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Sample records for adult congenital heart

  1. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  2. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr 24,2014 From the Committee on ... below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: Adults with Congenital Heart Defects Introduction: ...

  3. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was used to assess mortality pre

  4. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regressio

  5. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation.

  6. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...

  7. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-02-22

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes.

  8. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce.

  9. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  10. A review of the economics of adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckeler, Michael D; Thomas, Ian D; Andrews, Jennifer; Joiner, Keith; Klewer, Scott E

    2016-01-01

    Adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) now outnumber children with the disease. Thanks to medical advances over the past 75 years, many of these fatal childhood heart problems have changed to chronic medical conditions. As the population of adults with CHD increases, they will require increasingly complex medical, surgical and catheter-based therapies. In addition, social burdens including education, employment and insurability, which increase the societal costs of adult CHD, are now being recognized for adults living with CHD. This review summarizes the available literature on the economics of adult CHD.

  11. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease.

  12. Sports participation in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); Domburg, R.V. (Ron Van); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); H. Boersma (Eric); Pelliccia, A. (Antonio); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: It is unclearwhether sports participation in adultswith repaired congenital heart disease is safe and has benefits. Methods: Congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients who underwent corrective surgery for Atrial Septal Defect, Ventricular Septal Defect, Pulmonary Stenosis, Tet

  13. Clinical features of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome associated with different types of congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈果

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical features and hemodynamics of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in different types of congenital heart diseases (CHD) .Methods Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome with different types of CHD diagnosed by right heart

  14. Adolescents and Adults with Congenital Heart Diseases in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Al-Balushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of our study was to examine the spectrum, demographics, and mortality rate among adolescents and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHD in Oman. Methods: Data was collected retrospectively from the Royal Hospital, Muscat, electronic health records for all patients with a diagnosis of CHD aged 13 years and above. Data was analyzed according to the type of CHD and in-hospital mortality was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results: A total of 600 patients with CHD were identified, among them 145 (24% were aged 18 years or below. The median age was 24 years. The majority of patients had a simple form of CHD. Atrial and ventricular septal defects together constituted 62.8% of congenital heart diseases. Most patients were clustered in Muscat (32% and the Batinah regions (31.1% of Oman. Patients with tetralogy of Fallot and Fontan had shorter survival time than recorded in the published literature. Conclusion: Mostly simple forms of CHD in younger patients was observed. The survival rate was significantly shortened in more complex lesions compared to simple lesions. A national data registry for CHD is needed to address the morbidities and mortality associated with the disease.

  15. Genetic counseling in the adult with congenital heart disease: what is the role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke; Greenway, Steven; Silversides, Candice K; Mital, Seema

    2011-08-01

    New discoveries using high-resolution methods for detecting genetic aberrations indicate that the genetic contribution to congenital heart disease has been significantly underestimated in the past. DNA diagnostics have become more accessible and genetic test results are increasingly being used to guide clinical management. Adult congenital heart disease specialists seeking to counsel adults with congenital heart disease about the genetic aspects of their condition face the challenge of keeping abreast of new genetic techniques and discoveries. The emphasis of this review is on the genetic basis of structural cardiovascular defects. A framework for identifying adult congenital heart disease patients most likely to benefit from genetic testing is suggested, along with a summary of current techniques for genetic testing. The clinical and ethical challenges associated with genetic counseling are highlighted. Finally, emerging technologies and future directions in genetics and adult congenital heart disease are discussed.

  16. Transfer to Adult Care--Experiences of Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, Ann; Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of children born with congenital heart disease survive into adulthood due to successes of cardiac surgery and medical management. Interviews with 16 young adults with congenital heart disease to explore their experiences of transfer from pediatric to adult care were performed. The analysis identified five themes; Feeling secure during the transfer process, Experiencing trust in the care, Expecting to be involved, Assuming responsibility for one's health is a process and Lack of knowledge leads to uncertainty. In conclusion; a structured and gradual transfer process was necessary to enable the informants to shoulder the responsibility for self-care.

  17. Risks and Benefits of Exercise Training in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie-A; Marcotte, François; Dore, Annie; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Mondésert, Blandine; Mercier, Lise-Andrée; Khairy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Exercise capacity in adults with various forms of congenital heart disease is substantially lower than that of the general population. Although the underlying congenital heart defect, and its sequelae, certainly contribute to observed exercise limitations, there is evidence suggesting that deconditioning and a sedentary lifestyle are important implicated factors. The prevalence of acquired cardiovascular comorbidities is on the increase in the aging population with congenital heart disease, such that obesity and a sedentary lifestyle confer increased risk. Health fears and misconceptions are common barriers to regular physical activity in adults with congenital heart disease, despite evidence linking lower functional capacity to poor outcomes, and data supporting the safety and efficacy of exercise in bestowing numerous physical and psychosocial rewards. With few exceptions, adults with congenital heart disease should be counselled to exercise regularly. In this contemporary review, we provide a practical approach to assessing adults with congenital heart disease before exercise training. We examine available evidence supporting the safety and benefits of exercise training. Risks associated with exercise training in adults with congenital heart disease are discussed, particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death. Finally, recommendations for exercise training are provided, with consideration for the type of congenital heart disease, the nature (ie, static vs dynamic) and intensity (ie, low, medium, high) of the physical activity, and associated factors such as systemic ventricular dysfunction and residual defects. Further research is required to determine optimal exercise regimens and to identify effective strategies to implement exercise training as a key determinant of healthy living.

  18. [Perspectives in the management of congenital heart defects in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartyánszky, István; Varga, Sándor; Havasi, Kálmán; Babik, Barna; Katona, Márta; Bogáts, Gábor

    2015-01-18

    Due to improving results in congenital heart surgery, the number of adult patients with congenital heart defect is increasing. The question is: what kind of problems can be managed in this patient-group? The authors review the different problems of management of congenital heart defects in adults based on national and international literature data. Simple defects recognised in adults, postoperative residual problems, changing of small grafts and valves, correction of primary or operated coarctation aortae can be usually managed without problems. A very close follow-up is necessary to establish the correct period for heart transplantation in patients with transposition of great arteries with Senning/Mustard operation, and univentricular heart corrected with "Fontan-circulation" type surgical procedure. The authors conclude that although the number of patients increases, only a few congenital heart diseases may cause problems. It seems important (1) to monitor asymptomatic patient who underwent operation (Fallot-IV, Ross procedure, etc.), (2) follow up regularly patients who underwent Senning/Mustard procedure (magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, brain natriuretic peptide measurement), (3) define the proper period of preparation for heart transplantation of patients with a univentricular heart, with special attention to the possibility of multiorgan (lung, liver, etc.) failure. Due to the improvement of foetal diagnosis of congenital heart defects, the number of patients with complex congenital heart defects is decreasing. The standard management of these patients could be primary heart transplantation in infancy.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases as candidate biomarkers in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggen, Vivan J M; Eindhoven, Jannet A; van den Bosch, Annemien E; Witsenburg, Maarten; Cuypers, Judith A A E; Langstraat, Jannette S; Boersma, Eric; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-07-01

    Context Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are associated with diastolic dysfunction and heart failure in acquired heart disease. Objective To investigate the role of MMPs as novel biomarkers in clinically stable adults with congenital heart disease. Methods We measured serum MMP-2, -3, -9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in 425 patients and analysed the association with cardiac function and exercise capacity. Results MMP-2 was significantly associated with exercise capacity, ventilatory efficiency and left ventricular deceleration time, independently of age, sex, body surface area and NT-proBNP. Conclusion MMP-2 may provide new information in the clinical evaluation of adults with congenital heart disease.

  20. Congenital heart defects and medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehin, Connie; Ragsdale, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists perform imaging studies that are useful in the diagnosis of congenital heart defects in infants and adults. These studies also help to monitor congenital heart defect repairs in adults. This article describes the development and functional anatomy of the heart, along with the epidemiology and anatomy of congenital heart defects. It also discusses the increasing population of adults who have congenital heart defects and the most effective modalities for diagnosing, evaluating, and monitoring congenital heart defects.

  1. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease: The who, the when and the how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B; Vejlstrup, N; Sondergaard, L

    2015-03-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events. It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts. Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable recommendations for which patients are likely to benefit from which anticoagulation treatments, when they should be considered and how these would be carried out.

  2. Theory of mind deficit in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavarino, Claudia; Bianchino, Claudia; Brach-Prever, Silvia; Riggi, Chiara; Palumbo, Luigi; Bara, Bruno G; Bosco, Francesca M

    2015-10-01

    This article provides the first assessment of theory of mind, that is, the ability to reason about mental states, in adult patients with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease and matched healthy controls were administered classical theory of mind tasks and a semi-structured interview which provides a multidimensional evaluation of theory of mind (Theory of Mind Assessment Scale). The patients with congenital heart disease performed worse than the controls on the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale, whereas they did as well as the control group on the classical theory-of-mind tasks. These findings provide the first evidence that adults with congenital heart disease may display specific impairments in theory of mind.

  3. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Silversides, Candice K.; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and mult...

  4. Heart failure treatment in adults with congenital heart disease: where do we stand in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Valente, Anne Marie

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in adults with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). However there is currently little evidence to guide treatment strategies in this growing group of patients. Unlike the majority of HF, which is usually caused by LV systolic or diastolic dysfunction, CHD-HF is more often a consequence of RV disease, valve dysfunction, shunting or pulmonary hypertension. It is therefore not appropriate to extrapolate from the acquired HF literature and apply it to this heterogeneous population of CHD patients. Additionally, patients with CHD have been excluded from most large trials of medical or device therapy of HF, which has resulted in small retrospective and underpowered studies in the CHD population. This article critically reviews the current knowledge about CHD-HF, paying particular attention to medical therapy in different CHD populations, cardiac resynchronisation therapy and implantable cardiac defibrillators, and the challenges of heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support in CHD patients.

  5. Orthotropic heart transplantation for adult congenital heart disease: a case with heterotaxy and dextrocardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hikaru; Fukushima, Norihide; Ichikawa, Hajime; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    A 41-year-old male with heterotaxy (left isomerism) and dextrocardia composed by single ventricle, absent inferior vena cava, bilateral superior vena cava (SVC), common atrioventricular valve has received orthotopic heart transplantation (HTx) after long waiting period as Status-1. Reconstructions of bilateral SVC and hepatic vein route were successful without use of prosthetic material, and the donor heart was placed in the left mediastinum. In spite of satisfactory early recovery, the patient expired 4 months after transplantation mainly from fungal infection which developed following humoral rejection. HTx for adult patients with complex congenital heart disease is demanding in technical as well as pre- and post-transplant management, and indication should be critically determined.

  6. Mobile health in adults with congenital heart disease: Current use and future needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.; A. Backx (Ad); Zwart, R.; Veelenturf, A.H.; D. Robbers-Visser (Daniëlle); M. Groenink (Maarten); A. Abu-Hanna (Ameen); N. Bruining (Nico); M.P. Schijven; B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara); B.J. Bouma (Berto)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Many adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are affected lifelong by cardiac events, particularly arrhythmias and heart failure. Despite the care provided, the cardiac event rate remains high. Mobile health (mHealth) brings opportunities to enhance daily monitoring and henc

  7. 3D Printing to Guide Ventricular Assist Device Placement in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Saeed, Omar; Zaidi, Ali; Sanz, Javier; Nielsen, James C; Hsu, Daphne T; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2016-04-01

    As the population of adults with congenital heart disease continues to grow, so does the number of these patients with heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are underutilized in adults with congenital heart disease due to their complex anatomic arrangements and physiology. Advanced imaging techniques that may increase the utilization of mechanical circulatory support in this population must be explored. Three-dimensional printing offers individualized structural models that would enable pre-surgical planning of cannula and device placement in adults with congenital cardiac disease and heart failure who are candidates for such therapies. We present a review of relevant cardiac anomalies, cases in which such models could be utilized, and some background on the cost and procedure associated with this process.

  8. Efficacy of Antiarrhythmic Drugs in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Supraventricular Tachycardias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyak, Zeliha; Kroon, Bart; de Groot, Joris R.; Wagenaar, Lodewijk J.; van Dijk, Arie P.; Mulder, Bart A.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Post, Marco C.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2013-01-01

    Supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) are a major cause of morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Few data exist on safety and efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in this population. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs in adults with CHD and first-onset SVT on

  9. Transitioning the young adult with congenital heart disease for life-long medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Susan M; Landzberg, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Guidelines for the successful orchestration of transitioning of the adolescent and young and older adult patient with congenital heart disease to a health care system appropriate for their long-term congenital heart disease care and counseling appear necessary to improve patient and family confidence, education, therapy, life quality, and survival outcomes. Schema for care organization and delivery for adult patients with congenital heart disease remain primitive and largely unimplemented. The presence of a strong central care oversight organization and the establishment of a multi-institutional database to assist in assessment of care outcomes and guidelines appears requisite to these needs and for the establishment of transitioning guidelines for these patients as they assume a greater and deeper shared control of their futures with their caregivers.

  10. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  11. Understanding age-based transition needs: Perspectives from adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to explore the transition process in congenital heart disease (CHD) care through the perceived needs and concerns of adolescents (pretransition) and the experiential insight from adults (post-transition), in order to inform future transition initiatives and information ...

  12. Nurse specialists in adult congenital heart disease: The current status in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, P.; Scholte op Reimer, W.; De Geest, S.; Fridlund, B.; Heikkila, J.; Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Martensson, J.; Smith, K; Stewart, S.; Stromberg, A; Thompson, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Recommendations for the management of adults with congenital heart disease indicate that specialist referral centres should employ nurse specialists who are trained and educated in the care for these patients. We surveyed the involvement, education and activities of nurse specialists in the car

  13. Outcome of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in adults with congenital heart disease : a multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yap, Sing-Chien; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Budts, Werner; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Schalij, Martin J.; Drenthen, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Aims To investigate outcome and complications of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) and to identify predictors of (in-) appropriate shocks. Methods and results Sixty-four CHD patients >= 18 years at first ICD implantation [63% tetralogy of Fa

  14. The epidemiology of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fred H; Marelli, Ariane J

    2014-01-01

    The impact of lifelong exposure to myocardial dysfunction in populations with congenital heart disease (CHD) is becoming increasingly recognized. Most children born with CHD now reach adulthood and the long-term sequelae of treatment are contributing to substantial comorbidity. The combination of structural changes present at birth with changes resulting from cardiac surgery can result in heart failure. This article reports on the current state of knowledge on the epidemiology of heart failure in this patient population.

  15. Myocardial factor revisited: The importance of myocardial fibrosis in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Craig S; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-06-15

    Pioneers in congenital heart surgery observed that exercise capacity did not return to normal levels despite successful surgical repair, leading some to cite a "myocardial factor" playing a role. They conjectured that residual alterations in myocardial function would be significant for patients' long-term outlook. In fulfillment of their early observations, today's adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population shows well-recognized features of heart failure, even among patients without clear residual anatomic or hemodynamic abnormalities, demonstrating the vital role of the myocardium in their morbidity and mortality. Whereas the 'myocardial factor' was an elusive concept in the early history of congenital heart care, we now have imaging techniques to detect and quantify one such factor--myocardial fibrosis. Understanding the importance of myocardial fibrosis as a final common pathway in a variety of congenital lesions provides a framework for both the study and treatment of clinical heart failure in this context. While typical heart failure pharmacology should reduce or attenuate fibrogenesis, efforts to show meaningful improvements with standard pharmacotherapy in ACHD repeatedly fall short. This paper considers the importance of myocardial fibrosis and function, the current body of evidence for myocardial fibrosis in ACHD, and its implications for research and treatment.

  16. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: complex congenital cardiac lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Salehian, Omid; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger's syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  17. Exercise Performance in Children and Young Adults After Complete and Incomplete Repair of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Omer; Katz, Uriel; Reuveny, Ronen; Williams, Craig A; Dubnov-Raz, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Few previous studies have addressed exercise capacity in patients with corrected congenital heart disease (CHD) and significant anatomical residua. The aim of this study was to determine the aerobic fitness and peak cardiac function of patients with corrected CHD with complete or incomplete repairs, as determined by resting echocardiography. Children, adolescents and young adults (heart defect had decreased aerobic fitness, with evidence of impaired peak cardiac function and lower pulmonary perfusion. Patients that had undergone a complete repair had decreased aerobic fitness attributed only to deconditioning. These newly identified differences explain why in previous studies, the lowest fitness was seen in patients with the most hemodynamically significant heart malformations.

  18. Anesthesia for the adult patient with an unrepaired congenital cyanotic heart defect: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Marianne S

    2012-06-01

    Adult congenital heart disease, previously considered a rare comorbidity, is increasingly becoming a reality for today's anesthesia providers. Improvements in prenatal diagnosis, sophisticated surgical techniques and equipment, advances in pediatric critical care, enhanced efficacy of cardiovascular pharmacologic agents, and an overall increase in postrepair survival rates have resulted in an estimated population of approximately 800,000 adults with congenital heart disease. Despite successful surgical repair or palliation, these individuals present the anesthesia provider with a multitude of challenges. Individualized care of these fragile patients should be approached with a keen understanding of the patient's underlying cardiac anomaly. This case report chronicles the anesthetic care of a 36-year-old woman presenting for left-sided ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and stent placement. Her medical history was remarkable for the presence of complex congenital heart disease consisting of multiple anomalies: a double-outlet right ventricle, transposition of the great arteries, pulmonary stenosis, atrial septal defect, and a hypoplastic left ventricle with concomitant mitral valve atresia. General anesthesia was successfully administered, with meticulous attention given to maintenance of systemic vascular resistance to minimize shunting, oxygenation, administration of preprocedure antibiotics, and judicious replacement of intravenous fluids via air-filtered tubing.

  19. Genetic counseling for young adults who have a congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, R

    1986-01-01

    Early individual guidance is needed for all adolescents and young adults with congenital heart defects. This should include not only a personal interest in the individual but also an attempt to identify concerns about sex education, smoking, drugs and the risks of pregnancy and possible inheritance. In a prospective study of 252 women with various cardiac malformations, the incidence of congenital heart defects in their progeny was 15.7% (13% exclusive of genetic syndromes and those with a positive family history). In those with a positive family history or a genetic syndrome the incidence was 56% in the offspring. Genetic syndromes with cardiac components are increasingly apparent. The role of teratogens such as medications, illicit drugs, and environmental exposure play a not yet clearly defined role. Careful discussion with potential parents, giving facts but with a positive approach, is an obligation of every physician.

  20. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Congenital Heart Defects? Congenital (kon-JEN-ih-tal) heart defects are problems ... carry blood to the heart or the body Congenital heart defects change the normal flow of blood through the ...

  1. Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Tedrow, Usha B; Triedman, John K

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major source of morbidity and mortality in adults with CHD. A multidisciplinary approach in a center specializing in the care of ACHD is most likely to have the expertise needed provide this care. Knowledge of the underlying anatomy, mechanism of arrhythmia, and potential management strategies is critical, as well as access and expertise in the use of advanced imaging and ablative technologies. Future challenges in management include refining the underlying mechanism and putative ablation targets for catheter ablation of AF, an arrhythmia rapidly rising in prevalence in this population.

  2. Interventional and surgical treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyak, Zeliha; de Groot, Joris R; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2010-12-01

    Arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, mortality and hospital admission in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). The etiology of arrhythmias in this population is often multifactorial and includes electrical disturbances as part of the underlying defect, surgical intervention or hemodynamic abnormalities. Despite the numerous existing arrhythmia management tools including drug therapy, pacing and ablation, management of arrhythmias in adults with CHD remains difficult and challenging. Owing to improvement in mapping and ablation techniques, ablation and arrhythmia surgery are being performed more frequently in adults with CHD. However, there is little information on the long-term results of these treatment strategies. The purpose of this article is therefore to review the available data on nonpharmacological treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with CHD and to give an overview of the available data on the early and late outcomes of these treatment strategies.

  3. Emerging Research Directions in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: A Report From an NHLBI/ACHA Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitz, Michelle; Burns, Kristin M; Brindis, Ralph; Broberg, Craig S; Daniels, Curt J; Fuller, Stephanie M P N; Honein, Margaret A; Khairy, Paul; Kuehl, Karen S; Landzberg, Michael J; Mahle, William T; Mann, Douglas L; Marelli, Ariane; Newburger, Jane W; Pearson, Gail D; Starling, Randall C; Tringali, Glenn R; Valente, Anne Marie; Wu, Joseph C; Califf, Robert M

    2016-04-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting about 0.8% of live births. Advances in recent decades have allowed >85% of children with CHD to survive to adulthood, creating a growing population of adults with CHD. Little information exists regarding survival, demographics, late outcomes, and comorbidities in this emerging group, and multiple barriers impede research in adult CHD. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Adult Congenital Heart Association convened a multidisciplinary working group to identify high-impact research questions in adult CHD. This report summarizes the meeting discussions in the broad areas of CHD-related heart failure, vascular disease, and multisystem complications. High-priority subtopics identified included heart failure in tetralogy of Fallot, mechanical circulatory support/transplantation, sudden cardiac death, vascular outcomes in coarctation of the aorta, late outcomes in single-ventricle disease, cognitive and psychiatric issues, and pregnancy.

  4. Atrial-based pacing has no benefit over ventricular pacing in preventing atrial arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opic, P.; Yap, S.C.; Kranenburg, M. van; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Budts, W.; Vliegen, H.W.; Erven, L. van; Can, A.; Sahin, G.; Groot, N.M. de; Witsenburg, M.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether atrial-based pacing prevents atrial arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with ventricular pacing. METHODS AND RESULTS: All adult CHD patients from four participating centres with a permanent pacemaker were identified. Patients with permanent a

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Executive summary

    OpenAIRE

    Silversides, Candice K.; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and mul...

  6. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lisa X; Khan, Abigail May; Drajpuch, David; Fuller, Stephanie; Ludmir, Jonathan; Mascio, Christopher E; Partington, Sara L; Qadeer, Ayesha; Tobin, Lynda; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Kim, Yuli Y

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with adverse outcomes and increased mortality in cardiac patients. No studies have examined PTSD in the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of PTSD in patients with ACHD and explore potential associated factors. Patients were enrolled from an outpatient ACHD clinic and completed several validated measures including the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Clinical data were abstracted through medical data review. A total of 134 participants (mean age 34.6 ± 10.6; 46% men) were enrolled. Of the 127 participants who completed the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, 14 (11%) met criteria for elevated PTSD symptoms specifically related to their congenital heart disease or treatment. Of the 134 patients who completed PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, 27 (21%) met criteria for global PTSD symptoms. In univariate analyses, patients with congenital heart disease-specific PTSD had their most recent cardiac surgery at an earlier year (p = 0.008), were less likely to have attended college (p = 0.04), had higher rates of stroke or transient ischemic attack (p = 0.03), and reported greater depressive symptoms on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (7 vs 2, p PTSD were depressive symptoms (p PTSD is present in 11% to 21% of subjects seen at a tertiary referral center for ACHD. The high prevalence of PTSD in this complex group of patients has important implications for the medical and psychosocial management of this growing population.

  8. Prosthetic valves in adult patients with congenital heart disease : Rationale and design of the Dutch PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freling, H. G.; van Slooten, Y. J.; van Melle, J. P.; Mulder, B. J. M.; van Dijk, A. P. J.; Hillege, H. L.; Post, M. C.; Sieswerda, G. Tj; Jongbloed, M. R. M.; Willems, T. P.; Pieper, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Data on long-term complications in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic valve are scarce. Moreover, the influence of prosthetic valves on quality of life (QoL) and functional outcome in ACHD patients with prosthetic valves has not been studied. The primary objective o

  9. Prosthetic valves in adult patients with congenital heart disease: Rationale and design of the Dutch PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freling, H.G.; Slooten, Y.J. van; Melle, J.P. van; Mulder, B.J.; Dijk, A.P. van; Hillege, H.L.; Post, M.C.; Sieswerda, G.T.; Jongbloed, M.R.; Willems, T.P.; Pieper, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term complications in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic valve are scarce. Moreover, the influence of prosthetic valves on quality of life (QoL) and functional outcome in ACHD patients with prosthetic valves has not been studied. OBJECTIVES:

  10. Evaluation of right ventricular function in adults with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussadori, Claudio; Di Salvo, Giovanni; Pluchinotta, Francesca R; Piazza, Luciane; Gaio, Giampiero; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Carminati, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The right ventricle (RV) is of lesser importance in acquired heart disease, but its role is of increasing importance in congenital heart disease (CHD). Despite major progress being made, precise measurements of the RV are challenging because of its peculiar anatomical structure that is not adaptable to any planar geometrical assumption. This is particularly true in adult patients with CHD where the RV shape eludes any standardization, it may assume various morphologies, and its modality of contraction depends on previous surgical treatment and/or pathophysiological conditions. However, reliable and repeatable quantification of RV dimensions and function for these patients are essential to provide appropriate timing for intervention to optimize outcomes. In this population, echocardiographic evaluation should not be limited to an observational and subjective functional assessment of the RV but must provide quantitative values repeatable and clinically reliable to help the decision-making process. The aim of this review was to discuss the echocardiographic approach to the RV in adult patients with CHD in general and in specific cases of pressure or volume overload.

  11. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Congenital Heart Defects KidsHealth > For Parents > Congenital Heart Defects A A A What's in this article? How ... a Problem en español Anomalías cardíacas congénitas A congenital heart defect is a problem in the heart's structure that ...

  12. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, David M; Ordovas, Karen G

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical and medical therapy have prolonged survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) such that general medical conditions like coronary artery disease (CAD) are now the main determinants of mortality. A summary of the association of CAD with CHD, as well as a discussion of the radiologic evaluation of the coronary arteries in adults with CHD is described herein. Cross sectional imaging to evaluate CAD in adults with CHD should follow the same appropriateness criteria as gender and aged matched patients without CHD. Coronary CT imaging may be particularly valuable in evaluating the coronary arteries in this patient population as invasive coronary angiography may prove challenging secondary to complicated or unconventional anatomy of the coronary arteries. Further, typical methods for evaluating CAD such as stress or echocardiography may be impractical in adults with CHD. Finally, delineating the anatomic relationship of the coronary arteries and their relationship with the sternum, chest wall, conduits, grafts, and valves is highly recommended in patients with CHD prior to reintervention to avoid iatrogenic complications.

  13. NT-proBNP and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease and a prosthetic valve : a multicentre PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, R C; Pieper, P G; van Slooten, Y J; Freling, H G; Sieswerda, G T; van Dijk, A. P. J.; Jongbloed, M R M; Post, M. C.; Bouma, B. J.; Berger, R M F; Ebels, T; van Melle, J P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: N-terminal B‑type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is an important biomarker for the detection of heart failure. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic heart valve are at risk for heart failure. This study aimed to determine the value of NT-proBNP in ACHD patients wi

  14. Clinical countermeasures against congenital heart disease in adults%成人先天性心脏病临床对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仲英

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is common among the newborns, and the incidence rate is about 0. 8%. Over the past 30 years,great progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart disease in children. As a result,many children with such diseases now survive to adulthood. In the United States alone, the population of adults with congenital heart disease, either surgically corrected or uncorrected, is estimated to be increasing at a rate of about 5 percent every year; in 2008 there had be almost 1 million such patients. Currently in China, although there is no statistical data of incidence of adult congenital heart disease,the number of such patients must be huge. This article discusses congenital heart disease from two aspects: acyanotic and cyanotic;and clinical countermeasures against each type will be described.%先天性心脏病比较常见的,在新生儿中发生率约0.8%.在过去的30年,儿童先天性心脏病诊断和治疗取得了巨大进步,许多孩子因此可以存活到成年.仅在美国,经矫治或未矫治的先天性心脏病成人数,预计将以每年约5%的速度增长,2008已达近100万例患者.中国还没有成人先天性心脏病的统计数据,但患者数目必须是巨大的.文章从紫绀型和紫绀型2个方面阐述常见成人先天性心脏病的临床对策.

  15. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970296 Evaluating the degree of pulmonary vascularlesions in congenital heart disease with selective pul-monary angiography. PAN Shiwei(潘世伟), et al.Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. Chin JCardiol 1997; 25(1): 39-41. Objective: To evaluate the degree of pulmonary vas-

  16. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  17. Contemporary prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult congenital heart disease following the updated clinical classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, A.C. van; Schuuring, M.J.; Hessen, I.D. van; Zwinderman, A.H.; Cozijnsen, L.; Reichert, C.L.; Hoorntje, J.C.A.; Wagenaar, L.J.; Post, M.C.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Hoendermis, E.S.; Mulder, B.J.; Bouma, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aging congenital heart disease (CHD) population is prone to develop a variety of sequelae, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Previous prevalence estimates are limited in applicability due to the use of tertiary centers, or database encoding only. We aimed to investigat

  18. The care of adults with congenital heart disease across the globe: Current assessment and future perspective: A position statement from the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gary; Mulder, Barbara J; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Daniels, Curt J; Elizari, Maria Amalia; Hong, Gu; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Michael J; Marelli, Ariane J; O'Donnell, Clare P; Oechslin, Erwin N; Pearson, Dorothy D; Pieper, Els P G; Saxena, Anita; Schwerzmann, Markus; Stout, Karen K; Warnes, Carole A; Khairy, Paul

    2015-09-15

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased markedly over the past few decades as a result of astounding successes in pediatric cardiac care. Nevertheless, it is now well understood that CHD is not cured but palliated, such that life-long expert care is required to optimize outcomes. All countries in the world that experience improved survival in CHD must face new challenges inherent to the emergence of a growing and aging CHD population with changing needs and medical and psychosocial issues. Founded in 1992, the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD) is the leading global organization of professionals dedicated to pursuing excellence in the care of adults with CHD worldwide. Recognizing the unique and varied issues involved in caring for adults with CHD, ISACHD established a task force to assess the current status of care for adults with CHD across the globe, highlight major challenges and priorities, and provide future direction. The writing committee consisted of experts from North America, South America, Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and Oceania. The committee was divided into subgroups to review key aspects of adult CHD (ACHD) care. Regional representatives were tasked with investigating and reporting on relevant local issues as accurately as possible, within the constraints of available data. The resulting ISACHD position statement addresses changing patterns of worldwide epidemiology, models of care and organization of care, education and training, and the global research landscape in ACHD.

  19. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greutmann, Matthias; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Major advances in open-heart surgery have led to rapidly evolving cohorts of adult survivors and the majority of affected women now survive to childbearing age. The risk of cardiovascular complications during pregnancy and peripartum depend

  20. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions critical congenital heart disease critical congenital heart disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a ...

  1. A cardiac-specific health-related quality of life module for young adults with congenital heart disease: development and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Zwinderman, K.A.H.; Vogels, T.; Vliegen, H.W.; Kamphuis, R.P.; Ottenkamp, J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Bruil, J.

    2004-01-01

    This study represents the development and validation of a cardiac-specific module of the generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, the TAAQOL (TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life), for young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Items were selected based on literature, an explorativ

  2. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Dore, Annie; Kiess, Marla; Salehian, Omid; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death.Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single-ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the late outcomes, genetics, medical therapy and interventional approaches in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present executive summary is a brief overview of the new guidelines and includes the recommendations for interventions. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up requirements. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  3. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  4. Platelet abnormalities in adults with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension related to congenital heart defects (Eisenmenger syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remková, Anna; Šimková, Iveta; Valkovičová, Tatiana; Kaldarárová, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension suffer from life-threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications. The aim of this study was to compare selected platelet, endothelial, and coagulation parameters in healthy volunteers and patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension because of congenital heart defects. The study included healthy volunteers (n = 50) and patients with cyanotic congenital heart defects classified as Eisenmenger syndrome (n = 41). We investigated platelet count, mean platelet volume, and platelet aggregation - spontaneous and induced by various concentrations of five agonists. Von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen, factor VIII and XII, plasminogen activator inhibitor, antithrombin, D-dimer, and antiphospholipid antibodies were also investigated. We found a decreased platelet count [190 (147-225) vs. 248 (205-295) 10 l, P < 0.0001], higher mean platelet volume [10.9 (10.1-12.0) vs. 10.2 (9.4-10.4) fl, P < 0.0001], and significantly decreased platelet aggregation (induced by five agonists, in various concentrations) in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome compared with controls. These changes were accompanied by an increase of plasma vWF antigen [141.6 (108.9-179.1) vs. 117.4 (9.2-140.7) IU/dl, P = 0.022] and serum anti-β2-glycoprotein [2.07 (0.71-3.41) vs. 0.47 (0.18-0.99) U/ml, P < 0.0001]. Eisenmenger syndrome is accompanied by platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopenia with increased platelet size is probably due to a higher platelet turnover associated with platelet activation. Impaired platelet aggregation can reflect specific platelet behaviour in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome. These changes can be related both to bleeding and to thrombotic events. A higher vWF antigen may be a consequence of endothelial damage in Eisenmenger syndrome, but the cause for an increase of anti-β2-glycoprotein is unknown.

  5. Knowledge-based 3D reconstruction of the right ventricle : comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzebiatowska-Krzynska, Aleksandra; Driessen, Mieke; Sieswerda, GT; Wallby, Lars; Swahn, Eva; Meijboom, Folkert

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Assessment of right ventricular (RV) function is a challenge, especially in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). The aim of the present study is to assess whether knowledge-based RV reconstruction, used in the everyday practice of an echo-lab for adult CHD in a tertiary referral center

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in adults with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome: current advanced management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alto, Michele; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2014-09-01

    The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) increases morbidity and reduces survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition, depending on the type of the underlying defect and previous repair strategies. There is growing evidence of the benefits of PAH-specific therapy in the PAH-CHD population, but despite recent advances mortality rates remain relatively high. In the last years, an increasing focus has been placed on patients with PAH-CHD and net left-to-right shunt. Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of these patients and uncertainty on the cut-off values for eventual defect closure. Pregnancy conveys significant risks in PAH-CHD patients: appropriate counselling and care, including psychological support and a multidisciplinary team, should be part of the routine management of women with PAH-CHD of reproductive age. Some subgroups, such as patients with Down's syndrome, Fontan circulation and 'segmental' pulmonary hypertension, present particular challenges in terms of management and therapy. The current review focuses on contemporary treatment strategies in PAH-CHD patients with particular emphasis on challenging patient groups and conditions.

  7. Prevalence and determinants of anemia in adults with complex congenital heart disease and ventricular dysfunction (subaortic right ventricle and single ventricle physiology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Nicholas; Piran, Sanaz; Harrison, Jeanine; Azevedo, Eduardo; Oechslin, Erwin; Silversides, Candice K

    2008-09-01

    Anemia is well recognized as a marker of poor prognosis in patients with acquired heart disease and heart failure. Adults with complex congenital heart disease and ventricular dysfunction (subaortic right ventricle or single-ventricle physiology) represent a different population, because they are typically much younger and have less co-morbidity compared with patients with acquired forms of heart disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of anemia in this population. Baseline hemoglobin levels were recorded at the time of the initial clinic visit, and final hemoglobin levels were those recorded before death or transplantation or at study completion. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin complex congenital heart disease and ventricular dysfunction, in particular those with Fontan physiology.

  8. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  9. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  10. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  11. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  12. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 Not all people with ... supports you in your pursuit of heart health. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The Impact of ...

  13. Implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Eva; Fernandes, Susan M; Landzberg, Michael J; Moons, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Although different guidelines on adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) care advocate for lifetime cardiac follow-up, a critical appraisal of the guideline implementation is lacking. We investigated the implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2008 guidelines for ACHD follow-up by investigating the type of health care professional, care setting, and frequency of outpatient visits in young adults with CHD. Furthermore, correlates for care in line with the recommendations or untraceability were investigated. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, including 306 patients with CHD who had a documented outpatient visit at pediatric cardiology before age 18 years. In all, 210 patients (68.6%) were in cardiac follow-up; 20 (6.5%) withdrew from follow-up and 76 (24.9%) were untraceable. Overall, 198 patients were followed up in tertiary care, 1/4 (n = 52) of which were seen at a formalized ACHD care program and 3/4 (n = 146) remained at pediatric cardiology. Of those followed in formalized ACHD and pediatric cardiology care, the recommended frequency was implemented in 94.2% and 89%, respectively (p = 0.412). No predictors for the implementation of the guidelines were identified. Risk factors for becoming untraceable were none or lower number of heart surgeries, health insurance issues, and nonwhite ethnicity. In conclusion, a significant number of adults continue to be cared for by pediatric cardiologists, indicating that transfer to adult-oriented care was not standard practice. Frequency of follow-up for most patients was in line with the ACC/AHA 2008 guidelines. A considerable proportion of young adults were untraceable in the system, which makes them vulnerable for discontinuation of care.

  14. Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects. ...

  15. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  16. Decentralization of care for adults with congenital heart disease in the United States: a geographic analysis of outpatient surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G Maxwell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend that adults with congenital heart disease (CHD undergo noncardiac surgery in regionalized centers of expertise, but no studies have assessed whether this occurs in the United States. We hypothesized that adults with CHD are less likely than children to receive care at specialized CHD centers. METHODS: Using a comprehensive state ambulatory surgical registry (California Ambulatory Surgery Database, 2005-2011, we calculated the proportion of adult and pediatric patients with CHD who had surgery at a CHD center, distance to the nearest CHD center, and distance to the facility where surgery was performed. RESULTS: Patients with CHD accounted for a larger proportion of the pediatric population (n = 11,254, 1.0% than the adult population (n = 10,547, 0.07%. Only 2,741 (26.0% adults with CHD had surgery in a CHD center compared to 6,403 (56.9% children (p<0.0001. Adult CHD patients who had surgery at a non-specialty center (11.9 ± 15.4 miles away lived farther from the nearest CHD center (37.9 ± 43.0 miles than adult CHD patients who had surgery at a CHD center (23.2 ± 28.4 miles; p<0.0001. Pediatric CHD patients who had surgery at a non-specialty center (18.0 ± 20.7 miles away lived farther from the nearest CHD center (35.7 ± 45.2 miles than pediatric CHD patients who had surgery at a CHD center (22.4 ± 26.0 miles; p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike children with CHD, most adults with CHD (74% do not have outpatient surgery at a CHD center. For both adults and children with CHD, greater distance from a CHD center is associated with having surgery at a non-specialty center. These results have significant public health implications in that they suggest a failing to achieve adequate regional access to specialized ACHD care. Further studies will be required to evaluate potential strategies to more reliably direct this vulnerable population to centers of expertise.

  17. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950283 Surgical treatment of congenital coronaryartery fistula.CAO Qingheng(曹庆亨),et al.DeptCardiovasc Surg,Shanghai Chest Hosp,Shanghai,200030.Shanghai Med J 1995;18(1):10-12.From October 1957 through December 1990,twenty-five patients with congenital coronary artery fistula(CCAF),including 3 cases complicated with giantcoronary artery aneurysms,underwent surgical repair.The ages ranged from 4 to 47 years (mean 19.8years).CCAF originated from the right coronaryartery in 17 cases (68.0%) and terminated into RA,RV,pulmonary artery (PA) or LV,in 8 cases (32.

  18. Risk Factors for Increased Hospital Resource Utilization and In-Hospital Mortality in Adults With Single Ventricle Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Doshi, Pratik; Onukwube, Jennifer; Fram, Ricki Y; Robbins, James M

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease are now expected to survive to adulthood. Co-morbid medical conditions (CMCs) are common. We sought to identify risk factors for increased hospital resource utilization and in-hospital mortality in adults with single ventricle. We analyzed data from the 2001 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in patients aged ≥18 years admitted to nonteaching general hospitals (NTGHs), TGHs, and pediatric hospitals (PHs) with either hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tricuspid atresia or common ventricle. National estimates of hospitalizations were calculated. Elixhauser CMCs were identified. Length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and effect of CMCs were determined. Age was greater in NTGH (41.5 ± 1.3 years) than in TGH (32.8 ± 0.5) and PH (25.0 ± 0.6; p <0.0001). Adjusted LOS was shorter in NTGH (5.6 days) than in PH (9.7 days; p <0.0001). Adjusted costs were higher in PH ($56,671) than in TGH ($31,934) and NTGH ($18,255; p <0.0001). CMCs are associated with increased LOS (p <0.0001) and costs (p <0.0001). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality included increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 5.250, CI 2.825 to 9.758 for 45- to 64-year old vs 18- to 30-year old), male gender (OR 2.72, CI 1.804 to 4.103]), and the presence of CMC (OR 4.55, CI 2.193 to 9.436) for 2 vs none). No differences in mortality were found among NTGH, TGH, and PH. Cardiovascular procedures were more common in PH hospitalizations and were associated with higher costs and LOS. CMCs increase costs and mortality. In-hospital mortality is increased with age, male gender, and the presence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

  19. Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects? Many congenital heart defects cause few or no signs and symptoms. A ... lips, and fingernails) Fatigue (tiredness) Poor blood circulation Congenital heart defects don't cause chest pain or other painful ...

  20. Experiences and Outcomes of Transition from Pediatric to Adult Health Care Services for Young People with Congenital Heart Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heery, Emily; Sheehan, Aisling M; While, Alison E; Coyne, Imelda

    2015-01-01

    This review synthesizes the empirical literature on outcomes and experiences of transfer and transition from pediatric to adult care for young people with congenital heart disease. A systematic review of papers published between January 2001 and May 2013 that examined outcomes or experiences of transfer and transition among young people with congenital heart disease was conducted. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers with the outcomes data combined using narrative synthesis and the experiences data integrated using thematic synthesis. Thirteen papers were included in the review: six reported outcomes following transfer, six reported experiences of transfer and transition, and one reported both outcomes and experiences. The review data indicate that high proportions of young people were lost to follow-up or experienced long gaps in care after leaving pediatric cardiology. Factors that protected against loss to follow-up or lapse in care included: beliefs that specialized adult care was necessary; poorer health status; attendance at pediatric appointments without parents; and pediatric referral to an adult congenital heart disease center. Data on experiences highlighted that many young people were unconcerned about transition, but lacked knowledge about their condition and were insufficiently prepared for transfer. In terms of adult services, many young people desired continuity in the quality of care, youth-oriented facilities, a personalized approach, and for their parents to remain involved in their care, but in a secondary, supportive capacity. In conclusion, the high proportions of young people lost to follow-up highlight the need for formal transition programs, which ensure a planned and coordinated transfer. Patients with congenital heart disease need education throughout adolescence about the implications of their condition, the differences between pediatric and adult services, and self-care management.

  1. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  2. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  3. Predictors of Memory Deficits in Adolescents and Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease Compared to Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A. Pike

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescents and young adults with congenital heart disease [CHD] show a range of memory deficits, which can dramatically impact their clinical outcomes and quality of life. However, few studies have identified predictors of these memory changes. The purpose of this investigation was to identify predictors of memory deficits in adolescents and young adults with CHD after surgical palliation compared to healthy controls. Method: 156 adolescents and young adults [80 CHD and 76 controls; age 14-21 years] were recruited and administered an instrument to assess memory [Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2nd Edition – general memory index (GMI score] and completed questionnaires that measure anxiety, depression, sleepiness, health status, and self-efficacy. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to assess group differences, and logistic regression to identify predictors of memory deficits. Results: CHD subjects consisted of 58% males, median age 17 years, 41% Hispanic, and medians of 2 previous heart surgeries and 14 years since last surgery. Memory deficits [GMI < 85] were identified in 50% CHD compared to 4% healthy controls [median GMI 85 vs. 108, p <0.001]. Of GMI subscale medians, CHD subjects had significantly worse memory performance vs. healthy controls [verbal 88 vs. 105, p <0.001; attention 88 vs. 109, p<0.001; working memory 86 vs. 108, p <0.001]. No significant differences appeared between groups for visual memory. Multiple clinical and psychosocial factors were identified which were statistically different on bivariate analyses between the subjects with and without memory deficits. By multivariate analysis, male gender, number of surgeries, anxiety, and self-efficacy emerged as independent predictors of memory deficits. Conclusion: Adolescents and young adults with CHD, more than a decade since their last surgery, show significant verbal, attention and working memory deficits over controls. To enhance

  4. Adult patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease: a review on advanced medical treatment with bosentan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Schuuring

    2010-08-01

    treatment for adults with CHD-PAH. This review focuses on bosentan in CHD-PAH. In particular, we discuss outcome of various clinical trials and compare efficacy and safety of bosentan to other advanced therapies.Keywords: pulmonary arterial hypertension, bosentan, endothelin-1 receptor antagonist, congenital heart disease

  5. Hybrid Surgery Options for Complex Clinical Scenarios in Adult Patients with Congenital Heart Disease: Three Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapetto, Filippo; Kenny, Damien; Turner, Mark; Parry, Andrew; Stoica, Serban; Uzun, Orhan; Caputo, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The strategy for the management of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) often represents a challenge for cardiac surgeons and cardiologists due to complex anatomy, wide range of clinical presentations, and a high-risk profile. However, hybrid approach may represent an attractive solution. We report three cases of adult patients previously operated for CHD and recently treated with a hybrid approach in our institution. Case 1: a 76-year-old woman with permanent atrial fibrillation, lung disease, chronic kidney disease, microcytic anemia, and type II diabetes mellitus, previously operated for atrial septal defect closure and pulmonary valvotomy, presented with severe pulmonary regurgitation and advanced right ventricular failure. In order to minimize the surgical risk, a hybrid approach was used: an extensive right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) plication was followed by implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT prosthesis in the RVOT through the right ventricular apex, without cardiopulmonary bypass. Case 2: a 64-year-old man with previous atrial septum excision and pericardial baffle for partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage with intact interatrial septum, presented with worsening dyspnea, right ventricular failure, and pulmonary hypertension caused by baffle stenosis. His comorbidities included coronary artery disease, atrial flutter, and previous left pneumonectomy. After performing a redo longitudinal median sternotomy, a 20-mm stent was implanted in the baffle with access through the superior vena cava. Case 3: a 50-year-old man, with previous atrioventricular septal defect repair, followed by mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis, subsequently developed a paravalvular leak (PVL) with severe mitral regurgitation and severe left ventricular dysfunction. He underwent a transapical PVL device closure with two Amplatzer Vascular Plugs. In our opinion, hybrid surgery is a promising therapeutic modality that increases the available

  6. Effects of iloprost combined with low dose tadalafil in adult congenital heart disease patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension: a single-center,open-label controlled study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张曹进

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the therapy efficacy of iloprost combined with low dose tadalafil in adult congenital heart disease(CHD)patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension(PAH).Methods Adult CHD patients with severe PAH were included and divided into the sequential combination therapy group[iloprost:10μg/inhalation,6 times per day for 6 months,and then add oral tadalafil(5 mg/d)till 12 months,n=32]and upfront combination therapy group[iloprost:10μg/inhalation,6 times per day combined with oral tadalafil(5 mg)

  7. Protect Your Heart in the Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  8. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  9. Congenital subclavian arteriovenous malformation causing cardiac failure in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoop, T M; Sreejith, P; Thomas, Joby K; Gailin, B; Jabbar, P K; Ittycheria, Cherian C; George, Raju

    2009-07-01

    Congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the thoracic region are rarely reported in adults. The authors report an unusual case of a 30-year-old man who presented with a large congenital AVM and heart failure. The diagnosis was made using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and computed tomography. Embolization followed by surgical resection of the AVM resulted in the prompt relief of heart failure.

  10. Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease Page Content ​​​The first thing most parents want ... common and expected. About Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth ...

  11. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušek, Jan; Kubuš, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment option for adult patients suffering heart failure due to idiopathic or ischemic cardiomyopathy associated with electromechanical dyssynchrony. There is limited evidence suggesting similar efficacy of CRT in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Due to the heterogeneity of structural and functional substrates, CRT implantation techniques are different with a thoracotomy or hybrid approach prevailing. Efficacy of CRT in CHD seems to depend on the anatomy of the systemic ventricle with best results achieved in systemic left ventricular patients upgraded to CRT from conventional pacing. Indications for CRT in patients with CHD were recently summarized in the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) and the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) Expert Consensus Statement on the Recognition and Management of Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease and are presented in the text.

  12. A cardiac-specific health-related quality of life module for young adults with congenital heart disease: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, M; Zwinderman, K H; Vogels, T; Vliegen, H W; Kamphuis, R P; Ottenkamp, J; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P; Bruil, J

    2004-05-01

    This study represents the development and validation of a cardiac-specific module of the generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument, the TAAQOL (TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life), for young adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Items were selected based on literature, an explorative previous study in CHD patients, interviews with patients, and the advice of experts. The newly developed Congenital Heart Disease-TNO/AZL Adult Quality of Life (CHD-TAAQOL) was tested in 156 patients with mild or complex CHD and consisted of three hypothesised subject scales: 'Symptoms' (9 items), 'Impact Cardiac Surveillance' (7 items), and 'Worries' (10 items). Cronbach's alpha for the three scales were 0.77, 0.78, and 0.82, respectively. Scale structure was confirmed by Principal Component Analysis, corrected item-scale and interscale correlations. Overall, 55% of reported health status problems were associated with negative emotions, which is an argument for assessing HRQoL as a concept distinct from health status. Convergent validity with validated generic instruments (TAAQOL and Short Form-36, SF-36) showed satisfactory coefficients. Discriminant validity was proven by significantly higher scores for mild CHD patients compared with those with complex CHD. In conclusion, the CHD-TAAQOL module together with the generic TAAQOL can be used to assess group differences for cardiac-specific HRQoL in young adults with CHD. Testing psychometric properties of the CHD-TAAQOL shows satisfactory results. However, to detect changes in HRQoL over time, further research is needed.

  13. [Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a life-long disease requiring an integrated therapy. It may negatively influence the quality of life. In childhood, the main problems of the care of these patients involve sex determination and ensuring optimum growth and puberty. The therapeutic goals for adults are the prevention of Addisonian crisis and ensuring the best possible quality of life, including fertility.Key words: androgens - cardiovascular risk - congenital adrenal hyperplasia - bone density - testicular rest tumors.

  14. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  15. Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Shi Zhang; Nai-Kang Zhou; Chang-Hai Yu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae in adults. METHODS: Eleven adult cases of congenital bronchoesophageal fistula diagnosed and treated in our hospital between May 1990 and August 2010 were reviewed. Its clinical presentations, diagnostic methods, anatomic type, treatment, and follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: Of the chief clinical presentations, nonspecific cough and sputum were found in 10 (90.9%), recurrent bouts of cough after drinking liquid food in 6 (54.6%), hemoptysis in 6 (54.6%), low fever in 4 (36.4%), and chest pain in 3 (27.3%) of the 11 cases, respectively. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis ranged 5-36.5 years. The diagnosis of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae was established in 9 patients by barium esophagography, in 1 patient by esophagoscopy and in 1 patient by bronchoscopy, respectively. The congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae communicated with a segmental bronchus, a main bronchus, and an intermediate bronchus in 8, 2 and 1 patients, respectively. The treatment of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae involved excision of the fistula in 10 patients or division and suturing in 1 patient. The associated lung lesion was removed in all patients. No long-term sequelae were found during the postoperative follow-up except in 1 patient with bronchial fistula who accepted reoperation before recovery. CONCLUSION: Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula is rare in adults. Its most useful diagnostic method is esophagography. It must be treated surgically as soon as the diagnosis is established.

  16. Stroke Recurrence in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada identified 135 patients with congenital heart disease diagnosed with arterial ischemic stroke during 1992-2008 and registered in the Canadian Pediatric Stroke Registry-Toronto site.

  17. Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity Updated:Apr 19,2016 Exercise Is for Everyone ... almost all patients do some form of regular physical activity. There are a few exceptions, so it's good ...

  18. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices.

  19. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  20. Popular Hybrid Congenital Heart Procedures without Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aamisha; Amin, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    As surgical and catheter interventions advance, patients with congenital heart disease are now offered alternative treatment options that cater to their individual needs. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons have led to the development of hybrid procedures, using the best techniques of each respective field to treat these complex cardiac entities from initial treatment in the pediatric patient to repeat intervention in the adult. We present a review of the increased popularity and trend in hybrid procedures in congenital heart disease without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass.

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital complete heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Patrícia; Carriço, Ana; Ramalho, Carla; Matias, Alexandra; Monterroso, José; Areias, José Carlos

    2007-06-01

    Congenital complete heart block (CHB) is a conduction defect with an incidence in the general population of 1/15,000 to 1/22,000 live births. It is frequently associated with structural heart defects or maternal autoimmune disease. We describe a case of CHB associated with maternal systemic lupus erythematosus and review our previous cases and experience of CHB.

  2. Turning 18 with congenital heart disease : prediction of infective endocarditis based on a large population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Veen, Gerrit; Stappers, Jan L. M.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims The risk of infective endocarditis (IE) in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet empirical risk estimates are lacking. We sought to predict the occurrence of IE in patients with congenital heart disease at the transition from childhood into adulthood. Methods and re

  3. Marital stability and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, A R; Newburger, J W; Fyler, D C

    1982-06-01

    The incidence of divorce or legal separation was studied in 438 families of children born with heart disease who entered the New England Regional Infant Cardiac Program between 1968 and 1973. The parents were interviewed when the children were 5 1/2 years old. The rate of divorce in 438 families of children with critical congenital heart disease was not significantly different from the rate in two comparison groups: (1) 25 families of children whose cardiac defect was spontaneously cured, and (2) 26 families of children catheterized in infancy for suspected cardiac defect but who were found to be free of heart disease. Rates of divorce or legal separation for the three groups were: critical congenital heart disease, 12.1%, spontaneously cured, 4.2% free of heart disease, 11.5% these rates were not significantly different. The average national divorce rate was 20.3% for the same period.

  4. Air pollution and congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agay-Shay, Keren; Friger, Michael; Linn, Shai; Peled, Ammatzia; Amitai, Yona; Peretz, Chava

    2013-07-01

    Environmental factors such as ambient air pollution have been associated with congenital heart defects. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between gestational exposure to air pollution and the risk of congenital heart defects. We conducted a registry-based cohort study with a total of 135,527 live- and still-births in the Tel-Aviv region during 2000-2006. We used a Geographic Information System-based spatiotemporal approach with weekly inverse distance weighting modeling to evaluate associations between gestational exposure to ambient air pollution during weeks 3-8 of pregnancy and the risk for congenital heart defects. The following pollutants were studied: carbon monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, ozone, sulfur-dioxide and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm and 2.5 μm (PM10, PM2.5 respectively). Logistic models, adjusted for socio-demographic covariates were used to evaluate the associations. We found that maternal exposure to increased concentrations of PM10 was associated with multiple congenital heart defects (adjusted OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10 for 10 μg/m(3) increment). An inverse association was observed between concentrations of PM2.5 and isolated patent ductus arteriosus (adjusted OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.68 to 0.91 for 5 µg/m(3) increment). Sensitivity analyses showed that results were consistent. Generally there were no evidence for an association between gaseous air pollutants and congenital heart defects.Our results for PM10 and congenital heart defects confirm results from previous studies. The results for PM2.5 need further investigations.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuster, M.; Beerbaum, P.; Meyer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bad Oeyenhausen (Germany). Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW

    2004-07-01

    The Clinic for Congenital Heart Defects in Bad Oeynhausen, Germany, specializes in the interdisciplinary care of children and adolescents with congenital heart defects. The available expertise covers all aspects of diagnosis and treatment, as well as clinical research at the highest level. The clinic has a complete array of imaging systems, including a Philips Integris BV5000 Biplane cath lab system, Philips Gyroscan Intera CV MR system, ultrasound and PET systems. The range of available equipment makes it possible to select the most appropriate imaging modality for each situation, with particular reference to the need to minimize the overall radiation exposure. (orig.)

  6. Phase-contrast MRI and applications in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A., E-mail: adgoldberg@geisinger.edu [Department of Radiology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA (United States); Jha, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    A review of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques, with specific application to congenital heart disease, is presented. Theory, pitfalls, advantages, and specific examples of multiple, well-described congenital heart disease presentations are discussed.

  7. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD bi

  8. Congenital Heart Disease and General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. de Koning (Wilfred)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe treatment of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has progressed vastly over the last five decennia. In the Netherlands, around 200,000 children are born each year, around 1,800 of whom have a CHD. This incidence – 6 – 8 per thousand live births – is reported to be similar ro

  9. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctors use open-heart surgery to repair VSDs. Patent Ductus Arteriosus Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a fairly common heart defect that ... ductus arteriosus closes. In some babies, however, the ductus arteriosus remains open (patent). The opening allows oxygen-rich blood from the ...

  10. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-03-04

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD.

  11. Implantation of total artificial heart in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S L

    2014-07-18

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation. In the case presented here, a 17 year-old patient with congenital transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) experienced progressively worsening HF due to his congenital condition. He was hospitalized multiple times and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). However, his condition soon deteriorated to end-stage HF with multisystem organ failure. Due to the patient's grave clinical condition and the presence of complex cardiac lesions, the decision was made to proceed with a TAH. The abnormal arrangement of the patient's ventricles and great arteries required modifications to the TAH during implantation. With the TAH in place, the patient was able to return home and regain strength and physical well-being while awaiting a donor heart. He was successfully bridged to heart transplantation 5 months after receiving the device. This report highlights the TAH is feasible even in patients with structurally abnormal hearts, with technical modification.

  12. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypoplastic left heart repair; Tetralogy of Fallot repair; Coarctation of the aorta repair; Atrial septal defect repair; ... done in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Coarctation of the aorta repair: Coarctation of the aorta ...

  13. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedures with catheters (thin, flexible tubes) can fix medium and large ASDs. Heart surgery may be needed ... parts. Conditions in your everyday life (lifestyle and environment) Some things in your life and environment (where ...

  14. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  15. Echocardiographic evaluation of right ventricular function in congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiu-fai Cheung

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review aims to provide an overview of conventional and novel indices used in clinical and research arenas for evaluation of right ventricular (RV) function in congenital heart diseases with a dual-chambered circulation.Data sources Articles cited in this review were selected using PubMed search of publications in English with no date limits.The search terms included "echocardiography","right ventricle","RV function","cardiac function",and "congenital heart disease".Key references were also searched for additional publications.Study selection Articles related to description of echocardiographic techniques in the evaluation of subpulmonary or systemic RV function and their applications in congenital cardiac malformations were retrieved and reviewed.Results Three approaches have been used to evaluate subpulmonary and systemic RV function:(1) assessment of changes in RV size in the cardiac cycle,(2) determination of Doppler-derived velocities and systolic and diastolic time intervals,and (3) quantification of myocardial velocities and deformation.Conclusions Conventional and novel echocardiographic techniques enable the evaluation of subpulmonary and systemic RV function.Novel echocardiographic techniques have further allowed quantification of RV volumes and direct interrogation of myocardial deformation.These new techniques show promise in a more comprehensive evaluation beyond "eye-bailing" of RV function in the growing population of adolescent and adult congenital heart patients.

  16. Hematologic Abnormalities in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Chamanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with cyanotic heart disease may have an acceptable quality of life. However, they are invariably prone to several complications. The aim of this study is search about hematologic abnormalities in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study every cyanotic congenital heart disease patients who was referred to the adult congenital heart disease clinic was selected and asked of any possible hyperviscosity symptoms, gingival bleeding, Epistaxis, hemoptysis, hypermenorrhagia and gouty arthritis irrespective of their age, gender and primary diagnosis in a six-month period. In this regard, 02 saturation was obtained via pulse oximetry, an abdominal ultrasound was done in order to discover any gallstones and lab tests including CBC, coagulation parameters (bleeding time(BT,clotting time(CT, prothrombin time(PT,international ratio( INR, Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr were provided as well. Results:  A total of 69 patients were enrolled in the present study. The mean age of the patients was 22.44±5.72 with a minimum of 15 and the maximum of 46 years old. Twenty two (34.4% of them were female and 45(65.6% were male. Conclusion: Our patients had less hyperuricemia, there is no correlation between hyperviscosity symptoms and haematocrit level and an inverse correlation between the Ferritin level and hyperviscosity symptoms were seen.  

  17. Recurrent congenital heart block in neonatal lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Maria C; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Albert, Dimpna; Ferrer, Queralt; Girona, Josep

    2007-07-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is the main complication of neonatal lupus (NL) and is strongly associated with the presence of anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. The recurrence of CHB in subsequent pregnancies in mothers with these antibodies is uncommon, occurring in approximately 15% of cases. We describe here a case of recurrent CHB in a previously asymptomatic mother with Sjögren syndrome and discuss the current strategies for the prevention and treatment of CHB in NL.

  18. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...

  19. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2016-11-02

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  20. Consecutive percutaneous valve-in-valve replacement late after Ross procedure: A novel approach in an adult with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Dominik M; Kay, Joseph D; Kim, Michael S

    2015-11-15

    The emergence of transcatheter valve technology over the last decade has made significant impact on the treatment of patients with valvular heart disease. There has been increasing experience with both native and valve-in-valve indications with promising results. We present the case of a young woman with congenital heart disease who underwent the Ross procedure for bicuspid aortic valve endocarditis with subsequent reoperation and surgical aortic valve replacement for neo-aortic root dilation who experienced worsening symptoms related to both pulmonary and aortic valve dysfunction. She was successfully treated with percutaneous pulmonary and aortic valve replacement with excellent early term technical results and marked improvement in symptoms.

  1. Early extubation after congenital heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Halimić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in anesthesia, cardiopulmonary bypass and surgical techniques, children undergoing congenital heart surgery require postoperativemechanical ventilation. Early extubation was definedas ventilation shorter than 12 hours. Aim of this study is to identify factors associated with successful early extubation after pediatric cardiac surgery.Methods: The study was performed during period from January 2006 to January 2011 at Pediatric Clinic and Heart Center University Clinical center Sarajevo. One hundred children up to 5 years of age, who have had congenital heart disease, with left–right shunt and obstructive heart disease were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I - patients extubated within 12 hours after surgery and Group II - patients extubated 12 or more hours after surgery. Results: The most frequently encountered preoperative variables were age with odds ratio 4% 95%CI (1-7%, Down's syndrome 8.5 95%CI (1.6-43.15, failure to thrive 4.3 95%CI( 1-18. Statistically significant postoperative data included lung disease (reactive airways, pneumonia, atelectasis, pneumothorax and with odds ratio 35.1 95 %CI (4-286 and blood transfusion with odds ratio 4.6 95%CI (2-12. Blood transfusion (p=0.002 (Wald=9.2 95%CI (2-12, during as well as after operation procedure has statistically significant influence on prediction time of extubation. Proven markers were age with cut of 21.5 months (sensitivity 74% and specificity 70% and extracorporeal circulation (ECC with cut-of 45.5 minutes (sensitivity 71% and specificity 65%.Conclusion: Early extubation is possible in many children undergoing congenital heart surgery. Younger age and prolonged ECC time are markers associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  2. Psychosocial aspects of congenital heart disease in adulthood: A longitudinal cohort study of 20-33 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.M. van Rijen (Susan)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Adults with congenital heart disease form a rather new phenomenon. Improvements in surgical techniques over the last decades have lead to lower mortality rates for children born with a congenital heart disease, enabling more of them to grow into adulthood (Sparacino, 19

  3. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD.

  4. Anatomical assessment of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John C

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) is replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization as the modality of choice for anatomic and functional characterization of congenital heart disease (CHD) when echocardiographic imaging is insufficient. In this manuscript, we discuss the principles of anatomic imaging of CHD, placing emphasis on the appropriate choice and modification of pulse sequences necessary to evaluate infants and small children. Clinical examples are provided to illustrate the relative strengths and shortcomings of different CMR imaging techniques. Although cardiovascular function and flow techniques are not described, their role in evaluating the severity of anatomic defects is emphasized. Anatomic characterization represents the first component of a carefully-planned, integrated CMR assessment of CHD.

  5. Cardiac transplantation for pediatric patients. With inoperable congenital heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, K M; Denfield, S W; Schowengerdt, K O; Towbin, J A; Radovancević, B; Frazier, O. H.; Price, J K; Gajarski, R J

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the expanding use of transplantation as the definitive option for pediatric patients with inoperable congenital heart disease. This study compares perioperative risk factors and outcomes in pediatric patients who received heart transplants for congenital heart disease with those in pediatric patients who received heart transplants for cardiomyopathy. Retrospective data collected on 40 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac transplantation from 1 January...

  6. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  7. Cancer risk among patients with congenital heart defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Morten; Garne, Ester; Sværke, Claus

    2013-01-01

    -based interventions, the standardised incidence ratio was 1.45 (95% confidence interval: 0.86-2.29). Conclusion The overall risk of cancer among congenital heart defect patients without Down's syndrome was not statistically significantly elevated. Cancer risk in the congenital heart defect cohort as a whole...

  8. Incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xue-yong; LI Xiao-feng; L(U) Xiao-dong; LIU Ying-long

    2009-01-01

    Background The incidence of congenital heart disease has been studied in developed countries for many years, but rarely in the mainland of China. Fetal echocardiographic screening for congenital heart disease was first performed in Beijing in the early 2000s, but the impact was not clear. The current study was undertaken to determine the incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China and to estimate the impact of fetal echocardiography on the incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease.Methods The study involved all infants with congenital heart disease among the 84 062 total births in Beijing during the period of January 1 and December 31, 2007. An echocardiographic examination was performed on every baby suspected to have congenital heart disease, prenatally or/and postnatally.Results A total of 686 infants were shown to have congenital heart disease among 84 062 total births. The overall incidence was 8.2/1000 total births. Mothers of 128 of 151 babies diagnosed prenatally were chosen to terminate the pregnancy. Two of the 151 infants died in utero. A specific lesion was identified for each infant and the frequencies of lesions were determined for each class of infants (total births, stillbirths and live births). The incidence of congenital heart disease in stillbirths and live births was 168.8/1000 and 6.7/1000, respectively. The difference between the incidence of total birth and the incidence of live birth was statistically significant (P<0.001).Conclusions The incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease in Beijing is within the range reported in developed countries. Fetal echocardiography reduce significantly the incidence of livebom congenital heart disease.

  9. Congenital heart disease in India: a status report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Anita

    2005-07-01

    Pediatric cardiac care in India is still in its infancy. We have no data on congenital heart disease (CHD) prevalence at birth or on proportional mortality from CHD. The resources are not only limited but also are at times improperly utilized. There are very few specialized pediatric cardiology training programs, those that are, are concentrated in certain regions of India and are often imparted through combined adult and pediatric programs. The existing number of trained personnel for pediatric cardiology and pediatric cardiac surgery is inadequate. Above all there is no national policy for pediatric heart care. Increasing awareness of the problem amongst the pediatricians through CMEs, seminars, symposia is likely to be most helpful in early diagnosis and timely referral of cases. Training programs exclusively dedicated to pediatric cardiology and pediatric cardiac surgery need to be established in centres with good standards of pediatric cardiac care.

  10. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  11. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, A. de; Roest, A.A.W. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful in the assessment of patients with complex congenital heart disease and in the post-surgical follow-up of patients with corrected congenital heart disease. A thorough understanding of the congenital cardiac malformations that can be encountered is needed and the use of the sequential segmental analysis helps to standardize the evaluation and diagnosis of (complex) congenital heart disease. After surgical correction of congenital heart defects, patients must be followed over extended periods of time, because morphological and functional abnormalities may still be present or may develop. The use of echocardiography may be hampered in these patients as scar tissue and thorax deformities limit the acoustic window. Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be advantageous in the follow-up of these post-surgical patients and with the use of several different techniques the morphological as well as functional abnormalities can be evaluated and followed over time. (orig.)

  12. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  13. Congenital heart disease in Mexico: advances of the regionalization project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; Curi-Curi, Pedro; Ramírez-Marroquín, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Consistent with the mission of the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery to promote health care for children with congenital heart disease all around the world, a Mexican Association of Specialists in Congenital Heart Disease (abbreviated in Spanish as AMECC) was created in Mexico in 2008. Our efforts were coordinated with those of the National Health Secretary with the objective being implementation of a national plan for regionalization of care for patients with congenital heart disease. To improve our knowledge related to technologic and human resources for management of congenital heart disease, we developed a national survey. Finally, a national database was created for collecting all Mexican centers' information related to congenital heart disease care in order to quantify the advances related to the proposed plans. The database utilized international consensus nomenclature. The aim of this article is to show the sequence of our actions in relation to direct accomplishments and the current status of congenital heart disease care in Mexico. This article emphasizes the main aspects of these actions: regionalization project implementation, national survey results, and cardiovascular pediatric surgical database creation. Knowledge of outcomes related to successful actions would be useful for those countries that face similar challenges and may lead them to consider adoption of similar measures with the respective adjustments to their own reality.

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele D'Alto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD, with most cases occurring in patients with congenital cardiac shunts. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodelling and dysfunction, resulting in a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart. Eventually, reversal of the shunt may arise, with the development of Eisenmenger's syndrome, the most advanced form of PAH-CHD. The prevalence of PAH-CHD has fallen in developed countries over recent years and the number of patients surviving into adulthood has increased markedly. Today, the majority of PAH-CHD patients seen in clinical practice are adults, and many of these individuals have complex disease or received a late diagnosis of their defect. While there have been advances in the management and therapy in recent years, PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition and some subgroups, such as those with Down's syndrome, present particular challenges. This article gives an overview of the demographics, pathophysiology and treatment of PAH-CHD and focuses on individuals with Down's syndrome as an important and challenging patient group.

  15. Evaluation of swallowing in infants with congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Karine da Rosa; Firpo, Cora; Gasparin, Marisa; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Dornelles, Silvia; Bacaltchuk, Tzvi; Levy, Deborah Salle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were younger than 7 months and had a diagnosis of congenital heart defect and suspected swallowing difficulties. Results Of the 19 infants with congenital heart defect, the median age was 3.2 months. A significant association was found between suction rhythm and dysphagia (p = 0.036) and between oral-motor oral feeding readiness and dysphagia (p = 0.014). Conclusions The data suggest that dysphagia often occurs after surgery in infants with congenital heart defect. Infants with congenital heart defect had very similar behavior to preterm infants in terms of oral feeding readiness.

  16. Evaluation of Swallowing in Infants with Congenital Heart Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, Karine da Rosa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical repair of congenital heart disease in the first years of life compromises the coordination of the suction, breathing, and swallowing functions. Objective To describe the alterations in swallowing found in infants with congenital heart defect during their hospitalization. Methods Prospective, cross-sectional study in a reference hospital for heart disease. The sample consisted of 19 postsurgical patients who underwent an evaluation of swallowing. The infants included were younger than 7 months and had a diagnosis of congenital heart defect and suspected swallowing difficulties. Results Of the 19 infants with congenital heart defect, the median age was 3.2 months. A significant association was found between suction rhythm and dysphagia (p = 0.036 and between oral-motor oral feeding readiness and dysphagia (p = 0.014. Conclusions The data suggest that dysphagia often occurs after surgery in infants with congenital heart defect. Infants with congenital heart defect had very similar behavior to preterm infants in terms of oral feeding readiness.

  17. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  18. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  19. Genes in congenital heart disease: atrioventricular valve formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joziasse, I.C.; van de Smagt, J.J.; Smith, K.; Bakkers, J.; Sieswerda, G.J.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Through the use of animal studies, many candidate genes (mainly encoding transcriptional factors and receptors) have been implicated in the development of congenital heart disease. Thus far, only a minority of these genes have been shown to carry mutations associated with congenital disease in human

  20. Cardiac biomarkers in children with congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaya Sugimoto; Seiko Kuwata; Clara Kurishima; Jeong Hye Kim; Yoich Iwamoto; Hideaki Senzaki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most congenital heart diseases (CHDs) have specific hemodynamics, including volume and pressure overload, as well as cyanosis and pulmonary hypertension, associated with anatomical abnormalities. Such hemodynamic abnormalities can cause activation of neurohormones, inflammatory cytokines, fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells, which in turn contribute to the development of pathologic conditions such as cardiac hypertrophy,fi brosis, and cardiac cell damages and death. Measuring biomarker levels facilitates the prediction of these pathological changes, and provides information about the stress placed on the myocardial cells, the severity of the damage, the responses of neurohumoral factors, and the remodeling of the ventricle. Compared to the ample information on cardiac biomarkers in adult heart diseases, data from children with CHD are still limited. Data sources: We reviewed cardiac biomarkers-specifi cally focusing on troponin as a biomarker of myocardial damage, amino-terminal procollagen type III peptide (PIIIP) as a biomarker of myocardialfi brosis and stromal remodeling, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)/N-terminal proBNP as biomarkers of cardiac load and heart failure, by introducing relevant publications, including our own, on pediatric CHD patients as well as adults. Results: Levels of highly sensitive troponin I are elevated in patients with atrial septal defects (ASDs) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs). PIIIP levels are also elevated in patients with ASD, VSD, pulmonary stenosis, and Tetralogy of Fallot. Measurement of BNP and N-terminal proBNP levels shows good correlation with heart failure score in children. Conclusions: In the treatment of children with CHD requiring delicate care, it is vital to know the specifi c degree of myocardial damage and severity of heart failure. Cardiac biomarkers are useful tools for ascertaining the condition of CHDs with ease and are likely to be useful in determining the appropriate care of

  1. Adultos com cardiopatia congênita submetidos à primeira cirurgia: prevalência e resultados em um hospital terciário Adults with congenital heart disease undergoing first surgery: prevalence and outcomes at a tertiary hospital

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    Gustavo Alves de Mello

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico da cardiopatia congênita em adultos apresentou importante crescimento nos últimos anos. Contudo, ainda assim, o número de pacientes que atingem a idade adulta sem tratamento cirúrgico adequado permanece elevado. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados hospitalares e diagnósticos dos pacientes adultos com cardiopatia congênita submetidos à primeira operação. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo, que analisou prontuários de pacientes operados para correção de cardiopatia congênita com idade maior ou igual a 18 anos. O critério de exclusão foi cirurgia para reoperação. Foi analisado o período entre dezembro de 2007 e dezembro de 2010, com inclusão de 79 pacientes. RESULTADOS: Os defeitos do septo atrial foram os mais prevalentes (53,1%, seguidos de comunicação interventricular (15,2%, coarctação da aorta (6,3% e canal atrioventricular parcial (6,3%. Treze (16,4% pacientes apresentavam doença associada adquirida e 14 pacientes (17,7%, congênita. Trinta e três (41,8% pacientes apresentavam hipertensão pulmonar. O tempo médio de internamento em UTI e hospitalar foi de 3,9 e 14,5 dias, respectivamente. Complicações ocorreram em 18 (22,8% pacientes, sendo as infecciosas as mais comuns. A mortalidade hospitalar foi de dois (2,5% pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento da cardiopatia congênita em adultos como primeira cirurgia apresentou resultado bastante favorável. Contudo, em nossa série, houve maior tempo de internamento em UTI e hospitalar.INTRODUCTION: Surgical treatment of congenital heart disease in adults showed a significant growth in recent years. But even so, the number of patients who reach adulthood without adequate surgical treatment remains high. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the results and hospital diagnoses of adult patients with congenital heart disease underwent the first surgery. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of records of patients operated for correction of congenital heart

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease : An epidemiologic perspective from a Dutch registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffels, M. G. J.; Engelfriet, P. M.; Berger, R. M. F.; van Loon, R. L. E.; Hoendermis, E.; Vriend, J. W. J.; Bresser, P.; Mulder, B. J. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease is usually the result of a large systemic-topulmonary shunt, and often leads to right ventricular failure and early death. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of PAH among adult patients

  3. Long-term tricuspid valve prosthesis-related complications in patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; Freling, Hendrik G.; van Melle, Joost P.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with acquired valvar disease, morbidity and mortality rates after tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) are high. However, in adult patients with congenital heart disease, though data concerning outcome after TVR are scarce, even poorer results are suggested in patients with Ebst

  4. Right Ventricular Adaptation in Congenital Heart Diseases

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    Beatrijs Bartelds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, enormous progress has been made in the treatment of congenital heart diseases (CHD; most patients now survive into adulthood, albeit with residual lesions. As a consequence, the focus has shifted from initial treatment to long-term morbidity and mortality. An important predictor for long-term outcome is right ventricular (RV dysfunction, but knowledge on the mechanisms of RV adaptation and dysfunction is still scarce. This review will summarize the main features of RV adaptation to CHD, focusing on recent knowledge obtained in experimental models of the most prevalent abnormal loading conditions, i.e., pressure load and volume load. Models of increased pressure load for the RV have shown a similar pattern of responses, i.e., increased contractility, RV dilatation and hypertrophy. Evidence is accumulating that RV failure in response to increased pressure load is marked by progressive diastolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of this progressive dysfunction are insufficiently known. The RV response to pressure load shares similarities with that of the LV, but also has specific features, e.g., capillary rarefaction, oxidative stress and inflammation. The contribution of these pathways to the development of failure needs further exploration. The RV adaptation to increased volume load is an understudied area, but becomes increasingly important in the growing groups of survivors of CHD, especially with tetralogy of Fallot. Recently developed animal models may add to the investigation of the mechanisms of RV adaptation and failure, leading to the development of new RV-specific therapies.

  5. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

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    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD.Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia.Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families.Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%.Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis.

  6. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD. Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia. Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families. Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%. Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:173-6.

  7. Assessment of Diastolic Function in Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Dilveer Kaur; Burch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Diastolic function is an important component of left ventricular (LV) function which is often overlooked. It can cause symptoms of heart failure in patients even in the presence of normal systolic function. The parameters used to assess diastolic function often measure flow and are affected by the loading conditions of the heart. The interpretation of diastolic function in the context of congenital heart disease requires some understanding of the effects of the lesions themselves on these parameters. Individual congenital lesions will be discussed in this paper. Recently, load-independent techniques have led to more accurate measurements of ventricular compliance and remodeling in heart disease. The combination of inflow velocities and tissue Doppler measurements can be used to estimate diastolic function and LV filling pressures. This review focuses on diastolic function and assessment in congenital heart disease.

  8. Transcriptional atlas of cardiogenesis maps congenital heart disease interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Hartjes, Katherine A; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Olson, Timothy M; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian heart development is built on highly conserved molecular mechanisms with polygenetic perturbations resulting in a spectrum of congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, knowledge of cardiogenic ontogeny that regulates proper cardiogenesis remains largely based on candidate-gene approaches. Mapping the dynamic transcriptional landscape of cardiogenesis from a genomic perspective is essential to integrate the knowledge of heart development into translational applications that accelerate disease discovery efforts toward mechanistic-based treatment strategies. Herein, we designed a time-course transcriptome analysis to investigate the genome-wide dynamic expression landscape of innate murine cardiogenesis ranging from embryonic stem cells to adult cardiac structures. This comprehensive analysis generated temporal and spatial expression profiles, revealed stage-specific gene functions, and mapped the dynamic transcriptome of cardiogenesis to curated pathways. Reconciling known genetic underpinnings of CHD, we deconstructed a disease-centric dynamic interactome encoded within this cardiogenic atlas to identify stage-specific developmental disturbances clustered on regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), BMP signaling, NF-AT signaling, TGFb-dependent EMT, and Notch signaling. Collectively, this cardiogenic transcriptional landscape defines the time-dependent expression of cardiac ontogeny and prioritizes regulatory networks at the interface between health and disease.

  9. Changing demographics of pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease

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    B.J.M. Mulder

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a serious complication of congenital heart disease (CHD. Without early surgical repair, around one-third of paediatric CHD patients develop significant PAH. Recent data from the Netherlands suggest that >4% of adult CHD patients have PAH, with higher rates in those with septal defects. A spectrum of cardiac defects is associated with PAH-CHD, although most cases develop as a consequence of large systemic-to-pulmonary shunts. Eisenmenger's syndrome, characterised by reversed pulmonary-to-systemic (right-to-left shunt, represents the most advanced form of PAH-CHD and affects as many as 50% of those with PAH and left-to-right shunts. It is associated with the poorest outcome among patients with PAH-CHD. 40 yrs ago, ∼50% of children with CHD requiring intervention died within the first year, and <15% survived to adulthood. Subsequent advances in paediatric cardiology have seen most patients with CHD survive to adulthood, with resulting shifts in the demographics of CHD and PAH-CHD. The number of adults presenting with CHD is increasing and, although mortality is decreasing, morbidity is increasing as older patients are at increased risk of arrhythmia, heart failure, valve regurgitation and PAH. Data show that probability of PAH increases with age in patients with cardiac defects.

  10. Congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts

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    Nahvi H.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Oral clefts are among the most common congenital anomalies. Infants with oral clefts often have other associated congenital defects, especially congenital heart defects. The reported incidences and the types of associated malformations and congenital heart defects vary between different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of associated congenital heart defects in children with oral clefts. Methods: All infants with cleft lip and palate referred to the Children's Medical Center and Bahramy; the teaching Hospitals of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1991 to 2005 were prospectively enrolled in this study group. All patients were examined and noted by an academic cleft team contain; a pediatrician and a pediatric surgeon, and received cardiac consultation and echocardiography by a pediatric cardiologist. non cardiac associated anomalies, still born and patients without echocardiography were excluded from the study.  Data including age, gender, exposure to contagions and high risk elements ,consanguinity and familial history of oral cleft, type of oral cleft, results of cardiac consultation and echocardiography and associated cardiac anomalies were cumulated and analyzed by SSPS version 13.5Results: Among the 284 infants with oral clefts, 162 were male (57% and 122 were female (43%. Seventy-nine patients (27.8% had cleft lip, 84 (29.5% had cleft palate and 121 (42.6% had both cleft lip and palate. Of all the patients, 21.1% had congenital heart defects. the most common type Of these congenital heart defects(28.3%  was atrial septal defect.Conclusions: For patients with cleft lip and palate, we recommend preoperative cardiac consultation, careful examination and routine echocardiography for associated cardiac anomalies, as well as appropriate management and prophylactic antibiotic therapy for those with associated congenital heart anomaly.

  11. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Mohd; Chowdhary, J; Khajuria, K; Reyaz, A M

    2009-12-01

    A retrospective analysis of case-records data of 53,653 patients (0-18 years) over a two and half year period was conducted to ascertain the spectrum of congenital heart diseases. Two hundred and twenty one patients were found having congenital heart diseases; a prevalence of 4.1/1000. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most frequent lesion seen in 69 (31.2%), followed by patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in 36 (16.3%) children. Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) was the most frequent cyanotic heart disease seen in 17 (7.8%) patients.

  12. Intrauterine Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Sharron; Priest, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure during pregnancy are linked to a host of deleterious effects on the pregnancy, fetus, and infant. Health outcomes improve when women quit smoking at any time during the pregnancy. However, the developing heart is vulnerable to noxious stimuli in the early weeks of fetal development, a time when many women are not aware of being pregnant. Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Research shows an association between maternal tobacco exposure, both active and passive, and congenital heart defects. This article presents recent evidence supporting the association between intrauterine cigarette smoke exposure in the periconceptional period and congenital heart defects and discusses clinical implications for practice for perinatal and neonatal nurses.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital fetal heart abnormalities and clinical analysis*

    OpenAIRE

    Li,Hui; Wei, Jun; Ma, Ying; Shang, Tao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of detecting fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) using the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography. Methods: Nine hundred and eighty-two high-risk pregnancies for fetal CHD were included in this study, the fetal heart was scanned with the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography described by Yagel, autopsy was conducted when pregnancy was terminated. Blood from fetal heart was collected for fetal chromosome analysis. A close ...

  14. The evolving role of the total artificial heart in the management of end-stage congenital heart disease and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas D; Jefferies, John L; Zafar, Farhan; Lorts, Angela; Morales, David L S

    2015-01-01

    Advances in medical therapies have yielded improvement in morbidity and a decrease in mortality for patients with congenital heart disease, both surgically palliated and uncorrected. An unintended consequence is a cohort of adolescent and adult patients with heart failure who require alternative therapies. One intriguing option is placement of a total artificial heart (TAH) either as a bridge to transplant or as a destination therapy. Of the 1091 Jarvik-7 type TAH (Symbion, CardioWest and SynCardia) placed between 1985 and 2012, only 24 have been performed in patients with congenital heart disease, and a total of 51 were placed in patients younger than 21. At our institution, the SynCardia TAH was implanted in a 19-year-old patient with cardiac allograft failure because of chronic rejection and related multisystem organ failure including need for hemodialysis. Over the next year, she was nutritionally and physically rehabilitated, as were her end organs, allowing her to come off dialysis, achieve normal renal function and eventually be successfully transplanted. Given the continued growth of adolescent and adult congenital heart disease populations with end-stage heart failure, the TAH may offer therapeutic options where previously there were few. In addition, smaller devices such as the SynCardia 50/50 will open the door for applications in smaller children. The Freedom Driver offers the chance for patients to leave the hospital with a TAH, as does the AbioCor, which is a fully implantable TAH option. In this report, we review the history of the TAH and potential applications in adolescent patients and congenital heart disease.

  15. Congenial Heart Disease at Adult Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2004-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Congenital cardiac defects are by far the most common congenital anomalies. Of all live births around the world, approximately 1% is born with congenital heart disease.1 This number is even higher if patients with a bicuspid aortic valve are included.2 Accordingly, in t

  16. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  17. Gluten Sensitivity among Egyptian Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alameey, Inas R.; Ahmed, Hanaa H.; Tawfik, Sawsan M.; Hassaballa, Fawzia; Gawad, Ayman M. Abdel; Eltahlawy, Eman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in infants with congenital heart disease. AIM: This study was designed to evaluate age-dependent serum levels of antigliadin antibodies among malnourished Egyptian infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) and gastrointestinal symptoms. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This case-control study conducted on 60 infants with established congenital heart disease. They were subdivided into cyanotic and acyanotic groups, and each group includes 30 patients compared with thirty apparently healthy infants of matched age, sex, and social class. Serum antigliadin antibodies levels were measured using ELISA. RESULTS: The mean age of introduction of cereals in the diet and appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms were six months. On comparison with controls, patients showed highly significant higher serum levels of antigliadin antibodies (P Gluten containing foods should never be introduced before the end of the six months. PMID:28293318

  18. Neurological status of children with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M T; Hussain, M Z; Bhuiyan, M R; Roy, G R; Barua, C; Kabir, A

    2014-07-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common birth defect & a significant cause of childhood morbidity & mortality. Structural brain abnormalities are more common in children with CHD than general population. This study details the cognitive, motor and behavioral development of a child with congenital heart disease who is on medical management. In this retrospective descriptive study, abnormalities in neurobehavioral status of infant & children (6-42 months of age) with CHD, who are on medical management were assessed by a standardized neurobehavioral assessment test, BSID-II. Fifty-eight children were included, who were diagnosed as a case of congenital heart disease & confirmed by Colour Doppler echocardiography in the Paediatric Cardiology Department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Bangladesh. Mean age of the children was 23±13 months (range, 6 to 42 months); M:F = 1:1.9. Among them 22(37.9%) had cyanotic and 36(62.1%) had acyanotic congenital heart disease. Neurobehavioral and neurologic abnormalities were documented in a significant number of children. BSID-II showed 23(39.7%) had delayed metal development, 24(41.4%) had motor impairment and 16(27.6%) had non-optimal behavioral performance. Interestingly, infant and young children with acyanotic congenital heart defects were more likely to demonstrate severe neurologic compromise than were those with cyanotic defects. Findings of this study suggest that the prevalence of neurobehavioral abnormalities in infants and young children with congenital heart defects has been under predicted & indicates that delay in closure (surgery/device) puts the patient at an increased risk of neuro-developmental insult.

  19. Echocardiography for the Assessment of Congenital Heart Defects in Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katharyn Jean; Schwarzwald, Colin Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Congenital heart disease should be considered when evaluating calves with chronic respiratory signs, failure to thrive, poor growth, or if a murmur is heard on physical examination. Echocardiography is currently the gold standard for diagnosing congenital heart defects. A wide variety of defects, either alone or in combination with a ventricular septal defect, are possible. A standardized approach using sequential segmental analysis is required to fully appreciate the nature and severity of more complex malformations. The prognosis for survival varies from guarded to poor and depends on the hemodynamic relevance of the defects and the degree of cardiac compensation.

  20. Early complications of stenting in patients with congenital heart disease : a multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gameren, Menno; Witsenburg, Maarten; Takkenberg, Johanna J. M.; Boshoff, Derize; Mertens, Luc; van Oort, Anton M.; de Wolf, DanieL; Freund, Matthias; Sreeram, Narayanswani; Bokenkamp, Regina; Talsma, Melle D.; Gewillig, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Aims Stenting has become an established interventional cardiology procedure for congenital heart disease. Although most stent procedures are completed successfully, complications may occur. This multicentre study evaluated early complications after stenting in patients with congenital heart disease,

  1. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

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    Mariana Alievi Mari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months. Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001. The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042, child's age (P=0.001 and income per capita (P=0.019. Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up.

  2. Prevalence of Congenital Heart Diseases in Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism

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    Mohamed Abdel Megied Abo El-Magd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to assess the prevalence of cardiac anomalies in primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH patients. Fifty patients with PCH recruited after diagnosis by ultrasonography or scintigraphy (64% Dysgenesis, 36% Dyshormonogenesis. The prevalence of cardiac anomalies was 18%, with renal anomalies being 8%. There was no significant difference in the longitudinal follow-up of growth and sexual maturation between a hypothyroid with and without anomalies. Statistically significant difference was found with replacement therapy of both groups. Hence, echocardiography should be done to screen this birth defect as soon as possible so as to prevent or delay the possible complications. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 85-91

  3. A Child with Lung Hypoplasia, Congenital Heart Disease, Hemifacial Microsomia, and Inguinal Hernia: Ipsilateral Congenital Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chengming; Huang, Can; Liu, Jijia; Yang, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old Chinese boy was diagnosed with ipsilateral congenital malformations: right lung hypoplasia, dextroversion of heart, atrial septal defect, hepatic vein drainage directly into the right atrium, facial asymmetry, right microtia and congenital deafness, and indirect inguinal hernia. He underwent indirect inguinal hernia repair at the age of 2. Although without any facial plastic surgery performed, he underwent a repair of atrial septal defect and recovered uneventfully. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from any symptom of dyspnea; his heart function returned to the first grade. PMID:26294998

  4. A Child with Lung Hypoplasia, Congenital Heart Disease, Hemifacial Microsomia, and Inguinal Hernia: Ipsilateral Congenital Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengming Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old Chinese boy was diagnosed with ipsilateral congenital malformations: right lung hypoplasia, dextroversion of heart, atrial septal defect, hepatic vein drainage directly into the right atrium, facial asymmetry, right microtia and congenital deafness, and indirect inguinal hernia. He underwent indirect inguinal hernia repair at the age of 2. Although without any facial plastic surgery performed, he underwent a repair of atrial septal defect and recovered uneventfully. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from any symptom of dyspnea; his heart function returned to the first grade.

  5. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  6. Sotalol for atrial tachycardias after surgery for congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BeaufortKrol, GCM; BinkBoelkens, MTE

    1997-01-01

    Atrial tachycardias, in particular atrial flutter after surgery for congenital heart disease, is associated with a high mortality. Treatment with various antiarrhythmic drugs and/or antitachycardia pacemakers is not very successful. Sotalol, a Class III drug, has shown to be a promising drug in adul

  7. [Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in congenital heart block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios Prieto, Ernesto; Martínez Ceccopieri, David Alejandro; Panduro Barón, J Guadalupe; Fajardo Dueñas, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Describe a case of a female patient having anti-Ro/SSA antibodies without any other risk factor or collagen disease. In her first pregnancy a congenital heart block and hydrops in the fetus were diagnosed, and these caused stillbirth. In a second pregnancy an in utero treatment resulted in the succesful delivery of a normal child.

  8. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions.

  9. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  10. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  11. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øyen, Nina; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Leirgul, Elisabeth;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a national cohort study, we...

  12. Nutritional Approach of Pediatric Patients Diagnosed with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togănel Rodica

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects are among the most frequent anomalies present at birth, representing a heterogeneous group of malformations, both in terms of pathogenesis and clinical significance of the lesion. Failure to grow is well documented in infants with complex congenital heart defects; the presence of associated chromosomal abnormalities, cyanosis, and cardiac failure adds to the complexity and challenge. Malnutrition etiology can be grouped into the following three categories: inadequate intake, inefficient absorption and utilization, and/or increased energy needs. The consequences of malnutrition are both short and long term, timely nutritional intervention being necessary in order to maintain an adequate nutritional state. Because there are several types of congenital heart defects and multiple mechanisms by which they produce failure to thrive, no single strategy will be adequate to treat all cases. Medical complications such as chylotorax, necrotizing enterocolitis, laryngeal and neurological dysfunction play a major role in the requisite nutrition therapy in infants with congenital heart defect; limited access to human milk and parenteral concerns, as well as stress about feeding are also factors that can contribute to poor outcomes concerning nutrition and growth. Protocols are being considered and designed, and a systematic approach is always needed. The quality of life for patient and family, as well as getting the child back on track for age-appropriate development are always at the fore-front of each care plan.

  13. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, he...

  14. Grown Up Congenital Heart Diseases (GUCH: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajmer Singh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The survival of children with congenital heart disease into adulthood has increased. These patients may require primary cardiac surgical repair, repair after prior palliation, revision of repair for residual lesion, or non-cardiac surgery. Preoperative cardiac evaluation consists of review of laboratory data, echocardiography, cardiac MRI, CT, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, arrhythmia monitoring, and cardiac catheterization. Perioperative complications are more frequently seen in high-risk patients i.e. those with pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, heart failure, and poor general health. Guidelines for the management of patients with grown up congenital heart (GUCH diseases suggest that such patients are best treated in dedicated tertiary care centres by a multidisciplinary team, knowledgeable about the anatomy and pathophysiology of the lesion.

  15. Congenital heart disease. Evaluation of anatomy and function by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebergen, S.A.; Roos, A. de [Dept. of Radiology, Leiden Univ. Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2000-06-01

    With the increasing number of patients surviving after therapeutic intervention for congenital heart disease (CHD), accurate and frequent follow-up of their morphologic and functional cardiovascular status is required, preferably with a noninvasive imaging technique. Echocardiography, either transthoracic or transesophageal, has been the first choice for this purpose, and will probably keep that status, at least in a large segment of the CHD spectrum. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established method for high-resolution visualization of cardiovascular morphology. In the past decade, newer MRI techniques have been developed that allow functional evaluation of CHD patients. Particularly the introduction of breath-hold imaging, contrast-enhanced MRA and user-friendly computer software for image analysis may move functional MRI of CHD from the science laboratory to clinical use. It is already evident that MRI is superior to echocardiography in certain areas of limited echocardiographic acces, such as the pulmonary artery branches and the aortic arch in adult patients. But MRI has also a unique potential for accurate volumetric analysis of ventricular function and cardiovascular blood flow, without any geometric assumptions. If supported by increased cooperation between cardiologists and radiologists, MRI will grow into a useful noninvasive imaging tool that, together with echocardiography, will obviate the need for invasive catheter studies for diagnostic purposes. (orig.) [German] Weltweit werden jaehrlich etwa 1,5 Millionen Kinder mit kongenitalen Herzerkrankungen (CHD, congenital heart disease) geboren. Durch Verbesserung der verschiedenen chirurgischen und interventionellen Techniken ist die Ueberlebensrate von CHD-Patienten drastisch gestiegen. Immer mehr Patienten mit postoperativen Residuen, Folgezustaenden und Komplikationen benoetigen eine umfassende Nachsorge. Die Darstellung und Quantifizierung morphologischer und funktioneller kardiovaskulaerer

  16. Living with a Congenital Heart Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the dentist also can help prevent IE. Birth Control and Pregnancy Women who have heart defects should ... with their doctors about the safest type of birth control for them. Many of these women can safely ...

  17. Complete congenital heart block in autoimmune hepatitis (SLA-positive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolle, P; Mayet, W; Lohse, A W; Treichel, U; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Gerken, G

    1994-08-01

    Complete congenital heart block is a serious complication of neonatal lupus erythematosus which most often occurs in children of mothers suffering from connective tissue disease. We report the occurrence of complete congenital heart block associated with autoimmune hepatitis (SLA-positive). A 32-year-old woman was treated for more than 10 years for autoimmune hepatitis (SLA-/ANA-positive) and remained in clinical remission under immunosuppressive therapy. She showed an MHC-haplotype typical for autoimmune hepatitis (A1, B8, DR3). After a normal first pregnancy, an emergency caesarean section was performed in the 32nd week of her second pregnancy because of fetal bradycardia. The child died a few hours after delivery of complete congenital AV-block. Retrospective analysis of the maternal serum showed the emergence of SS-A/Ro-antibodies prior to the second pregnancy. The maternal serum antibodies were reactive with the 52 kD SS-A/Ro-antigen, as demonstrated by immunoblot employing recombinant SSA/Ro-antigen. The occurrence of complete congenital heart block has been shown to be associated with the presence of SS-A/Ro antibodies as well as the MHC-haplotype DR3. With respect to this genetic linkage, pregnant patients with autoimmune hepatitis and the MHC-haplotype DR3 should be examined for the presence of SS-A/Ro-antibodies. They should be closely followed during pregnancy to enable early detection of the development of congenital heart block, as prevention by plasmapheresis plus dexamethasone may be possible at an early stage.

  18. Radionuclide angiocardiography in the diagnosis of congenital heart disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Austin, E.H.; Peter, C.A.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    Radionuclide angiocardiography provides a noninvasive assessment of cardiac function and blood flow through the heart and lungs. During the past three years, this procedure has been used at the Duke University Medical Center for evaluation of 343 patients with congenital heart disorders. A review of this experience shows tat the resulting data were frequently useful in the surgical management of these patients. In patients with abnormal blood flow patterns, noninvasive imaging of blood flow was useful before and after operative correction. Radionuclide measurements of left-to-right intracardiac shunts were sufficiently accurate for use in the initial evaluation of patients with murmurs and to document the absence of shunt after operative closure of intracardiac septal defects. Moreover, measurements of right-to-left cardiac shunts were of benefit in the management of children with cyanotic heart disease. Measurements of left ventricular function obtained during rest and exercise were most useful in patients with origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery and in patients with congenital valvular insufficiency. This experience demonstrates that radionuclide angiocardiography provides important measurements of central hemodynamics and cardiac function which are useful in the management of patients with congenital heart disorders.

  19. Cardiac CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn, E-mail: ssiripornpitak@yahoo.com [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Pornkul, Ratanaporn [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Khowsathit, Pongsak [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Layangool, Thanarat; Promphan, Worakan [Pediatric Cardiology Unit, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health, Bangkok (Thailand); Pongpanich, Boonchob [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Cardiac imaging plays an important role in both congenital and acquired heart diseases. Cardiac computed tomography (angiography) cCT(A) is a non-invasive, increasingly popular, complementary modality to echocardiography in evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD) in children. Despite radiation exposure, cCT(A) is now commonly used for evaluation of the complex CHD, giving information of both intra-cardiac and extra-cardiac anatomy, coronary arteries, and vascular structures. This review article will focus on the fundamentals and essentials for performing cCT(A) in children, including radiation dose awareness, basic techniques, and strengths and weaknesses of cCT(A) compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and applications. The limitations of this modality will also be discussed, including the CHD for which cMRI may be substituted.

  20. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan H Bittles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders.

  1. 10.7.Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930270 Clinical analysis of rupture of aorticsinus aneurysm in 30 cases.ZHANG Yuwei (张玉威),et al.Instit Cardiovasc Dis,Dept Med,Shenyang Milit General Hosp,PLA.Chin Cir J1993;8(1):30—31.Rupture of aortic sinus aneurysm is a rarecongenital heart disease.It is sometimes misdi-agnosed and treated because of no typical symp-toms and signs.30 cases with rupture of a-neurysm of aortic sinus were studied.Clinicaldata suggested that the disease could be firstlynoticed when the healthy male aged 20~40years developed suddenly chest pain or extreme-ly uncomfortable feeling with gradually increas-ing heart dysfunction low—frequency harsh andsuperficial continuous precordial murmurs.Chest X-ray exhibited enlargement of heartand asymmetry of pulmonary plethora.ECG

  2. Postoperative cardiac arrest in children with congenital heart abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The exact survival rates and markers of survival after postoperative cardiac arrest in children with congenital heart abnormalities are unknown. METHODS In this one-year study, we identified children younger than seven years of age with postoperative cardiac arrest in our pediatric cardiac intensive care unit database. Parameters from perioperative, pre-arrest, and resuscitation periods were analyzed for these patients. Comparisons were made between survivors and non-survivors afte...

  3. Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 causes congenital heart defects in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thienpont, Bernard; Zhang, Litu; Postma, Alex V;

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common major developmental anomalies and the most frequent cause for perinatal mortality, but their etiology remains often obscure. We identified a locus for CHDs on 6q24-q25. Genotype-phenotype correlations in 12 patients carrying a chromosomal deletion...... in cardiac development was further supported by its conserved expression in the developing human and zebrafish heart. Moreover, a critical, dosage-sensitive role during development was demonstrated by the cardiac defects observed upon titrated knockdown of tab2 expression in zebrafish embryos...

  4. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza, Rogerio [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli, E-mail: ijatene@hcor.com.br [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested.

  5. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Failure Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... or maintain quality of life. Urinary Incontinence and Heart Failure If you have heart failure, you may experience ...

  6. Congenital heart disease in the newborn requiring early intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Weon Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although antenatal diagnostic technique has considerably improved, precise detection and proper management of the neonate with congenital heart disease (CHD is always a great concern to pediatricians. Congenital cardiac malformations vary from benign to serious conditions such as complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA, critical pulmonary and aortic valvular stenosis/atresia, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS, obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR, which the baby needs immediate diagnosis and management for survival. Unfortunately, these life threatening heart diseases may not have obvious evidence early after birth, most of the clinical and physical findings are nonspecific and vague, which makes the diagnosis difficult. High index of suspicion and astute acumen are essential to decision making. When patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is opened widely, many serious malformations may not be noticed easily in the early life, but would progress as severe acidosis/shock/cyanosis or even death as PDA constricts after few hours to days. Ductus dependent congenital cardiac lesions can be divided into the ductus dependent systemic or pulmonary disease, but physiologically quite different from each other and treatment strategy has to be tailored to the clinical status and cardiac malformations. Inevitably early presentation is often regarded as a medical emergency. Differential diagnosis with inborn error metabolic disorders, neonatal sepsis, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN and other pulmonary conditions are necessary. Urgent identification of the newborn at such high risk requires timely referral to a pediatric cardiologist, and timely intervention is the key in reducing mortality and morbidity. This following review deals with the clinical presentations, investigative modalities and approach to management of congenital cardiac malformations presenting in the early life.

  7. Haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    In patients with congenital heart disease, haemodynamic findings demonstrated on cardiac CT might provide useful hints for understanding the haemodynamics of cardiac defects. In contrast to morphological features depicted on cardiac CT, such haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT have not been comprehensively reviewed in patients with congenital heart disease. This article describes normal haemodynamic phenomena of cardiovascular structures and various abnormal haemodynamic findings with their mechanisms and clinical significance on cardiac CT in patients with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  8. Urine β 2-Microglobolin in the Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Mohammad Noori; Simin Sadeghi; Iraj Shahramian; Kambiz Keshavarz

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the renal tubular function in the patients with congenital heart disease using β2-microglobulin. Methods: In this case-control study, based on oxymetry, the patients with congenital heart disease were divided into two groups of cyanotic (n=20) and acyanotic (n=20). Congenital heart disease was diagnosed by echocardiography. Healthy individuals within the same age and sex groups were used as controls. Na+, β2-micro globulin, creatinine (Cr), and β2-...

  9. [Computerized tomography in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, V N; Iurpol'skaia, L A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the possibility to use CT techniques (SCT and MRT) for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. A total of 426 patient aged 0-54 years were examined (171 by MRT and 255 by SCT. SCT of the heart with bolus injection of a contrast medium was performed on an Evolution C-150 superfast tomograph in the step-scanning regime and prospective synchronization with ECG (slice thickness 1.5-3 mm). Fasting SCT was used to examine children in the first year of life during quiet (unforced) breathing. Contrast material (Omnipack-300, 350; Visipack-270, 320) was administered at a dose of 1.5-2.0 ml/ kg b.w. at 0.2-0.6 ml/s. MRT was performed using a conventional MR tomograph with a 1 T field and pulsed spin-echo sequences synchronized with ECG for obtaining the anatomic picture and gradient echo-signals (cine-MRT) for the assessment of functional parameters (slice thickness 4-7 mm). Babies were examined under medicamentous sedation. All images were treated and analysed using an Advantage Windows 2.0 workstation and a program package for heart image analysis. A rational procedure of CT and image analysis was developed in the course of the study. It provided data on the formation of all segments and intercommunications of the heart, mutual localization of its cavities and major vessels, permitted to perform morphometry of selected cardiac structures and detect anatomic defects. The informative and diagnostic value of methods for comprehensive evaluation of the heart and mediastinum in patients with congenital heart disease was assessed. Methods of choice for the diagnosis of abnormalities and follow-up of the patients in different periods after surgery were identified.

  10. Consensus on timing of intervention for common congenital heart diseases: part I - acyanotic heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Syamasundar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review/editorial is to discuss how and when to treat the most common acyanotic congenital heart defects (CHD); the discussion of cyanotic heart defects will be presented in a subsequent editorial. By and large, the indications and timing of intervention are decided by the severity of the lesion. Balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty is the treatment of choice for valvar pulmonary stenosis and the indication for intervention is peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient >50 mmHg across the pulmonary valve. For aortic valve stenosis, balloon aortic valvuloplasty appears to be the first therapeutic procedure of choice; the indications for balloon dilatation of aortic valve are peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient across the aortic valve in excess of 70 mmHg irrespective of the symptoms or a gradient ≥ 50 mmHg with either symptoms or electrocardiographic ST-T wave changes indicative of myocardial perfusion abnormality. The indications for intervention in coarctation of the aorta are significant hypertension and/or congestive heart failure along with a pressure gradient in excess of 20 mmHg across the coarctation; the type of intervention varies with age at presentation and the anatomy of coarctation: surgical intervention for neonates and young infants, balloon angioplasty for discrete native coarctation in children, and stents in adolescents and adults. Long segment coarctations or those associated with hypoplasia of the isthmus or transverse aortic arch require surgical treatment in younger children and stents in adolescents and adults. For post-surgical aortic recoarctation, balloon angioplasty in young children and stents in adolescents and adults are treatment options. Transcatheter closure methods are currently preferred for ostium secundum atrial septal defects (ASDs); the indications for occlusion are right ventricular volume overload by echocardiogram. Ostium primum, sinus venosus and coronary sinus ASDs require surgical closure. For all ASDs

  11. [Congenital sick sinus syndrome in a healthy heart: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Youssef; Hmam, Mohamed; Battikh, Kaïes; Mlika, Azmi; Terras, Mouna; Longo, Salma; Kraïem, Sondes; Slimane, Mohamed L

    2003-06-01

    Isolated congenital sick sinusal syndrome on non harmed heart is a rare affection. Its association with an atrio-ventricular block is exceptional. The authors report a case of a 19 year-old patient, with an early history of bradycardia, hospitalised for effort intolerance. His electrocardiogram reveals a high degree sino-atrial block replaced by a junctional rhythm at 30/mn. During Treadmill test, the sinusal acceleration is satisfactory and an effort atrio-ventricular block was present. He later had a definitive stimulation under DDDR. This report shows that the sinusal node, in the same way as the atrio-ventricular node may be injured by congenital dysimmunitary process. The coexistence of these two conductive troubles worsen the prognosis and should lead more often to the practice of definitive stimulation by the only mode DDDR.

  12. Adult duodenal intussusception associated with congenital malrotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Enteroenteric intussusception is a condition in which full-thickness bowel wall becomes telescoped into the lumen of distal bowel. In adults, there is usually an abnormality acting as a lead point, usually a Meckels' diverticulum, a hamartoma or a tumour. Duodenoduodenal intussusception is exceptionally rare because the retroperitoneal situation fixes the duodenal wall.The aim of this report is to describe the first published case of this condition. A patient with duodeno-duodenal intussusception secondary to an ampullary lesion is reported. A 66 year-old lady presented with intermittent abdominal pain, weight loss and anaemia. Ultrasound scanning showed dilated bile and pancreatic ducts.CT scanning revealed intussusception involving the full-thickness duodenal wall. The lead point was an ampullary villous adenoma. Congenital partial (type Ⅱ)malrotation was found at operation and this abnormality permitted excessive mobility of the duodenal wall such that intussusception was possible. This condition can be diagnosed using enhanced CT. Intussusception can be complicated by bowel obstruction, ischaemia or bleeding,and therefore the underlying cause should be treated as soon as possible.

  13. Congenital meningocoele presenting in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra V Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old male patient presented with low back pain radiating to both lower limbs for 2 years and urinary incontinence for 2 months. He had swelled over his lower back since birth. The neurological examination revealed a decreased perianal sensation. Local examination of the lumbar swelling showed a brilliantly transilluminant, cystic midline swelling in the lumbar area with underlying spina bifida. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a low-lying conus at L3 level associated with spina bifida at L5 and a meningocoele sac. The patient underwent excision of the meningocoele and detethering of cord by extirpation of hypertrophied filum terminale. The patient had an immediate relief of his symptoms. At 3 month follow-up the lumbar wound had healed well, and there was a significant improvement in the perianal hypoesthesia. The adult presentation of a congenital meningocoele and spinal dysraphism is rare, especially in the fifth decade. The possible causes of this delayed presentation are analyzed, and the relevant literature on the subject is presented.

  14. Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices for Pediatric Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopski, Steven G; Moskowitz, William B; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    The use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices is a viable therapeutic treatment option for patients with congestive heart failure. Ventricular assist devices, cavopulmonary assist devices, and total artificial heart pumps continue to gain acceptance as viable treatment strategies for both adults and pediatric patients as bridge-to-transplant, bridge-to-recovery, and longer-term circulatory support alternatives. We present a review of the current and future MCS devices for patients having congenital heart disease (CHD) with biventricular or univentricular circulations. Several devices that are specifically designed for patients with complex CHD are in the development pipeline undergoing rigorous animal testing as readiness experiments in preparation for future clinical trials. These advances in the development of new blood pumps for patients with CHD will address a significant unmet clinical need, as well as generally improve innovation of the current state of the art in MCS technology.

  15. Ambient air pollution and congenital heart defects in Lanzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lan; Qiu, Jie; Zhang, Yaqun; Qiu, Weitao; He, Xiaochun; Wang, Yixuan; Sun, Qingmei; Li, Min; Zhao, Nan; Cui, Hongmei; Liu, Sufen; Tang, Zhongfeng; Chen, Ya; Yue, Li; Da, Zhenqiang; Xu, Xiaoying; Huang, Huang; Liu, Qing; Bell, Michelle L.; Zhang, Yawei

    2015-07-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most prevalent type of birth defects. The association of air pollution with congenital heart defects is not well understood. We investigated a cohort of 8969 singleton live births in Lanzhou, China during 2010-2012. Using inverse distance weighting, maternal exposures to particulate matter with diameters ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were estimated as a combination of monitoring station levels for time spent at home and in a work location. We used logistic regression to estimate the associations, adjusting for maternal age, education, income, BMI, disease, folic acid intake and therapeutic drug use, and smoking; season of conception, fuel used for cooking and temperature. We found significant positive associations of Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) with PM10 during the 1st trimester, 2nd trimester and the entire pregnancy (OR 1st trimester = 3.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36, 11.53; OR 2nd trimester = 3.59, 95% CI: 1.57, 8.22; OR entire pregnancy = 2.09, 95% CI: 1.21, 3.62, per interquartile range (IQR) increment for PM10 (IQR = 71.2, 61.6, and 27.4 μg m-3, respectively)), and associations with NO2 during 2nd trimester and the entire pregnancy (OR 2nd trimester = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.11, 3.34; OR entire pregnancy = 2.32, 95% Cl: 1.14, 4.71, per IQR increment for NO2 (IQR = 13.4 and 10.9 μg m-3, respectively)). The associations for congenital malformations of the great arteries and pooled cases showed consistent patterns. We also found positive associations for congenital malformations of cardiac septa with PM10 exposures in the 2nd trimester and the entire pregnancy, and SO2 exposures in the entire pregnancy. Results indicate a health burden from maternal exposures to air pollution, with increased risk of congenital heart defects.

  16. Fetal echocardiographic screening in twins for congenital heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; MENG Tao; SHANG Tao; GUAN Yun-ping; ZHOU Wei-wei; YANG Guang; BI Li-hua

    2007-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital disorder at birth. Yagel and colleagues's method of heart examination has been proved valuable in finding CHD prenatally in single pregnancies. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of CHD in twin pregnancies and the sensitivity of the method.Methods A total of 1103 pregnant women with twins were enrolled in this study, including 127 cases with high-risk for CHD. Five transverse ultrasound measurements were used for fetal heart examination, including the upper abdomen view, four-chamber view, five-chamber view, pulmonary artery bifurcation view, and three-vessel view. In the fetuses who were diagnosed with CHD and whose parents requested termination of the pregnancy, autopsy of the fetal heart was performed after an abortion, and a blood sample was collected from the heart for chromosome evaluation. In the other fetuses, a close follow-up was conducted by echocardiography within one year after birth.Results Antenatally, CHD was found in 12 twins, of which 4 were from the high-risk group (3.15%), and 8 from the low-risk group (0.82%). In 2 pairs of the twins, the two fetuses had a same kind of CHD (one pair had tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), another pair had rhabdomyoma). Another pair had different types of anomaly (one fetus had TOF, and the other duodenal atresia with a normal heart). Termination of pregnancy was performed in these three pairs and the autopsy of the fetal heart confirmed the ultrasound findings. In the other 9 pairs, CHD was detected in one fetus, and a normal heart in the others. In the cases who received chromosome evaluation, 2 had abnormal chromosomes. During the follow-up after birth, heart examinations confirmed the prenatal diagnosis in 7 of the 9. The diagnosis of CHD was missed antenatally in 2 pairs of twins. In both the cases, one fetus was normal, and the other was confirmed as having CHD after birth (small ventricle septum defect in one, and persistent

  17. Pulse oximetry for screening critical congenital heart disease in newborns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Cui-ying; WU Shu-yan; YOU Ke-li; CHEN Guan-di; LI Zhi-gang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulse oximetry screening (POS) has been proposed as an effective,noninvasive,inexpensive tool allowing earlier diagnosis of critical congenital heart disease (CCHD).However,most neonates are discharged from the hospital without this evaluation in China.This study aimed at assessing the feasibility of POS for newborns in detecting CCHD in the department of obstetrics and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Methods POS was performed in 355 neonates born in the department of obstetrics or admitted to the NICU between January 2015 and June 2015.These neonates were divided into normal group,mild congenital heart disease group (MCHD) and CCHD group,according to the result of echocardiography or computerized tomography (CT).The gestational age,birth weight and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) were compared among the three groups.The SpO2 value and diagnosis time of the CCHD cases were classified and analyzed.Results The premature birth and low birth weight were the high risk factors of mild congenital heart disease.There was no difference (P > 0.05) in SpO2 between the MCHD group and the normal group.Significant difference in the SpO2 appeared between the CCHD group and the normal group (P < 0.05).Combination of POS and clinical examination can reduce the missing diagnosis rate in screening for CCHD.Conclusions POS incurs very low cost and risk of harm and is not required for special gaining,therefore,an effective way to identify CCHD in neonates.

  18. Perinatal and Delivery Management of Infants with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanapo, Laura; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Donofrio, Mary T

    2016-03-01

    Advances in fetal echocardiography have improved prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) and allowed better delivery and perinatal management. Some newborns with CHD require urgent intervention after delivery. In these cases, delivery close to a pediatric cardiac center may be considered, and the presence of a specialized cardiac team in the delivery room or urgent transport of the infant should be planned in advance. Delivery planning, monitoring in labor, rapid intervention at birth if needed, and avoidance of iatrogenic preterm delivery have the potential to improve outcomes for infants with prenatally diagnosed CHD.

  19. Planar Cell Polarity Signaling Pathway in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is a common cardiac disorder in humans. Despite many advances in the understanding of CHD and the identification of many associated genes, the fundamental etiology for the majority of cases remains unclear. The planar cell polarity (PCP signaling pathway, responsible for tissue polarity in Drosophila and gastrulation movements and cardiogenesis in vertebrates, has been shown to play multiple roles during cardiac differentiation and development. The disrupted function of PCP signaling is connected to some CHDs. Here, we summarize our current understanding of how PCP factors affect the pathogenesis of CHD.

  20. "CONGENTIAL PANHYPOPITUITARISM ASSOCIATED WITH IMPAIRED LIVER FUNCTION TESTS AND CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Khalili-Matinzadeh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The term congenital hypopituitarism defines deficiency of all of the pituitary hormones. Hypoglycemia and microphallus (in males are common findings, and some infants have shown evidence of the neonatal hepatitis syndrome. We report a case of congenital panhypopituitarism with deficiency of six major hormones and association with severe hypoglycemia, impaired liver function tests and congenital heart disease.

  1. Congenital Heart Disease in an Infant with 49,XXXXY Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Argun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available 49,XXXXY syndrome which is characterized with the addition of three extra X chromosomes to 46,XY is the rarest sex chromosome aneuploidy syndrome. Its classical findings were defined as a triad of mental retardation, hypogonadism and radioulnar synostosis. In 49,XXXXY syndrome, congenital heart defects like patent ductus arteriosus, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis, Fallot’s tetralogy have been reported. We present a case diagnosed in the newborn stage with low birth weight, short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial findings and hypoplastic male genitalia who was found to have severe pulmonary hypertension and medium patent ductus arteriosus when admitted at 4 months of age with heart failure and who underwent transcathater ductus closure with Amplatzer Duct Occluder I. To our knowledge, our case is the first reported 49,XXXXY syndrome with patent ductus arteriosus closed with the transcathater route.

  2. Studies of Genes Involved in Congenital Heart Disease

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    Tushar K. Ghosh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD affects the intricate structure and function of the heart and is one of the leading causes of death in newborns. The genetic basis of CHD is beginning to emerge. Our laboratory has been engaged in identifying mutations in genes linked to CHD both in families and in sporadic cases. Over the last two decades, we have employed linkage analysis, targeted gene sequencing and genome wide association studies to identify genes involved in CHDs. Cardiac specific genes that encode transcription factors and sarcomeric proteins have been identified and linked to CHD. Functional analysis of the relevant mutant proteins has established the molecular mechanisms of CHDs in our studies.

  3. Congenital heart defects in oculodentodigital dysplasia: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Lippa, Andrew M; Wilkens, Alisha; Feret, Holly A; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H

    2013-12-01

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia is caused by mutations in the GJA1 gene. Oculodentodigital dysplasia presents with a spectrum of clinical features including craniofacial, ocular, dental, and limb anomalies. Although recent findings implicate the major role of GJA1 during cardiac organogenesis, congenital heart defects are infrequently reported in oculodentodigital dysplasia. Here we report on two patients with GJA1 mutations presenting with cardiac malformations and type III syndactyly. Patient 1 presented with pulmonary atresia, an intact septum, right ventricular hypoplasia and tricuspid stenosis. The infant had a small nose, thin columella and bilateral 4-5 syndactyly of the fingers. A de novo c.226C>T (p.Arg76Cys) mutation was identified. Patient 2 presented at 6 months with a ventricular septal defect. The child had hypoplastic alae nasi with a thin columella and bilateral 4-5 syndactyly of the digits. A de novo missense mutation, c.145C>G (p.Gln49Glu) was found. Our two patients underscore the importance of cardiac evaluations as part of the initial workup for patients with findings of oculodentodigital dysplasia. Conversely, those patients with type III syndactyly and congenital heart defect should be screened for GJA1 mutations.

  4. Lactacidosis in the neonate is minimized by prenatal detection of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, PM; Lisowski, LA; Stoutenbeek, P; Hitchcock, JF; Bennink, GBWE; Meijboom, EJ

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of prenatal detection of congenital heart disease on preventing severe preoperative lactacidosis. Design Patients operated upon for congenital heart disease during the first 31 days of life (n=209) were studied retrospectively, 21 were diagnosed prenatally and 18

  5. Congenital Heart Disease: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

    These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with congenital heart disease. The booklet begins with general information about congenital heart disease. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures.…

  6. Congenital heart defects in europe: prevalence and perinatal mortality, 2000 to 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester

    2011-01-01

    This study determines the prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects (CHD), diagnosed prenatally or in infancy, and fetal and perinatal mortality associated with CHD in Europe.......This study determines the prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects (CHD), diagnosed prenatally or in infancy, and fetal and perinatal mortality associated with CHD in Europe....

  7. Increased prevalence of congenital heart defects in monozygotic and dizygotic twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Anne Maria; Almind Pedersen, Dorthe; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    Smaller studies and many case series reports indicate that congenital heart defects may be more common in monochorionic twins than in dichorionic twins and singletons.......Smaller studies and many case series reports indicate that congenital heart defects may be more common in monochorionic twins than in dichorionic twins and singletons....

  8. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease.

  9. Spectrum of Congenital Heart Diseases in Eastern Nepal: A tertiary care hospital experience

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    Prashant Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Congenital heart diseases are neglected especially in world’s poorest nations and appear to be ignored and unexplored dimension of health. The exact prevalence and spectrum of congenital heart diseases in Nepal is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to describe the local experience on the magnitude and the pattern of congenital heart disease in order to increase the awareness of the public and health policy makers on its burden in Nepal.Materials & Methods: This is an observational hospital based study carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Nepal. The duration of this study was from April 2015 to July 2016. The echocardiography reports of all patients clinically suspected of having congenital heart disease were retrieved, and their diagnostic details were extracted. Only patients of day one of life to 14 years of age were included. Congenital heart diseases like bicuspid aortic valve, mitral valve prolapse and various inherited cardiomyopathies were excluded.Results: A total of 330 echocardiograms were performed for clinically suspected congenital heart disease.  The mean age of study population was 22.31±34.08 months with male to female ratio of 1.2:1. 23% of clinically suspected congenital heart disease cases turned out to have normal echocardiography. Acyanotic congenital heart disease was most common (81.5% followed by cyanotic congenital heart disease (14.2% and obstructive congenital heart disease (4.3%. Atrial septal defect was found to be the most common form of acyanotic congenital heart disease (52% which was followed by ventricular septal defect (28.8% and patent ductus arteriosus (14.8%. Tetralogy of Fallot and double outlet right ventricle were the most common form of cyanotic CHD representing 44.4% of all cyanotic patients. Pulmonary stenosis was the most common obstructive congenital heart disease observed in this study population (63.6%. Rarer entities, like d-transposition of great

  10. Altering hemodynamics leads to congenital heart defects (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matthew T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  11. Prognostic Value of Serum B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Early Mortality and Morbidity of Children with Congenital Heart Disease after Open Heart Surgery

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    Nozar Givtaj

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain type natriuretic peptide (BNP is a cardiac hormone that is secreted mainly by the ventricles in response to volume expansion and pressure load. It can predict post-operative complications after heart surgery in adults. We sought to investigate the prognostic value of BNP in children after heart surgery. Methods: We measured the BNP serum levels in 96 children with congenital heart diseases before, immediately after, and 12 hours after open heart surgery. We studied the ability of the post-operative BNP serum level variations to predict mortality and morbidity in children. Results: In total, 96 patients, comprising 40 (41.7% females and 56 (58.3% males with a mean age of 4.1 years (range: 1 month to 17 years, with various congenital heart diseases were studied. The rise in the serum BNP level 12 hours post surgery was directly related to mortality before discharge from hospital (P value=0.004, congestive heart failure after surgery (P value<0.001 , patients' cyanosis (P value=0.045, duration of ICU stay (r=0.342, P value=0.004, and post-operative need for inotropic drugs (P value<0.001. Conclusion: The rise in the BNP serum level 12 hours after heart surgery is a good marker for predicting mortality, morbidity, and early diagnosis of heart failure in children.

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital fetal heart abnormalities and clinical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; WEI Jun; MA Ying; SHANG Tao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of detecting fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) using the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography. Methods: Nine hundred and eighty-two high-risk pregnancies for fetal CHD were included in this study, the fetal heart was scanned with the five transverse planes technique of fetal echocardiography described by yagel, autopsy was conducted when pregnancy was terminated. Blood from fetal heart was collected for fetal chromosome analysis. A close follow-up was given for normal fetal heart pregnancies and neconatal echocardiography was performed to check the accuracy of prenatal diagnosis. Results: (1) Forty-six cases(4.68%) were found to have fetal heart abnormalities in this study, 69.56% of them were diagnosed by single four-chamber view, another 30.43% fetal CHD were found by combining other views; (2) Fotry-one parents of prenatal fetuses with CHD chose to terminate pregnancy, thirty-two of them gave consent to conduct autopsy, 93.75% of which yielded unanimous conclusion between prenatal fetal echocardiography and autopsy; (3) Thirty-two of 46 cases underwent fetal chromosome analysis, 8 cases (25%) were found to have abnormal chromosome; (4) Five cases were found to have right ventricle and atrium a little bigger than those on the left side, with the unequal condition being the same after birth, but there were no clinical manifestations and they are healthy for the time being; (5) Nine hundred and thirty-six cases were not found with abnormality in this study, but one case was diagnosed with ventricular septal defect after birth, one case was diagnosed with patent ductus arteriosus, one case had atrial septal defect after birth. Conclusions: (1) The detected CHD rate was 4.68% by screening fetal heart with five transverse planes according to Yagel's description of high risk population basis for CHD. The coinciding rate of prenatal diagnosis and autopsy was 93.75%; (2) The sensitivity of detecting fetal heart

  13. Perioperative morbidity and mortality after noncardiac surgery in young adults with congenital or early acquired heart disease: a retrospective cohort analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bryan G; Wong, Jim K; Lobato, Robert L

    2014-04-01

    An increasing number of patients with congenital heart disease survive to adulthood. Expert opinion suggests that noncardiac surgery is a high-risk event, but few data describe perioperative outcomes in this population. Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we identified a cohort of patients aged 18 to 39 years with prior heart surgery who underwent noncardiac surgery between 2005 and 2010. A comparison cohort with no prior cardiovascular surgery was matched on age, sex, race/ethnicity, operation year, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and Current Procedural Terminology code. A study cohort consisting of 1191 patients was compared with a cohort of 5127 patients. Baseline dyspnea, inpatient status at the time of surgery, and a prior operation within 30 days were more common in the study cohort. Postoperative outcomes were less favorable in the study cohort. Observed rates of death, perioperative cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, stroke, respiratory complications, renal failure, sepsis, venous thromboembolism, perioperative transfusion, and reoperation were significantly higher in the study cohort (P heart disease are at risk for adverse outcomes and support the need for further registry-based investigations.

  14. Anaesthetic management of patients with congenital heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of congenital heart disease is about one percent of all live births in the United States. Treatment is being performed at a younger age and these children are showing improved survival. It is not unusual for children with congenital heart disease to present for non-cardiac surgery. Their management depends on their age, type of lesion, extent of corrective procedure, the presence of complications and other congenital anomalies. Each patient needs a detailed pre-operative evaluation to understand the abnormal anatomy and physiology, and related anaesthetic implications. No anaesthetic agent is an absolute contraindication, although drugs beneficial for one lesion may be detrimental for another. Regional anaesthesia has also been safely used in children with congenital heart disease. However the anaesthesiologist must have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of the lesion and the pharmacology of drugs being used to be able to provide safe anaesthesia for children with congenital heart disease.

  15. Mutations of connexin43 in fetuses with congenital heart malformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ping; XIE Li-jian; HUANG Guo-ying; ZHAO Xiao-qing; CHANG Cai

    2005-01-01

    Background Gap junction channels formed by connexin43 (Cx43) protein are important in cardiac morphogenesis, and Cx43 gene is thought to be associated with congenital heart malformation (CHM). This study was undertaken to detect the mutations of Cx43 in fetuses with CHM.Methods Cx43 extron DNA was amplified by PCR from 16 fetuses with a variety of CHM. The PCR products were analyzed by SSCP and DNA sequencing. Thirty children who had no CHM were selected as controls. Results Eight homozygous mutations of Cx43 were observed in a fetus with double outlet right ventricule (DORV), five of the 8 mutations were missense mutations including Arg239Trp, Ser251Thr, Ala253Pro, Pro283Leu and Thr290Asn, and the remaining 3 were silent polymorphisms including Gly252Gly, Pro256Pro and Thr275Thr. No mutations were found in other fetuses and the control group.Conclusions Mutations of Cx43 may be associated with congenital conotruncal anomalies. PCR-SSCP is an effective method for screening the mutations of Cx43.

  16. Pregnancy after fontan repair of complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, J V; Radford, D

    2001-11-01

    We describe four successful pregnancies in three women who had previously had a Fontan repair for congenital heart disease. Each pregnancy resulted in a live birth and there was no maternal mortality The infants were premature, being delivered at 26, 30 and 35 weeks, and weighing 1,020, 1,333 and 1,930 g respectively The fourth infant was born at 32 weeks and no birthweight is available. Maternal complications occurred and were those anticipated after a Fontan repair. Two mothers required treatment for supraventricular arrhythmias (atrial flutter and fibrillation). Ventricular failure was present in two mothers and required ongoing drug treatment. Raised systemic venous pressures caused peripheral oedema in two mothers and hepatomegaly and ascites in one mother. The physiology, potential complications, anaesthetic concerns and drug treatment in pregnancy after Fontan repair are discussed.

  17. The team approach to pregnancy and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Henryk; Johnson, Mark R; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2006-11-01

    The successful pediatric management of congenital heart disease has resulted in increasing numbers of these patients in the reproductive age group and increasing clinical challenges for their physicians. These challenges can be met successfully, with improved results for mother and child, through a concerted comprehensive team approach that relies on a thorough understanding of the patient's underlying cardiac pathology and its anticipated interaction with the pregnancy, and ongoing close evaluation and communication with a team of trained and experienced specialist, including (but not limited to) cardiologist, obstetricians, anesthetists, pediatricians, clinical nurse specialists, and clinical geneticists. Such teams are not always available locally and it will be necessary to refer medium- and high-risk patients to a specialized tertiary care center.

  18. Dental health and management for children with congenital heart disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common developmental anomalies. Children with CHD are at increased risk of developing oral disease, and are at increased risk from the systemic effects of oral disease. Recent changes in guidelines related to prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have highlighted the importance of establishing and maintaining oral health for this group of patients. The management of children with CHD can be complex and, unfortunately, many of these children do not receive the care they require. The challenges that these children pose are discussed, and suggestions are made for the appropriate management of these patients and the key role that all those working in primary dental care have to play.

  19. Dental health and management for children with congenital heart disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common developmental anomalies. Children with CHD are at increased risk of developing oral disease, and are at increased risk from the systemic effects of oral disease. Recent changes in guidelines related to prophylaxis against infective endocarditis have highlighted the importance of establishing and maintaining oral health for this group of patients. The management of children with CHD can be complex and, unfortunately, many of these children do not receive the care they require. The challenges that these children pose are discussed, and suggestions are made for the appropriate management of these patients and the key role that all those working in primary dental care have to play.

  20. Urine β 2-Microglobolin in the Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

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    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to evaluate the renal tubular function in the patients with congenital heart disease using β2-microglobulin. Methods: In this case-control study, based on oxymetry, the patients with congenital heart disease were divided into two groups of cyanotic (n=20 and acyanotic (n=20. Congenital heart disease was diagnosed by echocardiography. Healthy individuals within the same age and sex groups were used as controls. Na+, β2-micro globulin, creatinine (Cr, and β2-microglobulin/Cr ratio were measured in random urine samples and the results were compared to the same parameters in the control group using Tukey, One-Way ANOVA, and X2 tests. Results: Based on the study results, urine sodium in the patients with cyanotic heart disease was significantly different from that of the controls (P=0.023. The results also revealed a significant difference between the two groups with congenital heart disease regarding urine β2-microglobulin (P=0.045. In addition, the patients with cyanotic heart disease were significantly different from those with acyanotic heart disease and the controls regarding urine β2-micro globulin/Cr ratio (P=0.012 and P=0.026, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that renal tubular dysfunction began in the patients with congenital heart disease, especially in those with cyanotic congenital heart disease. Besides, early diagnosis before cardiac surgery leads to better control of renal tubular disease.

  1. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation.

  2. Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease: In Whom to Consider and When?

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    Christine H. Attenhofer Jost

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to impressive improvements in surgical repair options, even patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD may survive into adulthood and have a high risk of end-stage heart failure. Thus, the number of patients with CHD needing heart transplantation (HTx has been increasing in the last decades. This paper summarizes the changing etiology of causes of death in heart failure in CHD. The main reasons, contraindications, and risks of heart transplantation in CHD are discussed and underlined with three case vignettes. Compared to HTx in acquired heart disease, HTx in CHD has an increased risk of perioperative death and rejection. However, outcome of HTx for complex CHD has improved over the past 20 years. Additionally, mechanical support options might decrease the waiting list mortality in the future. The number of patients needing heart-lung transplantation (especially for Eisenmenger’s syndrome has decreased in the last years. Lung transplantation with intracardiac repair of a cardiac defect is another possibility especially for patients with interatrial shunts. Overall, HTx will remain an important treatment option for CHD in the near future.

  3. The Importance of Nomenclature for Congenital Heart Disease: Implications for Research and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Matthew J; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Reller, Mark D; Mahle, William T; Botto, Lorenzo D; Tolbert, Paige E; Jacobs, Marshall L; Lacour-Gayet, Francois G; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Mavroudis, Constantine; Correa, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Background Administrative databases are often used for congenital heart disease research and evaluation, with little validation of the accuracy of the diagnostic codes. Methods Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program surveillance records were reviewed and classified using a version of the International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. Using this clinical nomenclature as the referent, we report the sensitivity and false positive fraction (1 – positive predictive value) of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes for tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Results We identified 4918 infants and foetuses with congenital heart disease from the surveillance records. Using only the International Classification of Diseases diagnosis codes, there were 280 records with tetralogy, 317 records with transposition, and 192 records with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Based on the International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code, 330 records were classified as tetralogy, 163 records as transposition, and 179 records as hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The sensitivity of International Classification of Diseases diagnosis codes was 83% for tetralogy, 100% for transposition, and 95% for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The false positive fraction was 2% for tetralogy, 49% for transposition, and 11% for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Conclusions Analyses based on International Classification of Diseases diagnosis codes may have substantial misclassification of congenital heart disease. Isolating the major defect is difficult, and certain codes do not differentiate between variants that are clinically and developmentally different. PMID:19063779

  4. Growth curves in Down syndrome with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline D’Azevedo Sica

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: To assess dietary habits, nutritional status and food frequency in children and adolescents with Down syndrome (DS and congenital heart disease (CHD. Additionally, we attempted to compare body mass index (BMI classifications according to the World Health Organization (WHO curves and curves developed for individuals with DS. Method: Cross-sectional study including individuals with DS and CHD treated at a referral center for cardiology, aged 2 to 18 years. Weight, height, BMI, total energy and food frequency were measured. Nutritional status was assessed using BMI for age and gender, using curves for evaluation of patients with DS and those set by the WHO. Results: 68 subjects with DS and CHD were evaluated. Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD was the most common heart disease (52.9%. There were differences in BMI classification between the curves proposed for patients with DS and those proposed by the WHO. There was an association between consumption of vitamin E and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Conclusion: Results showed that individuals with DS are mostly considered normal weight for age, when evaluated using specific curves for DS. Reviews on specific curves for DS would be the recommended practice for health professionals so as to avoid precipitated diagnosis of overweight and/or obesity in this population.

  5. Prognosis of the Newborns with Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Molaei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital heart disease (CHD is defined as problems affecting the heart of the fetus. According to previous studies, the incidence rate varies from 4-12 in 1000 live births. This study aimed to evaluate the demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, and findings that have impact on the prognosis of newborns hospitalized in Tabriz children Hospital, northwest of Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 82 neonates with CHD admitted in Tabriz children Hospital, northwest of Iran from December 2011 to December 2012. Demographic characteristics, main complaints, symptoms, clinical presentations, associated anomalies, diagnoses, and also the correlation between the treatment process and mortality were evaluated. All data were analyzed using SPSS™ version 16 statistical software. Results: A total of 82 neonates with CHD were enrolled. The mean age and birth weight were 8.54 days and 2828.17 grams, respectively. The most common chief complaint was respiratory distress (58 cases, 70.73%. The most common diagnosis was d-transposition of great arteries and the most frequent therapeutic procedure was medical therapy in combination with mechanical ventilation (31 cases, 37.8%. 10 neonates (12.1% had complications while seizure was the most common complication of the study (4 case, 4.87%. Of 82 newborns in this study, 30 patients (36.6% died of which 13 cases (43.33% had DTGA; the most common therapeutic procedure was mechanical ventilation plus medical therapy which was performed in 22 patients (73.33%. In our study, no significant correlation could be observed between age, sex or weight of neonates and final outcome. Conclusion: Mortality of neonates with critical CHD is high. Also, the neonates treated with more invasive methods have higher mortality rates. It is obvious that both early detection and timely management affect ultimate prognosis of these patients. Hence, prenatal (fetal echocardiography and

  6. Can folic acid protect against congenital heart defects in Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Willemijn M.; Werler, Martha M.; Louik, Carol; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested a protective effect of folic acid (FA) on congenital heart anomalies. Down syndrome (DS) infants are known to have a high frequency of heart anomalies. Not all children with DS suffer from heart anomalies, which raises the question whether maternal factors

  7. Congenital Heart Defects in Europe Prevalence and Perinatal Mortality, 2000 to 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester

    2011-01-01

    Background-This study determines the prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects (CHD), diagnosed prenatally or in infancy, and fetal and perinatal mortality associated with CHD in Europe. Methods and Results-Data were extracted from the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies central database for

  8. Homocysteine related Nutritional and Genetic Risk Factors for Human Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Verkleij-Hagoort (Anna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart defects (CHDs) belong to the most common group of major congenital malformations in newborns. Most CHDs are considered complex diseases with a multifactorial aetiology, which are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This thesis p

  9. The origin of congenital heart defects and the epigenetic programming of the healthy child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Obermann-Borst (Sylvia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBirth defects are a global burden affecting 7% of births worldwide. Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most common congenital malformation with approximately 1 million children born each year. It is not only the most frequent group of birth defects in human, but also the leading caus

  10. Pregnancy-related Health Behavior of Women with Congenital Heart Disease : Room for Behavioral Change Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Philip; Budts, Werner; Costermans, Els; Huyghe, Els; Pieper, Petronella G.; Drenthen, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. In order to reduce risks for unfavorable outcomes, pregnant women need to adopt specific health behaviors. We investigated the pregnancy-related health behavior of women with congenit

  11. CONGENITAL COMPLETE HEART BLOCK IN DOWN SYNDROME: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome ( T risomy 21 is the commonest disorder among chromosomal anomalies having incidence of 1:650 – 1:1000 live births. [1] The clinical manifestations of Down syndrome are numerous and can present in any body system. Down association of congenital heart disease is well known. Among all cases of congenital heart diseases, 4% - 10% are with Down syndrome, and 40% - 60% of Down syndrome patients have congenital heart disease. The most common congenital cardiac anomaly in Down syndrome is Atrioventricular septal defects, followed by patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defects. Oth er forms of complex heart disease can occur including overriding aorta and Tetralogy of fallot. [2] The pure Conduction defect are very rare to have association with the Down syndrome and is not reported in infancy so far.

  12. Retroaortic left innominate vein – Incidence, association with congenital heart defects, embryology, and clinical significance

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In a retrospective analysis of echocardiograms, the incidence of retroaortic innominate vein was found to be 0.55% amongst children with congenital heart disease. It was most commonly associated with tetralogy of Fallot and right aortic arch.

  13. Fibrinogen function is impaired in whole blood from patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Johansson, P I; Bochsen, Louise;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have haemostatic abnormities associated with bleeding and thrombo-embolic events. The haemostatic abnormalities are not fully understood, but recent studies indicate that elevated haematocrit and fibrinogen function may...

  14. Routine prenatal screening for congenital heart disease: what can be expected? A decision-analytic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Buskens (Erik); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J. Hess (Jakob); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: This study assessed the potential impact of fetal ultrasound screening on the number of newborns affected by cardiac anomalies. METHODS: A decision model was developed that included the prevalence and history of congenital heart disease, characte

  15. Heart Failure in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrous, Hoda; Hummel, Scott L

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality in older adults and a growing public health problem placing a huge financial burden on the health care system. Many challenges exist in the assessment and management of HF in geriatric patients, who often have coexisting multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive impairment, and frailty. These complex "geriatric domains" greatly affect physical and functional status as well as long-term clinical outcomes. Geriatric patients have been under-represented in major HF clinical trials. Nonetheless, available data suggest that guideline-based medical and device therapies improve morbidity and mortality. Nonpharmacologic strategies, such as exercise training and dietary interventions, are an active area of research. Targeted geriatric evaluation, including functional and cognitive assessment, can improve risk stratification and guide management in older patients with HF. Clinical trials that enroll older patients with multiple morbidities and HF and evaluate functional status and quality of life in addition to mortality and cardiovascular morbidity should be encouraged to guide management of this age group.

  16. 77. Ultrasonography assessment of congenital renal anomalies in children with congenital heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Hamadah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US assessment of renal anomalies in children requiring pediatric cardiac surgery is not a standard practice. This study aimed to study the role of bedside US performed by intensivists to detect occult renal anomalies associated with congenital heart disease (CHD. Prospective descriptive study for 100 consecutive children with CHD admitted to Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU from Januarry 1st, 2015 through June, July 2015. Ultrasound of kidneys was performed initially by trained pediatric cardiac intensivists to ascertain the presence of both kidneys in renal fossae and to check for gross kidney anomalies. After screening of 100 consecutive children with CHD with renal US, we identified in 94 cases (94% normal right and left kidney in the standard sonographer shape in the renal fossae. In 6 cases further investigation revealed ectopic kidney in 3 patients (50%, solitary functional kidney in 2 patients (33.4% and bilateral grade IV hydronephrosis in one patient (16.6%. Urinary tract infection developed peri-operatively in 66% of the cases with kidney anomalies. No significant renal impairment was noted in these patients post-surgery. We observed no specific association between the type of renal anomaly and specific CHD. Renal US in children with CHD demonstrated prevalence of associated congenital renal anomalies in 6% of children undergoing cardiac surgery. The presence of occult kidney anomalies did not impact the kidney function or the short term outcome after cardiac repair except for an increased risk of urosepsis. Performing renal US should be a standard practice in all children with CHD.

  17. Addressing sexual health in congenital heart disease: when being the same isn't the same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Pelech, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    A larger number of individuals born with congenital heart disease is living into adolescence and young adulthood. With this comes the responsibility to counsel these patients regarding their sexual and reproductive health. This study utilizes representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to compare sexual measures including percentage of that sexually active, age of first sexual activity, number of sexual partners, condom use, and history of sexually transmitted diseases in those with and without congenital heart disease. A total of 1086 patients (1057 without congenital heart disease and 29 with congenital heart disease) were included in this study. Likelihood of being sexually active, age of first sexual intercourse, and condom use did not differ significantly between the two groups after multivariate analysis. Incidence of sexually transmitted disease did not differ between the two groups after multivariate analysis except for genital warts. There are no major differences in sexual measures between those with and without congenital heart disease. The absence of significant differences in sexual measures in those with congenital heart disease compared with the general population places this group of individuals at increased health risk known to occur with pregnancy.

  18. Congenital heart defects in two siblings in an Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Mehmet Necdet; Argin, Atilla

    2010-04-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by anomalies of the anterior segment of the eye, face, teeth, and umbilicus. Many other extraocular findings, including congenital heart defects, have been reported in association with this syndrome. It has been suggested by some investigators that the coexistence of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and congenital heart defects is not a chance event but it represents a distinct entity. We report a family in which four members in three generations have typical ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Two of them, who are siblings, also have congenital heart defects. The congenital heart defect was bicuspid aortic valve anomaly with severe stenosis and mild regurgitation in one sibling and ostium secundum atrial septal defect in the other. To our knowledge, the combination of congenital heart defects with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome in siblings has not been reported previously. Our observation further strengthens the notion that Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with congenital heart defects is not a chance event.

  19. Fetal Growth and Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifer, William P.; Andrews, Howard

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated differences in growth between fetuses with and without congenital heart disease (CHD) and tested associations between growth and early childhood neurodevelopment (ND). In this prospective cohort study, fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and controls had biparietal diameter (BPD), head (HC) and abdominal circumference (AC), femur length (FL), and estimated fetal weight (EFW) recorded serially during pregnancy at 18and controls were assessed using–26 weeks GA (F1), at 27–33 weeks GA (F2), and at 34–40 weeks GA (F3). CHD subjects underwent Bayley Scales of Infant Development-III ND testing at 18 months. Differences between CHD fetuses and controls were assessed using t tests and generalized linear modeling. Correlations between biometry and ND informed regression modeling. We enrolled 41 controls and 68 fetuses with CHD (N = 24 HLHS, N = 21 TGA, N = 23 TOF), 46 of whom had ND scores available. At 18–26 weeks, CHD fetuses were smaller than controls in all biometric parameters. Differences in growth rates were observed for HC, BPD, and AC, but not for FL or EFW. Cognitive score correlated with HC/AC at F2 (r = −0.33, P = 0.04) and mean HC/AC across gestation (r = −0.35, P = 0.03). Language correlated with FL/BPD at F2 (r = 0.34, P = 0.04). In stepwise linear regression, mean HC/AC predicted Cognition (B = −102, P = 0.026, R2 = 0.13) and FL/BPD at F2 predicted Language score (B = 127, P = 0.03, R2 = 0.12). Differences in growth between CHD fetuses and controls can be measured early in pregnancy. In CHD fetuses, larger abdominal relative to head circumference is associated with better 18-month neurodevelopment. PMID:25753684

  20. Remission of congenital complete heart block without anti-Ro/La antibodies: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Ro/La negative congenital heart block (CHB is uncommon. We report one such case of CHB, with no associated structural heart disease or maternal autoantibodies. The heart block reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously at two weeks of age, and the patient remains in sinus rhythm at a one year followup. Whether patients with antibody negative complete heart block have a different clinical course is conjectural.

  1. Remission of congenital complete heart block without anti-Ro/La antibodies: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Souvik; Saha, Anindya Kumar; Sardar, Syamal Kumar; Singh, Arun Kumarendu

    2013-07-01

    Anti-Ro/La negative congenital heart block (CHB) is uncommon. We report one such case of CHB, with no associated structural heart disease or maternal autoantibodies. The heart block reverted to sinus rhythm spontaneously at two weeks of age, and the patient remains in sinus rhythm at a one year followup. Whether patients with antibody negative complete heart block have a different clinical course is conjectural.

  2. Lessons Learned From Newborn Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Matthew E; Aucott, Susan W; Glidewell, Jill; Hackell, Jesse; Kochilas, Lazaros; Martin, Gerard R; Phillippi, Julia; Pinto, Nelangi M; Saarinen, Annamarie; Sontag, Marci; Kemper, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Newborn screening for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) was added to the US Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Within 4 years, 46 states and the District of Columbia had adopted it into their newborn screening program, leading to CCHD screening being nearly universal in the United States. This rapid adoption occurred while there were still questions about the effectiveness of the recommended screening protocol and barriers to follow-up for infants with a positive screen. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with the American Academy of Pediatrics to convene an expert panel between January and September 2015 representing a broad array of primary care, neonatology, pediatric cardiology, nursing, midwifery, public health, and advocacy communities. The panel's goal was to review current practices in newborn screening for CCHD and to identify opportunities for improvement. In this article, we describe the experience of CCHD screening in the United States with regard to: (1) identifying the target lesions for CCHD screening; (2) optimizing the algorithm for screening; (3) determining state-level challenges to implementation and surveillance of CCHD; (4) educating all stakeholders; (5) performing screening using the proper equipment and in a cost-effective manner; and (6) implementing screening in special settings such as the NICU, out-of-hospital settings, and areas of high altitude.

  3. Prenatal Diagnosis of Non-Syndromic Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailes, Elizabeth C.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Johnson, Candice Y.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Correa, Adolfo; Honein, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Congenital heart defects (CHDs) occur in nearly 1% of live births. We sought to assess factors associated with prenatal CHD diagnosis in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). Methods We analyzed data from mothers with CHD-affected pregnancies from 1998–2005. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was defined as affirmative responses to questions about abnormal prenatal ultrasounds and/or fetal echocardiography obtained during a structured telephone interview. Results Fifteen percent (1,097/7,299) of women with CHD-affected pregnancies (excluding recognized syndromes and single-gene disorders) reported receiving a prenatal CHD diagnosis. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was positively associated with advanced maternal age, family history of CHD, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, twin or higher order gestation, CHD complexity and presence of extracardiac defects. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was inversely associated with maternal Hispanic race/ethnicity, prepregnancy overweight or obesity, and pre-existing hypertension. Prenatal CHD diagnosis varied by time to NBDPS interview and NBDPS study site. Conclusions Further work is warranted to identify reasons for the observed variability in maternal reports of prenatal CHD diagnosis and the extent to which differences in health literacy or health system factors such as access to specialized prenatal care and/or fetal echocardiography may account for such variability. PMID:24222433

  4. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease:A clinical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie A Chaix; Gregor Andelfinger; Paul Khairy

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease(CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient followup. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel.

  5. Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in oral cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, M M; Rocha, C M G; Katina, T; Caldas, M; Codorniz, A; Medeiros, C

    2003-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of congenital heart diseases (CHDs) in cleft patients, the type of cleft and the presence of a syndrome were coded in 220 patients. A Doppler echocardiogram with color-flow mapping (DE) was obtained in all patients. Mean age was 112.0 +/- 101.2 months (range, 1-576 months), and 56.8% (125) were males. Cleft lip and palate occurred in 144 patients (65.5%), cleft lip in 40 (18.2%), and cleft palate in 36 (16.4%). Cleft palates were more frequent among females. Twenty-four CHDs were diagnosed in 21 of 220 patients (9.5%): 7 mitral valve prolapses, 6 atrial septal defects, 4 patent ductus arteriosus, 3 ventricular septal defects, 2 cases of tetralogy of Fallot, 1 pulmonary stenosis, and 1 bicuspid aortic valve. The presence of CHD did not correlate with the type of cleft. Syndromes occurred in 28 patients (12.7%), and this association was higher among patients with a cleft palate.

  6. Academic proficiency in children after early congenital heart disease surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Swearingen, Christopher J; Melguizo, Maria S; Reeves, Rachel N; Rowell, Jacob A; Gibson, Neal; Holland, Greg; Bhutta, Adnan T; Kaiser, Jeffrey R

    2014-02-01

    Children with early surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) are known to have impaired neurodevelopment; their performance on school-age achievement tests and their need for special education remains largely unexplored. The study aimed to determine predictors of academic achievement at school age and placement in special education services among early CHD surgery survivors. Children with CHD surgery at age from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2003, at the Arkansas Children's Hospital were identified. Out-of-state births and infants with known genetic and/or neurologic conditions were excluded. Infants were matched to an Arkansas Department of Education database containing standardized assessments at early school age and special-education codes. Predictors for achieving proficiency in literacy and mathematics and the receipt of special education were determined. Two hundred fifty-six children who attended Arkansas public schools and who had surgery as infants were included; 77.7 % had either school-age achievement-test scores or special-education codes of mental retardation or multiple disabilities. Scores on achievement tests for these children were 7-13 % lower than those of Arkansas students (p early CHD surgery were less proficient on standardized school assessments, and many received special education. This is concerning because achievement-test scores at school age are "real-world" predictors of long-term outcomes.

  7. Factors Influencing Adaptation and Performance at Physical Exercise in Complex Congenital Heart Diseases after Surgical Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Bassareo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last thirty years, steady progress in the diagnostic tools and care of subjects affected by congenital heart diseases (CHD has resulted in a significant increase in their survival to adulthood, even for those affected by complex CHD. Based on these premises, a number of teenagers and adults affected by corrected (surgically or through interventional techniques CHD ask to be allowed to undertake sporting activities, both at a recreational and competitive level. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanisms influencing the adaption at physical exercise of patients suffering from complex CHD. The conclusion is that even if there are some modest risks with exercise, they should be seen in perspective, and the life-long benefits of regular exercise on general health, mood, and well-being should be emphasized.

  8. Medico-legal aspects of congenital heart diseases in buying and selling of pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passantino, Annamaria; Pugliese, Michela; Quartarone, Valeria; Russo, Natalia; Bussadori, Roberto; Guercio, Bartolomeo

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The veterinarian should be able to assess congenital and inherited malformations such as heart defects because they may be object of legal disputes. In this study, the authors report some cases of congenital heart defects in pets (dogs and cats) to clarify whether or not they may be considered a redhibitory defect. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 medical records of pets referred with suspected congenital heart disease were examined. All patients aged between 3 and 24 months underwent clinical examination, chest X-ray examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiography and angiocardiography when necessary. Results: Congenital heart diseases or associated cardiac malformations were confirmed. Considering the above congenital diseases as redhibitory defect and the rights of the owners from a strictly legal viewpoint, 9 owners demanded an estimatory action and 11 a redhibitory action; 1 owner decided to demand the reimbursement of veterinary expenses because the animal died; 7 owners took no legal action but requested surgical intervention. Conclusions: Until more appropriate and detailed legislation on the buying and selling of pet animals is put in place; the authors propose to include in the contract a temporal extension of the guarantee relating to congenital heart disease, which can often become evident later. PMID:28246457

  9. Medico-legal aspects of congenital heart diseases in buying and selling of pets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Passantino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The veterinarian should be able to assess congenital and inherited malformations such as heart defects because they may be object of legal disputes. In this study, the authors report some cases of congenital heart defects in pets (dogs and cats to clarify whether or not they may be considered a redhibitory defect. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 medical records of pets referred with suspected congenital heart disease were examined. All patients aged between 3 and 24 months underwent clinical examination, chest X-ray examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiography and angiocardiography when necessary. Results: Congenital heart diseases or associated cardiac malformations were confirmed. Considering the above congenital diseases as redhibitory defect and the rights of the owners from a strictly legal viewpoint, 9 owners demanded an estimatory action and 11 a redhibitory action; 1 owner decided to demand the reimbursement of veterinary expenses because the animal died; 7 owners took no legal action but requested surgical intervention. Conclusions: Until more appropriate and detailed legislation on the buying and selling of pet animals is put in place; the authors propose to include in the contract a temporal extension of the guarantee relating to congenital heart disease, which can often become evident later.

  10. Congenital hepatic fibrosis, liver cell carcinoma and adult polycystic kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, J L; Kissane, J M; Valdes, A J

    1977-06-01

    In reviewing the literature, we found no liver cell carcinoma (LCC) or well-documented adult polycystic kidneys (APK) associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We report a 69-year-old man with CHF, LCC, APK, duplication cyst of distal portion of stomach, two calcified splenic artery aneurysms, myocardial fibrosis and muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. The LCC was grossly predunculated and microscopically showed prominent fibrosis and hyaline intracytoplasmic inclusions in the tumor cells.

  11. Congenital heart disease and its journey from dental plaque to arterial plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinathi Reddy Kankara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is mostly found in children, approximately around 7–10% from overall heart diseases. The etiology is multifactorial but reported associations include untreated maternal diabetes, phenylketonuria, intake of retinoic acid last but not least is oral pathogens present in periodontopathic bacteria. The main objective of this article is to explain about different mechanisms by which it is associated with dental, periodontal manifestations. It also explains about two patients who reported to our hospital with congenital heart disease and their dental and periodontal management.

  12. Familial TAB2 microdeletion and congenital heart defects including unusual valve dysplasia and tetralogy of fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karin; Applegate, Carolyn; Wang, Tao; Batista, Denise A S

    2015-11-01

    Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 was recently implicated as a cause for a variety of congenital heart defects. Reported cases have genomic deletions of 2-10 Mbs including TAB2 at 6q24-25 are almost always de novo and show variable cardiac and extra cardiac phenotype. We report on an inherited, 281 kb deletion in a three generation family. This is the smallest reported deletion involving TAB2 that segregates with congenital heart defects. Three affected individuals in this family present with myxomatous cardiac valves in addition to structural heart defects commonly associated with TAB2 deletions. Findings from this family support a key role of TAB2 haploinsufficiency in congenital heart defects and expand the phenotypic spectrum of TAB2-microdeletion syndrome.

  13. Congenital Heart Defects and Receipt of Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Autry, Andrew; Razzaghi, Hilda; Boyle, Coleen A.; Mahle, William T.; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated the prevalence of receipt of special education services among children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared with children without birth defects. METHODS Children born from 1982 to 2004 in metropolitan Atlanta with CHDs (n = 3744) were identified from a population-based birth defect surveillance program; children without birth defects (n = 860 715) were identified from birth certificates. Cohorts were linked to special education files for the 1992–2012 school years to identify special education services. Children with noncardiac defects or genetic syndromes were excluded; children with CHDs were classified by presence or absence of critical CHDs (ie, CHDs requiring intervention by age one year). We evaluated the prevalence of receipt of special education services and prevalence rate ratios using children without birth defects as a reference. RESULTS Compared with children without birth defects, children with CHDs were 50% more likely to receive special education services overall (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–1.7). Specifically, they had higher prevalence of several special education categories including: intellectual disability (aPRR = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.8–5.1), sensory impairment (aPRR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.8–5.0), other health impairment (aPRR = 2.8; 95% CI: 2.2–3.5), significant developmental delay (aPRR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3–2.8), and specific learning disability (aPRR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.7). For most special education services, the excess prevalence did not vary by presence of critical CHDs. CONCLUSIONS Children with CHDs received special education services more often than children without birth defects. These findings highlight the need for special education services and the importance of developmental screening for all children with CHDs. PMID:26283775

  14. Anthropometric profiles of children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanti R. Sjarif

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undernutrition is a common cause of morbidity in children with CHD. Previous data from developing country showed prevalence of preoperative undernutrition in children with CHD was up to 45%. The aim of this study are to determine the anthropometric profiles and prevalence of undernutrition in children with CHD by using the anthropometric measurement.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged 0-2 years old with CHD in Cipto Mangunkusumo hospital. All patients underwent an anthropometric evaluation (weight, length and head circumference at presentation. Undernutrition, failure to thrive /FTT, short stature and microcephaly were determined according to WHO, weight-for-length, weight-for-age at 2 points, length-for-age, head circumference-for-age z-score < -2SD accordingly.Results: We had total of 95 patients, 73 patients with acyanotic and 22 patients with cyanotic lesions. Prevalence of undernutrition in CHD was 51.1%, with 22.3% severe undernutrition. FTT was found in 64.9%, short stature in 49.5% and microcephaly in  37% patients. FTT was found higher in acyanotic (72.2% compared to cyanotic lesions (42.9%. In acyanotic, weight was affected more than length (72.2% vs 49.3%. In cyanotic, weight and length affected equally (42.9% vs 54.5%. Diet counseling were done in patients with undernutrition. Medicines, transcatheter or surgery intervention were indicated in selected patients.Conclusions: Prevalence of FTT was higher than undernutrition in children with CHD. FTT was found higher in acyanotic lesions. In acyanotic, weight was affected more than length. In cyanotic, weight and length affected equally. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:40-5Keywords: congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, undernutrition

  15. IS LOW BIRTH WEIGHT ASSOCIATED WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutan Nalini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Daily we see lots of still birth cases and the agony associated with it after carrying the fetus for so many months with the negative outcome it is quite disheartening. Malnutrition is quite rampant in the country as far as the females are concerned and in the name of the religion and rituals, it complicates the issue further. If the mother is malnourished, the chance of low birth weight baby is high. OBJECTIVES To correlate the prevalence of cardiac anomalies in low birth weight fetuses. MATERIAL AND METHOD The study was carried out in 40 stillbirth fetuses with detailed account of nutritional status of the mother, consanguinity, history of previous pregnancies, miscarriages, socio-economic status and exposure to drugs/radiation. The number of cases with fetus having cardiac anomalies was quite significant. RESULTS Out of total 40 stillbirth fetuses, 29 (72.5% stillbirths were from less than 2.5kg and 11 (27.5% were from more than 2.5kg. Cardiac anomalies were present in 16 and 02 cases respectively. Fused heart-01, mesocardia-01, Dextrocardia with CORV-02, Interrupted aortic arch-02, Abnormal origin of right subclavian artery-01, Tetralogy of Fallot-01, VSD-07, ASD-01, transposition of great vessels-01, persistent truncus arteriosus with tricuspid atresia, elongated hypertrophied abnormally positioned Rt. Atrium, rudimentary Rt. Ventricle-01, mal-attachment of ductus arteriosus-03, double superior vena cava-01, dilated caval system-01. CONCLUSION Considering the high incidence of cardiac anomalies in fetuses of low birth weight, we must try to create awareness and support the expectant mothers to avoid the low birth weight babies and thus the congenital anomalies.

  16. Report from the international society for nomenclature of paediatric and congenital heart disease: creation of a visual encyclopedia illustrating the terms and definitions of the international pediatric and congenital cardiac code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Jorge M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Spicer, Diane; Backer, Carl; Martin, Gerard R; Franklin, Rodney C G; Béland, Marie J; Krogmann, Otto N; Aiello, Vera D; Colan, Steven D; Everett, Allen D; William Gaynor, J; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry L; Weinberg, Paul; Anderson, Robert H; Elliott, Martin J

    2010-10-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the field of pediatric heart disease over the past 30 years. Although survival after heart surgery in children has improved dramatically, complications still occur, and optimization of outcomes for all patients remains a challenge. To improve outcomes, collaborative efforts are required and ultimately depend on the possibility of using a common language when discussing pediatric and congenital heart disease. Such a universal language has been developed and named the International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC). To make the IPCCC more universally understood, efforts are under way to link the IPCCC to pictures and videos. The Archiving Working Group is an organization composed of leaders within the international pediatric cardiac medical community and part of the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease (www.ipccc.net). Its purpose is to illustrate, with representative images of all types and formats, the pertinent aspects of cardiac diseases that affect neonates, infants, children, and adults with congenital heart disease, using the codes and definitions associated with the IPCCC as the organizational backbone. The Archiving Working Group certifies and links images and videos to the appropriate term and definition in the IPCCC. These images and videos are then displayed in an electronic format on the Internet. The purpose of this publication is to report the recent progress made by the Archiving Working Group in establishing an Internet-based, image encyclopedia that is based on the standards of the IPCCC.

  17. Determination of the prevalence of congenital heart disease in the patients admitted to the heart clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shokoufeh Ahmadipour; Behzad Mohammadpour Ahranjani; Sara Daeichin; Zahra Mirbeig Sabzevari

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) among the patients who refferred to the heart clinic so as to make an early and correct diagnosis. Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study, all the patients admitted to the heart clinic who had symptoms or signs ofCHDwere included. The data were collected in one year based on the medical records. The main variables consisted of age, gender, history of folic acid consumption by the mother in pregnancy, clinical signs, symptoms and so on. Results: Among the 763 admitted patients, 498 were males and the rest were females. Infants were the most common group and teenagers were the least one. The most common findings for which the patients had been referred were chest pain and a murmur heard during a normal physical examination. Based on the echocardiography findings, ventricular and atrial septal defects were the most common ones. The history of folic acid consumption was negative in 168 mothers within their pregnancy. Conclusions: Since the causes and risk factors in the incidence ofCHD in children are numerous, we recommended that the information about these diseases should be given to the community and strengthen the referral system, design registration system ofCHD set up in the country round.

  18. Doppler ultrasound evaluation of cerebral blood flow pattern in neonates with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon [Yongdong Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woong Han [Sejong General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    To evaluate intracerebral resistive index (RI) values in neonates with congenital heart disease and to investigate their changes after the corrective surgery of the congenital heart disease. Sixty nine neonates with congenital heart disease who underwent brain ultrasonography were included. Resistive index values were obtained at the genu portion of the anterior cerebral arteries through the anterior fontanelles. The patients were divided into 4 groups according to the presence of associated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and intracranial RI values. We evaluated the types of congenital heart disease that could influence RI values. Resistive index values were statistically higher in patients with PDA than in patients without PDA (p<0.05). RI values were higher in cases of large PDA with left-to-right shunt, but within the normal range in cases of small or nearly closing PDA or large PDA with bidirectional blood flow or with right-to-left shunt. For those patients without PDA, RI values were higher when patients had pulmonary atresia with multiple collateral vessels into the lung or when truncus arteriosus was present. RI values were also high in patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. RI values were normalized after the ligation of PDA, but patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome showed persistently high RI values even after the Norwood's operation with Blalock-Taussig shunt. RI values are influenced by various congenital heart diseases except PDA. Therefore, the presences of the congenital heart disease and its hemodynamic changes should be taken into consideration in the evaluation of the intracranial RI values using Doppler ultrasonography.

  19. The registry of anomalous aortic origin of the coronary artery of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Julie A; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Caldarone, Christopher; Jegatheeswaran, Anusha; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2010-12-01

    The anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery from the wrong sinus of Valsalva with interarterial, intramural, and/or intraconal course is a rare congenital anomaly that is associated with a high risk of sudden death in children. The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society established the Registry of Anomalous Aortic Origin of the Coronary Artery to help determine the outcome of children and young adults managed with surgical intervention versus observation and to test the hypothesis that subsets of patients with anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery can be identified in whom the risk of intervention is less than the risk of observation. All institutional members of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society were recruited for participation. The registry consists of a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed between 1 January, 1998 and 20 January, 2009 and a prospective, population-based cohort of patients newly diagnosed from 21 January, 2009 onwards. Baseline demographics, diagnoses, and results of tests will be obtained through a review of the medical records. Annual follow-up data will be collected. Data will be analysed for different factors of risk at diagnosis, different strategies of treatment, and the impact of both on the outcomes of the patients. As of June 2010, 28 institutions had applied for approval from their institutional review board and 16 institutions had received approval from their institutional review board. Seventy-four patients have enrolled to date. We hope to use the established Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry as a guide to successful implementation, with a cooperative effort between institutions. The overall purpose of the Registry of Anomalous Aortic Origin of the Coronary Artery is to determine the outcome of surgical intervention versus observation in children and young adults with anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery, and to describe the natural and "unnatural" history of these patients over the course of their lifetime

  20. Management considerations for the adult with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchus, Richard J

    2015-06-15

    The congenital adrenal hyperplasias (CAH) are a group of genetic defects in cortisol biosynthesis, most commonly steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). With the advent of cortisone therapy in the 1960s and newborn screening in the 1990s, most children with 21OHD now reach adulthood. The needs and concerns of adults with 21OHD overlap with those of children, but the focus and approach shift as these patients reach adulthood. Cohort studies suggest that adults with 21OHD experience significant health concerns such as infertility, obesity, short stature, neoplasia, and bone loss, as well as reduced quality of life. Nevertheless, the spectrum of health status and disease severity is broad, but only some of the reasons for these disparities are known. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge and suggested approaches to management adults with classic 21OHD, plus a few major considerations for adults with nonclassic 21OHD.

  1. Congenital heart defect in a patient with deletion of chromosome 7q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, G E; Watson, M S; Duncan, L M; Dowton, S B

    1988-02-01

    We describe a premature male infant with a terminal deletion of 7q [del(7) (pter----q34:)]. Manifestations include low birth weight, hypertelorism, bilateral cleft lip and palate, cryptorchidism, and a complex congenital heart defect. The latter consisted of hypoplasia of the main pulmonary artery, absent pulmonary valve, ventricular septal defect, and anomalous right pulmonary artery. We briefly review the spectrum of heart defects seen with chromosome 7 deletions, and comment on the incidence of this unusual heart lesion.

  2. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  3. Quality of Life and Congenital Heart Disease in Childhood and Adolescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoletti, Juliana [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia - IC/FUC, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Marx, Giovana Caroline; Hattge, Sérgio Pedro Júnior [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pellanda, Lucia Campos, E-mail: lupellanda@gmail.com [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia - IC/FUC, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Advances in cardiac surgery techniques and early diagnosis have enabled the increased survival of individuals with congenital heart disease. The investigation of the quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease provides complementary information to clinical data that can assist in decision making on the part of health professionals. Although many studies have been conducted to investigate the quality of life of children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, the results prove to be contradictory; while some studies show that congenital heart disease can impact the quality of life, others describe a better perception of quality of life among children and adolescents who suffer from the disease when compared with healthy control subjects. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the assessment of health related quality of life in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, in order to systematize the existing knowledge on this topic today. It is observed that research seeks to investigate aspects of personality in cardiac patients, their coping strategies used and perceived social support, aiming at better understanding the association of these variables with the level of quality of life in this population.

  4. Observed Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects From a Surveillance Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Correa, Adolfo; Li, Song; Feng, Xinheng; Gindler, Jacqueline; Lin, Hui; Webb, Catherine; Li, Wei; Trines, Jean; Berry, Robert J.; Yeung, Lorraine; Luo, Ying; Jiang, Meifang; Chen, Hua; Sun, Xiamei; Li, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of major and minor congenital heart defects among fetuses and neonates using sonography in a general population of 4 areas surrounding Shanghai, China. Methods Pregnant women were recruited between April 2004 and December 2005 in Jiaxing City, Suzhou City, Changshu County, and Haining County. All participants could have 3 sonographic examinations performed by specially trained physicians regardless of medical indication: a fetal sonographic screen and fetal echocardiography between 20 and 28 weeks’ gestation and neonatal echocardiography. Diagnoses of congenital heart defects were made on the basis of review of all available scans by an international group of experts in pediatric cardiology. Prevalence rates were calculated per 1000 births. Results Among 4006 scanned fetuses and neonates, there were 75 congenital heart defects, including 12 major defects. The observed prevalence for all congenital heart defects was 18.7 (95% confidence interval, 14.8–23.5) per 1000 births, and the prevalence for major defects was 3.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.6–5.2) per 1000 births. The most common defects were ventricular septal defects (n = 47 [62.7%]), atrial septal defects (n = 14 [18.7%]), tetralogy of Fallot (n = 4 [5.3%]), and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (n = 3 [4.0%]). Conclusions The prevalence of all congenital heart defects in the 4 areas of China studied was higher than that reported in other countries, with ventricular septal defects being the most frequent defects. Our data likely reflect a better estimate of the total prevalence of congenital heart defects in China than reported previously. PMID:21705732

  5. Late Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease Among US Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Cora; Ailes, Elizabeth; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Oster, Matthew E.; Olney, Richard S.; Cassell, Cynthia H.; Fixler, David E.; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for Newborns in the United States in 2011. Many states have recently adopted or are considering requirements for universal CCHD screening through pulse oximetry in birth hospitals. Limited previous research is directly applicable to the question of how many US infants with CCHD might be identified through screening. OBJECTIVES To estimate the proportion of US infants with late detection of CCHD (>3 days after birth) based on existing clinical practice and to investigate factors associated with late detection. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Descriptive and multivariable analysis. Data were obtained from a multisite population-based study of birth defects in the United States, the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). We included all live-born infants with estimated dates of delivery from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2007, and nonsyndromic, clinically verified CCHD conditions potentially detectable through screening via pulse oximetry. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was the proportion of infants with late detection of CCHD through echocardiography or at autopsy under the assumption that universal screening at birth hospitals might reduce the number of such late diagnoses. Secondary outcome measures included prevalence ratios for associations between selected demographic and clinical factors and late detection of CCHD. RESULTS Of 3746 live-born infants with nonsyndromic CCHD, late detection occurred in 1106 (29.5% [95%CI, 28.1%–31.0%]), including 6 (0.2%) (0.1% –0.4%) first receiving a diagnosis at autopsy more than 3 days after birth. Late detection varied by CCHD type from 9 of 120 infants (7.5%[95%CI, 3.5%–13.8%]) with pulmonary atresia to 497 of 801 (62.0% [58.7%–65.4%]) with coarctation of the aorta. In multivariable analysis, late detection varied significantly by CCHD type and study site, and infants with

  6. NORMOTHERMIA FOR PEDIATRIC AND CONGENITAL HEART SURGERY: AN EXPANDED HORIZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mahir eShamsuddin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in pediatric cardiac surgery is generally performed with hypothermia, flow reduction and hemodilution. From 10/2013 to 12/2014 55 patients, median age 6 years (range 2 months to 52 years, median weight 18.5kg (range 3.2 to 57 kg, underwent surgery with normothermic high flow CPB in a new unit.There were no early or late deaths. Fifty patients (90.9% were extubated within 3 hrs, 3 (5.5% within 24 hrs and 2 (3.6% within 48 hrs. Twentyfour patients (43.6% didn’t require inotropic support, 31 (56.4% received dopamine or dobutamine: 21 ≤5 mcg/kg/min, 8 5-10 mcg/kg/min, and 2 >10 mcg/kg/min. Two patients (6.5% required noradrenaline 0.05-0.1 mcg/kg/min.On arrival to ICU and after 3 and 6 hrs and 8:00 am the next morning, mean lactate levels were 1.9±09, 2.0±1.2, 1.6±0.8 and 1.4±0.7 mmol/L (0.6-5.2 mmol/L respectively. From arrival to ICU to 8:00 am the next morning mean urine output was 3.8±1.5 mL/kg/hr (0.7-7.6 mL/kg/hr, and mean chest drainage was 0.6±0.5 mL/kg/hr (0.1-2.3 mL/kg/hr. Mean ICU and hospital stay were 2.7±1.4 days (2-8 days and 7.2±2.2 days (4-15 days respectively. In conclusion, normothermic high flow CPB allows pediatric and congenital heart surgery with favorable outcomes even in a new unit. The immediate post-operative period is characterized by low requirement for inotropic and respiratory support, low lactate production, adequate urine output, minimal drainage from the chest drains, shorter ICU and hospital stay.

  7. Relationship Between Polymorphism of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase and Congenital Heart Defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN CHENG; WEN-LI ZHU; JING-JING DAO; SHU-QING LI; YONG LI

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between G1958A gene polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) and occurrence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in North China. Methods One hundred and ninety-two CHD patients and their parents were included in this study as case group in Liaoning Province by birth defect registration cards, and 124 healthy subjects (age and gender matched) and their parents were simultaneously selected from the same geographic area as control. Their gene polymorphism of MTHFD G1958A locus was examined with PCR-RFLP, and serum folic acid and homocysteine (Hcy) levels were tested with radio-immunoassay and fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Results There existed gene polymorphism at MTHFD G1958A locus in healthy subjects living in North China. The percentages of GG, GA, and AA genotype were 57.98%, 35.57%, and 6.45% respectively, and the A allele frequency was 24.23%, which was significantly different from Western population. No difference was observed when comparing genotype distribution and allele frequency between the case and control groups, so was the result from the comparison between genders. The A allele frequency of arterial septal defect patients' mothers (10.87%) was significantly lower than that of controls (28.15%) (P=0.014), with OR=0.31 (95% CI: 0.09-0.84), and no difference in the other subgroups. The percentage of at least one parent carrying A allele in arterial septal defect subgroup (43.48%) was significantly lower than that in controls (69.64%) (P=0.017), with OR=0.34 (95% CI: 0.12-0.92). The analysis of genetic transmission indicated that there was no transmission disequillibrium in CHD nuclear families. Their serum folic acid level was significantly higher than that of controls (P=0.000), and Hcy level of the former was higher than that of the latter with no statistical significance (P>0.05). Serum Hcy and folic acid levels of mothers with gene mutation were lower than those of mothers

  8. The present and future of interventional catheterization for congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Over the past decade, the focus of the pediatric catheterization laboratory has changed dramatically from its primary function of providing diagnosis to offering treatment.Since Rashkind first described the technique for atrial septostomy in the setting of complete transposition of the great arteries in 1966, therapeutic catheterization techniques have replaced conventional surgery, including both corrective and palliative surgeries, for many lesions. Interventional catheterization has become an important modality in the treatment of congenital heart disease. In addition, in the staged management of complex congenital heart disease, better outcomes have been acquired by combined surgical and interventional catheterization strategies. Although great advances have been made in the therapeutic catheterization for congenital heart disease in some Chinese medical centers, there is considerable difference in both clinical applications and basic researches between China and other developed countries. Thus, it is very important to expand this advanced technique aggressively but carefully.

  9. DISTRIBUTION OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASES AT TERTIARY CARE CENTER: SINGLE CENTER EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The current study was undertaken at a tertiary care center, Bhopal, MP, India, with the objective of establishing frequency of occurrence of congenital heart diseases by echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHOD 10,000 consecutive cases undergoing Echo Color Doppler in the Cardiology Department Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between 1st Jan 2009 and July 2011 were analysed. Echo CD was performed by consultant cardiologist using Acuson Aspen Color Doppler machine following the ASE guidelines. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In the present study out of 10,000consecutive cases undergoing echo 648 were identified to having congenital heart diseases. Isolated VSD (30.5%, isolated ASD (23.6% PDA (9% and TOF (8.3% were commonest defect observed. Most common congenital heart disease found in the present study is VSD and is most prevalent in males and is highest among 0-5 yrs.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease at 0.3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmgren, N.

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the potential of static MR imaging in congenital heart disease. The diagnosis of vascular rings, causing significant respiratory morbidity, previously required invasive methods for diagnosis. In aberrant left pulmonary artery, an uncommon anomaly, MR imaging at 0.3 T provided complete anatomic information. Complex congenital heart malformation is a diagnostic challenge. MR imaging at 0.3 T was efficient in defining most of the components of complex disease. It is especially valuable for imaging of extracardiac structures, which can be difficult to evaluate using echocardiography. MR imaging is an important complement to echocardiography. Improved equipment with sophisticated dynamic applications using high magnetic field strength is now available. The anatomical evaluation of congenital heart anomalies is however still based on static images, and low field magnets will certainly be used even in the future. 141 refs, 11 figs, 8 tabs.

  11. Down syndrome: Molecular mapping of the congenital heart disease and duodenal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenburg, J.R. (University of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Bradley, C.; Disteche, C.M. (University of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of congenital heart and gut disease and mental retardation. DS individuals also have characteristic facies, hands, and dermatoglyphics, in addition to abnormalities of the immune system, and increased risk of leukemia, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Although their molecular basis is unknown, recent work on patients with DS and partial duplications of chromosome 21 has suggested small chromosomal regions located in band q22 that are likely to contain the genes for some of these features. The authors now extend these analyses to define molecular markers for the congenital heart disease, the duodenal stenosis, and an 'overlap' region for the facial and some of the skeletal features. They report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular analysis of two patients. These studies provide the molecular basis for the construction of a DS phenotypic map and focus the search for genes responsible for the physical features, congenital heart disease, and duodenal stenosis of DS.

  12. Deletion of a single-copy DAAM1 gene in congenital heart defect: a case report

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    Bao Bihui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an increasing incidence of congenital heart defects (CHDs in recent years, genotype-phenotype correlation and array-based methods have contributed to the genome-wide analysis and understanding of genetic variations in the CHD population. Here, we report a copy number deletion of chromosomal 14q23.1 in a female fetus with complex congenital heart defects. This is the first description of DAAM1 gene deletion associated with congenital heart anomalies. Case Presentation Compared with the control population, one CHD fetus showed a unique copy number deletion of 14q23.1, a region that harbored DAAM1 and KIAA0666 genes. Conclusions Results suggest that the copy number deletion on chromosome 14q23.1 may be critical for cardiogenesis. However, the exact relationship and mechanism of how DAAM1 and KIAA0666 deletion contributes to the onset of CHD is yet to be determined.

  13. Human fetal cardiac progenitors: The role of stem cells and progenitors in the fetal and adult heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatovic, Ivana; Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Sylvén, Christer; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The human fetal heart is formed early during embryogenesis as a result of cell migrations, differentiation, and formative blood flow. It begins to beat around gestation day 22. Progenitor cells are derived from mesoderm (endocardium and myocardium), proepicardium (epicardium and coronary vessels), and neural crest (heart valves, outflow tract septation, and parasympathetic innervation). A variety of molecular disturbances in the factors regulating the specification and differentiation of these cells can cause congenital heart disease. This review explores the contribution of different cardiac progenitors to the embryonic heart development; the pathways and transcription factors guiding their expansion, migration, and functional differentiation; and the endogenous regenerative capacity of the adult heart including the plasticity of cardiomyocytes. Unfolding these mechanisms will become the basis for understanding the dynamics of specific congenital heart disease as well as a means to develop therapy for fetal as well as postnatal cardiac defects and heart failure.

  14. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  15. Living With Half a Heart - Experiences of Young Adults With Single Ventricle Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Dorthe; King, Catriona; Christensen, Rie F;

    2013-01-01

    Research (UCSF), Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Abstract BACKGROUND AND RESEARCH OBJECTIVE: Approximately 3% of children with congenital heart disease born in Denmark have single ventricle physiology (SVP). In previous decades, these children did not survive into adulthood. However, because of new......J Cardiovasc Nurs 2013;28(2):187-96 Living With Half a Heart-Experiences of Young Adults With Single Ventricle Physiology: A Qualitative Study. Overgaard D, King C, Christensen RF, Schrader AM, Adamsen L. SourceDorthe Overgaard, PhD, RN Researcher, The Heart Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital...

  16. Treacher Collins syndrome with multiple congenital heart defects after paroxetine exposure: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinlen, N; Zenciroğlu, A; Dilli, D; Aydin, B; Beken, S; Okumuş, N

    2014-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with an incidence of I in 40,000 to in 70,000 live births. It is characterized by abnormalities of the pinnae which are frequently associated with atresia of the external auditory canals and anomalies of the middle ear ossicles. Rarely congenital heart defects can be present. Prenatal paroxetine exposure may enhance the risks of major malformation, particularly cardiac defects. This article reports a newborn, whose mother used paroxetine during pregnancy, presenting with multiple congenital heart defects associated to typical physical characteristics of Treacher Collins syndrome.

  17. MR evaluation of cardiovascular physiology in congenital heart disease: flow and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Oliver M; Higgins, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become the method of choice in the evaluation of a number of questions in congenital heart disease. In addition to morphology, modern CMR techniques allow the visualization of function and flow in a temporally resolved manner. Among the pathologies where these methods play a major role are shunts, septal defects, aortic coarctation, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, and valvular regurgitation. This paper explains the basics of functional and flow encoded CMR and discusses their application in the assessment of several types of congenital heart disease.

  18. Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula in an adult: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Su; Xiu-Qin Wei; Xiu-Yi Zhi; Qing-Sheng Xu; Ting Ma

    2007-01-01

    Bronchoesophageal fistulas are usually diagnosed in the neonatal period. As such, the condition is rare in adults.We present a case of a congenital bronchoesophageal fistula in a 62-year-old man with the complaint of severe bouts of cough and choking after swallowing liquid. His workup included a barium esophagogram that revealed a fistula between the esophagus and a right lower lobe bronchus. The diagnosis should be considered in certain individuals with suggestive symptomatology and unexplained respiratory pathology. The fistula was divided and resected, The patient had an uneventful recovery.

  19. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities.

  20. Congenital Heart Disease Requiring Maintenance of Ductus Arteriosus in Critically Ill Newborns Admitted at A Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cucerea Manuela

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital heart diseases (CHD have been reported to be responsible for 30 to 50% of infant mortality caused by congenital disabilities. In critical cases, survival of newborns with CHD depends on the patency of the ductus arteriosus (PDA, for maintaining the systemic or pulmonary circulation. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and side effects of PGE (prostaglandin E administration in newborns with critical congenital heart disease requiring maintenance of the ductus arteriosus.

  1. Two congenital coronary abnormalities affecting heart function: anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery and congenital left main coronary artery atresia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yanyan; Jin Mei; Han Ling; Ding Wenhong; Zheng Jianyong; Sun Chufan; Lyu Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Background The anomalous origin of the left coronary artery (LCA) from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) and congenital left main coronary artery atresia (CLMCA-A) are two kinds of very rare coronary heart diseases which affect heart function profoundly.This study aimed to retrospectively illustrate the clinical features and therapy experience of ALCAPA and CLMCA-A patients.Methods From April 1984 to July 2012,in Beijing Anzhen Hospital,23 patients were diagnosed with ALCAPA and 4 patients with CLMCA-A.We summarized the clinical data of the 27 cases and retrospectively analyzed the clinical manifestation,diagnosis,and treatments of these two kinds of congenital coronary abnormalities.Results The 23 patients (13 males and 10 females,aged ranging from 2.5 months to 65 years) identified with ALCAPA were classified into infantile type (age of onset younger than 12 months,16 cases) and adult type (age of onset older than 12 months,7 cases).Four patients were diagnosed with CLMCA-A (three males and one female,aged ranging from 3 months to 2 years).The main clinical manifestations of infantile-type ALCAPA and CLMCA-A include repeated respiratory tract infection,heart failure,dyspnea,feeding intolerance,diaphoresis,and failure to thrive.And these two congenital coronary abnormalities might be misdiagnosed as endocardial fibroelastosis,dilated cardiomyopathy,and acute myocardial infarction.As for the adult-type ALCAPA,cardiac murmurs and discomfort of the precordial area are the most common presentations and might be misdiagnosed as coronary heart disease,myocarditis,or patent ductus arteriosus.In ECG examination:Infantile-type ALCAPA and CLMCA-A showed abnormal Q waves with T wave inversion in leads I,avL,and V4-V6,especially in lead avL.However,ECG of adult-type ALCAPA lacked distinct features.In chest radiography:pulmonary congestion and cardiomegaly were the most common findings in infantile-type ALCAPA and CLMCA-A,while pulmonary artery segment dilation was more common in

  2. Congenital Heart Diseases in the Newborns of Diabetic Mothers: an Echocardiographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahimpour

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the discovery of insulin and current improvement in diabetics care, congenital malformations in diabetics are still more frequent than in the general population. The aim of this study was to identify congenital heart dieases (CHD in the newborns of diabetic mothers (IDMS. Methods: In our prospective study, color doppler echocardiography was performed in 75 consecutive full- term newborns of diabetic mothers by GE Vivid3 echocardiographic device. Newborns were classified into two subgroups according to the type of the mothers’ diabetes: pre-gestational and gestational. They were also those were classified into three subgroups according to their birth weight: appropriate, large and small for gestational age. Data analysis was made by Fisher exact test and Chi-Square test. Results: Forty nine (65% and thirty six (35% of subjects were infants of gestational (IGDM and pre-gestational diabetic mothers (IPDM, respectively. Fifty five Newborns (73% were apropriate, fourteen (19% were large and six (8% were small for gestational age. The most common echocardiographic findings included: patent ductus arteriosus (PDA: 54.7%, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP: 24%, ventricular septal defect (VSD: 4%, atrial septal defect (ASD: 2.7%, transposition of great arteries (TGA: 1.3% and coarctation of the Aorta (COA: 1.3%. Overall incidence of congenital heart diseases was 9.3 after exclusion of PDA and HCMP cases. The incidence of congenital heart diseases was higher in macrosomic than nonmacrosomic infants of diabetic mothers (P<0.001. Congenital heart diseases were more common in infants of pre-gestational than gestational diabetic mothers (P=0.004. Conclusion: Our results showed that diabetic mothers are at increased risk of giving birth to a newborn with congenital heart disease, and transthoracic echocardiography is recommended for all infants of diabetic mothers.

  3. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: ... with heart disease and those who have suffered stroke are at higher risk for serious problems from ...

  4. Lessons learned from study of congenital hip disease in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartofilakidis, George; Lampropoulou-Adamidou, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons specialising in adult hip reconstruction surgery often face the problem of osteoarthritis secondary to congenital hip disease (CHD). To achieve better communication among physicians, better treatment planning and evaluation of the results of various treatment options, an agreed terminology is needed to describe the entire pathology. Furthermore, a generally accepted classification of the deformities is necessary. Herein, the authors propose the use of the term “congenital hip disease” and its classification as dysplasia, low dislocation and high dislocation. Knowledge of the CHD natural history facilitates comprehension of the potential development and progression of the disease, which differs among the aforementioned types. This can lead to better understanding of the anatomical abnormalities found in the different CHD types and thus facilitate preoperative planning and choice of the most appropriate management for adult patients. The basic principles for improved results of total hip replacement in patients with CHD, especially those with low and high dislocation, are: Wide exposure, restoration of the normal centre of rotation and the use of special techniques and implants for the reconstruction of the acetabulum and femur. Application of these principles during total hip replacement in young female patients born with severe deformities of the hip joint has led to radical improvement of their quality of life. PMID:28032030

  5. Community-based case-control study of childhood stroke risk associated with congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, CK; Sidney, S.; Fullerton, HJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - : A better understanding of the stroke risk factors in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) could inform stroke prevention strategies. We analyzed pediatric stroke associated with CHD in a large community-based case-control study. METHODS - : From 2.5 million children (aged 30-fold (odds ratio, 31; confidence interval 4-241) increased risk of stroke in children with CHD when compared with controls. After excluding periop...

  6. Noteworthy Literature in 2015: Anesthesia for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twite, Mark; Ing, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    This article is a review of the literature published during the 12 months of 2015, which is of interest to the congenital cardiac anesthesiologist. While the review is not exhaustive, it identifies 7 themes in the literature for 2015 and cites 78 peer-reviewed publications.

  7. Atlas-Based Ventricular Shape Analysis for Understanding Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Genevieve; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Gilbert, Kathleen; Perry, James C; Hegde, Sanjeet; Marsden, Alison; Young, Alistair A; Omens, Jeffrey H; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2016-12-01

    Congenital heart disease is associated with abnormal ventricular shape that can affect wall mechanics and may be predictive of long-term adverse outcomes. Atlas-based parametric shape analysis was used to analyze ventricular geometries of eight adolescent or adult single-ventricle CHD patients with tricuspid atresia and Fontans. These patients were compared with an "atlas" of non-congenital asymptomatic volunteers, resulting in a set of z-scores which quantify deviations from the control population distribution on a patient-by-patient basis. We examined the potential of these scores to: (1) quantify abnormalities of ventricular geometry in single ventricle physiologies relative to the normal population; (2) comprehensively quantify wall motion in CHD patients; and (3) identify possible relationships between ventricular shape and wall motion that may reflect underlying functional defects or remodeling in CHD patients. CHD ventricular geometries at end-diastole and end-systole were individually compared with statistical shape properties of an asymptomatic population from the Cardiac Atlas Project. Shape analysis-derived model properties, and myocardial wall motions between end-diastole and end-systole, were compared with physician observations of clinical functional parameters. Relationships between altered shape and altered function were evaluated via correlations between atlas-based shape and wall motion scores. Atlas-based shape analysis identified a diverse set of specific quantifiable abnormalities in ventricular geometry or myocardial wall motion in all subjects. Moreover, this initial cohort displayed significant relationships between specific shape abnormalities such as increased ventricular sphericity and functional defects in myocardial deformation, such as decreased long-axis wall motion. These findings suggest that atlas-based ventricular shape analysis may be a useful new tool in the management of patients with CHD who are at risk of impaired ventricular

  8. Self management of oral anticoagulant therapy in children with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke E.;

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The concept of self – management of oral anticoagulation has been shown to entail better quality of treatment than conventional management when assessed in selected adults. We have extended the concept of self – management to include children with congenital cardiac disease...... complications requiring doctoral intervention. All the patients and their parents expressed full satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusion: Selfmanagement of oral anticoagulation provides a good quality of treatment, which is feasible and safe in selected children with congenital cardiac disease....

  9. Clinical classification in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Willemijn M H; Douwes, Johannes M; Ploegstra, Mark-Jan; Krishnan, Usha; Roofthooft, Marcel; Hillege, Hans L; Ivy, D Dunbar; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Berger, Rolf M F

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a frequent cause of pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), with diverse etiology and outcome. We aimed to describe phenotypic heterogeneity in pediatric PAH associated with CHD (PAH-CHD), assess the applicability of the Nice CHD classification, and explore

  10. Health-related fitness profiles in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Wetterslev, Jørn; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigates whether subgroups of different health-related fitness (HrF) profiles exist among girls and boys with complex congenital heart disease (ConHD) and how these are associated with lifestyle behaviors. METHODS: We measured the cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength...

  11. Risk Factors for Gross Motor Dysfunction in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne H.; Eldridge, Bev J.; Galea, Mary P.; Harris, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) that is severe enough to require early surgery are at risk for cognitive and motor delays, as well as musculoskeletal impairments, and are best managed by an interdisciplinary team during their hospital stay and after discharge. The purpose of this article is to review some of the risk factors associated…

  12. Exercise in children with common congenital heart lesions: balancing benefits with risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Melanie; Selvadurai, Hiran; Sherwood, Megan; Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2013-10-01

    Children with corrected common congenital heart lesions are often withheld from regular exercise by their parents. While there are some modest risks with exercise, they should be seen in perspective, and the life-long benefits of regular exercise on general health, mood and well-being should be emphasised.

  13. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, W.; Hoendermis, E.S.; Moons, P.; Heida, K.Y.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Sollie, K.M.; Berger, R.M.; Lely, A.T.; Canobbio, M.M.; Pieper, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed consen

  14. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, C.P.; Ramdjan, T.T.; Gotte, M.; Brundel, B.J.; Evertz, R.; Vriend, J.W.; Molhoek, S.G.; Dorman, H.G.; Opstal, J.M. van; Konings, T.C.; Voort, P. van der; Delacretaz, E.; Houck, C.; Yaksh, A.; Jansz, L.J.; Witsenburg, M.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Triedman, J.K.; Bogers, A.J.; Groot, N.M. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in patients with CHD are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD: (1) the a

  15. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, Christophe P; Ramdjan, Tanwier T T K; Götte, Marco; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Evertz, Reinder; Vriend, Joris W J; Molhoek, Sander G; Dorman, H G Reinhart; van Opstal, Jurren M; Konings, Thelma C; van der Voort, Pepijn; Delacrétaz, Etienne; Houck, Charlotte; Yaksh, Ameeta; Jansz, Luca J; Witsenburg, Maarten; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Triedman, John K; Bogers, Ad J J C; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in CHD patients are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD 1) the age of

  16. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome with congenital heart disease: a new association.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We report a sibship of two brothers and one sister with the osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and congenital heart disease. They presented in infancy with visual impairment and psychomotor retardation. Major features included bilateral cataracts, generalised osteopenia, severe platyspondyly, borderline mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, joint laxity, and ventricular septal defect. Parental consanguinity and affected sibs of both sexes strongly suggested autosomal recessive inheritance. ...

  17. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, Willem; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Moons, Philip; Heida, Karst Y.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Van Dijk, Arie P.J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Lely, A. Titia; Canobbio, Mary M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Berger, Rudolphus

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed consen

  18. Are Grown-ups with Congenital Heart Disease Willing to Participate in an Exercise Program?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, Manon L.; Feenstra, Marlies; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; Nieuwland, Wybe; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo examine the willingness of grown-ups with congenital heart disease (GUCH) to participate in the GUCH Training Program-Individualised (GTI), an exercise program specifically designed for GUCH, and to identify factors affecting their willingness to participate. Design and SettingIn this cr

  19. Dietary intake of B-vitamins in mothers born a child with a congenital heart defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkleij-Hagoort, A.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Ursem, N.T.C.; Jonge, de R.; Hop, W.C.J.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Periconceptional use of multivitamins reduces the risk of a child with a congenital heart defect (CHD). Data on the impact of maternal diet, however, are lacking. AIM OF THE STUDY: We investigated the association between the maternal dietary intake of B-vitamins and having a child with a

  20. Time Course of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuwen, Christophe P.; Ramdjan, Tanwier T. T. K.; Gotte, Marco; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Evertz, Reinder; Vriend, Joris W. J.; Molhoek, Sander G.; Dorman, Henderikus G. R.; van Opstal, Jurren M.; Konings, Thelma C.; van der Voort, Pepijn; Delacretaz, Etienne; Houck, Charlotte; Yaksh, Ameeta; Jansz, Luca. J.; Witsenburg, Maarten; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Triedman, John K.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; de Groot, Natasja M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is rising in the aging patients with congenital heart defects (CHD). However, studies reporting on AF in patients with CHD are scarce. The aim of this multicenter study was to examine in a large cohort of patients with a variety of CHD: (1) the ag

  1. Explanatory Value of the Ability Index as Assessed by Cardiologists and Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Anne-Marie Voss; Lisby, Karen H; King, Catriona;

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The Ability Index was developed to classify patients with congenital heart disease into four functional classes. Functional class is typically determined by the cardiologist, based on data from a clinical interview. The validity of the Ability Index as assessed by the patient has...

  2. Cardiac surgery in grown-up congenital heart patients. Will the surgical workload increase?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klcovansky, J.; Søndergård, Lars; Helvind, M.;

    2008-01-01

    The number of patients with grown-up congenital heart (GUCH) disease is steadily increasing. Although there is agreement that the medical service for GUCH patients should be expanded in coming years, it is still unknown whether this should also include the surgical service. In an attempt...

  3. Physical Activity and Sport Participation in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease: Perceptions of Children and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Kirsh, Joel A.; Kilburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the…

  4. Long-Term Prostaglandin E1 Infusion for Newborns with Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykanat, Alper; Yavuz, Taner; Özalkaya, Elif; Topçuoğlu, Sevilay; Ovalı, Fahri; Karatekin, Güner

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E1 is crucial for keeping the patent ductus arteriosus in critical congenital heart disease for the survival and palliation of particularly prematurely born babies until a cardiosurgical intervention is available. In this study, the side effects of prostaglandin E1 in newborns with critical congenital heart disease and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Thirty-five newborns diagnosed with critical congenital heart disease were treated with prostaglandin E1 between January 2012 and September 2014 at our hospital. Patient charts were examined for prostaglandin E1 side effects (metabolic, gastric outlet obstruction, apnea), clinical status, and prognosis. Acquired data were analyzed in the SPSS 20.0 program. Patients with birth weight under 2500 g needed more days of prostaglandin E1 infusion than ones with birthweight over 2500 g (P = 0.016). The ratio of patients with birth weight under 2500 g who received prostaglandin E1 longer than 7 days was higher than the patients with birth weight over 2500 g (P = 0.02). Eighteen side effects were encountered in 11 of 35 patients (31%). Of these side effects, 1 patient had 4, 4 patients had 2, and 6 patients had only 1 side effect. Discontinuation of the therapy was never needed. Prostaglandin E1 is an accepted therapy modality for survival and outcome in critical congenital heart disease in particularly low-birth-weight babies until a surgical intervention is available. Side effects are not less encountered but are almost always manageable, and discontinuation is not needed.

  5. The haematocrit - an important factor causing impaired haemostasis in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Johansson, P I; Idorn, L;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease(CCHD) have haemostatic abnormalities, which result in an increased risk of bleeding. The cause is unknown, but recent studies have indicated that an elevated haematocrit, which is present in cyanotic patients, could be an important factor...

  6. The Clinical and Molecular Relations Between Idiopathic Preterm Labor and Maternal Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Monique W. M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Oudijk, Martijn A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Afink, Gijs B.; Postma, Alex V.; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Preterm labor (PTL) is an important cause of preterm delivery. The trigger initiating the process toward overt labor and parturition is poorly understood and the molecular basis remains an enigma. It recently emerged that the overall occurrence of PTL in pregnant women with congenital heart disease

  7. Outcome of pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease - A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, Willem; Pieper, Petronella G.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; van Lottum, Willem A.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Yap, Sing C.; Moons, Philip; Ebels, Tjark; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    A search of peer-reviewed literature was conducted to identify reports that provide data on complications associated with pregnancy in women with structural congenital heart disease (CHD). This review describes the outcome of 2,491 pregnancies, including 377 miscarriages (15%) and 114 elective abort

  8. Effect of Congenital Heart Defects on Language Development in Toddlers with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visootsak, J.; Hess, B.; Bakeman, R.; Adamson, L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS, OMIM #190685) is the most commonly identified genetic form of intellectual disability with congenital heart defect (CHD) occurring in 50% of cases. With advances in surgical techniques and an increasing lifespan, this has necessitated a greater understanding of the neurodevelopmental consequences of CHDs. Herein, we…

  9. Prevalence of cerebral and pulmonary thrombosis in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Thomsen, C;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have a high prevalence of thrombosis, the most frequently described locations being the cerebral and pulmonary vessels. The reported prevalence of both cerebral infarction and pulmonary thrombosis has been highly variable. The aim...

  10. Screening of 99 Danish patients with congenital heart disease for GATA4 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Litu; Tümer, Zeynep; Jacobsen, Joes Ramsøe;

    2006-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1% of the population, but only few genes involved in human CHD are presently known. Germ-line mutations in the zinc finger transcription factor GATA4 have been associated with familial cases of atrial and ventricular septal defects and pulmonary...

  11. Amplitude integrated electroencephalographic activity in infants with congenital heart disease before surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, H-J.; Mud, M.; Roofthooft, M. T. R.; Bos, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Infants with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at risk for brain injury. An accurate tool to monitor brain function is amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG). It records both background patterns and electrographic seizure activity (EA). Aims: Our aim was to determine aEEG patterns in infants w

  12. Problems of the neonates with congenital heart disease requiring early interventions: a regional report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Muhittin; Aldudak, Bedri; Akar, Melek; Akdeniz, Osman; Tüzün, Heybet; Çelebi, Vefik

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this study, it was aimed to determine the problems of the neonates who were diagnosed with congenital heart disease requiring early intervention in our hospital. Material and Methods: The files of the newborn babies with congenital heart disease requiring early intervention who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital between January 2011 and January 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. In all cases, echocardiography and ‘’Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-II” (SNAP-II) scoring were performed within the first day of admission. The data were interpreted using Number Cruncher Statistical System 2007 software. The statistical significance was set at palprostadil and age were not related to mortality. Three patients were discharged following planning of elective surgery and 60 patients were referred to a tertiary center by air ambulance. Conclusions: The results of our study indicated that prenatal diagnosis could not be made in neonates with congenital heart disease requiring intervention in our region. The mortality rates of these patients were related to the severity of the clinical status at presentation rather than to the age, gender and type of congenital heart disease. The mortality was much higher in the patients who developed circulatory failure. Most of the patients who survived were sent by air ambulance to the centers where the intervention was to be performed. PMID:26568691

  13. Congenital heart disease protein 5 associates with CASZ1 to maintain myocardial tissue integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Stephen; Amin, Nirav M; Gibbs, Devin; Christine, Kathleen S; Charpentier, Marta S; Conlon, Frank L

    2014-08-01

    The identification and characterization of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the differentiation and morphogenesis of specific cell types of the developing heart are crucial to understanding the process of cardiac development and the pathology associated with human congenital heart disease. Here, we show that the cardiac transcription factor CASTOR (CASZ1) directly interacts with congenital heart disease 5 protein (CHD5), which is also known as tryptophan-rich basic protein (WRB), a gene located on chromosome 21 in the proposed region responsible for congenital heart disease in individuals with Down's syndrome. We demonstrate that loss of CHD5 in Xenopus leads to compromised myocardial integrity, improper deposition of basement membrane, and a resultant failure of hearts to undergo cell movements associated with cardiac formation. We further report that CHD5 is essential for CASZ1 function and that the CHD5-CASZ1 interaction is necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. Collectively, these results establish a role for CHD5 and CASZ1 in the early stages of vertebrate cardiac development.

  14. Virtual cardiotomy based on 3-D MRI for preoperative planning in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Thomas Sangild [University of Aarhus, Department of Computer Science, Aarhus N (Denmark); University of Aarhus, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus (Denmark); Beerbaum, Philipp; Razavi, Reza; Greil, Gerald Franz [King' s College London School of Medicine, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, London (United Kingdom); Mosegaard, Jesper [Alexandra Institute, Aarhus (Denmark); Rasmusson, Allan [University of Aarhus, Department of Computer Science, Aarhus N (Denmark); Schaeffter, Tobias [King' s College London School of Medicine, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Austin, Conal [Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Patient-specific preoperative planning in complex congenital heart disease may be greatly facilitated by virtual cardiotomy. Surgeons can perform an unlimited number of surgical incisions on a virtual 3-D reconstruction to evaluate the feasibility of different surgical strategies. To quantitatively evaluate the quality of the underlying imaging data and the accuracy of the corresponding segmentation, and to qualitatively evaluate the feasibility of virtual cardiotomy. A whole-heart MRI sequence was applied in 42 children with congenital heart disease (age 3{+-}3 years, weight 13{+-}9 kg, heart rate 96{+-} 21 bpm). Image quality was graded 1-4 (diagnostic image quality {>=}2) by two independent blinded observers. In patients with diagnostic image quality the segmentation quality was also graded 1-4 (4 no discrepancies, 1 misleading error). The average image quality score was 2.7 - sufficient for virtual reconstruction in 35 of 38 patients (92%) older than 1 month. Segmentation time was 59{+-}10 min (average quality score 3.5). Virtual cardiotomy was performed in 19 patients. Accurate virtual reconstructions of patient-specific cardiac anatomy can be produced in less than 1 h from 3-D MRI. The presented work thus introduces a new, clinically feasible noninvasive technique for improved preoperative planning in complex cases of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  15. Brain volumes predict neurodevelopment in adolescents after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rhein, Michael; Buchmann, Andreas; Hagmann, Cornelia; Huber, Reto; Klaver, Peter; Knirsch, Walter; Latal, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Patients with complex congenital heart disease are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. Evidence suggests that brain maturation can be delayed and pre- and postoperative brain injury may occur, and there is limited information on the long-term effect of congenital heart disease on brain development and function in adolescent patients. At a mean age of 13.8 years, 39 adolescent survivors of childhood cardiopulmonary bypass surgery with no structural brain lesions evident through conventional cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and 32 healthy control subjects underwent extensive neurodevelopmental assessment and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral scans were analysed quantitatively using surface-based and voxel-based morphometry. Compared with control subjects, patients had lower total brain (P = 0.003), white matter (P = 0.004) and cortical grey matter (P = 0.005) volumes, whereas cerebrospinal fluid volumes were not different. Regional brain volume reduction ranged from 5.3% (cortical grey matter) to 11% (corpus callosum). Adolescents with cyanotic heart disease showed more brain volume loss than those with acyanotic heart disease, particularly in the white matter, thalami, hippocampi and corpus callosum (all P-values Brain volume reduction correlated significantly with cognitive, motor and executive functions (grey matter: P < 0.05, white matter: P < 0.01). Our findings suggest that there are long-lasting cerebral changes in adolescent survivors of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease and that these changes are associated with functional outcome.

  16. Congenital choledochal cysts in adults: twenty-five-year experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying-bin; CAO Li-ping; PENG Shu-you; WANG Jian-wei; Khagendra Raj Devkota; JI Zhen-ling; LI Jiang-tao; WANG Xu-an; MA Xiao-ming; CAI Wei-long; KONG Ying

    2007-01-01

    Background Choledochal cyst is rare in western countries. The relatively high incidence of coexistent hepatobiliary disease increases the difficulty of the surgical management of choledochal cyst. Here we analyze the diagnosis and treatment of congenital bile duct cyst in 122 Chinese adults.Methods The clinical data of 122 patients with congenital choledochal cysts admitted from 1981 to 2006 were analyzed.Results Clinical symptoms in most cases were nonspecific, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Sixty-one patients (50%) had coexistent pancreatobiliary disease. Among the 122 patients, 119 patients underwent ultrasonic examination;ERCP/MRCP was performed in 63 cases and CT in 102 cases. Abnormal pancreatobiliary duct junction was found in 48 patients. Sixteen patients had malignant lesions in the bile duct, arising in 11 of them from incomplete choledochal cyst that underwent various operations including cystenterostomy or cystojejunostomy. There was significant difference between the patients who underwent incomplete cyst resection and complete cyst resection in malignancy rate of bile duct (Chi square test, P= 0.000; odds ratio, 7.800; 95 % confidence interval, 2.450 to 24.836).Conclusions ERCP, CT and MRCP had proved their great values in the classification of the disease. Cyst excision with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy is recommended as the treatment of choice for patients with type Ⅰ or type Ⅳ cysts. For type Ⅴ cyst (Caroli's disease) with recurrent cholangitis, liver transplantation should be considered.

  17. Anaesthetic considerations in children with congenital heart disease undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Menghraj Shahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to provide an updated and comprehensive review on current perioperative anaesthetic management of paediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD coming for non-cardiac surgery. Search of terms such as "anaesthetic management," "congenital heart disease" and "non-cardiac surgery" was carried out in KKH eLibrary, PubMed, Medline and Google, focussing on significant current randomised control trials, case reports, review articles and editorials. Issues on how to tailor perioperative anaesthetic management on cases with left to right shunt, right to left shunt and complex heart disease are discussed in this article. Furthermore, the author also highlights special considerations such as pulmonary hypertension, neonates with CHD coming for extracardiac surgery and the role of regional anaesthesia in children with CHD undergoing non-cardiac operation.

  18. Cardiovascular cast model fabrication and casting effectiveness evaluation in fetus with severe congenital heart disease or normal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Hai-yan; Xie, Ming-xing; He, Lin; Han, Wei; Hong, Liu; Peng, Yuan; Hu, Yun-fei; Song, Ben-cai; Wang, Jing; Wang, Bin; Deng, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the application and effectiveness of vascular corrosion technique in preparing fetal cardiovascular cast models, 10 normal fetal heart specimens with other congenital disease (control group) and 18 specimens with severe congenital heart disease (case group) from induced abortions were enrolled in this study from March 2013 to June 2015 in our hospital. Cast models were prepared by injecting casting material into vascular lumen to demonstrate real geometries of fetal cardiovascular system. Casting effectiveness was analyzed in terms of local anatomic structures and different anatomical levels (including overall level, atrioventricular and great vascular system, left-sided and right-sided heart), as well as different trimesters of pregnancy. In our study, all specimens were successfully casted. Casting effectiveness analysis of local anatomic structures showed a mean score from 1.90±1.45 to 3.60±0.52, without significant differences between case and control groups in most local anatomic structures except left ventricle, which had a higher score in control group (P=0.027). Inter-group comparison of casting effectiveness in different anatomical levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. Intra-group comparison also revealed undifferentiated casting effectiveness between atrioventricular and great vascular system, or left-sided and right-sided heart in corresponding group. Third-trimester group had a significantly higher perfusion score in great vascular system than second-trimester group (P=0.046), while the other anatomical levels displayed no such difference. Vascular corrosion technique can be successfully used in fabrication of fetal cardiovascular cast model. It is also a reliable method to demonstrate three-dimensional anatomy of severe congenital heart disease and normal heart in fetus.

  19. Correlations Between Echocardiographic Systolic and Diastolic Function with Cardiac Catheterization in Biventricular Congenital Heart Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadorlik, H; Stiver, C; Khan, S; Miao, Y; Holzer, R; Cheatham, J P; Cua, C L

    2016-04-01

    Newer echocardiographic techniques may allow for more accurate assessment of left ventricular (LV) function. Adult studies have correlated these echocardiographic measurements with invasive data, but minimal data exist in the pediatric congenital heart population. Purpose of this study was to evaluate which echocardiographic measurements correlated best with LV systolic and diastolic catheterization parameters. Patients with two-ventricle physiology who underwent simultaneous echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization were included. Images were obtained in the four-chamber view. LV systolic echocardiographic data included ejection fraction, displacement, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) s' wave, global longitudinal strain, and strain rate (SR) s' wave. Diastolic echocardiographic data included mitral E and A waves, TDI e' and a' waves, and SRe' and SRa' waves. E/TDI e', TDI e'/TDI a', E/SRe', and SRe'/SRa' ratios were also calculated. Catheterization dP/dt was used as a marker for systolic function, and LV end-diastolic pressure (EDP) was used as a marker for diastolic function. Correlations of the echocardiographic and catheterization values were performed using Pearson correlation. Twenty-nine patients were included (14 females, 15 males). Median age at catheterization was 3.4 years (0.04-17.4 years). dP/dt was 1258 ± 353 mmHg/s, and LVEDP was 10.8 ± 2.4 mmHg. There were no significant correlations between catheterization dP/dt and systolic echocardiographic parameters. LVEDP correlated significantly with SRe' (r = -0.4, p = 0.03), SRa' (r = -0.4, p = 0.03), and E/SRe' (r = 0.5, p = 0.004). In pediatric congenital heart patients, catheterization dP/dt did not correlate with echocardiographic measurements of LV systolic function. Further studies are needed to determine which echocardiographic parameter best describes LV systolic function in this population. Strain rate analysis significantly correlated with LVEDP. Strain rate analysis should be considered as an

  20. Whole heart cine MR imaging of pulmonary veins in patients with congenital heart disease. Comparison with Spin Echo MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Hideaki [Yamagata City Hospital Saiseikan (Japan); Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of Whole Heart Cine (WHC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared to that of spin echo (SE) MR imaging. Among our 35 patients, 4 patients had anomalous PV return. Detectability of four PVs on each MR examination images were evaluated. MR imaging is an effective modality for the clarification of PVs, and WHC MR imaging is more useful in delineating PV anomalies than SE MR imaging. (author)

  1. Rare copy number variants contribute to congenital left-sided heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Phillip Hitz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Left-sided congenital heart disease (CHD encompasses a spectrum of malformations that range from bicuspid aortic valve to hypoplastic left heart syndrome. It contributes significantly to infant mortality and has serious implications in adult cardiology. Although left-sided CHD is known to be highly heritable, the underlying genetic determinants are largely unidentified. In this study, we sought to determine the impact of structural genomic variation on left-sided CHD and compared multiplex families (464 individuals with 174 affecteds (37.5% in 59 multiplex families and 8 trios to 1,582 well-phenotyped controls. 73 unique inherited or de novo CNVs in 54 individuals were identified in the left-sided CHD cohort. After stringent filtering, our gene inventory reveals 25 new candidates for LS-CHD pathogenesis, such as SMC1A, MFAP4, and CTHRC1, and overlaps with several known syndromic loci. Conservative estimation examining the overlap of the prioritized gene content with CNVs present only in affected individuals in our cohort implies a strong effect for unique CNVs in at least 10% of left-sided CHD cases. Enrichment testing of gene content in all identified CNVs showed a significant association with angiogenesis. In this first family-based CNV study of left-sided CHD, we found that both co-segregating and de novo events associate with disease in a complex fashion at structural genomic level. Often viewed as an anatomically circumscript disease, a subset of left-sided CHD may in fact reflect more general genetic perturbations of angiogenesis and/or vascular biology.

  2. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Marshall L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Hornik, Christoph; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Habib, Robert H; Edwards, Fred H

    2016-09-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. With more than 400,000 total operations from nearly all centers performing pediatric and congenital heart operations in North America, the STS CHSD is an unparalleled platform for clinical investigation, outcomes research, and quality improvement activities in this subspecialty. In 2015, several major original publications reported analyses of data in the CHSD pertaining to specific diagnostic and procedural groups, age-defined cohorts, or the entire population of patients in the database. Additional publications reported the most recent development, evaluation, and application of metrics for quality measurement and reporting of pediatric and congenital heart operation outcomes. This use of the STS CHSD for outcomes research and for quality measurement continues to expand as database participation and the available wealth of data in it continue to grow. This article reviews outcomes research and quality improvement articles published in 2015 based on STS CHSD data.

  3. Anesthetic management of a 2-day-old with complete congenital heart block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal connective tissue disorders such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (most common, Sjogren′s syndrome, mixed connective tissue disorders may lead to the rare condition of complete congenital heart block in the neonate. Rare fetal syndromes such as myocarditis, 18p syndrome, mucopolysaccharidoses and mitochondrial diseases are other causes. The mortality rate of this condition is inversely propotional to the age of presentation being 6 % in the neonatal age group. As the cardiac output in the neonate is heart rate dependent, it is crucial to maintain the heart rate in these patients. Pharamacological interventions with dopamine, isoprenaline, epinephrine and atropine are known for their variable response. Although permanent pacing is the most reliable mode of management, the access to it is often not readily available, especially in the developing countries. In such cases temporary pacing methods become lifesaving. Of all the modalities of temporary pacing (transcutaneous, transesophageal and transvenous transcutaneous pacing is the most readily available and immediate mode. In this case report we present a two day old neonate with isolated complete congenital heart block and a resting heart rate of 50-55/min in immediate need of palliative surgery for trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF. With pharmacological intervention the heart rate could only be raised to 75-80/min. The surgery was successfully carried out using transcutaneous pacing to maintain a heart rate of 100/min.

  4. Ultrasound findings in fetal congenital heart block associated with maternal anti-Ro/SSA and Anti-La/SSB antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jasmine; Clark, Toshi J; Tan, Justin H; Delaney, Shani; Jolley, Jennifer A

    2015-03-01

    We present the sonographic features of a second-trimester fetus diagnosed with a bradyarrhythmia at 19 weeks' gestation. The mother carried a diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome, including the presence of SSA and SSB antibodies. Ultrasound M-mode and fetal echocardiogram revealed the etiology of the bradycardia to be a complete fetal congenital heart block, likely due to transplacental passage of autoimmune anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies. Consequential to the congenital heart block, the fetus developed hydrops fetalis at 21 weeks' gestational age. We discuss the 2 major etiologies of congenital heart block and the implications in subsequent pregnancies.

  5. Case Report: Emergency awake craniotomy for cerebral abscess in a patient with unrepaired cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassl, Jens; Tobler, Daniel; Zumofen, Daniel; Steiner, Luzius A.; Goettel, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old male with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease undergoing emergency craniotomy for a cerebral abscess. Maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamic stability and adequate tissue oxygenation during anesthesia may be challenging in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease. In this case, we decided to perform the surgery as an awake craniotomy after interdisciplinary consensus. We discuss general aspects of anesthetic management during awake craniotomy and specific concerns in the perioperative care of patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:27928498

  6. A new plastic surgical technique for adult congenital webbed penis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-bing CHEN; Xian-fan DING; Chong LUO; Shi-cheng YU; Yan-lan YU; Bi-de CHEN; Zhi-gen ZHANG; Gong-hui LI

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To introduce a novel surgical technique for correction of adult congenital webbed penis.Methods:From March 2010 to December 2011,12patients (age range:14-23 years old) were diagnosed as having a webbed penis and underwent a new surgical procedure designed by us.Results:All cases were treated successfully without severe complication.The operation time ranged from 20 min to 1 h.The average bleeding volume was less than 50 ml.All patients achieved satisfactory cosmetic results after surgery.The penile curvature disappeared in all cases and all patients remained well after 1 to 3 months of follow-up.Conclusions:Adult webbed penis with complaints of discomfort or psychological pressure due to a poor profile should be indicators for surgery.Good corrective surgery should expose the glans and coronal sulcus,match the penile skin length to the penile shaft length dorsally and ventrally,and provide a normal penoscrotal junction.Our new technique is a safe and effective method for the correction of adult webbed penis,which produces satisfactory results.

  7. Comparative study on cerebral injury after open heart surgery in patients with congenital and rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; XIAO Ying-bin; CHEN Lin; ZHONG Qian-jin; WANG Xue-feng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively study the different effects of open heart surgery on brain tissues of patients with congenital and rheumatic heart disease. Methods: Forty patients with congenital heart disease (CHD, CHD group, n=20) or rheumatic heart disease (RHD, RHD group, n=20) underwent on-pump (cardiopulmonary bypass, CPB) heart-beating open heart surgery. Blood samples before CPB, and 20 minutes, 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days after CPB were collected, and the levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and protein S-100b in the plasma were determined with enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. All the patients were examined with electroencephalogram (EEG) before and 1 week after operation. The changes of NSE, S-100b and EEG compared to verify the difference of postoperative cerebral injury between CHD cases and RHD cases. Results: The plasma level of S-100b increased significantly 20 minutes after CPB and was still higher than the preoperative level at 24 hours after operation in both groups (P<0.01). The plasma level of NSE increased more significantly in the CHD group than in the RHD group 20 minutes after CPB and it returned to the normal level 24 hours after CPB in the CHD group but remained at a high level in the RHD group (P<0.01). The levels of NSE and S-100b returned to the normal levels on the 7th day after CPB. Abnormal EEG was found in 75% of the patients in the CHD group and 60% in the RHD group. Conclusions: On-pump heart-beating open heart surgery can cause certain cerebral injury in the patients with CHD or RHD. The injury was more severe and recovered more quickly in the CHD group than in the RHD group.

  8. Recent Decrease in the Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoshnood, Babak; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine trends in the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHDs) in Europe and to compare these trends with the recent decrease in the prevalence of CHDs in Canada (Quebec) that was attributed to the policy of mandatory folic acid fortification. STUDY DESIGN: We used data...... for the period 1990-2007 for 47 508 cases of CHD not associated with a chromosomal anomaly from 29 population-based European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies registries in 16 countries covering 7.3 million births. We estimated trends for all CHDs combined and separately for 3 severity groups using random...

  9. Congenital heart disease in the offspring and maternal habits and home exposures during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, J; Heinonen, O P

    1992-11-01

    To test the effect of maternal habits and home exposures during early pregnancy on the occurrence of congenital heart disease in the offspring, 406 cases and 756 controls were studied. The cases included all cardiovascular malformations detected in Finland during 1982-1983, while the healthy controls were randomly selected from all babies born during the same period. Case and control mothers were interviewed after delivery using a structured and pre-tested questionnaire. Maternal overall drug consumption during the first trimester was as prevalent among case mothers (13.3%) as controls (14.6%). Neither was the risk of congenital heart disease associated with maternal use of contraceptive pills, salicylates, diazepam, or sweetening agents separately. Maternal exposures to disinfectants, dyes, lacquers, paints, pesticides, or glues at home were equally prevalent in case and control groups. Several earlier miscarriages was a predictor of an infant born with congenital heart disease (OR = 2.7, CI95 = 1.4-5.3). Maternal ultrasound examination was performed during the first 16 weeks of pregnancy more often among the case group (28.3%) than among the control group (22.0%). However, the association between ultrasound examination and the risk of congenital heart disease in the offspring was not statistically significant (OR = 1.2, 95% confidence interval 0.9-1.7) when adjusted for confounding factors such as the threat of miscarriage in logistic regression analysis. It is concluded that maternal ultrasound examination, intake of some common drugs, and exposure to a number of environmental factors at home during early pregnancy are probably not harmful for the developing fetal heart.

  10. Anesthetic management of congenital broncho-esophageal fistula in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Ranjan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Broncho-esophageal fistula (BEF are quite rare in adults, more so the congenital variety. The common causes of BEF in adults include infections, trauma, and malignancies. We report a rare case of congenital BEF manifesting in adulthood with repeated pulmonary infections. We emphasize mainly on the preoperative preparation and perioperative management of this patient. It is essential to have a high index of suspicion to diagnose congenital BEF in adults. Anesthesiologists play an important role in successful management of these cases.

  11. Adults living with heart failure and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Sommer, Irene; Bjerrum, Merete

    Background Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Fatigue negatively impacts on patients’ everyday life, prognosis and quality of life. No specific cure or effective interventions to alleviate fatigue are available. Over the past decade, qualitative...... To synthesise the best available evidence related to the lived experiences and management of fatigue in everyday life in adult patients with stable heart failure to develop effective interventions to support self-care. Specific questions on the patients’ lived experiences included: • How do patients with HF...... describe their experiences of fatigue? • How do patients with HF perceive the impact of fatigue in everyday life? • How do patients with HF manage fatigue and its consequences in everyday life? Methods A systematic literature search for published and unpublished studies 1995-2012 was carried out from...

  12. Long-Term Nationwide Follow-Up Study of Simple Congenital Heart Disease Diagnosed in Otherwise Healthy Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk, Jørgen; Laursen, Henning Bækgaard; Olsen, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systematic follow-up is currently not recommended for patients with simple congenital heart disease; however, only a few data exist on the long-term prognosis of simple congenital heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We undertook a nationwide follow-up study of a cohort of 1241 simple...... congenital heart disease patients, diagnosed from 1963 through 1973, in otherwise healthy children and alive at 15 years of age. We identified 10 age- and sex-matched general population controls per patient. We followed the study population through Danish public registries from the age of 15 years up...... with simple congenital heart disease in the 1960s have substantially increased long-term mortality and cardiac morbidity compared with the general population. Further studies on the effectiveness of systematic medical follow-up programs appear warranted....

  13. A Primer on Computational Simulation in Congenital Heart Disease for the Clinician

    CERN Document Server

    Clementel, Irene Vignon; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; 10.1016/j.ppedcard.2010.09.002

    2011-01-01

    Interest in the application of engineering methods to problems in congenital heart disease has gained increased popularity over the past decade. The use of computational simulation to examine common clinical problems including single ventricle physiology and the associated surgical approaches, the effects of pacemaker implantation on vascular occlusion, or delineation of the biomechanical effects of implanted medical devices is now routinely appearing in clinical journals within all pediatric cardiovascular subspecialties. In practice, such collaboration can only work if both communities understand each other's methods and their limitations. This paper is intended to facilitate this communication by presenting in the context of congenital heart disease (CHD) the main steps involved in performing computational simulation-from the selection of an appropriate clinical question/problem to understanding the computational results, and all of the "black boxes" in between. We examine the current state of the art and ...

  14. Detection of critical congenital heart defects: Review of contributions from prenatal and newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Richard S; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Sontag, Marci K

    2015-04-01

    In 2011, statewide newborn screening programs for critical congenital heart defects began in the United States, and subsequently screening has been implemented widely. In this review, we focus on data reports and collection efforts related to both prenatal diagnosis and newborn screening. Defect-specific, maternal, and geographic factors are associated with variations in prenatal detection, so newborn screening provides a population-wide safety net for early diagnosis. A new web-based repository is collecting information on newborn screening program policies, quality indicators related to screening programs, and specific case-level data on infants with these defects. Birth defects surveillance programs also collect data about critical congenital heart defects, particularly related to diagnostic timing, mortality, and services. Individuals from state programs, federal agencies, and national organizations will be interested in these data to further refine algorithms for screening in normal newborn nurseries, neonatal intensive care settings, and other special populations; and ultimately to evaluate the impact of screening on outcomes.

  15. Eponymous cardiovascular surgeries for congenital heart diseases--imaging review and historical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buethe, Ji; Ashwath, Ravi C; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgical techniques over the past few decades have revolutionized the management of the patients with congenital heart disease, and many now survive into adulthood. Several eponymous surgical procedures performed for congenital heart disease have been named after eminent surgeons. In this article, we provide a short biography of the surgeons associated with these eponymous surgical procedures along with their other important scientific contributions. This is followed by a review of these surgical procedures and their most common complications. Imaging appearances of these surgical procedures along with common complications are described and illustrated, with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. The surgical procedures described in this review include Blalock-Taussig, Potts, Waterston, Glenn, Fontan, Kawashima, Norwood, Sano, Damus-Kaye-Stansel, Mustard, Senning, Jatene, LeCompte, Rastelli, Rashkind, Ross, and Waldenhausen.

  16. OntoDiagram: Automatic Diagram Generation for Congenital Heart Defects in Pediatric Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Vishwanath, Kartik; Viswanath, Venkatesh; Drake, William; Lee, Yugyung

    2005-01-01

    In pediatric cardiology as well as many other medical specialties, the accurate portrayal of a large volume of patient information is crucial to providing good patient care. Our research aims at utilizing clinical and spatial ontologies representing the human heart, to automatically generate a Mullins-like diagram [6] based on a patient's information in the cardiology databases. Our ontology allows an intuitive way of modeling congenital defects with the structure of the hum...

  17. Screening of congenital heart disease patients using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Meden; El-Segaier, Milad; Fernlund, Eva;

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent copy number variants (CNVs) are found in a significant proportion of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and some of these CNVs are associated with other developmental defects. In some syndromic patients, CHD may be the first presenting symptom, thus screening of patients...... that the MLPA assay detects clinically relevant CNVs and suggest that it could be used within pediatric cardiology as a first tier screen to detect clinically relevant CNVs and identify syndromic patients at an early stage....

  18. Children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease can be identified through population-based registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Gunnar; Hærskjold, Ann; Stensballe, Lone Graff;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological research is facilitated in Sweden by a history of national health care registers, making large unselected national cohort studies possible. However, for complex clinical populations, such as children with congenital heart disease (CHD), register-based studies...... are challenged by registration limitations. For example, the diagnostic code system International Classification of Diseases, 10th version (ICD-10) does not indicate the clinical significance of abnormalities, therefore may be of limited use if used as the sole parameter in epidemiological research. Palivizumab...

  19. Pediatric and congenital heart transplant: twenty-year experience in a tertiary Brazilian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Augusto Miana; Estela Azeka; Luiz Fernando Canêo; Aída Luisa Turquetto; Carla Tanamati; Juliano Gomes Penha; Alexandre Cauduro; Marcelo Biscegli Jatene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac transplantation remains the gold standard for end-stage cardiomyopathies and congenital heart defects in pediatric patients. Objective: This study aims to report on 20 years of experience since the first case and evaluate our results. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database and outpatient follow-up. Between October 1992 and April 2012, 109 patients underwent 114 transplants. 51.8% of them being female. The age of patients ranged from 12 days to...

  20. Risk Factors for post-Cardiac Surgery Diaphragmatic Paralysis in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Akbariasbagh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injured phrenic nerve secondary to cardiac surgeries is the most common cause of diaphragmatic paralysis (DP in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for DP caused by congenital heart defect corrective surgeries in pediatrics.Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted in a 2-year period (2006–2008, included 451 children with congenital heart diseases admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital. The diaphragmatic function was examined via fluoroscopy, and the frequency of DP and its relevant parameters were evaluated.Results: Of the 451 patients, comprising 268 males and 183 females at an age range of 3 days to 204 months (28.2 ± 33.4 months, 25 (5.5% infants (60% male and 40% female, age range = 15 days to 132 months, 41.2 ± 28.1 months had DP as follows: 48% unilateral right-sided and 36% unilateral left-sided. Additionally, 68% had cyanotic congenital heart disease and 84% had DP following total correction surgery.  The highest prevalence rates of DP resulting in phrenic hemiparesis were observed after arterial switch operation, Fontan procedure, and Blalock–Taussig shunt surgery, respectively. Thirteen (52% of the 25 DP patients underwent surgical diaphragmatic plication because of severe respiratory distress and dependency on mechanical ventilation, and most of the cases of plication underwent arterial switch operation. The rate of mortality was 24% (6 patients.Conclusion: DP with a prevalence of 5.5% was one of the most common complications secondary to cardiac surgeries in the infants included in the present study. Effective factors were age, weight, cyanotic congenital heart defects, and previous cardiac surgery. Diaphragmatic plication improved prognosis in severe cases.

  1. Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Malformations – Possibilities for the Employment of Telepathology

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Tennstedt; Kathrin Sunkel-Wehrstedt; Martin Vogel; Peter Hufnagl

    2000-01-01

    Goal: In a study of 10 autopsy cases with congenital cardiac malformations we investigated whether obtaining a second opinion by means of telepathology could satisfy quality standards for the diagnosis of cardiac malformations and what the advantages and disadvantages of such a procedure might be. Material: The investigatory samples were 10 formalin‐fixed hearts with complex malformations from 9 fetuses and one newborn on which autopsies had been performed at the Pathological Institute of the...

  2. Screening for congenital heart defects by transabdominal ultrasound - role of early gestational screening and importance of operator training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkola, Taisto; Ojala, Tiina H; Ulander, Veli-Matti; Jaeggi, Edgar; Pitkänen, Olli M

    2015-03-01

    The majority of congenital heart defects occur without identifiable risk factors. Detection rates are therefore highly dependent on the experience and expertise of the obstetrical screening operator. In the first trimester, the risk of congenital heart defects increases with increasing nuchal thickness (≥2.5 mm detects 44% of major congenital heart defects), but because of the number of false positives, the positive predictive value is only a few percent. The anatomy of major congenital heart defects may be delineated in less than half of the fetuses during early second trimester. The reported yield of congenital heart defects detection during the mid-gestational routine obstetrical screening has improved over time and detection rates up to 85% of major congenital heart defects have been reported when outflow tract and three-vessel views are included in conjunction with the four-chamber view. Improved detection rates have been achieved following screening operator training interventions combined with a low referral threshold to obtain a detailed fetal echocardiographic study.

  3. Ophthalmic Evaluation of Children from the Tibet Plateau with Congenital Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqin Wang; Qian Shi; Lin Sun; Jing Wang; Lei Li; Tianchang Li; Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.To perform ophthalmic examinations to evaluate the ocular characteristics of children living in the Tibet plateau and diagnosed with congenital heart disease.Methods:.Children with congenital heart disease underwent a conventional ocular examination including distant acuity test, slit-lamp examination,.fundus examination,.non-contact in-traocular pressure measurement,.measurement of corneal thickness, and fundus photography.Results: Forty-two Tibetan children, aged between 4 and 18 years and diagnosed with congenital heart disease,.were en-rolled in this study..The percentage of low visual acuity was 4.76%, mean intraocular pressure was (13.67±2.15) mmHg, average corneal thickness was (492.55±33.79) μm,.96.43%had an anterior chamber depth of 1 / 2 corneal thickness (CT), and 35.7% had an obvious fundus vascular tortuosity.Conclusion:.This study adds to the understanding of the ocu-lar status of the population living in the Tibet plateau, thereby offering clinical evidence for the prevention and treatment of eye diseases in this area. (Eye Science 2014; 29:134-137)

  4. Assessment of right ventricular systolic function by echocardiography after surgical repair of congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraiche, Diala; Ben Moussa, Nidhal

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative impairment of right ventricular (RV) systolic function can appear after surgical repair of complex congenital heart defects, such as tetralogy of Fallot; it is caused by chronic volume and/or pressure overload due to pulmonary regurgitation and/or stenosis. RV dysfunction is strongly associated with prognosis in these patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard for quantification of RV volumes and ejection fraction in patients with congenital heart diseases; however, it is costly and is not widely available. Echocardiography is the imaging modality that is most available and most frequently used to assess RV systolic function. However, RV ejection fraction cannot be measured accurately by standard two-dimensional echocardiography because of its pyramidal shape. Surrogate parameters of RV systolic function are mostly used in routine practice. New techniques of two-dimensional strain and three-dimensional quantification of RV volumes and ejection fraction have been developed in recent years. The aim of this article is to show the pertinence of each variable of RV systolic function measured by echocardiography in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and residual chronic RV overload.

  5. Adult congenital diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a rare case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), which mainly occurs in the newborn or in childhood with severe respiratory distress and high mortality, is rarely found in adult, especially for those uncommon right CDH [1–4]. Whereas, liver as the main hernial

  6. Acute ischemic stroke in a child with cyanotic congenital heart disease due to non-compliance of anticoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Misbahuddin; James, Anish F.; Qureshi, Raheel S.; Saraf, Sapan; Ahluwalia, Tina; Mukherji, Joy Dev; Kole, Tamorish

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a common presentation in geriatric patients in emergency department but rarely seen in pediatric patients. In case of acute ischemic stroke in pediatric age group, management is different from that of adult ischemic stroke where thrombolysis is a good op. METHODS: We report a case of a 17-year-old male child presenting in emergency with an episode of acute ischemic stroke causing left hemiparesis with left facial weakness and asymmetry. The patient suffered from cyanotic congenital heart disease for which he had undergone Fontan operation previously. He had a history of missing his daily dose of warfarin for last 3 days prior to the stroke. RESULTS: The patient recovered from acute ischemic stroke without being thrombolyzed. CONCLUSION: In pediatric patients, acute ischemic stroke usually is evolving and may not require thrombolysis. PMID:25215056

  7. Management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease: recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Ilja M; van Riel, Annelieke C M J; Mulder, Barbara J M; Bouma, Berto J

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a serious complication of adult congenital heart disease associated with systemic-to-pulmonary shunts. Although early shunt closure restricts development of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients remain at risk even after repair. The development of pulmonary arterial hypertension is associated with a markedly increased morbidity and mortality. It is important to identify patients with a poor prognosis using disease specific markers. Echocardiography and biomarkers arise as practical tools to determine the risk of mortality. Although pulmonary arterial hypertension cannot be cured, four classes of disease-targeting therapies are currently available and several promising therapies are being studied. There is a shift in drug studies towards more clinically relevant endpoints such as time to clinical worsening and morbidity and mortality events.

  8. 成人先天性心脏病合并重度肺动脉高压手术处置策略及效果分析%Outcome analysis for the surgical treatment in adult patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方敏华; 王镇龙; 张春振; 李波; 吴洪江

    2015-01-01

    的效果是满意的。%Objective To study the surgical strategy of adult patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and to identify the risk factors for the outcomes. Methods Between January 2005 and December 2013, 202 adult patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease underwent the surgical repair. There were 95 male and 107 female with age ranged 18 to 61 years. The ratio of pulmonary arterial pressure/systemic arterial pressure (PAP/AOP) in all patients was more than 0.75 and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was ranged from 2 to 14 Wood unit before operation. 127 patients with PVR less than 6 Wood unit and without heart failure symptom underwent the surgical repair directly. 75 patients with PVR more than 6 Wood unit or with heart failure symptom underwent acute pulmonary vasodilator testing. Among them, 48 patients with positive results received the surgical repair and 27 patients with negative results underwent the surgical repair after receiving targeted therapy about from 2 to 3 month and re-undergoing cardiac catheterization to judge the change of PVR. Results The early mortality was 3.5%. The early postoperative adverse events included severe low cardiac output syndrome occured in 24 patients, hypoxemia in 19 patients and pulmonary crisis in 9 patients. Univariate analysis revealed preoperative moderate or severe MI (P=0.014), atrial fibrillation (P=0.030), the size of heart (P=0.011) as risk factors for the early death. Univariate analysis revealed age (P=0.003), preoperative moderate or severe MI (P=0.001), atrial fibrillation (P=0.001), PVR (P=0.025), the size of heart (P=0.001), the postoperative PAP/AOP more than 0.5 after 72 hour (P=0.001) as risk factors for the early postoperative adverse events. In the multivariate analysis, age (P=0.023), with moderate or severe MI (P=0.026) and the postoperative PAP/AOP more than 0.5 after 72 hour (P=0.001) was independent risk factors for the

  9. [Optimization of postoperative medical therapy of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakov, I S; Medvedev, A P; Pichugin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined surgical and medical treatment of infective endocarditis in patients with congenital valvular heart disease when included in a regimen of the drug Reamberin. In this regard, the analysis of the effectiveness of a combination regimen of 74 patients with valvular congenital heart diseases complicated with infective endocarditis. Given the indications for surgical correction operative technique features and possible technical difficulties in carrying out such operations, due to the inflammatory changes and tissue destruction, and ways to overcome them. For the correction of metabolic disorders in the postoperative period, 47 patients (main group) was appointed Reamberin: once, intravenous drip 400 ml/day during the first 5 days after surgery. 27 patients (control group) was conducted infusion therapy depending on the severity of the condition according to the classical scheme. In addition to standard clinical and laboratory examination, to assess the effectiveness of Reamberin was investigated catalase activity of CPK in blood serum in the dynamics of observation (1, 3 and 5 days after surgery). It is revealed that surgical approach, used in complex treatment of patients with valvular congenital heart diseases, including reorganization of the cavities of the heart, increasing the frequency of joints and the use of reinforcing strips of synthetic material that prevents the cutting of sutures through the inflamed tissue has achieved good short-and long-term results. Infective endocarditis and destruction of the valvular annulus fibrosus the use of a frame of strips of polytetrafluoroethylene allows you to restore its integrity and to implant a mechanical prosthesis. The inclusion in the regimen of patients with infective endocarditis complicated by cardiac insufficiency in the early postoperative period the drug Reamberin improves the efficiency of treatment by a more rapid restoration of the normal

  10. Chiari s Network: Association with Other Congenital Heart Diseases

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    Hasim Husrevsahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was performed to assess the prevalence of Chiari%u2019s Network (CN in a pediatric outpatient department population by using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and to determine its association with other cardiac anomalies. Material and Method: 2232 children who underwent cardiac examination and TTE at the pediatric cardiology outpatient department of our institution between April 2013 and April 2014 were included in the study. Routine M-mode, 2-D, and Doppler studies were applied. All co-existent lesions were recorded. Results: Of 2232 children, CN was detected in 76 patients (3.41% and found most frequently during the first month. Atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale (ASD/PFO was the most common congenital defect seen with CN (55.3%. Ten children (13.2% had peripheral pulmonary stenosis (PPS and seven (9.21% showed atrial septal aneurism (ASA associated with CN. Of patients with CN, a total of 11 patients (14.5%, 10 of them 1-8 days old and 1 of them 17 days old, demonstrated right ventricular dysfunction. Three (3.9% patients 1-12 days old demonstrated biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Twenty-nine of the studied patients (11% demonstrated right ventricular diastolic dysfunction (90% 1-30 days old. Of the total 2232 patients, 267 individuals (8.4% showed ASA whereas there were only7 cases (9.6% of CN patients. Discussion: CN is an uncommon and incidental finding that should be recognized appropriately. This may not be always a normal variant. Proper documentation of CN is critical regarding possible future complications.

  11. PROFILE OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE AS DIAGNOSED BY FETAL ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, A TERTIARY CARE EXPERIENCE

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    Venkata Arunavalli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The incidence of congenital heart disease is 0.8 in 1000 live births. Fetal echo cardiography offers a chance to detect most hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease in early pregnancy, so that their management prenatally, at birth and postnatally can be planned better. OBJECTIVES : To analyze the profile of congenital heart disease as diagnosed by fetal echocardiography, in pregnant women referred to a tertiary care centre. MATERIAL AND METHODS : The study design is retrospective, observational study. A total number of 583 fetal echo studies were performed at our C entre from January 1 st 2014 to June 30 th 2015. All studies were performed by a single operator. The main i ndications for the referral were: inability to visualize a clear four chamber view on obstetric scan, echogenic focus in LV cavity, maternal diabetes, family history of congenital heart disease, and maternal request. Statistical analysis was performed usin g statistical package for social sciences SPSS: CHICAGO, 3L VSA program. All the women with abnormal FE studies, except ones with complex CHDS were instructed to bring the new borns for 2D echo within 1 – 2 days after birth. RESULTS : Overall, significant C HD was found in 5.4% of FE studies (32 out of 583 cases . The most common indications for referral were: inability to visualize a clear four chamber view on obstetric scan, echogenic focus in LV cavity, maternal diabetes, family history of congenital heart disease, and maternal request. The risk factors with highest yield of CHD were poly hydroamnios and maternal diabetes. The commonest lesion found was ostium secundum ASD. There was a significant correlation between the presence of echogenic focus prenatal ly and small to moderate sized ostium secundum ASD after birth. CONCLUSION : Our data suggests that the risk factors with highest yield of CHD are polyhydromnios and meternal diabetes. Presence of echogenic focus in the LV in FE is associated

  12. Congenitally corrected transposition in the adult: detection by radionuclide angiocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guit, G.L.; Kroon, H.M.; Chin, J.G.; Pauwels, E.K.; van Voorthuisen, A.E.

    1985-11-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition (CCT) of the great vessels is an uncommon anomaly usually detected in children because of associated severe cardiac malformations. When these are absent, patients may be hemodynamically normal, but associated cardiac abnormalities are usually present in CCT, leading to symptoms in adulthood. When CCT is suggested in an adult, diagnosis by means of ultrasound may be difficult. Radionuclide angiocardiography (RA) is a simple, noninvasive method by which to diagnose CCT. The authors found consistent morphologic scintigraphic results in 13 patients with proved CCT, leading to establishment of reliable diagnostic criteria. In all instances of situs solitus the aorta ascends and descends on the left with vertical orientation. In the case of situs inversus, the aorta ascends and descends on the right with vertical orientation. The authors criteria are independent of the situs and cardiac position, unlike earlier reports by others. They believe images obtained in the anterior projection are sufficient for the study. The practical application of RA study in patient diagnosis is demonstrated, giving special attention to patients referred because of situs solitus and dextrocardia, in which CCT is known to be present in 50% of cases.

  13. 3D-shaded surface rendering of gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, S.; Kikinis, R.; Dumanli, H. [Surgical Planning Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Geva, T.; Powell, A.J. [Department of Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chung, T. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Background. Gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography is a useful imaging technique for patients with congenital heart disease. Objective. This study sought to determine the added value of creating 3D shaded surface displays compared to standard maximal intensity projection (MIP) and multiplanar reformatting (MPR) techniques when analyzing 3D MR angiography data. Materials and methods. Seventeen patients (range, 3 months to 51 years old) with a variety of congenital cardiovascular defects underwent gadolinium-enhanced 3D MR angiography of the thorax. Color-coded 3D shaded surface models were rendered from the image data using manual segmentation and computer-based algorithms. Models could be rotated, translocated, or zoomed interactively by the viewer. Information available from the 3D models was compared to analysis based on viewing standard MIP/MPR displays. Results. Median postprocessing time for the 3D models was 6 h (range, 3-25 h) compared to approximately 20 min for MIP/MPR viewing. No additional diagnostic information was gained from 3D model analysis. All major findings with MIP/MPR postprocessing were also apparent on the 3D models. Qualitatively, the 3D models were more easily interpreted and enabled adjacent vessels to be distinguished more readily. Conclusion. Routine use of 3D shaded surface reconstructions for visualization of contrast enhanced MR angiography in congenital heart disease cannot be recommended. 3D surface rendering may be more useful for presenting complex anatomy to an audience unfamiliar with congenital heart disease and as an educational tool. (orig.)

  14. The alteration of interelemental ratios in myocardium under the congenital heart disease (SRXRF)

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    Trunova, V.A. [A.V. Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk, Lavrentyeva 3 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: Trunova@inp.nsk.su; Zvereva, V.V. [A.V. Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk, Lavrentyeva 3 (Russian Federation); Okuneva, G.N. [E.N. Meshalkin Institute of Pathology of Circulation of the Blood, 630055 Novosibirsk, Rechkunovskaja 15 (Russian Federation); Levicheva, E.N. [E.N. Meshalkin Institute of Pathology of Circulation of the Blood, 630055 Novosibirsk, Rechkunovskaja 15 (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    It is the myocardium that bears the basic functional loading during heart working, including muscle contractility and enzyme activity. The elemental concentrations in myocardium tissue of heart were determined by SRXRF technique. Our investigation is systematical: the elemental content in each compartment (left and right ventricles, left and right auricles) of hearts of healthy and diseased children (congenital heart diseases, transposition of main vessels (TMV)) was analyzed. The elemental distribution in myocardium of four heart chambers of human fetuses was also analyzed. Following elements were determined: S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr. It was revealed that the elemental concentrations in myocardium of both ventricles are almost constant in heart of fetuses and healthy children. The transition from pre-natal study (fetus) to post-natal study is accompanied by the redistribution of chemical elements in myocardium. The higher concentrations of S, Fe, Ca, Sr and Cu in myocardium of children are observed, the content of K, Br, Rb and especially Se is lower than in heart of fetuses. The elemental distribution in myocardium of children TMV is considerably different in comparison with the healthy children: the higher levels of Cu are observed. The content of Se is lower.

  15. The alteration of interelemental ratios in myocardium under the congenital heart disease (SRXRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunova, V. A.; Zvereva, V. V.; Okuneva, G. N.; Levicheva, E. N.

    2007-05-01

    It is the myocardium that bears the basic functional loading during heart working, including muscle contractility and enzyme activity. The elemental concentrations in myocardium tissue of heart were determined by SRXRF technique. Our investigation is systematical: the elemental content in each compartment (left and right ventricles, left and right auricles) of hearts of healthy and diseased children (congenital heart diseases, transposition of main vessels (TMV)) was analyzed. The elemental distribution in myocardium of four heart chambers of human fetuses was also analyzed. Following elements were determined: S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr. It was revealed that the elemental concentrations in myocardium of both ventricles are almost constant in heart of fetuses and healthy children. The transition from pre-natal study (fetus) to post-natal study is accompanied by the redistribution of chemical elements in myocardium. The higher concentrations of S, Fe, Ca, Sr and Cu in myocardium of children are observed, the content of K, Br, Rb and especially Se is lower than in heart of fetuses. The elemental distribution in myocardium of children TMV is considerably different in comparison with the healthy children: the higher levels of Cu are observed. The content of Se is lower.

  16. Temporal Trends in Survival Among Infants With Critical Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Matthew E.; Lee, Kyung A.; Honein, Margaret A.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the trends in survival for infants with critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs) and to examine the potential impact of timing of diagnosis and other prognostic factors on survival. METHODS We performed a retrospective population-based cohort study in infants born with structural congenital heart defects (CHDs) between 1979 and 2005 and ascertained by the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program. We estimated Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities for 12 CCHD phenotypes by birth era and timing of diagnosis among infants without noncardiac defects or chromosomal disorders and used stratified Cox proportional hazards models to assess potential prognostic factors. RESULTS Of 1 056 541 births, there were 6965 infants with CHDs (1830 with CCHDs). One-year survival was 75.2% for those with CCHDs (n = 1336) vs 97.1% for those with noncritical CHDs (n = 3530; P 1 day of age (n = 405; P < .001). There was a significantly higher risk of 1-year mortality for infants with an earlier birth era, earlier diagnosis, and low birth weight and whose mothers were <30 years old. CONCLUSIONS One-year survival for infants with CCHDs has been improving over time, yet mortality remains high. Later diagnosis is associated with improved 1-year survival. These benchmark data and identified prognostic factors may aid future evaluations of the impact of pulse oximetry screening on survival from CCHDs. PMID:23610203

  17. Pediatric and congenital heart transplant: twenty-year experience in a tertiary Brazilian Hospital

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    Leonardo Augusto Miana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac transplantation remains the gold standard for end-stage cardiomyopathies and congenital heart defects in pediatric patients. Objective: This study aims to report on 20 years of experience since the first case and evaluate our results. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database and outpatient follow-up. Between October 1992 and April 2012, 109 patients underwent 114 transplants. 51.8% of them being female. The age of patients ranged from 12 days to 21 years with a mean of 8.8±5.7 years and a median of 5.2 years. The underlying diagnosis was dilated cardiomyopathy in 61.5%, congenital heart disease in 26.6% and restrictive cardiomyopathy in 11.9%. All patients above 17 years old had congenital heart disease. Results: Survival rate at 30 days, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years were 90.4%, 81.3%, 70.9%, 60.5%, 44.4% and 26.7%, respectively. Mean cold ischemic time was 187.9 minutes and it did not correlate with mortality (P>0.05. Infectious complications and rejection episodes were the most common complications (P<0.0001, occurring, respectively, in 66% and 57.4% of the survivors after 10 years. There was no incidence of graft vascular disease and lymphoproliferative disease at year one, but they affected, respectively, 7.4% and 11% of patients within 10 years. Conclusion: Twenty-year pediatric heart transplant results at our institution were quite satisfactory and complication rates were acceptable.

  18. The Comparison of Pulse Oximetry and Cardiac Catheterization in Managing the Treatment of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Abbasi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bachground & aim: Pulse oximetry and cardiac catheterization are concerned in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease. Diagnosis of arterial oxygen saturation in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD can be used to assess and manage their effecacy. The purpose of this study was to compare pulse oximetry and cardiac catheterizations in treatment manage of children with congenital heart disease. Methods: In the present cross sectional study, 110 patients with cyanic and non syani heart disease were studied undergoing right and left heart catheterization by pulse oximetry of index finger and simultaneously, oxygen saturation was measured by cardiac catheterization. Data were analyzed with SPSS software by using Pearson correlation and linear regression. Results: A significant correlation was seen between arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry and arterial oxygen saturation (p<0.0001 as well as heart rate, electrocardiogram and pulse oximetry (p<0.0001 respectively. Furthermore, the presence of cyanosis (p=0.001, digital clubbing of the fingers ((p=0.001, low oxygen saturation in the superior vena cava and right atrium (p=0.002 can reduce the accuracy of pulse oximetry for detection of arterial oxygen saturation. The mean right atrial pressure can effect on accuracy of pulse oximetry to detect heartbeat (p=0.034. Maximum sensitivity and specificity for detection of pulse oximetry oxygen saturation was 88 % and 88 heart rate per minute. Conclusion: Pulse oximetric is a useful tool for estimating the arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate in children with congenital heart disease (CHD and is a non-invasive method in comparison with cardiac catheterization. Key words: Pulse oximeter, Congenital Heart Disease, Cardiac Catheterization

  19. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

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    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Ohara, Nobutoshi; Takagi, Junichi; Sato, Noboru; Kato, Hirohisa (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine); Eto, Takaharu

    1989-10-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author).

  20. The Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study: rationale, design, and early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, Bruce; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Kaltman, Jonathan; Kaski, Juan Pablo; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie; Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy; Rosenberg, Ellen; Seiden, Howard; Seidman, Christine; Sleeper, Lynn; Tennstedt, Sharon; Kaltman, Jonathan; Schramm, Charlene; Burns, Kristin; Pearson, Gail; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2013-02-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the leading cause of infant mortality among birth defects, and later morbidities and premature mortality remain problematic. Although genetic factors contribute significantly to cause CHD, specific genetic lesions are unknown for most patients. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium established the Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study to investigate relationships between genetic factors, clinical features, and outcomes in CHD. The Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium comprises 6 main and 4 satellite sites at which subjects are recruited, and medical data and biospecimens (blood, saliva, cardiovascular tissue) are collected. Core infrastructure includes an administrative/data-coordinating center, biorepository, data hub, and core laboratories (genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, candidate gene evaluation, and variant confirmation). Eligibility includes all forms of CHD. Annual follow-up is obtained for probands age is 5.5 years. The one third enrolled at age <1 year are contacted annually for follow-up information. The distribution of CHD favors more complex lesions. Approximately, 11% of probands have a genetic diagnosis. Adequate DNA is available from 97% and 91% of blood and saliva samples, respectively. Genomic analyses of probands with heterotaxy, atrial septal defects, conotruncal, and left ventricular outflow tract obstructive lesions are underway. The scientific community's use of Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium resources is welcome.

  1. sup 67 Ga imaging in the patients with infective endocarditis after surgery for congenital heart disease

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    Kohata, Tohru; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Takamiya, Makoto; Yagihara, Toshikatsu (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    {sup 67}Ga imaging was performed in sixteen patients (age: 8 m.-18 y.) who had persistent fever and positive acute phase reactants after surgery for congenital heart disease. Abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga over the heart and the lungs was evaluated with a computer. Abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga was observed in seven patients. Of them, three showed it in the area of peripheral pulmonary artery and the other four showed it in the area of artificial vessels for pulmonary artery reconstruction. In six patients with positive blood cultures, five showed abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga and in ten patients with negative blood cultures, two showed it. Vegetation was detected with 2D-echocardiography in four patients and all of them showed abnormal uptake of {sup 67}Ga, while in 12 patients without vegetation three showed it. In conclusion, {sup 67}Ga imaging was useful to detect the foci of infective endocarditis or pulmonary embolism caused by the vegetation in infective endocarditis in the patients after surgery for congenital heart disease, especially in the peripheral pulmonary arteries and artificial vessels which could not be detected with 2D-echo. (author).

  2. Case series: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine for anesthesia in patients with uncorrected congenital cyanotic heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery

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    Rakhee Goyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with uncorrected congenital cyanotic heart disease is less but at times some may present for non-cardiac surgery with a high anesthetic risk. Some of these may even be adults with compromised cardiopulmonary physiology posing greater challenges to the anesthesiologist. The authors have used a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine for anesthesia for non cardiac surgery in five patients with cyanotic heart disease and right to left shunt (3-Eisenmenger′s syndrome, 2-Tetralogy of Fallot. The sympathoinhibitory effects of dexmedetomidine were balanced with the cardiostimulatory effects of ketamine, thereby maintaining good cardiovascular stability. The analgesia was good and there was no postoperative agitation.This drug combination was effective and safe for patients with cyanotic heart disease for non cardiac surgeries.

  3. Moving towards universal prenatal detection of critical congenital heart disease in southern Nevada: a community-wide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William; Castillo, William; Rollins, Robert; Luna, Carlos; Kip, Katrinka; Ludwick, Joseph; Madan, Nitin; Ciccolo, Michael; Galindo, Alvaro; Rothman, Abraham; Mayman, Gary; Cass, Kathleen; Thomas, Vincent; Restrepo, Humberto; Acherman, Ruben

    2015-02-01

    This study compares the current, prenatal detection rate for critical congenital heart disease in Southern Nevada with the previously reported rate, after developing and expanding a comprehensive, community-wide fetal cardiology program. For the current-period analysis, we inquired our database and electronic health records for patients born in Clark County, Nevada, with critical congenital heart disease between May 2012 and April 2014, and we compared the results with the previous period between May 2003 and April 2006. The major components of the community-wide program include fetal congenital heart disease screening via general obstetric ultrasound studies performed in obstetrician's offices, radiology imaging centers, or maternal-fetal medicine specialty practices; subsequent referral for comprehensive fetal echocardiography performed in maternal-fetal medicine offices under the on-site supervision by fetal cardiologists; and recurring community educational programs teaching the 5-axial plane, fetal echocardiographic screening protocol to general obstetric sonographers and instructing perinatal sonographers in advanced imaging topics. For the current period, the prenatal detection rate for critical congenital heart disease in Southern Nevada was 71 versus 36% for the previous period (p congenital heart disease may be related to our expanded decentralized, community-wide fetal cardiology program, and our experiences may be applicable to other metropolitan areas.

  4. Congenital tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare and late presentation in adult patient

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    Waseem M Hajjar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital H-type tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF in adults is a rare presentation and can test the diagnostic acumen of a surgeon, endoscopist, and the radiologist. These undetected fistulas may present as chronic lung disease of unknown origin because repeated aspirations can lead to recurrent lung infections and bronchiectasis. Congenital TEFs should be considered in the diagnosis of infants and young adults with recurrent respiratory distress and/or infections. Here, we present the successful management of this rare case in an adult patient.

  5. Three-dimensional echocardiographic virtual endoscopy for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Haihong; Sun, Kun; Yu, Jianguo; Chen, Binjin; Chen, Guozhen; Hong, Wenjing; Yao, Liping; Wu, Lanping

    2010-12-01

    Virtual endoscopy (VE) is a new post-processing method that uses volumetric data sets to simulate the tracks of a "conventional" flexible endoscope. However, almost all studies of this method have involved virtual visualizations of the cardiovascular structures applied to computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) datasets. This paper introduces a novel visualization method called the "three-dimensional echocardiographic intracardiac endoscopic simulation system (3DE IESS)", which uses 3D echocardiographic images in a virtual reality (VR) environment to diagnose congenital heart disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the feasibility of VE in the evaluation of congenital heart disease in children and its accuracy compared with 2DE. Three experienced pediatric cardiologists blinded to the patients' diagnoses separately reviewed 40 two-dimensional echocardiographic (2DE) datasets and 40 corresponding VE datasets and judged whether abnormal intracardiac anatomy was present in terms of a five-point scale (1 = definitely absent; 2 = probably absent; 3 = cannot be determined; 4 = probably present; and 5 = definitely present). Compared with clinical diagnosis, the diagnostic accuracy of VE was 98.7% for ASD, 92.4% for VSD, 92.6% for TOF, and 94% for DORV, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of VE was significantly higher than that of 2DE for TOF and DORV except for ASD and VSD. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for VE was closer to the optimal performance point than was the ROC curve for 2DE. The area under the ROC curve was 0.96 for VE and 0.93 for 2DE. Kappa values (range, 0.73-0.79) for VE and 2DE indicated substantial agreement. 3D echocardiographic VE can enhance our understanding of intracardiac structures and facilitate the evaluation of congenital heart disease.

  6. The value of flat-detector computed tomography during catheterisation of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeckler, Martin [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Koch, Andreas; Greim, Verena; Shabaiek, Amira; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Rueffer, Andre; Cesnjevar, Robert [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Congenital Heart Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To analyse the diagnostic utility of flat-detector computed tomography imaging (FD-CT) in patients with congenital heart disease, including the value of image fusion to overlay three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions on fluoroscopic images during catheter-based interventions. We retrospectively analysed 62 consecutive paediatric patients in whom FD-CT was used during catheterisation of congenital heart disease. Expert operators rated the clinical value of FD-CT over conventional fluoroscopic imaging. Added radiation exposure and contrast medium volume were evaluated. During a 12-month period, FD-CT was performed in 62 out of 303 cardiac catheterisations. Median patient age was 3.5 years. In 32/62 cases, FD-CT was used for diagnostic purposes, in 30/62 cases it was used in the context of interventions. Diagnostic utility was never rated as ''misleading''. It was classified as ''not useful'' in six cases (9.7%), ''useful'' in 18 cases (29.0%), ''very useful'' in 37 cases (59.7%) and ''essential'' in one case (1.6%). The median added dose-area product was 111.0 {mu}Gym{sup 2}, the required additional quantity of contrast medium was 1.6 ml/kg. FD-CT provides useful diagnostic information in most of the patients investigated for congenital heart disease. The added radiation exposure and contrast medium volume are reasonable. (orig.)

  7. EARLY DETECTION OF CRITICAL CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN NEW BORNS USING PULSE OXIMETRY SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShahForum,Chatterjee Rajib, PatelPrashant C, Kunkulol Rahul R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital heart diseases which are dependent on the ductusarteriosus to maintain adequate oxygenation or systemic blood flow are termed as a critical congenital heart disease (CCHD. Delay in the diagnosis of CCHD is the major cause leading to morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Clinical evaluation is likely to miss the diagnosis in first few hours of hospital stay after birth due to absence of signs and symptoms of CCHD. In the absence of clinical findings during early neonatal period, the best parameter that can be assessed is the detection of hypoxemia by pulse oximetry screening. Objectives: To record the value of Pulse Oximetry within 24 hours of birth and evaluate Pulse Oximetry as screening tool for early diagnosis of CCHD. &Methods: Longitudinal descriptive study was conducted on total 700 intramural neonates, satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, who were evaluated within 24 hours of birth with currently available pulse oximeter, after the Institutional Ethical Committee approval. The study was conducted over a period of 4 months. Part-A: Neonatal Case Record, Part-B: Pulse Oximetry Screening Record, Part-C: Clinical Examination Record, Part-D: Echocardiography Record. Results and Conclusion: Total 700 neonates were screened by pulse oximeter with consecutive sampling method. 4 (0.57% subjects were detected to have positive screen and the diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography. Study revealed that Pulse Oximetry Screening can be an important primary screening tool in routine neonatal care for early detection of Critical Congenital Heart Diseases particularly in rural setup

  8. Risk Factors of Congenital Heart Diseases: A Case-Control Study in Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghavi-Behzad Mohammad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital heart diseases are of immense importance and also a high prevalence. Contributing factors to developing these defects have not been abundantly studied. Therefore, the current study was conducted aiming at determining the effective factors on Congenital Heart Disease (CHD in newborn infants of Northwest Iran. Methods: A case-control study was carried out in North-West of Iran from 2002 to 2012 and a total of 473 infants entered the study. Required data were obtained through check lists completed by the information of hospital records and interview with mothers of 267 newborn infants with CHD together with medical records of mothers as the case group, and 206 medical records of healthy infants at the same period all together with those of their mothers as the control group. The obtained data were statistically analyzed using descriptive statistical methods, T-test, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, and Multi-variable Logistic Regression Model (OR with 95% CI, using SPSS.19. In the present study, P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Based on the results of univariable analyses, the number of previous cesarean sections, past medical history of diseases, gestational age (GA, fetal weight at birth, diastolic blood pressure, fetal heart rate, pulse rate, fetal hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, and fetal head circumference at birth have significant relationship with incidence of congenital abnormalities (P<0.05. Family history, past cesarean sections history, past medical history and GA had significant relationship with CHD incidence. Conclusion: Based on the results of present study, in order to control and reduce the cases of CHD, it is crucial to make proper decisions and implement policies for reducing cesarean cases, lowering consanguineous marriages, providing proper pre-marriage counseling, prompt treatment of mothers’ illnesses, improving pregnancy health care and mothers

  9. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome with congenital heart disease: a new association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teebi, A S; Al-Awadi, S A; Marafie, M J; Bushnaq, R A; Satyanath, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a sibship of two brothers and one sister with the osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and congenital heart disease. They presented in infancy with visual impairment and psychomotor retardation. Major features included bilateral cataracts, generalised osteopenia, severe platyspondyly, borderline mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, joint laxity, and ventricular septal defect. Parental consanguinity and affected sibs of both sexes strongly suggested autosomal recessive inheritance. Analysis of the present and previously reported cases showed a wide range of interfamilial variability which may point to the existence of multiple allelism or genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome.

  10. [Analgosedation with fentanyl/midazolam after correction of congenital heart defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Behnke, I; Rothes, A; Hund, F; Huth, R; Wippermann, C F; Schmidt, F X; Oelert, H; Schranz, D

    1995-01-01

    There is no standard therapy in the management of postoperative pain control following corrective cardiac surgery of congenital heart disease. Assessment in the preverbal age is difficult. In a randomized study we compared a combined treatment of fentanyl and midazolam, given as continuous infusion versus single dose application. A pain assessment score was used to measure the effectiveness of analgosedation in addition to recording nurseries observations. Fentanyl and midazolam are an appropriate combination for postoperative pain treatment. Continuous application is considered to be more effective concerning basic anxiety, cumulative dosage and to avoid volume overload in infants and young children, following cardiac surgery; overdosage was not observed.

  11. Developing and Evaluating Virtual Cardiotomy for Preoperative Planning in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Beerbaum, Philipp; Mosegaard, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    Careful preoperative planning is of outmost importance -- in particular when considering complex corrective surgery on congenitally malformed hearts. As an aid to such decisionsmaking we describe a system for virtual reconstruction of patient-specific morphology from 3D-capable imaging modalities...... such as MRI and CT. We introduce and illustrate the concept of virtual cardiotomy as a new tool to preoperatively evaluate the feasibility of different surgical strategies by investigating the anatomical spatial relations through any number of virtual incisions. Ve review the technical and clinical...

  12. [Successful treatment of atrial fibrillation by resection of a congenital aneurysm of the left heart atrium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigl, F; Steinbeck, G; Rienmüller, R; Kemkes, B M; Klinner, W

    1992-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurred in a 27-year-old patient with a history of globular cardiac enlargement since childhood. Because of the probable causal relationship between the preexisting heart disease-which was supposed to be an enlargement of the left atrium-and the rhythm disturbance, we recommended a surgical intervention. Cardiac surgery revealed a congenital aneurysm of the left atrial appendage which could be resected without any complication. Postoperatively, atrial fibrillation had returned to regular sinus rhythm. The bad prognosis with a high risk of systemic embolism is the reason why early cardiac surgery should be performed after diagnosis of this rare anomaly (20 reported cases) of the left atrium.

  13. Meier-Gorlin syndrome: Report of an additional patient with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 7 year old female child with the classical triad of Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS, (microtia, absent patella and short stature. She had the characteristic facial features, with normal mentality and defective speech, skeletal abnormalities, conductive hearing loss, cystitis and normal growth hormone level. She suffered from recurrent chest infection during the first year of life which improved gradually with age. Although congenital heart is rarely observed in MGS, our patient had in addition fenestrated interatrial septal defect.

  14. Asymptomatic congenital intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia and epigastric hernia in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Greca, Gaetano; Sofia, Maria; Randazzo, Valentina; Barbagallo, Francesco; Lombardo, Rosario; Soma, Pierfranco; Russello, Domenico

    2007-08-01

    The congenital intrapericardial hernia is a rare kind of diaphragmatic hernia. It is due to an embryologic defect of the central tendon of the diaphragm, often accompanied by other congenital malformations. This work presents a unique case report in the literature of the congenital association between intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia and epigastric hernia in an adult woman. In spite of herniation of the colon and omentum the patient was completely asymptomatic, requesting surgery for an epigastric hernia for aesthetic reasons. The defect of the diaphragm was sutured and the abdominal wall was repaired with a prosthetic mesh.

  15. Adult congenital diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a rare case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU LiGuo; XU YiYao; MAO YiLei; SANG XinTing; YANG ZhiYing; LU Xin; ZHONG ShouXian; HUANG JieFu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), which mainly occurs in the newborn or in childhood with severe respiratory distress and high mortality, is rarely found in adult, especially for those uncommon right CDH [1-4].Whereas, liver as the main hernial content has been reported only in two cases throughout the world [5-6].This is a report of a right-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia of the liver in a 46-year-old woman.

  16. Profile and risk factors for congenital heart defects: A study in a tertiary care hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abqari, Shaad; Gupta, Akash; Shahab, Tabassum; Rabbani, MU; Ali, S Manazir; Firdaus, Uzma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in children representing a major global health burden. It is thus important to determine their prevalence and spectrum and identify risk factors associated with the development of heart defects. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was carried out in the Department of Pediatrics and Center of Cardiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India, from February 2014 to August 2015. All patients referred with complaints or clinical examination suggestive of CHDs were further evaluated with echocardiography. On Echocardiography, patients having CHDs were included as cases and those having a normal echocardiographic study were included as controls. Healthy controls were also included. 400 cases and 400 controls were thus identified; preterms having patent ductus arteriosus and patent foramen ovale and those with acquired heart defects were excluded. Risk factors among cases and controls were further studied. Results: Acyanotic heart defects were 290 (72.50%) of the total heart defects, whereas the contribution of cyanotic heart defects was 110 (27.50%). Out of all CHDs, ventricular septal defect was the most common lesion with contribution of 152 (38%) cases, whereas among the cyanotic heart defects, Tetralogy of Fallot was the most common lesion (18% of total cases). Out of the total 400 cases, 261 were males (65.25%). On univariate analysis, paternal age (odds ratio, OR, 2.01), bad obstetric history (OR, 2.65), antenatal febrile illness (OR, 4.12), and advanced maternal age (OR, 3.28) were found to increase the risk of CHD whereas intake of multivitamin (OR, 3.02) was found to be protective. The risk factors were further analyzed with multivariate logistic regression analysis and all the above factors were found to be significantly associated. Conclusion: We noted that the profile of CHD in our population was similar

  17. Advances in the Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: A Clinician's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Gillian M; Kirk, Edwin P; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Sholler, Gary F; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Harvey, Richard P; Winlaw, David S

    2017-02-21

    Our understanding of the genetics of congenital heart disease (CHD) is rapidly expanding; however, many questions, particularly those relating to sporadic forms of disease, remain unanswered. Massively parallel sequencing technology has made significant contributions to the field, both from a diagnostic perspective for patients and, importantly, also from the perspective of disease mechanism. The importance of de novo variation in sporadic disease is a recent highlight, and the genetic link between heart and brain development has been established. Furthermore, evidence of an underlying burden of genetic variation contributing to sporadic and familial forms of CHD has been identified. Although we are still unable to identify the cause of CHD for most patients, recent findings have provided us with a much clearer understanding of the types of variants and their individual contributions and collectively mark an important milestone in our understanding of both familial and sporadic forms of disease.

  18. [Biologically active substances in patients with hypervolemic congenital heart defects undergoing general multicomponent anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, N M; Guliamov, D S; Karimova, T Z; Belova, O A; Ivanova, L S; Nam, L N

    1994-01-01

    In 95 patients with hypervolemic congenital heart diseases (42 with interventricular and interatrial septal defects, and 53 with patent ductus arteriosus) mixed venous blood levels of serotonin, histamine, adrenalin, noradrenaline, total 11-hydroxycorticosteroids were studied using spectrofluorimetry, cyclic adenosine- and guanosine-monophosphate (cAMP and cGMP), prostaglandins E+A and F2 alpha and their interaction were assessed using radioimmunoassay and correlation analysis, respectively. Before surgical treatment the patients showed higher (than in the control) concentrations of histamine, adrenalin, noradrenaline, cAMP, and cGMP, prostaglandins E+A. During anesthesia including fentanyl, morphine, diazepam, N2O:O2 in patients with heart valve defects cGMP level was increased and in patients with patent ductus arteriosus cAMP level was increased during analogous anesthesia with morphine replaced by halothane.

  19. Nutrition Support for Children Undergoing Congenital Heart Surgeries: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Judith J M; Cheifetz, Ira M; Ong, Chengsi; Nakao, Masakazu; Lee, Jan Hau

    2015-07-01

    Energy imbalance in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is common and influenced by age, underlying cardiac diagnoses, and presence or absence of congestive heart failure. During the surgical hospitalization period, these children are prone to nutritional deterioration due to stress of surgery, anesthetic/perfusion techniques, and postoperative care. Poor nutrition is associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. This review aims to examine various aspects of nutrition in critically ill children with CHD, including (1) energy expenditure, (2) perioperative factors that contribute to energy metabolism, (3) bedside practices that are potentially able to optimize nutrient delivery, and (4) medium- to long-term impact of energy balance on clinical outcomes. We propose a nutrition algorithm to optimize nutrition of these children in the perioperative period where improvements in nutrition status will likely impact surgical outcomes.

  20. [Management of heart diseases in pregnancy: rheumatic and congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction and post partum cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M; Hilfiker-Kleiner, D; Günter, H H; Schieffer, E; Drexler, H

    2008-07-01

    Heart disease is present in 0.5-1% of all pregnancies. It is the leading non-obstetric cause of maternal mortality accounting for about 10-15% of all maternal death. Over the last decades the underlying cardiac disease has changed. Also new therapeutic options have been developed. In western industrial countries the incidence of acquired rheumatic heart disease has declined. In contrast, as a result of neonatal corrective or palliative surgery, congenital heart disease has become an increasing and challenging problem. Maternal older age and the increase in women's smoking habits amplify the likelihood of coronary artery disease. Multiple therapeutic options including percutaneous interventions are available and novel therapeutic concepts are emerging i.e. for peripartum cardiomyopathy. Management of pregnancy, labor and delivery requires accurate diagnosis of the underlying cardiac disorder. Hemodynamic changes physiologically occurring during pregnancy have a different impact depending on the type and severity of cardiac anomalies. Management of these patients requires teamwork of obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthetists and sometimes cardiac surgeons.

  1. Genetic Modifiers Predisposing to Congenital Heart Disease in the Sensitized Down Syndrome Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiqing; Cherry, Sheila; Klinedinst, Donna; DeLeon, Valerie; Redig, Jennifer; Reshey, Benjamin; Chin, Michael T.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2012-01-01

    Background About half of people with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit some form of congenital heart disease (CHD). However, trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) alone is insufficient to cause CHD as half of all people with DS have a normal heart, suggesting that genetic modifiers interact with dosage sensitive gene(s) on Hsa21 to result in CHD. We hypothesize that a threshold exists in both Down syndrome and euploid populations for the number of genetic perturbations that can be tolerated before CHD results. Methods and Results We ascertained a group of individuals with DS and complete atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and sequenced two candidate genes for CHD, CRELD1, which is associated with AVSD in people with or without DS, and HEY2, whose mouse ortholog produces septal defects when mutated. Several deleterious variants were identified but the frequency of these potential modifiers was low. We crossed mice with mutant forms of these potential modifiers to the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. Crossing loss-of-function alleles of either Creld1 or Hey2 onto the trisomic background caused a significant increase in the frequency of CHD, demonstrating an interaction between the modifiers and trisomic genes. We showed further that although either of these mutant modifiers is benign by itself, they interact to affect heart development when inherited together. Conclusions Using mouse models of Down syndrome and of genes associated with congenital heart disease we demonstrate a biological basis for an interaction that supports a threshold hypothesis for additive effects of genetic modifiers in the sensitized trisomic population. PMID:22523272

  2. The accuracy of chest radiographs in the detection of congenital heart disease and in the diagnosis of specific congenital cardiac lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laya, Bernard F. [St. Luke' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Quezon (Philippines); Goske, Marilyn J. [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Section of Pediatric Radiology, The Children' s Hospital, Cleveland, OH (United States); Children' s Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Department of Radiology, Akron, OH (United States); Morrison, Stuart; Reid, Janet R. [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Section of Pediatric Radiology, The Children' s Hospital, Cleveland, OH (United States); Swischuck, Leonard [The University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Radiology, Galveston, TX (United States); Ey, Elizabeth H. [The Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Dayton, OH (United States); Murphy, Daniel J. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Lieber, Michael; Obuchowski, Nancy [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. Traditional teaching holds that specific types of CHD can be diagnosed on the chest radiograph (CXR) through pattern recognition. To determine the accuracy of radiologists in detecting CHD on the CXR. This study was a blinded retrospective review of chest radiographs from 281 patients (<12 years) by five pediatric radiologists from three institutions. Thirteen groups were evaluated that included 12 categories of CHD and a control group of patients without heart disease. Radiographs were assessed for heart size, heart and mediastinal shape and vascularity. Clinical information, angiography, echocardiograms and surgery were used as the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. The average accuracy of the five readers in distinguishing normal from CHD patients was 78% (range of 72% to 82%). The overall measure of accuracy in distinguishing specific congenital cardiac lesions among 13 groups of patients was 71% (range of 63% to 79%). CXR alone is not diagnostic of specific cardiac lesions, with a low accuracy of only 71%. We believe that less emphasis should be placed on the use of radiographs alone in diagnosing specific congenital cardiac lesions. (orig.)

  3. Chromosome 8p23.1 deletions as a cause of complex congenital heart defects and diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Margaret J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Holder, Ashley M; Breman, Amy M; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-08-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genomic hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm.

  4. Chromosome 8p23.1 Deletions as a Cause of Complex Congenital Heart Defects and Diaphragmatic Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Margaret J.; Shchelochkov, Oleg A.; Holder, Ashley M.; Breman, Amy M.; Dagli, Aditi; Bacino, Carlos; Scaglia, Fernando; Zori, Roberto T.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Scott, Daryl A.; Kang, Sung-Hae Lee

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent interstitial deletion of a region of 8p23.1 flanked by the low copy repeats 8p-OR-REPD and 8p-OR-REPP is associated with a spectrum of anomalies that can include congenital heart malformations and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Haploinsufficiency of GATA4 is thought to play a critical role in the development of these birth defects. We describe two individuals and a monozygotic twin pair discordant for anterior CDH all of whom have complex congenital heart defects caused by this recurrent interstitial deletion as demonstrated by array comparative genome hybridization. To better define the genotype/phenotype relationships associated with alterations of genes on 8p23.1, we review the spectrum of congenital heart and diaphragmatic defects that have been reported in individuals with isolated GATA4 mutations and interstitial, terminal, and complex chromosomal rearrangements involving the 8p23.1 region. Our findings allow us to clearly define the CDH minimal deleted region on chromosome 8p23.1 and suggest that haploinsufficiency of other genes, in addition to GATA4, may play a role in the severe cardiac and diaphragmatic defects associated with 8p23.1 deletions. These findings also underscore the importance of conducting a careful cytogenetic/molecular analysis of the 8p23.1 region in all prenatal and postnatal cases involving congenital defects of the heart and/or diaphragm. PMID:19606479

  5. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R D; Katz, M G; Fargnoli, A S; Kendle, A P; Mihalko, K L; Bridges, C R

    2016-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation.

  6. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. D.; Katz, M. G.; Fargnoli, A. S.; Kendle, A. P.; Mihalko, K. L.; Bridges, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation. PMID:26293994

  7. Left-to-Right Shunt with Congenital Heart Disease: Single Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Ayhan; Olgunturk, Rana; Kula, Serdar; Saylan, Berna; Pektas, Ayhan; Oguz, Deniz; Tunaoglu, Sedef

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in congenital heart disease (CHD) with an isolated, large left-to-right shunt and to indicate the factors in the development of PAH. Methods. The pressure measurements in the cardiac chambers and the calculations based on the Fick's principle were compared among 3 separate groups of patients, respectively, with PAH, with hyperkinetic pulmonary hypertension (HPH), and with neither PAH nor HPH. Results. PAH was diagnosed in 30 (12.3%) patients, HPH in 35 (14.4%), while 177 (73.1%) were free of either. The highest risk for the development of PAH was found in the presence of perimembranous ventricular septal defect. A statistically significant difference was seen among these groups as to their left atrial pressure (p = 0.005) and the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAPmean; p < 0.001). While a correlation was present between RpI on one hand and age on the other (p = 0.014), a multiple linear regression could not evidence any correlation among age (p = 0.321), gender (p = 0.929). Conclusion. Our findings do not allow establishing a correlation between the duration of the high pulmonary flow and pulmonary vascular resistance increase or PAH development in isolated left-to-right shunts with congenital heart diseases. PMID:23862073

  8. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  9. Three-dimensional cine MRI in free-breathing infants and children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael C.; Kramer, Ulrich; Bretschneider, Christiane; Doering, Joerg; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan [University of Tuebingen (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Greil, Gerald F. [St. Thomas Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London (United Kingdom); Martirosian, Petros [University of Tuebingen, Section of Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Patients with congenital heart disease frequently have complex cardiac and vascular malformations requiring detailed non-invasive diagnostic evaluation including functional parameters. To evaluate the morphological and functional information provided by a novel 3-D cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence. Twenty consecutive children (mean age 2.2 years, nine boys) were examined using a 1.5-T MR system including 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo sequences, static 3-D SSFP and 3-D cine SSFP sequences. Measurement of ventricular structures and volumes showed close agreement between the 3-D cine SSFP sequence and the 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo and static 3-D SSFP sequences (left ventricular volumes mean difference 1.0-1.9 ml and 8.8-11.4%, respectively; right ventricular volumes 1.7-2.1 ml and 9.9-16.9%, respectively). No systematic bias was observed. 3-D cine MRI provides anatomic as well as functional information with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution in free-breathing infants with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  10. Growth Status of Iranian Children with Hemodynamically Important Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dalili

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between congenital heart disease (CHD and growth retardation is well documented. We investigated the growth condition of Iranian children with several types of congenital heart disease (CHD and compared it with worldwide researches. Growth condition was investigated in 469 patients with important CHD aged from 1 month to 18 years. The patients were divided into two groups; infants (aged 12 months or less, and children (1-18 yrs of age. Children with hemodynamically unimportant small VSDs or small ASDs were not studied. Other exclusion criteria were prematurity, known genetic disorders and neurologic disease affecting growthd. All patients' cardiac diagnoses were made on the basis of clinical and laboratory examinations; including electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and angiography. Body weight and height of all patients were measured using conventional methods and compared with standard growth charts. In all patients body weights and heights were significantly lower than normal population. This difference was greater in the weight of female children. Other risk factors for growth failure were large left-to-right intracardiac shunts, pulmonary hypertension and cyanosis. Iranian children with CHD have growth failure somewhat different from other countries. Lower body weights of cyanotic patients and female children indicated that these patients need more nutritional and psychosocial attention.

  11. Challenges in the management of congenital heart disease in Vietnam: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Minh Phuc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam, in Asia, is a low middle-income country with a relatively large population to cater to. Not many know about Vietnam, or its healthcare sector especially the field of pediatric cardiology and congenital heart disease. In contrast to the developed world, congenital heart disease (CHD is not diagnosed early. Since most of the patients visit the hospital only in later stages of the disease there are many complications during the operation and post-operatively. But during the past 5 years (from 2009, there has been major improvement in the treatment of CHD, both by intervention and surgery. At present, all kinds of CHD, both simple and complex are being successfully treated in our country. Today in Vietnam, all children under 6 years of age have health insurance coverage, under which almost all operations and catheter interventions are done free in government hospitals. It is helping many patients, especially those from the poor socioeconomic background. However, the present infrastructure is inadequate and a long waiting list has accumulated for treatment of CHD.

  12. Vitamin D Status After Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Children With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Zahr, Riad; Faustino, Edward Vincent S; Carpenter, Thomas; Kirshbom, Paul; Hall, E Kevin; Fahey, John T; Kandil, Sarah B

    2016-06-01

    Deficiency in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the critically ill. Children who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are typically deficient in 25OHD. It is unclear whether this deficiency is due to CPB. We hypothesized that CPB reduces the levels of 25OHD in children with congenital heart disease. We conducted a prospective observational study on children aged 2 months to 17 years who underwent CPB. Serum was collected at 3 time points: immediately before, immediately after surgery, and 24 hours after surgery. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, vitamin D binding protein, and albumin levels were measured. Levels were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. We enrolled 20 patients, 40% were deficient in 25OHD with levels Vitamin D binding protein and albumin levels did not significantly change. Cardiopulmonary bypass decreases 25OHD by reducing the free fraction. Current investigations are geared to establish whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with outcomes and if treatment is appropriate.

  13. Educational achievement among long-term survivors of congenital heart defects: a Danish population-based follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Morten; Hjortdal, Vibeke E; Mortensen, Laust Hvas;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Congenital heart defect patients may experience neurodevelopmental impairment. We investigated their educational attainments from basic schooling to higher education. Patients and methods: Using administrative databases, we identified all Danish patients with a cardiac defect diagnosis...... of educational attainment was reduced among long-term congenital heart defect survivors....... and controls born at term and without extracardiac defects or chromosomal anomalies. Results: We identified 2986 patients. Their probability of completing compulsory basic schooling was approximately 10% lower than that of control individuals (adjusted hazard ratio=0.79, ranged from 0.75 to 0.82 0.79; 95...

  14. The Application of an Anatomical Database for Fetal Congenital Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yang; Qiu-Yan Pei; Yun-Tao Li; Zhen-Juan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Fetal congenital heart anomalies are the most common congenital anomalies in live births.Fetal echocardiography (FECG) is the only prenatal diagnostic approach used to detect fetal congenital heart disease (CHD).FECG is not widely used,and the antenatal diagnosis rate of CHD varies considerably.Thus,mastering the anatomical characteristics of different kinds of CHD is critical for ultrasound physicians to improve FECG technology.The aim of this study is to investigate the applications of a fetal CHD anatomic database in FECG teaching and training program.Methods:We evaluated 60 transverse section databases including 27 types of fetal CHD built in the Prenatal Diagnosis Center in Peking University People's Hospital.Each original database contained 400-700 cross-sectional digital images with a resolution of 3744 pixels × 5616 pixels.We imported the database into Amira 5.3.1 (Australia Visage Imaging Company,Australia) three-dimensional (3D) software.The database functions use a series of 3D software visual operations.The features of the fetal CHD anatomical database were analyzed to determine its applications in FECG continuing education and training.Results:The database was rebuilt using the 3D software.The original and rebuilt databases can be displayed dynamically,continuously,and synchronically and can be rotated at arbitrary angles.The sections from the dynamic displays and rotating angles are consistent with the sections in FECG.The database successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship features of different fetal CHDs.We established a fetal CHD anatomy training database and a standardized training database for FECG.Ultrasound physicians and students can learn the anatomical features of fetal CHD and FECG through either centralized training or distance education.Conclusions:The database of fetal CHD successfully reproduced the anatomic structures and spatial relationship of different kinds of fetal CHD.This database can be

  15. Mortality from Congenital Heart Disease in Mexico: A Problem on the Rise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Torres-Cosme

    Full Text Available Temporal trends in mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD vary among regions. It is therefore necessary to study this problem in each country. In Mexico, congenital anomalies were responsible for 24% of infant mortality in 2013 and CHD represented 55% of total deaths from congenital anomalies among children under 1 year of age. The objectives of this study were to analyze the trends in infant mortality from CHD in Mexico (1998 to 2013, its specific causes, age at death and associated socio-demographic factors.Population-based study which calculated the compounded annual growth rate of death rom CHD between 1998 and 2013. Specific causes, age at which death from CHD occurred and risk factors associated with mortality were analyzed for the year 2013.Infant mortality from CHD increased 24.8% from 1998 to 2013 (114.4 to 146.4/ 100,000 live births. A total of 3,593 CHD deaths occurred in 2013; the main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt (n = 487; 19.8/100,000 live births and cyanotic heart disease (n = 410; 16.7/100,000. A total of 1,049 (29.2% deaths from CHD occurred during the first week of life. Risk factors associated with mortality from CHD were, in order of magnitude: non-institutional birth, rural area, birth in a public hospital and male sex.Mortality from CHD has increased in Mexico. The main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt, which are not necessarily fatal if treated promptly. Populations vulnerable to death from CHD were identified. Approximately one-third of the CHD occurred during the first week of life. It is important to promote early diagnosis, especially for non-institutional births.

  16. Mortality from Congenital Heart Disease in Mexico: A Problem on the Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Cosme, José Luis; Rolón-Porras, Constanza; Aguinaga-Ríos, Mónica; Acosta-Granado, Pedro Manuel; Reyes-Muñoz, Enrique; Murguía-Peniche, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Temporal trends in mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) vary among regions. It is therefore necessary to study this problem in each country. In Mexico, congenital anomalies were responsible for 24% of infant mortality in 2013 and CHD represented 55% of total deaths from congenital anomalies among children under 1 year of age. The objectives of this study were to analyze the trends in infant mortality from CHD in Mexico (1998 to 2013), its specific causes, age at death and associated socio-demographic factors. Methods Population-based study which calculated the compounded annual growth rate of death rom CHD between 1998 and 2013. Specific causes, age at which death from CHD occurred and risk factors associated with mortality were analyzed for the year 2013. Results Infant mortality from CHD increased 24.8% from 1998 to 2013 (114.4 to 146.4/ 100,000 live births). A total of 3,593 CHD deaths occurred in 2013; the main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt (n = 487; 19.8/100,000 live births) and cyanotic heart disease (n = 410; 16.7/100,000). A total of 1,049 (29.2%) deaths from CHD occurred during the first week of life. Risk factors associated with mortality from CHD were, in order of magnitude: non-institutional birth, rural area, birth in a public hospital and male sex. Conclusions Mortality from CHD has increased in Mexico. The main causes were CHD with left-to-right shunt, which are not necessarily fatal if treated promptly. Populations vulnerable to death from CHD were identified. Approximately one-third of the CHD occurred during the first week of life. It is important to promote early diagnosis, especially for non-institutional births. PMID:26937635

  17. Assessment of congenital heart disease (CHD): Is there a role for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manganaro, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Savelli, S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: sarasavelli@hotmail.it; Di Maurizio, M.; Perrone, A.; Francioso, A.; La Barbera, L.; Totaro, P.; Fierro, F.; Tomei, A.; Coratella, F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Giancotti, A. [Department of Gynaecological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ballesio, L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ventriglia, F. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, UMBERTO I Hospital, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: To review our experience with fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: We performed fetal MRI in 32 fetuses with an echocardiographically assessed CHD. Both direct and indirect signs of CHD were investigated. Direct signs considered were: morpho-volumetric abnormalities of the heart; malrotations; ventricular and atrial septal defects; anomalies of the origin, size and course of the great arteries. Indirect signs considered were: difficulty to recognize a 'normal' anatomical structures in the reference projections; increase of the vascular size before a stenosis; hypertrophy of the papillary muscles; cardiomegaly and pericardial effusion. All MRI findings were compared with postnatal or autoptic findings. Results: MRI allowed the CHD to be visualised by direct signs in 17 fetuses, indirect signs in 5 and both direct and indirect signs in 9 fetuses, excluding the prenatal echocardiographic suspect of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in 1 fetus. Postnatal echocardiograms or autoptic findings confirmed a normal heart in 1 fetus and CHD in 31 fetuses including a single cardiac anomaly or syndrome in 19 fetuses, 2 associated cardiac abnormalities in 11 and 3 cardiac anomalies in 1 fetus. However, in 2 fetuses MRI detected a ventricular septal defect successively disclosed by gold standard. Conclusions: MRI is a promising method for further assessment of the cardiovascular pathologies diagnosed by echocardiography, and may be a valuable tool in assessing associated extracardiac anomalies.

  18. MRI of congenital heart disease in childhood; MR-Tomographie kongenitaler Herzvitien im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, F.; Habermann, C.R.; Adam, G. [Radiologisches Zentrum, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Lilje, C.; Weil, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Abt. Paediatrische Kardiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    MRI provides a non-invasive diagnostic tool complementing echocardiography on one hand, and showing advantages over echocardiography, on the other hand, especially after corrective procedures. The multiple different MRI sequences need to be adapted to examinations of children and patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), and can be used to detect morphologic changes, blood-flow in the heart and thoracic vessels and diastolic or systolic function of myocardium. Several factors determine the success of the examination of a complex congenital heart disease or a postoperative situs. Pediatric radiologists and radiologists experienced in congenital heart diseases have to work in close cooperation. Echocardiography should be performed before MRI. The results of prior examinations and the clinical history of the patients, including possible palliative or reconstructive operations, must be available before MRI to guide the planning of the examination. With a systematic segmental approach to the situs, to the atrial and ventricular morphology, and to the visceroatrial, atrioventricular and ventriculoarterial connections, most CHDs can be diagnosed correctly. With appropriate knowledge, MRI can also be performed quite accurately after complex operations and may avoid or delay invasive diagnostic procedures. The aim of this article is to impart knowledge, to mention problems and to provide guidance in the performance of cardiac MRI in patients with CHD. (orig.) [German] Die MRT bietet sich als nicht-invasive Methode zur Diagnostik kongenitaler Herzvitien im Kindesalter einerseits als Ergaenzung zur Echokardiographie an, andererseits ergeben sich auch Vorteile insbesondere nach Korrektureingriffen. Die verschiedenen MRT-Sequenzen muessen an die Untersuchung von Kindern adaptiert werden und koennen Aufschluss ueber die Morphologie, Blutfluesse im Herz und in den thorakalen Gefaessen und ueber die myokardiale Wandbewegung geben. Die sichere Durchfuehrung und Befundung der

  19. The Burden of Care: Mothers’ Experiences of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakinne Sabzevari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mothers play a key role in caring for their sick children. Their experiences of care were influenced by culture, rules, and the system of health and care services. There are few studies on maternal care of children with congenital heart disease. Also, each of them has studied a particular aspect of care. The present research aimed to understand care experiences of mothers of children with congenital heart disease. Methods: A conventional content analysis was used to obtain rich data. The goal of content analysis is “to provide knowledge and deeper understanding of the phenomenon under the study”. The study was conducted in Kerman, Iran in 2014, on mothers of children with CHD. The purposive sampling technique was used to select the participants. Participants were 14 mothers of children with CHD and one father and one nurse of open heart surgery unit, from two hospitals affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were constructed. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. MAXQDA 2007 software (VERBI GmbH, Berlin, Germany was used to classify and manage the coding. Constant comparative method was done for data analysis. The reliability and validity of the findings, including the credibility, confirm ability, dependability, and transferability, were assessed. Results: According to the content analysis, the main theme was the catastrophic burden of child care on mothers that included three categories: 1 the tension resulting from the disease, 2 involvement with internal thoughts, and 3 difficulties of care process Conclusion: The results of this study may help health care professionals to provide supportive and educational packages to the patients, mothers and Family members until improving the management of patient’s care.

  20. High postoperative serum levels of surfactant type B as novel prognostic markers for congenital heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Is?k

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Congenital heart diseases are observed in 5 to 8 of every 1000 live births. The presence of a valuable biomarker during the surgical periods may aid the clinician in a more accurate prognosis during treatment. Methods: For this reason, surfactant protein B plasma levels may help to evaluate patients with cardiac problems diminishing the alveolocapillary membrane stability. In this study, plasma levels of this biomarker were measured in the preoperative and postoperative periods. This study was conducted to detect the differences between pulmonary hypertensive and normotensive patients. The differences before and after cardiopulmonary bypass were examined. Results: The differences in cardiopulmonary bypass time, cross-clamp time , inotropic support dose, and duration of intensive care of patients with and without pulmonary hypertensive were found to be statistically significant (P<0.05. The results revealed that this pathophysiological state was related to other variables that were studied. We believe that the differences in preoperative and postoperative SPB levels could be attributed to alveolocapillary membrane damage and alveolar surfactant dysfunction. We found that this pathophysiological condition was significantly associated with postoperative parameters. Conclusion: The findings of the current study showed that surfactant protein B was present in the blood of patients with a congenital heart disease during the preoperative period. Long by-pass times may exert damage to the alveolocapillary membrane in patients with pulmonary hypertension and preoperative heart failure, and it is recommended to keep the option of surfactant therapy in mind during the postoperative course at the intensive care unit before preparing the patients for extubation.

  1. The Burden of Care: Mothers’ Experiences of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzevari, Sakinne; Nematollahi, Monirsadat; Mirzaei, Tayebeh; Ravari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Mothers play a key role in caring for their sick children. Their experiences of care were influenced by culture, rules, and the system of health and care services. There are few studies on maternal care of children with congenital heart disease. Also, each of them has studied a particular aspect of care. The present research aimed to understand care experiences of mothers of children with congenital heart disease. Methods: A conventional content analysis was used to obtain rich data. The goal of content analysis is “to provide knowledge and deeper understanding of the phenomenon under the study”. The study was conducted in Kerman, Iran in 2014, on mothers of children with CHD. The purposive sampling technique was used to select the participants. Participants were 14 mothers of children with CHD and one father and one nurse of open heart surgery unit, from two hospitals affiliated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were constructed. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. MAXQDA 2007 software (VERBI GmbH, Berlin, Germany) was used to classify and manage the coding. Constant comparative method was done for data analysis. The reliability and validity of the findings, including the credibility, confirm ability, dependability, and transferability, were assessed. Results: According to the content analysis, the main theme was the catastrophic burden of child care on mothers that included three categories: 1) the tension resulting from the disease, 2) involvement with internal thoughts, and 3) difficulties of care process Conclusion: The results of this study may help health care professionals to provide supportive and educational packages to the patients, mothers and Family members until improving the management of patient’s care. PMID:27713900

  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E. Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R.; Yang, Peixin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVE We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects. STUDY DESIGN A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. RESULTS Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin

  3. Incidence and risk factors of nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery in Georgian population with congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomtadze, M; Chkhaidze, M; Mgeladze, E; Metreveli, I; Tsintsadze, A

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial infections still remain a serious problem in patients undergoing open heart surgery. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence, etiology and main risk factors of nosocomial infections (NI) following cardiac surgery in congenital heart diseases population. Retrospective case study was conducted. 387 patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), who underwent cardiac surgery from January 2007 to December 2008 were studied. The age of the most patients varied between 1 day to 15 years, 73 patients (18,8%) were older than 15 years. All 387 patients underwent cardiac surgery. The rate of NI was 16%. The most common infections were bloodstream infections (BSI) (7,75%) and respiratory tract infections (7%) respectively. The rate of NI was higher in patients under 1 year of age, after urgent surgery and urgent reoperation, long cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp time, also in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, with open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month. It was concluded that the most common nosocomial infection after cardiac surgery congenital heart diseases in Georgian population was blood stream infection. The main risk factors of NI in the same setting were age under 1 year, urgent surgery, urgent reoperation, long CPB and aortic cross-clamp time, long duration of mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month.

  4. 76. Profile and spectrum of congenital heart defect in pediatric patient with down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alsuhaibani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormality worldwide. It occurs in 1 of every 800 live births. Almost one-half of patients with Down Syndrome have congenital heart defect. Our objective is to describe the frequency and spectrum of congenital heart defect (CHD among children with Down Syndrome in Saudi Arabia and identify the rate of primary and secondary pulmonary hypertension among pediatric patients with Down syndrome. Cross-sectional, retrospective study of the cardiac anomalies among 331 pediatric patients (0–18 years with Down Syndrome in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH from August 2001 till October 2014. The demographic data, reason for referral, echocardiography data including systolic function parameters, the presence of CHD, type and details of CHD, presence of pulmonary hypertension (PHTN, history of cardiac surgeries or transcatheter interventions. Among the 331 pediatric patients with Down Syndrome; 230 patients (69.5% have Congenital Heart Defect (CHD. The patients with CHD were significantly younger (median age 3 months with lower weight (P-value <0.05 and height (P-value <0.05 compared to patients with no CHD. The median age at first assessment was 3 months. The most common type of CHDs among DS pediatric patients was atrial septal defect secundum (ASD II which account for 33.5% of all CHD followed by ventricular septal defect (VSD which account for 26.5%, then atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD 21.7% and moderate to large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA 21.7%. There is another (11.7% who have other CHDs. Pulmonary hypertension was present in 32% of patients with CHD vs 4% among patients with no CHD. There is significant relationship between CHD and pulmonary hypertension with odds ratio 11.3 (CI 3.99–31.83, P-value <0.05. 15% of patients underwent either cardiac surgery or transcatheter intervention. Almost two thirds of Down Syndrome patients have CHD with pulmonary hypertension affecting almost

  5. Pacing-induced congenital heart defects assessed by OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matt T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  6. "What I Wish You Knew": Social Barriers toward Physical Activity in Youth with Congenital Heart Disease (CHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moola, Fiona; Fusco, Caroline; Kirsh, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the benefits of physical activity for youth with congenital heart disease (CHD), most patients are inactive. Although literature has addressed medical and psychological barriers to participation, little is known about the social barriers that youth encounter. This qualitative study explored sociocultural barriers to physical activity from…

  7. Early pregnancy exposure to antihistamines and risk of congenital heart defects : results of two case-control studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smedts, Huberdina P. M.; de Jonge, Linda; Bandola, Sarah J. G.; Baardman, Marlies E.; Bakker, Marian K.; Stricker, Bruno H. C.; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P. M.

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: We aimed to study the association between use of antihistamines in early pregnancy and congenital heart defects (CHD) in the offspring. DESIGN: Two case-control studies. SETTING: HAVEN study, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, and Eurocat Northern Netherlands (NNL), Univer

  8. High maternal vitamin E intake by diet or supplements is associated with congenital heart defects in the offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smedts, H. P. M.; de Vries, J. H.; Rakhshandehroo, M.; Wildhagen, M. F.; Verkleij-Hagoort, A. C.; Steegers, E. A.; Steegers-Theunissen, R. P. M.

    2009-01-01

    To study associations between maternal dietary and supplement intake of antioxidants vitamin E, retinol and congenital heart defects (CHDs). Case-control study. Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Participants were 276 case mothers of a child with CHD and 324 control mo

  9. High maternal vitamin E intake by diet or supplements is associated with congenital heart defects in the offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smedts, H.P.M.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Rakhshandehroo, M.; Wildhagen, M.F.; Verkleij-Hagoort, A.C.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study associations between maternal dietary and supplement intake of antioxidants vitamin E, retinol and congenital heart defects (CHDs). Design Case–control study. Setting Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Population Participants were 276 case mothers of

  10. Maternal intake of fat, riboflavin and nicotinamide and the risk of having offspring with congenital heart defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smedts, H.P.M.; Rakhshandehroo, M.; Verkleij-Hagoort, A.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Ottenkamp, J.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    With the exception of studies on folic acid, little evidence is available concerning other nutrients in the pathogenesis of congenital heart defects (CHDs). Fatty acids play a central role in embryonic development, and the B-vitamins riboflavin and nicotinamide are co-enzymes in lipid metabolism. Ai

  11. Multidetector CT for congenital heart patients: what a paediatric radiologist should know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jean-Francois; Rohnean, Adela; Sigal-Cinqualbre, Anne [Radiology Unit, Marie Lannelongue Hospital, Plessis-Robinson (France)

    2010-06-15

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is increasingly used for imaging congenital heart disease (CHD) patients in addition to echocardiography, due to its ability to provide high quality three-dimensional images, giving a comprehensive evaluation of complex heart malformations. Using 4-slice or 16-slice CT, diagnostic information in CHD patients is limited to extra-cardiac anatomy, mainly the pulmonary arteries, aorta and venous connections. Due to high heart rates in babies however, coronary evaluation and intra-cardiac analysis were not reliable with the first generations of MDCT. Larger detector size with 64-slice CT and faster acquisition time, up to 75 ms for one slice, has progressively improved coronary and intra-cardiac visualization. Because radiation dose is the main concern, especially in children, every attempt to minimize dose whilst preserving image quality is important: the ALARA concept should always be applied in this population. The 80 kVp setting is now well accepted as a standard for more and more radiological teams involved in CT of children. Different acquisition strategies are now possible for childhood coronary imaging, using retrospective or even prospective gating. Using the latest technology, sub-mSv acquisitions are now attainable for scanning a whole thorax, providing a complete analysis of any 3-D cardiac malformation, including coronary artery course visualisation. This review will describe how technological developments have improved image quality with continuous reduction of radiation dose. (orig.)

  12. Genetic abnormalities in FOXP1 are associated with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Wei; Mislankar, Mona; Misra, Chaitali; Huang, Nianyuan; Dajusta, Daniel G; Harrison, Steven M; McBride, Kim L; Baker, Linda A; Garg, Vidu

    2013-09-01

    The etiology for the majority of congenital heart defects (CHD) is unknown. We identified a patient with unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and hypoplastic left ventricle who harbored an ~0.3 Mb monoallelic deletion on chromosome 3p14.1. The deletion encompassed the first four exons of FOXP1, a gene critical for normal heart development that represses cardiomyocyte proliferation and expression of Nkx2.5. To determine whether FOXP1 mutations are found in patients with CHD, we sequenced FOXP1 in 82 patients with AVSD or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We discovered two patients who harbored a heterozygous c.1702C>T variant in FOXP1 that predicted a potentially deleterious substitution of a highly conserved proline (p.Pro568Ser). This variant was not found in 287 controls but is present in dbSNP at a 0.2% frequency. The orthologous murine Foxp1 p.Pro596Ser mutant protein displayed deficits in luciferase reporter assays and resulted in increased proliferation and Nkx2.5 expression in cardiomyoblasts. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 is associated with human CHD.

  13. Partnership for the heart. German-Estonian health project for the treatment of congenital heart defects in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Friedrich; Schierbaum, Clausjürgen; Konertz, Wolfgang; Schneider, Martin; Kern, Hartmut; Int, Eve; Tael, Kristi; Siigur, Urmas; Kleinfeld, Klaus; Bühlmeyer, Konrad; Fotuhi, Parwis; Winter, Stefan Frank

    2005-08-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) occur in 8 per 1000 live births. If they remain untreated, 70-80% of these patients die in early childhood. With modern diagnostic and treatment procedures, 90% of these patients reach adulthood. Within 8 years following reunification of Germany, it was possible to improve treatment for CHD in former East Germany to West German standards. Based on the experience gained in this process, a plan for improvement of care of Estonian patients with CHD was developed and implemented in the German-Estonian project, "Partnership for the Heart". The main elements of the project were (1) the training of Estonian physicians in Germany, (2) training courses conducted by German and Estonian specialists in Estonia and (3) use of telemedicine for consultation on a continuous basis. During the project 15 Estonian patients underwent cardiac surgery and/or catheter interventions performed by a joint team of German and Estonian specialists. The infant mortality due to CHD in Estonia fell by 28% during the project period. Key techniques of cardiac surgery are now being employed in Estonia without outside support, indicating the success of the training program and the long-term improvements to cardiac health care in Estonia. The total project costs were 314,252 Euro (euro), which is 50% lower than the estimated cost of treating the 15 patients abroad in Western Europe. The structure of "Partnership for the Heart" and the modified self-sufficiency model of medical care have not only produced results for Estonia but can be taken as a template for future bilateral health projects with other transition countries and for other fields of medical specialisation, and thus might aid a European health policy.

  14. Intervening on Affective Involvement and Expression of Emotions in an Adult with Congenital Deafblindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marga A. W.; Janssen, Marleen J.; Ruijssenaars, Wied A. J. J. M.; Huisman, Mark; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 20-week intervention to foster affective involvement during interaction and communication between an adult with congenital deafblindness (CDB) and his caregivers in a group home and a daytime activities center. Using a single-subject design, we examined whether the intervention increased affective involvement…

  15. Defining the phenotype and diagnostic considerations in adults with congenital disorders of N-linked glycosylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuis, D.F.; Janssen, M.C; Cassiman, D.; Lefeber, D.J.; Morava-Kozicz, E.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of N-glycosylation (CDG) form a rapidly growing group of more than 20 inborn errors of metabolism. Most patients are identified at the pediatric age with multisystem disease. There is no systematic review on the long-term outcome and clinical presentation in adult patients. Here

  16. Stress in adults with congenital deafblindness and an intellectual disability: Information from their cortisol curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloeming-Wolbrink, K.A.; Jansen, M.J.; Weerth, C. de; Ruijssenaars, A.J.J.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Eijsbout, A.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Adults with congenital deafblindness and an intellectual disability are at high risk for exposure to chronic and severe stress. Sensory deprivation, separations from primary caregivers, and difficulties in communication, from birth on, make daily life stressful for them. Chronic and high stress can

  17. Stress in adults with congenital deafblindness and an intellectual disability: Information about their cortisol curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloeming-Wolbrink, K.A.; Janssen, M.J.; Weerth, C. de; Ruijssenaars, A.J.J.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Eijsbouts, A.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Adults with congenital deafblindness and an intellectual disability are at high risk for exposure to chronic and severe stress. Sensory deprivation, separations from primary caregivers, and difficulties in communication, from birth on, make daily life stressful for them. Chronic and high stress can

  18. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in ...

  19. Hope in elderly adults with chronic heart failure. Concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboral, Meriam F; Evangelista, Lorraine S; Whetsell, Martha V

    2012-01-01

    This topic review employed Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis to explore the construct of hope in elderly adults with chronic heart failure. The articles analyzed revealed that hope, as the belief of the occurrence of a positive result without any guarantee that it will be produced, is necessary for the survival and wellbeing of the elderly adults enduring this disease.

  20. Prevalence of Congenital Heart Defects in Metropolitan Atlanta, 1998–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Mark D.; Strickland, Matthew J.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Mahle, William T.; Correa, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine an accurate estimate of the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) using current standard diagnostic modalities. Study design We obtained data on infants with CHD delivered during 1998–2005 identified by the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, an active, population-based birth defects surveillance system. Physiologic shunts in infancy and shunts associated with prematurity were excluded. Selected infant and maternal characteristics of the cases were compared with those of the overall birth cohort. Results From 1998–2005 there were 398 140 births, of which 3240 infants had CHD, for an overall prevalence of 81.4/10 000 births. The most common CHD were muscular ventricular septal defect, perimembranous ventricular septal defect, and secundum atrial septal defect, with prevalence of 27.5, 10.6, and 10.3/10 000 births, respectively. The prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot, the most common cyanotic CHD, was twice that of transposition of the great arteries (4.7 vs. 2.3/10 000 births). Many common CHD were associated with older maternal age and multiple-gestation pregnancy; several were found to vary by sex. Conclusion This study, using a standardized cardiac nomenclature and classification, provides current prevalence estimates of the various CHD subtypes. These estimates can be used to assess variations in prevalence across populations, time or space. PMID:18657826

  1. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  2. MR and cine-MR imaging in the diagnosis of infantile congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱会英; 韩立新; 黄新华; 王霞

    2001-01-01

    目的评价磁共振成像(MRI)及电影磁共振成像(cine-MRI)在小儿先天性心脏病(简称先心病)中的诊断 价值。方法对34例先心患儿常规行横轴位、冠状位、矢状位成像,并根据诊断需要选择垂直于室间隔的长轴 位、短轴位及平行于室间隔的长轴位。在图像中选择感兴趣的层面做心脏cine-MRI,每个心动周期内采集 16-32帧图像,以动态观察心脏及大血管变化,并与二维超声心动图(2DE)、心血管造影(CAG)及手术结 果进行对照分析。 结果MRI测量6例左向右分流型先心病患儿缺损口或内径值与手术所见相吻合(P=0.924),与2DE呈 正相关(r=0.973),且MRI较2DE更接近手术实测值。MRI及cine-MRI诊断28例复杂型先心病,27例与 手术诊断相一致。 结论MRI能准确显示房、室间隔的缺损、动脉导管未闭部位及内径,cine-MRI能以电影的方式显示间隔 缺损的分流、心脏与大血管血流状况及畸形的病理形态。本组资料证实MRI及cine-MRI是一种安全、无 创的诊断小儿先天性心脏病的检查方法,有较大的临床应用价值。%Objective To assess the effectiveness of magnetic resonanceimaging (MRI) and cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) in the diagnosis of infantile congenital heart disease. Methods A total of 34 cases were studied with MRI and cine-MRI. The data were analyzed and compared with those of two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE), cardioangiography (CAG) and surgery. Results The size of the defect or its caliber obtained from MRI in 6 patients with left to right shunt congenital heart disease was compatible with that observed in surgery (P=0.924). Comparison of cine-MRI and CAG in 28 patients with complicated congenital heart disease showed that the diagnosis of 27 cases by cine-MRI was the same as that by CAG. Conclusion Both MRI and cine-MRI play an important role in diagnosing infantile congenital heart disease.

  3. Is Pulse Oximetry Useful for Screening Neonates for Critical Congenital Heart Disease at High Altitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2016-06-01

    Now that pulse oximetry is used widely to screen for critical congenital heart disease, it is time to consider whether this screening method is applicable to those who live at high altitudes. Consideration of basic physical principles and reports from the literature indicate that not only is the 95 % cutoff point for arterial oxygen saturation incorrect at high altitudes, but the lower saturations are accompanied by greater variability and therefore there is the possibility of a greater percentage of false-positive screening tests at high altitudes. Because of ethnic differences in response to high altitudes, normative data will have to be collected separately in different countries and perhaps for different ethnic groups.

  4. 1st and 2nd Trimester Headsize in Fetuses with Congenital Heart Disease: A Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Mette Høj; Petersen, Olav Bjørn; Vestergaard, Else Marie;

    2014-01-01

    and screening for fetal malformations is carried out. Our cohort includes all fetuses in Western Denmark (2.9 million inhabitants) screened in between January 1st 2012 and December 31st 2013, diagnosed with any structural, non-syndromic congenital heart disease either during pregnancy or up to 6 months after...... birth. Results 276 fetuses with CHD were identified. 114 (41%) were genetically screened primarily by chromosomal microarray analysis (n=82). Fetuses with identified chromosomal abnormalities were excluded as were multiple gestation fetuses and fetuses with major extra cardiac malformations. Data from...... 208 fetuses (75%) with presumed non-syndromic CHD were included, 85 (41%) with minor and 123 (59%) with major CHD. Z-scores for head size were analysed. Conclusions: Our preliminary results suggest that Bi-parietal-diameter in children with CHD is within the normal range in the 1st trimester...

  5. Effects of eHealth physical activity encouragement in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Andersen, Lars L; Søndergaard, Lars;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess benefit and harms of adding an eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling in adolescents with congenital heart disease. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 158 adolescents aged 13-16years with no physical activity......%) fulfilled the compliance criteria of using the eHealth application for at least 2 consecutive weeks. In the control group, 61 patients (79%) completed both exercise tests. Adjusted for baseline values, the difference between the intervention group and the control group in mean VO2 peak at 1year was -0.65ml......·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI -2.66 to 1.36). Between-group differences at 1year in physical activity, generic health-related quality of life, and disease-specific quality of life were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Adding a tailored eHealth intervention to health education and individual...

  6. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, S J; Caputo, M; Tulloh, R M

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed.

  7. Managing the Morbidity Associated with Respiratory Viral Infections in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Geskey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with congenital heart disease (CHD are at risk for increased morbidity from viral lower respiratory tract infections because of anatomical cardiac lesions than can worsen an already compromised respiratory status. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV remains an important pathogen in contributing toward the morbidity in this population. Although the acute treatment of RSV largely remains supportive, the development of monoclonal antibodies, such as palivuzumab, has reduced the RSV-related hospitalization rate in children with CHD. This review highlights the specific cardiac complications of RSV infection, the acute treatment of bronchiolitis in patients with CHD, and the search for new therapies against RSV, including an effective vaccine, because of the high cost associated with immunoprophylaxis and its lack of reducing RSV-related mortality.

  8. The importance of early involvement of paediatric palliative care for patients with severe congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaud, Sophie; Lloyd, David F A; Laddie, Joanna; Razavi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Growing numbers of patients with severe congenital heart disease (CHD) are surviving into late childhood and beyond. This increasingly complex patient group may experience multiple formidable and precarious interventions, lifelong morbidity and the very real risk of premature death on many occasions throughout their childhood. In this paper, we discuss the advantages of a fully integrated palliative care ethos in patients with CHD, offering the potential for improved symptom control, more informed decision-making and enhanced support for patients and their families throughout their disease trajectory. These core principles may be delivered alongside expert cardiac care via non-specialists within pre-existing networks or via specialists in paediatric palliative care when appropriate. By broaching these complex issues early-even from the point of diagnosis-an individualised set of values can be established around not just end-of-life but also quality-of-life decisions, with clear benefits for patients and their families regardless of outcome.

  9. Perioperative pharmacological management of pulmonary hypertensive crisis during congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Nathan; de Jesus Perez, Vinicio A; Richter, Alice; Haddad, François; Denault, André; Rojas, Vanessa; Yuan, Ke; Orcholski, Mark; Liao, Xiaobo

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertensive crisis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) who require cardiac surgery. At present, prevention and management of perioperative pulmonary hypertensive crisis is aimed at optimizing cardiopulmonary interactions by targeting prostacyclin, endothelin, and nitric oxide signaling pathways within the pulmonary circulation with various pharmacological agents. This review is aimed at familiarizing the practitioner with the current pharmacological treatment for dealing with perioperative pulmonary hypertensive crisis in PAH-CHD patients. Given the life-threatening complications associated with pulmonary hypertensive crisis, proper perioperative planning can help anticipate cardiopulmonary complications and optimize surgical outcomes in this patient population.

  10. Optical measurement of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with congenital heart defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Buckley, Erin M.; Kim, Meeri N.; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Durning, Suzanne M.; Mason, Stefanie E.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Putt, Mary E.; Wang, Jiongjiong; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-05-01

    We employ a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitor for neonates with congenital heart disease (n=33). The NIRS-DCS device measured changes during hypercapnia of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations; cerebral blood flow (rCBFDCS); and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). Concurrent measurements with arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging (rCBFASL-MRI, n=12) cross-validate rCBFDCS against rCBFASL-MRI, showing good agreement (R=0.7, p=0.01). The study demonstrates use of NIRS-DCS on a critically ill neonatal population, and the results indicate that the optical technology is a promising clinical method for monitoring this population.

  11. Exogenous hormones and other drug exposures of children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, K J; Fyler, D C; Goldblatt, A; Kreidberg, M B

    1979-04-01

    A history of oral contraceptive use, hormonal pregnancy tests, prescribed hormones and other drugs was obtained from 390 mothers of infants with congenital heart disease and 1254 mothers of normal infants in Massachusetts. The data show a small positive association between estrogen/progesterone exposure and cardiac malformation, the prevalence ratio estimate of exposed to non-exposed being 1.5 (90 per cent confidence limits are 1.0, 2.1). No association was evident, however, between hormones and trunco-conal or any other class of defect among the cases, an observation which casts doubt on a causal relationship betweem hormones and cardiovascular malformations. Several other drugs were reported more frequently by cases' mothers. These include: ampicillin; aspirin; a combined anti-nausea agent (doxylamine succinate, dicyclomine hydrochloride and pyridoxine hydrochloride); chlordiazopoxide, codeine, diazepam, diphenylhydantoin; insulin; phenobarbital; phenothiazine; phenylephrine; and tetracycline.

  12. ALTERATIONS IN FREQUENCY OF ULNAR LOOPS AND ‘ATD’ ANGLE IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaywant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Dermatoglyphics is a scientific study of epidermal ridge configuration on palm, soles and fingertips valuable for medico legal and genetic investigations. Dermatoglyphics form in utero during early gestation and may be influenced by genetic and environmental factors operating at that time. Present investigation was undertaken to study alterations in dermatoglyphic patterns with special reference to various congenital heart diseases (CHD. The study involved 102 cases of CHD and 100 cases of normal individuals. It was observed that percent frequency of ulnar loops significantly increased in CHD group as compared to control group. Mean 'atd' angle was also increased in CHD group as compared to control group indicating distal displacement of palmar axial triradius (t. Thus, rise in frequency of ulnar loops and increase in 'atd' angle can be considered as one of the diagnostic criteria for CHD.

  13. Congenital heart diseases: post-operative appearance on multi-detector CT - a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasian, Anderanik; Malik, Sachin; Shamsa, Kamran; Krishnam, Mayil S. [UCLA Medical Center, Department of Radiological Science, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Echocardiography is considered as an initial imaging modality of choice in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is preferred for detailed functional information. Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in clinical practice in assessing post-operative morphological and functional information of patients with complex CHD when echocardiography and MR imaging are not contributory. Radiologists should understand and become familiar with the complex morphology and physiology of CHD, as well as with various palliative and corrective surgical procedures performed in these patients, to obtain CT angiograms with diagnostic quality and promptly recognise imaging features of normal post-operative anatomy and complications of these complex surgeries. (orig.)

  14. A Post-operative Feeding Protocol to Improve Outcomes for Neonates With Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, Jennifer; Fry-Bowers, Eileen

    2017-01-04

    Neonates with critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) are vulnerable to malnutrition during the post-operative period due to hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism. To improve nutritional outcomes during hospitalization, a nurse led post-operative enteral feeding protocol was implemented at a large U.S. children's hospital. During an eight-month implementation period, twenty-one neonates met protocol inclusion criteria. Days for neonates to achieve goal caloric feedings (120kcal/kg/day) were decreased. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed serum albumin levels and serial anthropometric measurements improved significantly throughout hospitalization (ppost-operative period is an effective way to improve nutritional outcomes and shorten length of hospital stay.

  15. Unenhanced steady state free precession versus traditional MR imaging for congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Dandan, E-mail: chchsister@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Kong, Xiangquan, E-mail: kxq0525@126.com [Department of Radiology, the Affiliated Union Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhou, Xuhui, E-mail: xiaolintongqq@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Li, Shurong, E-mail: 80917333@qq.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wang, Huanjun, E-mail: 463822507@qq.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess potential benefits of three dimensional (3D) steady state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance sequence for congenital heart disease (CHD). Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients with CHD (male:female ratio,14:6, mean age, 27.5 ± 8.5 years) underwent both 3D SSFP and traditional MR imaging (TMRI) [including two dimensional (2D) SSFP and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA)]. Image quality and diagnosis were compared, and Bland–Altman analysis was used to evaluate consistency of 3D SSFP and CEMRA for diameter measurements. Results: A total of 35 intra and 81 extra cardiac anomalies were identified in all patients. The image quality of 3D SSFP and TMRI for either intra or extra cardiac anomalies of all patients scored ≥3, which allowed an establishment of diagnosis for all cases. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 3D SSFP for the detection of intra cardiac anomalies were all 100%, whereas for extra cardiac anomalies they were 93.8%, 93.8%, 100%, respectively. Mean differences (3D SSFP minus CEMRA) for aorta and pulmonary arteries were 0.5 ± 1.2 mm and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm, respectively, showing good consistency of 3D SSFP and CEMRA for diameter measurements. Conclusion: 3D SSFP MRI can be an alternative image modality to TMRI for patients with congenital heart disease, especially for those who have renal insufficiency, breath-hold difficulty or who are allergic to contrast agent. It can also provide powerful complementary information for patients who undergo TMRI, especially at ventriculoarterial connection site.

  16. Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Malformations – Possibilities for the Employment of Telepathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Tennstedt

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal: In a study of 10 autopsy cases with congenital cardiac malformations we investigated whether obtaining a second opinion by means of telepathology could satisfy quality standards for the diagnosis of cardiac malformations and what the advantages and disadvantages of such a procedure might be. Material: The investigatory samples were 10 formalin‐fixed hearts with complex malformations from 9 fetuses and one newborn on which autopsies had been performed at the Pathological Institute of the Charité Hospital. The requests for a second opinion, which included text and image data, were sent in the form of Microsoft PowerPoint presentations to 5 experts in 4 countries. Per case the number of images that were sent was between 3 and 7. The size of the files was between 439 and 942 kb. The time required for preparation of the cases for sending them to the specialists was between 1 and 2 hours: this encompassed the time for putting the notation on the images, compressing them, creating a file that included both the images and the clinical data and then sending the case file. Results: All 10 cardiac malformations were correctly identified. In 8 of the 10 cases at least one expert had questions. After these questions had been answered and further images had been sent final correct diagnoses were made in all cases. All experts said that the quality of the images was very good. Use of a standardized findings questionnaire, which also included the marking of anatomic structures and of pathological findings in the images, proved useful. Standardized findings forms facilitate orientation during interpretation of the cases and should be used generally to avoid misunderstandings in telepathological communication. Conclusions: In general it is possible to obtain an effective and reliable diagnosis of congenital heart malformations by means of telepathology. It is far quicker to get a second opinion by this means than by conventional means.

  17. THE ROLE OF PHYSICAL THERAPY IN DIMINISHING THE EFFECTS OF THE CONGENITAL HEART DEFECT - CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croitoru Ramona

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In ROMANIA, fetal abnormalities are the cause of 20-30% of infant mortality, being second only to prematurity - 53% in 2005. The restriction of the fetal growth represents the main cause for intrauterine fetal death (60-70%, and the second cause of neonatal deaths - 41%. Perinatal mortality is caused by 6 obstetrical complications: prematurity, multiple pregnancy, pregnancy-induced hypertension, uteroplacental apoplexy, placenta praevia, pelvic presentation. The termination of pregnancy for prenatally diagnosed fetal abnormalities is excluded from the perinatal mortality statistics, according to the epidemiological information. The motivation for choosing a physical therapy intervention in the case of the pediatric congenital heart defect is represented by its number of pediatric cases, and by the problems confronted by the medical teams, the professional literature not being always very clear about the situations encountered in the everyday practice. As the number of congenital heart and blood vessels defects is the highest among pediatric cardiovascular pathologies, they represent a field of maximum interest for rehabilitation in pediatric cardiology.Several modern medicine studies show that physical therapy plays an important role in the rehabilitation of cardiovascular patients.Starting from several cases we researched in relation to our theme, but also from the consulted professional literature, we chose this theme to highlight the importance of this malformative syndrome, and the difficulties that can appear during functional rehabilitation.In conclusion, the results obtained after conducting this study allow us to say that our hypotheses, stating that through a correct and complete assessment of the motor potential one can intervene, using physical therapy means, to reestablish a lost function, and by selecting correctly the means and methods based on the extremely complex diagnosis of the case study, one can contribute to the improvement

  18. Repeatability of heart rate variability in congenital hypothyroidism as analysed by detrended fluctuation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, J C; Solís, L I; Pérez, J E; Gaitán, M J; Rivera, I R; Mandujano, M; Sánchez, M C; González-Camarena, R

    2009-10-01

    The analysis of heart rate fluctuations, or heart rate variability (HRV), may be applied to explore children's neurodevelopment. However, previous studies have reported poor reliability (repeatability) of HRV measures in children at rest and during light exercise. Whether the reliability can be improved by controlling variables such as physical activity, breathing rate and tidal volume, or by selecting non-conventional techniques for analysing the data remains as an open question. We evaluated the short-term repeatability of RR-interval data from medicated children with congenital hypothyroidism (CH). The alpha(1) exponents, obtained by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), from the data of 21 children collected at two different sessions were compared. Elapsed days between sessions were 59 +/- 33, and data were obtained during 10 min, trying to restrict the children's activity while being seated. We found statistical agreement between the means of alpha(1) exponents for each session (p = 0.94) and no bias with a low-coefficient variation (9.1%); an intraclass correlation coefficient ri = 0.48 ([0.14 0.72], 95% confidence interval) was also estimated. These findings, which were compared with results obtained by conventional time and frequency techniques, indicate the existence of agreement between the alpha(1) exponents obtained at each session, thereby providing support concerning the repeatability of HRV data as analysed by DFA in children with congenital hypothyroidism. Of particular interest was also the agreement found by using the central frequency of the high-frequency band and the parameter pNN20, both showing better or similar ri than alpha(1) (0.77 [0.57 0.89] and 0.51 [0.17 0.74], respectively), yet considerably better repeatability than other conventional time and frequency parameters.

  19. Maternal diabetes induces congenital heart defects in mice by altering the expression of genes involved in cardiovascular development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Samuel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital heart defects are frequently observed in infants of diabetic mothers, but the molecular basis of the defects remains obscure. Thus, the present study was performed to gain some insights into the molecular pathogenesis of maternal diabetes-induced congenital heart defects in mice. Methods and results We analyzed the morphological changes, the expression pattern of some genes, the proliferation index and apoptosis in developing heart of embryos at E13.5 from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Morphological analysis has shown the persistent truncus arteriosus combined with a ventricular septal defect in embryos of diabetic mice. Several other defects including defective endocardial cushion (EC and aberrant myofibrillogenesis have also been found. Cardiac neural crest defects in experimental embryos were analyzed and validated by the protein expression of NCAM and PGP 9.5. In addition, the protein expression of Bmp4, Msx1 and Pax3 involved in the development of cardiac neural crest was found to be reduced in the defective hearts. The mRNA expression of Bmp4, Msx1 and Pax3 was significantly down-regulated (p p p Conclusion It is suggested that the down-regulation of genes involved in development of cardiac neural crest could contribute to the pathogenesis of maternal diabetes-induced congenital heart defects.

  20. Prevalence and profile of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension in Down syndrome in a pediatric cardiology service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Alves Mourato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To determine the frequence and profile of congenital heart defects in Down syndrome patients referred to a pediatric cardiologic center, considering the age of referral, gender, type of heart disease diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and its association with pulmonary hypertension at the initial diagnosis.METHODS:Cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection of 138 patients with Down syndrome from a total of 17,873 records. Descriptive analysis of the data was performed, using Epi-Info version 7.RESULTS: Among the 138 patients with Down syndrome, females prevailed (56.1% and 112 (81.2% were diagnosed with congenital heart disease. The most common lesion was ostium secundum atrial septal defect, present in 51.8%, followed by atrioventricular septal defect, in 46.4%. Ventricular septal defects were present in 27.7%, while tetralogy of Fallot represented 6.3% of the cases. Other cardiac malformations corresponded to 12.5%. Pulmonary hypertension was associated with 37.5% of the heart diseases. Only 35.5% of the patients were referred before six months of age.CONCLUSIONS: The low percentage of referral until six months of age highlights the need for a better tracking of patients with Down syndrome in the context of congenital heart disease, due to the high frequency and progression of pulmonary hypertension.

  1. A case of congenital aplasia of the epiglottis in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang Jae; Myung, Nam Suk; Lee, Hyoung Ju; Koo, Soo Kweon

    2014-01-01

    Aplasia or hypoplasia of the epiglottis in an adult is rarely reported congenital anomaly of the larynx. Most patients with epiglottic aplasia have presented fatal symptom of respiratory distress and severe aspiration in infancy or childhood. We present a case of congenital absence of the epiglottis found in a 33-year-old woman complaining of recurrent lingual tonsillitis. Laryngoscopic finding and CT scan revealed an isolated epiglottic aplasia and normal appearance of other laryngeal structure. This is the first description of physiologic evaluation in an epiglottic anomaly to find the compensatory mechanism of aspiration prevention. We discussed this case with a review of literature.

  2. Serum NT-proBNP Levels Are Not Related to Vitamin D Status in Young Patients with Congenital Heart Defects

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    E. Passeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Hypovitaminosis D frequently occurs in early life and increases with age. Vitamin D has been suggested to influence cardiac performance and N-terminal-pro-type B natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP release in adults with heart failure. Objectives. To assess the vitamin D status and the impact of hypovitaminosis D on circulating NT-proBNP levels in young patients with congenital heart defects (CHD. Design and Patients. This cross-sectional study included the assessment of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD, parathyroid function markers, and NT-proBNP levels in a series of 230 young in-patients (117 females, 113 males; 6.4 (4.0–9.1 years (median, interquartile range with CHD. Results. Serum 25OHD levels 30 ng/mL occurred in 25% of patients. Serum 25OHD levels inversely correlated with age (r=-0.169, P=0.013 and height standard deviation score (r=-0.269, P=0.001. After correction for age, 25OHD negatively correlated with serum PTH levels (β=-0.200, P=0.002. PTH levels above the upper quartile (44 pg/mL occurred in 32% of hypovitaminosis D patients. Serum NT-proBNP levels were not correlated with 25OHD and PTH levels. Conclusions. Half of the young CHD patients were diagnosed with 25OHD deficiency and a third of hypovitaminosis D patients experienced hyperparathyroidism. Nonetheless, serum NT-proBNP levels were not associated with hypovitaminosis D as well as hyperparathyroidism.

  3. Case Report: Emergency awake craniotomy for cerebral abscess in a patient with unrepaired cyanotic congenital heart disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Corinne D’Antico

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 39-year-old male with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease undergoing emergency craniotomy for a cerebral abscess. Maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamic stability and adequate tissue oxygenation during anesthesia may be challenging in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease. In this case, we decided to perform the surgery as an awake craniotomy after interdisciplinary consensus. We discuss general aspects of anesthetic management during awake craniotomy and specific concerns in the perioperative care of patients with congenital heart disease.

  4. The Influence of Exercise Training on Quality of Life and Psychosocial Functioning in Children with Congenital Heart Disease:A Review of Intervention Studies

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    Karolijn Dulfer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents operated upon for congenital heart disease may show reduced exercise capacity and physical activity, associated with lowered quality of life. This review presents intervention studies on the influence of an exercise program on quality of life and psychosocial functioning in children with severe congenital heart disease. Participation in an exercise program among young people with complex congenital heart disease seemed to have positive effects on quality of life and passive leisure time spent. However, more effects of the exercise programs may have been expected. For future research it is important to critically evaluate the content of the exercise programs.

  5. A new 48, XXYY/47, XYY syndrome associated with multiple skeletal abnormalities, congenital heart disease and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutesa, Leon; Jamar, Mauricette; Hellin, Anne Cecile; Pierquin, Genevieve; Bours, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    While the XYY and XXYY syndromes have been several time described in patients, the combination of both syndromes in an individual is a rare event and may result in a severe phenotype. In the present observation, a boy with congenital scoliosis due to segmented thoracic hemivertebra associated with radioulnar synostosis and congenital heart disease is described. Chromosome G-banding and FISH analysis demonstrated a de novo mosaic karyotype 48, XXYY/47, XYY in this patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of XYY and XXYY syndromes.

  6. A new 48, XXYY/47, XYY syndrome associated with multiple skeletal abnormalities, congenital heart disease and mental retardation

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    Leon Mutesa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While the XYY and XXYY syndromes have been several time described in patients, the combination of both syndromes in an individual is a rare event and may result in a severe phenotype. In the present observation, a boy with congenital scoliosis due to segmented thoracic hemivertebra associated with radioulnar synostosis and congenital heart disease is described. Chromosome G-banding and FISH analysis demonstrated a de novo mosaic karyotype 48, XXYY/47, XYY in this patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of XYY and XXYY syndromes.

  7. Evolving hybrid approaches: the preservation of the 'neglected' pulmonary valve function in patients with congenital heart disease.

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    Vida, Vladimiro L; Bacha, Emile; Stellin, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The involvement of the hemodynamic expertise in the operating room led to the development of new strategies aimed to improve both early and long-term outcome of patients with congenital heart disease. During the last decade, with the aim of preserving the pulmonary valve function, we embarked on a new surgical approach, which combines surgical and interventional techniques, which are performed in the operating room. We believe that the preservation of the pulmonary valve function can be extended to any patients with classic tetralogy of Fallot and other selected patients with congenital pulmonary valve hypoplasia and dysfunction.

  8. Protein patterns of brush-border fragments in congenital lactose malabsorption and in specific hypolactasia of the adult.

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    Freiburghaus, A U; Schmitz, J; Schindler, M; Rotthauwe, H W; Kuitunen, P; Launiala, K; Hadorn, B

    1976-05-06

    Brush-border membrane proteins of the small-bowel mucosa were separated on polyacrylamide gels from intestinal biopsy specimens obtained from four children with congenital lactose malabsorption and from two adults with specific hypolactasia. In three patients with the congenital type of lactase deficiency the protein band corresponding to brush-border lactase was reduced in intensity, but was never completely absent. No difference in gel patterns was detected when this pattern in congenital deficiency was compared to that obtained from the two patients with adult-type selective hypolactasia. In one patient with congenital lactose malabsorption the protein band corresponding to lactase activity was not detectable. The findings suggest that the mechanisms leading to low lactase activity in the congenital and adult forms of lactose intolerance are similar.

  9. Planning of vessel grafts for reconstructive surgery in congenital heart diseases

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    Rietdorf, U.; Riesenkampff, E.; Schwarz, T.; Kuehne, T.; Meinzer, H.-P.; Wolf, I.

    2010-02-01

    The Fontan operation is a surgical treatment for patients with severe congenital heart diseases, where a biventricular correction of the heart can't be achieved. In these cases, a uni-ventricular system is established. During the last step of surgery a tunnel segment is placed to connect the inferior caval vein directly with the pulmonary artery, bypassing the right atrium and ventricle. Thus, the existing ventricle works for the body circulation, while the venous blood is passively directed to the pulmonary arteries. Fontan tunnels can be placed intra- and extracardially. The location, length and shape of the tunnel must be planned accurately. Furthermore, if the tunnel is placed extracardially, it must be positioned between other anatomical structures without constraining them. We developed a software system to support planning of the tunnel location, shape, and size, making pre-operative preparation of the tunnel material possible. The system allows for interactive placement and adjustment of the tunnel, affords a three-dimensional visualization of the virtual Fontan tunnel inside the thorax, and provides a quantification of the length, circumferences and diameters of the tunnel segments. The visualization and quantification can be used to plan and prepare the tunnel material for surgery in order to reduce the intra-operative time and to improve the fit of the tunnel patch.

  10. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

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    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (Pdefects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  11. Experience with intravenous digital subtraction angiography following shunting in 4 cases of congenital heart diseases

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    Higashidate, Masafumi; Konno, Susumu; Sumitomo, Naokata; Ito, Sango; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA) was performed in two patients with Fallot's tetralogy who underwent Blalock-Taussing operation, a patient with coarctation of the aortic arch who underwent extra-anastomic bypass between the ascending aorta and the descending aorta, and a patient with stenosis of the tricuspid valve who underwent Fontan type operation (anastomosis between the right atrium and the pulmonary artery). The conventional cardiac angiography was also performed for the comparison with IV-DSA in all patients. IV-DSA revealed the thickness of the subclavian artery anastomosed by Blaloch-Taussing operation, but failed to determine the accurate thickness of the pulmonary artery required for PA-index for radical surgery in cases of Fallot's tetralogy. Bypass from the ascending aorta to the descending aorta was well visualized by IV-DSA because the heart did not overlap on the image. In cases of Fontan type operation, IV-DSA permitted the visualization of blood flow from the right atrium to the pulmonary artery and the shape of the pulmonary artery. It is concluded that IV-DSA is a less invasive, simple technique to evaluate patients' condition following shunting for congenital heart diseases, as compared to the conventional method. (Namekawa, K.).

  12. Does malnutrition influence outcome in children undergoing congenital heart surgery in a developing country?

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    Eva M. Marwali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Most children undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD in developing countries are malnourished. Malnutrition is known as a co-morbidity factor that might predict and influence outcomes after surgery. Objectives To evaluate the effect of malnutrition and other associated risk factors on post-operative outcomes in children with CHDs underwent cardiac surgery. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a single center tertiary pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU in Indonesia. Our cohort included all children between 5 and 36 months of age undergoing congenital heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass from November 2011 until February 2014. Outcomes measured were the length of intubation and the length of ICU stay. Variables for potential influence investigated were the nutritional status, age, gender, type of cardiac anomaly (acyanotic vs. cyanotic, Aristotle score, cardiopulmonary bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, and Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM III score. Results Out of 249 patients included, 147 (59% showed malnourishment on admission. Malnourished patients were significantly younger in age, presented with an acyanotic heart defects, and had higher PRISM III score. Additionally, they also had a longer mechanical ventilation time and ICU stay than those with a normal nutritional status. After adjusting for various variables using a multiple logistic regression model it could be demonstrated that a higher Z-score for weight to age was a significant protective factor for the intubation time of more than 29 hours with an odds ratio of 0.66 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.92, P = 0.012. Non-malnourished patients had a 49% significantly higher chance for extubation with a hazard ratio of 1.49 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.99, P= 0.007. Conclusion Malnourishment is clearly associated in a linear fashion with longer mechanical ventilation and ICU stay. As one of significant and potentially treatable co

  13. Value of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Evaluation of Thoracic Venous Abnormalities among Pediatrics with Congenital Heart Disease

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    Dalia F Elbeih*, Mervat M El-Gohary *, Naglaa H Shebrya*,Mohammed A Saleh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Venous anomalies of the thorax can involve systemic or pulmonary veins and range from isolated incidental findings to components of more complex anomalies, most often congenital heart disease (CHD. Although echocardiography and catheter directed cardiac angiography are generally accepted as the primary imaging techniques for evaluation of CHD, CT and MRI are important complementary diagnostic tools. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT with its increasing availability and utility is now becoming a further method of imaging CHD. In light of its widespread availability, MDCT and 3D imaging are increasingly considered as a viable “one-stop shop” for preoperative imaging evaluation of cardiovascular structures in selected pediatric patients.Aim of the work: The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of MDCT in visualization of the thoracic venous system in pediatrics with congenital heart disease, show prevalence and types of venous anomalies and to compare this data with echocardiographic findings.Methods: The studied group included 30 cases referred to us by pediatric cardiologists to be examined by MSCT angiography of the heart and thoracic vessels. All the patients were known cases of congenital heart disease and underwent echocardiography. They were referred to answer specific anatomic question raised by inconclusive echocardiography, to assess suspected systemic and suspected pulmonary venous anomalies. All patients were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination and MDCT examination with CT lightspeed VCT XT 64-detectors row scanner (General Electric, Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.Results: CTA findings had 77.8 % concordance with echocardiographic findings regarding SVC anomalies, 66.7 % concordance with echocardiography regarding IVC anomalies and 90 % concordance regarding pulmonary venous anomalies.Conclusion: Low dose protocol CTA is a promising method that complementary to Echocardioraphy

  14. The Levels of Ghrelin, TNF-α, and IL-6 in Children with Cyanotic and Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

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    Yasar Dogan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Ghrelin has effects on nutrient intake and growth. The cause of growth retardation in congenital heart disease is multifactorial. The aim of the present study is to investigate the ghrelin in congenital heart disease and the association of ghrelin with TNF-α and IL-6. Materials and methods. We measured serum ghrelin, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels using spesific immunoassay in 68 patients (47 acyanotic, 21 cyanotic with congenital heart disease and in 25 control subjects. Results. In comparison to controls, serum ghrelin, TNF-α levels were significantly higher in acyanotic patients and cyanotic patients with congenital heart disease (P<.0001. In acyanotic and cyanotic patients with congenital heart disease, there was a positive correlation between ghrelin and TNF-α (r=.485, P<.05 and r=.573 , P<.01, resp.. Conclusion. Serum ghrelin levels is elevated in acyanotic and cyanotic patients with congenital heart disease. Increased ghrelin levels represents malnutrition and growth retardation in these patients. The relation of ghrelin with cytokines may be explained by the possible effect of chronic congestive heart failure and chronic shunt hypoxemia.

  15. Evaluation of High Resolution Melting for MTHFR C677T Genotyping in Congenital Heart Disease.

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    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available High resolution melting (HRM is a simple, flexible and low-cost mutation screening technique. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene encoding a critical enzyme, potentially affects susceptibility to some congenital defects like congenital heart disease (CHD. We evaluate the performance of HRM for genotyping of the MTHFR gene C677T locus in CHD cases and healthy controls of Chinese Han population.A total of 315 blood samples from 147 CHD patients (male72, female 75 and 168 healthy controls (male 92, female 76 were enrolled in the study. HRM was utilized to genotype MTHFR C677T locus of all the samples. The results were compared to that of PCR-RFLP and Sanger sequencing. The association of the MTHFR C677T genotypes and the risk of CHD was analyzed using odds ratio with their 95% confidence interval (CIs from unconditional logistic regression.All the samples were successfully genotyped by HRM within 1 hour and 30 minutes while at least 6 hours were needed for PCR-RFLP and sequencing. The genotypes of MTHFR C677T CC, CT, and TT were 9.52%, 49.66%, and 40.82% in CHD group but 29.17%, 50% and 20.83% in control group, which were identical using both methods of HRM and PCR-RFLP, demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of HRM were all 100%.MTHFR C677T is a potential risk factor for CHD in our local residents of Shandong province in China. HRM is a fast, sensitive, specific and reliable method for clinical application of genotyping.

  16. 小儿先天性心脏病封堵术后的护理体会%Nursing Experience of Children with Congenital Heart Disease after Transcatheter Closure of Congenital Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾珍; 郭文馨

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨小儿先天性心脏病封堵术后护理要点。方法回顾性分析我科自2014年1月~2015年5月共50例小儿先天性心脏病封堵术的案例。结果手术成功,术后恢复快,无严重并发症。结论患者年龄小,体重低,护理难度大,规范有效的护理能有效预防并发症的发生,促进术后恢复。%Objective To explore the nursing points of the patients with congenital heart disease in children. Methods A retrospective analysis of 50 cases of congenital heart disease in children from January 2014 to May 2015, a total of cases of congenital heart disease. Results The operation was successful, and the recovery was fast and no serious complication. Conclusion Patients with low age, low weight, dif iculty of nursing, standardized and ef ective nursing can ef ectively prevent the occur ence of complications, promote postoperative recovery.

  17. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ADULT PATIENTS WITH CONGENITAL CLUBFOOT IN SEVERITY DEGREE

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    A. A. Mukhamadeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There were treated 48 patients (adolescents and adults with severe congenital clubfoot in Saratov Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics. 43 patients had the age ranged from 16 to 30, 5 patients had the age over 30. 19 patients had bilateral clubfoot, 29 patients had unilateral clubfoot including 19 on right side and 10 left side. To improve treatment results and to prevent deformity recurrence we developed two-staged surgery for congenital clubfoot treatment in adults. Cartilages of talo-navicular, talo-calcanean, cuneo-talar joints are deleted and deformity is corrected with external fixator on I stage. Surgeon performs external fixator resetting, autobone grafting of these joints with compressive arthrodesis on second stage. This method results in full foot reconstruction, good functional outcome, full weight-bearing and improves patient life’s quality.

  18. Decreased plasma ADAMTS-13 activity as a predictor of postoperative bleeding in cyanotic congenital heart disease

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    Rosangela P.S. Soares

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the preoperative plasma antigenic concentration and activity of von Willebrand factor and its main cleaving protease ADAMTS-13 in pediatric patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease undergoing surgical treatment and investigate possible correlations with postoperative bleeding. METHODS: Plasma antigenic concentrations (von Willebrand factor:Ag and ADAMTS-13:Ag were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Collagen-binding assays were developed to measure biological activities (von Willebrand factor:collagen binding and ADAMTS-13 activity. The multimeric structure of von Willebrand factor was analyzed using Western immunoblotting. Demographic, diagnostic, and general and specific laboratory data and surgery-related variables were subjected to univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis for the prediction of postoperative bleeding. RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were enrolled, with ages ranging from 9 months to 7.6 years (median 2.5 years. The plasma concentrations of von Willebrand factor:Ag and ADAMTS-13:Ag were decreased by 65 and 82%, respectively, in the patients compared with the controls (p<0.001. An increased density of low-molecular-weight fractions of von Willebrand factor, which are suggestive of proteolytic degradation (p = 0.0081, was associated with decreased ADAMTS-13 activity, which was likely due to ADAMTS-13 consumption (71% of controls, p = 0.0029 and decreased von Willebrand factor:collagen binding (76% of controls, p = 0.0004. Significant postoperative bleeding occurred in 13 patients. The preoperative ADAMTS-13 activity of <64.6% (mean level for the group, preoperative activated partial thromboplastin time, and the need for cardiopulmonary bypass were characterized as independent risk factors for postoperative bleeding, with respective hazard ratios of 22.35 (95% CI 1.69 to 294.79, 1.096 (95% CI 1.016 to 1.183, and 37.43 (95% CI 1.79 to 782.73. CONCLUSION: Low plasma ADAMTS-13

  19. Clinical Characteristics of Down Syndrome Children With Congenital Heart Disease in a Developing Country

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    Mottaghi Moghaddam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Down syndrome (DS is the most common chromosomal abnormality in newborns and is associated with other congenital malformations and health problems. The features of Down syndrome differ according to ethnicity and geographic region. Objectives The main aim was to assess the clinical characteristics of DS patients in a referral pediatric cardiology department. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the clinical characteristics of children with Down syndrome and heart defects in an educational hospital over 11 years (from September 2001 to September 2012 in Iran. All data were collected according to a checklist created by the researchers, which included the clinical information, genetic characteristics, cardiac and non-cardiac co-existing diseases, and parental variables of the children. An independent t-test and a chi-square test were used to compare qualitative variables such as birth weight and age of diagnosis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results 100 patients with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease were evaluated; 52 were female (52% and 48 were male (48%. The average birth weight of the subjects was 2745 ± 523 (mean ± SD grams. The mean age of the patients’ mothers was 32 ± 6 years, and the mean age of the patients’ fathers was 36 ± 6 years. Chromosomal analysis was performed for 61 patients, 60 of whom had free trisomy (98.4%, one of whom had translocation (1.6%, and none of whom had a mosaic pattern of chromosomal abnormality. The parents of 33 the patients in this study were consanguineous. All patients had cardiac disorders, but non-cardiac disorder also was recorded in 37 patients (37%. The most common non-cardiac disorder in patients was hypothyroidism, and the second most common was gastrointestinal problems. Conclusions Parents were blood relatives in 33 (33% of the patient cases, which is a very high rate. Therefore, non-random mating is an important issue in

  20. Neonatal pulse oximetry screening improves detecting of critical congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-jing; HUANG Guo-ying

    2013-01-01

    Objective Life-threatening critical congenital heart disease (cCHD) is often not detected in the neonatal period.Unrecognized cCHD results in high morbidity and mortality rates.As a non-invasive,convenient,quick and accurate measuring method,pulse oximetry is considered to be a promising strategy to screen for cCHD in neonates.This article is a review on the neonatal pulse oximetry screening for cCHD.Data sources Articles on neonatal pulse oximetry screening for cCHD were accessed from PubMed,using keywords including congenital heart defects,neonatal screening and oximetry.Study selection Original articles and critical reviews selected were relevant to the review's theme.Results The factors in the course of implementation,including threshold for positive pulse-oximetry screening results,the pulse oximeters used,timing of the screening,and the measuring position,influence the accuracy of the screening.It is recommended that the screening is completed on the second day of life,before hospital discharge.Motion-tolerant pulse oximeters,which can also be applied to measure the saturation in low-perfusion conditions,should be used.The probe should be put on both the right hand and on one foot.Thresholds of <95% in either limb or a difference of >3% between the limbs as a positive result may be appropriate.It should be emphasized that pulse-oximetry screening cannot be used as the only way to detect cCHD,clinical examination is also important in this situation.Cost-benefit analysis in the United Kingdom revealed it was plausible to use pulse oximetry as an adjunct to clinical examination.However,it is still controversial as to whether pulse oximetry can be used as a routine screening method for cCHD in neonates.Conclusions Neonatal pulse oximetry screening improves detection of cCHD.Further studies should be carried out before it becomes one of the routine newborn screening programs.

  1. Folate Deficiency and Folic Acid Supplementation: The Prevention of Neural-Tube Defects and Congenital Heart Defects

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    Andrew E. Czeizel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Diet, particularly vitamin deficiency, is associated with the risk of birth defects. The aim of this review paper is to show the characteristics of common and severe neural-tube defects together with congenital heart defects (CHD as vitamin deficiencies play a role in their origin. The findings of the Hungarian intervention (randomized double-blind and cohort controlled trials indicated that periconceptional folic acid (FA-containing multivitamin supplementation prevented the major proportion (about 90% of neural-tube defects (NTD as well as a certain proportion (about 40% of congenital heart defects. Finally the benefits and drawbacks of three main practical applications of folic acid/multivitamin treatment such as (i dietary intake; (ii periconceptional supplementation; and (iii flour fortification are discussed. The conclusion arrived at is indeed confirmation of Benjamin Franklin’s statement: “An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of care”.

  2. Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Congenital Disease Often Misdiagnosed in Adults

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    Jessica Falleti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal duplication is a rare congenital disease which affected more commonly the ileum, while the stomach is rarely involved. Generally diagnosed in paediatric or young age, it could be difficult to suspect a gastrointestinal duplication in adults. Herein, we report a 55-year-old male with a gastric duplication cyst found on routinely checkup for chronic hepatitis and first misdiagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST; we also discuss its embryology.

  3. Congenital hip disease in adults: terminology, classification, pre-operative planning and management.

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    Karachalios, T; Hartofilakidis, G

    2010-07-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge relating to the management of adult patients with congenital hip disease. Orthopaedic surgeons who treat these patients with a total hip replacement should be familiar with the arguments concerning its terminology, be able to recognise the different anatomical abnormalities and to undertake thorough pre-operative planning in order to replace the hip using an appropriate surgical technique and the correct implants and be able to anticipate the clinical outcome and the complications.

  4. Micro-economic impact of congenital heart surgery: results of a prospective study from a limited-resource setting.

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    Manu Raj

    Full Text Available The microeconomic impact of surgery for congenital heart disease is unexplored, particularly in resource limited environments. We sought to understand the direct and indirect costs related to congenital heart surgery and its impact on Indian households from a family perspective.Baseline and first follow-up data of 644 consecutive children admitted for surgery for congenital heart disease (March 2013 - July 2014 in a tertiary referral hospital in Central Kerala, South India was collected prospectivelyfrom parents through questionnaires using a semi-structured interview schedule.The median age was 8.2 months (IQR: 3.0- 36.0 months. Most families belonged to upper middle (43.0% and lower middle (35.7% socioeconomic class. Only 3.9% of families had some form of health insurance. The median expense for the admission and surgery was INR 201898 (IQR: 163287-266139 [I$ 11989 (IQR: 9696-15804], which was 0.93 (IQR: 0.52-1.49 times the annual family income of affected patients. Median loss of man-days was 35 (IQR: 24-50 and job-days was 15 (IQR: 11-24. Surgical risk category and hospital stay duration significantly predicted higher costs. One in two families reported overwhelming to high financial stress during admission period for surgery. Approximately half of the families borrowed money during the follow up period after surgery.Surgery for congenital heart disease results in significant financial burden for majority of families studied. Efforts should be directed at further reductions in treatment costs without compromising the quality of care together with generating financial support for affected families.

  5. Transvenous cardiac resynchronization therapy in complex congenital heart diseases: dextrocardia with transposition of the great arteries after Mustard operation.

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    Zartner, Peter A; Wiebe, Walter; Volkmer, Marius; Thomas, Daniel; Schneider, Martin

    2009-04-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy revealed first promising results in patients with a congenital heart disease and a systemic right ventricle. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed accessibility of the coronary sinus in an 18-year-old male patient with mirror dextrocardia, d-transposition of the great arteries and ventricular septal defect (VSD) after Mustard operation and VSD patch closure. In literatures, transvenous lead placement is discussed in this anatomical setting, with opposed position of the ventricular leads and reliable lead characteristics.

  6. Heart rhythm and conduction disturbances in early postoperative period after surgical correction for congenital heart defects in infants

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    Bockeria L. A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The study aimed to determine the range of rhythm and conduction disturbances in early postoperative period in infants and prove the prognostic value of some pre- and intraoperative factors for development of such complications. Material and methods. The study included 235 children aged from 1 to 3 years who underwent surgeries for congenital heart diseases (CHD under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Exclusion criteria were: age less than 1 year or more than 3 years, presence of confirmed heart rhythm disturbances before surgery except incomplete or complete right bundle branch block in presence of right ventricular myocardial hypertrophy, left anterior bundle branch block in presence of partial or complete atrioventricular canal defect and sinus tachycardia equal to circulatory failure (CF. Results. Ventricular arrhythmias such as premature ventricular contraction (PVC of different character were frequently seen in early postoperative period after surgical correction of CHD. They were noted in 36% of overall number postoperative arrhythmias. Supraventricular extrasystole occurred in 29% cases, different types of supraventricular tachycardias – in 17%, AV-blocks of different grades – in 10%. We noted the following predictors for postoperative rhythm disturbance development: age more than 25 months at the moment of surgery, prolonged CPB and aortic cross-clamping during ventricular septal defect (VSD (70 and 39 minutes, respectively and Fallot’s tetralogy correction (100 and 60 minutes, respectively and exceeding the critical end-point of aortic cross-clamping during atrial septal defect correction (ASD (24 minutes, presence of IIA and IIb grade for CF before surgery, surgical correction of ASD under hypothermia of less than 32 °C. Exceeding the critical end-points of CPB and aortic clamping in patients with Fallot’s tetralogy and exceeding the critical end-points of aortic clamping in children with VSD and ASD were shown to be the

  7. Study on hemodynamic status in congenital heart disease. 2. Volume study and amplitude study by radionuclide angiocardiography

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    Hamada, Rousei; Nonaka, Zenji; Kan, Zuishou

    1987-01-01

    Hemodynamic characteristics of congenital heart disease with left to right shunt were studied by gated blood-pool studies in 45 children with congenital heart disease (19 cases of atrial septal defect: ASD, 20 cases of ventricular septal defect: VSD, and 16 cases of patent ductus arteriosus: PDA) and 20 cases with normal cardiac function as a control group. Volume ratio (VR) was culculated as the ratio of right/left ventricular radioactivity counts. Amplitude ratio (AR) was culculated as the ratio of right/left ventricular mean amplitudes. In control group VR was 0.96 +- 0.16 (mean value +- standard deviation), and AR was 0.63 +- 0.10. In ASD group VR was 1.50 +- 0.32, and AR was 0.75 +- 0.14. In VSD group VR was 0.64 +- 0.14, and AR was 0.52 +- 0.11. In PDA group VR was 0.42 +- 0.13, and AR was 0.52 +- 0.11. Statistical analyses showed that there were significant differences among four groups about VR and AR respectively. In conclusion, radionuclide angiocardiography is noninvasive and valuable for hemodyanmic studies of children with congenital heart disease, especially for differential diagnoses among them.

  8. The Risk of Congenital Heart Anomalies Following Prenatal Exposure to Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors—Is Pharmacogenetics the Key?

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    Daud, Aizati N. A.; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Groen, Henk; Wilffert, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are often prescribed during pregnancy. Previous studies that found an increased risk of congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart anomalies (CHA), with SRI use during pregnancy have created concern among pregnant women and healthcare professionals about the safety of these drugs. However, subsequent studies have reported conflicting results on the association between CHA and SRI use during pregnancy. These discrepancies in the risk estimates can potentially be explained by genetic differences among exposed individuals. In this review, we explore the potential pharmacogenetic predictors involved in the pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of SRIs, and their relation to the risk of CHA. In general, the risk is dependent on the maternal concentration of SRIs and the foetal serotonin level/effect, which can be modulated by the alteration in the expression and/or function of the metabolic enzymes, transporter proteins and serotonin receptors involved in the serotonin signalling of the foetal heart development. Pharmacogenetics might be the key to understanding why some children exposed to SRIs develop a congenital heart anomaly and others do not. PMID:27529241

  9. Does malnutrition influence outcome in children undergoing congenital heart surgery in a developing country?

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    Eva M. Marwali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Most children undergoing cardiac surgery forcongenital heart disease (CHD in developing countries aremalnourished. Malnutrition is known as a co-morbidity factorthat might predict and influence outcomes after surgery.Objectives To evaluate the effect of malnutrition and otherassociated risk factors on post-operative outcomes in childrenwith CHDs underwent cardiac surgery.Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a singlecenter tertiary pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICUin Indonesia. Our cohort included all children between 5 and36 months of age undergoing congenital heart surgery withcardiopulmonary bypass from November 2011 until February2014. Outcomes measured were the length of intubation and thelength of ICU stay. Variables for potential influence investigatedwere the nutritional status, age, gender, type of cardiac anomaly(acyanotic vs. cyanotic, Aristotle score, cardiopulmonary bypasstime, aortic cross-clamp time, and Pediatric Risk of Mortality(PRISM III score.Results Out of 249 patients included, 147 (59% showedmalnourishment on admission. Malnourished patients weresignificantly younger in age, presented with an acyanotic heartdefects, and had higher PRISM III score. Additionally, they alsohad a longer mechanical ventilation time and ICU stay thanthose with a normal nutritional status. After adjusting for variousvariables using a multiple logistic regression model it could bedemonstrated that a higher Z-score for weight to age was asignificant protective factor for the intubation time of more than29 hours with an odds ratio of 0.66 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.92, P =0.012. Non-malnourished patients had a 49% significantly higherchance for extubation with a hazard ratio of 1.49 (95% CI 1.12to 1.99, P= 0.007.Conclusion Malnourishment is clearly associated in a linearfashion with longer mechanical ventilation and ICU stay. As one ofsignificant and potentially treatable co-morbidity factors, preventionof malnourishment

  10. The epidemiological aspects of congenital heart disease in central and southern district of Iran

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    Sara Amel-Shahbaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital heart disease (CHD is a major health problem and its prevalence is different around the world. The aim of study was determination of the epidemiological aspects of CHD in central and southern district of Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, 3714 medical records were evaluated from March 21, 2001 to December 18, 2011. Medical records of inpatients from angiography and outpatients in the Heart Clinic of Afshar hospital (a referral hospital in center and south of Iran were the source of information. Types of CHD and demographic data including age, sex and residential location are collected. The data were analyzed by SPSS (version 17 software. Chi-square and Fisher′s exact tests were used to compare variables between groups. Results: At the study, the mean age of the patients at diagnosis time was 8.8 ± 11.6 year (at the range of one day to 76 years with median of 4 years. The percentage of females and males was 54.2 (n: 2014 and 43.8 (n: 1627, respectively. The chi-square test showed that there was significant difference in frequency of CHDs between females and males (P value < 0.0001. Ventricular septal defect (VSD was found to be the most frequent of CHDs (27%. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (16.8%, atrial septal defect (ASD (15.8%, pulmonary stenosis (PS (11% and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF (8.9% were more prevalent in CHDs after VSD. Conclusions: The frequency of CHDs in female was more than male and VSD, PDA, ASD, PS, and TOF were most common in CHDs, respectively.

  11. Identification of functional mutations in GATA4 in patients with congenital heart disease.

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    Erli Wang

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is one of the most prevalent developmental anomalies and the leading cause of noninfectious morbidity and mortality in newborns. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, the etiology of CHD remains largely unknown. GATA4 is a highly conserved transcription factor that regulates a variety of physiological processes and has been extensively studied, particularly on its role in heart development. With the combination of TBX5 and MEF2C, GATA4 can reprogram postnatal fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes directly. In the past decade, a variety of GATA4 mutations were identified and these findings originally came from familial CHD pedigree studies. Given that familial and sporadic CHD cases allegedly share a basic genetic basis, we explore the GATA4 mutations in different types of CHD. In this study, via direct sequencing of the GATA4 coding region and exon-intron boundaries in 384 sporadic Chinese CHD patients, we identified 12 heterozygous non-synonymous mutations, among which 8 mutations were only found in CHD patients when compared with 957 controls. Six of these non-synonymous mutations have not been previously reported. Subsequent functional analyses revealed that the transcriptional activity, subcellular localization and DNA binding affinity of some mutant GATA4 proteins were significantly altered. Our results expand the spectrum of GATA4 mutations linked to cardiac defects. Together with the newly reported mutations, approximately 110 non-synonymous mutations have currently been identified in GATA4. Our future analysis will explore why the evolutionarily conserved GATA4 appears to be hypermutable.

  12. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

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    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  13. Treatment and Patient Reported Outcome in Children with Hirschsprung Disease and Concomitant Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasserius, Johan; Hedbys, Josefine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is reported to be associated with Hirschsprung disease (HD). The aim was to evaluate any differences between children with HD with and without CHD, respectively, with regard to patient characteristics, medical care, and patient reported bowel function. Method. This is a retrospective chart study and a cross-sectional long-term follow-up of patients older than 4 years old, including all children with HD operated on with transanal endorectal pull-through (TERPT) at a tertiary center of pediatric surgery. Information about patient characteristics, diagnostics, surgery, and medical care was compiled. At long-term follow-up, bowel function was assessed by Bowel Function Score. Results. Included were 53 HD-patients, 13 with CHD and 40 without CHD. Children with CHD more commonly presented with failure to thrive; 4 (23%) compared to those without CHD (0%) (p < 0.01). In the long-term follow-up, including 32 patients (6 with CHD), constipation was more commonly reported by children with CHD 5 (83%) than by children without CHD 4 (27%) (p = 0.01). No differences were shown in the other parameters such as fecal control and incontinence. Conclusion. HD-patients with CHD more commonly presented with failure to thrive and more frequently reported constipation than HD-patients without CHD. The findings indicate that HD-patients with CHD might need special consideration in their initial care and long-term follow-up.

  14. Multidisciplinary management of pregnancy in complex congenital heart disease: a model for coordination of care.

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    Harris, Rachel C; Fries, Melissa H; Boyle, Annelee; Adeniji-Adele, Hassan; Cherian, Zacharia; Klein, Nancy; John, Anitha S

    2014-01-01

    With advancements in medical care, many women with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) are now living into adulthood and childbearing years. The strains of pregnancy and parturition can be dangerous in such patients, and careful interdisciplinary plans must be made to optimize maternal and fetal health through this process. Several large studies have been published regarding risk prediction and medical management of pregnancy in complex CHD, though few case studies detailing clinical care plans have been published. The objective of this report is to describe the process of developing a detailed pregnancy and delivery care plan for three women with complex CHD, including perspectives from the multidisciplinary specialists involved in the process. This article demonstrates that collaboration between specialists in the fields of cardiology, anesthesiology, high-risk obstetrics, maternal fetal medicine, and neonatology results in clinically successful individualized treatment plans for the management of pregnancy in complex CHD. Multidisciplinary collaboration is a crucial element in the management of pregnancy in complex CHD. We provide a template used in three cases which can serve as a model for the design of future care plans.

  15. The role of stents in the treatment of congenital heart disease: Current status and future perspectives

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    Peters Bjoern

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular or intracardiac stenoses occur in many forms of congenital heart disease (CHD. Therefore, the implantation of stents has become an accepted interventional procedure for stenotic lesions in pediatric cardiology. Furthermore, stents are know to be used to exclude vessel aneurysm or to ensure patency of existing or newly created intracardiac communications. With the further refinement of the first generation of devices, a variety of "modern" stents with different design characteristics have evolved. Despite the tremendous technical improvement over the last 20 years, the "ideal stent" has not yet been developed. Therefore, the pediatric interventionalist has to decide which stent is suitable for each lesion. On this basis, currently available stents are discussed in regard to their advantages and disadvantages for common application in CHD. New concepts and designs developed to overcome some of the existing problems, like the failure of adaptation to somatic growth, are presented. Thus, in the future, biodegradable or growth stents might replace the currently used generation of stents. This might truly lead to widening indications for the use of stents in the treatment of CHD.

  16. Genetic knowledge and attitudes of parents of children with congenital heart defects.

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    Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M; Klima, Jennifer; Kelleher, Kelly; Chisolm, Deena; McBride, Kim L

    2014-12-01

    Clinical genetic testing for specific isolated congenital heart defects (CHD) is becoming standard of care in pediatric cardiology practice. Both genetic knowledge and attitudes toward genetic testing are associated with an increased utilization of genetic testing, but these factors have not been evaluated in parents of children with CHD. We mailed a survey to measure the demographics, genetic knowledge, and attitudes towards genetic testing of parents of children with CHD who previously consented to participate in a separate research study of the genetic etiology of left ventricular outflow tract malformations (LVOT). Of the 378 eligible families, 190 (50%) returned surveys with both parents completing surveys in 97 (51%) families, resulting in 287 participants. Genetic knowledge was assessed on an adapted measure on which the mean percent correct was 73.8%. Educational attainment and household income were directly and significantly associated with genetic knowledge (P Parents of younger children were less likely to endorse employment or racial/social discrimination. Genetic knowledge was not correlated with specific attitudes. Among parents of children with CHD, genetic knowledge was directly associated with household income and education, but additional research is necessary to determine what factors influence attitudes towards genetic testing.

  17. A computer-based matrix for rapid calculation of pulmonary hemodynamic parameters in congenital heart disease

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    Lopes Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac catheterization for hemodynamic purposes, parameter estimation by the indirect Fick method using a single predicted value of oxygen consumption has been a matter of criticism. Objective : We developed a computer-based routine for rapid estimation of replicate hemodynamic parameters using multiple predicted values of oxygen consumption. Materials and Methods : Using Microsoft ® Excel facilities, we constructed a matrix containing 5 models (equations for prediction of oxygen consumption, and all additional formulas needed to obtain replicate estimates of hemodynamic parameters. Results : By entering data from 65 patients with ventricular septal defects, aged 1 month to 8 years, it was possible to obtain multiple predictions for oxygen consumption, with clear between-age groups ( P < .001 and between-methods ( P < .001 differences. Using these predictions in the individual patient, it was possible to obtain the upper and lower limits of a likely range for any given parameter, which made estimation more realistic. Conclusion : The organized matrix allows for rapid obtainment of replicate parameter estimates, without error due to exhaustive calculations.

  18. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD.

  19. Rare variants in NR2F2 cause congenital heart defects in humans.

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    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K; Mercer, Catherine L; Gerety, Sebastian S; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Swaminathan, G Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Louw, Jacoba; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M; O'Kelly, Ita M; Salmon, Anthony P; Bu'lock, Frances A; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Fitzpatrick, David F; Wilson, David I; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10(-7)) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters.

  20. Transcatheter stenting of arterial duct in duct-dependent congenital heart disease

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    Đukić Milan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Critical congenital heart diseases (CHD are mostly duct-dependent and require stable systemic-pulmonary communication. In order to maintain patency of the ductus arteriosus (DA, the first line treatment is Prostaglandin E1 and the second step is the surgical creation of aortic-pulmonary shunt. To reduce surgical risk in neonates with the critical CHD, transcatheter stenting of DA can be performed in selected cases. Case Outline. A four-month old infant was diagnosed with the pulmonary artery atresia with ventricular septal defect (PAA/VSD. The left pulmonary artery was perfused from DA, and the right lung through three major aortopulmonary collaterals (MAPCAs. A coronary stent was placed in the long and critically stenotic DA, with final arterial duct diameter of 3.5 mm, and significantly increased blood supply to the left lung. After the procedure, the infant’s status was improved with regard to arterial oxygen saturation, feeding and weight gain. During the follow-up, one year later, aortography revealed in-stent stenosis. The left pulmonary artery, as well as the branches, was well-developed and the decision was made to proceed with further surgical correction. Conclusion. Stenting of DA can be an effective alternative to primary surgical correction in selected patients with duct-dependent CHD.

  1. Incidence and Etiology of Chylothorax after Congenital Heart Surgery in Children

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    Parvin Akbari-Asbagh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chylothorax is a rare but serious postoperative condition with a high rate of morbidity and may lead to the mortality of children undergoing congenital heart disease (CHD surgery. This study evaluated the specific surgical procedures associated with the higher risk of postoperative chylothorax.Methods: We assessed 435 cases undergoing CHD surgery between April 2003 and May 2006. We detected postoperative chylothorax in 6 patients. The diagnosis of chylothorax was established based on the presence of an odorless fluid with the characteristic milky appearance of the fluid (except when the patients were fasting in the immediate postoperative period, a triglyceride level greater than 110 mg/dL or between 50 and 110 mg/dL with a pleural fluid white cell count greater than 1000, and more than 80% lymphocytes on differential when the pleural fluid was not chylous.Results: Over a 37-month period, 435 (mean age = 51.6 months; 232 males patients underwent various types of surgical procedures for CHD; 6 patients developed chylothorax after the Fontan operation; one patient died due to severe chylothorax;3 patients were managed by nutritional modifications, diuretics, and thoracocentesis; and  2 patients required thoracic duct ligation. The Fisher exact test analysis showed a significant association between the Fontan operation and postoperative chylothorax (p value < 0.0001.Conclusion: Our study showed a significant association between the Fontan surgery and chylothorax.

  2. Executive function deficits in congenital heart disease: why is intervention important?

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    Calderon, Johanna; Bellinger, David C

    2015-10-01

    It is widely recognised that children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at high risk for neurodevelopmental impairments including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder symptoms. Executive function impairments are one of the most prominent neurodevelopmental features associated with CHD. These deficits can have widespread debilitating repercussions in children's neurocognitive, behavioural, and psycho-social development. There is a crucial gap in research regarding the efficacy of preventive or treatment strategies for these important cognitive morbidities. Executive functions are complex neurocognitive skills highly amenable to improvement. Evidence-based interventions have shown promising results in other paediatric populations, strongly suggesting that they might also benefit the growing population of children with CHD. In this review, we summarise the available data on executive function impairments in children and adolescents with CHD. We underline the important co-morbidity of executive dysfunction with other cognitive and psychiatric issues in CHD, which raises awareness of the crucial need to prevent or at least mitigate these deficits. Finally, we summarise future avenues for research in terms of interventions that may help reduce executive function impairments in youth with CHD.

  3. Prevalence of congenital heart defects associated with Down syndrome in Korea.

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    Kim, Min-A; Lee, You Sun; Yee, Nan Hee; Choi, Jeong Soo; Choi, Jung Yun; Seo, Kyung

    2014-11-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is common in infants with Down syndrome (DS), which is the principle cause of mortality. However, there is no data available for the frequency and types of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. We investigated the frequency of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. After the survey on birth defects was conducted throughout the country, the prevalence of CHD in DS in 2005-2006 was calculated. This study was conducted based on the medical insurance claims database of the National Health Insurance Corporation. The number of total births in Korea was 888,263 in 2005-2006; of them, 25,975 cases of birth defects were identified. The prevalence of DS was 4.4 per 10,000 total births, accounting for 1.5% of all birth defects. Of the 394 infants with DS, 224 (56.9%) had a CHD. Atrial septal defect was the most common defect accounting for 30.5% of DS followed by ventricular septal defect (19.3%), patent duct arteriosus (17.5%), and atrioventricular septal defect (9.4%). Our study will be helpful to demonstrate the current status of DS and to identify the distribution of CHD in infants with DS in Korea.

  4. A Novel Approach to Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD Screening at Moderate Altitude

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    Erin Lueth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP has endorsed Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD screening using pulse oximetry nationwide, but, however, acknowledges that altitude may impact failure rates and alternative algorithms may be required at high altitudes. We therefore evaluated a modified screening protocol at an altitude of 6200 feet with the hypothesis that modifications could decrease failure rates. We evaluated 2001 well, newborn infants ≥35 weeks gestation using a modified protocol, which included a lower saturation cutoff for the first screen (85% instead of the AAP recommended 90% and an oxygen hood intervention between the first two screens. Using our modified screening algorithm, we found a 0.3% failure rate, which was similar to the 0.2% sea-level rate and statistically different from the 1.1% rate identified in a recent study at similar altitude. Had the AAP protocol been used, the failure rate would have increased to 0.8%, which is similar to prior reports near this altitude. Echocardiograms were performed on failing newborns with no CCHD identified. A Birth Defects Registry Database review demonstrated one newborn with CCHD was missed after meeting AAP passing criteria. Overall, this study demonstrates that an alternative algorithm can be implemented at moderate altitude with decreased failure rate and comparable false negative rate.

  5. Dental plaque microbial profiles of children from Khartoum, Sudan, with congenital heart defects

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    Mohamed Ali, Hiba; Berggreen, Ellen; Nguyen, Daniel; Wahab Ali, Raouf; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Hasturk, Hatice; Mustafa, Manal

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Few studies have focused on the bacterial species associated with the deterioration of the dental and gingival health of children with congenital heart defects (CHD). The aims of this study were (1) to examine the dental plaque of children with CHD in order to quantify bacterial load and altered bacterial composition compared with children without CHD; and (2) to investigate the correlation between the level of caries and gingivitis and dental biofilm bacteria among those children. In this cross-sectional study, participants were children (3–12 years) recruited in Khartoum State, Sudan. A total of 80 CHD cases from the Ahmed Gasim Cardiac Centre and 80 healthy controls from randomly selected schools and kindergartens were included. Participants underwent clinical oral examinations for caries (decayed, missing, and filled teeth indices [DMFT] for primary dentition, and DMFT for permanent dentition), and gingivitis (simplified gingival index [GI]). Pooled dental biofilm samples were obtained from four posterior teeth using paper points. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection and quantification of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcussanguinis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization was used for the detection of 40 additional bacterial species. CHD cases had a significantly higher caries experience (DMFT = 4.1 vs. 2.3, p gingivitis (4.2 vs. 2.0; p gingivitis. PMID:28326155

  6. Relationship Between Polymorphism of Cystathionine beta Synthase Gene and Congenital Heart Disease in Chinese Nuclear Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-MING SONG; XIAO-YING ZHENG; WEN-LI ZHU; LEI HUANG; YONG LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between polymorphism of cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) gene and development of congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods One hundred and twenty-seven CHD case-parent triads were recruited from Liaoning Province as patient group, and 129 healthy subjects without family history of birth defect were simultaneously recruited as control group together with their biological parents. For all subjects the polymorphism of CBS gene G919A locus was examined by PCR-ARMS method. Results The frequencies of three genotypes (w/w, w/m, and m/m) in control group were 27.2%, 58.4%, and 14.4%, respectively, with no significant difference in gender. A significant difference in the allele frequency was found between CHD patients and controls, the wild allele frequency was 67.9% in patients and 55.7% in controls.CHD parents' genotype distribution was significantly different from that in controls. Further comparison of each type of CHD showed that genotype frequencies in several CHD subtypes were significantly different from those in their corresponding controls. The results of TDT analysis showed that no allele transmission disequilibrium existed in CHD nuclear families.Conclusions CBS gene G919A mutation is associated with the development of CHD, and the mutated allele may decrease the risk of CHD.

  7. Transcription factor HAND2 mutations in sporadic Chinese patients with congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Lei; LI Xiao-feng; SHEN A-dong; WANG Qiang; LIU Cai-xia; GUO Ya-jie; SONG Zhen-jiang; LI Zhong-zhi

    2010-01-01

    Background The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor HAND2 plays an essential role in cardiac morphogenesis.However, the prevalence of HAND2 mutations in congenial heart disease (CHD) and the correlation between the HAND2 genotype and CHD phenotype have not been studied extensively. Methods We amplified the exons and the flanking intron sequences of the HAND2 gene in 131 patients diagnosed with congenital defects of the right ventricle, outflow tract, aortic artery or cardiac cushion and confirmed the mutations by sequencing.Results Seven mutations including three missense mutations (P11R, S36N and V83L), one isonymous mutation (H14H)and three mutations in untranslated region (241 A>G, 604C>T and 3237T>A) were identified in 12 out of the 131 patients.Both nonisonymous mutations are located in the transcriptional activation domain on the N-terminus. Only one mutation (S36N) was identified in 250 normal healthy controls. The distribution of 3637T>A is the unique one which was differentbetween the 2 groups.Conclusions HAND2 may be a potential candidate gene of stenosis of the right ventricle, outflow tract. Further study of those with a family history of HAND2 mutations will help convincingly relate their genotype to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  8. Computational modelling for congenital heart disease: how far are we from clinical translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglino, Giovanni; Capelli, Claudio; Bruse, Jan; Bosi, Giorgia M; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Computational models of congenital heart disease (CHD) have become increasingly sophisticated over the last 20 years. They can provide an insight into complex flow phenomena, allow for testing devices into patient-specific anatomies (pre-CHD or post-CHD repair) and generate predictive data. This has been applied to different CHD scenarios, including patients with single ventricle, tetralogy of Fallot, aortic coarctation and transposition of the great arteries. Patient-specific simulations have been shown to be informative for preprocedural planning in complex cases, allowing for virtual stent deployment. Novel techniques such as statistical shape modelling can further aid in the morphological assessment of CHD, risk stratification of patients and possible identification of new ‘shape biomarkers’. Cardiovascular statistical shape models can provide valuable insights into phenomena such as ventricular growth in tetralogy of Fallot, or morphological aortic arch differences in repaired coarctation. In a constant move towards more realistic simulations, models can also account for multiscale phenomena (eg, thrombus formation) and importantly include measures of uncertainty (ie, CIs around simulation results). While their potential to aid understanding of CHD, surgical/procedural decision-making and personalisation of treatments is undeniable, important elements are still lacking prior to clinical translation of computational models in the field of CHD, that is, large validation studies, cost-effectiveness evaluation and establishing possible improvements in patient outcomes. PMID:27798056

  9. Platelet-derived microparticles and platelet function profile in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Youssef, Omneya Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Platelet microparticles (PMPs) and function profile in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) have not been widely explored. We investigated platelet aggregation, flow cytometric platelet surface receptors (P-selectin and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa) and PMPs in 23 children with cyanotic CHD (CCHD), 30 children with acyanotic CHD (ACHD) and 30 healthy controls correlating these variables to hematological and coagulation parameters including von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF Ag) as a marker of endothelial dysfunction. Hemoglobin, hematocrit (HCT), D-dimer, and vWF Ag were significantly higher in CCHD than ACHD group. Platelet MPs and P-selectin expression were increased in patients than controls, particularly in CCHD and positively correlated to HCT, D-dimer, and vWF Ag while platelet count, aggregation, and GP IIb/IIIa expression were decreased in CCHD compared with ACHD group and negatively correlated to HCT. The overproduction of PMPs and platelet activation with suppressed aggregation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of coagulation/hemostatic abnormalities in children with CCHD.

  10. Critical Congenital Heart Disease Screening by Pulse Oximetry in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manja, Veena; Mathew, Bobby; Carrion, Vivien; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2014-01-01

    Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) screening is effective in asymptomatic late preterm and term newborn infants with a low false positive rate (0.035%). Objective (1) To compare 2817 NICU discharges before and after implementation of CCHD screening; and (2) to evaluate CCHD screening at < 35 weeks gestation. Methods collection of results of CCHD screening including preductal and postductal SpO2 values. Results During the pre-CCHD screen period, 1247 infants were discharged from the NICU and one case of CCHD was missed. After 3/1/12, 1508 CCHD screens were performed among 1570 discharges and no CCHDs were missed. The preductal and postductal SpO2 values were 98.8±1.4% and 99±1.3% respectively in preterm and 98.9±1.3% and 98.9±1.4% in term infants. Ten infants had false positive screens (10/1508=0.66%). Conclusions Performing universal screening in the NICU is feasible but is associated with a higher false positive rate compared to asymptomatic newborn infants. PMID:25058746

  11. Is surgery recommended in adults with neglected congenital muscular torticollis? A prospective study

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    Sharifi Reza

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital muscular torticollis is the third most common congenital musculoskeletal anomaly after dislocation of the hip and clubfoot. When diagnosed early, it is obvious that it can be managed with good or excellent results. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the efficacy of surgery in neglected adult cases. Methods From January 2003 to June 2007, 18 adult skeletally matured patients were surgically treated for neglected congenital muscular torticollis and prospectively followed (at least one year. Bipolar release was performed in all patients. Radiography and the modified Lee's scoring system which included function and cosmesis, were used to measure the surgical results. Complications were also recorded. Results Four cases were lost during follow-up. Of the remaining 14 patients, 10 cases were males and 4 females. The age at operation ranged from 18 to 32 (average 21.9 years. The mean follow-up period was 2.5 years (range 1–5 years. Excellent results were noted in 7 patients, good in 5, and poor in 2 patients. Significant improvement (>10° of the cervico-thoracic scoliosis was noted only in 3 of 10 patients. Conclusion Patients with congenital muscular torticollis can benefit from surgical treatment even in adulthood. Surgical bipolar sectioning of the sternocleidomastoid muscle should be considered even in adults with irreversible facial and skeletal deformities. The surgery restores the range of neck motion and resolves the head tilt; therefore it can improve the quality of life. This procedure is an effective and relatively complication-free method.

  12. Effect of Folic Acid Food Fortification in Canada on Congenital Heart Disease Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, K.S.; Luo, Wei; León, Juan Andrés; Lisonkova, Sarka; Van den Hof, Michiel; Evans, Jane; Lim, Ken; Little, Julian; Sauve, Reg; Kramer, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results for the effects of periconceptional multivitamins containing folic acid and of folic acid food fortification on congenital heart defects (CHDs). Methods: We carried out a population-based cohort study (N=5 901 701) of all live births and stillbirths (including late-pregnancy terminations) delivered at ≥20 weeks’ gestation in Canada (except Québec and Manitoba) from 1990 to 2011. CHD cases were diagnosed at birth and in infancy (n=72 591). We compared prevalence rates and temporal trends in CHD subtypes before and after 1998 (the year that fortification was mandated). An ecological study based on 22 calendar years, 14 geographic areas, and Poisson regression analysis was used to quantify the effect of folic acid food fortification on nonchromosomal CHD subtypes (n=66 980) after controlling for changes in maternal age, prepregnancy diabetes mellitus, preterm preeclampsia, multiple birth, and termination of pregnancy. Results: The overall birth prevalence rate of CHDs was 12.3 per 1000 total births. Rates of most CHD subtypes decreased between 1990 and 2011 except for atrial septal defects, which increased significantly. Folic acid food fortification was associated with lower rates of conotruncal defects (adjusted rate ratio [aRR], 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62–0.85), coarctation of the aorta (aRR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.61–0.96), ventricular septal defects (aRR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75–0.96), and atrial septal defects (aRR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.69–0.95) but not severe nonconotruncal heart defects (aRR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.65–1.03) and other heart or circulatory system abnormalities (aRR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.89–1.11). ConclusionS: The association between food fortification with folic acid and a reduction in the birth prevalence of specific CHDs provides modest evidence for additional benefit from this intervention. PMID:27572879

  13. A rare cervical dystonia mimic in adults: congenital muscular torticollis (fibromatosis colli, a follow-up

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    Mehmet Can Uluer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neglected or undiagnosed congenital muscular torticollis (CMT in adults is quite rare, although it is the third most common congenital deformity in the newborn [1]. When left untreated at an early age, deficits in lateral and rotational range of motion can occur along with irreversible facial and skeletal deformities that develop over time. Subtle cases can go unnoticed until early adulthood, with predominant fibrotic replacement in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM making physical therapy and chemodenervation mostly ineffective. Surgical intervention, in these cases, can prove effective in alleviating pain, improving function and cosmesis [2].We report an update on a previously reported case, misdiagnosed as cervical dystonia, which had undergone partial myectomy of the anterior belly of the SCM with some relief of symptoms but not total resolution after the correct diagnosis of fibromatosis colli [3].

  14. Three-dimensional echocardiography in congenital heart disease : an expert consensus document from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the American Society of Echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, John; Lopez, Leo; Acar, Philippe; Friedberg, Mark; Khoo, Nee; Ko, Helen; Marek, Jan; Marx, Gerald; McGhie, Jackie; Meijboom, Folkert; Roberson, David; Van den Bosch, Annemien; Miller, Owen; Shirali, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) has become important in the management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), particularly with pre-surgical planning, guidance of catheter intervention, and functional assessment of the heart. 3DE is increasingly used in children because of good ac

  15. Establishment of Relational Model of Congenital Heart Disease Markers and GO Functional Analysis of the Association between Its Serum Markers and Susceptibility Genes

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    Min Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of present study was to construct the best screening model of congenital heart disease serum markers and to provide reference for further prevention and treatment of the disease. Methods. Documents from 2006 to 2014 were collected and meta-analysis was used for screening susceptibility genes and serum markers closely related to the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Data of serum markers were extracted from 80 congenital heart disease patients and 80 healthy controls, respectively, and then logistic regression analysis and support vector machine were utilized to establish prediction models of serum markers and Gene Ontology (GO functional annotation. Results. Results showed that NKX2.5, GATA4, and FOG2 were susceptibility genes of congenital heart disease. CRP, BNP, and cTnI were risk factors of congenital heart disease (p<0.05; cTnI, hs-CRP, BNP, and Lp(a were significantly close to congenital heart disease (p<0.01. ROC curve indicated that the accuracy rate of Lp(a and cTnI, Lp(a and BNP, and BNP and cTnI joint prediction was 93.4%, 87.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. But the detection accuracy rate of the markers’ relational model established by support vector machine was only 85%. GO analysis suggested that NKX2.5, GATA4, and FOG2 were functionally related to Lp(a and BNP. Conclusions. The combined markers model of BNP and cTnI had the highest accuracy rate, providing a theoretical basis for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease.

  16. 'End-stage' heart failure therapy: potential lessons from congenital heart disease: from pulmonary artery banding and interatrial communication to parallel circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, Dietmar; Akintuerk, Hakan; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2017-02-15

    The final therapy of 'end-stage heart failure' is orthotopic heart, lung or heart-lung transplantation. However, these options are not available for many patients worldwide. Therefore, novel therapeutical strategies are needed. Based on pathophysiological insights regarding (1) the long-term impact of an obstructive pulmonary outflow tract in neonates with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, (2) the importance of a restrictive versus a non-restrictive atrial septum in neonates born with a borderline left ventricle and (3) the significance of both, a patent foramen ovale and/or open ductus arteriosus for survival of newborns with persistent pulmonary hypertension, the current review introduces some therapeutical strategies that may be applicable to selected patients with heart failure. These strategies include (1) reversible pulmonary artery banding in left ventricular-dilated cardiomyopathy with preserved right ventricular function, (2) the creation of restrictive interatrial communication to treat diastolic (systolic) heart failure, (3) atrioseptostomy or reverse Potts shunt in pulmonary arterial hypertension and (4) return to a fetal, parallel circulation by combining atrioseptostomy and reversed Potts shunt with or without placement of a bilateral pulmonary artery banding. While still being experimental, it is hoped that the procedures presented in the current overview will inspire future novel therapeutic strategies that may be applicable to selected patients with heart failure.

  17. Application of new balloon catheters in the treatment of congenital heart defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiszer, Roland; Szkutnik, Małgorzata; Smerdziński, Sebastian; Chodór, Beata; Białkowski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Balloon angioplasty (BAP) and aortic or pulmonary balloon valvuloplasty (BAV, BPV) are well-established treatment options in congenital heart defects. Recently, significant technological progress has been made and new catheters have been implemented in clinical practice. Aim To analyze the results of BAP, BAV and BPV with the new balloon catheter Valver and its second generation Valver II, which the company Balton (Poland) launched and developed. These catheters have not been clinically evaluated yet. Material and methods We performed 64 interventions with Valver I and Valver II. With Valver I the following procedures were performed: 17 BPV (including 9 in tetralogy of Fallot – TOF), 10 BAV and 27 BAP in coarctations of the aorta (CoA) – including 9 native and 18 after surgery. With Valver II ten interventions were done – 3 BPV, 2 pulmonary supravalvular BAP (after switch operations), 2 BAP of recoarctations and 3 other BAP. Age of the patients ranged from a few days to 40 years. Results All procedures were completed successfully, without rupture of any balloon catheters. The pressure gradient drop was statistically significant in all groups: BPV in isolated pulmonary valvular stenosis 28.1 mm Hg (mean), BPV in TOF 18.7 mm Hg, BAV 32.8 mm Hg, BAP in native CoA 15.4 mm Hg and in recoarctations 18.6 mm Hg. In 3 cases during rapid deflation of Valver I, wrinkles of the balloons made it impossible to insert the whole balloon into the vascular sheath (all were removed surgically from the groin). No such complication occured with Valver II. Conclusions Valver balloon catheters are an effective treatment modality in different valvular and vascular stenoses. PMID:27625686

  18. Clinical Characteristic and Outcome of Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystle Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection (ALRTI is the leading cause of deaths in children under 5 years of age worldwide, and has high morbidity and mortality in children with Congenital Heart Disease (CHD. The objective of this study was to obtain the incidence, clinical characteristic, and outcome of ALRTI children with CHD. Methods: A retrospective hospital-based study was conducted from January 2007–December 2011 to medical record of child patients with ALRTI and CHD in the Department of Child Health of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung. The diagnosis of CHD was determined by echocardiography. The collected data was analyzed and presented in percentage shown in tables. Results : From 3,897 children who had ALRTI, there were 149 children with CHD (3.8%, with 11.4% of whom founded with recurrent episodes. This happened often in girls than boys with quite similar ratio of 1.37: 1.The majority of children (80% was under 1 year old of age, 72.5% with malnutrition, and 24.8% with severe malnutrition. Clinical symptoms mostly found were difficulty of breathing (98%, fever (85.2%, cough (75.2%, and runny nose (63.1%. The most common types of CHD were Patent Ductus Arteriosus (47.6%, followed by Ventricular Septal Defect (47%. Bronchopneumonia (86.6% was the common type of ALRTI. The length of stay was mostly less than 10 days (70.5%. From all the children 43.7% had complications, and 6.7% died. Conclusions: The ALRTI in children with CHD is not common and has good outcome. The majority for CHD lesions are Patent Ductus Arteriosus and Ventricular Septal Defect while for ALRTI is Bronchopneumonia.

  19. Self-representation of children suffering from congenital heart disease and maternal competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perricone, Giovanna; Polizzi, Concetta; De Luca, Francesco

    2013-02-05

    Child development may be subject to forms of motor, physical, cognitive and self-representation impairments when complex congenital heart disease (CHD) occurs. In some cases, inadequacy of both self-representation as well as the family system are displayed. It seems to be important to search the likely internal and external resources of the CHD child, and the possible connections among such resources, which may help him/her to manage his/her own risk condition. The research project inquires the possible resources related to the self-representation and self-esteem levels of the CHD child, and those related to maternal self-perception as competent mothers. A group of 25 children (mean age = 10.2; SD=1.8) suffering from specific forms of CHD, and a group made up of their relative mothers (mean age = 38.2; SD=5) were studied. The tools used were the Human Figure Drawing, to investigate child body-related self-representation; the TMA scale (Self-esteem Multidimensional Test), to investigate the child's self-esteem; and the Q-sort questionnaire, to assess how mothers perceived their maternal competence. Data concerning the likely correlations between the child's self-representation and the maternal role competence show [that] positive correlations between some indicators of maternal competence, specific aspects of CHD children's self-representation (mothers' emotional coping and children's self-image adequacy) and self-esteem (mothers' emotional scaffolding and children's self-esteem at an emotional level). By detecting the occurrence of specific correlations among resources of both child and mother, the study provides cardiologists with information that is useful for building a relationship with the families concerned, which would seem to enhance the quality of the process of the cure itself.

  20. Is lung biopsy useful for surgical decision making in congenital heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frescura, C; Thiene, G; Giulia Gagliardi, M; Mazzucco, A; Pellegrino, P A; Daliento, L; Biscaglia, S; Carminati, M; Gallucci, V

    1991-01-01

    Sixty patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), age range 3 months-45 years (median 2 years), underwent lung biopsy to exclude pulmonary vascular disease (PVD): 25 had an atrioventricular (AV) septal defect, 14 a ventricular septal defect (VSD), 7 a complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA) + VSD, 3 an atrial septal defect, and 2 a patent ductus arteriosus; 9 had other malformations. Scoring of histological section (0-4) according to a modified Heath-Edwards classification disclosed that 30 patients had severe "irreversible" PVD (greater than or equal to grade 3) (11 AV septal defect, 8 VSD, 6 TGA + VSD and 5 others); 8 patients were younger than 1 year. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated in 51 patients and exceeded 7 U/m2 in 1 of 2 patients with grade 0, in 9 of 18 with grade 1, in 1 of 4 with grade 2, in 11 of 18 with grade 3, and in 8 of 9 with grade 4. PVR was also calculated after 100% oxygen administration in 19 patients, 14 of whom had a resting PVR greater than or equal to 7 U/m2. PVR persisted greater than or equal to 7 U/m2 in 5 patients: 4 had PVD greater than or equal to grade 3 and died after surgery. PVR fell to under 7 U/m2 in 14 patients, 3 of whom had PVD greater than or equal to grade 3:1 patient with grade 4 was not operated upon and 2 with grade 3 were operated upon: all are alive. Follow-up in discharged living patients was 100%, with a mean of 50 months. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery with 10 early and 2 late deaths. Among the 12 subjects with a fatal outcome, 10 had irreversible lesions. The 5 non-operated patients all had irreversible lesions at biopsy, and are still alive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)