for face and object recognition, is abnormal in schizophrenia, but has not been studied in schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). Thin-slice MR images showed no differences, either in right, left or total fusiform gyri volumes, between subjects with SPD (N = 21) and normal controls (N = 19). However, there was a correlation between severity of illusions and magical thinking suffered by the SPD subjects and smaller right fusiform gyrus volumes. This suggests th...

  11. Interactions between Inhibitory Interneurons and Excitatory Associational Circuitry in Determining Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Hippocampal Dentate Granule Cells: A Large-Scale Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip eHendrickson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on findings from a million-cell granule cell model of the rat dentate gyrus that was used to explore the contributions of local interneuronal and associational circuits to network-level activity. The model contains experimentally derived morphological parameters for granule cells, which each contain approximately 200 compartments, and biophysical parameters for granule cells, basket cells and mossy cells that were based both on electrophysiological data and previously published models. Synaptic input to cells in the model consisted of glutamatergic AMPA-like EPSPs and GABAergic-like IPSPs from excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. The main source of input to the model was from layer II entorhinal cortical neurons. Network connectivity was constrained by the topography of the system, and was derived from axonal transport studies, which provided details about the spatial spread of axonal terminal fields, as well as how subregions of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices project to subregions of the dentate gyrus. Results of this study show that strong feedback inhibition from the basket cell population can cause high-frequency rhythmicity in granule cells, while the strength of feedforward inhibition serves to scale the total amount of granule cell activity. Results furthermore show that the topography of local interneuronal circuits can have just as strong an impact on the development of spatio-temporal clusters in the granule cell population as the perforant path topography does, both sharpening existing clusters and introducing new ones with a greater spatial extent. Finally, results show that the interactions between the inhibitory and associational loops can cause high frequency oscillations that are modulated by a low-frequency oscillatory signal. These results serve to further illustrate the importance of topographical constraints on a global signal processing feature of a neural network, while also

  12. Differential effects of rapamycin treatment on tonic and phasic GABAergic inhibition in dentate granule cells after focal brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Corwin R; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Smith, Bret N

    2016-06-01

    The cascade of events leading to post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unclear. Altered inhibition in the hippocampal formation and dentate gyrus is a hallmark of several neurological disorders, including TBI and PTE. Inhibitory synaptic signaling in the hippocampus is predominately driven by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission, and is prominently mediated by postsynaptic type A GABA receptors (GABAAR's). Subsets of these receptors involved in tonic inhibition of neuronal membranes serve a fundamental role in maintenance of inhibitory state, and GABAAR-mediated tonic inhibition is altered functionally in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy. In this study, we assessed the effect of mTOR inhibition on hippocampal hilar inhibitory interneuron loss and synaptic and tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells (DGCs) after controlled cortical impact (CCI) to determine if mTOR activation after TBI modulates GABAAR function. Hilar inhibitory interneuron density was significantly reduced 72h after CCI injury in the dorsal two-thirds of the hemisphere ipsilateral to injury compared with the contralateral hemisphere and sham controls. Rapamycin treatment did not alter this reduction in cell density. Synaptic and tonic current measurements made in DGCs at both 1-2 and 8-13weeks post-injury indicated reduced synaptic inhibition and THIP-induced tonic current density in DGCs ipsilateral to CCI injury at both time points post-injury, with no change in resting tonic GABAAR-mediated currents. Rapamycin treatment did not alter the reduced synaptic inhibition observed in ipsilateral DGCs 1-2weeks post-CCI injury, but further reduced synaptic inhibition of ipsilateral DGCs at 8-13weeks post-injury. The reduction in THIP-induced tonic current after injury, however, was prevented by rapamycin treatment at both time points. Rapamycin treatment thus differentially modifies CCI-induced changes in synaptic and tonic GABAAR

  13. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  14. Modulation of adult-born neurons in the inflamed hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Rosi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life new neurons are continuously added to the hippocampal circuitry involved with spatial learning and memory. These new cells originate from neural precursors in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, migrate into the granule cell layer and integrate into neural networks encoding spatial and contextual information. This process can be influenced by several environmental and endogenous factors and is modified in different animal models of neurological disorders. Neuroinflammation, as defined by the presence of activated microglia, is a common key factor to the progression of neurological disorders. Analysis of the literature shows that microglial activation impacts not only the production, but also the migration and the recruitment of new neurons. The impact of microglia on adult-born neurons appears much more multifaceted than ever envisioned before, combining both supportive and detrimental effects that are dependent upon the activation phenotype and the factors being released. The development of strategies aimed to change microglia toward states that promote functional neurogenesis could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities against neurological disorders associated with cognitive deficits and neuroinflammation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on how production, distribution and recruitment of new neurons into behaviorally relevant neural networks are modified in the inflamed hippocampus.

  15. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells

  16. Alzheimer's Disease and Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis; Exploring Shared Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Carolyn; Bartolotti, Nancy; Lazarov, Orly

    2016-01-01

    New neurons incorporate into the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurogenesis is modulated by behavior and plays a major role in hippocampal plasticity. Along with older mature neurons, new neurons structure the dentate gyrus, and determine its function. Recent data suggest that the level of hippocampal neurogenesis is substantial in the human brain, suggesting that neurogenesis may have important implications for human cognition. In support of that, impaired neurogenesis compromises hippocampal function and plays a role in cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. We review current work suggesting that neuronal differentiation is defective in Alzheimer's disease, leading to dysfunction of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, alterations in critical signals regulating neurogenesis, such as presenilin-1, Notch 1, soluble amyloid precursor protein, CREB, and β-catenin underlie dysfunctional neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we discuss the detectability of neurogenesis in the live mouse and human brain, as well as the therapeutic implications of enhancing neurogenesis for the treatment of cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27199641

  17. Behavior modification after inactivation of cerebellar dentate nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Todd C; Villatoro, Lee; Arneson, Tom; Ahuja, Brittany; Voss, Stephanie; Swain, Rodney A

    2012-08-01

    Effort-based decision making occurs when subjects are given a choice between a reward available at a high response cost and a reward available at a low response cost and is altered in individuals with disorders such as autism or particular patterns of brain injury. The current study explored the relationship between effort-based decision making and reinforcement characteristics in the T maze. This was done using both normal animals and animals with bilateral inactivation of the cerebellar dentate nuclei. Rats chose between alternatives in which one arm contained high-density reinforcement (HR) and the other arm contained low-density reinforcement (LR). During training, the HR arm was obstructed and the point at which the animal no longer worked for reinforcement (breaking point) was determined. The cerebellar dentate nuclei were then transiently inactivated and once again breaking points were assessed. The results indicated that inactivation of the dentate nucleus disrupted effort-based decision making. Additionally, altering both the palatability and the magnitude of the reinforcement were assessed in an attempt to reestablish the original preinactivation breaking point. It was hypothesized that an increase in the strength or magnitude of the reinforcement would promote an increase in the breaking point of the animal even when the cerebellum was inactivated. The results indicated that with both strategies animals effectively reestablished original breaking points. The results of this study will inform the current literature regarding the modification of behavior after brain injury and further the understanding of the behavioral deficits associated with cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:22845704

  18. Effect of thyroxine on munc-18 and syntaxin-1 expression in dorsal hippocampus of adult-onset hypothyroid rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset hypothyroidism induces a variety of impairments on hippocampus- dependent neurocognitive functioningin which many synaptic proteins in hippocampus neurons are involved. Here, we observed the effect of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the expression of syntaxin-1 and munc-18 in the dorsal hippocampus and whether the altered proteins could be restored by levothyroxine (T4 treatment. All rats were separated into 4 groups randomly: hypothyroid group, 5μg T4/100 g body weight (BW treated group, 20 μg T4/100g BW treated group and control group. The radioimmunoassay kits were applied to assay the levels of serum T3 and T4, and the levels of syntaxin-1 and munc-18 in hippocampus were assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Both analysis corroborated that syntaxin-1 in the hypothyroid group was significantly higher. Munc-18 was lower in four layers of CA3 and dentate gyrus by immunohistochemistry. After two weeks of treatment with 5 μg T4/100g BW for hypothyroidism, syntaxin-1 levels were completely restored, whereas the recovery of munc-18 only located in two of the four impaired layers. Twenty μg T4/100g BW treatment normalized munc-18 levels. These data suggested that adult-onset hypothyroidism induced increment of syntaxin-1 and decrement of munc-18 in the dorsal hippocampus, which could be restored by T4 treatment. Larger dosage of T4 caused more effective restorations.

  19. Prion replication occurs in endogenous adult neural stem cells and alters their neuronal fate: involvement of endogenous neural stem cells in prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroa Relaño-Ginès

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are irreversible progressive neurodegenerative diseases, leading to severe incapacity and death. They are characterized in the brain by prion amyloid deposits, vacuolisation, astrocytosis, neuronal degeneration, and by cognitive, behavioural and physical impairments. There is no treatment for these disorders and stem cell therapy therefore represents an interesting new approach. Gains could not only result from the cell transplantation, but also from the stimulation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSC or by the combination of both approaches. However, the development of such strategies requires a detailed knowledge of the pathology, particularly concerning the status of the adult neurogenesis and endogenous NSC during the development of the disease. During the past decade, several studies have consistently shown that NSC reside in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS and that adult neurogenesis occurs throughout the adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle or the Dentate Gyrus of the hippocampus. Adult NSC are believed to constitute a reservoir for neuronal replacement during normal cell turnover or after brain injury. However, the activation of this system does not fully compensate the neuronal loss that occurs during neurodegenerative diseases and could even contribute to the disease progression. We investigated here the status of these cells during the development of prion disorders. We were able to show that NSC accumulate and replicate prions. Importantly, this resulted in the alteration of their neuronal fate which then represents a new pathologic event that might underlie the rapid progression of the disease.

  20. Effects of chronic treatment with methylphenidate on oxidative stress and inflammation in hippocampus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Shabab, Behnaz

    2016-04-21

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a central stimulant, prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The long-term behavioral consequences of MPH treatment are unknown. In this study, the oxidative stress and neuroinflammation induced by various doses of MPH were investigated. Forty adult male rats were divided into 5 groups; and treated with different doses of MPH for 21 days. Twenty four hours after drug treatment, Open Field Test (OFT) was performed in all animals. At the end of the study, blood cortisol level (BCL) was measured and hippocampus was isolated and oxidative stress and inflammation parameters and histological changes were analyzed. Chronic MPH at all doses decreased central square entries, number of rearing, ambulation distance and time spent in central square in OFT. BCL increased in doses 10 and 20mg/kg of MPH. Furthermore, MPH in all doses markedly increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized glutathione (GSSG) level, Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNF-α) in isolated hippocampus. MPH (10 and 20mg/kg) treated groups had decreased mitochondrial reduced glutathione (GSH) content, and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRx) activities. 10 and 20mg/kg of MPH change cell density and morphology of cells in Dentate Gyrus (DG) and CA1 areas of hippocampus. Chronic treatment with high doses of MPH can cause oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in hippocampus of adult rats. PMID:26687276

  1. Maternal immune activation differentially impacts mature and adult-born hippocampal neurons in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; van Praag, Henriette

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in the hippocampus, a brain area important for learning and memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus develops both before and after birth. To study the relative contribution of mature and adult-born DG granule cells to disease etiology, we compared both cell populations in a mouse model of psychiatric illness resulting from maternal immune activation. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (PolyIC, 5mg/kg) or saline was given on gestation day 15 to pregnant female C57Bl/6 mice. Male offspring (n=105), was administered systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, 50mg/kg) (n=52) or intracerebral retroviral injection into the DG (n=53), to label dividing cells at one month of age. Two months later behavioral tests were performed to evaluate disease phenotype. Immunohistochemistry and whole-cell patch clamping were used to assess morphological and physiological characteristics of DG cells. Three-month-old PolyIC exposed male offspring exhibited deficient pre-pulse inhibition, spatial maze performance and motor coordination, as well as increased depression-like behavior. Histological analysis showed reduced DG volume and parvalbumin positive interneuron number. Both mature and new hippocampal neurons showed modifications in intrinsic properties such as increased input resistance and lower current threshold, and decreased action potential number. Reduced GABAergic inhibitory transmission was observed only in mature DG neurons. Differential impairments in mature DG cells and adult-born new neurons may have implications for behavioral deficits associated with maternal immune activation. PMID:25449671

  2. Early postischemic 45Ca accumulation in rat dentate hilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have found postischemic regional accumulation of calcium to be time-dependent and coincident with the progression of ischemic cell change. In the most vulnerable cells in the hippocampus one would therefore expect to find a primary and specific early uptake of calcium after ischemia. Autoradiograms of 45Ca and 3H-inulin distribution were investigated before and 1 h after 20 min ischemia in the rat hippocampus. Two different methodological approaches were used for administration of 45Ca: (a) administration via microdialysis probes, (b) intraventricular injection. During control conditions the 45Ca autoradiograms showed variations in distribution volume in accordance with 3H-inulin determination of extracellular space size. One hour after ischemia a massive accumulation of 45Ca was found in the dentate hilus. No change in the distribution pattern of 3H-inulin could be demonstrated 1 h after ischemia. We suggest that 45Ca accumulation in dentate hilus 1 h after ischemia is a result of increased Ca2+ uptake before irreversible cell damage occurs and is not due to passive influx of calcium across a leaky plasma membrane

  3. A practical approach to diseases affecting dentate nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, S; Jaggi, S; Patel, B; Yadav, R; Hanagandi, P; Faria do Amaral, L L

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of diseases affect the dentate nuclei. When faced with the radiological demonstration of signal changes in the dentate nuclei, radiologists and clinical neurologists have to sieve through the many possibilities, which they do not encounter on a regular basis. This task can be challenging, and therefore, developing a clinical, radiological, and laboratory approach is important. Information on the topic is scattered and the subject has not yet been reviewed. In this review, a combined clinicoradiological approach is presented. The signal changes in T1, T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), diffusion, susceptibility weighted, and gadolinium-enhanced images can give specific or highly suggestive patterns, which are illustrated. The role of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnostic process is discussed. Specific radiological patterns do not exist in a significant proportion of patients where the clinical and laboratory analysis becomes important. In this review, we group the clinical constellations to narrow down the differential diagnosis and highlight the diagnostic clinical signs, such as tendon xanthomas and Kayser-Fleischer rings. As will be seen, a number of these conditions are potentially reversible, and hence, their early diagnosis is desirable. Finally, key diagnostic tests and available therapies are outlined. The practical approach thus begins with the radiologist and winds its way through the clinician, towards carefully selected diagnostic tests defining the therapy options. PMID:26577296

  4. Autocrine action of BDNF on dendrite development of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Chang, Xingya; She, Liang; Xu, Duo; Huang, Wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-06-01

    Dendrite development of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus is critical for their incorporation into existing hippocampal circuits, but the cellular mechanisms regulating their dendrite development remains largely unclear. In this study, we examined the function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is expressed in adult-born GCs, in regulating their dendrite morphogenesis. Using retrovirus-mediated gene transfection, we found that deletion and overexpression of BDNF in adult-born GCs resulted in the reduction and elevation of dendrite growth, respectively. This effect was mainly due to the autocrine rather than paracrine action of BDNF, because deletion of BDNF only in the newborn GCs resulted in dendrite abnormality of these neurons to a similar extent as that observed in conditional knockout (cKO) mice with BDNF deleted in the entire forebrain. Furthermore, selective expression of BDNF in adult-born GCs in BDNF cKO mice fully restored normal dendrite development. The BDNF autocrine action was also required for the development of normal density of spines and normal percentage of spines containing the postsynaptic marker PSD-95, suggesting autocrine BDNF regulation of synaptogenesis. Furthermore, increased dendrite growth of adult-born GCs caused by voluntary exercise was abolished by BDNF deletion specifically in these neurons and elevated dendrite growth due to BDNF overexpression in these neurons was prevented by reducing neuronal activity with coexpression of inward rectifier potassium channels, consistent with activity-dependent autocrine BDNF secretion. Therefore, BDNF expressed in adult-born GCs plays a critical role in dendrite development by acting as an autocrine factor. PMID:26041908

  5. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on neurogenesis and tryptophan hydroxylase expression in adolescent and adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Klomp

    Full Text Available The antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac has been increasingly prescribed to children and adolescents with depressive disorders despite a lack of thorough understanding of its therapeutic effects in the paediatric population and of its putative neurodevelopmental effects. Within the framework of PRIOMEDCHILD ERA-NET, we investigated; a effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a structural readout relevant for antidepressant action and hippocampal development; b effects on tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH expression, a measure of serotonin synthesis; c whether treatment effects during adolescence differed from treatment at an adult age, and d whether they were subregion-specific. Stereological quantification of the number of proliferating (Ki-67+ cells and of the number of young migratory neurons (doublecortin+, revealed a significant age-by-treatment interaction effect, indicating that fluoxetine affects both proliferation and neurogenesis in adolescent-treated rats differently than it does in adult-treated rats. In terms of subregional differences, fluoxetine enhanced proliferation mainly in the dorsal parts of the hippocampus, and neurogenesis in both the suprapyramidal and infrapyramidal blades of the dentate gyrus in adolescent-treated rats, while no such differences were seen in adult-treated rats. Fluoxetine exerted similar age-by-treatment interaction effects on TPH cells mainly in the ventral portion of the dorsal raphe nucleus. We conclude that fluoxetine exerts divergent effects on structural plasticity and serotonin synthesis in adolescent versus adult-treated rats. These preliminary data indicate a differential sensitivity of the adolescent brain to this drug and thus warrant further research into their behavioural and translational aspects. Together with recent related findings, they further call for caution in prescribing these drugs to the adolescent population.

  6. Bumetanide promotes neural precursor cell regeneration and dendritic development in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wang-shu Xu; Xuan Sun; Cheng-guang Song; Xiao-peng Mu; Wen-ping Ma; Xing-hu Zhang; Chuan-sheng Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Bumetanide has been shown to lessen cerebral edema and reduce the infarct area in the acute stage of cerebral ischemia. Few studies focus on the effects of bumetanide on neuroprotection and neurogenesis in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. We established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by injecting endothelin-1 in the left cortical motor area and left corpus striatum. Seven days later, bumetanide 200 µg/kg/day was injected into the lateral ventricle for 21 consecutive days with a mini-...

  7. Hippocampal network activity is transiently altered by induction of long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Bikbaev

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A role for oscillatory activity in hippocampal neuronal networks has been proposed in sensory encoding, cognitive functions and synaptic plasticity. In the hippocampus, theta (5–10 Hz and gamma (30–100 Hz oscillations may provide a mechanism for temporal encoding of information, and the basis for formation and retrieval of memory traces. Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission, a candidate cellular model of synaptic information storage, is typically induced by high-frequency tetanisation (HFT of afferent pathways. Taking into account the role of oscillatory activity in the processing of information, dynamic changes may occur in hippocampal network activity in the period during HFT and/or soon after it. These changes in rhythmic activity may determine or, at least, contribute to successful potentiation and, in general, to formation of memory. We have found that short-term potentiation (STP and LTP as well LTPfailure are characterised with different profiles of changes in theta and gamma frequencies. Potentiation of synaptic transmission was associated with a significant increase in the relative theta power and mean amplitude of theta cycles in the period encompassing 300 seconds after HFT. Where LTP or STP, but not failure of potentiation, occurred, this facilitation of theta was accompanied by transient increases in gamma power and in the mean amplitude of gamma oscillations within a single theta cycle. Our data support that specific, correlated changes in these parameters are associated with successful synaptic potentiation. These findings suggest that changes in theta-gamma activity associated with induction of LTP may enable synaptic information storage in the hippocampus.

  8. Effects of the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 on ketamine-evoked behaviours and neurochemical changes in the dentate gyrus of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imre, Gabor; Salomons, Amber; Jongsma, Minke; Fokkema, Dirk S.; Den Boer, Johan A.; Ter Horst, Gert J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the functions of group 11 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) is to modulate glutamate release. Thus, targeting mGluR2/3s might be a novel treatment for several psychiatric disorders associated with inappropriate glutamatergic neurotransmission, such as schizophrenia. In an effort to

  9. ARG3.1/ARC expression in hippocampal dentate gyrus astrocytes: ultrastructural evidence and co-localization with glial fibrillary acidic protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodríguez, J.J.; Davies, H.A.; Errington, M.L.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Bliss, T.V.P.; Stewart, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2008), s. 671-678. ISSN 1582-1838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Hippocampus * Ultrastructure * Glia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.114, year: 2008

  10. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation ...

  11. Isolation rearing reduces neuronal excitability in dentate gyrus granule cells of adolescent C57BL/6J mice: role of GABAergic tonic currents and neurosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Talani; Francesca Biggio; Valentina Licheri; Valentina Locci; Giovanni Biggio; Enrico Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extr...

  12. INDUCTION OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN THE RAT DENTATE GYRUS AFTER ADRENALECTOMY - COMPARISON WITH NEURODEGENERATIVE CHANGES USING SILVER IMPREGNATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRUGERS, HJ; MEDEMA, RM; POSTEMA, F; KORF, J

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we performed a light microscopic anatomical comparison of adrenalectomy (ADX)-induced neurodegeneration using silver impregnation and reaction of astroglial cells using GFAP immunocytochemistry in the hippocampus of the rat. Three survival times following ADX were studied: 24 ho

  13. Evaluation of the protective effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil on the dentate gyrus following chronic restraint stress in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Saiful Bhari Talip; Mohd Asnizam Asari; Aaijaz Ahmed Khan; Kuttulebbai Nainamohamed Salam Sirajudeen

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to chronic restraint stress has been shown to cause a number of morphological changes in the hippocampal formation of rats. Tocotrienol, an isoform of vitamin E, exhibits numerous health benefits, different from those of tocopherol. Recent studies have demonstrated that tocotrienol prevents stress-induced changes in the gastric mucosa, thus indicating that it may also protect other organs such as the brain from the damaging effects of stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study w...

  14. Genetic manipulation of adult-born hippocampal neurons rescues memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richetin, Kevin; Leclerc, Clémence; Toni, Nicolas; Gallopin, Thierry; Pech, Stéphane; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2015-02-01

    In adult mammals, neural progenitors located in the dentate gyrus retain their ability to generate neurons and glia throughout lifetime. In rodents, increased production of new granule neurons is associated with improved memory capacities, while decreased hippocampal neurogenesis results in impaired memory performance in several memory tasks. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis is impaired and the granule neurons that are generated fail to integrate existing networks. Thus, enhancing neurogenesis should improve functional plasticity in the hippocampus and restore cognitive deficits in these mice. Here, we performed a screen of transcription factors that could potentially enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We identified Neurod1 as a robust neuronal determinant with the capability to direct hippocampal progenitors towards an exclusive granule neuron fate. Importantly, Neurod1 also accelerated neuronal maturation and functional integration of new neurons during the period of their maturation when they contribute to memory processes. When tested in an APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, directed expression of Neurod1 in cycling hippocampal progenitors conspicuously reduced dendritic spine density deficits on new hippocampal neurons, to the same level as that observed in healthy age-matched control animals. Remarkably, this population of highly connected new neurons was sufficient to restore spatial memory in these diseased mice. Collectively our findings demonstrate that endogenous neural stem cells of the diseased brain can be manipulated to become new neurons that could allow cognitive improvement. PMID:25518958

  15. Reduced hippocampal dentate cell proliferation and impaired spatial memory performance in aged epileptic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa F Cavarsan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased adult neurogenesis is observed after training in hippocampal-dependent tasks and also after acutely induced status epilepticus (SE although the specific roles of these cells are still a matter of debate. In this study, we investigated hippocampal cell proliferation and differentiation and the spatial learning performance in young or aged chronically epileptic rats. Status was induced by pilocarpine in 3 or 20-month old rats. Either two or twenty months later, rats were treated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and subsequently underwent to 8-day schedule of water maze tests. As expected, learning curves were faster in young than in aged animals (P<0.001. Chronically epileptic animals exhibited impaired learning curves compared to age-matched controls. Interestingly, the duration of epilepsy (2 or 20 months did not correlate with the memory impairment of aged epileptic animals. The number of BrdU-positive cells was greater in young epileptic subjects than in age-matched controls. In contrast, cell proliferation was not increased in aged epileptic animals, irrespective of the time of SE induction. Finally, dentate cell proliferation was not related to performance in the water maze. Based on the present results we conclude that even though aging and epilepsy lead to impairments in spatial learning, their effects are not additive.

  16. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Anke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferation and maturation of neuronal progenitor cells and spatial learning performance. In addition we used cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 deficient mice and treatment with CB1 antagonist AM251 in Nestin-GFP-reporter mice to investigate the role of the CB1 receptor in adult neurogenesis in detail. Results THC and CBD differed in their effects on spatial learning and adult neurogenesis. CBD did not impair learning but increased adult neurogenesis, whereas THC reduced learning without affecting adult neurogenesis. We found the neurogenic effect of CBD to be dependent on the CB1 receptor, which is expressed over the whole dentate gyrus. Similarly, the neurogenic effect of environmental enrichment and voluntary wheel running depends on the presence of the CB1 receptor. We found that in the absence of CB1 receptors, cell proliferation was increased and neuronal differentiation reduced, which could be related to CB1 receptor mediated signaling in Doublecortin (DCX-expressing intermediate progenitor cells. Conclusion CB1 affected the stages of adult neurogenesis that involve intermediate highly proliferative progenitor cells and the survival and maturation of new neurons. The pro-neurogenic effects of CBD might explain some of the positive therapeutic features of CBD-based compounds.

  17. Prenatal activation of toll-like receptor-4 dampens adult hippocampal neurogenesis in an IL-6 dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeslam eMouihate

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal immune challenge has been associated with alteration in brain development and plasticity that last into adulthood. We have previously shown that prenatal activation of toll-like receptor 4 by LPS induces IL-6-dependent STAT-3 signaling pathway in the fetal brain. Whether this IL-6-dependent activation of fetal brain results in long lasting impact in brain plasticity is still unknown. Furthermore, it has been shown that prenatal LPS heightens the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA response in adulthood. In the present study we tested whether LPS administration during pregnancy affects neurogenesis in adult male offspring. Because corticosterone, the end-product of HPA axis activity in rats, alters neurogenesis we tested whether this enhanced HPA axis responsiveness in adult male offspring played a role in the long lasting impact of LPS on neurogenesis during adulthood. Pregnant rats were given either LPS, or LPS and an IL-6 neutralizing antibody (IL-6Ab. The newly born neurons were monitored in the subventricular zone (SVZ and the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus of adult male offspring by monitoring doublecortin and T-box brain protein 2 expression: two well-established markers of newly born neurons. Prenatal LPS decreased the number of newly born neurons in the DG, but not in the SVZ of adult offspring. This decreased number of newly born neurons in the DG was absent when IL-6Ab was co-injected with LPS during pregnancy. Furthermore, administration of a corticosterone receptor blocker, RU-486, to adult offspring blunted the prenatal LPS induced decrease in newly born neurons in the DG.These data suggest that maternally triggered IL-6 plays a crucial role in the long lasting impact of LPS on adult neurogenesis.

  18. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is functionally important for stress-induced social avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Lagace, Diane C.; Donovan, Michael H.; DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Farnbauch, Laure A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Berton, Olivier; Nestler, Eric J.; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2010-01-01

    The long-term response to chronic stress is variable, with some individuals developing maladaptive functioning, although other “resilient” individuals do not. Stress reduces neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone (SGZ), but it is unknown if stress-induced changes in neurogenesis contribute to individual vulnerability. Using a chronic social defeat stress model, we explored whether the susceptibility to stress-induced social avoidance was related to changes in SGZ proliferation and...

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  17. Tool use specific adult neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in rodent (Octodon degus hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Kumazawa-Manita

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that degus (Octodon degus, which are a species of small caviomorph rodents, could be trained to use a T-shaped rake as a hand tool to expand accessible spaces. To elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of this higher brain function, we compared this tool use learning task with a simple spatial (radial maze memory task and investigated the changes that were induced in the hippocampal neural circuits known to subserve spatial perception and learning. With the exposure to an enriched environment in home cage, adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was augmented by tool use learning, but not radial maze learning, when compared to control conditions. Furthermore, the proportion of new synapses formed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, the target area for projections of mossy fiber axons emanating from newborn neurons, was specifically increased by tool use learning. Thus, active tool use behavior by rodents, learned through multiple training sessions, requires the hippocampus to generate more novel neurons and synapses than spatial information processing in radial maze learning.

  18. Alteration of forebrain neurogenesis after cervical spinal cord injury in the adult rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Solenne eFELIX

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI triggers a complex cellular response at the injury site, leading to the formation of a dense scar tissue. Despite this local tissue remodeling, the consequences of SCI at the cellular level in distant rostral sites (i.e. brain, remain unknown. In this study, we asked whether cervical SCI could alter cell dynamics in neurogenic areas of the adult rat forebrain. To this aim, we quantified BrdU incorporation and determined the phenotypes of newly generated cells (neurons, astrocytes, or microglia during the subchronic and chronic phases of injury. We find that subchronic SCI leads to a reduction of BrdU incorporation and neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. By contrast, subchronic SCI triggers an increased BrdU incorporation in the dorsal vagal complex of the hindbrain, where most of the newly generated cells are identified as microglia. In chronic condition 90 days after SCI, BrdU incorporation returns to control levels in all regions examined, except in the hippocampus, where SCI produces a long-term reduction of neurogenesis, indicating that this structure is particularly sensitive to SCI. Finally, we observe that SCI triggers an acute inflammatory response in all brain regions examined, as well as a hippocampal-specific decline in BDNF levels, which could explain the SCI-mediated distant effects on forebrain neurogenesis. This study provides the first demonstration that forebrain neurogenesis is vulnerable to a distal SCI.

  19. Constraint-induced movement therapy enhanced neurogenesis and behavioral recovery after stroke in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuansheng; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Shanshan; Nie, Yingxue

    2009-08-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has been extensively used for stroke rehabilitation. CIMT encourages use of the impaired limb along with restraint of the ipsilesional limb in daily life, and may promote behavioral recovery and induce structural changes in brain after stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CIMT enhances neurogenesis in rat brain after stroke that was generated by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Adult rats were divided into sham group, ischemia group and ischemia treated with CIMT group. Rats of CIMT group were treated with a plaster cast to restrain the healthy forelimb for 14 days beginning 1 week after ischemia. The proliferation of neuronal cells labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and behavioral recovery were analyzed at day 29 after ischemia. We also measured the tissue level of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) by ELISA. SDF-1 might be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis following stroke. In the subventricular zone of the animals treated with CIMT, there was a significant increase in the number of BrdU-positive cells (135 +/- 18, P behavioral performances and increased the SDF-1 protein levels in the cortex and dentate gyrus. In conclusion, CIMT treatment enhances neurogenesis and functional recovery after stroke. PMID:19638734

  20. Sleep and adult neurogenesis: implications for cognition and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Anka D; Meerlo, Peter; McGinty, Dennis; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus plays a critical role in learning and memory throughout life, in part by the integration of adult-born neurons into existing circuits. Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus is regulated by numerous environmental, physiological, and behavioral factors known to affect learning and memory. Sleep is also important for learning and memory. Here we critically examine evidence from correlation, deprivation, and stimulation studies that sleep may be among those factors that regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. There is mixed evidence for correlations between sleep variables and rates of hippocampal cell proliferation across the day, the year, and the lifespan. There is modest evidence that periods of increased sleep are associated with increased cell proliferation or survival. There is strong evidence that disruptions of sleep exceeding 24 h, by total deprivation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic restriction or fragmentation, significantly inhibit cell proliferation and in some cases neurogenesis. The mechanisms by which sleep disruption inhibits neurogenesis are not fully understood. Although sleep disruption procedures are typically at least mildly stressful, elevated adrenal corticosterone secretion is not necessary for this effect. However, procedures that prevent both elevated corticosterone and interleukin 1β signaling have been found to block the effect of sleep deprivation on cell proliferation. This result suggests that sleep loss impairs hippocampal neurogenesis by the presence of wake-dependent factors, rather than by the absence of sleep-specific processes. This would weigh against a hypothesis that regulation of neurogenesis is a function of sleep. Nonetheless, impaired neurogenesis may underlie some of the memory and mood effects associated with acute and chronic sleep disruptions. PMID:24218292

  1. Bidirectional communication between amygdala and fusiform gyrus during facial recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Herrington, John D.; Taylor, James M.; Grupe, Daniel W.; Curby, Kim M.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research have documented the specialization of fusiform gyrus (FG) for facial information processes. Recent theories indicate that FG activity is shaped by input from amygdala, but effective connectivity from amygdala to FG remains undocumented. In this fMRI study, 39 participants completed a face recognition task. 11 participants underwent the same experiment approximately four months later. Robust face-selective activation of FG, amygdala, and lateral occipital cortex were observ...

  2. MRI assessment of superior temporal gyrus in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Adriana; Sousa, Nuno; Férnandez, Montse; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Shenton, Martha E.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate volumes and asymmetry of superior temporal gyrus (STG) and correlate these measures with a neurocognitive evaluation of verbal performance in Williams syndrome (WS) and in a typically developing age-matched and sex-matched group. Background: Despite initial claims of language strength in WS, recent studies suggest delayed language milestones. The STG is implicated in linguistic processing and is a highly lateralized brain region. Method: Here, we examined...

  3. Macro- and Microscopic Structural Features of the Cerebellar Dentate Nucleus in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Shyian, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Since ancient times the study of one part of the brain - the cerebellum - has attracted the attention of many researchers, however, neither anatomy of the cerebellum, nor its function remain fully studied. The nuclei of the cerebellum, including the dentate nucleus are not sufficiently studied. The structural features of the cerebellar dentate nucleus of human in ontogenesis and its topographic and anatomic location are important not only for anatomists, physiologists, but also for clinicians...

  4. Immunohistochemical distribution of Calbindin D-28K immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of adult cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; LI Jin-lian; XIONG Kang-hui; LI Ji-shuo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: In order to get more information about the possible functions of Calbindin D-28K in the central nervous system of adult cat, the distribution of Calbindin D-28K in the central nervous system of adult cat was examined. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining techniques were used, and immunostained sections were observed under a light microscopy. Results: A high density of both immunoreactive perikarya and fibers were observed in the basal ganglia, amygdaloid complex, nucleus of the fields of Forel, subthalamic nucleus, paracentral nucleus, pulvinar nucleus, subthalamus, dorsal hypothalamic area, lateral hypothalamic area, anterior hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, superior colliculus, inferior colliculus, oculomo-tor nucleus, superior olivary complex, marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, vestibular nuclei, the spinal trigeminal nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, cuneate nucleus, inferior olivary complex, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum and in the laminae Ⅱ of the spinal cord, whereas the dentate gyrus, the central medial nucleus of the thalamus, the paracentral and central lateral nucleus of the thalamus, the lateral dorsal nucleus of the thalamus,the ventrolateral complex of the thalamus, the medioventral nucleus of the thalamus, the posterior hypothalamic area, the dorsal hypothalamic area, the infundibular nucleus, the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and the interfascicular nucleus had just a high density of immunoreactive perikarya, and no positive fibres were detected in these areas. Conclusion: The present results showed that Calbindin D-28K-like immunoreactivity was widely distributed throughout the central nervous system of adult cat and might play an important role in the activities of the neurons in the central nervous system of adult cat.

  5. Expression of nestin by neural cells in the adult rat and human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Hendrickson

    Full Text Available Neurons and glial cells in the developing brain arise from neural progenitor cells (NPCs. Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, is thought to be expressed exclusively by NPCs in the normal brain, and is replaced by the expression of proteins specific for neurons or glia in differentiated cells. Nestin expressing NPCs are found in the adult brain in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus. While significant attention has been paid to studying NPCs in the SVZ and SGZ in the adult brain, relatively little attention has been paid to determining whether nestin-expressing neural cells (NECs exist outside of the SVZ and SGZ. We therefore stained sections immunocytochemically from the adult rat and human brain for NECs, observed four distinct classes of these cells, and present here the first comprehensive report on these cells. Class I cells are among the smallest neural cells in the brain and are widely distributed. Class II cells are located in the walls of the aqueduct and third ventricle. Class IV cells are found throughout the forebrain and typically reside immediately adjacent to a neuron. Class III cells are observed only in the basal forebrain and closely related areas such as the hippocampus and corpus striatum. Class III cells resemble neurons structurally and co-express markers associated exclusively with neurons. Cell proliferation experiments demonstrate that Class III cells are not recently born. Instead, these cells appear to be mature neurons in the adult brain that express nestin. Neurons that express nestin are not supposed to exist in the brain at any stage of development. That these unique neurons are found only in brain regions involved in higher order cognitive function suggests that they may be remodeling their cytoskeleton in supporting the neural plasticity required for these functions.

  6. Newly generated cells are increased in hippocampus of adult mice lacking a serine protease inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sticker Melanie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone occurs throughout the life of mammals and newly generated neurons can integrate functionally into established neuronal circuits. Neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus are modulated by changes in the environment (enrichment, exercise, hippocampal-dependent tasks, NMDA receptor (NMDAR activity, sonic hedgehog (SHH and/or other factors. Results previously, we showed that Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1, a potent serine protease inhibitor, regulates the NMDAR availability and activity as well as SHH signaling. Compared with wild-type (WT, we detected a significant increase in BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of mice lacking PN-1 (PN-1 -/- both in controls and after running exercise. Patched homologue 1 (Ptc1 and Gli1 mRNA levels were higher and Gli3 down-regulated in mutant mice under standard conditions and to a lesser extent after running exercise. However, the number of surviving BrdU-positive cells did not differ between WT and PN-1 -/- animals. NMDAR availability was altered in the hippocampus of mutant animals after exercise. Conclusion All together our results indicate that PN-1 controls progenitors proliferation through an effect on the SHH pathway and suggest an influence of the serpin on the survival of newly generated neurons through modulation of NMDAR availability.

  7. Alzheimer’s disease and Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis; Exploring Shared Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly eLazarov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available New neurons incorporate into the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurogenesis is modulated by behavior and plays a major role in hippocampal plasticity. Along with older mature neurons, new neurons structure the dentate gyrus and determine its function. Recent data suggest that the level of hippocampal neurogenesis is substantial in the human brain, suggesting that neurogenesis may have important implications for human cognition. In support of that, impaired neurogenesis compromises hippocampal function and plays a role in cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease mouse models. We review current work suggesting that neuronal differentiation is defective in Alzheimer’s disease, leading to dysfunction of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, alterations in critical signals regulating neurogenesis, such as presenilin-1, Notch 1, soluble amyloid precursor protein, CREB, and β-catenin underlie dysfunctional neurogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease. Lastly, we discuss the detectability of neurogenesis in the live mouse and human brain, as well as the therapeutic implications of enhancing neurogenesis for the treatment of cognitive deficits and Alzheimer’s disease.

  8. Cannabinoid administration increases 5HT1A receptor binding and mRNA expression in the hippocampus of adult but not adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavitsanou, K; Wang, H; Dalton, V S; Nguyen, V

    2010-08-11

    The endocannabinoid and serotonin systems share a high level of overlap in terms of the physiological processes that they regulate, however, little is known about their functional interactions particularly during adolescence, a vulnerable period for both the development of psychosis and for initiation to substance use. In the present study, the effects of cannabinoid treatment on serotonin 5HT1A receptor density and mRNA expression were investigated in two age groups: Adolescent (postnatal day 35) and adult (postnatal day 70) rats were injected with the synthetic cannabinoid HU210 (25, 50 or 100 microg/kg) or vehicle for 1, 4 or 14 days and sacrificed 24 h after the last injection. 5HT1A receptor density was measured in different brain regions using [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT quantitative autoradiography whereas mRNA expression was measured in adjacent brain sections. Higher levels of both serotonin 5HT1A receptor binding and mRNA expression were observed in limbic regions in adolescent control animals compared to adults. 5HT1A receptor density was increased by 23% in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of adult rats treated with 100 microg/kg HU210 for 4 days compared to vehicle treated controls. The same treatment increased mRNA expression by 27% and by 14% in the CA1 region and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus respectively. 5HT1A receptor density was increased by 22% in the CA1 of adult animals treated with 50 microg HU210, by 26% in the dentate gurus of adult rats treated with 100 microg for 14 days. By contrast, 5HT1A receptor density or mRNA expression was not affected in the brain of adolescent animals in any of the brain regions examined. These results suggest that cannabinoid treatment has differential effects on serotonin-related neurochemistry in adolescent compared to adult rats. The effects in the adult brain may compromise hippocampal function and could account for the cognitive deficits seen in habitual heavy cannabis users. PMID:20438810

  9. Exosomes as novel regulators of adult neurogenic niches

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    Luis Federico Batiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles. SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb. The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs, which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as neurogenic niche. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs. EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles in adult

  10. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  11. Objective assessment of mastication predominance in healthy dentate subjects and patients with unilateral posterior missing teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Y; Kuwatsuru, R; Tsukiyama, Y; Oki, K; Koyano, K

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate mastication predominance in healthy dentate individuals and patients with unilateral posterior missing teeth using objective and subjective methods. The sample comprised 50 healthy dentate individuals (healthy dentate group) and 30 patients with unilateral posterior missing teeth (partially edentulous group). Subjects were asked to freely chew three kinds of test foods (peanuts, beef jerky and chewing gum). Electromyographic activity of the bilateral masseter muscles was recorded. The chewing side (right side or left side) was judged by the level of root mean square electromyographic amplitude. Mastication predominance was then objectively assessed using the mastication predominant score and the mastication predominant index. Self-awareness of mastication predominance was evaluated using a modified visual analogue scale. Mastication predominance scores of the healthy dentate and partially edentulous groups for each test food were analysed. There was a significant difference in the distribution of the mastication predominant index between the two groups (P self-awareness of mastication predominance in the healthy dentate group, whereas strong correlation was observed in the partially edentulous group (P aware of mastication predominance than healthy dentate individuals. Our findings suggest that an objective evaluation of mastication predominance is more precise than a subjective method. PMID:27121170

  12. Pharmacological reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies functional brain circuits in mice exposed to a cocaine conditioned place preference paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Pedraz, María; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) behaviour and the functional brain circuitry involved. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was pharmacologically reduced with temozolomide (TMZ), and mice were tested for cocaine-induced CPP to study c-Fos expression in the hippocampus and in extrahippocampal addiction-related areas. Correlational and multivariate analysis revealed that, under normal conditions, the hippocampus showed widespread functional connectivity with other brain areas and strongly contributed to the functional brain module associated with CPP expression. However, the neurogenesis-reduced mice showed normal CPP acquisition but engaged an alternate brain circuit where the functional connectivity of the dentate gyrus was notably reduced and other areas (the medial prefrontal cortex, accumbens and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus) were recruited instead of the hippocampus. A second experiment unveiled that mice acquiring the cocaine-induced CPP under neurogenesis-reduced conditions were delayed in extinguishing their drug-seeking behaviour. But if the inhibited neurons were generated after CPP acquisition, extinction was not affected but an enhanced long-term CPP retention was found, suggesting that some roles of the adult-born neurons may differ depending on whether they are generated before or after drug-contextual associations are established. Importantly, cocaine-induced reinstatement of CPP behaviour was increased in the TMZ mice, regardless of the time of neurogenesis inhibition. The results show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis sculpts the addiction-related functional brain circuits, and reduction of the adult-born hippocampal neurons increases cocaine seeking in the CPP model. PMID:25870909

  13. TGF-β superfamily gene expression and induction of the Runx1 transcription factor in adult neurogenic regions after brain injury.

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    Trevor T Logan

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI increases neurogenesis in the forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ and the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily cytokines are important regulators of adult neurogenesis, but their involvement in the regulation of this process after brain injury is unclear. We subjected adult mice to controlled cortical impact (CCI injury, and isolated RNA from the SVZ and DG at different post-injury time points. qPCR array analysis showed that cortical injury caused significant alterations in the mRNA expression of components and targets of the TGF-β, BMP, and activin signaling pathways in the SVZ and DG after injury, suggesting that these pathways could regulate post-injury neurogenesis. In both neurogenic regions, the injury also induced expression of Runt-related transcription factor-1 (Runx1, which can interact with intracellular TGF-β Smad signaling pathways. CCI injury strongly induced Runx1 expression in activated and proliferating microglial cells throughout the neurogenic regions. Runx1 protein was also expressed in a subset of Nestin- and GFAP-expressing putative neural stem or progenitor cells in the DG and SVZ after injury. In the DG only, these Runx1+ progenitors proliferated. Our data suggest potential roles for Runx1 in the processes of microglial cell activation and proliferation and in neural stem cell proliferation after TBI.

  14. Activation of the dentate nucleus in a verb generation task: A 7T MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thürling, M; Küper, M; Stefanescu, R; Maderwald, S; Gizewski, E R; Ladd, M E; Timmann, D

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of a topographic organization within the human cerebellar cortex for motor and non-motor functions. Likewise, a subdivision of the dentate nucleus in a more dorsal and rostral motor domain and a more ventral and caudal non-motor domain has been proposed by Dum and Strick (2003) based on anatomical studies in monkey. In humans, however, very little is known about topographic organization within the dentate nucleus. Activation of the dentate nucleus in a verb generation task was examined in young and healthy subjects using ultra-highfield 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with its increase in signal-to-noise ratio. Data of 17 subjects were included in statistical analysis. Subjects were asked to (i) read words (nouns) aloud presented on a screen, (ii) silently read the same nouns, (iii) silently generate the appropriate verbs to the same nouns and (iv) to silently repeat the names of the months. A block design was used. For image processing, a recently developed region of interest (ROI) driven normalization method of the dentate nuclei was applied. Activation related to motor speech (contrast aloud reading minus silent reading) was strongest in the rostral parts of the dentate nucleus. Dorsorostral activations were present bilaterally. Activation related to verb generation (contrast verb generation minus silent reading) was found in the ventrocaudal parts of the dentate nucleus on the right. The present findings are in good accordance with the anatomical data in monkeys and suggest that the human dentate nucleus can be subdivided into a rostral and more dorsal motor domain and a ventrocaudal non-motor domain. PMID:21640191

  15. Acute stress enhances adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis and activation of newborn neurons via secreted astrocytic FGF2

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Elizabeth D.; Muroy, Sandra E; Sun, Wayne G.; Covarrubias, David; Leong, Megan J; Barchas, Laurel A; Kaufer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest A little stress can be good for you. Just over 100 years ago, psychologists Robert Yerkes and John Dodson suggested that cognitive performance improves as stress increases, although it falls off again if stress levels continue to rise. The hippocampus is a key brain region for both memory and the regulation of emotion, and is highly sensitive to the main class of stress hormones, glucocorticoids. One particular subregion of the hippocampus, the dentate gyrus, contains a high dens...

  16. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Levy

    2014-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal matur...

  17. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study of treatment-naive adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

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    Tiffany M Chaim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attention-Deficit/Hiperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a prevalent disorder, but its neuroanatomical circuitry is still relatively understudied, especially in the adult population. The few morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies available to date have found heterogeneous results. This may be at least partly attributable to some well-known technical limitations of the conventional voxel-based methods usually employed to analyze such neuroimaging data. Moreover, there is a great paucity of imaging studies of adult ADHD to date that have excluded patients with history of use of stimulant medication. METHODS: A newly validated method named optimally-discriminative voxel-based analysis (ODVBA was applied to multimodal (structural and DTI MRI data acquired from 22 treatment-naïve ADHD adults and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC. RESULTS: Regarding DTI data, we found higher fractional anisotropy in ADHD relative to HC encompassing the white matter (WM of the bilateral superior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal left gyrus, left postcentral gyrus, bilateral cingulate gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus; reductions in trace (a measure of diffusivity in ADHD relative to HC were also found in fronto-striatal-parieto-occipital circuits, including the right superior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral cingulate gyrus, as well as the left body and right splenium of the corpus callosum, right superior corona radiata, and right superior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculi. Volumetric abnormalities in ADHD subjects were found only at a trend level of significance, including reduced gray matter (GM in the right angular gyrus, and increased GM in the right supplementary motor area and superior frontal gyrus. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that adult ADHD is associated

  18. Netrin-5 is highly expressed in neurogenic regions of the adult brain.

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    Satoru eYamagishi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian netrin family proteins are involved in targeting of axons, neuronal migration, and angiogenesis and act as repulsive and attractive guidance molecules. Netrin-5 is a new member of the netrin family with homology to the C345C domain of netrin-1. Unlike other netrin proteins, murine netrin-5 consists of two EGF motifs of the laminin V domain (LE and the C345C domain, but lacks the N-terminal laminin VI domain and one of the three LE motifs. We generated a specific antibody against netrin-5 to investigate its expression pattern in the rodent adult brain. Strong netrin-5 expression was observed in the olfactory bulb, rostral migrate stream (RMS, the subventricular zone (SVZ, and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, where neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain. In the SVZ and RMS, netrin-5 expression was observed in Mash1-positive transit-amplifying cells and in Doublecortin (DCX-positive neuroblasts, but not in GFAP-positive astrocytes. In the olfactory bulb, netrin-5 expression was maintained in neuroblasts, but its level was decreased in NeuN-positive mature neurons. In the hippocampal SGZ, netrin-5 was observed in Mash1-positive cells and in DCX-positive neuroblasts, but not in GFAP-positive astrocytes, suggesting that netrin-5 expression occurs from type 2a to type 3 cells. These data suggest that netrin-5 is produced by both transit-amplifying cells and neuroblasts to control neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  19. Prophylactic Role of Oral Melatonin Administration on Neurogenesis in Adult Balb/C Mice during REM Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Armas, Gabriela; Flores-Soto, Mario Eduardo; Chaparro-Huerta, Verónica; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; Soto-Rodríguez, Sofía; Rusanova, Iryna; Acuña-Castroviejo, Dario; González-Perez, Oscar; González-Castañeda, Rocío Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of melatonin in the proliferation of neural progenitors, melatonin concentration, and antiapoptotic proteins in the hippocampus of adult mice exposed to 96 h REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) prophylactic administration of melatonin for 14 days. Material and Methods. Five groups of Balb/C mice were used: (1) control, (2) REMSD, (3) melatonin (10 mg/kg) plus REMSD, (4) melatonin and intraperitoneal luzindole (once a day at 5 mg/kg) plus REMSD, and (5) luzindole plus REMSD. To measure melatonin content in hippocampal tissue we used HPLC. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins were measured by Western Blot and neurogenesis was determined by injecting 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and BrdU/nestin expressing cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus were quantified by epifluorescence. Results. The melatonin-treated REMSD group showed an increased neural precursor in 44% with respect to the REMSD group and in 28% when contrasted with the control group (P expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL as compared to the rest of the groups. Conclusion. The exogenous administration of melatonin restores the tissue levels of sleep-deprived group and appears to be an efficient neuroprotective agent against the deleterious effects of REMSD. PMID:27579149

  20. Prophylactic Role of Oral Melatonin Administration on Neurogenesis in Adult Balb/C Mice during REM Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Soto, Mario Eduardo; Chaparro-Huerta, Verónica; Soto-Rodríguez, Sofía; González-Perez, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of melatonin in the proliferation of neural progenitors, melatonin concentration, and antiapoptotic proteins in the hippocampus of adult mice exposed to 96 h REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) prophylactic administration of melatonin for 14 days. Material and Methods. Five groups of Balb/C mice were used: (1) control, (2) REMSD, (3) melatonin (10 mg/kg) plus REMSD, (4) melatonin and intraperitoneal luzindole (once a day at 5 mg/kg) plus REMSD, and (5) luzindole plus REMSD. To measure melatonin content in hippocampal tissue we used HPLC. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins were measured by Western Blot and neurogenesis was determined by injecting 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and BrdU/nestin expressing cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus were quantified by epifluorescence. Results. The melatonin-treated REMSD group showed an increased neural precursor in 44% with respect to the REMSD group and in 28% when contrasted with the control group (P < 0.021). The melatonin-treated REMSD group also showed the highest expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL as compared to the rest of the groups. Conclusion. The exogenous administration of melatonin restores the tissue levels of sleep-deprived group and appears to be an efficient neuroprotective agent against the deleterious effects of REMSD.

  1. Hippocampal structure, metabolism, and inflammatory response after a 6-week intense aerobic exercise in healthy young adults: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gerd; Herbsleb, Marco; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Schumann, Andy; Brünner, Franziska; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Gussew, Alexander; Puta, Christian; Smesny, Stefan; Gabriel, Holger W; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Interventional studies suggest that changes in physical fitness affect brain function and structure. We studied the influence of high intensity physical exercise on hippocampal volume and metabolism in 17 young healthy male adults during a 6-week exercise program compared with matched controls. We further aimed to relate these changes to hypothesized changes in exercised-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We show profound improvement of physical fitness in most subjects and a positive correlation between the degree of fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels. We unexpectedly observed an average volume decrease of about 2%, which was restricted to right hippocampal subfields CA2/3, subiculum, and dentate gyrus and which correlated with fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels negatively. This result indicates that mainly those subjects who did not benefit from the exercise program show decreased hippocampal volume, reduced BDNF levels, and increased TNF-α concentrations. While spectroscopy results do not indicate any neuronal loss (unchanged N-acetylaspartate levels) decreased glutamate-glutamine levels were observed in the right anterior hippocampus in the exercise group only. Responder characteristics need to be studied in more detail. Our results point to an important role of the inflammatory response after exercise on changes in hippocampal structure. PMID:26082010

  2. Spine formation pattern of adult-born neurons is differentially modulated by the induction timing and location of hippocampal plasticity.

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    Noriaki Ohkawa

    Full Text Available In the adult hippocampus dentate gyrus (DG, newly born neurons are functionally integrated into existing circuits and play important roles in hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it remains unclear how neural plasticity regulates the integration pattern of new neurons into preexisting circuits. Because dendritic spines are major postsynaptic sites for excitatory inputs, spines of new neurons were visualized by retrovirus-mediated labeling to evaluate integration. Long-term potentiation (LTP was induced at 12, 16, or 21 days postinfection (dpi, at which time new neurons have no, few, or many spines, respectively. The spine expression patterns were investigated at one or two weeks after LTP induction. Induction at 12 dpi increased later spinogenesis, although the new neurons at 12 dpi didn't respond to the stimulus for LTP induction. Induction at 21 dpi transiently mediated spine enlargement. Surprisingly, LTP induction at 16 dpi reduced the spine density of new neurons. All LTP-mediated changes specifically appeared within the LTP-induced layer. Therefore, neural plasticity differentially regulates the integration of new neurons into the activated circuit, dependent on their developmental stage. Consequently, new neurons at different developmental stages may play distinct roles in processing the acquired information by modulating the connectivity of activated circuits via their integration.

  3. Fast, potent pharmacological expansion of endogenous hes3+/sox2+ cells in the adult mouse and rat hippocampus.

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    Simone Pacioni

    Full Text Available The adult hippocampus is involved in learning and memory. As a consequence, it is a brain region of remarkable plasticity. This plasticity exhibits itself both as cellular changes and neurogenesis. For neurogenesis to occur, a population of local stem cells and progenitor cells is maintained in the adult brain and these are able to proliferate and differentiate into neurons which contribute to the hippocampal circuitry. There is much interest in understanding the role of immature cells in the hippocampus, in relation to learning and memory. Methods and mechanisms that increase the numbers of these cells will be valuable in this research field. We show here that single injections of soluble factors into the lateral ventricle of adult rats and mice induces the rapid (within one week increase in the number of putative stem cells/progenitor cells in the hippocampus. The established progenitor marker Sox2 together with the more recently established marker Hes3, were used to quantify the manipulation of the Sox2/Hes3 double-positive cell population. We report that in both adult rodent species, Sox2+/Hes3+ cell numbers can be increased within one week. The most prominent increase was observed in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. This study presents a fast, pharmacological method to manipulate the numbers of endogenous putative stem cells/progenitor cells. This method may be easily modified to alter the degree of activation (e.g. by the use of osmotic pumps for delivery, or by repeat injections through implanted cannulas, in order to be best adapted to different paradigms of research (neurodegenerative disease, neuroprotection, learning, memory, plasticity, etc.

  4. Functional organization of the fusiform gyrus revealed with connectivity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Wang, Jiaojian; Fan, Lingzhong; Zhang, Yuanchao; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-08-01

    Within the object recognition-related ventral visual stream, the human fusiform gyrus (FG), which topographically connects the striate cortex to the inferior temporal lobe, plays a pivotal role in high-level visual/cognitive functions. However, though there are many previous investigations of distinct functional modules within the FG, the functional organization of the whole FG in its full functional heterogeneity has not yet been established. In the current study, a replicable functional organization of the FG based on distinct anatomical connectivity patterns was identified. The FG was parcellated into medial (FGm), lateral (FGl), and anterior (FGa) regions using diffusion tensor imaging. We validated the reasonability of such an organizational scheme from the perspective of resting-state whole brain functional connectivity patterns and the involvement of functional subnetworks. We found corroborating support for these three distinct modules, and suggest that the FGm serves as a transition region that combines multiple stimuli, the FGl is responsible for categorical recognition, and the FGa is involved in semantic understanding. These findings support two organizational functional transitions of the ventral temporal gyrus, a posterior/anterior direction of visual/semantic processing, and a media/lateral direction of high-level visual processing. Our results may facilitate a more detailed study of the human FG in the future. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3003-3016, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27132874

  5. Flavanol-rich food for thought

    OpenAIRE

    Pa, Judy; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial in older adults shows that high dietary intake of cocoa flavanols enhances memory performance and neural function in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a region critical for learning and memory.

  6. Profiling Identifies Precursor Suspects: Notch Family Again!

    OpenAIRE

    Breunig, Joshua J.; Rakic, Pasko

    2010-01-01

    Newborn neurons in the adult dentate gyrus pass through several distinct precursor and progenitor classes prior to differentiation. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Lugert et al. (2010) characterized their strikingly different proliferative behaviors after neurogenic stimuli or aging.

  7. Dissociation between the activity of the right middle frontal gyrus and the middle temporal gyrus in processing semantic priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Laufer

    Full Text Available The aim of this event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study was to test whether the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG and middle temporal gyrus (MTG would show differential sensitivity to the effect of prime-target association strength on repetition priming. In the experimental condition (RP, the target occurred after repetitive presentation of the prime within an oddball design. In the control condition (CTR, the target followed a single presentation of the prime with equal probability of the target as in RP. To manipulate semantic overlap between the prime and the target both conditions (RP and CTR employed either the onomatopoeia "oink" as the prime and the referent "pig" as the target (OP or vice-versa (PO since semantic overlap was previously shown to be greater in OP. The results showed that the left MTG was sensitive to release of adaptation while both the right MTG and MFG were sensitive to sequence regularity extraction and its verification. However, dissociated activity between OP and PO was revealed in RP only in the right MFG. Specifically, target "pig" (OP and the physically equivalent target in CTR elicited comparable deactivations whereas target "oink" (PO elicited less inhibited response in RP than in CTR. This interaction in the right MFG was explained by integrating these effects into a competition model between perceptual and conceptual effects in priming processing.

  8. Neuronal Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Astrocytic Gonadotrophin Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH) Immunoreactivity in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J K; Tse, M T; Hamson, D K; Taves, M D; Ma, C; McGuire, N; Arckens, L; Bentley, G E; Galea, L A M; Floresco, S B; Soma, K K

    2015-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are neuropeptides secreted by the hypothalamus that regulate reproduction. GnRH receptors are not only present in the anterior pituitary, but also are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting that GnRH regulates hippocampal function. GnIH inhibits pituitary gonadotrophin secretion and is also expressed in the hippocampus of a songbird; its role outside of the reproductive axis is not well established. In the present study, we employed immunohistochemistry to examine three forms of GnRH [mammalian GnRH-I (mGnRH-I), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and lamprey GnRH-III (lGnRH-III)] and GnIH in the adult rat hippocampus. No mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ cell bodies were present in the hippocampus. Sparse mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ fibres were present within the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus, along the hippocampal fissure, and within the hilus of the dentate gyrus. No lGnRH-III was present in the rodent hippocampus. GnIH-immunoreactivity was present in the hippocampus in cell bodies that resembled astrocytes. Males had more GnIH+ cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus than females. To confirm the GnIH+ cell body phenotype, we performed double-label immunofluorescence against GnIH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NeuN. Immunofluorescence revealed that all GnIH+ cell bodies in the hippocampus also contained GFAP, a marker of astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that GnRH does not reach GnRH receptors in the rat hippocampus primarily via synaptic release. By contrast, GnIH might be synthesised locally in the rat hippocampus by astrocytes. These data shed light on the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:26258544

  9. Glutamate receptor antagonists and growth factors modulate dentate granule cell neurogenesis in organotypic, rat hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten; Montero, Maria;

    2005-01-01

    Generation of dentate granule cells and its modulation by glutamate receptor antagonists, growth factors and pilocarpine-induced seizure-like activity was investigated in rat hippocampal slice cultures derived from 1-week-old rats and grown for 2 weeks. Focussing on the dentate granule cell layer...

  10. Erregungsausbreitung im Gyrus dentatus und in der CA3-Region nach Reizung des Stratum granulosum, des perforant path und des Hilus im Gyrus dentatus der Ratte (in vitro)

    OpenAIRE

    Dogan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Die Erregungsausbreitung im Gyrus dentatus wurde an hippocampalen Schnittpräparaten der Ratte analysiert, die mit dem spannungssensitiven Fluoreszenzfarbstoff RH 795 gefärbt wurden. Anhand eines aus 464 Photodioden bestehenden Arrays erfolgte die Registrierung der Fluoreszenzänderungen des Farbstoffs, die in einem weiten Bereich in linearer Beziehung zu den mittleren Änderungen der Membranpotentiale einer Gewebesäule stehen, die von einer einzelnen Diode erfasst wird. Eine Reizung des Gyrus ...

  11. Congenitally acquired persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis viral infection reduces neuronal progenitor pools in the adult hippocampus and subventricular zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Sun

    Full Text Available Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV can be transmitted through congenital infection, leading to persistent infection of numerous organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS. Adult mice persistently infected with LCMV (LCMV-cgPi mice exhibit learning deficits, such as poor performance in spatial discrimination tests. Given that deficits in spatial learning have been linked to defects in adult neurogenesis, we investigated the impact of congenital LCMV infection on generation of neuroblasts from neural progenitor cells within neurogenic zones of adult mice. In LCMV-cgPi mice, QPCR and immunohistochemistry detected presence of LCMV glycoprotein-coding RNA and nucleoprotein in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone (SVZ, sites of neurogenesis that harbor populations of neuroblasts. Numbers of neuroblasts were reduced in LCMV-cgPi mice, as determined by IHC quantification, and analysis of BrdU incorporation by flow cytometry revealed lower numbers of BrdU-labeled neuroblasts. Additionally, TUNEL assays performed in situ showed increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the two neurogenic regions. Next, neurosphere cultures were infected in vitro with LCMV and differentiated to create a population of cells that consisted of both transit amplifying cells and neuroblasts. Immunocytochemical and TUNEL assays revealed increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells that express nestin, suggesting that the drop in numbers of neuroblasts was due to a combination of impaired proliferation and apoptosis of progenitor cells. LCMV-cgPi mice exhibited transcriptional up-regulation several cytokines and chemokines, including gamma-interferon inducible chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10. Chronic up-regulation of these chemokines can facilitate a pro-inflammatory niche that may contribute to defects in neurogenesis.

  12. Fatherhood reduces the survival of adult-generated cells and affects various types of behavior in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Yue; Jia, Xixi; Liu, Yan; Wang, Zuoxin

    2013-11-01

    Motherhood has profound effects on physiology, neuronal plasticity, and behavior. We conducted a series of experiments to test the hypothesis that fatherhood, similarly to motherhood, affects brain plasticity (such as cell proliferation and survival) and various behaviors in the highly social prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). In Experiment 1, adult males were housed with their same-sex cage mate (control), single-housed (isolation), or housed with a receptive female to mate and produce offspring (father) for 6 weeks. Fatherhood significantly reduced cell survival (assessed by bromodeoxyuridine labeling), but not cell proliferation (assessed by Ki67-labeling), in the amygdala, dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and ventromedial hypothalamus, suggesting that fatherhood affects brain plasticity. In Experiment 2, neither acute (20 min) nor chronic (20 min daily for 10 consecutive days) pup exposure altered cell proliferation or survival in the brain, but chronic pup exposure increased circulating corticosterone levels. These data suggest that reduced cell survival in the brain of prairie vole fathers was unlikely to be due to the level of pup exposure and display of paternal behavior, and may not be mediated by circulating corticosterone. The effects of fatherhood on various behaviors (including anxiety-like, depression-like, and social behaviors) were examined in Experiment 3. The data indicated that fatherhood increased anxiety- and depression-like behaviors as well as altered aggression and social recognition memory in male prairie voles. These results warrant further investigation of a possible link between brain plasticity and behavioral changes observed due to fatherhood. PMID:23899240

  13. Memory-enhancing effects of Cuscuta japonica Choisy via enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Minho; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Choi, Jin Gyu; Jeon, Seong Gak; Song, Eun Ji; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Myung Sook

    2016-09-15

    It is generally accepted that functional and structural changes within the hippocampus are involved in learning and memory and that adult neurogenesis in this region may modulate cognition. The extract of Cuscuta japonica Choisy (CJ) is a well-known traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been used since ancient times as a rejuvenation remedy. The systemic effects of this herb are widely known and can be applied for the treatment of a number of physiological diseases, but there is a lack of evidence describing its effects on brain function. Thus, the present study investigated whether CJ would enhance memory function and/or increase hippocampal neurogenesis using mice orally administered with CJ water extract or vehicle for 21days. Performance on the novel object recognition and passive avoidance tests revealed that treatment with CJ dose-dependently improved the cognitive function of mice. Additionally, CJ increased the Ki-67-positive proliferating cells and the number of doublecortin-stained neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and double labeling with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and neuronal specific nuclear protein showed that CJ increased the number of mature neurons in the DG. Finally, CJ resulted in the upregulated expression of neurogenic differentiation factor, which is essential for the maturation and differentiation of granule cells in the hippocampus. Taken together, the present findings indicate that CJ stimulated neuronal cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, which are all processes associated with neurogenesis. Additionally, these findings suggest that CJ may improve learning and memory via the enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27185736

  14. Hippocampal sub-regional shape and physical activity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Vijay R; Tang, Xiaoying; Carlson, Michelle C

    2016-08-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology, and a target biomarker region for testing intervention efficacy. Over the last few decades, a growing body of evidence from animal and human models suggests that physical activity (PA) is associated with structural benefits to the hippocampus in older adults. Very few human studies, however have explored hippocampal sub-regional specificity of PA; this is significant considering that sub-regions of the hippocampus are associated with distinct cognitive tasks and are differentially affected by disease pathology. This study used objective and self-reported measures of daily walking activity and exercise, and surface-based regional shape analysis using high-field hippocampal sub-regional partitions to explore sub-region specific hippocampal associations in a sample of nondemented, community-dwelling older adults at elevated sociodemographic risk for cognitive decline. Vertex-wise surface areas, which may be more sensitive than global volume measures, were calculated using shape diffeomorphometry, and PA was assessed using step activity monitors and PA questionnaires. We found that daily walking activity in a participant's environment was associated in cross-section mainly with larger surface areas of the subiculum in women. Associations remained significant when controlling for self-reported exercise. Prior studies have found that PA related to exercise and aerobic fitness may be most closely associated with the anterior hippocampus, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These novel findings are the first, to our knowledge, in human models to suggest that PA related to navigation that may not reach the level of moderate-intensity exercise may be associated with specific sub-regions of the hippocampus. These findings underscore the importance of better understanding the independent and related biological mechanisms and pathways by which increasing exercise as well as non

  15. Dopaminergic lesioning impairs adult hippocampal neurogenesis by distinct modification of α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Grimm, Thomas; Schlachetzki, Zinayida; Ben Abdallah, Nada M B; Ettle, Benjamin; Vöhringer, Patrizia; Ferger, Boris; Winner, Beate; Nuber, Silke; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms of cognitive and affective nature are present in premotor and motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons, persists throughout the mammalian life span in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be severely affected in the course of PD, accounting for some of the neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression and cognitive impairment. Two important PD-related pathogenic factors have separately been attributed to contribute to both PD and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: dopamine depletion and accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). In the acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model, altered neurogenesis has been linked merely to a reduced dopamine level. Here, we seek to determine whether a distinct endogenous α-syn expression pattern is associated, possibly contributing to the hippocampal neurogenic deficit. We observed a persistent reduction of striatal dopamine and a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta in contrast to a complete recovery of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive dopaminergic fibers within the striatum. However, dopamine levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased. Survival of newly generated neurons was significantly reduced and paralleled by an accumulation of truncated, membrane-associated, insoluble α-syn within the hippocampus. Specifically, the presence of truncated α-syn species was accompanied by increased activity of calpain-1, a calcium-dependent protease. Our results further substantiate the broad effects of dopamine loss in PD-susceptible brain nuclei, gradually involved in the PD course. Our findings also indicate a detrimental synergistic interplay between dopamine depletion and posttranslational modification of α-syn, contributing to impaired hippocampal plasticity in PD. PMID:26451750

  16. Poor receptive joint attention skills are associated with atypical gray matter asymmetry in the posterior superior temporal gyrus of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, William D; Misiura, Maria; Reamer, Lisa A;

    2014-01-01

    an important and highly adaptive skill in primates, including humans. Here, we examined whether individual differences in responding to socio-communicative cues was associated with variation in either gray matter (GM) volume and asymmetry in a sample of chimpanzees. Magnetic resonance image scans and......-aged and elderly chimpanzee performed more poorly on the RJA task and had significantly less GM than young-adult and sub-adult chimpanzees. The results are consistent with previous studies implicating the posterior temporal gyrus in the processing of socially relevant information....

  17. Critical periods during development of the dentate nucleus and their clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudović Radmila

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to identify the critical periods in the development of the human dentate nucleus in fetuses of different gestational ages and in one newborn brain. Material and Methods. The fetal brains were fixed in alcohol-formalin-acetic acid, embedded in paraffin, cut into 30m sections, and stained with cresyl violet. The sections were examined by light microscopy. In order to identify vulnerable periods, histological and stereological analyses were done. Formation of the dentate nucleus. The first appearance of the dentate nucleus was noticed in fetus of 12.5 weeks of gestation (wg, and its cells corresponded to the first and second stage of maturation. Formation of the dorsomedial lamina begins at the end of the 13th wg, and it starts to fold at 19.5 wg. At this time, cells correspond to the third stage of maturation, and formation of the ventromedial lamina begins. The first folds of the ventromedial lamina are noticed at 23.5 wg. Fourth stage maturity cells are noticed at 23.5 wg. remaining conspicuous up to birth. The numerical density of the nerve cell nuclei shows a constant decrease. Conclusion. Based on our results, we can conclude that during development of the dentate nucleus, there are two vulnerable periods. The first one corresponds to the fourth month of intrauterine life, and the second to the intensive growth of the dorsomedial and ventrolateral lamina (20.0 - 24.5 wg.

  18. Higher language ability is related to angular gyrus activation increase during semantic processing, independent of sentence incongruency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Van Ettinger-Veenstra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relation between individual language ability and neural semantic processing abilities. Our aim was to explore whether high-level language ability would correlate to decreased activation in language-specific regions or rather increased activation in supporting language regions during processing of sentences. Moreover, we were interested if observed neural activation patterns are modulated by semantic incongruency similarly to previously observed changes upon syntactic congruency modulation. We investigated 27 healthy adults with a sentence reading task - which tapped language comprehension and inference, and modulated sentence congruency - employing functional magnetic resonance imaging. We assessed the relation between neural activation, congruency modulation, and test performance on a high-level language ability assessment with multiple regression analysis. Our results showed increased activation in the left-hemispheric angular gyrus extending to the temporal lobe related to high language ability. This effect was independent of semantic congruency, and no significant relation between language ability and incongruency modulation was observed. Furthermore, a significant increase of activation in the inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally when the sentences were incongruent, indicating that processing incongruent sentences was more demanding than processing congruent sentences and required increased activation in language regions. The correlation of high-level language ability with increased rather than decreased activation in the left angular gyrus, a region specific for language processing is opposed to what the neural efficiency hypothesis would predict. We can conclude that there is no evidence found for an interaction between semantic congruency related brain activation and high-level language performance, even though the semantic incongruent condition shows to be more demanding and evoking more neural activation.

  19. Poor Receptive Joint Attention Skills Are Associated with Atypical Grey Matter Asymmetry in the Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WilliamHopkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental data have implicated the posterior superior temporal gyrus as an important cortical region in the processing of socially relevant stimuli such as gaze following, eye direction, and head orientation. Gaze following and responding to different socio-communicative signals is an important and highly adaptive skill in primates, including humans. Here, we examined whether individual differences in responding to socio-communicative cues was associated with variation in either grey matter volume and asymmetry in a sample of chimpanzees. MRI scans and behavioral data on receptive joint attention (RJA was obtained from a sample of 191 chimpanzees. We found that chimpanzees that performed poorly on the RJA task had more rightward asymmetries in the posterior but not anterior superior temporal gyrus. We further found that middle-aged and elderly chimpanzee performed more poorly on the RJA task and had significantly less grey matter than young-adult and sub-adult chimpanzees. The results are consistent with previous studies implicating the posterior temporal gyrus in the processing of socially relevant information.

  20. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Geraldine J; Dowling, Margaret J; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-04-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the Na(V)1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channels in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. PMID:19603521

  1. Genetically targeting new neurons in the adult hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengang Yang; Guo-Li Ming; Hongjun Song

    2011-01-01

    @@ Neurogenesis, the birth of new neu-rons from neural stem cells, is known to occur throughout life in two specific regions of the adult mammalian brain, the subgranular zone/hippocampal dentate gyms and the subventricular zone/olfactory bulb [1-3]. Adult neuro-genesis is a multi-step process (Figure 1), which includes proliferation and fate specification of adult neural stem cells, morphogenesis, migration, axonal and dendritic development, survival, and synaptic integration by newborn neurons [4].

  2. Low-frequency stimulation induces a durable long-term depression in young adult hyperthyroid rats: the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Burak; Bitiktaş, Soner; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Dursun, Nurcan; Dönmez Altuntaş, Hamiyet; Suer, Cem

    2016-06-15

    Long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTD) are cellular mechanisms of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. We have previously shown that adult hyperthyroid rats showed a delay in the acquisition of a place learning task and attenuated long-term potentiation. However, changes in LTD in hyperthyroidism remain unclear. Rats were administered 0.2 mg/kg/day of L-thyroxine for 21 days starting at postnatal day 40 to induce hyperthyroidism. LTD was induced in the dentate gyrus using low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the perforant pathway. The mRNA expressions of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) were evaluated using a quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. In control rats, a standard LFS protocol induced a slight depression of the population spike (PS) amplitude during the induction phase of LTD (76±13% vs. baseline), but a small potentiation of the PS amplitude was observed in the early (107±18%) and late (111±20%) phases of LTD. Interestingly, in the hyperthyroid rats, the same LFS protocol induced a reliable LTD in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus as evidenced by a marked depression in the PS amplitude during the induction (54±6% vs. baseline) and the early phases (56±8%) of LTD. Elevated mRNA levels of p38-MAPK and PP1 were observed in the hippocampus of the LFS-treated hyperthyroid rats compared with the hippocampus of the vehicle-treated hyperthyroid rats. No significant change in p38-MAPK or PP1 mRNA expression was observed in the euthyroid rats. The present study shows that a standard LFS protocol can induce a durable depression of synaptic strength and an upregulation of PP1 and p38-MAPK mRNA in hyperthyroid rats. We conclude that hyperthyroidism can induce molecular changes associated with degeneration of the hippocampus. The relationship between the levels of thyroid hormone and dementia requires further investigation. PMID:27128724

  3. The anatomical and functional specialization of the fusiform gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kevin S; Zilles, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The fusiform gyrus (FG) is commonly included in anatomical atlases and is considered a key structure for functionally-specialized computations of high-level vision such as face perception, object recognition, and reading. However, it is not widely known that the FG has a contentious history. In this review, we first provide a historical analysis of the discovery of the FG and why certain features, such as the mid-fusiform sulcus, were discovered and then forgotten. We then discuss how observer-independent methods for identifying cytoarchitectonical boundaries of the cortex revolutionized our understanding of cytoarchitecture and the correspondence between those boundaries and cortical folding patterns of the FG. We further explain that the co-occurrence between cortical folding patterns and cytoarchitectonical boundaries are more common than classically thought and also, are functionally meaningful especially on the FG and probably in high-level visual cortex more generally. We conclude by proposing a series of alternatives for how the anatomical organization of the FG can accommodate seemingly different theoretical aspects of functional processing, such as domain specificity and perceptual expertise. PMID:26119921

  4. Obstruction increases activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Saito, Hirofumi; Oi, Misato

    2016-08-01

    The right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) is involved in intention understanding during interpersonal interactions. To examine how prior experience of cooperation and competition affects one's right IFG activation in the subsequent interaction, using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) we simultaneously measured paired participants' bilateral IFG activations during a turn-taking game. Participant pairs were assigned to either one of two roles: a Builder taking the initial move to copy a target disk-pattern on monitor and the Partner taking the second move to aid in (cooperation) or to obstruct (competition) the Builder. The experiment consisted of two sessions. One participant (B-P) played as a Builder (B-) in session 1 and changed the role to the Partner (-P) in session 2, and vice versa for the paired participant (P-B). NIRS data in competition demonstrated that the Builder (B-) being obstructed in session 1 showed higher right IFG activation when (s)he took a role of obstructor (-P) in session 2 (the obstructed effect), whereas "the cooperated effect" was not revealed in cooperation. These results suggest that prior experience of being obstructed may facilitate understanding of the Builder and/or the obstructor's tactical move, thereby increasing his/her right IFG activation when one is meant to obstruct in subsequent competitions. PMID:26366676

  5. Processing Chinese hand-radicals activates the medial frontal gyrus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Lin Wu; Yu-Chen Chan; Joseph P. Lavallee; Hsueh-Chin Chen; Kuo-En Chang; Yao-Ting Sung

    2013-01-01

    Embodied semantics theory asserts that the meaning of action-related words is neural y represented through networks that overlap with or are identical to networks involved in sory-motor processing. While some studies supporting this theory have focused on Chinese cha-racters, less attention has been paid to their semantic radicals. Indeed, there is stil disagreement about whether these radicals are processed independently. The present study investigated whether radicals are processed separately and, if so, whether this processing occurs in sensory-motor gions. Materials consisted of 72 high-frequency Chinese characters, with 18 in each of four ries:hand-action verbs with and without hand-radicals, and verbs not related to hand actions, with and without hand-radicals. Twenty-eight participants underwent functional MRI scans while reading the characters. Compared to characters without hand-radicals, reading characters with hand-radicals activated the right medial frontal gyrus. Verbs involving hand-action activated the left inferior parietal lobule, possibly reflecting integration of information in the radical with the semantic meaning of the verb. The findings may be consistent with embodied semantics theory and suggest that neural representation of radicals is indispensable in processing Chinese characters.

  6. Diabetes and Tooth Loss in a National Sample of Dentate Adults Reporting Annual Dental Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Kapp, PhD, MPH

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPeriodontal disease has been associated with tooth loss and reported as more prevalent among people with diabetes than among those without diabetes. Having an annual dental examination is a national goal of Healthy People 2010. Our objective was to examine whether an association exists between diabetes and tooth loss among a population reporting an annual dental visit.MethodsWe used data from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to examine the association between self-reported diabetes and tooth removal due to decay or periodontal disease among 155,280 respondents reporting a dental visit within the past year. We calculated prevalence estimates, odds ratios, and 95% confidence intervals. Multiple logistic regression allowed for adjustment.ResultsThe overall prevalence of tooth removal among the people in the study was 38.3%. People with diabetes had a significantly higher prevalence of tooth removal. In a multivariable model adjusting for selected covariates, respondents with diabetes were 1.46 times as likely (95% CI, 1.30–1.64 to have at least one tooth removed than respondents without diabetes. A stronger association between diabetes and tooth loss was observed among people in the younger age groups than among those in the older age groups.ConclusionEven among people reporting a recent dental visit, diabetes was independently associated with tooth loss. Multidisciplinary efforts are needed to raise awareness of the risk of tooth loss among younger people with diabetes. Good oral hygiene as well as annual dental examinations are important for preventing tooth loss.

  7. Diabetes and Tooth Loss in a National Sample of Dentate Adults Reporting Annual Dental Visits

    OpenAIRE

    Julie M. Kapp, PhD, MPH; Suzanne Austin Boren, PhD; Shumei Yun, PhD; Joseph LeMaster, MD, MPH

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal disease has been associated with tooth loss and reported as more prevalent among people with diabetes than among those without diabetes. Having an annual dental examination is a national goal of Healthy People 2010. Our objective was to examine whether an association exists between diabetes and tooth loss among a population reporting an annual dental visit. Methods We used data from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to examine the association between...

  8. Semaphorin 5A inhibits synaptogenesis in early postnatal- and adult-born hippocampal dentate granule cells

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yuntao; Wang, Shih-Hsiu; Song, Juan; Mironova, Yevgeniya; Ming, Guo-li; Kolodkin, Alex L.; Giger, Roman J.

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Neurons communicate with one another at specialized junctions called synapses. There are two types of synapses, called excitatory synapses and inhibitory synapses, and the density and strength of both are tightly regulated because small deviations from the normal density and/or strength may lead to illness. For example, an excess of excitatory synapses has been observed in patients who have autism spectrum disorders and exhibit difficulties in social interaction. The gene that co...

  9. Early life stress enhancement of limbic epileptogenesis in adult rats: mechanistic insights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to early postnatal stress is known to hasten the progression of kindling epileptogenesis in adult rats. Despite the significance of this for understanding mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE and its associated psychopathology, research findings regarding underlying mechanisms are sparse. Of several possibilities, one important candidate mechanism is early life 'programming' of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis by postnatal stress. Elevated corticosterone (CORT in turn has consequences for neurogenesis and cell death relevant to epileptogenesis. Here we tested the hypotheses that MS would augment seizure-related corticosterone (CORT release and enhance neuroplastic changes in the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight-week old Wistar rats, previously exposed on postnatal days 2-14 to either maternal separation stress (MS or control brief early handling (EH, underwent rapid amygdala kindling. We measured seizure-induced serum CORT levels and post-kindling neurogenesis (using BrdU. Three weeks post-kindling, rats were euthanized for histology of the hippocampal CA3c region (pyramidal cell counts and dentate gyrus (DG (to count BrdU-labelled cells and measure mossy fibre sprouting. As in our previous studies, rats exposed to MS had accelerated kindling rates in adulthood. Female MS rats had heightened CORT responses during and after kindling (p<0.05, with a similar trend in males. In both sexes total CA3c pyramidal cell numbers were reduced in MS vs. EH rats post-kindling (p = 0.002. Dentate granule cell neurogenesis in female rats was significantly increased post-kindling in MS vs. EH rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that early life stress results in enduring enhancement of HPA axis responses to limbic seizures, with increased hippocampal CA3c cell loss and augmented neurogenesis, in a sex-dependent pattern. This implicates important candidate mechanisms through which early life

  10. The Effects of Exercise on Adolescent Hippocampal Neurogenesis in a Rat Model of Binge Alcohol Exposure During the Brain Growth Spurt

    OpenAIRE

    Helfer, Jennifer L.; Goodlett, Charles R.; Greenough, William T.; Klintsova, Anna Y.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol during the brain growth spurt results in impaired cognition and learning in adulthood. This impairment is accompanied by permanent structural changes in the hippocampal formation. Exercise improves performance on hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tasks and increases adult neurogenesis in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus. The present study examined the effects of wheel running during adolescence on dentate gyrus cell proliferation and neurogenesis after postnatal b...

  11. Green tea compound epigallo-catechin-3-gallate (EGCG) increases neuronal survival in adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-López, L; Márquez-Valadez, B; Gómez-Sánchez, A; Silva-Lucero, M D C; Torres-Pérez, M; Téllez-Ballesteros, R I; Ichwan, M; Meraz-Ríos, M A; Kempermann, G; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G B

    2016-05-13

    Epigallo-catechin-3-gallate (EGCG), found in the leaves of Camellia sinensis (green tea), has antioxidant- and scavenger-functions and acts neuroprotectively. It has been publicized as anti-aging remedy but data on potential cellular mechanisms are scarce. Recent studies claimed that EGCG specifically promotes neural precursor cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of C57Bl/6 mice, without changes at the level of immature and mature new neurons. We here analyzed the effects of EGCG on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in male Balb/C mice and saw a different pattern. Two weeks of treatment with EGCG (0, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10mg/kg) showed a dose-response curve that peaked at 2.5mg/kg of EGCG with significantly increased cell survival without affecting cell proliferation but decreasing apoptotic cells. Also, EGCG increased the population of doublecortin-(DCX)-expressing cells that comprises the late intermediate progenitor cells (type-2b and -3) as well as immature neurons. After EGCG treatment, the young DCX-positive neurons showed more elaborated dendritic trees. EGCG also significantly increased net neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus and increased the hippocampal levels of phospho-Akt. Ex vivo, EGCG exerted a direct effect on survival and neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells, which was absent, when PI3K, a protein upstream of Akt, was blocked. Our results thus support a pro-survival and a pro-neurogenic role of EGCG. In the context of the conflicting published results, however, potential genetic modifiers must be assumed. These might help to explain the overall variability of study results with EGCG. Our data do indicate, however, that natural compounds such as EGCG can in principle modulate brain plasticity. PMID:26917271

  12. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  13. 3-[3-(3-florophenyl-2-propyn-1-ylthio)-1, 2, 5-thiadiazol-4-yl]-1, 2, 5, 6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine oxalate, a novel xanomeline derivative, improves neural cells proliferation and survival in adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoliang Zhang; Qiang Gong; Shuang Zhang; Lin Wang; Yinghe Hu; Haiming Shen; Suzhen Dong

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed the influence of 3-[3-(3-florophenyl-2-propyn-1-ylthio)-1, 2, 5-thiadiazol-4-yl]-1, 2, 5, 6-tetrahydro-1-methylpyridine oxalate (EUK1001), a novel xanomeline derivative of the M1/M4 receptor agonist, on hippocampal neurogenesis in adult C57BL6 mice. Results showed that 15-day EUK1001 treatment via intraperitoneal injection promoted neural cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus, although cell differentiation did not change. The majority of bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells co-expressed the immature neuronal marker doublecortin. In addition, the level of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was not altered. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression was up-regulated following EUK1001 treatment, but no change was observed in expression of camp-responsive element binding protein 1, paired box gene 6, vascular endothelial growth factor alpha, neurogenic differentiation factor 1, and wingless-related mouse mammary tumor virus integration site 3A mRNA. These experimental findings indicated that EUK1001 enhanced proliferation and survival of hippocampal cells, possibly by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

  14. Analysis of parahippocampal gyrus in 115 patients with hippocampal sclerosis

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    Ferreira Nelson Fortes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Analysis of the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG involvement in 115 patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS by MR imaging. The simultaneous occurrence of ipsilateral fornix (F and mamillary body (MB volume loss was checked also. These findings were correlated with the side of hippocampal involvement, the sex, patient´s age, and the symptoms onset. METHOD: The MR images of 115 patients with HS were studied retrospectively. All the examinations were performed on 1.5 T units (SIGNA, GE, Milwaukee, WI and included high resolution coronal T2-weighted images (3 mm thickness, 0.6 mm gap. RESULTS: The patient's age ranged between 3.5 and 80 years (mean 34.1; 62 (53.9% were female and 53 (46.1% were male. There were HS on the left side in 53 (46.0%, on the right side in 51 (44.3%, and bilateral in 11 (9.7%. In 43 (37.3% cases there were ipsilateral PHG volume loss and signal hyper intensity on T2-weighted imaging. In 29 (25.2% cases there were ipsilateral fornix volume loss and in 10 (34.5% of this there were also ipsilateral MB changes. In abnormal PHG, 23 (53.4% were on the left side, 17 (39.5% were on the right side, and 3 (7.1% were bilateral. There were fornix changes in 15 (34.8% cases and MB volume loss in 5 (11.6% cases. Pertinent clinical data were obtained in only 18 (41.8% of the PHG lesion cases and 11 (61.1% of these patients had epileptic attacks for more than 20 years before the examination. CONCLUSION: PHG involvement must be investigated in patients with HS and we suggest that the term mesial temporal sclerosis should be used only if there are also changes at this anatomical site.

  15. Left inferior frontal gyrus is critical for response inhibition

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    Ashley Victoria

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lesion studies in human and non-human primates have linked several different regions of prefrontal cortex (PFC with the ability to inhibit inappropriate motor responses. However, recent functional neuroimaging studies have specifically implicated right inferior PFC in response inhibition. Right frontal dominance for inhibitory motor control has become a commonly accepted view, although support for this position has not been consistent. Particularly conspicuous is the lack of data on the importance of the homologous region in the left hemisphere. To investigate whether the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG is critical for response inhibition, we used neuropsychological methodology with carefully characterized brain lesions in neurological patients. Results Twelve individuals with damage in the left IFG and the insula were tested in a Go/NoGo response inhibition task. In alternating blocks, the difficulty of response inhibition was easy (50% NoGo trials or hard (10% NoGo trials. Controls showed the predicted pattern of faster reaction times and more false alarm errors in the hard condition. Left IFG patients had higher error rates than controls in both conditions, but were more impaired in the hard condition, when a greater degree of inhibitory control was required. In contrast, a patient control group with orbitofrontal cortex lesions showed intact performance. Conclusion Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on a highly specific association between right IFG and inhibitory control. The present results indicate that the integrity of left IFG is also critical for successful implementation of inhibitory control over motor responses. Our findings demonstrate the importance of obtaining converging evidence from multiple methodologies in cognitive neuroscience.

  16. Anthropometrics of mental foramen in dry dentate and edentulous mandibles in Coastal Andhra population of Andhra Pradesh State

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivas Moogala; Sahitya Sanivarapu; Ramanarayana Boyapati; Narasimha Swamy Devulapalli; Swarna Chakrapani; Laxmikanth Kolaparthy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the morphological features and morphometrics of mental foramen with reference to surrounding anatomical landmarks in Coastal Andhra population of Andhra Pradesh State. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and nineteen dry dentate and edentulous mandibles are examined in this study. Out of these 127 were dentate and 92 were edentulous. Various morphological and morphometrical parameters were measured by using digital Vernier caliper, metallic wire and m...

  17. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Dowling, Margaret; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium c...

  18. Mathematical Model of Neuronal Morphology: Prenatal Development of the Human Dentate Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković, Katarina; Bačić, Goran; Ristanović, Dušan; Milošević, Nebojša T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the morphological changes of the human dentate nucleus during prenatal development using mathematical models that take into account main morphometric parameters. The camera lucida drawings of Golgi impregnated neurons taken from human fetuses of gestational ages ranging from 14 to 41 weeks were analyzed. Four morphometric parameters, the size of the neuron, the dendritic complexity, maximum dendritic density, and the position of maximum density, were obtai...

  19. Apraxia of speech associated with an infarct in the precentral gyrus of the insula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been postulated that the precentral gyrus in the left insula is responsible for co-ordination of speech. We report a paitent with this disturbance who showed an acute infarct limited to this region. (orig.)

  20. Hypofunction in the posterior cingulate gyrus correlates with disorientation for time and place in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hirono, N.; Mori, E.; Ishii, K.; Ikejiri, Y; Imamura, T; Shimomura, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Yamashita, H.; Sasaki, M.

    1998-01-01

    The relation between orientation for time and place and regional cerebral glucose metabolism was examined in 86 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease of minimal to moderate severity. Regional glucose metabolic rates in the posterior cingulate gyri and in the right middle temporal gyrus were significantly correlated with temporal orientation, and the glucose metabolic rate in the right posterior cingulate gyrus was significantly correlated with locational orientation irr...

  1. Quantified distribution of the noradrenaline innervation in the hippocampus of adult rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently developed radioautographic technique, based on the uptake labeling of monoamine terminals in vitro, was used to quantify the noradrenaline (NA) innervation in adult rat hippocampus. After incubation of brain slices with 1 microM 3H-NA, the NA varicosities were visualized as small aggregates of silver grains, in light microscope radioautographs prepared at 3 equidistant horizontal levels across the ventral 2/3 of the hippocampus. Using a computer-assisted image analyzer, counts were obtained from the subiculum (SUB), 3 sectors of Ammon's horn (CA1, CA3-a, CA3-b) and 3 sectors of the dentate gyrus (DG-medial blade, crest, and lateral blade), every lamina being sampled in each region. After a double correction for duration of radioautographic exposure and section thickness, and following measurement of varicosity diameter in electron microscope radioautographs, it was possible to express these results in number of terminals per volumetric unit of tissue. It was thus found that the overall density of hippocampal NA innervation averages 2.1 million varicosities/mm3 of tissue, a value almost twice as high as that in cerebral cortex. This innervation is 20% denser ventrally than dorsally and is heterogeneous both in terms of regional and laminar distribution. SUB and DG are more strongly innervated than Ammon's horn, wherein CA1 has the lowest overall density. In SUB and CA1, there is a clear predilection of NA varicosities for the stratum moleculare. In CA3, there is a narrow band of even stronger innervation in the stratum radiatum, near the apical border of the stratum pyramidale, contrasting with a 3 times lower density in this cell layer and the stratum oriens. In DG, the NA innervation is again the weakest in the cell body layer and exhibits an almost 3-fold greater density in the polymorph layer, the highest of all hippocampus

  2. Distinct Effects of Chronic Dopaminergic Stimulation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Striatal Doublecortin Expression in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Rachele; Steigleder, Tobias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C. M.; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Schwab, Stefan; Winner, Beate; Winkler, Jürgen; Kohl, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ), recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g., the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA) receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX), and Ropinirole (ROP), on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg) were applied intraperitoneally within 12 h after a 14-days-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg) applied at the beginning of 14-days DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX) in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active

  3. Distinct effects of chronic dopaminergic stimulation on hippocampal neurogenesis and striatal doublecortin expression in adult mice

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    Rachele eSalvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ, recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g. the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX and Ropinirole (ROP, on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg were applied intraperitoneally within 12 hours after a 14-day-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and NeuN 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg applied at the beginning of 14-day DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active and

  4. Distinct Effects of Chronic Dopaminergic Stimulation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Striatal Doublecortin Expression in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Rachele; Steigleder, Tobias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Schwab, Stefan; Winner, Beate; Winkler, Jürgen; Kohl, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ), recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g., the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA) receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX), and Ropinirole (ROP), on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg) were applied intraperitoneally within 12 h after a 14-days-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg) applied at the beginning of 14-days DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX) in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX(+) neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active

  5. The Methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD is crucial for MeCP2’s dysfunction-induced defects in adult newborn neurons

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    Na eZhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human X-linked gene MECP2 are responsible for most Rett syndrome (RTT cases, predominantly within its methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD. To examine the role of MBD in the pathogenesis of RTT, we generated two MeCP2 mutant constructs, one with a deletion of MBD (MeCP2-ΔMBD, another mimicking a mutation of threonine 158 within the MBD (MeCP2-T158M found in RTT patients. MeCP2 knockdown resulted in a decrease in total dendrite length, branching, synapse number, as well as altered spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in vitro, which could be reversed by expression of full length human MeCP2 (hMeCP2-FL. However, the expression of hMeCP2-ΔMBD in MeCP2-silenced neurons did not rescue the changes in neuronal morphology and spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations, while expression of hMeCP2-T158M in these neurons could only rescue the decrease in dendrite length and branch number. In vivo over expression of hMeCP2-FL but not hMeCP2-ΔMBD in adult newborn neurons of the dentate gyrus also rescued the cell autonomous effect caused by MeCP2 deficiency in dendrites length and branching. Our results demonstrate that an intact and functional MBD is crucial for MeCP2 functions in cultured hippocampal neurons and adult newborn neurons.

  6. Pathological evaluation of ganglion cells in biopsies from upper side of the dentate line in patients with perianal problems

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    Marjan Joudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Constipation is one of the most common complaints of individuals, which may present with complication like hemorrhoid and fissure. Hirschsprung is a disease presenting with chronic constipation and its diagnosis may be delayed until adulthood. It is diagnosed by biopsies from anorectal transitional zone. This study aimed to evaluate the association between Hirschsprung and anorectal problems. Method: Sixty three patients with anorectal problems who underwent surgery enrolled in this study. Some consecutive biopsies were obtained from anal canal at 2, 4 and 6 cm above the dentate line. Biopsies were assessed for ganglion cells changes. Patients' data and biopsies results were analyzed with SPSS version18. Results: Out of 63 patients 29 (46 % patients were female and 34 (54 % were male with the mean of 32.65 ± 13.73 years. Fifty six (73 % patients complained from constipation with the mean time of 57.65 ± 45.21 months. Aganglionic zone were reported in six patients with the mean length of 43.33 mm. There was not any relation between anal ganglion cells pathology and constipation (p=0.363, but there was a significant relation between duration of constipation and pathologic changes (p=0.001. The ratio of constipation duration to age was related to anal ganglion cell pathology (p=0.001. Hemorrhoid degree was also affected anal ganglion cells pathology (p=0.037. Conclusion: The relation between Hirschsprung's disease and anorectal problems in adults were significant. The pathologic findings were more presented in younger patients, and those with longer history of constipation and lower degree hemorrhoids. Key words: Anal ganglion cells, Hemorrhoids, Constipation  

  7. NF-kappaB in long-term memory and structural plasticity in the adult mammalian brain

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    Barbara eKaltschmidt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB is a well known regulator of inflammation, stress and immune responses as well as cell survival. In the nervous system NF-κB is one of the crucial components in the molecular switch, that converts short- to long-term memory, a process requiring de novo gene expression. Here, we will review published research on NF-κB and downstream target genes in mammals, which are necessary for structural plasticity and long-term memory, both under normal and pathological conditions in the brain. Genetic evidence has revealed that NF-κB does regulate neuroprotection, neuronal transmission and long-term memory. Additionally, after genetic ablation of all NF-κB subunits, a severe defect in hippocampal adult neurogenesis was observed during aging. Proliferation of neural precursors is increased, however axon outgrowth, synaptogenesis and tissue homeostasis of the dentate gyrus is hampered. In this process, the NF-κB target gene PKAcat and other downstream target genes such as Igf2 are critically involved. Thus, NF-κB activity seems to be crucial in regulating structural plasticity and replenishment of granule cells within the hippocampus throughout life. In addition to the function of NF-κB in neurons we will discuss data on a neuro-inflammatory role of the transcription factor in glia. Finally a model for NF-κB homeostasis on the molecular level is presented, in order to explain seemingly contradictory the friend or foe role of NF-κB in the nervous system.

  8. Mixed electrical-chemical synapses in adult rat hippocampus are primarily glutamatergic and coupled by connexin-36

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    Farid Hamzei-Sichani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendrodendritic electrical signaling via gap junctions is now an accepted feature of neuronal communication in the mammalian brain, whereas axodendritic and axosomatic gap junctions have rarely been described. We present ultrastructural, immunocytochemical, and dye-coupling evidence for “mixed” (electrical/chemical synapses in adult rat hippocampus on both principal cells and interneurons. Thin-section electron microscopic images of small gap junction-like appositions were found at mossy fiber (MF terminals on thorny excrescences of CA3 pyramidal neurons (CA3pyr, apparently forming glutamatergic mixed synapses. Lucifer Yellow injected into four weakly-fixed CA3pyr was detected in MF axons that contacted the injected CA3pyr, supporting gap junction-mediated coupling between those two types of principal cells. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold-labeling revealed diverse sizes and morphologies of connexin36-containing gap junctions throughout hippocampus. Of 20 immunogold-labeled gap junctions, seven were large (328-1140 connexons, three of which were consistent with electrical synapses between interneurons; but nine were at axon terminal synapses, three of which were immediately adjacent to distinctive glutamate receptor-containing postsynaptic densities, forming mixed glutamatergic synapses. Four others were adjacent to small clusters of immunogold-labeled 10-nm E-face intramembrane particles, apparently representing extrasynaptic glutamate receptor particles. Gap junctions also were on spines in stratum lucidum, stratum oriens, dentate gyrus, and hilus, on both interneurons and unidentified neurons. In addition, one putative GABAergic mixed synapse was found in thin section images of a CA3pyr, but none found by immunogold-labeling were at GABAergic mixed synapses, suggesting their rarity. Cx36-containing gap junctions throughout hippocampus suggest the possibility of reciprocal modulation of electrical and chemical signals in diverse

  9. The hippocampus of the eastern rock sengi: cytoarchitecture, markers of neuronal function, principal cell numbers, and adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomianka, Lutz; Drenth, Tanja; Cavegn, Nicole; Menges, Dominik; Lazic, Stanley E; Phalanndwa, Mashudu; Chimimba, Christian T; Amrein, Irmgard

    2013-01-01

    The brains of sengis (elephant shrews, order Macroscelidae) have long been known to contain a hippocampus that in terms of allometric progression indices is larger than that of most primates and equal in size to that of humans. In this report, we provide descriptions of hippocampal cytoarchitecture in the eastern rock sengi (Elephantulus myurus), of the distributions of hippocampal calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin, and somatostatin, of principal neuron numbers, and of cell numbers related to proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Sengi hippocampal cytoarchitecture is an amalgamation of characters that are found in CA1 of, e.g., guinea pig and rabbits and in CA3 and dentate gyrus of primates. Correspondence analysis of total cell numbers and quantitative relations between principal cell populations relate this sengi to macaque monkeys and domestic pigs, and distinguish the sengi from distinct patterns of relations found in humans, dogs, and murine rodents. Calretinin and calbindin are present in some cell populations that also express these proteins in other species, e.g., interneurons at the stratum oriens/alveus border or temporal hilar mossy cells, but neurons expressing these markers are often scarce or absent in other layers. The distributions of parvalbumin and somatostatin resemble those in other species. Normalized numbers of PCNA+ proliferating cells and doublecortin-positive (DCX+) differentiating cells of neuronal lineage fall within the overall ranges of murid rodents, but differed from three murid species captured in the same habitat in that fewer DCX+ cells relative to PCNA+ were observed. The large and well-differentiated sengi hippocampus is not accompanied by correspondingly sized cortical and subcortical limbic areas that are the main hippocampal sources of afferents and targets of efferents. This points to intrinsic hippocampal information processing as the selective advantage of the large sengi hippocampus

  10. The hippocampus of the eastern rock sengi: cytoarchitecture, markers of neuronal function, principal cell numbers and adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz eSlomianka

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The brains of sengis (elephant shrews, order Macroscelidae have long been known to contain a hippocampus that in terms of allometric progression indices is larger than that of most primates and equal in size to that of humans. In this report, we provide descriptions of hippocampal cytoarchitecture in the eastern rock sengi (Elephantulus myurus, of the distributions of hippocampal calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin and somatostatin, of principal neuron numbers and of cell numbers related to proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Sengi hippocampal cytoarchitecture is an amalgamation of characters that are found in CA1 of, e.g., guinea pig and rabbits and in CA3 and dentate gyrus of primates. Correspondence analysis of total cell numbers and quantitative relations between principal cell populations relate this sengi to macaque monkeys and domestic pigs, and distinguish the sengi from distinct patterns of relations found in humans, dogs and murine rodents. Calretinin and calbindin are present in some cell populations that also express these proteins in other species, e.g., interneurons at the stratum oriens/alveus border or temporal hilar mossy cells, but neurons expressing these markers are often scarce or absent in other layers. The distributions of parvalbumin and somatostatin resemble those in other species. Normalized numbers of PCNA+ proliferating cells and doublecortin+ differentiating cells of neuronal lineage fall within the overall ranges of murid rodents, but differed from three murid species captured in the same habitat in that fewer doublecortin+ cells relative to PCNA+ were observed . The large and well-differentiated sengi hippocampus is not accompanied by correspondingly sized cortical and subcortical limbic areas that are the main hippocampal sources of afferents and targets of efferents. This points to intrinsic hippocampal information processing as the selective advantage of the large sengi

  11. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, Maïna; Meurisse, Maryse; Keller, Matthieu; Lévy, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the DG was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the postpartum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the DG the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the DG. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor. PMID:24600367

  12. Transient global amnesia associated with an acute infarction at the cingulate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Tur, Alejandro; Romero-Godoy, Jorge; de la Cruz Cosme, Carlos; Arboix, Adriá

    2014-01-01

    Background. Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a syndrome of sudden, unexplained isolated short-term memory loss. In the majority of TGA cases, no causes can be identified and neuroimaging, CSF studies and EEG are usually normal. We present a patient with TGA associated with a small acute infarct at the cingulate gyrus. Case Report. The patient, a 62 year-old man, developed two episodes of TGA. He had hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. He was found to have an acute ischemic stroke of small size (15 mm of maximal diameter) at the right cerebral cingulate gyrus diagnosed on brain magnetic resonance imaging. No lesions involving other limbic system structures such as thalamus, fornix, corpus callosum, or hippocampal structures were seen. The remainder of the examination was normal. Conclusion. Unilateral ischemic lesions of limbic system structures may result in TGA. We must bear in mind that TGA can be an associated clinical disorder of cingulate gyrus infarct. PMID:25126430

  13. Digital morphometric study of the extrasulcal surface of the cingulate gyrus in man

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    Spasojević Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The frequency of different morphological types and extrasulcal (visible surface area of the cingulate gyms, were measured and analyzed in order to obtain more precise data about morphology, right/left and sex differences in the human brain. Material and methods. The study included 42 brains (84 hemispheres from persons of both sexes and of different age (26 males, 16 females, 20-65 years old, without neuropathological changes. After fixation in 10% formaline (3-4 weeks and removal of meninges the brains were photographed under standard conditions by digital camera. Following determination of morphological type, regions of interest of cingulate gyrus were determined in stereotactic system system of coordinates and the extrasulcal surface was measured by digital AutoCAD planimetry. Results and discussion. Three basic morphological types of cingulate gyrus were found: the continuous type (34.5%, segmented type (35.7% and double paralel type (29.8%. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of morphological types related to the side (right/left or sex (p>0.05. The area of extrasulcal cortex of cingulate gyrus was statistically significantly (p<0.O5 larger on the left hemispheres (for 1.13 cm than on the right (left: 14.58 cm; right: 13.45 cm. The extrasulcal surface of the left cingulate gyrus was significantly larger (p0.05 in males (males 15.9 cm: females - 13.6 cm, while for the right cingulate gyrus this difference was not significant. Conclusion. Morphometry indicated sex and right/left differences of extrasulcal surface area of the human cingulate gyrus. However, the morphological analysis itself did not indicate corresponding differences, suggesting complexity of the problem of sex dimorphism and of right/left asymmetries in the domain of limbic cortex.

  14. Perinatal asphyxia reduces dentate granule cells and exacerbates methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in adulthood.

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    Tomoyasu Wakuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstetric complications have been regarded as a risk factor for schizophrenia later in life. One of the mechanisms underlying the association is postulated to be a hypoxic process in the brain in the offspring around the time of birth. Hippocampus is one of the brain regions implicated in the late-onset dopaminergic dysfunction associated with hypoxic obstetric complications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used an animal model of perinatal asphyxia, in which rat pups were exposed to 15 min of intrauterine anoxia during Cesarean section birth. At 6 and 12 weeks after birth, the behavior of the pups was assessed using a methamphetamine-induced locomotion test. In addition, the histopathology of the hippocampus was examined by means of stereology. At 6 weeks, there was no change in the methamphetamine-induced locomotion. However, at 12 weeks of age, we found an elevation in methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity, which was associated with an increase of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. At the same age, we also found a reduction of the dentate granule cells of the hippocampus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that the dopaminergic dysregulation after perinatal asphyxia is associated with a reduction in hippocampal dentate granule cells, and this may partly contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  15. The impact of maternal separation on adult mouse behaviour and on the total neuron number in the mouse hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, K.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    controls. Apparently a single maternal separation can impact the number of neurons in mouse hippocampus either by a decrease of neurogenesis or as an increase in neuron apoptosis. This study is the first to assess the result of maternal separation combining behaviour and stereology Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...... number of errors made by the MS24 mice compared to controls and in total distance moved. The mice were subsequently sacrificed and the total number of neurons estimated in the hippocampus using the optical fractionator. We found a significant loss of neurons in the dentate gyrus in MS mice compared to...

  16. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine for more than 6 weeks decreases neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohira Koji

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that chronic treatment with serotonergic antidepressants upregulates adult neurogenesis of the dentate gyrus (DG. In contrast, some studies claimed that there was very little alteration of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ by the antidepressants. Since almost all of those studies treated animals with drugs for 2 to 4 weeks as chronic treatment models of antidepressants, it is possible that antidepressant treatments for longer periods would affect adult neurogenesis in the SVZ. Results In the present study, we examined the effects of long-term (up to 9 weeks administration of fluoxetine (FLX, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on cell proliferation and survival in the DG and the SVZ of adult mice. As reported previously, in the DG of mice treated with FLX for 3, 6, or 9 weeks that were also injected with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU in the last 3 days before perfusion, the numbers of Ki67- and BrdU-positive cells, which are cell proliferation markers, were significantly upregulated even at 3 weeks after the onset of the FLX treatments, and these increases were sustained in mice treated with FLX for 9 weeks. On the other hand, in the SVZ, we found a small, insignificant decrease in the numbers of Ki67- and BrdU-positive cells at 3 weeks, followed by highly significant decreases in the numbers of Ki67- and BrdU-positive cells at both 6 and 9 weeks. Furthermore, among olfactory newly generated cells that survived for 3 weeks after BrdU injection, the number of new cells was decreased at 9 weeks of FLX treatment. Conclusions These results demonstrate that long-term (more than 6 weeks treatment with FLX has the opposite effect on neurogenesis in the SVZ than it does in the DG. The results also suggest that the decrease in neurogenesis in the SVZ might be involved in some aspects of the drugs' therapeutic effects on depression. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that some of the

  17. Age-Related Increase in Inferior Frontal Gyrus Activity and Social Functioning in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A.; Thioux, Marc; Nanetti, Luca; van der Gaag, Christiaan; Ketelaars, Cees; Minderaa, Ruud; Keysers, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypoactivation of the inferior frontal gyrus during the perception of facial expressions has been interpreted as evidence for a deficit of the mirror neuron system in children with autism. We examined whether this dysfunction persists in adulthood, and how brain activity in the mirror ne

  18. Apraxia of speech associated with an infarct in the precentral gyrus of the insula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, M.; Komori, T.; Isozaki, E.; Hirai, S. [Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Takeda, K. [Department of Neuropsychology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    It has been postulated that the precentral gyrus in the left insula is responsible for co-ordination of speech. We report a paitent with this disturbance who showed an acute infarct limited to this region. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 refs.

  19. The effects of stimulation of the anterior cingulate gyrus in cats with freedom of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapres, G.; Cadilhac, J.; Passouant, P.

    1980-01-01

    Stimuli of varying strength, frequency and duration were applied to the anterior cingulate gyrus in unanesthetized cats with freedom of movement. The motor, vegetative and electrical effects of these stimuli, although inconstant, lead to a consideration of the role of this structure in the extrapyramidal control of motricity.

  20. Neurons in the Fusiform Gyrus are Fewer and Smaller in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, Imke A. J.; Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; von Cappeln, Patricia; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Korr, Hubert; Heinsen, Helmut; Hof, Patrick R.; van Engeland, Herman; Schmitz, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities in face perception are a core feature of social disabilities in autism. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that patients with autism could perform face perception tasks. However, the fusiform gyrus (FG) and other cortical regions supporting face processing in controls are hypoactive in patients with autism.…

  1. Inferior Frontal Gyrus Activity Triggers Anterior Insula Response to Emotional Facial Expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabbi, Mbemba; Keysers, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The observation of movies of facial expressions of others has been shown to recruit similar areas involved in experiencing one's own emotions: the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). the anterior insula and adjacent frontal operculum (IFO). The Causal link bet between activity in these 2 regions, associat

  2. Amygdala and fusiform gyrus temporal dynamics: Responses to negative facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauch Scott L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amygdala habituates in response to repeated human facial expressions; however, it is unclear whether this brain region habituates to schematic faces (i.e., simple line drawings or caricatures of faces. Using an fMRI block design, 16 healthy participants passively viewed repeated presentations of schematic and human neutral and negative facial expressions. Percent signal changes within anatomic regions-of-interest (amygdala and fusiform gyrus were calculated to examine the temporal dynamics of neural response and any response differences based on face type. Results The amygdala and fusiform gyrus had a within-run "U" response pattern of activity to facial expression blocks. The initial block within each run elicited the greatest activation (relative to baseline and the final block elicited greater activation than the preceding block. No significant differences between schematic and human faces were detected in the amygdala or fusiform gyrus. Conclusion The "U" pattern of response in the amygdala and fusiform gyrus to facial expressions suggests an initial orienting, habituation, and activation recovery in these regions. Furthermore, this study is the first to directly compare brain responses to schematic and human facial expressions, and the similarity in brain responses suggest that schematic faces may be useful in studying amygdala activation.

  3. TMS over the Left Angular Gyrus Impairs the Ability to Discriminate Left from Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirnstein, Marco; Bayer, Ulrike; Ellison, Amanda; Hausmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms of the ability to discriminate left from right are hardly explored. Clinical studies from patients with impairments of left-right discrimination (LRD) and neuroimaging data suggest that the left angular gyrus is particularly involved in LRD. Moreover, it is argued that the often reported sex…

  4. Specific marker of feigned memory impairment: The activation of left superior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zi-Xiang; Xue, Li; Liang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Li-Li; Mei, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Hu

    2015-11-01

    Faking memory impairment means normal people complain lots of memory problems without organic damage in forensic assessments. Using alternative forced-choice paradigm, containing digital or autobiographical information, previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that faking memory impairment could cause the activation in the prefrontal and parietal regions, and might involve a fronto-parietal-subcortical circuit. However, it is still unclear whether different memory types have influence on faking or not. Since different memory types, such as long-term memory (LTM) and short-term memory (STM), were found supported by different brain areas, we hypothesized that feigned STM or LTM impairment had distinct neural activation mapping. Besides that, some common neural correlates may act as the general characteristic of feigned memory impairment. To verify this hypothesis, the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) combined with an alternative word forced-choice paradigm were used in this study. A total of 10 right-handed participants, in this study, had to perform both STW and LTM tasks respectively under answering correctly, answering randomly and feigned memory impairment conditions. Our results indicated that the activation of the left superior frontal gyrus and the left medial frontal gyrus was associated with feigned LTM impairment, whereas the left superior frontal gyrus, the left precuneus and the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were highly activated while feigning STM impairment. Furthermore, an overlapping was found in the left superior frontal gyrus, and it suggested that the activity of the left superior frontal gyrus might be acting as a specific marker of feigned memory impairment. PMID:26479324

  5. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5±3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis

  6. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seok Nam; Joh, Chul Woo; Lee, Dong Soo [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul national University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5{+-}3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis.

  7. Regulation of action potential delays via voltage-gated potassium Kv1.1 channels in dentate granule cells during hippocampal epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eKirchheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Action potential (AP responses of dentate gyrus granule (DG cells have to be tightly regulated to maintain hippocampal function. However, which ion channels control the response delay of DG cells is not known. In some neuron types, spike latency is influenced by a dendrotoxin (DTX-sensitive delay current (ID mediated by unidentified combinations of voltage-gated K+ (Kv channels of the Kv1 family Kv1.1-6. In DG cells, the ID has not been characterized and its molecular basis is unknown. The response phenotype of mature DG cells is usually considered homogenous but intrinsic adaptations likely occur in particular in conditions of hyperexcitability, for example during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. In this study, we examined response delays of DG cells and underlying ion channel molecules by employing a new combination of gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp recordings in acute brain slices and single-cell reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SC RT-qPCR experiments. An in vivo mouse model of TLE consisting of intrahippocampal kainate (KA injection was used to examine epilepsy-related plasticity. Response delays of DG cells were DTX-sensitive and strongly increased in KA-injected hippocampi; Kv1.1 mRNA was elevated 10-fold, and the response delays correlated with Kv1.1 mRNA abundance on the single cell level. Other Kv1 subunits did not show overt changes in mRNA levels. Kv1.1 immunolabeling was enhanced in KA DG cells. The biophysical properties of ID and the delay heterogeneity between inner and outer DG cell layer were characterized. Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs, where KA incubation also induced ID upregulation, reversibility and neuroprotective potential for DG cells were tested. In summary, the AP timing of DG cells is effectively controlled via scaling of Kv1.1 subunit transcription. With this antiepileptic mechanism, DG cells delay their

  8. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor independent changes in expression of polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule despite blockade of homosynaptic long-term potentiation and heterosynaptic long-term depression in the awake freely behaving rat dentate gyrus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Dallerac, G. M.; Tabuchi, M.; Davies, H.A.; Colyer, F. M.; Stewart, M.G.; Doyere, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 4, 03 (2008), s. 169-178. ISSN 1740-925X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Adhesion molecules * hippocampus * synaptic plasticity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.937, year: 2008

  9. Facilitation of the HPA Axis to a Novel Acute Stress Following Chronic Stress Exposure Modulates Histone Acetylation and the ERK/MAPK Pathway in the Dentate Gyrus of Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ferland, Chantelle L.; Harris, Erin P.; Lam, Mai; Schrader, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that when presented with novel acute stress, animals previously exposed to chronic homotypic or heterotypic stressors exhibit normal or enhanced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) response compared with animals exposed solely to that acute stressor. The molecular mechanisms involved in this effect remain unknown. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of the key pathways regulated in the hippocampus in both acute and chronic stress. The aim of this study wa...

  10. Rapid and long-term induction of effector immediate early genes (BDNF, Neuritin and Arc) in peri-infarct cortex and dentate gyrus after ischemic injury in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Teilum, Maria; Wieloch, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    The genomic response following brain ischemia is very complex and involves activation of both protective and detrimental signaling pathways. Immediate early genes (IEGs) represent the first wave of gene expression following ischemia and are induced in extensive regions of the ischemic brain...... including cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Neuritin and Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) belong to a subgroup of immediate early genes implicated in synaptic plasticity known as effector immediate early genes. Here, we investigated the...... at 0-6 h of reperfusion for Neuritin and 0-12 h of reperfusion for Arc while BDNF was induced 0-9 h of reperfusion. Our study demonstrates a rapid and long-term activation of effector immediate early genes in distinct brain areas following ischemic injury in rat. Effector gene activation may be part...

  11. Alterations in synaptic curvature in the dentate gyrus following induction of long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and treatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist CPP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medvedev, N. I.; Popov, V. I.; Dallerac, G.; Davies, H.A.; Laroche, S.; Kraev, I. V.; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Doyere, V.; Stewart, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 171, č. 2 (2010), s. 390-397. ISSN 0306-4522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : D synaptic ultrastructure * hippocampus * long term potentiation and depression Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.215, year: 2010

  12. Dioxouranium(VI) complexes with potential ter-and tetra-dentate Schiff base ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of dioxouranium(VI) complexes were synthesised with the tetradentate Schiff base ligands (N202 donor set) obtained by the condensation of ethylenediamine with salicyladehyde(H2salen), acetylacetone (H2aaen) or benzoyl acetone (H2baen) and ter-dentate Schiff base ligands derived by condensation of salicylaldehyde with glycine(glysal), o-aminophenol(APhSal) or 2-amino 4-methyl pyridine (AMPy Sal) as well as glycine with acetylacetone (glyaa). The terdentate ligands have the N02 or N20 donor set. The tetradentate ligands formed complexes of the type [U02LX2], where L =H2salen, H2aaen, H2baen and X = Cl, I, N03, NCS, 0.5 S04; and the complexes contain 6-coordinated U022+ group with the anions inside the coordination sphere. The IR evidence shows that the thiocyanate group is actually N-bonded iso-thiocyanato, the nitrato group is involved in unidentate covalent bonding and the sulphato group is bonded covalently in a bidentate manner. The far IR spectra was studied to find the ν(U-Cl) at 234 cm-1 and the delta(0U0) at ca. 225 cm-1. U02(Cl04)2 reacted with H2salen to form U02(salen). The terdentate ligands H2glysal and H2glyaa formed complexes of the type U02(glysal)H20 and U02(glyaa)2H20, which is confirmed on the basis of IR and DTG, TGA data. The U022+ group is 4- and 5-coordinated respectively, in these complexes. The potential ter-dentate ligands H2APhSal and HAMPySal behaved essentially as bidentate ligands and formed 4-coordinate, neutral complexes, U02L2(L= H-APhSal or AMPySal). author)

  13. Proteomic analysis of hippocampal dentate granule cells in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Application of laser capture technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YairM.Gozal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is the most common cause of dementia with pre-senile onset, accounting for as many as 20% of cases. A common subset of FTLD cases is characterized by the presence of ubiquitinated inclusions in vulnerable neurons (FTLD-U. While the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in FTLD-U have not yet been elucidated, the presence of inclusions in this disease indicates enhanced aggregation of one or several proteins. Moreover, these inclusions suggest altered expression, processing, or degradation of proteins during FTLD-U pathogenesis. Thus, one approach to understanding disease mechanisms is to delineate the molecular changes in protein composition in FTLD-U brain. Using a combined approach consisting of laser capture microdissection (LCM and high resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, we identified 1252 proteins in hippocampal dentate granule cells excised from three post-mortem FTLD-U and three unaffected control cases processed in parallel. Additionally, we employed a labeling-free quantification technique to compare the abundance of the identified proteins between FTLD-U and control cases. Quantification revealed 54 proteins with selective enrichment in FTLD-U, including TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43, a recently identified component of ubiquitinated inclusions. Moreover, 19 proteins were selectively decreased in FTLD-U. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis of TDP-43 and three additional protein candidates suggests that our proteomic profiling of FTLD-U dentate granule cells reveals both inclusion-associated proteins and non-aggregated disease-specific proteins. Application of LCM is a valuable tool in the molecular analysis of complex tissues, and its application in the proteomic characterization of neurodegenerative disorders such as FTLD-U may be used to identify proteins altered in disease.

  14. Effects of developmental hyperserotonemia on the morphology of rat dentate nuclear neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, L H; Segal, S

    2016-05-13

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social cognition, disordered communication, restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Furthermore, abnormalities in basic motor control, skilled motor gestures, and motor learning, are common in ASD. These characteristics have been attributed to a possible defect in the pre- and postnatal development of specific neural networks including the dentate-thalamo-cortical pathway, which is involved in motor learning, automaticity of movements, and higher cognitive functions. The current study utilized custom diolistic labeling and unbiased stereology to characterize morphological alterations in neurons of the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum in developing rat pups exposed to abnormally high levels of the serotonergic agonist 5-methyloxytryptamine (5-MT) pre-and postnatally. Occurring in as many as 30% of autistic subjects, developmental hyperserotonemia (DHS) is the most consistent neurochemical finding reported in autism and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ASD. This exposure produced dramatic changes in dendritic architecture and synaptic features. We observed changes in the dendritic branching morphology which did not lead to significant differences (p>0.5) in total dendritic length. Instead, DHS groups presented with dendritic trees that display changes in arborescence, that appear to be short reaching with elaborately branched segments, presenting with significantly fewer (p>0.001) dendritic spines and a decrease in numeric density when compared to age-matched controls. These negative changes may be implicated in the neuropathological and functional/behavioral changes observed in ASD, such as delays in motor learning, difficulties in automaticity of movements, and deficits in higher cognitive functions. PMID:26892293

  15. Evidence for a motor and a non-motor domain in the human dentate nucleus--an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küper, M; Dimitrova, A; Thürling, M; Maderwald, S; Roths, J; Elles, H G; Gizewski, E R; Ladd, M E; Diedrichsen, J; Timmann, D

    2011-02-14

    Dum and Strick (J. Neurophysiol. 2003; 89, 634-639) proposed a division of the cerebellar dentate nucleus into a "motor" and "non-motor" area based on anatomical data in the monkey. We asked the question whether motor and non-motor domains of the dentate can be found in humans using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Therefore dentate activation was compared in motor and cognitive tasks. Young, healthy participants were tested in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Data from 13 participants were included in the final analysis. A block design was used for the experimental conditions. Finger tapping of different complexities served as motor tasks, while cognitive testing included a verbal working memory and a visuospatial task. To further confirm motor-related dentate activation, a simple finger movement task was tested in a supplementary experiment using ultra-highfield (7 T) fMRI in 23 participants. For image processing, a recently developed region of interest (ROI) driven normalization method of the deep cerebellar nuclei was used. Dorso-rostral dentate nucleus activation was associated with motor function, whereas cognitive tasks led to prominent activation of the caudal nucleus. The visuospatial task evoked activity bilaterally in the caudal dentate nucleus, whereas verbal working memory led to activation predominantly in the right caudal dentate. These findings are consistent with Dum and Strick's anatomical findings in the monkey. PMID:21081171

  16. A survey on oral hygiene practices among Malaysian adults

    OpenAIRE

    Esa, R.; Razak, I. A.; Jallaudin, R. L.; Jaafar, N.

    1992-01-01

    A survey on oral hygiene practices was conducted on 537 dentate adult patients aged 15 years and over. The aim of this study was to investigate the variation in dental behavior with regards to socio-demographic factors, namely age, sex, ethnicity, income, education and occupational status. Patients attending nine randomly selected government dental clinics were interviewed on their daily oral hygiene practices. The majority (89.7) of the subjects reported that they brushed their teeth, 68 use...

  17. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ. Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte

  18. An fMRI investigation on simple multiplication in younger and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SUN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the cortical activation patterns and their correlation with behavioristics during simple multiplication in Chinese younger and older adults. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed as healthy younger and older participants resolving arithmetic and control problems. Results Totally 39 right-handed healthy adults were recruited in this study, including 19 (11 females, 8 males younger and 20 (12 females, 8 males older subjects. Age (P = 0.000 was significantly different between 2 groups, and no significant difference was observed in years of education (P = 0.125 and IQ scores (P = 0.921. The accuracy for simple multiplication (P = 0.880 and control task (P = 0.142 were not significantly different between 2 groups, however differences were observed in reaction time for experimental (P = 0.005 and control (P = 0.000 tasks. In younger group, activation in right hemisphere included inferior parietal lobule with an extending to the intraparietal sulcus and superior/middle temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, premotor cortex and prefrontal cortex. Activation of supramarginal gyrus, angular gyrus, temporal lobe was found in the left. And activation in medial cingulate gyrus, precuneus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus, and supplementary motor area (SMA was also observed. In older group, supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, precentral gyrus, premotor cortex and prefrontal cortex were activated in the right hemisphere. Left angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, precentral gyrus, premotor cortex, insula and prefrontal cortex were also activated, as well as cingulate gyrus, paracentral lobule and prefrontal cortex in the medial part. The conjunction analysis of the fMRI data revealed in a distributed network consisting of inferior parietal area, precuneus, precentral/postcentral gyrus and prefrontal lobe, as well as some subcortical areas. Conclusions The major components of the network subserving simple

  19. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Applied to Heschl's Gyrus Modulates Pitch Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Mathys, Christoph; Loui, Psyche; Zheng, Xin; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2010-01-01

    The neural basis of the human brain's ability to discriminate pitch has been investigated by functional neuroimaging and the study of lesioned brains, indicating the critical importance of right and left Heschl's gyrus (HG) in pitch perception. Nonetheless, there remains some uncertainty with regard to localization and lateralization of pitch discrimination, partly because neuroimaging results do not allow us to draw inferences about the causality. To address the problem of causality in pitch...

  20. Non-invasive brain-stimulation applied to Heschl's gyrus modulates pitch discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    XinZheng

    2010-01-01

    The neural basis of the human brain's ability to discriminate pitch has been investigated by functional neuroimaging and the study of lesioned brains, indicating the critical importance of right and left Heschl's gyrus (HG) in pitch perception. Nonetheless, there remains some uncertainty with regard to localization and lateralization of pitch discrimination, partly because neuroimaging results do not allow us to draw inferences about the causality. To address the problem of causality in pitch...

  1. Cingulate gyrus morphology in children and adolescents with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorkquist, Olivia A.; Fryer, Susanna L.; Reiss, Allan L; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can lead to a variety of cognitive and other birth defects, collectively termed fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), which includes the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). This study examined the impact of gestational alcohol exposure on the morphology of the cingulate gyrus, given this region’s role in cognitive control, attention, and emotional regulation, all of which are affected in children with FASD. Thirty-one youth (ages 8–16) with histories of heavy...

  2. BOLD response to motion verbs in left posterior middle temporal gyrus during story comprehension

    OpenAIRE

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Vuust, Peter; Roepstorff, Andreas; Dohn, Anders; Lund, Torben Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    A primary focus within neuroimaging research on language comprehension is on the distribution of semantic knowledge in the brain. Studies have shown that the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LPMT), a region just anterior to area MT/V5, is important for the processing of complex action knowledge. It has also been found that motion verbs cause activation in LPMT. In this experiment we investigated whether this effect could be replicated in a setting resembling real life language comprehens...

  3. A rostro-caudal gradient of structured sequence processing in the left inferior frontal gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Uddén, Julia; Bahlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present two novel perspectives on the function of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). First, a structured sequence processing perspective facilitates the search for functional segregation within the LIFG and provides a way to express common aspects across cognitive domains including language, music and action. Converging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies suggests that the LIFG is engaged in sequential proces...

  4. Tractography of the parahippocampal gyrus and material specific memory impairment in unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Yogarajah, M.; Powell, H.W.R.; Parker, G J M; Alexander, D. C.; Thompson, P J; Symms, M.R.; Boulby, P.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.; Barker, G.J.; Koepp, M J.; Duncan, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with disrupted memory function. The structural changes underlying this memory impairment have not been demonstrated previously with tractography.Methods: We performed a tractography analysis of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging scans in 18 patients with unilateral TLE undergoing presurgical evaluation, and in 10 healthy controls. A seed region in the anterior parahippocampal gyrus was selected from which to trace the white matter con...

  5. Enhanced spontaneous functional connectivity of the superior temporal gyrus in early deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Ding; Dong Ming; Baikun Wan; Qiang Li; Wen Qin; Chunshui Yu

    2016-01-01

    Early auditory deprivation may drive the auditory cortex into cross-modal processing of non-auditory sensory information. In a recent study, we had shown that early deaf subjects exhibited increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) bilaterally during visual spatial working memory; however, the changes in the organization of the STG related spontaneous functional network, and their cognitive relevance are still unknown. To clarify this issue, we applied resting state functional ...

  6. Inter-hemispheric connectivity in the fusiform gyrus supports memory consolidation for faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Maximilian J; O'Gorman Tuura, Ruth; Klaver, Peter

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated how changes of functional connectivity over time accompany consolidation of face memories. Based on previous research, it was hypothesized that connectivity changes in networks initially active during face perception and face encoding would be associated with individual recognition memory performance. Resting-state functional connectivity was examined shortly before, shortly after and about 40 min after incidental learning of faces. Memory performance was assessed in a surprise recognition test shortly after the last resting-state session. Results reveal that memory performance-related connectivity between the left fusiform face area and other brain areas gradually changed over the course of the experiment. Specifically, the increase in connectivity with the contralateral fusiform gyrus, the hippocampus, the amygdala and the inferior frontal gyrus correlated with recognition memory performance. As the increase in connectivity in the two final resting-state sessions was associated with memory performance, the present results demonstrate that memory formation is not restricted to the incidental learning phase but continues and increases in the following 40 min. It is discussed that the delayed increase in inter-hemisphere connectivity between the left and right fusiform gyrus is an indicator for memory formation and consolidation processes. PMID:26844811

  7. Histopathologic characterization of the BTBR mouse model of autistic-like behavior reveals selective changes in neurodevelopmental proteins and adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephenson Diane T

    2011-05-01

    doublecortin, PSA-NCAM and NeuroD immunoreactive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, and a marked reduction in the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU positive progenitors. Furthermore, a significant and profound reduction in BDNF mRNA was seen in the BTBR dentate gyrus. No significant differences were seen in the expression of AchE, mossy fiber synapses or immunoreactivities of microtubule-associated protein MAP2, parvalbumin and glutamate decarboxylase GAD65 or GAD67 isoforms. Conclusions We documented modest and selective alterations in glia, neurons and synapses in BTBR forebrain, along with reduced neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. Of all markers examined, the most distinctive changes were seen in the neurodevelopmental proteins NG2, PSA-NCAM, NeuroD and DCX. Our results are consistent with aberrant development of the nervous system in BTBR mice, and may reveal novel substrates to link callosal abnormalities and autistic behaviors. The changes that we observed in the BTBR mice suggest potential novel therapeutic strategies for intervention in autism spectrum disorders.

  8. Relationship of central incisor implant placement to the ridge configuration anterior to the nasopalatine canal in dentate and partially edentulous individuals: a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Xueting; Hu, WenJie; Meng, Huanxin

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aims of this study were to investigate the ridge contour anterior to the nasopalatine canal, and the difference between the incidences of the nasopalatine canal perforation in dentate and partially edentulous patients by cone-beam computed tomography. Methods. Cone-beam computed tomography scan images from 72 patients were selected from database and divided into dentate and partially edentulous groups. The configuration of the ridge anterior to the canal including palatal conc...

  9. Anthropometrics of mental foramen in dry dentate and edentulous mandibles in Coastal Andhra population of Andhra Pradesh State

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    Srinivas Moogala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the morphological features and morphometrics of mental foramen with reference to surrounding anatomical landmarks in Coastal Andhra population of Andhra Pradesh State. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and nineteen dry dentate and edentulous mandibles are examined in this study. Out of these 127 were dentate and 92 were edentulous. Various morphological and morphometrical parameters were measured by using digital Vernier caliper, metallic wire and metallic scale on both the right and left sides. Results: In the present study, the distance between most anterior margin of mental foramen and posterior border of ramus of the mandible is [MF-PR], MF-PR is 69.61 ± 6.03 mm on the right side and is 69.17 ± 6. 0 mm on left side in dentate mandible. In edentulous type, MF-PR is 68.39 ±6.4 mm on right side and 68.81 ± 6.55 mm on left side. In the present study, the distance between symphysis menti and most anterior margin of mental foramen [MF-SM] in dentate mandible is 28.24 ± 5.09 mm on right side and is 27.45 ± 3.7 mm on left side. In edentulous mandible (MF-SM is 28.51 ± 4.5 mm on right side and on left side is 27.99 ± 4.50 mm. Conclusion: Acquiring the knowledge and importance of anatomy of mental foramen is helpful in avoiding neurovascular complications, during regional anesthesia, peri apical surgeries, nerve repositioning and dental implant placement.

  10. NT-3 Facilitates Hippocampal Plasticity and Learning and Memory by Regulating Neurogenesis

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    Sakata, Kazuko; Akbarian, Schahram; Bates, Brian; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Lu, Bai; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Zhao, Mingrui

    2006-01-01

    In the adult brain, the expression of NT-3 is largely confined to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), an area exhibiting significant neurogenesis. Using a conditional mutant line in which the "NT-3" gene is deleted in the brain, we investigated the role of NT-3 in adult neurogenesis, hippocampal plasticity, and memory. Bromodeoxyuridine…

  11. Transient Global Amnesia Associated with an Acute Infarction at the Cingulate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Gallardo-Tur; Jorge Romero-Godoy; Carlos de la Cruz Cosme; Adriá Arboix

    2014-01-01

    Background. Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a syndrome of sudden, unexplained isolated short-term memory loss. In the majority of TGA cases, no causes can be identified and neuroimaging, CSF studies and EEG are usually normal. We present a patient with TGA associated with a small acute infarct at the cingulate gyrus. Case Report. The patient, a 62 year-old man, developed two episodes of TGA. He had hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. He was found to have an acute ischemic stroke of small...

  12. 56Fe particle exposure results in a long-lasting increase in a cellular index of genomic instability and transiently suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal R.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24 h), intermediate (7 d), and/or long time points (2-3 mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  13. An anxiogenic drug, FG 7142, induced an increase in mRNA of Btg2 and Adamts1 in the hippocampus of adult mice

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    Kurumaji Akeo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety and stress-related disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders. The hippocampus is a crucial brain area involved in the neural circuits of the pathophysiology of anxiety and stress-related disorders, and GABA is one of most important neurotransmitters related to these disorders. An anxiogenic drug and a pharmacological stressor, FG7142 (N-methyl-ß-carboline-3-carboxamide, produces anxiety in humans and experimental animals, acting at the benzodiazepine sites of the GABAA receptors as a partial inverse agonist. This drug as well as immobilization stress produced an increased mRNA in a number of genes, e.g., Btg2 and Adamsts1, in the cortex of rodents. The present study was carried out to clarify the effect of the anxiogenic drug on the gene expressions in the hippocampus and to obtain a new insight into the GABAergic system involved in the pathophysiology of the disorders. Method We examined the effects of FG7142 on the gene expression of Btg2 and Adamts1 in the hippocampus of mice using a quantitative RT-PCR method as well as an in situ hybridization method. Results The intraperitoneal administration of FG7142 at a dose of 20 mg/kg, but not 10 mg/kg, induced a statistically significant increase in the hippocampal mRNA of both genes in adult mice (postnatal days 56, being blocked by co-administrations of flumazenil (twice of 10 mg/kg, i.p., an antagonist at the benzodiazepine binding site, while FG7142 failed to produce any change in the gene expressions in infant mice (postnatal days 8. In addition, the in situ hybridization experiment demonstrated an upregulation of the gene expressions restricted to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in adult mice. Conclusions The present study suggests a functional coupling between the GABAergic system and the transcriptional regulation of the two genes (Btg2 and Adamsts1 in the hippocampus of adult mice, which may play a role in the brain function related to

  14. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers

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    Hänggi Jürgen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurophysiological and neuroanatomical foundations of persistent developmental stuttering (PDS are still a matter of dispute. A main argument is that stutterers show atypical anatomical asymmetries of speech-relevant brain areas, which possibly affect speech fluency. The major aim of this study was to determine whether adults with PDS have anomalous anatomy in cortical speech-language areas. Methods Adults with PDS (n = 10 and controls (n = 10 matched for age, sex, hand preference, and education were studied using high-resolution MRI scans. Using a new variant of the voxel-based morphometry technique (augmented VBM the brains of stutterers and non-stutterers were compared with respect to white matter (WM and grey matter (GM differences. Results We found increased WM volumes in a right-hemispheric network comprising the superior temporal gyrus (including the planum temporale, the inferior frontal gyrus (including the pars triangularis, the precentral gyrus in the vicinity of the face and mouth representation, and the anterior middle frontal gyrus. In addition, we detected a leftward WM asymmetry in the auditory cortex in non-stutterers, while stutterers showed symmetric WM volumes. Conclusions These results provide strong evidence that adults with PDS have anomalous anatomy not only in perisylvian speech and language areas but also in prefrontal and sensorimotor areas. Whether this atypical asymmetry of WM is the cause or the consequence of stuttering is still an unanswered question.

  15. Releasing dentate nucleus cells from Purkinje cell inhibition generates output from the cerebrocerebellum.

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    Takahiro Ishikawa

    Full Text Available The cerebellum generates its vast amount of output to the cerebral cortex through the dentate nucleus (DN that is essential for precise limb movements in primates. Nuclear cells in DN generate burst activity prior to limb movement, and inactivation of DN results in cerebellar ataxia. The question is how DN cells become active under intensive inhibitory drive from Purkinje cells (PCs. There are two excitatory inputs to DN, mossy fiber and climbing fiber collaterals, but neither of them appears to have sufficient strength for generation of burst activity in DN. Therefore, we can assume two possible mechanisms: post-inhibitory rebound excitation and disinhibition. If rebound excitation works, phasic excitation of PCs and a concomitant inhibition of DN cells should precede the excitation of DN cells. On the other hand, if disinhibition plays a primary role, phasic suppression of PCs and activation of DN cells should be observed at the same timing. To examine these two hypotheses, we compared the activity patterns of PCs in the cerebrocerebellum and DN cells during step-tracking wrist movements in three Japanese monkeys. As a result, we found that the majority of wrist-movement-related PCs were suppressed prior to movement onset and the majority of wrist-movement-related DN cells showed concurrent burst activity without prior suppression. In a minority of PCs and DN cells, movement-related increases and decreases in activity, respectively, developed later. These activity patterns suggest that the initial burst activity in DN cells is generated by reduced inhibition from PCs, i.e., by disinhibition. Our results indicate that suppression of PCs, which has been considered secondary to facilitation, plays the primary role in generating outputs from DN. Our findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms used by PCs to influence limb motor control and on the plastic changes that underlie motor learning in the cerebrocerebellum.

  16. Prevalence of Gingival Biotypes among Young Dentate North Indian Population: A Biometric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Polsani L; Bhoria, Mohaneesh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of various gingival biotypes and to corroborate gingival thickness and gingival biotypes across tooth type, site, and gender. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted across systemically healthy subjects. A systematic clinical evaluation for gingival biotypes and gingival thicknesses was recorded by modified Iwanson’s gauge, to the nearest 0.1 mm, probing the gingival sulcus at the midfacial aspect of maxillary and mandibular central incisors and first molars. All measurements were made across a total of 920 sites in 115 subjects (69 female and 46 male) based on gingival transparency and were statistically analyzed. Results: A significant agreement on the reproducibility of the measurements was noted. The median overall gingival thickness was recorded at 0.75 mm with interquantile difference of 0.39 mm. The thin biotype variant showed across the ranges of 0.3 to 0.6 mm of gingival thicknesses and thick biotype variant across the ranges of 1.0 to 1.2 mm, with more prevalence in anterior and posterior site respectively. Moreover, for gingi-val thickness of 0.7 mm, the probe visibility showed tendency toward both thin/thick biotype variant in both anterior and posterior segments. The disposition of male participants toward thick biotype and female participants toward the thin biotype variant has been noted. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the current study, our data support the traditional hypothesis of two main gingival biotypes as distinguishable by gingival transparency. In addition, we provide evidence of existence of intermediate biotypes with respect to gingival thickness. These findings can be utilized as objective guidelines for determination of biotype and can be implicated in many dental operative procedures. How to cite this article: Rathee M, Rao PL, Bhoria M. Prevalence of Gingival Biotypes among Young Dentate North Indian Population: A Biometric Approach. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016

  17. Medial orbital gyrus modulation during spatial perspective changes: Pre- vs. post-8 weeks mindfulness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasino, Barbara; Campanella, Fabio; Fabbro, Franco

    2016-02-01

    Mindfulness meditation exercises the ability to shift to an "observer perspective". That means learning to observe internally and externally arising stimulations in a detached perspective. Both before and after attending a 8-weeks mindfulness training (MT) participants underwent an fMRI experiment (serving as their own internal control) and solved a own-body mental transformation task, which is used to investigate embodiment and perspective taking (and an non-bodily mental transformation task as control). We found a stimulus×time-points interaction: the own-body mental transformation task (vs. non-bodily) in the post (vs. pre-MT) significantly increased activations in the medial orbital gyrus. The signal change in the right medial orbital gyrus significantly correlated with changes in a self-maturity personality scale. A brief MT caused increased activation in areas involved in self related processing and person perspective changes, together with an increase in self-maturity, consistently with the aim of mindfulness meditation that is exercising change in self perspective. PMID:26821244

  18. Altered functional connectivity of fusiform gyrus in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a resting state fMRI study

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    Liyu Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual cognition such as face recognition requires a high level of functional interaction between distributed regions of a network. It has been reported that the fusiform gyrus (FG is an important brain area involved in facial cognition; altered connectivity of FG to some other regions may lead to a deficit in visual cognition especially face recognition. However, whether functional connectivity between the FG and other brain regions changes remains unclear during the resting state in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI subjects. Here, we employed a resting state functional MRI (fMRI to examine changes in functional connectivity of left/right FG comparing aMCI patients with age-matched control subjects. Forty-eight aMCI and thirty-eight control subjects from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI were analyzed. We focused on the correlation between low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in the FG and those in all other brain regions. Compared to the control group, we found some discrepant regions in the aMCI group which presented increased or decreased connectivity with the left/right FG including the left precuneus, left lingual gyrus, right thalamus, supramarginal gyrus, left supplementary motor area, left inferior temporal gyrus, and left parahippocampus. More importantly, we also obtained that both left and right FG have increased functional connections with the left middle occipital gyrus (MOG and right anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC in aMCI patients. That was not a coincidence and might imply that the MOG and ACC also play a critical role in visual cognition, especially face recognition. These findings in a large part supported our hypothesis and provided a new insight in understanding the important subtype of MCI.

  19. Response inhibition of face stimuli linked to inferior frontal gyrus microstructure in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Skjold, Jonathan; Baaré, William Frans Christiaan; Jernigan, Terry Lynne; Madsen, Kathrine Skak

    . Inhibition of negative faces has been shown to be more difficult than that of positive faces1,3. The brain network underlying response inhibition includes the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), right presupplementary motor area (preSMA), and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) bilaterally 4–6. The white...... matter underlying these regions continues to develop throughout childhood and adolescence, as indicated by in an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA), possibly reflecting ongoing myelination, and/or increase in axon diameter and density7,8. Here we used an emotional Go/Nogo task to test the hypothesis...... that better response inhibition (i.e. lower false alarm rate) of negative faces would be associated with higher FA in right IFG, right preSMA, and bilateral SLF in adolescents....

  20. BOLD response to motion verbs in left posterior middle temporal gyrus during story comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Vuust, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    A primary focus within neuroimaging research on language comprehension is on the distribution of semantic knowledge in the brain. Studies have shown that the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LPMT), a region just anterior to area MT/V5, is important for the processing of complex action...... knowledge. It has also been found that motion verbs cause activation in LPMT. In this experiment we investigated whether this effect could be replicated in a setting resembling real life language comprehension, i.e. without any overt behavioral task during passive listening to a story. During f......MRI participants listened to a recording of the story ‘‘The Ugly Duckling’’. We incorporated a nuisance elimination regression approach for factoring out known nuisance variables both in terms of physiological noise, sound intensity, linguistic variables and emotional content. Compared to the remaining text...

  1. A case of tactile agnosia with a lesion restricted to the post-central gyrus

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    Estanol Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tactile agnosia has been described after lesions of the primary sensory cortex but the exact location and extension of those lesions is not clear. We report the clinical features and imaging findings in a patient with an acute ischemic stroke restricted to the primary sensory area (S1. A 73-year-old man had a sudden onset of a left alien hand, without left hemiparesis. Neurological examination showed intact primary sensory functions, but impaired recognition of shape, size (macrogeometrical and texture (microgeometrical of objects; damage confined to the post-central gyrus, sparing the posterior parietal cortex was demonstrated on MRI. An embolic occlusion of the anterior parietal artery was suspected as mechanism of stroke. Tactile agnosia with impaired microgeometrical and macrogeometrical features′ recognition can result from a single lesion in the primary sensory cortex (S1 in the right parietal hemisphere, sparing other regions of the cerebral cortex which presumably participate in tactile object recognition.

  2. Asymmetry and sexual dimorphism of the medial frontal gyrus visible surface in humans

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    Spasojević Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Studies of visible (extrasulcal surface of the brain hemispheres are not feasible for measurements of the brain size, but are valuable for analysis and quantification of sexual dimorphism and/or asymmetries of the human brain. Morphological and morphometric investigations of the brain may contribute in genetic studies of the human nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine and to quantify sexual dimorphism and the right/left morphological asymmetry of the visible surface of medial frontal gyrus (gyrus frontalis medialis - GFM. Methods. Measurements and analysis of the visible surface of GFM were done on 84 hemispheres (42 brains from the persons of both sexes: 26 males and 16 females, 20-65 years of age. After fixation in 10% formalin and dissection, digital morphometric measurements were performed. We studied these in relation to the side of the hemisphere and the person's sex. Standardized digital AutoCAD planimetry of the visible surface of GFM was enabled by the use of coordinate system of intercommissural line. Results. In the whole sample, the visible surface of the right GFM (21.39 cm2 was statistically significantly greater (p < 0.05 than the left GFM (18.35 cm2 indicating the right/left asymmetry of the visible surface of GFM. Also, the visible surface of the right GFM in the males (22.66 cm2 was significantly greater (p < 0.05 than in the females (19.35 cm2, while the difference in size of the left GFM between the males and the females was not significant (p > 0.05. Conclusion. Morphological analysis of visible surface of GFM performed by digital planimetry showed sexual dimorphism of the visible surface and the presence of right/left asymmetry of GFM.

  3. Involuntary switching into the native language induced by electrocortical stimulation of the superior temporal gyrus: a multimodal mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasino, Barbara; Marin, Dario; Canderan, Cinzia; Maieron, Marta; Budai, Riccardo; Fabbro, Franco; Skrap, Miran

    2014-09-01

    We describe involuntary language switching from L2 to L1 evoked by electro-stimulation in the superior temporal gyrus in a 30-year-old right-handed Serbian (L1) speaker who was also a late Italian learner (L2). The patient underwent awake brain surgery. Stimulation of other portions of the exposed cortex did not cause language switching as did not stimulation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, where we evoked a speech arrest. Stimulation effects on language switching were selective, namely, interfered with counting behaviour but not with object naming. The coordinates of the positive site were combined with functional and fibre tracking (DTI) data. Results showed that the language switching site belonged to a significant fMRI cluster in the left superior temporal gyrus/supramarginal gyrus found activated for both L1 and L2, and for both the patient and controls, and did not overlap with the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). This area, also known as Stp, has a role in phonological processing. Language switching phenomenon we observed can be partly explained by transient dysfunction of the feed-forward control mechanism hypothesized by the DIVA (Directions Into Velocities of Articulators) model (Golfinopoulos, E., Tourville, J. A., & Guenther, F. H. (2010). The integration of large-scale neural network modeling and functional brain imaging in speech motor control. PMID:25058058

  4. Transient Beneficial Effects of Excitatory Theta Burst Stimulation in a Patient with Phonological Agraphia after Left Supramarginal Gyrus Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zuccoli, Giulio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient showing isolated phonological agraphia after an ischemic stroke involving the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG). In this patient, we investigated the effects of focal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) given as theta burst stimulation (TBS) over the left SMG, corresponding to the Brodmann area (BA) 40. The patient…

  5. Depression-like behaviour in neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-deficient mice and its reversal by an NCAM-derived peptide, FGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Jurgenson, Monika; Zharkovsky, Tamara; Sonn, Katrin; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    in the sucrose preference test, reduced adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and reduced levels of the phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) in the hippocampus. FGL administered acutely or repeatedly reduced depression-like behaviour in NCAM(-/-) mice without having an...

  6. Neurogenesis and the Spacing Effect: Learning over Time Enhances Memory and the Survival of New Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Helene M.; Glass, Arnold L.; Shors, Tracey J.

    2007-01-01

    Information that is spaced over time is better remembered than the same amount of information massed together. This phenomenon, known as the spacing effect, was explored with respect to its effect on learning and neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Because the cells are generated over time and because learning…

  7. Effect of prenatal stress on the expression of Parvalbuminand Calretinin in adult female rat offspring%孕期应激对子代雌鼠成年后钙结合蛋白Parvalbumin和Calretinin表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍校琼; 王岐本; 蔡维君; 罗明英

    2015-01-01

    restraint and ice-water stress. All rats were offered free choice between water and ethanol solution. After model establishment, brain tissues were harvested, the levels of PVand CR proteins in the hippocampus were detected by Western blot. Furthermore, PV and CR expression in hippocampus CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus were determined with confocal immunofluorescence. Results Compared to CON-NS group, the protein of PV and CR in the hippocampus was meaningfully decreased in CON-S, PS-NS and PS-S groups, with the lowest being in the PS-S group. The immunofluorescent results of PV and CR in hippocampus CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus were in agreements with the PV protein expression, which showed obviously decreased positive staining cells. Statistic analysis showed PV and CR expression had a significant difference between CON-NS and other groups, with most significant decrease of expression being in the PS-S group (P<0.05). Coclusion Prenatal stress may directly affect the calcium binding proteins PV and CR in the hippocampus of adult female rat offspring.

  8. Self-reported oral hygiene practices among adults in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Petersen, Poul Erik; Krustrup, Ulla;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the present level of oral hygiene practices in the Danish adult population aged 16 or above, in particular to analyse how self-care practices in terms of oral hygiene habits and cleaning of dentures are affected by socio-economic factors, dental status, actual dental visiting......-administered questionnaires. The response rate was 66%. RESULTS: Toothbrushing twice-a-day was reported by 68% of the dentates while 32% brushed their teeth once-a-day or less frequent. Daily use of toothpicks was reported by 28% while daily use of dental floss was reported by 11%. Oral hygiene habits were more frequent...

  9. Migration of bone marrow progenitor cells in the adult brain of rats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennie, Donnahue; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2016-04-26

    Neurogenesis takes place in the adult mammalian brain in three areas: Subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG); subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle; olfactory bulb. Different molecular markers can be used to characterize the cells involved in adult neurogenesis. It has been recently suggested that a population of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells may migrate to the brain and differentiate into neuronal lineage. To explore this hypothesis, we injected recombinant SV40-derived vectors into the BM and followed the potential migration of the transduced cells. Long-term BM-directed gene transfer using recombinant SV40-derived vectors leads to expression of the genes delivered to the BM firstly in circulating cells, then after several months in mature neurons and microglial cells, and thus without central nervous system (CNS) lesion. Most of transgene-expressing cells expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Thus, BM-derived cells may function as progenitors of CNS cells in adult animals. The mechanism by which the cells from the BM come to be neurons remains to be determined. Although the observed gradual increase in transgene-expressing neurons over 16 mo suggests that the pathway involved differentiation of BM-resident cells into neurons, cell fusion as the principal route cannot be totally ruled out. Additional studies using similar viral vectors showed that BM-derived progenitor cells migrating in the CNS express markers of neuronal precursors or immature neurons. Transgene-positive cells were found in the subgranular zone of the DG of the hippocampus 16 mo after intramarrow injection of the vector. In addition to cells expressing markers of mature neurons, transgene-positive cells were also positive for nestin and doublecortin, molecules expressed by developing neuronal cells. These cells were actively proliferating, as shown by short term BrdU incorporation studies. Inducing seizures by using kainic acid increased the number of BM progenitor cells

  10. Automatic domain-general processing of sound source identity in the left posterior middle frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Bruno L; Pernet, Cyril; Charest, Ian; Belizaire, Guylaine; Zatorre, Robert J; Belin, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    Identifying sound sources is fundamental to developing a stable representation of the environment in the face of variable auditory information. The cortical processes underlying this ability have received little attention. In two fMRI experiments, we investigated passive adaptation to (Exp. 1) and explicit discrimination of (Exp. 2) source identities for different categories of auditory objects (voices, musical instruments, environmental sounds). All cortical effects of source identity were independent of high-level category information, and were accounted for by sound-to-sound differences in low-level structure (e.g., loudness). A conjunction analysis revealed that the left posterior middle frontal gyrus (pMFG) adapted to identity repetitions during both passive listening and active discrimination tasks. These results indicate that the comparison of sound source identities in a stream of auditory stimulation recruits the pMFG in a domain-general way, i.e., independent of the sound category, based on information contained in the low-level acoustical structure. pMFG recruitment during both passive listening and explicit identity comparison tasks also suggests its automatic engagement in sound source identity processing. PMID:25038309

  11. Enhanced spontaneous functional connectivity of the superior temporal gyrus in early deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hao; Ming, Dong; Wan, Baikun; Li, Qiang; Qin, Wen; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-01-01

    Early auditory deprivation may drive the auditory cortex into cross-modal processing of non-auditory sensory information. In a recent study, we had shown that early deaf subjects exhibited increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) bilaterally during visual spatial working memory; however, the changes in the organization of the STG related spontaneous functional network, and their cognitive relevance are still unknown. To clarify this issue, we applied resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging on 42 early deafness (ED) and 40 hearing controls (HC). We also acquired the visual spatial and numerical n-back working memory (WM) information in these subjects. Compared with hearing subjects, the ED exhibited faster reaction time of visual WM tasks in both spatial and numerical domains. Furthermore, ED subjects exhibited significantly increased functional connectivity between the STG (especially of the right hemisphere) and bilateral anterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulated cortex. Finally, the functional connectivity of STG could predict visual spatial WM performance, even after controlling for numerical WM performance. Our findings suggest that early auditory deprivation can strengthen the spontaneous functional connectivity of STG, which may contribute to the cross-modal involvement of this region in visual working memory. PMID:26984611

  12. Increased BOLD signal in the fusiform gyrus during implicit emotion processing in anorexia nervosa☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonville, Leon; Giampietro, Vincent; Surguladze, Simon; Williams, Steven; Tchanturia, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background The behavioural literature in anorexia nervosa (AN) has suggested impairments in psychosocial functioning and studies using facial expression processing tasks (FEPT) have reported poorer recognition and slower identification of emotions. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used alongside a FEPT, depicting neutral, mildly happy and happy faces, to examine the neural correlates of implicit emotion processing in AN. Participants were instructed to specify the gender of the faces. Levels of depression, anxiety, obsessive–compulsive symptoms and eating disorder behaviour were obtained and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire uncorrelated variables. Results fMRI analysis revealed a greater blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in AN in the right fusiform gyrus to all facial expressions. This response showed a linear increase with the happiness of the facial expression and was found to be stronger in those not taking medication. PCA analysis revealed a single component indicating a greater level of general clinical symptoms. Conclusion Neuroimaging findings would suggest that alterations in implicit emotion processing in AN occur during early perceptual processing of social signals and illustrate greater engagement on the FEPT. The lack of separate components using PCA suggests that the questionnaires used might not be suited as predictive measures. PMID:24501698

  13. Anorexia Nervosa during Adolescence Is Associated with Decreased Gray Matter Volume in the Inferior Frontal Gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi X Fujisawa

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is an eating disorder characterized by the relentless pursuit to lose weight, mostly through self-starvation, and a distorted body image. AN tends to begin during adolescence among women. However, the underlying neural mechanisms related to AN remain unclear. Using voxel-based morphometry based on magnetic resonance imaging scans, we investigated whether the presence of AN was associated with discernible changes in brain morphology. Participants were 20 un-medicated, right-handed patients with early-onset AN and 14 healthy control subjects. Group differences in gray matter volume (GMV were assessed using high-resolution, T1-weighted, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging datasets (3T Trio scanner; Siemens AG and analyzed after controlling for age and total GMV, which was decreased in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG (left IFG: FWE corrected, p < 0.05; right IFG: uncorrected, p < 0.05 of patients with AN. The GMV in the bilateral IFG correlated significantly with current age (left IFG: r = -.481, p < .05; right IFG: r = -.601, p < .01 and was limited to the AN group. We speculate that decreased IFG volume might lead to deficits in executive functioning or inhibitory control within neural reward systems. Precocious or unbalanced neurological trimming within this particular region might be an important factor for the pathogenesis of AN onset.

  14. An interplay of fusiform gyrus and hippocampus enables prototype- and exemplar-based category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Robert K; Güntürkün, Onur; Suchan, Boris

    2016-09-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the contributions of different brain structures to prototype- and exemplar-based category learning using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-eight subjects performed a categorization task in which they had to assign prototypes and exceptions to two different families. This test procedure usually produces different learning curves for prototype and exception stimuli. Our behavioral data replicated these previous findings by showing an initially superior performance for prototypes and typical stimuli and a switch from a prototype-based to an exemplar-based categorization for exceptions in the later learning phases. Since performance varied, we divided participants into learners and non-learners. Analysis of the functional imaging data revealed that the interaction of group (learners vs. non-learners) and block (Block 5 vs. Block 1) yielded an activation of the left fusiform gyrus for the processing of prototypes, and an activation of the right hippocampus for exceptions after learning the categories. Thus, successful prototype- and exemplar-based category learning is associated with activations of complementary neural substrates that constitute object-based processes of the ventral visual stream and their interaction with unique-cue representations, possibly based on sparse coding within the hippocampus. PMID:27233826

  15. Deciphering phonemes from syllables in blood oxygenation level-dependent signals in human superior temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingtian; Hu, Xiaolin; Luo, Huan; Li, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Linguistic units such as phonemes and syllables are important for speech perception. How the brain encodes these units is not well understood. Many neuroimaging studies have found distinct representations of consonant-vowel syllables that shared one phoneme and differed in the other phoneme (e.g. /ba/ and /da/), but it is unclear whether this discrimination ability is due to the neural coding of phonemes or syllables. We combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with multivariate pattern analysis to explore this question. Subjects listened to nine Mandarin syllables in a consonant-vowel form. We successfully decoded phonemes from the syllables based on the blood oxygenation level-dependent signals in the superior temporal gyrus (STG). Specifically, a classifier trained on the cortical patterns elicited by a set of syllables, which contained two phonemes, could distinguish the cortical patterns elicited by other syllables that contained the two phonemes. The results indicated that phonemes have unique representations in the STG. In addition, there was a categorical effect, i.e. the cortical patterns of consonants were similar, and so were the cortical patterns of vowels. Further analysis showed that phonemes exhibited stronger encoding specificity in the mid-STG than in the anterior STG. PMID:26751256

  16. Early-latency categorical speech sound representations in the left inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Jussi; Green, Brannon M; May, Patrick J C; Sams, Mikko; Tiitinen, Hannu; Rauschecker, Josef P; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P

    2016-04-01

    Efficient speech perception requires the mapping of highly variable acoustic signals to distinct phonetic categories. How the brain overcomes this many-to-one mapping problem has remained unresolved. To infer the cortical location, latency, and dependency on attention of categorical speech sound representations in the human brain, we measured stimulus-specific adaptation of neuromagnetic responses to sounds from a phonetic continuum. The participants attended to the sounds while performing a non-phonetic listening task and, in a separate recording condition, ignored the sounds while watching a silent film. Neural adaptation indicative of phoneme category selectivity was found only during the attentive condition in the pars opercularis (POp) of the left inferior frontal gyrus, where the degree of selectivity correlated with the ability of the participants to categorize the phonetic stimuli. Importantly, these category-specific representations were activated at an early latency of 115-140ms, which is compatible with the speed of perceptual phonetic categorization. Further, concurrent functional connectivity was observed between POp and posterior auditory cortical areas. These novel findings suggest that when humans attend to speech, the left POp mediates phonetic categorization through integration of auditory and motor information via the dorsal auditory stream. PMID:26774614

  17. Differential Processing of Consonance and Dissonance within the Human Superior Temporal Gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine eFoo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The auditory cortex is well known to be critical for music perception, including the perception of consonance and dissonance. Studies on the neural correlates of consonance and dissonance perception have largely employed non-invasive electrophysiological and functional imaging techniques in humans as well as neurophysiological recordings in animals, but the fine-grained spatiotemporal dynamics within the human auditory cortex remain unknown. We recorded electrocorticographic (ECoG signals directly from the lateral surface of either the left or right temporal lobe of 8 patients undergoing neurosurgical treatment as they passively listened to highly consonant and highly dissonant musical chords. We assessed ECoG activity in the high gamma (γhigh, 70-150 Hz frequency range within the superior temporal gyrus (STG and observed two types of cortical sites of interest in both hemispheres: one type showed no significant difference in γhigh activity between consonant and dissonant chords, and another type showed increased γhigh responses to dissonant chords between 75-200ms post-stimulus onset. Furthermore, a subset of these sites exhibited additional sensitivity towards different types of dissonant chords. We also observed a distinct spatial organization of cortical sites in the right STG, with dissonant-sensitive sites located anterior to non-sensitive sites. In sum, these findings demonstrate differential processing of consonance and dissonance in bilateral STG with the right hemisphere exhibiting robust and spatially organized sensitivity towards dissonance.

  18. Reduced Hippocampal Dentate Cell Proliferation and Impaired Spatial Memory Performance in Aged-Epileptic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    LucieneCovolan; ClaudioM TQueiroz; JairGuilhermeSantos; GilbertoFXavier

    2013-01-01

    Increased adult neurogenesis is observed after training in hippocampal-dependent tasks and also after acutely induced status epilepticus (SE) although the specific roles of these cells are still a matter of debate. In this study, we investigated hippocampal cell proliferation and differentiation and the spatial learning performance in young or aged chronically epileptic rats. Status was induced by pilocarpine in 3 or 20-month old rats. Either two or twenty months later, rats were treated with...

  19. Altered functional connectivity of fusiform gyrus in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a resting state fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Liyu Huang

    2015-01-01

    Visual cognition such as face recognition requires a high level of functional interaction between distributed regions of a network. It has been reported that the fusiform gyrus (FG) is an important brain area involved in facial cognition; altered connectivity of FG to some other regions may lead to a deficit in visual cognition especially face recognition. However, whether functional connectivity between the FG and other brain regions changes remains unclear during the resting state in amnest...

  20. Perturbation of the left inferior frontal gyrus triggers adaptive plasticity in the right homologous area during speech production

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Saur, Dorothee; Price, Cathy J; Ulmer, Stephan; Baumgaertner, Annette; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the right hemisphere in aphasia recovery is unclear. We demonstrate that a virtual lesion of left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) decreased activity in the targeted area and increased activity in the contralateral homologous area during pseudoword repetition. This was associated with a stronger facilitatory drive from the right IFG to the left IFG. Importantly, responses became faster with increased influence of the right IFG on the left IFG. Our results shed new light on the dynamic...

  1. A rostro-caudal gradient of structured sequence processing in the left inferior frontal gyrus [Review article

    OpenAIRE

    Udden, J.; Bahlmann, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present two novel perspectives on the function of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). First, a structured sequence processing perspective facilitates the search for functional segregation within the LIFG and provides a way to express common aspects across cognitive domains including language, music and action. Converging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies suggests that the LIFG is engaged in sequential proces...

  2. A genome wide search for quantitative trait loci affecting the cortical surface area and thickness of Heschl's gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, D.; Fonteijn, H.; Guadalupe, T.; Zwiers, M.; Wittfeld, K; Teumer, A; Hoogman, M.; Arias Vásquez, A; Yang, Y; Buitelaar, J.; Fernández, G.; Brunner, H.; van Bokhoven, H; Franke, B.; Hegenscheid, K

    2014-01-01

    Heschl's gyrus (HG) is a core region of the auditory cortex whose morphology is highly variable across individuals. This variability has been linked to sound perception ability in both speech and music domains. Previous studies show that variations in morphological features of HG, such as cortical surface area and thickness, are heritable. To identify genetic variants that affect HG morphology, we conducted a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis in 3054 healthy individuals using ...

  3. Inferior frontal gyrus preserves working memory and emotional learning under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eBecker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Compensation has been widely applied to explain neuroimaging findings in neuropsychiatric patients. Functional compensation is often invoked when patients display equal performance and increased neural activity in comparison to healthy controls. According to the compensatory hypothesis increased activity allows the brain to maintain cognitive performance despite underlying neuropathological changes. Due to methodological and pathology-related issues, however, the functional relevance of the increased activity and the specific brain regions involved in the compensatory response remain unclear. An experimental approach that allows a transient induction of compensatory responses in the healthy brain could help to overcome these issues. To this end we used the nonselective beta-blocker propranolol to pharmacologically induce sub-optimal noradrenergic signaling in healthy participants. In two independent fMRI experiments participants received either placebo or propranolol before they underwent a cognitive challenge (experiment 1: working memory; experiment 2: emotional learning: Pavlovian fear conditioning. In experiment 1 propranolol had no effects on working memory performance, but evoked stronger activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG. In experiment 2 propranolol produced no effects on emotional memory formation, but evoked stronger activity in the right IFG. The present finding that sub-optimal beta-adrenergic signaling did not disrupt performance and concomitantly increased IFG activity is consistent with, and extends, current perspectives on functional compensation. Together, our findings suggest that under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling, heightened activity in brain regions located within the cognitive control network, particularly the IFG, may reflect compensatory operations subserving the maintenance of behavioral performance.

  4. Differential Processing of Consonance and Dissonance within the Human Superior Temporal Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Francine; King-Stephens, David; Weber, Peter; Laxer, Kenneth; Parvizi, Josef; Knight, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    The auditory cortex is well-known to be critical for music perception, including the perception of consonance and dissonance. Studies on the neural correlates of consonance and dissonance perception have largely employed non-invasive electrophysiological and functional imaging techniques in humans as well as neurophysiological recordings in animals, but the fine-grained spatiotemporal dynamics within the human auditory cortex remain unknown. We recorded electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals directly from the lateral surface of either the left or right temporal lobe of eight patients undergoing neurosurgical treatment as they passively listened to highly consonant and highly dissonant musical chords. We assessed ECoG activity in the high gamma (γhigh, 70-150 Hz) frequency range within the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and observed two types of cortical sites of interest in both hemispheres: one type showed no significant difference in γhigh activity between consonant and dissonant chords, and another type showed increased γhigh responses to dissonant chords between 75 and 200 ms post-stimulus onset. Furthermore, a subset of these sites exhibited additional sensitivity towards different types of dissonant chords, and a positive correlation between changes in γhigh power and the degree of stimulus roughness was observed in both hemispheres. We also observed a distinct spatial organization of cortical sites in the right STG, with dissonant-sensitive sites located anterior to non-sensitive sites. In sum, these findings demonstrate differential processing of consonance and dissonance in bilateral STG with the right hemisphere exhibiting robust and spatially organized sensitivity toward dissonance. PMID:27148011

  5. A role of right middle frontal gyrus in reorienting of attention: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Japee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The right middle fontal gyrus (MFG has been proposed to be a site of convergence of the dorsal and ventral attention networks, by serving as a circuit-breaker, to interrupt ongoing endogenous processes in the dorsal network, and reorienting a person’s attention to an exogenous stimulus. Here, we probed the contribution of the right MFG to both endogenous and exogenous attention by comparing performance on an orientation discrimination task of a patient with a right MFG resection and a group of healthy controls. On endogenously cued trials, participants were shown a central cue that predicted with 90% accuracy the location of a subsequent peri-threshold Gabor patch stimulus. On exogenously cued trials, a cue appeared briefly at one of two peripheral locations, followed by a variable inter-stimulus interval (ISI; range 0 to 700 ms and a Gabor patch in the same or opposite location as the cue. Behavioral data showed that for endogenous, and short ISI exogenous trials, valid cues facilitated faster responses compared to invalid cues, for both the patient and controls. However, at long ISIs, the patient exhibited difficulty in reverting back to top-down attentional control, once the facilitatory effect of the exogenous cue had dissipated. When explicitly cued during long ISIs to attend to both stimulus locations, the patient was able to re-engage successfully in top-down control. This result indicates that the right MFG may play an important role in reorienting attention from exogenous to endogenous control. Resting state fMRI data revealed that the right superior parietal lobule and right orbitofrontal cortex, showed significantly higher correlations with a left MFG seed region (a region tightly coupled with the resected region in controls in the patient relative to controls. We hypothesize that this paradoxical increase in cortical coupling represents a compensatory mechanism to offset the loss of function of the resected tissue in right

  6. Structural, functional, and perceptual differences in Heschl's gyrus and musical instrument preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Peter; Sluming, Vanessa; Roberts, Neil; Bleeck, Stefan; Rupp, André

    2005-12-01

    The musical pitch of harmonic complex sounds, such as instrumental sounds, is perceived primarily by decoding either the fundamental pitch (keynote) or spectral aspects of the stimuli, for example, single harmonics. We divided 334 professional musicians, including symphony orchestra musicians, 75 amateur musicians, and 54 nonmusicians, into either fundamental pitch listeners or spectral pitch listeners. We observed a strong correlation between pitch perception preference and asymmetry of brain structure and function in the pitch-sensitive lateral areas of Heschl's gyrus (HG), irrespective of musical ability. In particular, fundamental pitch listeners exhibited both larger gray matter volume measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and enhanced P50m activity measured using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in the left lateral HG, which is sensitive to rapid temporal processing. Their chosen instruments were percussive or high-pitched instruments that produce short, sharp, or impulsive tones (e.g., drums, guitar, piano, trumpet, or flute). By contrast, spectral pitch listeners exhibited a dominant right lateral HG, which is known to be sensitive to slower temporal and spectral processing. Their chosen instruments were lower-pitched melodic instruments that produce rather sustained tones with characteristic changes in timbre (e.g., bassoon, saxophone, french horn, violoncello, or organ). Singers also belonged to the spectral pitch listeners. Furthermore, the absolute size of the neural HG substrate depended strongly on musical ability. Overall, it is likely that both magnitude and asymmetry of lateral HG, and the related perceptual mode, may have an impact on preference for particular musical instruments and on musical performance. PMID:16597790

  7. Right supramarginal gyrus is crucial to overcome emotional egocentricity bias in social judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silani, Giorgia; Lamm, Claus; Ruff, Christian C; Singer, Tania

    2013-09-25

    Humans tend to use the self as a reference point to perceive the world and gain information about other people's mental states. However, applying such a self-referential projection mechanism in situations where it is inappropriate can result in egocentrically biased judgments. To assess egocentricity bias in the emotional domain (EEB), we developed a novel visuo-tactile paradigm assessing the degree to which empathic judgments are biased by one's own emotions if they are incongruent to those of the person we empathize with. A first behavioral experiment confirmed the existence of such EEB, and two independent fMRI experiments revealed that overcoming biased empathic judgments is associated with increased activation in the right supramarginal gyrus (rSMG), in a location distinct from activations in right temporoparietal junction reported in previous social cognition studies. Using temporary disruption of rSMG with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation resulted in a substantial increase of EEB, and so did reducing visuo-tactile stimulation time as shown in an additional behavioral experiment. Our findings provide converging evidence from multiple methods and experiments that rSMG is crucial for overcoming emotional egocentricity. Effective connectivity analyses suggest that this may be achieved by early perceptual regulation processes disambiguating proprioceptive first-person information (touch) from exteroceptive third-person information (vision) during incongruency between self- and other-related affective states. Our study extends previous models of social cognition. It shows that although shared neural networks may underlie emotional understanding in some situations, an additional mechanism subserved by rSMG is needed to avoid biased social judgments in other situations. PMID:24068815

  8. Altered resting-state functional connectivity of the insula in young adults with Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Tao; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Li, Chiang-Shan R; Zang, Yu-Feng; Shen, Zi-Jiao; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The insula has been implicated in salience processing, craving, and interoception, all of which are critical to the clinical manifestations of drug and behavioral addiction. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we examined resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the insula and its association with Internet gaming characteristics in 74 young adults with Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and 41 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects (HCs). In comparison with HCs, IGD subjects (IGDs) exhibited enhanced rsFC between the anterior insula and a network of regions including anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), putamen, angular gyrus, and precuneous, which are involved in salience, craving, self-monitoring, and attention. IGDs also demonstrated significantly stronger rsFC between the posterior insula and postcentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplemental motor area, and superior temporal gyrus (STG), which are involved in interoception, movement control, and auditory processing. Furthermore, IGD severity was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and angular gyrus, and STG, and with connectivity between the posterior insula and STG. Duration of Internet gaming was positively associated with connectivity between the anterior insula and ACC. These findings highlight a key role of the insula in manifestation of the core symptoms of IGD and the importance to examine functional abnormalities of the anterior and posterior insula separately in IGDs. PMID:25899520

  9. 1,2,4-Triazine-picolinamide functionalized, nona-dentate chelates for the segregation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) in biphasic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel family of nona-dentate ligands based on the (5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-picolinamide donor moiety has been synthesized from simple starting materials in high yield and purity. This group of ligands is an addition to the neutral nona-dentate group but the first to incorporate 1,2,4-triazine. Their ability to extract a select group of lanthanides from acidic aqueous solution has been correlated to their ability to meet the ideal trigonal tri-capped prismatic geometry that is seen by lanthanides and actinides in aqueous solution. The rate of metallation was determined using UV/VIS spectroscopy with pseudo first order conditions and showed similar behaviour to literature examples. Theoretical calculations were used to probe the bonding structure with lanthanides and actinides to predict the potential Ln/An segregating ability of the new ligands. (authors)

  10. Differential activity in left inferior frontal gyrus for pseudo and real words: an event-related functional MRI study on auditory lexical decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study lexical processing of pseudo words and real words by using a fast event-related functional MRI (ER-fMRI) design. Methods: Participants did an auditory lexical decision task on a list of pseudo-randomly intermixed real and pseudo Chinese two-character (or two-syllable) words. Pseudo words were constructed by recombining constituent characters of the real words to control for sublexical codes properties. Results: The behavioral performance of fourteen participants indicated that response to pseudowords was significantly slower and less accurate than to real words (mean error rate: 9.9% versus 3.9%, mean reaction time: 1618 ms versus 1143 ms). Processing of pseudo words and real words activated a highly comparable network of brain regions, including bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, superior, middle temporal gyrus, calcarine and lingual gyrus, and left supramarginal gyrus. Mirroring a behavioral lexical effect, left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was significantly more activated for pseudo words than for real words. Conclusion: The results indicate that the processing of left inferior frontal gyrus in judging pseudo words and real words is not related to grapheme-to-phoneme conversion, but rather to making positive versus negative responses in decision making. (authors)

  11. Connectivity differences between adult male and female patients with attention deifcit hyperactivity disorder according to resting-state functional MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-yong Park; Hyunjin Park

    2016-01-01

    Attention deifcit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a pervasive psychiatric disorder that affects both chil-dren and adults. Adult male and female patients with ADHD are differentially affected, but few studies have explored the differences. The purpose of this study was to quantify differences between adult male and female patients with ADHD based on neuroimaging and connectivity analysis. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained and preprocessed in 82 patients. Group-wise differences between male and female patients were quantiifed using degree centrality for different brain regions. The medial-, middle-, and inferior-frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, precuneus, supramarginal gyrus, superior- and middle-temporal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and cuneus were identiifed as regions with signiifcant group-wise differences. The identiifed regions were correlated with clinical scores relfecting de-pression and anxiety and signiifcant correlations were found. Adult ADHD patients exhibit different levels of depression and anxiety depending on sex, and our study provides insight into how changes in brain cir-cuitry might differentially impact male and female ADHD patients.

  12. Connectivity differences between adult male and female patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder according to resting-state functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-yong Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a pervasive psychiatric disorder that affects both children and adults. Adult male and female patients with ADHD are differentially affected, but few studies have explored the differences. The purpose of this study was to quantify differences between adult male and female patients with ADHD based on neuroimaging and connectivity analysis. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained and preprocessed in 82 patients. Group-wise differences between male and female patients were quantified using degree centrality for different brain regions. The medial-, middle-, and inferior-frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, precuneus, supramarginal gyrus, superior- and middle-temporal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and cuneus were identified as regions with significant group-wise differences. The identified regions were correlated with clinical scores reflecting depression and anxiety and significant correlations were found. Adult ADHD patients exhibit different levels of depression and anxiety depending on sex, and our study provides insight into how changes in brain circuitry might differentially impact male and female ADHD patients.

  13. Gadolinium deposition within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents - current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used clinically since 1988 for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Generally, GBCAs are considered to have an excellent safety profile. However, GBCA administration has been associated with increased occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with severely compromised renal function, and several studies have shown evidence of gadolinium deposition in specific brain structures, the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus, in patients with normal renal function. Gadolinium deposition in the brain following repeated CE-MRI scans has been demonstrated in patients using T1-weighted unenhanced MRI and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Additionally, rodent studies with controlled GBCA administration also resulted in neural gadolinium deposits. Repeated GBCA use is associated with gadolinium deposition in the brain. This is especially true with the use of less-stable, linear GBCAs. In spite of increasing evidence of gadolinium deposits in the brains of patients after multiple GBCA administrations, the clinical significance of these deposits continues to be unclear. Here, we discuss the current state of scientific evidence surrounding gadolinium deposition in the brain following GBCA use, and the potential clinical significance of gadolinium deposition. There is considerable need for further research, both to understand the mechanism by which gadolinium deposition in the brain occurs and how it affects the patients in which it occurs. (orig.)

  14. Kamin blocking is associated with reduced medial-frontal gyrus activation: implications for prediction error abnormality in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M Moran

    Full Text Available The following study used 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate the neural signature of Kamin blocking. Kamin blocking is an associative learning phenomenon seen where prior association of a stimulus (A with an outcome blocks subsequent learning to an added stimulus (B when both stimuli are later presented together (AB with the same outcome. While there are a number of theoretical explanations of Kamin blocking, it is widely considered to exemplify the use of prediction error in learning, where learning occurs in proportion to the difference between expectation and outcome. In Kamin blocking as stimulus A fully predicts the outcome no prediction error is generated by the addition of stimulus B to form the compound stimulus AB, hence learning about it is "blocked". Kamin blocking is disrupted in people with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy individuals with high psychometrically-defined schizotypy. This disruption supports suggestions that abnormal prediction error is a core deficit that can help to explain the symptoms of schizophrenia. The present study tested 9 healthy volunteers on an f-MRI adaptation of Oades' "mouse in the house task", the only task measuring Kamin blocking that shows disruption in schizophrenia patients that has been independently replicated. Participant's Kamin blocking scores were found to inversely correlate with Kamin-blocking-related activation within the prefrontal cortex, specifically the medial frontal gyrus. The medial frontal gyrus has been associated with the psychological construct of uncertainty, which we suggest is consistent with disrupted Kamin blocking and demonstrated in people with schizophrenia. These data suggest that the medial frontal gyrus merits further investigation as a potential locus of reduced Kamin blocking and abnormal prediction error in schizophrenia.

  15. Exploring the role of the posterior middle temporal gyrus in semantic cognition: Integration of anterior temporal lobe with executive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, James; Thompson, Hannah E; Hallam, Glyn; Karapanagiotidis, Theodoros; Murphy, Charlotte; De Caso, Irene; Krieger-Redwood, Katya; Bernhardt, Boris C; Smallwood, Jonathan; Jefferies, Elizabeth

    2016-08-15

    Making sense of the world around us depends upon selectively retrieving information relevant to our current goal or context. However, it is unclear whether selective semantic retrieval relies exclusively on general control mechanisms recruited in demanding non-semantic tasks, or instead on systems specialised for the control of meaning. One hypothesis is that the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) is important in the controlled retrieval of semantic (not non-semantic) information; however this view remains controversial since a parallel literature links this site to event and relational semantics. In a functional neuroimaging study, we demonstrated that an area of pMTG implicated in semantic control by a recent meta-analysis was activated in a conjunction of (i) semantic association over size judgements and (ii) action over colour feature matching. Under these circumstances the same region showed functional coupling with the inferior frontal gyrus - another crucial site for semantic control. Structural and functional connectivity analyses demonstrated that this site is at the nexus of networks recruited in automatic semantic processing (the default mode network) and executively demanding tasks (the multiple-demand network). Moreover, in both task and task-free contexts, pMTG exhibited functional properties that were more similar to ventral parts of inferior frontal cortex, implicated in controlled semantic retrieval, than more dorsal inferior frontal sulcus, implicated in domain-general control. Finally, the pMTG region was functionally correlated at rest with other regions implicated in control-demanding semantic tasks, including inferior frontal gyrus and intraparietal sulcus. We suggest that pMTG may play a crucial role within a large-scale network that allows the integration of automatic retrieval in the default mode network with executively-demanding goal-oriented cognition, and that this could support our ability to understand actions and non

  16. Adult Strabismus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Adult Strabismus En Español Read in Chinese Can anything be done for adults with strabismus (misaligned eyes)? Yes. Adults can benefit ...

  17. 牦牛海马的形态特征及成体神经发生的初探%Morphological characteristics and the first examination of adult neurogenesis of the hippocampus in yak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许文强; 徐鑫佳; 范力; 邵虹; 刘兵峰; 邵宝平; 王建林; 赵善廷

    2012-01-01

    The morphology and cell types of the hippocampus in adult yak were examined by the traditional staining of H. E and Golgi-Cox, and the neural stem cells and newborn neurons which located in Subgranular zone ( SGZ) of the dentate gyms were observed with Diaminobenzidine ( DAB) immunoperoxidase staining and immunofluorescence double-labeling for Doublecortin and Neuronal Nuclei (DCX/NeuN) , Glial fibrillary acid protein and Neuronal Nuclei (GFAP/NeuN). Our data indicate that the yak' s hippcampus mainly contains dentate gyrus and hippocampus proper, and both of them stratify clearly. Granular cells, mossy cells and pyramidal cells are the three major cell types of the hippocampus formation. The soma of pyramidal cells in the CA3 region is much bigger than in the CA1 region, while the latter has an average length of apical dendrites longer than the former. The pyramidal cells contain distinctive sublayers in the CA1 regions, but form a close uniform layer in the CA3 region. The somas of most DCX-positive cells, which distribute individually or in clusters, mainly locate in the deepest part of the granule cell layer closing to the hilus. A layer of GFAP-expressing radial glia-like cells is observed in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, and its cytoplasms and single polarity processes, but not nucleus, are GFAP-positive. A large number of star GFAP-positive cells is scattered throughout the hippocampus. Specially , the densities of GFAP-positive cells in the molecular layer and the boundary of the hilus closing to the granular layer are much higher than those in other zones. The morphological characteristics of the hippocampus in yak is similar to those observed in sheep, but differ from those reported in small mammals, such as rats, mice, cats, and rabbits. Finally, the DCX immunostaining indicates the presence of the newborn neurons in yak' s hippocampus. The immunofluorescence labe-ling for GFAP also indicates the astrocytes, especially radial glia, in the

  18. Fabrication and characterization of a novel microparticle with gyrus-patterned surface and growth factor delivery for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the expanded cells to the site of the defect. It was hypothesized that a novel microparticle combined of sustained and localized delivery of proliferative growth factors and gyrus-patterned surface would influence the cell behaviours of adherence and expansion on the microparticle in the present study. To test the hypothesis, gelatin particles with diameter ranging from 280 to 350 μm were fabricated and were modified by cryogenic freeze-drying treatment and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) incorporation. The results of in vitro chondrocyte culture illustrated that cells could proliferate more obviously on the microparticles with bFGF addition, but no correlation between attachment rate and bFGF was observed. On the other hand, microparticles with gyrus-patterned surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment rate and higher rate of cell growth, in particular on bFGF combined ones. It seems to be a promising candidate as a chondrocyte microparticle and could be the potential application in cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junhua; Chen, Keliang; Chen, Yan; Fang, Yuxing; Yang, Qing; Lv, Yingru; Lin, Nan; Bi, Yanchao; Guo, Qihao; Han, Zaizhu

    2016-01-01

    Given that extensive cerebral regions are co-atrophic in semantic dementia (SD), it is not yet known which critical regions (SD-semantic-critical regions) are really responsible for the semantic deficits of SD. To identify the SD-semantic-critical regions, we explored the relationship between the degree of cerebral atrophy in the whole brain and the severity of semantic deficits in 19 individuals with SD. We found that the gray matter volumes (GMVs) of two regions [left fusiform gyrus (lFFG) and left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG)] significantly correlated with the semantic scores of patients with SD. Importantly, the effects of the lFFG remained significant after controlling for the GMVs of the lPHG. Moreover, the effects of the region could not be accounted for by the total GMV, general cognitive ability, laterality of brain atrophy, or control task performance. We further observed that each atrophic portion of the lFFG along the anterior–posterior axis might dedicate to the loss of semantic functions in SD. These results reveal that the lFFG could be a critical region contributing to the semantic deficits of SD.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of a novel microparticle with gyrus-patterned surface and growth factor delivery for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Yijuan [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Liang Tang [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin Fang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Liu Shouxin [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Jin Yan, E-mail: yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2009-05-05

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the expanded cells to the site of the defect. It was hypothesized that a novel microparticle combined of sustained and localized delivery of proliferative growth factors and gyrus-patterned surface would influence the cell behaviours of adherence and expansion on the microparticle in the present study. To test the hypothesis, gelatin particles with diameter ranging from 280 to 350 {mu}m were fabricated and were modified by cryogenic freeze-drying treatment and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) incorporation. The results of in vitro chondrocyte culture illustrated that cells could proliferate more obviously on the microparticles with bFGF addition, but no correlation between attachment rate and bFGF was observed. On the other hand, microparticles with gyrus-patterned surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment rate and higher rate of cell growth, in particular on bFGF combined ones. It seems to be a promising candidate as a chondrocyte microparticle and could be the potential application in cartilage tissue engineering.