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  1. Urinary tract infection - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    A urinary tract infection, or UTI, is an infection of the urinary tract. The infection can occur at different points in ... al. Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of catheter-associated ... in adults: 2009 International Clinical Practice Guidelines from ...

  2. Evaluating risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in adult and pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Nicole M.; Magaret, Amalia; Stednick, Zach; Morrison, Alex; Butler-Wu, Susan; Zerr, Danielle; Rogers, Karin; Podczervinski, Sara; Cheng, Anqi; Wald, Anna; Pergam, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Background Although hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are routinely exposed to classic risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), few studies have assessed CDI risk in these high-risk patients, and data are especially lacking for pediatric HCT recipients. We aimed to determine incidence and risk factors for CDI in adult and pediatric allogeneic HCT recipients. Methods CDI was defined as having diarrhea that tested positive for C. difficile via PCR, cytotoxin assay, o...

  3. Impairment of pneumococcal antigen specific isotype-switched Igg memory B-cell immunity in HIV infected Malawian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwadamilola H Iwajomo

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal disease is associated with a particularly high morbidity and mortality amongst adults in HIV endemic countries. Our previous findings implicating a B-cell defect in HIV-infected children from the same population led us to comprehensively characterize B-cell subsets in minimally symptomatic HIV-infected Malawian adults and investigate the isotype-switched IgG memory B-cell immune response to the pneumococcus. We show that similar to vertically acquired HIV-infected Malawian children, horizontally acquired HIV infection in these adults is associated with IgM memory B-cell (CD19(+ CD27(+ IgM(+ IgD(+ depletion, B-cell activation and impairment of specific IgG B-cell memory to a range of pneumococcal proteins. Our data suggest that HIV infection affects both T-cell independent and T-cell dependent B-cell maturation, potentially leading to impairment of humoral responses to extracellular pathogens such as the pneumococcus, and thus leaving this population susceptible to invasive disease.

  4. Factors associated with development of opportunistic infections in HIV-1 infected adults with high CD4 cell counts: a EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Mocroft, A; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on factors predicting the development of opportunistic infections (OIs) at higher-than-expected CD4(+) cell counts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected adults. METHODS: Multivariate Poisson regression models were used to determine factors related to...... the development of groups of OIs above their respective traditional upper CD4(+) cell count thresholds: group 1 (>or=100 cells/ microL), OIs caused by cytomegalovirus, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Toxoplasma gondii; group 2 (>or=200 cells/ microL), Pneumocystis pneumonia and esophageal candidiasis......; and group 3 (>or=300 cells/ microL), pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. RESULTS: In groups 1, 2, and 3, 71 of 9,219, 125 of 7,934, and 36 of 7,838 patients, respectively, developed >or=1 intragroup OI. The strongest predictor of an OI in groups 1 and 2 was current CD4(+) cell count (for group...

  5. [Sarcoidosis and leukemia/T-cell lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 virus infection in adults (apropos of a case)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panelatti, G; Plumelle, Y; Arfi, S; Pascaline, N; Caplanne, D; Jean-Baptiste, G

    1992-01-01

    The HTLV-1 virus causes a disturbance of the immune system, the evaluation of which is often difficult. We report a case of sarcoidosis in a 49 year old woman of Martinique as evidenced by bilateral hilar adenopathy, hypercalcaemia, uveitis and granulomatous lesions on histological examination. Serological was positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Three years later she developed an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The relationships between the HTLV-1 retroviral infection and different pathologies observed are discussed. PMID:1287773

  6. Clostridium difficile infection after adult autologous stem cell transplantation: A multicenter study of epidemiology and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Carolyn D.; Dufresne, Simon F.; Hanna, David B.; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Treadway, Suzanne B.; Neofytos, Dionissios; Bélanger, Sylvie; Huff, Carol Ann; Laverdière, Michel; Marr, Kieren A.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to describe the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among adult recipients of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto HSCT) within the first year after HSCT in centers with variable epidemiology of hyper-toxigenic strains. A multicenter, retrospective nested case-control study was conducted among 873 auto HSCT recipients at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH, Baltimore, MD) and Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont (HMR, Montreal, Canada) between 1/2003-12/2008. D...

  7. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10-20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%-5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling-the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)-to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  8. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Zen Giam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ, encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8 and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided.

  9. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  10. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 infection in a Brazilian adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALLE Antonio Carlos Francesconi do

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 15-year-old patient infected with HTLV-1 who developed a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, as well as clinically and hematologically confirmed leukemia. The patient died 3 months after initial presentation of the disease. The rarity of the disease in this age group justifies the present report.

  11. The impact of B-cell perturbations on pneumococcal conjugate vaccine response in HIV-infected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Johannesson

    Full Text Available Untreated HIV infection results in severe perturbations of the B-cell population and hyporesponsiveness to vaccination. We studied associations between circulating B-cell subsets and antibody response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in treated and untreated HIV patients.Ninety-five HIV-infected adults were grouped according to antiretroviral therapy (ART and CD4+ cell count as follows: 20 ART-naïve (no prior ART, 62 ART-responders (received ART, and CD4 count >500 cells/µl, and 13 impaired responders (received ART for more than 3 years, and CD4 count <500 cells/µl. All subjects were immunized twice with double-dose 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 (toll-like receptor 9 agonist at baseline and after three months. Pre-vaccination B-cell subpopulations were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum IgG concentrations for vaccine serotypes were quantified by ELISA at baseline and 3, 4, and 9 months post-vaccination. ART responders had more isotype-switched memory B cells and more marginal-zone (MZ-like B cells compared with impaired responders. Furthermore, ART-naïve patients had higher concentration of transitional B cells and plasmablasts compared with B cells of other patient groups. The concentration of MZ-like, isotype switched memory cells and plasmablasts correlated positively with post-vaccination IgG concentration at 3, 4, and 9 months. Low concentrations of isotype-switched memory B cells was the strongest independent predictor of poor pneumococcal conjugate vaccine responsiveness, emphasizing that B-cell subset disturbances are associated with poor vaccine response among HIV-infected patients.

  12. Herpes simplex virus type-1 and human lymphocytes: virus expression and the response to infection of adult and foetal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in human lymphocytes of adult and foetal origin was studied. Virus DNA synthesis, antigen and particle production and the yield of infectious progeny were determined in cultured lymphocytes with or without exposure to stimulating concentrations of the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen. Separated subpopulations of cells were examined and the conclusion reached that only the stimulated T-lymphoblast was permissive for full virus expression. Stimulation of cell DNA synthesis in response to infection was observed in cultures of adult and foetal lymphocytes under conditions which were non-permissive for virus growth. Morphological change and prolonged culture survival were a feature of foetal lymphocytes exposed to u.v. irradiated HSV-1. (author)

  13. Strategies to control human cytomegalovirus infection in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents the major viral complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. HCMV infection may be controlled by the reconstituting immune system and remain subclinical or can lead to severe systemic and/or organ disease (mainly pneumonia and gastroenteritis) when immune reconstitution is delayed or impaired. In order to prevent the occurrence of HCMV disease, a prompt diagnosis of HCMV infection is mandatory. The adoption of pre-emptive therapy strategies guided by virological monitoring dramatically reduced the occurrence of HCMV disease. However, late-onset end-organ disease may occur in some patients with apparent immune reconstitution. In the near future, introduction of immunological monitoring and immunotherapies could markedly improve management of HCMV infection. PMID:27485084

  14. Pyelonephritis (Kidney Infection) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Urinary Tract Infections in Adults Vesicoureteral Reflux Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800- ... or both kidneys. This problem, which is called vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), happens when the valve mechanism that normally ...

  15. Urinary tract infection - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infection spreads to your kidneys, symptoms may include: Chills and shaking or night sweats Fatigue and a ... kidney infection, such as: Back or side pain Chills Fever Vomiting Also call if UTI symptoms come ...

  16. Maturation and Mip-1β Production of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Tanzanian Children, Adolescents and Adults: Impact by HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Co-Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Portevin

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that aging and HIV infection are associated with quantitative and functional changes of CMV-specific T cell responses. We studied here the expression of Mip-1β and the T cell maturation marker CD27 within CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in relation to age, HIV and active Tuberculosis (TB co-infection in a cohort of Tanzanian volunteers (≤ 16 years of age, n = 108 and ≥ 18 years, n = 79. Independent of HIV co-infection, IFNγ(+ CMVpp65-specific CD4(+ T cell frequencies increased with age. In adults, HIV co-infection further increased the frequencies of these cells. A high capacity for Mip-1β production together with a CD27(low phenotype was characteristic for these cells in children and adults. Interestingly, in addition to HIV co-infection active TB disease was linked to further down regulation of CD27 and increased capacity of Mip-1β production in CMVpp65-specific CD4+ T cells. These phenotypic and functional changes of CMVpp65-specific CD4 T cells observed during HIV infection and active TB could be associated with increased CMV reactivation rates.

  17. Binding of Excreted and/or Secreted Products of Adult Hookworms to Human NK Cells in Necator americanus-Infected Individuals from Brazil▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Olive, Denise; Damsker, Jesse M.; Loukas, Alex; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Constant, Stephanie L.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The impact of the interaction between excreted and/or secreted (ES) Necator americanus products and NK cells from Necator-infected individuals was analyzed. We investigated the binding of ES products to NK cells, the expression of NK cell receptors (CD56, CD159a/NKG2A, CD314/NKG2D, CD335/NKp46, and KLRF1/NKp80), the frequency of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing NK cells after whole-blood in vitro stimulation, and the capacity of N. americanus ES products to induce NK cell chemotaxis. In contrast to those from noninfected individuals, NK cells from Necator-infected individuals demonstrated no binding with N. americanus ES products. This phenomenon was not due to alterations in NK cell receptor expression in infected subjects and could not be reproduced with NK cells from uninfected individuals by incubation with immunoregulatory cytokines (interleukin-10/transforming growth factor β). Further, we found that a significantly greater percentage of NK cells from infected subjects than NK cells from uninfected individuals spontaneously produced IFN-γ upon ex vivo culture. Our findings support a model whereby NK cells from Necator-infected individuals may interact with ES products, making these cells refractory to binding with exogenous ES products. During N. americanus infection, human NK cells are attracted to the site of infection by chemotactic ES products produced by adult Necator worms in the gut mucosa. Binding of ES products causes the NK cells to become activated and secrete IFN-γ locally, thereby contributing to the adult hookworm's ability to evade host immune responses. PMID:18838519

  18. ADULT T CELL LEUKEMIA LYMPHOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Neely, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL) is a CD4+ lymphoproliferative malignancy resulting from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV1) infection. It includes differing clinical forms classified as smoldering, chronic, lymphomatous, and acute ATLL. The Tax protein of HTLV-1 has been implicated as a viral oncoprotein which enhances virus replication and alters cellular gene expression, including activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF kB), to result in lymphoid transformation. Chemotherapy f...

  19. Alterations in Natural Killer Cell Receptor Profiles During HIV Type 1 Disease Progression Among Chronically Infected South African Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Ambrose H.W.; Williams, Katie; Reddy, Sharon; Wilson, Douglas; Giddy, Janet; Alter, Galit; Ghebremichael, Musie; Carrington, Mary N; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D.; Altfeld, Marcus; Carr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that innate immune responses by natural killer (NK) cells play a significant role in restricting human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. Our aim was to characterize changes in NK cells associated with HIV-1 clade C disease progression. Here we used multiparametric flow cytometry (LSRII) to quantify phenotype and function of NK cells in a cross-sectional analysis of cryopreserved blood samples from a cohort of 41 chronically HIV-1-infected, treatment-na...

  20. Giardia lamblia infections in adult mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Byrd, L G; Conrad, J T; Nash, T E

    1994-01-01

    An adult mouse-Giardia lamblia model was developed and used to study host-parasite interactions, including antigenic variation. The H7/1 clone of isolate GS infected mice consistently and produced infections in 14 mouse strains tested. Infection patterns were mouse strain and Giardia isolate dependent. Antigenic variation occurred in immunocompetent mice but not in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency.

  1. Cytomegalovirus infection of adipose tissues induces steatitis in adult mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, P; Eddy, K. S.; Papadimitriou, J M; Robertson, T. A.; Shellam, G R

    1990-01-01

    Young adult mice infected with MCMV were shown to develop inflammatory lesions in the peripancreatic and salivary gland adipose tissues. MCMV replication was detected by immunoperoxidase staining and electron microscopy in adipocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and pericytes in brown and white adipose tissues. More infected cells were detected in C3H mice than in BALB/c, BALB.B, BALB.K or C57BL/6 mice. Peripancreatic steatitis consisted of a monocytic infiltrate surrounding focal necrosis...

  2. Vaccinations for Adults with Hepatitis C Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with Hepatitis C Infection This table shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  3. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  4. Intraabdominal Infections in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Ana; Johanning, Jason Michael

    2016-08-01

    Intraabdominal infections represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in the elderly population. Atypical presentations, diagnostic delays, additional comorbidities, and decreased physiologic reserve contribute to high morbidity and mortality, particularly among frail patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. While many infections are the result of age-related inflammatory, mechanical, or obstructive processes, infectious complications of feeding tubes are also common. The pillars of treatment are source control of the infection and judicious use of antibiotics. A patient-centered approach considering the invasiveness, risk, and efficacy of a procedure for achieving the desired outcomes is recommended. Structured communication and time-limited trials help ensure goal-concordant treatment. PMID:27394019

  5. Respiratory infections precede adult-onset asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory infections in early life are associated with an increased risk of developing asthma but there is little evidence on the role of infections for onset of asthma in adults. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of the occurrence of respiratory infections in the past 12 months to adult-onset asthma in a population-based incident case-control study of adults 21-63 years of age. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited all new clinically diagnosed cases of asthma (n = 521 during a 2.5-year study period and randomly selected controls (n = 932 in a geographically defined area in South Finland. Information on respiratory infections was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. The diagnosis of asthma was based on symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction in lung function measurements. The risk of asthma onset was strongly increased in subjects who had experienced in the preceding 12 months lower respiratory tract infections (including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted odds ratio (OR 7.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.16-9.99, or upper respiratory tract infections (including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.72-2.97. Individuals with personal atopy and/or parental atopy were more susceptible to the effects of respiratory infections on asthma onset than non-atopic persons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new evidence that recently experienced respiratory infections are a strong determinant for adult-onset asthma. Reducing such infections might prevent onset of asthma in adulthood, especially in individuals with atopy or hereditary propensity to it.

  6. CD4 cell count and the risk of AIDS or death in HIV-Infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy with a suppressed viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load....

  7. Clinical Features of Infection in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Dean C

    2016-08-01

    The impact of infectious diseases on older adults is far greater than on younger adults because of significantly higher morbidity and mortality caused by infection. The reasons for this greater impact include factors such as lower physiologic reserve due to age and chronic disease, age-related changes in host defenses, loss of mobility, higher risk for polypharmacy and adverse drug reactions, and being on drugs that increase the risk for infection (e.g., anticholinergic and other sedating medications increase the risk for pneumonia). PMID:27394015

  8. B cell depletion in HIV-1 subtype A infected Ugandan adults: relationship to CD4 T cell count, viral load and humoral immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Oballah

    Full Text Available To better understand the nature of B cell dysfunctions in subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype A, a rural cohort of 50 treatment-naïve Ugandan patients chronically infected with HIV-1 subtype A was studied, and the relationship between B cell depletion and HIV disease was assessed. B cell absolute counts were found to be significantly lower in HIV-1+ patients, when compared to community matched negative controls (p<0.0001. HIV-1-infected patients displayed variable functional and binding antibody titers that showed no correlation with viral load or CD4+ T cell count. However, B cell absolute counts were found to correlate inversely with neutralizing antibody (NAb titers against subtype A (p = 0.05 and subtype CRF02_AG (p = 0.02 viruses. A positive correlation was observed between subtype A gp120 binding antibody titers and NAb breadth (p = 0.02 and mean titer against the 10 viruses (p = 0.0002. In addition, HIV-1 subtype A sera showed preferential neutralization of the 5 subtype A or CRF02_AG pseudoviruses, as compared with 5 pseudoviruses from subtypes B, C or D (p<0.001. These data demonstrate that in patients with chronic HIV-1 subtype A infection, significant B cell depletion can be observed, the degree of which does not appear to be associated with a decrease in functional antibodies. These findings also highlight the potential importance of subtype in the specificity of cross-clade neutralization in HIV-1 infection.

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsey, Ann R; Walsh, Edward E

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is now recognised as a significant problem in elderly adults. Epidemiological evidence indicates the impact of RSV in older adults may be similar to non-pandemic influenza, both in the community and in long-term care facilities. Attack rates in nursing homes are approximately 5-10% per year with significant rates of pneumonia (10-20%) and death (2-5%). Estimates using US health care databases and viral surveillance results over a 9-year period indicate that RSV infection causes approximately 10,000 all-cause deaths annually among persons >64 years of age. In contrast, influenza A accounted for approximately 37,000 yearly deaths in the same age group. The clinical features of RSV infection may be difficult to distinguish from those of influenza but include nasal congestion, cough, wheezing and low-grade fever. Older persons with underlying heart and lung disease and immunocompromised patients are at highest risk for RSV infection-related pneumonia and death. Diagnosis of RSV infection in adults is difficult because viral culture and antigen detection are insensitive, presumably because of low viral titres. The combination of serology and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay offers the best sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of RSV but unfortunately these techniques are not widely available; consequently, most adult RSV disease goes unrecognised. Although treatment of RSV infection in the elderly is largely supportive, early therapy with ribavirin and intravenous gamma-globulin improves survival in immunocompromised persons. An effective RSV vaccine has not yet been developed. Therefore, prevention of RSV is limited to standard infection control practices, such as hand washing and the use of gowns and gloves. PMID:16038573

  10. Rabies virus infection of cultured adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Castellanos; Hernán Hurtado; Janeth Arias; Alvaro Velandia

    1996-01-01

    An in vitro model of adult dorsal root ganglion neurons infection by rabies virus is described. Viral marked neurotropism is observed, and the percentage and the degree of infection of the neurons is higher than in non neuronal cells, even if neurons are the minority of the cells in the culture. The neuritic tree is also heavily infected by the virus.

  11. Rabies virus infection of cultured adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Castellanos

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro model of adult dorsal root ganglion neurons infection by rabies virus is described. Viral marked neurotropism is observed, and the percentage and the degree of infection of the neurons is higher than in non neuronal cells, even if neurons are the minority of the cells in the culture. The neuritic tree is also heavily infected by the virus.

  12. Adult retinal stem cells revisited.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, B; Singhal, S; Jayaram, H.; Khaw, P T; Limb, G A

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in retinal stem cell research have raised the possibility that these cells have the potential to be used to repair or regenerate diseased retina. Various cell sources for replacement of retinal neurons have been identified, including embryonic stem cells, the adult ciliary epithelium, adult Müller stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). However, the true stem cell nature of the ciliary epithelium and its possible application in cell therapies has now been question...

  13. Adult Onset Langerhans’ Cell Histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahime İnci; Hamide Sayar; Mehmet Fatih İnci; Perihan Öztürk

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of diseases of unknown cause resulting from abnormal proliferation of bone marrow-originated dendritic cells called histiocytes. The incidence is between 0.5-5.4 per million. More common in childhood, it is extremely rare in adults. In adults, pulmonary involvement with Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis usually occurs as a single-system disease. In this article, the clinical, radiological and histopathological findings of a 51-year-old male patient...

  14. Defective Natural Killer cell antiviral capacity in paediatric HBV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ida Louise; Laura J., Pallett; Winther, Thilde Nordmann;

    2015-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells exhibit dysregulated effector function in adult chronic HBV infection (CHB), which may contribute to virus persistence. The role of NK cells in children infected perinatally with HBV is less studied. Access to a unique cohort enabled the cross-sectional evaluation of NK...

  15. Adult Onset Langerhans’ Cell Histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime İnci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis (LCH is a group of diseases of unknown cause resulting from abnormal proliferation of bone marrow-originated dendritic cells called histiocytes. The incidence is between 0.5-5.4 per million. More common in childhood, it is extremely rare in adults. In adults, pulmonary involvement with Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis usually occurs as a single-system disease. In this article, the clinical, radiological and histopathological findings of a 51-year-old male patient with both skin, bone and pulmonary involvement were presented and discussed with recent literature.

  16. Mast cells in bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rönnberg, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are implicated in immunity towards bacterial infection, but the molecular mechanisms by which mast cells contribute to the host response are only partially understood. Previous studies have examined how mast cells react to purified bacterial cell wall components, such as peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. To investigate how mast cells react to live bacteria we co-cultured mast cells and the gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus equi (S. equi) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)...

  17. Group B Strep Infection in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms. Bacteremia and sepsis (blood infections) symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumonia (lung infection) symptoms include: Fever ... in the infected area and might also include: Fever Chills Swilling Stiffness or inability to use affected limb ...

  18. Complicated Urinary Tract Infection in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complicated urinary tract infection occurs in individuals with functional or structural abnormalities of the genitourinary tract.OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge relevant to complicated urinary tract infection, and to provide evidence-based recommendations for management.METHODS: The literature was reviewed through a PubMed search, and additional articles were identified by journal reference review. A draft guideline was prepared and critically reviewed by members of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada Guidelines Committee, with modifications incorporated following the review.RESULTS: Many urological abnormalities may be associated with complicated urinary infection. There is a wide spectrum of potential infecting organisms, and isolated bacteria tend to be more resistant to antimicrobial therapy. Morbidity and infection outcomes in subjects with complicated urinary infection are principally determined by the underlying abnormality rather than the infection. Principles of management include uniform collection of a urine specimen for culture before antimicrobial therapy, characterization of the underlying genitourinary abnormality, and nontreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria except before an invasive genitourinary procedure. The antimicrobial regimen is determined by clinical presentation, patient tolerance, renal function and known or anticipated infecting organisms. If the underlying abnormality contributing to the urinary infection cannot be corrected, then early post-treatment recurrence of infection is anticipated.CONCLUSIONS: The management of complicated urinary infection is individualized depending on patient variables and the infecting organism. Further clinical investigations are necessary to assist in determining optimal antimicrobial regimens.

  19. O-Specific Polysaccharide-Specific Memory B Cell Responses in Young Children, Older Children, and Adults Infected with Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Amena; Rahman, M Arifur; Afrin, Sadia; Faruk, M Omar; Uddin, Taher; Akter, Aklima; Sami, M Israk Nur; Yasmin, Tahirah; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; Leung, Daniel T; LaRocque, Regina C; Charles, Richelle C; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Mandlik, Anjali; Kelly, Meagan; Kováč, Pavol; Xu, Peng; Calderwood, Stephen B; Harris, Jason B; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2016-05-01

    Cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 confers at least 3 to 10 years of protection against subsequent disease regardless of age, despite a relatively rapid fall in antibody levels in peripheral blood, suggesting that memory B cell responses may play an important role in protection. The V. cholerae O1-specific polysaccharide (OSP) component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is responsible for serogroup specificity, and it is unclear if young children are capable of developing memory B cell responses against OSP, a T cell-independent antigen, following cholera. To address this, we assessed OSP-specific memory B cell responses in young children (2 to 5 years, n = 11), older children (6 to 17 years, n = 21), and adults (18 to 55 years, n = 28) with cholera caused by V. cholerae O1 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We also assessed memory B cell responses against LPS and vibriocidal responses, and plasma antibody responses against OSP, LPS, and cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB; a T cell-dependent antigen) on days 2 and 7, as well as days 30, 90, and 180 after convalescence. In all age cohorts, vibriocidal responses and plasma OSP, LPS, and CtxB-specific responses peaked on day 7 and fell toward baseline over the follow-up period. In comparison, we were able to detect OSP memory B cell responses in all age cohorts of patients with detectable responses over baseline for 90 to 180 days. Our results suggest that OSP-specific memory B cell responses can occur following cholera, even in the youngest children, and may explain in part the age-independent induction of long-term immunity following naturally acquired disease. PMID:27009211

  20. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  1. Prevalence and Correlates of Helminth Co-infection in Kenyan HIV-1 Infected Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Walson, Judd L; Stewart, Barclay T; Sangaré, Laura; Mbogo, Loice W.; Otieno, Phelgona A.; Piper, Benjamin K. S.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John-Stewart, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Background Deworming HIV-1 infected individuals may delay HIV-1 disease progression. It is important to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV-1/helminth co-infection in helminth-endemic areas. Methods HIV-1 infected individuals (CD4>250 cells/ul) were screened for helminth infection at ten sites in Kenya. Prevalence and correlates of helminth infection were determined. A subset of individuals with soil-transmitted helminth infection was re-evaluated 12 weeks following albendazole the...

  2. Adult T-cell leukaemia lymphoma in an aborigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, M A; Frasca, J; Bastian, I

    1991-10-01

    A 44-year-old Aborigine with Adult T-cell Leukaemia/Lymphoma (ATLL) due to HTLV-I is reported. He presented with transverse myelitis of subacute onset, and subsequently developed frank T-cell leukaemia complicated by splenomegaly and hypercalcaemia. Cell surface marker studies showed a phenotype of CD3+ CD4+ CD8- CD25+, and serological and molecular studies confirmed HTLV-I infection. This is the first report of ATLL in an Australian Aborigine. PMID:1759923

  3. T-Cell-Dependent Control of Acute Giardia lamblia Infections in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, Steven M.; Nash, Theodore E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied immune mechanisms responsible for control of acute Giardia lamblia and Giardia muris infections in adult mice. Association of chronic G. lamblia infection with hypogammaglobulinemia and experimental infections of mice with G. muris have led to the hypothesis that antibodies are required to control these infections. We directly tested this hypothesis by infecting B-cell-deficient mice with either G. lamblia or G. muris. Both wild-type mice and B-cell-deficient mice eliminated t...

  4. Molecular Hallmarks of Adult T Cell Leukemia

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    MakotoYamagishi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular hallmarks of adult T cell leukemia (ATL comprise outstanding deregulations of signaling pathways that control the cell cycle, resistance to apoptosis, and proliferation of leukemic cells, all of which have been identified by early excellent studies. Nevertheless, we are now confronted the therapeutic difficulties of ATL that is a most aggressive T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Using next-generation strategies, emerging molecular characteristics such as specific surface markers and an additional catalog of signals affecting the fate of leukemic cells have been added to the molecular hallmarks that constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of ATL. Although human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is undoubtedly involved in ATL leukemogenesis, most leukemic cells do not express the viral protein Tax. Instead, cellular gene expression changes dominate homeostasis disorders of infected cells and characteristics of ATL. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of ATL molecular pathology, which supports the biological properties of leukemic cells. In addition, we discuss the recent discovery of two molecular hallmarks of potential generality; an abnormal microRNA (miRNA pattern and epigenetic reprogramming, which strongly involve the imbalance of the molecular network of lymphocytes. Global analyses of ATL have revealed the functional impact of crosstalk between multifunctional pathways. Clinical and biological studies on signaling inhibitory agents have also revealed novel oncogenic drivers that can be targeted in future. ATL cells, by deregulation of such pathways and their interconnections, may become masters of their own destinies. Recognizing and understanding of the widespread molecular applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of novel strategies for treating ATL.

  5. CD4 cell count and the risk of AIDS or death in HIV-Infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy with a suppressed viral load: a longitudinal cohort study from COHERE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Young

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using data from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (2010 merger, we assessed the risk of a new AIDS-defining event or death in successfully treated patients. We accumulated episodes of viral suppression for each patient while on cART, each episode beginning with the second of two consecutive plasma viral load measurements 500 copies/µl, the first of two consecutive measurements between 50-500 copies/µl, cART interruption or administrative censoring. We used stratified multivariate Cox models to estimate the association between time updated CD4 cell count and a new AIDS event or death or death alone. 75,336 patients contributed 104,265 suppression episodes and were suppressed while on cART for a median 2.7 years. The mortality rate was 4.8 per 1,000 years of viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was always associated with a reduced risk of a new AIDS event or death; with a hazard ratio per 100 cells/µl (95% CI of: 0.35 (0.30-0.40 for counts <200 cells/µl, 0.81 (0.71-0.92 for counts 200 to <350 cells/µl, 0.74 (0.66-0.83 for counts 350 to <500 cells/µl, and 0.96 (0.92-0.99 for counts ≥500 cells/µl. A higher CD4 cell count became even more beneficial over time for patients with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/µl. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the low mortality rate, the risk of a new AIDS event or death follows a CD4 cell count gradient in patients with viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was associated with the greatest benefit for patients with a CD4 cell count <200 cells/µl but still some slight benefit for those with a CD4 cell count ≥500 cells/µl.

  6. An adult case of oral infection with Kingella kingae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damme, P.A. van; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    An exceptional case of microbiologically confirmed oral infection with Kingella kingae in an immunocompetent adult (30-year-old woman) is presented and the pathogenesis is discussed and related to known literature data.K. kingae is a rather common but yet relatively unknown commensal corroding bacte

  7. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells. PMID:12931235

  8. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...... cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...

  9. Nosema ceranae Can Infect Honey Bee Larvae and Reduces Subsequent Adult Longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daren M Eiri

    Full Text Available Nosema ceranae causes a widespread disease that reduces honey bee health but is only thought to infect adult honey bees, not larvae, a critical life stage. We reared honey bee (Apis mellifera larvae in vitro and provide the first demonstration that N. ceranae can infect larvae and decrease subsequent adult longevity. We exposed three-day-old larvae to a single dose of 40,000 (40K, 10,000 (10K, zero (control, or 40K autoclaved (control N. ceranae spores in larval food. Spores developed intracellularly in midgut cells at the pre-pupal stage (8 days after egg hatching of 41% of bees exposed as larvae. We counted the number of N. ceranae spores in dissected bee midguts of pre-pupae and, in a separate group, upon adult death. Pre-pupae exposed to the 10K or 40K spore treatments as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Adults exposed as larvae had significantly elevated spore counts as compared to controls. Larval spore exposure decreased longevity: a 40K treatment decreased the age by which 75% of adult bees died by 28%. Unexpectedly, the low dose (10K led to significantly greater infection (1.3 fold more spores and 1.5 fold more infected bees than the high dose (40K upon adult death. Differential immune activation may be involved if the higher dose triggered a stronger larval immune response that resulted in fewer adult spores but imposed a cost, reducing lifespan. The impact of N. ceranae on honey bee larval development and the larvae of naturally infected colonies therefore deserve further study.

  10. Perivascular ancestors of adult multipotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Corselli (Mirko); C.W. Chen; M. Crisan (Mihaela); L. Lazzari (Lorenza); B. Péault (Bruno)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIndependent studies by numerous investigators have shown that it is possible to harvest multipotent progenitor cells from diverse dissociated and cultured fetal, perinatal, and principally adult developed tissues. Despite the increasingly recognized medical value of these progenitor cell

  11. Immunological control of adult neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs only in discrete regions of adult central nervous system: the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone. These areas are populated by adult neural stem cells (aNSC) that are regulated by a number of molecules and signaling pathways, which control their cell fate choices, survival and proliferation rates. For a long time, it was believed that the immune system did not exert any control on neural proliferative niches. However, it has been observed that many patholog...

  12. Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 infection drives spontaneous proliferation of natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Philip J; Hirschkorn, Dale F.; DeVita, Deborah A.; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Murphy, Eedward L

    2010-01-01

    Most human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infected subjects remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, with a few individuals developing HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukemia. Lymphocytes from about half of HTLV-1 infected subjects spontaneously proliferate in vitro, and how this phenomenon relates to symptomatic disease outcome and viral burden is poorly understood. Spontaneous proliferation was measured in lymphocyte subsets, an...

  13. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  14. Epidemiology of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in adults in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankilampi, U.; Herva, E.; Haikala, R.; Liimatainen, O.; Renkonen, O. V.; Leinonen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal infections in adults in Finland from 1983 to 1992 identified 862 episodes of pneumococcal bacteraemia and 97 episodes of meningitis. The overall incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections was 9.1 per 100,000 for all adults per year, but 27.1, 35.8, and 44.5 per 100,000 in those aged 65 years or over, 75 years or over, and 85 years or over, respectively. Most (99.7%) of the pneumococcal strains were sensitive to penicillin. Ninety-five percent of the strains belonged to serogroups/types present in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Group/type distribution was different in patients aged 16-64 years compared to those 65 years or over (P < 0.001), in bacteraemia compared to meningitis (P < 0.001), and in the years 1983-7 compared to 1988-92 (P < 0.05). PMID:9042030

  15. Infected Urachal Cyst in an Adult: A Laparoscopic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Ching-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Urachal cysts occur infrequently in adults and are rarely reported in the literature. Laparoscopic excision or robot-assisted laparoscopic excision of urachal cysts has widely been applied in recent years. We present a case of urachal cyst infection treated with antibiotics and two-staged operation. The laparoscopic procedure was performed without any complications. Strong suspicion is the key for early diagnosis. PMID:27462196

  16. Coronavirus infection of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first host cells to be infected by incoming c oronaviruses. Recent observations in vitro show that coronaviruses are released from a specific side of these polarized cells, and this polarized release might be important for the spread of the infection in vivo. Mechanisms for

  17. Inapparent Streptococcus agalactiae infection in adult/commercial tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiufeng; Fang, Wei; Ke, Bixia; He, Dongmei; Liang, Yuheng; Ning, Dan; Tan, Hailing; Peng, Hualin; Wang, Yunxin; Ma, Yazhou; Ke, Changwen; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    We report on inapparent infections in adult/commercial tilapia in major tilapia fish farms in Guangdong. A total of 146 suspected isolates were confirmed to be S. agalactiae using an API 20 Strep system and specific PCR amplification. All isolates were identified as serotype Ia using multiplex serotyping PCR. An MLST assay showed single alleles of adhP (10), atr (2), glcK (2), glnA (1), pheS (1), sdhA (3) and tkt (2), and this profile was designated 'unique ST 7'. The analysis of virulence genes resulted in 10 clusters, of which dltr-bca-sodA-spb1-cfb-bac (62, 42.47%) was the predominant virulence gene profile. The PFGE analysis of S. agalactiae yielded 6 distinct PFGE types (A, B, C, D, F and G), of which Pattern C (103) was the predominant type, accounting for approximately 70.55% (103/146) of the total S. agalactiae strains. Therefore, unlike what has been found in juvenile tilapia, in which PFGE pattern D/F is the major prevalent pattern, we found that pattern C was the major prevalent pattern in inapparent infected adult/commercial tilapia in Guangdong, China. In conclusion, we close a gap in the current understanding of S. agalactiae epidemiology and propose that researchers should be alert for inapparent S. agalactiae infections in adult/commercial tilapia to prevent a potential threat to food safety. PMID:27215811

  18. Clinical grade adult stem cell banking

    OpenAIRE

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Goebel, W. Scott; Woods, Erik J

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of scientific interest recently generated by the potential therapeutic applications of adult stem cells in human care but there are several challenges regarding quality and safety in clinical applications and a number of these challenges relate to the processing and banking of these cells ex-vivo. As the number of clinical trials and the variety of adult cells used in regenerative therapy increases, safety remains a primary concern. This has inspired many nations t...

  19. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Anemia in Taiwanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Yao Shih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA are common in adults. Although the most common causes of IDA usually arise from the gastrointestinal tract, the association between chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and anemia remains unclear. Aim. To evaluate the association of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and IDA. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 882 patients from January 2010 to April 2013. The status of Helicobacter pylori (H.p infection was confirmed and blood samples from the same participants were taken on the same day to check the level of hemoglobin, serum iron, ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC. Results. No significant difference was noted from the demographic data. The average level of hemoglobin (Hb was not different between negative and positive groups, pos 13.57 g/dL versus neg 13.65 g/dL (P=0.699. Although the levels of serum IDA related parameters were expected in positive group (lower serum iron and ferritin and higher TIBC these differences did not reach statistical significance (P=0.824 for iron, P=0.360 for ferritin, and P=0.252 for TIBC. Conclusion. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is not attributed to IDA. The levels of hemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin, and TIBC remain unaffected after chronic H.p infection. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to prove the association.

  20. Plague Bacteria Target Immune Cells During Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Marketon, Melanie M.; DePaolo, R. William; DeBord, Kristin L.; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    The plague is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Plague bacteria are thought to inject effector Yop proteins into host cells via the type III pathway. The identity of the host cells targeted for injection during plague infection is unknown. We found, using Yop β-lactamase hybrids and fluorescent staining of live cells from plague-infected animals, that Y. pestis selected immune cells for injection. In vivo, dendritic cells, macrophages, and neutrophils were injected most frequently, whe...

  1. Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs among young adult in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Salfa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STIs include a large group of widespread infectious diseases, which may cause acute symptoms, chronic infections and severe long term complications.The control and prevention of these infections are public health priorities for several reasons: • the large number of people that acquire an STI per year; • the major proportion of asymptomatic infected individuals; • the high circulation in patients with sexual risk behavior (young adults, pluripartner, men who have sex with men, foreigners, commercial sex workers; • increased biological susceptibility of some subjects, such as young adults (immature genital tissues and more receptive to pathogens, women (genital apparatus more complex and extended in which pathogens are more likely to settle, or individuals carrying states of severe immunodeficiency; • the serious complications in the event of failure or incorrect diagnosis and treatment (chronic disease, infertility, oncogenic transformation, synergy with HIV infection; • the possibility of preventing and treating many of these infections. Therefore, recent guidelines from international agencies have recommended countries from the European Union to improve epidemiological STI surveillance systems in order to standardize data collection to facilitate their comparability between different geographical areas and to improve the information flow for faster tracking of the impact; furthermore, to extend surveillance to widespread, but often asymptomatic, disease (e.g. Chlamydia trachomatis, to conduct behavioural surveillance in patients with STIs, to increase public awareness of the role of STIs in the transmission/acquisition of HIV, and to increase the commitment of institutions in the prevention and control of STIs.

  2. Bladder cancer in HIV-infected adults: an emerging concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Chawki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As HIV-infected patients get older more non-AIDS-related malignancies are to be seen. Cancer now represents almost one third of all causes of deaths among HIV-infected patients (1. Albeit bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancy worldwide (2, only 13 cases of bladder cancer in HIV-infected patients have been reported in the literature so far (3. Materials and Methods: We conducted a monocentric study in our hospital. We selected all patients who were previously admitted (from 1998 to 2013 in our hospital with diagnoses of HIV and bladder cancer. The objective was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of bladder cancers in HIV-infected patients in our hospital. Results: Based on our administrative HIV database (6353 patients, we found 15 patients (0.2% with a bladder cancer. Patients’ characteristics are presented in Table 1. Patients were mostly men and heavy smokers. Their median nadir CD4 cell count was below 200 and most had a diagnosis of AIDS. A median time of 14 years was observed in those patients, between the diagnosis of HIV-infection and the occurrence of bladder cancer, although in patients much younger (median age 56 than those developing bladder cancer without HIV infection (71.1 years (4. Haematuria was the most frequent diagnosis circumstance in HIV-infected patients who had relatively preserved immune function on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Histopathology showed relatively advanced cancers at diagnosis with a high percentage of non transitional cell carcinoma (TCC tumor and of TCC with squamous differentiation, suggesting a potential role for human papilloma virus (HPV co-infection. Death rate was high in this population. Conclusions: Bladder cancers in HIV-infected patients remain rare but occur in relatively young HIV-infected patients with a low CD4 nadir, presenting with haematuria, most of them being smokers, and have aggressive pathological features that are associated with

  3. [Hypercalcemia of T-cell leukemia in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Baptiste, G; Arfi, S; Plumelle, Y; Panelatti, G; Mangin, J L; Pascaline, N

    1993-04-01

    A retrospective study of 26 adults with acute T-cell leukemia showed that 14 patients (54%) had hypercalcemia at some point of the disease. Hypercalcemia was found at presentation in nine patients and revealed the disease in one. Eight patients had hypercalcemia at the time of death. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone levels were normal. All patients with hypercalcemia tested positive for the HTLV-1 by Elisa and Western blot. Six patients had focalized or diffuse lytic roentgenographic bone lesions. Hypercalcemia in acute T-cell leukemia may involve production of interleukin-1-alpha and parathyroid hormone-related protein by HTLV-1-infected cells. PMID:8167627

  4. The Effect of Arthrospira platensis Capsules on CD4 T-Cells and Antioxidative Capacity in a Randomized Pilot Study of Adult Women Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Not under HAART in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Stéphane Winter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplements are often used to improve the nutritional status of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV. Arthrospira platensis (Asp, also known as Spirulina, is a cyanobacterium rich in proteins and micronutrients. Cell and animal trials described immune-modulating, antiretroviral and antioxidant activities. This pilot study describes the effects of the supplementation of 5 g/day of Asp on a pre-highly-active antiretroviral therapy (pre-HAART, HIV-infected, adult female population. It was conducted as a three-month randomized controlled trial (RCT that compared a cup supplementation of five grams/day of Asp with a placebo of equal protein content and energy. The study included 73 HIV-infected women. The immediate outcome variables were CD4 T-cells, viral load and immune activation by CD8 T-cells expressing CD38. The antioxidant status was assessed by way of the total antioxidant capacity of the serum (TAOS. The renal function was documented by way of creatinine, urea and the calculated glomerular filtration rate. Statistical analyses were carried out with non-parametric tests, and the effect size of each interaction was calculated. No differences in the immunological and virological markers between the Asp and the placebo group could be observed. In the placebo group, 21 of 30 patients (70% developed concomitant events, while in the Asp group, only 12 of 28 patients (43% did. Both groups registered a significant weight increase; 0.5 kg (p < 0.05 in the Asp group and 0.65 kg (p < 0.05 in the placebo group. The antioxidant capacity increase of 56 (1–98 µM for Asp was significantly different from the decrease observed in the placebo group (p < 0.001. A slight increase in the creatinine level of 0.1 g/dL (p < 0.001 was observed in the Asp group, and no effect was observed in the urea levels. The improvement of the antioxidant capacity under Asp, shown for the first time on PLHIV, could become a focus for future research on the nutritional and

  5. Multisystem langerhans cell histiocytosis in adult

    OpenAIRE

    Anubhav Garg; Pramod Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), is a rare disorder, clinically presents with heterogeneous manifestations, and has an unpredictable outcome. Commonly seen in infancy or early childhood, the disorder is characterized by proliferation of abnormal and clonal Langerhans cell in skin, bone, lymph nodes, lungs, liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Occurrence of LCH in adults is rare. Here, we report the case of an adult with acute onset of polymorphic eruptions all over the body, which on biopsy sh...

  6. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and adult height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: A cross-sectional survey was performed to evaluate the association between H. pylori and adult height. Methods: H. pylori infection was assessed using a 13C-urea breath test and height measured by a research nurse using a stadiometer in participants between the ages of 40-49 years. Results: Height was measured in 2932/3682 participants that attended and were evaluable. H. pylori infected women were 1.4 cm shorter than uninfected women (95% confidence interval, CI=0.7-2.1 cm) and this statistically significant difference persisted after adjusting for age, ethnicity, childhood and present socio-economic status (H. pylori positives 0.79 cm shorter; 95%CI: 0.05-1.52 cm). H. pylori positive men were 0.7 cm shorter than uninfected men but this did not reach statistical significance (95% CI: -0.1-1.5 cm). Conclusion: Although H. pylori infection is associated with reduced adult height in women, this maybe due to residual confounding

  7. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously

  8. Inapparent Streptococcus agalactiae infection in adult/commercial tilapia

    OpenAIRE

    Jiufeng Sun; Wei Fang; Bixia Ke; Dongmei He; Yuheng Liang; Dan Ning; Hailing Tan; Hualin Peng; Yunxin Wang; Yazhou Ma; Changwen Ke; Xiaoling Deng

    2016-01-01

    We report on inapparent infections in adult/commercial tilapia in major tilapia fish farms in Guangdong. A total of 146 suspected isolates were confirmed to be S. agalactiae using an API 20 Strep system and specific PCR amplification. All isolates were identified as serotype Ia using multiplex serotyping PCR. An MLST assay showed single alleles of adhP (10), atr (2), glcK (2), glnA (1), pheS (1), sdhA (3) and tkt (2), and this profile was designated ‘unique ST 7’. The analysis of virulence ge...

  9. Adult Stem Cells and Diabetes Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ilgun, Handenur; Kim, Joseph William; Luo, LuGuang

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that diabetes will be the fourth most prevalent disease by 2050. Developing a new therapy for diabetes is a challenge for researchers and clinicians in field. Many medications are being used for treatment of diabetes however with no conclusive and effective results therefore alternative therapies are required. Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for diabetes therapy, and it has involved embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and pluripotent stem cell...

  10. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  11. Delayed expulsion of adult Trichinella spiralis by mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, T. Y.; Reed, N D; Crowle, P K

    1983-01-01

    Mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice and their mast cell-sufficient littermates were given infections of Trichinella spiralis. W/Wv mice were slower than their littermates to expel adult T. spiralis. Repair of the mast cell deficiency of W/Wv mice by bone marrow grafting was accompanied by accelerated expulsion of T. spiralis.

  12. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  13. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa B. Boyette

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan.

  14. Infection Prophylaxis and Management in Treating Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-03

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma

  15. A morphometric study of antral G-cell density in a sample of adult general population: comparison of three different methods and correlation with patient demography, helicobacter pylori infection, histomorphology and circulating gastrin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Fredrik; Borch, Kurt; Rehfeld, Jens F;

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to hypergastrinemia and either decreased or normal G-cell content in the antral mucosa. To clarify this controversial issue, we quantitatively determined antral G-cell content on the same biopsy specimens with three different methods and examined whet...... colonization seem to be determinants of the G-cell density. That common morphometric techniques correlate poorly is of utmost importance to bear in mind when quantitative morphological studies are planned, compared or interpreted....

  16. 28. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningson, Carl T; Stanislaus, Marisha A; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2003-02-01

    Stem cells are characterized by the ability to remain undifferentiated and to self-renew. Embryonic stem cells derived from blastocysts are pluripotent (able to differentiate into many cell types). Adult stem cells, which were traditionally thought to be monopotent multipotent, or tissue restricted, have recently also been shown to have pluripotent properties. Adult bone marrow stem cells have been shown to be capable of differentiating into skeletal muscle, brain microglia and astroglia, and hepatocytes. Stem cell lines derived from both embryonic stem and embryonic germ cells (from the embryonic gonadal ridge) are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal for long periods. Therefore embryonic stem and germ cells have been widely investigated for their potential to cure diseases by repairing or replacing damaged cells and tissues. Studies in animal models have shown that transplantation of fetal, embryonic stem, or embryonic germ cells may be able to treat some chronic diseases. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the use of stem cells as therapeutic agents for three such diseases: Diabetes, Parkinson disease, and congestive heart failure. We also discuss the potential use of stem cells as gene therapy delivery cells and the scientific and ethical issues that arise with the use of human stem cells. PMID:12592319

  17. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  18. Predictive diagnostic value of the tourniquet test for the diagnosis of dengue infection in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mayxay, Mayfong; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Catrin E Moore; Chansamouth, Vilada; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Sisouphone, Syho; Vongphachanh, Pankham; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Thongpaseuth, Soulignasack; Phongmany, Simmaly; Keolouangkhot, Valy; Strobel, Michel; Newton, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the accuracy of the admission tourniquet test in the diagnosis of dengue infection among Lao adults. Methods Prospective assessment of the predictive diagnostic value of the tourniquet test for the diagnosis of dengue infection, as defined by IgM, IgG and NS1 ELISAs (Panbio Ltd, Australia), among Lao adult inpatients with clinically suspected dengue infection. Results Of 234 patients with clinically suspected dengue infection on admission, 73% were serologically confirmed...

  19. Can thymic epithelial cells be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaysa Moreira-Ramos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is the cause of adult T cell leukaemias/lymphoma. Because thymic epithelial cells (TEC express recently defined receptors for the virus, it seemed conceivable that these cells might be a target for HTLV-1 infection. We developed an in vitro co-culture system comprising HTLV-1+-infected T cells and human TECs. Infected T cells did adhere to TECs and, after 24 h, the viral proteins gp46 and p19 were observed in TECs. After incubating TECs with culture supernatants from HTLV-1+-infected T cells, we detected gp46 on TEC membranes and the HTLV-1 tax gene integrated in the TEC genome. In conclusion, the human thymic epithelium can be infected in vitro by HTLV-1, not only via cell-cell contact, but also via exposure to virus-containing medium.

  20. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Zaragoza

    Full Text Available The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  1. Immunological elimination of infected cells as the candidate mechanism for tumor protection in polyomavirus-infected mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Wirth, J J; Fluck, M M

    1991-01-01

    The uniformly lethal development of mammary tumors in polyomavirus-infected adult female nude mice was prevented by adoptive cell transfer of polyomavirus-immune splenocytes or peritoneal cells. Transferred immune cells also lowered the growth rate of emerging tumors. The induction of other relatively less frequent tumors of the skin and bone was decreased as well. Using in situ hybridization of whole-body sections as well as hybridization of nucleic acids from the mammary glands, we show for...

  2. Modulation of innate antigen-presenting cell function by pre-patent schistosome infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E Ferragine

    Full Text Available Schistosomes are intravascular helminths that infect over 200 million people worldwide. Deposition of eggs by adult schistosomes stimulates Th2 responses to egg antigens and induces granulomatous pathology that is a hallmark of schistosome infection. Paradoxically, schistosomes require host immune function for their development and reproduction and for egress of parasite eggs from the host. To identify potential mechanisms by which immune cells might influence parasite development prior to the onset of egg production, we assessed immune function in mice infected with developing schistosomes. We found that pre-patent schistosome infection is associated with a loss of T cell responsiveness to other antigens and is due to a diminution in the ability of innate antigen-presenting cells to stimulate T cells. Diminution of stimulatory capacity by schistosome worms specifically affected CD11b(+ cells and did not require concomitant adaptive responses. We could not find evidence for production of a diffusible inhibitor of T cells by innate cells from infected mice. Rather, inhibition of T cell responsiveness by accessory cells required cell contact and only occurred when cells from infected mice outnumbered competent APCs by more than 3∶1. Finally, we show that loss of T cell stimulatory capacity may in part be due to suppression of IL-12 expression during pre-patent schistosome infection. Modulation of CD4(+ T cell and APC function may be an aspect of host immune exploitation by schistosomes, as both cell types influence parasite development during pre-patent schistosome infection.

  3. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gen; Suzuki

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure(CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  4. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Nan; Ning-kun ZHANG; Lian-ru GAO

    2013-01-01

    The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on...

  5. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Periodontal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Su-Hwan; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Lee, Yong-Moo

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major cause of tooth loss and characterized by inflammation of tooth-supporting structures. Recently, the association between periodontal disease and other health problems has been reported, the importance of treating periodontal disease for general health is more emphasized. The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues. The development of adult stem cell research enables to improve the cell-based tissue engineering for perio...

  6. Poor Aerobic Fitness May Contribute to Cognitive Decline in HIV-infected Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapstone, Mark; Hilton, Tiffany N; Yang, Hongmei; Guido, Joseph J; Luque, Amneris E; Hall, William J; Dewhurst, Stephen; Shah, Krupa

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-infected older adult (HOA) community is particularly vulnerable to cognitive impairment. Previous studies in the general older adult population have reported that lower scores on tests of cognitive function often correlate negatively with aerobic fitness [5-7]. HIV-infected individuals have significantly reduced aerobic fitness and physical function compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. Determining important correlates of cognitive ability may be beneficial in not only detecting precursors to future cognitive impairments, but also target areas for interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive ability and aerobic fitness in HIV-infected older adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study of HOA on antiretroviral therapy (ART) >50 years of age. Domain specific cognitive function was assessed by means of a neuropsychological battery. Aerobic fitness (VO2peak) was assessed using a graded, progressive treadmill test. Thirty-seven HOA on ART (mean±SD: age 59±6 years, BMI 28±5, CD4 663±337 cells/ml, duration since HIV diagnosis 17±7 years; 81% males) completed the cognitive tests. Several domains of cognition were significantly associated with VO2peak by Spearman correlation analysis (pdementia (OR=0.64; p=0.0006). In HOA and in conclusion, aerobic fitness is related to cognitive performance on various tasks. The likelihood of cognitive impairment increased with lower fitness levels. Therefore, increased fitness may serve an important factor in maintenance of cognition and neural integrity for aging HIV-infected individuals. Future prospective and large scale studies are needed to evaluate the effect of fitness and vascular stiffness and function on cognition and brain structure among HOA. PMID:24307964

  7. Magnitude of opportunistic infections and associated factors in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitiku H

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Habtamu Mitiku, Fitsum Weldegebreal, Zelalem Teklemariam Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Harar, Ethiopia Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of opportunistic infections (OIs and associated factors among HIV-infected adults on anti-retroviral therapy (ART in Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital, Eastern Ethiopia. Patients and methods: A hospital-based retrospective study was conducted in 358 HIV-infected adult patients on ART from April to June 2014. Data were collected through review of clinical records. The data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 16.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association of each independent variable with occurrence of OIs. A 95% confidence interval (CI and P-value less than 0.05 were considered as significant association. Results: A total of 358 patients were included in the study, in which majority (68.4% were females. The mean age of patients was 34 (standard deviation [SD] ±9.8 years. The overall of prevalence of OIs among HIV/AIDS patients on ART was 48%. The highest prevalent rates of OIs observed were tuberculosis (TB (21.23%, followed by Herpes zoster (11.2% and oral candidiasis (9.5%. Baseline CD4 cell count <200 cells/mm3 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =1.645, 95% CI =2.187, 3.983, baseline World Health Organization (WHO clinical stage III (AOR =2.801, 95% CI =1.958, 7.165 and IV (AOR =3.856; 95% CI =2.691, 10.390, and not using prophylaxis (AOR =1.912, 95% CI =1.444, 3.824 were found to have strong association with acquisition of OIs. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of OIs observed in this study. Baselines CD4 count of <200 cells/mm3, advanced WHO clinical stages, and not using prophylaxis were found to be predictors of OIs. Interventions were aimed at promoting early HIV testing and enrollment of HIV-infected individuals into ART services needed before CD4

  8. Research progress of adult cardiac stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan ZHENG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view is that the heart is a terminal organ. This dogma, however, has been widely questioned with the discovery of adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs. Since CSCs have a highly self-renewal capacity and specific myocardial differentiation potential, nowadays they have been regarded as the most promising type of stem cells used in ischemic heart disease and other replacement therapy of end-stage heart disease. The present paper will focus on current results of scientific research on human adult CSCs and epicardium-derived cell (EPDC, as well as the treatment strategies in the field of cardiac regeneration, and the problems and prospect disclosed in the research.

  9. Potential role for mucosal IgA in modulating Haemonchus contortus adult worm infection in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J N; Hernández, A; Stear, M J; Conde-Felipe, M; Rodríguez, E; Piedrafita, D; González, J F

    2016-06-15

    Haemonchus contortus (H. contortus) is a haematophagous parasite which causes important economic losses in small ruminants. On the island of Gran Canaria, two sheep breeds coexist which differ in their susceptibility to the infection with H. contortus; the resistant Canaria Hair Breed (CHB) sheep and the susceptible Canaria Sheep (CS) breed. The major target of resistance mechanisms in CHB sheep are directed to the adult parasite stage, reducing the worm burden, and decreased length and fecundity of surviving worms. Mucosal IgA (mIgA) has been shown to be an important regulator of immunity in Haemonchus and Teladorsagia infections; through correlations with larval stages where such mechanisms as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity and enzyme inhibition may mediate resistance. Here for the first time, we demonstrate a significant negative correlation between mIgA and adult worm length and fecundity only in the resistant CHB sheep. In contrast, and as reported in other sheep breeds, mIgA was only negatively correlated against the larval stage in the more susceptible CS breed. This study suggests mIgA may play a role in resistance to both larval and adult stages. PMID:27198794

  10. Concise Review: Quiescence in Adult Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumman, M; Dhawan, J; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) are tissue resident stem cells responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration following injury. In uninjured tissues, ASCs exist in a nonproliferating, reversibly cell cycle-arrested state known as quiescence or G0. A key function of the quiescent state is to preserve...... stemness in ASCs by preventing precocious differentiation, and thus maintaining a pool of undifferentiated ASCs. Recent evidences suggest that quiescence is an actively maintained state and that excessive or defective quiescence may lead to compromised tissue regeneration or tumorigenesis. The aim...

  11. Cell pattern in adult human corneal endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Wörner

    Full Text Available A review of the current data on the cell density of normal adult human endothelial cells was carried out in order to establish some common parameters appearing in the different considered populations. From the analysis of cell growth patterns, it is inferred that the cell aging rate is similar for each of the different considered populations. Also, the morphology, the cell distribution and the tendency to hexagonallity are studied. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that this phenomenon is analogous with cell behavior in other structures such as dry foams and grains in polycrystalline materials. Therefore, its driving force may be controlled by the surface tension and the mobility of the boundaries.

  12. Adult stem-like cells in kidney

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiichi Hishikawa; Osamu Takase; Masahiro Yoshikawa; Taro Tsujimura; Masaomi Nangaku; Tsuyoshi Takato

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatmentfor kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivationof kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidneytissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lowervertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephronsafter tubular damages is commonly observed after renalinjury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitorcell or system is reportedly presents suggesting thatadult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinicaltargets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclearif kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. Ingeneral, stemness is defined by several factors suchas self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency andcharacteristic gene expression profiles. The definiteuse of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidneyregeneration, and here we describe the recent broadfindings of kidney regeneration and the cells thatcontribute regeneration.

  13. Activation of Divergent Neuronal Cell Death Pathways in Different Target Cell Populations during Neuroadapted Sindbis Virus Infection of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Havert, Michael B.; Schofield, Brian; Griffin, Diane E.; Irani, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Infection of adult mice with neuroadapted Sindbis virus (NSV) results in a severe encephalomyelitis accompanied by prominent hindlimb paralysis. We find that the onset of paralysis parallels morphologic changes in motor neuron cell bodies in the lumbar spinal cord and in motor neuron axons in ventral nerve roots, many of which are eventually lost over time. However, unlike NSV-induced neuronal cell death found in the brain of infected animals, the loss of motor neurons does not appear to be a...

  14. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronan, Mark R; Rosenberg, Allison F; Oehlers, Stefan H; Saelens, Joseph W; Sisk, Dana M; Jurcic Smith, Kristen L; Lee, Sunhee; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique) methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ. PMID:26449262

  15. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Cronan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ.

  16. NKT cells in HIV-1 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique T cell population that have important immunoregulatory functions and have been shown to be involved in host immunity against a range of microorganisms. It also emerges that they might play a role in HIV-1 infection, and therefore be selectively depleted during the early stages of infection. Recent studies are reviewed regarding the dynamics of NKT depletion during HIV-I infection and their recovery under highly active antiretrovirai treatment (HAART). Possible mechanisms for these changes are proposed based on the recent developments in HIV pathogenesis. Further discussions are focused on HIV's disruption of NKT activation by downregulating CDId expression on antigen presentation cells (APC). HIV-1 protein Nefis found to play the major role by interrupting the intraceilular trafficking of nascent and recycling CDId molecules.

  17. Updates on the Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: What Are the Differences between Adults and Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Ran

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is acquired mainly during childhood and causes various diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and iron deficiency anemia. Although H. pylori infection in children differs from adults in many ways, this is often overlooked in clinical practice. Unlike adults, nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. Histopathological findings of gastric tissues are also different in children due to predominance of lymphocytes and plasma cells and the formation of gastric MALT. Although endoscopy is recommended for the initial diagnosis of H. pylori infection, several non-invasive diagnostic tests such as the urea breath test (UBT) and the H. pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) are available and well validated even in children. According to recent data, both the (13)C-UBT and HpSA using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay are reliable non-invasive tests to determine H. pylori status after eradication therapy, although children younger than 6 years are known to have high false positives. When invasive or noninvasive tests are applied to children to detect H. pylori infection, it should be noted that there are differences between children and adults in diagnosing H. pylori infection. PMID:27437185

  18. Prevalence of parasitemia and associated immunodeficiency among HIV-malaria co-infected adult patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caroline E Omoti; Chiedozie K Ojide; Patrick V Lofor; Emeka Eze; Joy C Eze

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the malaria parasitemia,CD4+ cell counts and some haematological indices amongHIV-malaria co-infected adult patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).Methods:A total of342 adultHIV positive subjects were recruited at the consultant outpatientHIV/AIDS clinic,University ofBeninTeachingHospital,BeninCity,Nigeria between June2011 toNovember2011.Blood samples were taken for malaria parasite count,CD4+ cell count and other haematological counts.Results:Out of the342 adultHIV positive subjects a total of254 patients (74.3%) were found to have malaria parasitemia.The incidence of malaria parasitemia increased with advancing clinical stage ofHIV infection and this was statistically significant (P=0.002).There was no statistical significance when gender was compared with the HIV-malaria status (P>0.05).Of the254 co-infected patients,134 (52.8%) had high parasitemia (>1.25×109/L).Sixty patients were found to be hyperparasitemic (>2.5 parasites/L).There was a significant association betweenCD4+ cell count and having significant parasitemia (P 0.05).Conclusions:The prevalence of parasitemia is high among theHIV/AIDS infected patients.

  19. Adult stem cell coatings for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells can become potent tools for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as heart failure, eye disease and osteoarthritis. Housing stem cells inside a hydrogel coating, directly deposited around them individually and in groups, may be an important solution to the problem of increasing stem cell viability and protection in cultivation. Such coatings can target regulatory proteins and genes for maintenance, differentiation and development into tissues. Already polymer coatings are being applied directly to protect insulin producing pancreatic islet cells in the hope of treating type I diabetes. Here, we review current emerging developments in adult mesenchymal stem cell nanocoating and microcoating techniques and assess their unique practical engineering, biological and potential clinical advantages.

  20. The influence of different helminth infection phenotypes on immune responses against HIV in co-infected adults in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabaso Musawenkosi LH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The convergent distribution of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and helminth infections has led to the suggestion that infection with helminths exacerbates the HIV epidemic in developing countries. In South Africa, it is estimated that 57% of the population lives in poverty and carries the highest burden of both HIV and helmith infections, however, the disease interactions are under-researched. Methods We employed both coproscopy and Ascaris lumbricoides-specific serum IgE to increase diagnostic sensitivity and to distinguish between different helminth infection phenotypes and their effects on immune responses in HIV co-infected individuals. Coproscopy was done by formol ether and Kato Katz methods. HIV positive and negative adults were stratified according to the presence or absence of A. lumbricoides and/or Trichuris trichuria eggs with or without elevated Ascaris IgE. Lymphocyte subsets were phenotyped by flow cytometry. Viral loads, serum total IgE and eosinophils were also analysed. Lymphocyte activation markers (CCR5, HLA-DR, CD25, CD38 and CD71 were determined. Non parametric statistics were used to describe differences in the variables between the subgroups. Results Helminth prevalence ranged between 40%-60%. Four distinct subgroups of were identified, and this included egg positive/high Ascaris-specific IgE (egg+IgEhi, egg positive/low IgE (egg+IgElo, egg negative/high IgE (egg-IgEhi and egg negative/low IgE (egg-IgElo individuals. The egg+IgEhi subgroup displayed lymphocytopenia, eosinophilia, (low CD4+ counts in HIV- group, high viral load (in HIV+ group, and an activated lymphocyte profile. High Ascaris IgE subgroups (egg+IgEhi and egg-IgEhi had eosinophilia, highest viral loads, and lower CD4+ counts in the HIV- group. Egg excretion and low IgE (egg+IgElo status demonstrated a modified Th2 immune profile with a relatively competent response to HIV. Conclusions People with both helminth egg excretion and high

  1. Acceleration of age-associated methylation patterns in HIV-1-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickabaugh, Tammy M; Baxter, Ruth M; Sehl, Mary; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Hultin, Patricia M; Hultin, Lance E; Quach, Austin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric; Jamieson, Beth D

    2015-01-01

    Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of young (20-35) and older (36-56) adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, pnetwork analysis (WGCNA) identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3) was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70) and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31). Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015). In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage=0.007088, p=2.08 x 10(-9); βHIV=0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage=0.008762, p=1.27 x 10(-5); βHIV=0.128649, p=0.0001). Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10(-6), odds ratio=1.91). These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that are similar to age-associated patterns and suggest that general aging

  2. Murine cellular cytotoxicity to syngeneic and xenogeneic herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, S; Drath, D B; Loo, L S

    1982-12-01

    Cellular cytotoxicity of C57BL/6 adult mice peritoneal cells to xenogeneic (Chang liver) and syngeneic (BL/6-WT3) herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells was analyzed in a 6-h 51Cr release assay. There was no difference in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to either target. There was no natural killer cytotoxicity to targets with cells from uninfected mice except at very high effector cell ratios. HSV-infected (2 X 10(4) PFU intraperitoneally 1 day previously) mice mediated significantly higher antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and required less antibody (10(-5) versus 10(-2) dilution), fewer cells, and less time to kill than cells from uninfected mice. HSV-infected mice mediated natural killer cytotoxicity but preferentially killed syngeneic HSV-infected cells. Stimulation of cytotoxicity was not virus specific since influenza-infected mice mediated similar levels of cytotoxicity to HSV-infected targets. There was no difference in morphology (95% macrophage) or in the percentage of FcR-positive cells, but infected mice had more peritoneal cells and generated higher levels of superoxide in response to opsonized zymosan or phorbolmyristate acetate. These data demonstrate nonspecific virus-stimulated metabolic and effector cell function which may enhance clearance of virus in an infected host. PMID:6295943

  3. Congenitally acquired persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis viral infection reduces neuronal progenitor pools in the adult hippocampus and subventricular zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Sun

    Full Text Available Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV can be transmitted through congenital infection, leading to persistent infection of numerous organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS. Adult mice persistently infected with LCMV (LCMV-cgPi mice exhibit learning deficits, such as poor performance in spatial discrimination tests. Given that deficits in spatial learning have been linked to defects in adult neurogenesis, we investigated the impact of congenital LCMV infection on generation of neuroblasts from neural progenitor cells within neurogenic zones of adult mice. In LCMV-cgPi mice, QPCR and immunohistochemistry detected presence of LCMV glycoprotein-coding RNA and nucleoprotein in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone (SVZ, sites of neurogenesis that harbor populations of neuroblasts. Numbers of neuroblasts were reduced in LCMV-cgPi mice, as determined by IHC quantification, and analysis of BrdU incorporation by flow cytometry revealed lower numbers of BrdU-labeled neuroblasts. Additionally, TUNEL assays performed in situ showed increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the two neurogenic regions. Next, neurosphere cultures were infected in vitro with LCMV and differentiated to create a population of cells that consisted of both transit amplifying cells and neuroblasts. Immunocytochemical and TUNEL assays revealed increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells that express nestin, suggesting that the drop in numbers of neuroblasts was due to a combination of impaired proliferation and apoptosis of progenitor cells. LCMV-cgPi mice exhibited transcriptional up-regulation several cytokines and chemokines, including gamma-interferon inducible chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10. Chronic up-regulation of these chemokines can facilitate a pro-inflammatory niche that may contribute to defects in neurogenesis.

  4. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of H1/IC31®, an adjuvanted TB subunit vaccine, in HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts greater than 350 cells/mm3: a phase II, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reither

    Full Text Available Novel tuberculosis vaccines should be safe, immunogenic, and effective in various population groups, including HIV-infected individuals. In this phase II multi-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, the safety and immunogenicity of the novel H1/IC31 vaccine, a fusion protein of Ag85B-ESAT-6 (H1 formulated with the adjuvant IC31, was evaluated in HIV-infected adults.HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T cell counts >350/mm3 and without evidence of active tuberculosis were enrolled and followed until day 182. H1/IC31 vaccine or placebo was randomly allocated in a 5:1 ratio. The vaccine was administered intramuscularly at day 0 and 56. Safety assessment was based on medical history, clinical examinations, and blood and urine testing. Immunogenicity was determined by a short-term whole blood intracellular cytokine staining assay.47 of the 48 randomised participants completed both vaccinations. In total, 459 mild or moderate and 2 severe adverse events were reported. There were three serious adverse events in two vaccinees classified as not related to the investigational product. Local injection site reactions were more common in H1/IC31 versus placebo recipients (65.0% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.015. Solicited systemic and unsolicited adverse events were similar by study arm. The baseline CD4+ T cell count and HIV viral load were similar by study arm and remained constant over time. The H1/IC31 vaccine induced a persistent Th1-immune response with predominately TNF-α and IL-2 co-expressing CD4+ T cells, as well as polyfunctional IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 expressing CD4+ T cells.H1/IC31 was well tolerated and safe in HIV-infected adults with a CD4+ Lymphocyte count greater than 350 cells/mm3. The vaccine did not have an effect on CD4+ T cell count or HIV-1 viral load. H1/IC31 induced a specific and durable Th1 immune response.Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (PACTR PACTR201105000289276.

  6. Progesterone induces adult mammary stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Purna A; Jackson, Hartland W; Beristain, Alexander G; Di Grappa, Marco A; Mote, Patricia A; Clarke, Christine L; Stingl, John; Waterhouse, Paul D; Khokha, Rama

    2010-06-10

    Reproductive history is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer after age, genetics and breast density. Increased breast cancer risk is entwined with a greater number of ovarian hormone-dependent reproductive cycles, yet the basis for this predisposition is unknown. Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) are located within a specialized niche in the basal epithelial compartment that is under local and systemic regulation. The emerging role of MaSCs in cancer initiation warrants the study of ovarian hormones in MaSC homeostasis. Here we show that the MaSC pool increases 14-fold during maximal progesterone levels at the luteal dioestrus phase of the mouse. Stem-cell-enriched CD49fhi cells amplify at dioestrus, or with exogenous progesterone, demonstrating a key role for progesterone in propelling this expansion. In aged mice, CD49fhi cells display stasis upon cessation of the reproductive cycle. Progesterone drives a series of events where luminal cells probably provide Wnt4 and RANKL signals to basal cells which in turn respond by upregulating their cognate receptors, transcriptional targets and cell cycle markers. Our findings uncover a dynamic role for progesterone in activating adult MaSCs within the mammary stem cell niche during the reproductive cycle, where MaSCs are putative targets for cell transformation events leading to breast cancer. PMID:20445538

  7. Association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with vaccine response in adults with well-controlled HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, S B; Rossheim, A E B; Siik, J; Cunningham, T D; Kerry, J A

    2016-05-01

    Even after CD4 count recovery on antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection is associated with decreased response to most vaccines compared to the general population. Chronic infections with viruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), which are more prevalent in HIV-infected populations, have been linked to immune dysfunction and decreased vaccine response in the general population. However, whether co-infection with these other viruses contributes to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection is unknown. We conducted a secondary analysis of data and serum from adults with well-controlled HIV infection from an inactivated polio vaccine trial (224 subjects) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine study (128 subjects). We evaluated the association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with post-vaccination antibody levels using both univariate and multivariate analyses, controlling for factors such as age, race, CD4 count, comorbidities, smoking status, and baseline antibody levels. Ninety-three percent, 7%, and 14% of subjects were co-infected with CMV, HBV, and HCV respectively. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, neither CMV nor HCV co-infection were significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody levels to either vaccine. HBV co-infection was significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody concentrations for pneumococcal serotype 7F on univariate analysis and 6A on multivariate analysis, but the association was with higher antibody concentrations. In conclusion, co-infection with CMV, HBV, or HCV does not appear to contribute to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection. PMID:26751638

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Early Versus Standard Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults in Haiti

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Serena P; Bang, Heejung; Severe, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Ambroise, Alex; Edwards, Alison; Hippolyte, Jessica; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; McGreevy, Jolion; Riviere, Cynthia; Marcelin, Serge; Secours, Rode; Warren D. Johnson; Pape, Jean W; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background AIDS has killed more than 25 million people since 1981, and about 33 million people (most of them living in low- and middle-income countries) are now infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. HIV destroys immune system cells (including CD4 cells, a type of lymphocyte), leaving infected individuals susceptible to other infections. Early in the AIDS epidemic, most HIV-infected people died within 10 years of infection. Then, in 1996, highly active antiretroviral ...

  9. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL

  10. Hypercalcemia associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, S. A.; Cervantes, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a frequent manifestation of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I infection is endemic in the Caribbean, Japan, Melanesia, and Africa. This article presents two cases of ATL to increase awareness of the disease by primary care physicians. The management of hypercalcemia is discussed. PMID:7473848

  11. A Mathematical Model of Baculovirus Infection on Insect Cells at Low Multiplicity of Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Hong ZHANG; Josée C. MERCHUK

    2004-01-01

    The expression efficiency of the insect cells-baculovirus system used for insecticidal virus production and the expression of medically useful foreign genes is closely related with the dynamics of infection. The present studies develop a model of the dynamic process of insect cell infection with baculovirus at low multiplicity of infection (MOI), which is based on the multi-infection cycles of insect cell infection at low MOI. A mathematical model for the amount of viruses released from primary infected cells and the amount of free viruses before secondary infected cells release viruses has been developed. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental data confirms qualitatively that this model is highly reasonable before secondary infected cells release viruses. This model is considered as a base for further modeling the entire complicated infection process.

  12. Aplastic crisis caused by parvovirus B19 in an adult patient with sickle-cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Setúbal Sérgio; Gabriel Adelmo H.D.; Nascimento Jussara P.; Oliveira Solange A.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a case of aplastic crisis caused by parvovirus B19 in an adult sickle-cell patient presenting with paleness, tiredness, fainting and dyspnea. The absence of reticulocytes lead to the diagnosis. Anti-B19 IgM and IgG were detected. Reticulocytopenia in patients with hereditary hemolytic anemia suggests B19 infection.

  13. A Multicenter Study of Pertussis Infection in Adults with Coughing in Korea: PCR-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sunghoon; Lee, Myung-Gu; Lee, Kwan Ho; Park, Yong Bum; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Jeong-Woong; Kim, Changhwan; Lee, Yong Chul; Park, Jae Seuk; Kwon, Yong Soo; Seo, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Hui Jung; Kwak, Seung Min; Kim, Ju-Ock; Lim, Seong Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited data on the incidence and clinical characteristics of adult pertussis infections are available in Korea. Methods Thirty-one hospitals and the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collaborated to investigate the incidence and clinical characteristics of pertussis infections among adults with a bothersome cough in non-outbreak, ordinary outpatient settings. Nasopharyngeal aspirates or nasopharyngeal swabs were collected for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cul...

  14. Poor Aerobic Fitness May Contribute to Cognitive Decline in HIV-infected Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mapstone, Mark; Hilton, Tiffany N.; Yang, Hongmei; Guido, Joseph J.; Luque, Amneris E; Hall, William J.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Shah, Krupa

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-infected older adult (HOA) community is particularly vulnerable to cognitive impairment. Previous studies in the general older adult population have reported that lower scores on tests of cognitive function often correlate negatively with aerobic fitness [5–7]. HIV-infected individuals have significantly reduced aerobic fitness and physical function compared to HIV-uninfected individuals. Determining important correlates of cognitive ability may be beneficial in not only detecting pre...

  15. Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Radiation Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Juliann G

    2016-08-01

    Recent understanding of the cellular and molecular signaling activations in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has provided new insights into their potential clinical applications, particularly for tissue repair and regeneration. This review focuses on these advances, specifically in the context of self-renewal for tissue repair and recovery after radiation injury. Thus far, MSCs have been characterized extensively and shown to be useful in mitigation and therapy for acute radiation syndrome and cognitive dysfunction. Use of MSCs for treating radiation injury alone or in combination with additional trauma is foreseeable. PMID:27356065

  16. Murine cellular cytotoxicity to syngeneic and xenogeneic herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kohl, S; Drath, D B; Loo, L S

    1982-01-01

    Cellular cytotoxicity of C57BL/6 adult mice peritoneal cells to xenogeneic (Chang liver) and syngeneic (BL/6-WT3) herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells was analyzed in a 6-h 51Cr release assay. There was no difference in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to either target. There was no natural killer cytotoxicity to targets with cells from uninfected mice except at very high effector cell ratios. HSV-infected (2 X 10(4) PFU intraperitoneally 1 day previously) mice mediated significa...

  17. Isolation and characterization of human cells resistant to retrovirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Somia Nikunj V; Lech Patrycja

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Identification of host cell proteins required for HIV-1 infection will add to our knowledge of the life cycle of HIV-1 and in the development of therapeutics to combat viral infection. We and other investigators have mutagenized rodent cells and isolated mutant cell lines resistant to retrovirus infection. Since there are differences in the efficiency of single round infection with VSVG pseudotyped HIV-1 on cells of different species, we conducted a genetic screen to isola...

  18. Isolation and characterization of human cells resistant to retrovirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lech, Patrycja; Somia, Nikunj V.

    2007-01-01

    Background Identification of host cell proteins required for HIV-1 infection will add to our knowledge of the life cycle of HIV-1 and in the development of therapeutics to combat viral infection. We and other investigators have mutagenized rodent cells and isolated mutant cell lines resistant to retrovirus infection. Since there are differences in the efficiency of single round infection with VSVG pseudotyped HIV-1 on cells of different species, we conducted a genetic screen to isolate human ...

  19. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Norbeck, Oscar;

    2005-01-01

    : The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of...... and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%-0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. CONCLUSION: This is the first example to our knowledge of an "acute...

  20. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Gaspar; May, Janet S.; Soumi Sukla; Bruno Frederico; Michael B Gill; Smith, Christopher M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary We detect invading viruses with dendritic cells and eliminate them with lymphocytes. A key interaction is lymphocyte activation by dendritic cells presenting viral antigens. Not all viruses can be eliminated, and some that persist deliberately colonize lymphocytes and dendritic cells, such that parasitism and host defence co-exist within the same sites. Once established, these infections are very hard to eliminate. Therefore to vaccinate against them we must determine how infec...

  1. Antiretroviral treatment of adult HIV infection: 2014 recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunthard, H.F.; Aberg, J.A.; Eron, J.J.; Hoy, J.F.; Telenti, A.; Benson, C.A.; Burger, D.M.; Cahn, P.; Gallant, J.E.; Glesby, M.J.; Reiss, P.; Saag, M.S.; Thomas, D.L.; Jacobsen, D.M.; Volberding, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: New data and antiretroviral regimens expand treatment choices in resource-rich settings and warrant an update of recommendations to treat adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). OBJECTIVE: To provide updated treatment recommendations for adults with HIV, emphasizing when

  2. Urine methylmalonic acid levels in HIV-infected adults with peripheral neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Adewumi, Adediran; Titilope, Adeyemo; Akinsegun, Akinbami; Vincent, Osunkalu; Alani, Akanmu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cobalamin deficiency and peripheral neuropathy (PN) are commonly seen in HIV-infected adults. The level of urine methylmalonic acid (UMMA), a reliable indicator of tissue cobalamin status, was determined in HIV infected subjects with and without PN to establish this association.

  3. Immunotherapy of invasive fungal infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Schmidt, Stanislaw; Tramsen, Lars; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of new antifungal compounds, invasive fungal infection remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Allogeneic HSCT recipients suffer from a long lasting defect of different arms of the immune system, which increases the risk for and deteriorates the prognosis of invasive fungal infections. In turn, advances in understanding these immune deficits have resulted in pro...

  4. [Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuillet, Séverine; Giroux-Leprieur, Bénédicte; Tazi, Abdellatif

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans-cell histiocytosis in adults is a rare condition of unknown etiology characterized by the accumulation of Langerhans cells organized in granulomas involving the distal bronchioles and destroying their walls. It occurs in young subjects who smoke, with frequency peaking between 20 and 40 years. High-resolution thoracic CT is essential for diagnosis; in typical forms it shows a combination of nodules, cavitary nodules, thick-walled cysts, and thin-walled cysts. Diagnostic certainty requires a surgical lung biopsy, by videothoracoscopy, but only if a specialist considers it indicated. It is difficult to predict the disease course for any given patient. A prospective multicenter cohort study currently underway should provide more information about the natural history of this disease. Management is empirical, for efficacy has not been proved for any treatment. Stopping smoking is especially important to prevent the added development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular complications, or the onset of bronchopulmonary cancer, the frequency of which appears elevated in these patients. Oral corticosteroids are used to treat disease progression, especially in the symptomatic mainly nodular forms, but their efficacy for respiratory function has not been shown. Vinblastine, the reference treatment for multisystem forms of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis, is not indicated for pulmonary involvement in adults. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in this condition should eventually make it possible to develop innovative treatment strategies. The creation of the national reference center for Langerhans-cell histiocytosis has given new momentum to clinical and pathophysiologic research on this orphan disease. PMID:19959324

  5. Sertoli cells maintain Leydig cell number and peritubular myoid cell activity in the adult mouse testis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Rebourcet

    Full Text Available The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health.

  6. Parasite nematode infections in Awassi adult sheep: distribution through Syrian farm flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, N; Gruner, L; Giangaspero, M; Tabbaa, D

    1995-01-01

    A survey was conducted on 1,474 adult sheep from 73 flocks distributed in the 13 provinces of Syria. Faecal egg and larval nematode outputs were studied. Marshallagia and Nematodirus infections were higher in the driest areas; infections by other nematodes, Dictyocaulus and small lungworms (Cystocaulus and Muellerius) were higher in the more rainy areas. A long transhumance limited small lungworm infections, which were higher in flocks using wet night shelters. PMID:7795666

  7. An adult case of urinary tract infection with Kingella kingae: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ramana KV; SK Mohanty

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Kingella kingae, though part of the normal upper respiratory tract and genitourinary tract, is increasingly being recognized as an important human pathogen. During the past decade, it has emerged as a significant pathogen in the pediatric age group primarily causing bacteremia and osteoarticular infections. Adult infection usually occurs in individuals who are severely immunocompromised and most infections have taken the form of septicemia or septic arthritis. Bacteremia...

  8. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  9. PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Jarque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However, they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients.

  10. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, J.A.W. [Diagnostic Radiology Department, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab

  12. [Severe Haemophilus influenzae b infection in healthy male adult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, A.C.; Gjorup, I.; David, Kim Peter

    2008-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) can be the cause of serious infections, and is mainly observed affecting children and immuno-compromised patients. We report a case of a healthy 49-year old male with a severe Hib infection complicated by septicaemia, meningitis and anuria. The risk of invasive Hib...

  13. A Clinical Predictor Score for 30-Day Mortality among HIV-Infected Adults Hospitalized with Pneumonia in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Koss

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a major cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. Pneumonia severity scores are promising tools to assist clinicians in predicting patients' 30-day mortality, but existing scores were developed in populations infected with neither HIV nor tuberculosis (TB and include laboratory data that may not be available in resource-limited settings. The objective of this study was to develop a score to predict mortality in HIV-infected adults with pneumonia in TB-endemic, resource-limited settings.We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective study enrolling HIV-infected adults with cough ≥2 weeks and 120 beats/minute, respiratory rate >30 breaths/minute, oxygen saturation <90%, and CD4 cell count <50 cells/mm3. Patients' 30-day mortality, stratified by score, was: score 0 or 1, 12.6%, score 2 or 3, 23.4%, score 4, 53.9%. For each 1 point change in clinical predictor score, the odds of 30-day mortality increased by 65% (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.39-1.96, p <0.001.A simple, four-point scoring system can stratify patients by levels of risk for mortality. Rapid identification of higher risk patients combined with provision of timely and appropriate treatment may improve clinical outcomes. This predictor score should be validated in other resource-limited settings.

  14. Differential anti-glycan antibody responses in Schistosoma mansoni-infected children and adults studied by shotgun glycan microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela van Diepen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis (bilharzia is a chronic and potentially deadly parasitic disease that affects millions of people in (subtropical areas. An important partial immunity to Schistosoma infections does develop in disease endemic areas, but this takes many years of exposure and maturation of the immune system. Therefore, children are far more susceptible to re-infection after treatment than older children and adults. This age-dependent immunity or susceptibility to re-infection has been shown to be associated with specific antibody and T cell responses. Many antibodies generated during Schistosoma infection are directed against the numerous glycans expressed by Schistosoma. The nature of glycan epitopes recognized by antibodies in natural schistosomiasis infection serum is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The binding of serum antibodies to glycans can be analyzed efficiently and quantitatively using glycan microarray approaches. Very small amounts of a large number of glycans are presented on a solid surface allowing binding properties of various glycan binding proteins to be tested. We have generated a so-called shotgun glycan microarray containing natural N-glycan and lipid-glycan fractions derived from 4 different life stages of S. mansoni and applied this array to the analysis of IgG and IgM antibodies in sera from children and adults living in an endemic area. This resulted in the identification of differential glycan recognition profiles characteristic for the two different age groups, possibly reflecting differences in age or differences in length of exposure or infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the shotgun glycan microarray approach to study antibody response profiles against schistosome-derived glycan elements, we have defined groups of infected individuals as well as glycan element clusters to which antibody responses are directed in S. mansoni infections. These findings are significant for further

  15. Cost-effectiveness of early versus standard antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults in Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena P Koenig

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a randomized clinical trial of early versus standard antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm³ in Haiti, early ART decreased mortality by 75%. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of early versus standard ART in this trial. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Trial data included use of ART and other medications, laboratory tests, outpatient visits, radiographic studies, procedures, and hospital services. Medication, laboratory, radiograph, labor, and overhead costs were from the study clinic, and hospital and procedure costs were from local providers. We evaluated cost per year of life saved (YLS, including patient and caregiver costs, with a median of 21 months and maximum of 36 months of follow-up, and with costs and life expectancy discounted at 3% per annum. Between 2005 and 2008, 816 participants were enrolled and followed for a median of 21 months. Mean total costs per patient during the trial were US$1,381 for early ART and US$1,033 for standard ART. After excluding research-related laboratory tests without clinical benefit, costs were US$1,158 (early ART and US$979 (standard ART. Early ART patients had higher mean costs for ART (US$398 versus US$81 but lower costs for non-ART medications, CD4 cell counts, clinically indicated tests, and radiographs (US$275 versus US$384. The cost-effectiveness ratio after a maximum of 3 years for early versus standard ART was US$3,975/YLS (95% CI US$2,129/YLS-US$9,979/YLS including research-related tests, and US$2,050/YLS excluding research-related tests (95% CI US$722/YLS-US$5,537/YLS. CONCLUSIONS: Initiating ART in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm³ in Haiti, consistent with World Health Organization advice, was cost-effective (US$/YLS <3 times gross domestic product per capita after a maximum of 3 years, after excluding research-related laboratory tests. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120510.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Early Versus Standard Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Serena P.; Bang, Heejung; Severe, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Ambroise, Alex; Edwards, Alison; Hippolyte, Jessica; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; McGreevy, Jolion; Riviere, Cynthia; Marcelin, Serge; Secours, Rode; Johnson, Warren D.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a randomized clinical trial of early versus standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, early ART decreased mortality by 75%. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of early versus standard ART in this trial. Methods and Findings Trial data included use of ART and other medications, laboratory tests, outpatient visits, radiographic studies, procedures, and hospital services. Medication, laboratory, radiograph, labor, and overhead costs were from the study clinic, and hospital and procedure costs were from local providers. We evaluated cost per year of life saved (YLS), including patient and caregiver costs, with a median of 21 months and maximum of 36 months of follow-up, and with costs and life expectancy discounted at 3% per annum. Between 2005 and 2008, 816 participants were enrolled and followed for a median of 21 months. Mean total costs per patient during the trial were US$1,381 for early ART and US$1,033 for standard ART. After excluding research-related laboratory tests without clinical benefit, costs were US$1,158 (early ART) and US$979 (standard ART). Early ART patients had higher mean costs for ART (US$398 versus US$81) but lower costs for non-ART medications, CD4 cell counts, clinically indicated tests, and radiographs (US$275 versus US$384). The cost-effectiveness ratio after a maximum of 3 years for early versus standard ART was US$3,975/YLS (95% CI US$2,129/YLS–US$9,979/YLS) including research-related tests, and US$2,050/YLS excluding research-related tests (95% CI US$722/YLS–US$5,537/YLS). Conclusions Initiating ART in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, consistent with World Health Organization advice, was cost-effective (US$/YLS <3 times gross domestic product per capita) after a maximum of 3 years, after excluding research-related laboratory tests. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120510 Please see

  17. Urinary Tract Infections in Adolescents and Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for prevention of UTI)]. Stephen B Calderwood, MD Patent Holder: Vaccine Technologies Inc [Vaccines (Cholera vaccines)]. Equity ... frequently or having a new sex partner ● Having diabetes ● Having a bladder or kidney infection in the ...

  18. Adult neural stem cells-Functional potential and therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; ZHU Jianhong

    2004-01-01

    The adult brain has been thought traditionally as a structure with a very limited regenerative capacity. It is now evident that neurogenesis in adult mammalian brain is a prevailing phenomenon. Neural stem cells with the ability to self-renew, differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes reside in some regions of the adult brain. Adult neurogenesis can be stimulated by many physiological factors including pregnancy. More strikingly, newborn neurons in hippocampus integrally function with local neurons, thus neural stem cells might play important roles in memory and learning function. It seems that neural stem cells could transdifferentiate into other tissues, such as blood cells and muscles. Although there are some impediments in this field, some attempts have been made to employ adult neural stem cells in the cell replacement therapy for traumatic and ischemic brain injuries.

  19. Clinical characteristics analysis of adult human adenovirus type 7 infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张乃春

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients infected with human adenovirus type 7 and to provide guidance for early diagnosis and timely control of the outbreak.Methods A total of 301 patients infected with the human adenoviruses who were quarantined in hospital from December 2012 to February 2013 were observed.Epidemiological questionnaires were used to collect data of clinical features of the disease including

  20. Comparison of pediatric and adult antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Lynne Vernice; Ozen, Metehan; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridum difficile infections (CDI) have been well studied for adult cases, but not as well in the pediatric population. Whether the disease process or response to treatments differs between pediatric and adult patients is an important clinical concern when following global guidelines based largely on adult patients. A systematic review of the literature using databases PubMed (June 3, 1978-2015) was conducted to compare AAD and CDI in pediatric and adult populations and determine significant differences and similarities that might impact clinical decisions. In general, pediatric AAD and CDI have a more rapid onset of symptoms, a shorter duration of disease and fewer CDI complications (required surgeries and extended hospitalizations) than in adults. Children experience more community-associated CDI and are associated with smaller outbreaks than adult cases of CDI. The ribotype NAP1/027/BI is more common in adults than children. Children and adults share some similar risk factors, but adults have more complex risk factor profiles associated with more co-morbidities, types of disruptive factors and a wider range of exposures to C. difficile in the healthcare environment. The treatment of pediatric and adult AAD is similar (discontinuing or switching the inciting antibiotic), but other treatment strategies for AAD have not been established. Pediatric CDI responds better to metronidazole, while adult CDI responds better to vancomycin. Recurrent CDI is not commonly reported for children. Prevention for both pediatric and adult AAD and CDI relies upon integrated infection control programs, antibiotic stewardship and may include the use of adjunctive probiotics. Clinical presentation of pediatric AAD and CDI are different than adult AAD and CDI symptoms. These differences should be taken into account when rating severity of disease and prescribing antibiotics. PMID:27003987

  1. Comparison of pediatric and adult antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Lynne Vernice; Ozen, Metehan; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Goh, Shan

    2016-03-21

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridum difficile infections (CDI) have been well studied for adult cases, but not as well in the pediatric population. Whether the disease process or response to treatments differs between pediatric and adult patients is an important clinical concern when following global guidelines based largely on adult patients. A systematic review of the literature using databases PubMed (June 3, 1978-2015) was conducted to compare AAD and CDI in pediatric and adult populations and determine significant differences and similarities that might impact clinical decisions. In general, pediatric AAD and CDI have a more rapid onset of symptoms, a shorter duration of disease and fewer CDI complications (required surgeries and extended hospitalizations) than in adults. Children experience more community-associated CDI and are associated with smaller outbreaks than adult cases of CDI. The ribotype NAP1/027/BI is more common in adults than children. Children and adults share some similar risk factors, but adults have more complex risk factor profiles associated with more co-morbidities, types of disruptive factors and a wider range of exposures to C. difficile in the healthcare environment. The treatment of pediatric and adult AAD is similar (discontinuing or switching the inciting antibiotic), but other treatment strategies for AAD have not been established. Pediatric CDI responds better to metronidazole, while adult CDI responds better to vancomycin. Recurrent CDI is not commonly reported for children. Prevention for both pediatric and adult AAD and CDI relies upon integrated infection control programs, antibiotic stewardship and may include the use of adjunctive probiotics. Clinical presentation of pediatric AAD and CDI are different than adult AAD and CDI symptoms. These differences should be taken into account when rating severity of disease and prescribing antibiotics. PMID:27003987

  2. The importance of bacterial and viral infections associated with adult asthma exacerbations in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyasu Iikura

    Full Text Available Viral infection is one of the risk factors for asthma exacerbation. However, which pathogens are related to asthma exacerbation in adults remains unclear.The relation between various infections and adult asthma exacerbations was investigated in clinical practice.The study subjects included 50 adult inpatients due to asthma exacerbations and 20 stable outpatients for comparison. The pathogens from a nasopharyngeal swab were measured by multiplex PCR analysis.Asthma exacerbations occurred after a common cold in 48 inpatients. The numbers of patients with viral, bacterial, or both infections were 16, 9, and 9, respectively. The dominant viruses were rhinoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and metapneumovirus. The major bacteria were S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Compared to pathogen-free patients, the patients with pathogens were older and non-atopic and had later onset of disease, lower FeNO levels, lower IgE titers, and a higher incidence of comorbid sinusitis, COPD, or pneumonia. Compared to stable outpatients, asthma exacerbation inpatients had a higher incidence of smoking and comorbid sinusitis, COPD, or pneumonia. Viruses were detected in 50% of stable outpatients, but a higher incidence of rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus infections was observed in asthma exacerbation inpatients. H. influenzae was observed in stable asthmatic patients. Other bacteria, especially S. pneumoniae, were important in asthma exacerbation inpatients.Viral or bacterial infections were observed in 70% of inpatients with an asthma exacerbation in clinical practice. Infection with S. pneumoniae was related to adult asthma exacerbation.

  3. Determinants for tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia: a multicentre case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta; Awoke, Worku; Wilder-Smith, Annalies

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify determinants for tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia. Design Case–control study. Setting Three hospitals and 10 health centres in Northwest Ethiopia. Participants A total of 446 individuals consented to participate in the study (150 cases and 296 controls). Cases were HIV-infected adults diagnosed with active TB, and controls were HIV-infected adults without active TB. Main outcome measure The link between TB ...

  4. Lopinavir/ritonavir significantly influences pharmacokinetic exposure of artemether/lumefantrine in HIV-infected Ugandan adults

    OpenAIRE

    Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Lamorde, Mohammed; Okaba-Kayom, Violet; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Katabira, Elly; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Pakker, Nadine; Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas; de Vries, Peter J; Back, David; Khoo, Saye; Merry, Concepta

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of HIV/malaria-coinfected patients with antiretroviral therapy (ART) and artemisinin-based combination therapy has potential for drug interactions. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of artemether, dihydroartemisinin and lumefantrine after administration of a single dose of 80/480 mg of artemether/lumefantrine to HIV-infected adults, taken with and without lopinavir/ritonavir. Methods A two-arm parallel study of 13 HIV-infected ART-naive adults and 16 HIV-infected adult...

  5. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Abacavir (1592U89), Zidovudine, and Lamivudine Administered Alone and in Combination in Adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Laurene H.; Chittick, Gregory E.; McDowell, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Abacavir (1592U89), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), has been evaluated for efficacy and safety in combination regimens with other nucleoside analogs, including zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC). To evaluate the potential pharmacokinetic interactions between these agents, 15 HIV-1-infected adults with a median CD4+ cell count of 347 cells/mm3 (range, 238 to 570 cells/mm3) were enrolled in a randomized,...

  6. Acceleration of age-associated methylation patterns in HIV-1-infected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy M Rickabaugh

    Full Text Available Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of young (20-35 and older (36-56 adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, p<1 x 10(-200 and 0.47, p<1 x 10(-200. Weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3 was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70 and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31. Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015. In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage=0.007088, p=2.08 x 10(-9; βHIV=0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage=0.008762, p=1.27 x 10(-5; βHIV=0.128649, p=0.0001. Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10(-6, odds ratio=1.91. These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that

  7. Risk factors for perceived unmet medical needs in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cho Ryok; Bang, Ji Hwan; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Kui Nam; Lee, Hee-Jin; Lee, Young Hwa; Ryu, Bo Yeong; Cho, Soo Kyung; Oh, Myoung-Don; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2016-09-01

    To identify the factors associated with perceived unmet medical needs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, we analyzed the results from a series of city-wide cross-sectional surveys of HIV-infected adults living in Seoul, Korea. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors related to unmet medical needs. Among the 775 subjects included in the study, 15.4% had perceived unmet medical needs. Significant factors included age group (35-49 years; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-3.06), lower monthly income (aOR, 3.75 for the <$900/mo group and 2.44 for the $900-$1800/mo group; 95% CI, 1.68-8.35 and 1.18-5.04, respectively), beneficiaries of the National Medical Aid Program (aOR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.01-3.17), recent CD4 cell counts <500/µL (aOR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.33). Taken together, these data reveal strong associations of middle age and low socioeconomic status with perceived unmet medical needs among HIV-infected adults. PMID:27009447

  8. Respiratory infections in adults with atopic disease and IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis and asthma, are common diseases with a prevalence of 30-40% worldwide and are thus of great global public health importance. Allergic inflammation may influence the immunity against infections, so atopic individuals could be susceptible to respiratory infections. No previous population-based study has addressed the relation between atopy and respiratory infections in adulthood. We assessed the relation between atopic disease, specific IgE antibodies and the occurrence of upper and lower respiratory infections in the past 12 months among working-aged adults. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A population-based cross-sectional study of 1008 atopic and non-atopic adults 21-63 years old was conducted. Information on atopic diseases, allergy tests and respiratory infections was collected by a questionnaire. Specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens were measured in serum. Adults with atopic disease had a significantly increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI; including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted risk ratio (RR 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43, 3.52 and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI; including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted RR 1.55 (1.14, 2.10. The risk of LRTIs increased with increasing level of specific IgE (linear trend P = 0.059. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new evidence that working-aged adults with atopic disease experience significantly more LRTIs and URTIs than non-atopics. The occurrence of respiratory infections increased with increasing levels of specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens, showing a dose-response pattern with LRTIs. From the clinical point of view it is important to recognize that those with atopies are a risk group for respiratory infections, including more severe LRTIs.

  9. Prevalence and Predictors of Intestinal Helminth Infections Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1–Infected Adults in an Urban African Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Modjarrad, Kayvon; Zulu, Isaac; Redden, David T.; Njobvu, Lungowe; Freedman, David O; Vermund, Sten H.

    2005-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is disproportionately burdened by intestinal helminth and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. Recent evidence suggests detrimental immunologic effects from concomitant infection with the two pathogens. Few studies, however, have assessed the prevalence of and predictors for intestinal helminth infection among HIV-1–infected adults in urban African settings where HIV infection rates are highest. We collected and analyzed sociodemographic and parasitologic data fr...

  10. Adult neural stem cells in the mammalian central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dengke K Ma; Michael A Bonaguidi; Guo-li Ming; Hongjun Song

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are present not only during the embryonic development but also in the adult brain of all mammalian species, including humans. Stem cell niche architecture in vivo enables adult NSCs to continuously generate functional neurons in specific brain regions throughout life. The adult neurogenesis process is subject to dynamic regulation by various physiological, pathological and pharmacological stimuli. Multipotent adult NSCs also appear to be intrinsically plastic, amenable to genetic programing during normal differentiation, and to epigenetic reprograming during de-differentiation into pluripotency. Increasing evidence suggests that adult NSCs significantly contribute to specialized neural functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Fully understanding the biology of adult NSCs will provide crucial insights into both the etiology and potential therapeutic interventions of major brain disorders. Here, we review recent progress on adult NSCs of the mammalian central nervous system, in-cluding topics on their identity, niche, function, plasticity, and emerging roles in cancer and regenerative medicine.

  11. Cytokine production by endothelial cells infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus type I.

    OpenAIRE

    H. Takashima; Eguchi, K.; Kawakami, A; Kawabe, Y; Migita, K; Sakai, M; Origuchi, T; Nagataki, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ability of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) to infect endothelial cells and induce cytokine production by these cells. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cocultured with HTLV-I infected T cell line (MT-2 cells) or uninfected T cell line (CEM cells). RESULTS: Following coculture with MT-2 cells, endothelial cells expressed HTLV-I specific core antigens. Endothelial cells cocultured with MT-2 cells produced significant amoun...

  12. Oral epithelial cells are susceptible to cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity are exposed to HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. Genital secretions and breast milk of HIV-1-infected subjects contain both cell-free and cell-associated virus. To determine if oral epithelial cells can be infected with HIV-1 we exposed gingival keratinocytes and adenoid epithelial cells to cell-free virus and HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. Using primary isolates we determined that gingival keratinocytes are susceptible to HIV-1 infection via cell-free CD4-independent infection only. R5 but not X4 viral strains were capable of infecting the keratinocytes. Further, infected cells were able to release infectious virus. In addition, primary epithelial cells isolated from adenoids were also susceptible to infection; both cell-free and cell-associated virus infected these cells. These data have potential implications in the transmission of HIV-1 in the oral cavity

  13. SECONDARY BACTERIAL INFECTION IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH PROLONGED AND SEVERE DENGUE FEVER

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    Anil Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Generally, in dengue shock syndrome antibiotics are not advised. But unrecognised bacterial infection is likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality, probably because of increased vascular permeability. OBJECTIVES To assess the incidence of secondary bacterial infection in adult patients with prolonged and severe dengue fever. METHODS A prospective study was conducted recruiting patients with confirmed acute dengue infection who had prolonged fever (>5 days. Prior to institution of antibiotic therapy, two sets of blood cultures were taken from patients. Demographic, clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters were recorded. Severity of fever & associated symptoms assessed. Ultrasonography done to find out development of ascites and pleural effusions. RESULTS Sixty patients (60.0% males with a mean age of 33.5 years (SD 12.1 were studied. The average duration of fever was 6.9 days (SD 1.6. Fifteen patients (25% had bacterial isolates in their blood cultures; Staphylococcus aureus (n=3, coliforms (n=7, pseudomonas (n=2 and 3 had mixed growths. The culture positive group had severe body aches and joints paint at admission and high grade fever, third space fluid accumulation and significant drop in platelets compared to culture-negative group. CONCLUSIONS A quarter of dengue patients with prolonged fever had a bacterial isolate. Culture-positive patients appeared more ill with body aches and had higher degrees of fever during the course of the illness. Increased vascular permeability may predispose to bacterial seepage into blood. Although white cell count is not helpful in detecting bacteraemia in dengue fever, low platelet count and severe symptoms at presentation may be helpful.

  14. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis B Infection in an Adult Population in Northeast China

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Zhang, Qingmei Li, Jie Sun, Chunyan Wang, Qing Gu, Xiangwei Feng, Bing Du, Wei Wang, Xiaodong Shi, Siqi Zhang, Wanyu Li, Yanfang Jiang, Junyan Feng, Shumei He, Junqi Niu

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim: The prevalence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is higher in adults than in children. We determined the seroepidemiology of HBV infection in an adult population in JiLin, China, to guide effective preventive measures.Methods: A cross-sectional serosurvey was conducted throughout JiLin, China. A total of 3833 people was selected and demographic and behavioral information gathered. Serum samples were tested for HBV markers and liver enzymes.Results: The prevalence of the hepat...

  15. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis B Infection in an Adult Population in Northeast China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Qingmei; Sun, Jie; Wang, Chunyan; Gu, Qing; Feng, Xiangwei; Du, Bing; Wang, Wei; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Siqi; Li, Wanyu; Jiang, Yanfang; Feng, Junyan; He, Shumei; Niu, Junqi

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim: The prevalence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is higher in adults than in children. We determined the seroepidemiology of HBV infection in an adult population in JiLin, China, to guide effective preventive measures. Methods: A cross-sectional serosurvey was conducted throughout JiLin, China. A total of 3833 people was selected and demographic and behavioral information gathered. Serum samples were tested for HBV markers and liver enzymes. Results: The prevalence of the hep...

  16. A Case of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in an HIV-Positive Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is commonly known to cause an influenza-like illness. However, it can also cause more severe disease in young children and older adults comprising of organ transplant patients with immunocompromised status. Till date, only four cases of RSV infections have been reported in HIV-positive adults. We describe here a case of HIV-positive female with relatively preserved immune function who presented with RSV infection requiring ventilation and showed improvement after prompt treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin.

  17. Modified Kigali Combined Staging Predicts Risk of Mortality in HIV-Infected Adults in Lusaka, Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Philip J.; Zulu, Isaac; Kancheya, Nzali G.; Lakhi, Shabir; Chomba, Elwyn; Vwalika, Cheswa; Kim, Dhong-Jin; Brill, Ilene; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the utility of the modified Kigali combined (MKC) staging system for predicting survival in HIV-infected Zambian adults in a prospective, longitudinal, open cohort. From 1995 to 2004, HIV-discordant couples (one HIV-infected partner and one HIV-negative partner) were recruited from couples' voluntary counseling and testing centers in Lusaka, Zambia and followed at 3-month intervals. MKC stage, which incorporates clinical stage with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), hematocrit,...

  18. Prevalence of sapovirus infection among infant and adult patients with acute gastroenteritis in Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Romani, Sara; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Bozorgi, Sajad Majidizadeh; Zali, Narges; JADALI, Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study investigated the prevalence of sapovirus infections in patient with acute gastroenteritis in Tehran, Iran. Background Sapovirus, a member of the family Caliciviridae is one of the major causative agents of viral gastroenteritis affecting both children and adult individuals. There isn't enough data about prevalence and genotypes of sapovirus infection in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. Patients and methods A total of 42 fecal samples were collected from patients with acute gas...

  19. Predictors of Pneumonia Severity in HIV-Infected Adults Admitted to an Urban Public Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Chew, Kara W.; Yen, Irene H.; Li, Jonathan Z.; Winston, Lisa G.

    2011-01-01

    Data on outcomes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the HIV-infected population are mixed and the perception of worse outcomes in HIV may lead to excess hospitalization. We retrospectively evaluated the utility of the Pneumonia Severity Index, or PORT score, as a prediction rule for mortality in 102 HIV-infected adults hospitalized at an urban public hospital with CAP. Primary outcome was survival at 30 days. Secondary outcomes included survival on discharge, intensive care unit (ICU) a...

  20. Poliovirus mutants excreted by a chronically infected hypogammaglobulinemic patient establish persistent infections in human intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunodeficient patients whose gut is chronically infected by vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) may excrete large amounts of virus for years. To investigate how poliovirus (PV) establishes chronic infections in the gut, we tested whether it is possible to establish persistent VDPV infections in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Four type 3 VDPV mutants, representative of the viral evolution in the gut of a hypogammaglobulinemic patient over almost 2 years [J. Virol. 74 (2000) 3001], were used to infect both undifferentiated, dividing cells, and differentiated, polarized enterocytes. A VDPV mutant excreted 36 days postvaccination by the patient was lytic in both types of intestinal cell cultures, like the parental Sabin 3 (S3) strain. In contrast, three VDPVs excreted 136, 442, and 637 days postvaccination, established persistent infections both in undifferentiated cells and in enterocytes. Thus, viral determinants selected between day 36 and 136 conferred on VDPV mutants the capacity to infect intestinal cells persistently. The percentage of persistently VDPV-infected cultures was higher in enterocytes than in undifferentiated cells, implicating cellular determinants involved in the differentiation of enterocytes in persistent VDPV infections. The establishment of persistent infections in enterocytes was not due to poor replication of VDPVs in these cells, but was associated with reduced viral adsorption to the cell surface

  1. Cell Phone Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryen, Diane Nelson; Carey, Allison; Friedman, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Although cell phone use has grown dramatically, there is a gap in cell phone access between people with disabilities and the general public. The importance of cell phone use among people with intellectual disabilities and studies about use of cell phones by adults with intellectual disabilities was described. Our goal was to determine the extent…

  2. B-Cell Response during Protozoan Parasite Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Amezcua Vesely, María C; Bermejo, Daniela A.; Montes, Carolina L.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Eva V.; Adriana Gruppi

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we discuss how protozoan parasites alter immature and mature B cell compartment. B1 and marginal zone (MZ) B cells, considered innate like B cells, are activated during protozoan parasite infections, and they generate short lived plasma cells providing a prompt antibody source. In addition, protozoan infections induce massive B cell response with polyclonal activation that leads to hypergammaglobulnemia with serum antibodies specific for the parasites and self and/or non relat...

  3. Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference Update: Infections in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, RH; Fallone, CA; Thomson, ABR

    1999-01-01

    The first Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference took place in April 1997. The initial recommendations of the conference were published in early 1998. An update meeting was held in June 1998, and the present paper updates and complements the earlier recommendations. Key changes included the following: the recommendation for testing and treating H pylori infection in patients with known peptic ulcer disease was extended to testing and treating patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia; it ...

  4. Distal Airway Stem Cells Render Alveoli in Vitro and During Lung Regeneration Following H1N1 Influenza Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pooja A.; Hu, Yuanyu; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hoe, Neo Boon; Wei, Tay Seok; Mu, Dakai; Sun, Yan; Joo, Lim Siew; Dagher, Rania; Zielonka, Elisabeth; Wang, Yun; Chow, Vincent T.; Crum, Christopher P.; Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The extent of lung regeneration following catastrophic damage and the potential role of adult stem cells in such a process remains obscure. Sublethal infection of mice with an H1N1 influenza virus related to that of the 1918 pandemic triggers massive airway damage followed by apparent regeneration. We show here that p63-expressing stem cells in the bronchiolar epithelium undergo rapid proliferation after infection and radiate to interbronchiolar regions of alveolar ablation. Once there, these...

  5. Nosocomial infection in adult admissions with hematological malignancies originating from different lineages: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection (NI causes prolonged hospital stays, increased healthcare costs, and higher mortality among patients with hematological malignancies (HM. However, few studies have compared the incidence of NI according to the HM lineage.To compare the incidence of NI according to the type of HM lineage, and identify the risk factors for NI.This prospective observational study monitored adult patients with HM admitted for >48 hours to the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army during 2010-2013. Attack rates and incidences of NI were compared, and multivariable logistic regression was used to control for confounding effects.This study included 6,613 admissions from 1,922 patients. During these admissions, 1,023 acquired 1,136 NI episodes, with an attack rate of 15.47% and incidence of 9.6‰ (95% CI: 9.1-10.2. Higher rates and densities of NIs were observed among myeloid neoplasm (MN admissions, compared to lymphoid neoplasm (LN admissions (28.42% vs. 11.00%, P<0.001 and 11.4% vs. 8.4‰, P<0.001. NI attack rates in acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN were higher than those in MDS (30.69% vs. 20.19%, P<0.001; 38.89% vs. 20.19%, P = 0.003. Attack rates in T/NK-cell neoplasm and B-cell neoplasm were higher than those in Hodgkin lymphoma (15.04% vs. 3.65%; 10.94% vs. 3.65%, P<0.001. Multivariable regression analysis indicated prolonged hospitalization, presence of central venous catheterization, neutropenia, current stem cell transplant, infection on admission, and old age were independently associated with higher NI incidence. After adjusting for these factors, MN admissions still had a higher risk of infection (odds ratio 1.34, 95% CI: 1.13-1.59, P<0.001.Different NI attack rates were observed for HM from different lineages, with MN lineages having a higher attack rate and incidence than LN lineages. Special attention should be paid to MN admissions, especially AML and MDS

  6. A case-control study of risk factors for rotavirus infections in adults, Denmark, 2005-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorleans, F; Falkenhorst, G; Böttiger, B; Howitz, M; Midgley, S; Nielsen, J; Mølbak, K; Ethelberg, S

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) infections affect young children, but can also occur in adults. We sought to identify risk factors for RV infections in adults aged ⩾18 years in Denmark, and to describe illness and genotyping characteristics. From March 2005 to February 2009, we recruited consecutive cases of...

  7. Education of the adult learner: a practical approach for the infection control practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M M; Lynch, P

    1986-12-01

    Infection control practitioners (ICPs) are expected to be educators in their role, yet few have had formal training in preparing, presenting, and evaluating education programs for personnel from different disciplines. This article presents guidance from several sources specific to "andragogy"--the art and science of helping adults learn--to assist the ICP in the role of educator. PMID:3642995

  8. Increased Coronary Vessel Wall Thickness in HIV-Infected Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.; Unsal, Aylin B.; Eshera, Sarah; Matta, Jatin R.; Muldoon, Nancy; McAreavey, Dorothea; Purdy, Julia B.; HAZRA, Rohan; Hadigan, Colleen; Gharib, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Young adults infected with HIV early in life have significantly thicker right coronary artery walls than controls as measured by black-blood coronary magnetic resonance imaging. Vessel wall thickening in patients correlated with length of antiretroviral exposure, smoking pack-years, and hyperlipidemia.

  9. Adult Reye-like syndrome associated with serologic evidence of acute parvovirus B19 infection

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    Paulo Sérgio Gonçalves da Costa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Reye's syndrome is an infrequently diagnosed medical condition affecting mainly children. The etiology, epidemiology and natural history of Reye's syndrome have been cloudily written in footnotes of medical books and exotic papers since the initial description in early 1950s. We report here a case of adult Reye's syndrome associated with serologic evidence of parvovirus B19 infection.

  10. Serious systemic infection caused by non-encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae biotype III in an adult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lester, Anne; Pedersen, P B

    1991-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is the aetiological agent in less than 1% of septic arthritis cases in adults and most often serotype b is involved. We report here a case of severe systemic infection due to non-encapsulated H. influenzae biotype III in a 40-year-old man, previously healthy although alcoho...

  11. Predominant Infection of CD150+ Lymphocytes and Dendritic Cells during Measles Virus Infection of Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    de Swart, Rik L.; Ludlow, Martin; de Witte, Lot; Yanagi, Yusuke; van Amerongen, Geert; McQuaid, Stephen; Yüksel, Selma; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H; Duprex, W. Paul; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is hypothesized to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150), which has been identified as the receptor for wild-type MV. We have infected rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant MV strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP); thus bringing together the optimal animal model fo...

  12. Adult neural stem cells: The promise of the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Philippe TaupinNational Neuroscience Institute, National University of SingaporeAbstract: Stem cells are self-renewing undifferentiated cells that give rise to multiple types of specialized cells of the body. In the adult, stem cells are multipotents and contribute to homeostasis of the tissues and regeneration after injury. Until recently, it was believed that the adult brain was devoid of stem cells, hence unable to make new neurons and regenerate. With the recent evidences that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS, the adult brain has the potential to regenerate and may be amenable to repair. The function(s of NSCs in the adult CNS remains the source of intense research and debates. The promise of the future of adult NSCs is to redefine the functioning and physiopathology of the CNS, as well as to treat a broad range of CNS diseases and injuries.Keywords: neurogenesis, transdifferentiation, plasticity, cellular therapy

  13. Permissiveness of human hepatoma cell lines for HCV infection

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    Sainz Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary and established human hepatoma cell lines have been evaluated for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in vitro, thus far only Huh7 cells have been found to be highly permissive for infectious HCV. Since our understanding of the HCV lifecycle would benefit from the identification of additional permissive cell lines, we assembled a panel of hepatic and non-hepatic cell lines and assessed their ability to support HCV infection. Here we show infection of the human hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and Hep3B with cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc, albeit to lower levels than that achieved in Huh7 cells. To better understand the reduced permissiveness of PLC and Hep3B cells for HCVcc infection, we performed studies to evaluate the ability of each cell line to support specific steps of the viral lifecycle (i.e. entry, replication, egress and spread. Results We found that while the early events in HCV infection (i.e. entry plus replication initiation are cumulatively equivalent or only marginally reduced in PLC and Hep3B cells, later steps of the viral life cycle such as steady-state replication, de novo virus production and/or spread are impaired to different degrees in PLC and Hep3B cultures compared to Huh7 cell cultures. Interestingly, we also observed that interferon stimulated gene (i.e. ISG56 expression was significantly and differentially up-regulated in PLC and Hep3B cells following viral infection. Conclusions We conclude that the restrictions observed later during HCV infection in these cell lines could in part be attributed to HCV-induced innate signaling. Nevertheless, the identification of two new cell lines capable of supporting authentic HCVcc infection, even at reduced levels, expands the current repertoire of cell lines amendable for the study of HCV in vitro and should aid in further elucidating HCV biology and the cellular determinants that modulate HCV infection.

  14. [Molecular features of beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Ryoko; Okada, Keisuke; Chiba, Naoko; Ubukata, Kimiko; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    We studied the relationship between features of beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 45) isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors observed from January 2001 through August at a hospital for the elderly. The meanage of subjects having invasive streptococcal infection with 22 invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) strains, 2 S. pyogenes isolates, and 21 S. agalactiae (GBS) was 80 years, and 85.7% and 86.4% had underly diseases in the GBS and SDSE infections. SDSE-infected were mainly emergency woman outpatients and GBS infected were mainly man inpatients. The clinical syndrome involved pneumonia, urosepsis, and cellulitis. GBS mortality was 14.3% and SDSE mortality 27.3%. Compared to survivors, nonsurvivors had more thrombocytopenia and marked serum C-reactive protein elevation when blood culture were performed. No difference was seen in white blood cell count between bath groups. Our observations suggest that blood culture should be obtained before antimicrobials administration in elderly individuals with underlying illness who are seen at the emergency department and have laboratory blood data suggestive of infectious disease. PMID:20560419

  15. Identifying research priorities on infections in older adults: proceedings of an interdisciplinary workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohfeld Lynne

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections pose a substantial burden to the health of older adults. In this report, we describe the proceedings of a workshop to formulate and prioritize research questions about infections in older adults using an interdisciplinary approach. Methods Researchers from four sectors (basic science, clinical sciences, health services and epidemiology/determinants of health and representatives from various Canadian local, provincial, and federal stakeholder groups were invited to a two-day workshop. Five multi-disciplinary groups and stakeholders from each of three healthcare settings (long term, acute care and community discussed research priorities for each of the settings. Five to ten research questions were identified for each setting. Results The research questions proposed ranged from risk factors and outcomes for different infections to the effect of nutrition on infection and the role of alternative and complementary medicine in treating infections. Health service issues included barriers to immunization, prolongation of hospital length of stay by infection, use of care paths for managing infections, and decision-making in determining the site of care for individuals with infections. Clinical questions included risk factor assessment for infection, the effectiveness of preventative strategies, and technology evaluation. Epidemiologic issues included the challenge of achieving a better understanding of respiratory infections in the community and determining the prevalence of colonization with multi-resistant bacteria. Conclusions The questions are of direct relevance to researchers in a wide variety of fields. Bringing together a multi-disciplinary group of researchers to frame and prioritize research questions about aging is feasible, participants valued the opinions of people working in other areas.

  16. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: ► The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. ► Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). ► EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. ► Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  17. Overwhelming postsplenectomy infection syndrome in adults - A clinically preventable disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takehiro Okabayashi; Kazuhiro Hanazaki

    2008-01-01

    Overwhelming postsplenectomy infection (OPSI)syndrome is a rare condition, but is associated with high mortality. However, recognition and clinical management of OPSI is not well established. The prevalence of splenectomy increased recently because it was a clinically effective treatment for hepatitis C virus-associated thrombocytopenia before the introduction of the interferon/ribavirin combination therapy. We reviewed the literature characterizing the clinicopathological features of OPSI and assessed the most effective and feasible administration of the condition. A Medline search was performed using the keywords 'overwhelming','postsplenectomy infection', 'postsplenectomy sepsis','chronic liver disease', and/or 'splenectomy'. Additional articles were obtained from references within the papers identified by the Medilne search. Durations between splenectomy and onset of OPSI ranged from less than 1 wk to more than 20 years. Autopsy showed that many patients with OPSI also had Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Although the mortality rate from OPSI has been reduced by appropriate vaccination and education,the precise pathogenesis and a suitable therapeutic strategy remain to be elucidated. Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is commonly observed in cirrhotic patients. Since the immune response in patients with PEM is compromised, a more careful management for OPSI should therefore be applied for cirrhotic patients after splenectomy. In addition, strict long-term follow up of OPST patients including informed consent will lead to a better prognosis.

  18. Isolation and characterization of human cells resistant to retrovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somia Nikunj V

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of host cell proteins required for HIV-1 infection will add to our knowledge of the life cycle of HIV-1 and in the development of therapeutics to combat viral infection. We and other investigators have mutagenized rodent cells and isolated mutant cell lines resistant to retrovirus infection. Since there are differences in the efficiency of single round infection with VSVG pseudotyped HIV-1 on cells of different species, we conducted a genetic screen to isolate human cells resistant to HIV-1 infection. We chemically mutagenized human HeLa cells and validated our ability to isolate mutants at test diploid loci. We then executed a screen to isolate HeLa cell mutants resistant to infection by an HIV-1 vector coding for a toxic gene product. Results We isolated two mutant cell lines that exhibit up to 10-fold resistance to infection by HIV-1 vectors. We have verified that the cells are resistant to infection and not defective in gene expression. We have confirmed that the resistance phenotype is not due to an entry defect. Fusion experiments between mutant and wild-type cells have established that the mutations conferring resistance in the two clones are recessive. We have also determined the nature of the block in the two mutants. One clone exhibits a block at or before reverse transcription of viral RNA and the second clone has a retarded kinetic of viral DNA synthesis and a block at nuclear import of the preintegration complex. Conclusion Human cell mutants can be isolated that are resistant to infection by HIV-1. The mutants are genetically recessive and identify two points where host cell factors can be targeted to block HIV-1 infection.

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Sleep Disturbance in a Large HIV-Infected Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allavena, C; Guimard, T; Billaud, E; De la Tullaye, S; Reliquet, V; Pineau, S; Hüe, H; Supiot, C; Chennebault, J-M; Michau, C; Hitoto, H; Vatan, R; Raffi, F

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the prevalence and factors associated with sleep disturbances in French adult HIV-infected outpatients. Patients fullfilled a self-administered questionnaire on their health behavior, sleep attitudes (Pittsburgh sleep quality index, PSQI), quality of life and depression; 1354 patients were enrolled. Median sleeping time was 7 h. Poor sleep quality was observed in 47 % of the patients, and moderate to serious depressive symptoms in 19.7 %. Factors significantly associated with sleep disturbances were depression, male gender, active employment, living single, tobacco-smoking, duration of HIV infection, nevirapine or efavirenz-including regimen. Prevalence of poor sleepers is high in this HIV adult outpatient population. Associated factors seem poorly specific to HIV infection and more related to social and psychological status. Taking care of these disturbances may prove to be an effective health management strategy. PMID:26271816

  20. High Seroprevalence of HBV and HCV Infection in HIV-Infected Adults in Kigali, Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Rusine, John; Ondoa, Pascale; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; Boer, Kimberly R.; Uwimana, Jean Marie; Mukabayire, Odette; Zaaijer, Hans; Mugabekazi, Julie; Reiss, Peter; van de Wijgert, Janneke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data on prevalence and incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Rwanda are scarce. Methods HBV status was assessed at baseline and Month 12, and anti-HCV antibodies at baseline, in a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients in Kigali, Rwanda: 104 men and 114 women initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at baseline, and 200 women not yet eligible for ART. Results Baseline prevalence of active HBV infection (HBsAg positive), past or occu...

  1. French 2013 guidelines for antiretroviral therapy of HIV-1 infection in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hoen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: These guidelines are part of the French Experts’ recommendations for the management of people living with HIV/AIDS, which were made public and submitted to the French health authorities in September 2013. The objective was to provide updated recommendations for antiretroviral treatment (ART of HIV-positive adults. Guidelines included the following topics: when to start, what to start, specific situations for the choice of the first session of antiretroviral therapy, optimization of antiretroviral therapy after virologic suppression, and management of virologic failure. Methods: Ten members of the French HIV 2013 expert group were responsible for guidelines on ART. They systematically reviewed the most recent literature. The chairman of the subgroup was responsible for drafting the guidelines, which were subsequently discussed within, and finalized by the whole expert group to obtain a consensus. Recommendations were graded for strength and level of evidence using predefined criteria. Economic considerations were part of the decision-making process for selecting preferred first-line options. Potential conflicts of interest were actively managed throughout the whole process. Results: ART should be initiated in any HIV-positive person, whatever his/her CD4 T-cell count, even when >500/mm3. The level of evidence of the individual benefit of ART in terms of mortality or progression to AIDS increases with decreasing CD4 cell count. Preferred initial regimens include two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (tenofovir/emtricitabine or abacavir/lamivudine plus a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (efavirenz or rilpivirine, or a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (atazanavir or darunavir. Raltegravir, lopinavir/r, and nevirapine are recommended as alternative third agents, with specific indications and restrictions. Specific situations such as HIV infection in women, primary HIV infection, severe immune suppression

  2. Evolutionary insights into postembryonic development of adult intestinal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizuya-Oka Atsuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the adult vertebrate intestine, multi-potent stem cells continuously generate all of the epithelial cells throughout the adulthood. While it has long been known that the frog intestine is formed via the development of adult intestinal stem cells during thyroid hormone (TH-dependent metamorphosis, the basic structure of the adult intestine is formed by birth in mammals and it is unclear if the subsequent maturation of the intestine involves any changes in the intestinal stem cells. Two recent papers showing that B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1 regulates postnatal epithelial stem cell reprogramming during mouse intestinal maturation support the model that adult intestinal stem cells are developed during postembryonic development in mammals, in a TH-dependent process similar to intestinal remodeling during amphibian metamorphosis. Since the formation of the adult intestine in both mammals and amphibians is closely associated with the adaptation from aquatic to terrestrial life during the peak of endogenous TH levels, the molecular mechanisms by which the adult stem cells are developed are likely evolutionally conserved.

  3. Modulation of host-cell MAPkinase signaling during fungal infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nir Osherov

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections contribute substantially to human suffering and mortality. The interaction between fungal pathogens and their host involves the invasion and penetration of the surface epithelium, activation of cells of the innate immune system and the generation of an effective response to block infection. Numerous host-cell signaling pathways are activated during fungal infection. This review will focus on the main fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus n...

  4. Human cytomegalovirus gene expression in long-term infected glioma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Fiallos

    Full Text Available The most common adult primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM, is characterized by fifteen months median patient survival and has no clear etiology. We and others have identified the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV gene products endogenously expressed in GBM tissue and primary cells, with a subset of viral genes being consistently expressed in most samples. Among these viral genes, several have important oncomodulatory properties, regulating tumor stemness, proliferation, immune evasion, invasion and angiogenesis. These findings lead us to hypothesize that a specific HCMV gene signature may be associated with GBM pathogenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we used glioma cell lines and primary glioma stem-like cells (GSC infected with clinical and laboratory HCMV strains and measured relative viral gene expression levels along several time points up to 15 weeks post-infection. While HCMV gene expression was detected in several infected glioma lines through week 5 post-infection, only HCMV-infected GSC expressed viral gene products 15 weeks post-infection. Efficiency of infection across time was higher in GSC compared to cell lines. Importantly, HCMV-infected GSC outlived their uninfected counterparts, and this extended survival was paralleled by increased tumorsphere frequency and upregulation of stemness regulators, such as SOX2, p-STAT3, and BMX (a novel HCMV target identified in this study. Interleukin 6 (IL-6 treatment significantly upregulated HCMV gene expression in long-term infected glioma cultures, suggesting that pro-inflammatory signaling in the tumor milieu may further augment HCMV gene expression and subsequent tumor progression driven by viral-induced cellular signaling. Together, our data support a critical role for long-term, low-level HCMV infection in promoting survival, stemness, and proliferation of GSC that could significantly contribute to GBM pathogenesis.

  5. Coexistence of Quiescent and Active Adult Stem Cells in Mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Linheng; Clevers, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells are crucial for physiological tissue renewal and regeneration after injury. Prevailing models assume the existence of a single quiescent population of stem cells residing in a specialized niche of a given tissue. Emerging evidence indicates that both quiescent (out of cell cycle and

  6. Wnt signaling in adult intestinal stem cells and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Krausová, M. (Michaela); Kořínek, V. (Vladimír)

    2014-01-01

    Signaling initiated by secreted glycoproteins of the Wnt family regulates many aspects of embryonic development and it is involved in homeostasis of adult tissues. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract the Wnt pathway maintains the self-renewal capacity of epithelial stem cells. The stem cell attributes are conferred by mutual interactions of the stem cell with its local microenvironment, the stem cell niche. The niche ensures that the threshold of Wnt signaling in the stem cell is kept in physi...

  7. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  8. Walking Stability during Cell Phone Use in Healthy Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Higginson, Christopher I.; Seymour, Kelly; Kamerdze, Morgan; Jill S. Higginson

    2015-01-01

    The number of falls and/or accidental injuries associated with cellular phone use during walking is growing rapidly. Understanding the effects of concurrent cell phone use on human gait may help develop safety guidelines for pedestrians. It was shown previously that older adults had more pronounced dual-task interferences than younger adults when concurrent cognitive task required visual information processing. Thus, cell phone use might have greater impact on walking stability in older than ...

  9. Development of neural stem cell in the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xin; Kang, Eunchai; Liu, Cindy Y.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2008-01-01

    New neurons are continuously generated in the dentate gyrus of the mammalian hippocampus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles throughout life. The origin of these new neurons is believed to be from multipotent adult neural stem cells. Aided by new methodologies, significant progress has been made in the characterization of neural stem cells and their development in the adult brain. Recent studies have also begun to reveal essential extrinsic and intrinsic molecular mechani...

  10. Predictors of mortality in a cohort of HIV-1-infected adults in rural Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo;

    2007-01-01

    CD4 cell count and plasma HIV RNA level are used to monitor HIV-infected patients in high-income countries, but the applicability in an African context with frequent concomitant infections has only been studied sparsely. Moreover, alternative inexpensive markers are needed in the attempts to roll...

  11. High seroprevalence of HBV and HCV infection in HIV-infected adults in Kigali, Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rusine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Data on prevalence and incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Rwanda are scarce. METHODS: HBV status was assessed at baseline and Month 12, and anti-HCV antibodies at baseline, in a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients in Kigali, Rwanda: 104 men and 114 women initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART at baseline, and 200 women not yet eligible for ART. RESULTS: Baseline prevalence of active HBV infection (HBsAg positive, past or occult HBV infection (anti-HBc positive and HBsAg negative and anti-HCV was 5.2%, 42.9%, and 5.7%, respectively. The active HBV incidence rate was 4.2/1,000 person years (PY. In a multivariable logistic regression model using baseline data, participants with WHO stage 3 or 4 HIV disease were 4.19 times (95% CI 1.21-14.47 more likely to have active HBV infection, and older patients were more likely to have evidence of past exposure to HBV (aRR 1.03 per year; 95%CI 1.01-1.06. Older age was also positively associated with having anti-HCV antibodies (aOR 1.09; 95%CI 1.04-1.14 while having a higher baseline HIV viral load was negatively associated with HCV (aOR 0.60; 95% CI 0.40-0.98. The median CD4 increase during the first 12 months of ART was lower for those with active HBV infection or anti-HCV at baseline. Almost all participants (88% with active HBV infection who were on ART were receiving lamivudine monotherapy for HBV. CONCLUSION: HBV and HCV are common in HIV-infected patients in Rwanda. Regular HBsAg screening is needed to ensure that HIV-HBV co-infected patients receive an HBV-active ART regimen, and the prevalence of occult HBV infection should be determined. Improved access to HBV vaccination is recommended. Active HCV prevalence and incidence should be investigated further to determine whether HCV RNA PCR testing should be introduced in Rwanda.

  12. Persistent, triple-virus co-infections in mosquito cells

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    Malasit Prida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that insects and crustaceans can carry simultaneous, active infections of two or more viruses without showing signs of disease, but it was not clear whether co-infecting viruses occupied the same cells or different cells in common target tissues. Our previous work showed that successive challenge of mosquito cell cultures followed by serial, split-passage resulted in stabilized cultures with 100% of the cells co-infected with Dengue virus (DEN and an insect parvovirus (densovirus (DNV. By addition of Japanese encephalitis virus (JE, we tested our hypothesis that stable, persistent, triple-virus co-infections could be obtained by the same process. Results Using immunocytochemistry by confocal microscopy, we found that JE super-challenge of cells dually infected with DEN and DNV resulted in stable cultures without signs of cytopathology, and with 99% of the cells producing antigens of the 3 viruses. Location of antigens for all 3 viruses in the triple co-infections was dominant in the cell nuclei. Except for DNV, this differed from the distribution in cells persistently infected with the individual viruses or co-infected with DNV and DEN. The dependence of viral antigen distribution on single infection or co-infection status suggested that host cells underwent an adaptive process to accommodate 2 or more viruses. Conclusions Individual mosquito cells can accommodate at least 3 viruses simultaneously in an adaptive manner. The phenomenon provides an opportunity for genetic exchange between diverse viruses and it may have important medical and veterinary implications for arboviruses.

  13. Gram Negative Wound Infection in Hospitalised Adult Burn Patients-Systematic Review and Metanalysis-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, Ernest A.; Azzopardi, Elayne; Camilleri, Liberato; Villapalos, Jorge; Boyce, Dean E.; Dziewulski, Peter; Dickson, William A.; Whitaker, Iain S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gram negative infection is a major determinant of morbidity and survival. Traditional teaching suggests that burn wound infections in different centres are caused by differing sets of causative organisms. This study established whether Gram-negative burn wound isolates associated to clinical wound infection differ between burn centres. Methods Studies investigating adult hospitalised patients (2000–2010) were critically appraised and qualified to a levels of evidence hierarchy. The contribution of bacterial pathogen type, and burn centre to the variance in standardised incidence of Gram-negative burn wound infection was analysed using two-way analysis of variance. Primary Findings Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanni, Enterobacter spp., Proteus spp. and Escherichia coli emerged as the commonest Gram-negative burn wound pathogens. Individual pathogens’ incidence did not differ significantly between burn centres (F (4, 20) = 1.1, p = 0.3797; r2 = 9.84). Interpretation Gram-negative infections predominate in burn surgery. This study is the first to establish that burn wound infections do not differ significantly between burn centres. It is the first study to report the pathogens responsible for the majority of Gram-negative infections in these patients. Whilst burn wound infection is not exclusive to these bacteria, it is hoped that reporting the presence of this group of common Gram-negative “target organisms” facilitate clinical practice and target research towards a defined clinical demand. PMID:24751699

  14. Facial Emotion Processing in Aviremic HIV-infected Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Baeza, A; Carvajal, F; Bayón, C; Pérez-Valero, I; Montes-Ramírez, M; Arribas, J R

    2016-08-01

    The emotional processing in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive individuals (HIV+) has been scarcely studied. We included HIV+ individuals (n = 107) on antiretroviral therapy (≥2 years) who completed 6 facial processing tasks and neurocognitive testing. We compared HIV+ and healthy adult (HA) participants (n = 40) in overall performance of each facial processing task. Multiple logistic regressions were conducted to explore predictors of poorer accuracy in those measures in which HIV+ individuals performed poorer than HA participants. We separately explored the impact of neurocognitive status, antiretroviral regimen, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on the tasks performance. We found similar performance in overall facial emotion discrimination, recognition, and recall between HIV+ and HA participants. The HIV+ group had poorer recognition of particular negative emotions. Lower WAIS-III Vocabulary scores and active HCV predicted poorer accuracy in recognition of particular emotions. Our results suggest that permanent damage of emotion-related brain systems might persist despite long-term effective antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27193364

  15. Adult stem cell-based apexogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yao; Shu, Li-Hong; Yan, Ming; Dai, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Generally, the dental pulp needs to be removed when it is infected, and root canal therapy (RCT) is usually required in which infected dental pulp is replaced with inorganic materials (paste and gutta percha). This treatment approach ultimately brings about a dead tooth. However, pulp vitality is extremely important to the tooth itself, since it provides nutrition and acts as a biosensor to detect the potential pathogenic stimuli. Despite the reported clinical success rate, RCT-treated teeth ...

  16. HIV-Infected Adolescent, Young Adult and Pregnant Smokers: Important Targets for Effective Tobacco Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerome Escota

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is inextricably linked to a number of health risks both in the general and HIV-infected populations. There is, however, a dearth of research on effective tobacco control programs among people living with HIV, and especially among adolescents, young adults and pregnant women, groups with heightened or increased vulnerability secondary to tobacco use. Adolescents and young adults constitute a growing population of persons living with HIV infection. Early and continued tobacco use in this population living with a disease characterized by premature onset multimorbidity and chronic inflammation is of concern. Additionally, there is an increased acuity for tobacco control among HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce pregnancy morbidity and improve fetal outcome. This review will provide an important summary of current knowledge of tobacco use among HIV-infected adolescents, young adults and pregnant women. The effects of tobacco use in these specific populations will be presented and the current state of tobacco control within these populations, assessed.

  17. Gestation and breastfeeding in schistosomotic mothers differently modulate the immune response of adult offspring to postnatal Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Patrícia d'Emery Alves; Lorena, Virgínia Maria Barros de; Fernandes, Érica de Souza; Sales, Iana Rafaela Fernandes; Nascimento, Wheverton Ricardo Correia do; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Albuquerque, Mônica Camelo Pessoa de Azevedo; Costa, Vlaudia Maria Assis; Souza, Valdênia Maria Oliveira de

    2016-02-01

    Schistosoma mansoni antigens in the early life alter homologous and heterologous immunity during postnatal infections. We evaluate the immunity to parasite antigens and ovalbumin (OA) in adult mice born/suckled by schistosomotic mothers. Newborns were divided into: born (BIM), suckled (SIM) or born/suckled (BSIM) in schistosomotic mothers, and animals from noninfected mothers (control). When adults, the mice were infected and compared the hepatic granuloma size and cellularity. Some animals were OA + adjuvant immunised. We evaluated hypersensitivity reactions (HR), antibodies levels (IgG1/IgG2a) anti-soluble egg antigen and anti-soluble worm antigen preparation, and anti-OA, cytokine production, and CD4+FoxP3+T-cells by splenocytes. Compared to control group, BIM mice showed a greater quantity of granulomas and collagen deposition, whereas SIM and BSIM presented smaller granulomas. BSIM group exhibited the lowest levels of anti-parasite antibodies. For anti-OA immunity, immediate HR was suppressed in all groups, with greater intensity in SIM mice accompanied of the remarkable level of basal CD4+FoxP3+T-cells. BIM and SIM groups produced less interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-g. In BSIM, there was higher production of IL-10 and IFN-g, but lower levels of IL-4 and CD4+FoxP3+T-cells. Thus, pregnancy in schistosomotic mothers intensified hepatic fibrosis, whereas breastfeeding diminished granulomas in descendants. Separately, pregnancy and breastfeeding could suppress heterologous immunity; however, when combined, the responses could be partially restored in infected descendants. PMID:26872339

  18. Differences in Liver Impairment Between Adults and Children with Dengue Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Vega, Rosario; Phumratanaprapin, Weerapong; Phonrat, Benjaluck; Dhitavat, Jittima; Sutherat, Maleerat; Choovichian, Vorada

    2016-05-01

    Dengue infection (DI) is a major vector-borne disease in southeast Asia and an important cause of morbidity. The complications such as hepatic impairment are common, and because the physiology of the liver differs between children and adults, the DI-associated liver impairments might be expected to differ as well. This study aims to compare the differences in liver impairment between adults and children with DI. We retrospectively studied 158 adults and 79 children with serologically confirmed DI admitted to the Bangkok Hospital for Tropical Diseases from 2008 to 2012. In total, 93% of adults and 87% of children exhibited abnormal liver enzyme levels during hospitalization. Overall, 76 (42.4%) adults and 16 (20.3%) children had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Compared with children, adults with dengue fever (DF) presented a significantly higher incidence of liver function impairment (alanine transaminase [ALT] > 2 × upper limit of normal [ULN]) (47.1% versus 25.5%), hepatitis (ALT > 4 × ULN) (29.4% versus 12.8%), and severe hepatitis (aspartate transaminase [AST]/ALT > 10 × ULN) (16.5% versus 4.3%). Children with DHF showed a significantly higher incidence of liver function impairment due to AST derangement than did adults (100% versus 73%). There were no differences in the total bilirubin, albumin, or total protein levels between adults and children. Liver enzymes normalized significantly more slowly in adults, and AST recovery was faster than ALT. In conclusion, liver function impairment was more common among adults than children with DF. As the severity progressed to DHF, liver injury became more common in children. PMID:26976884

  19. Epidemiology of human hookworm infections among adult villagers in Hejiang and Santai Counties, Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changhua, L; Xiaorong, Z; Dongchuan, Q; Shuhua, X; Hotez, P J; Defu, Z; Hulian, Z; Mingden, L; Hainan, R; Bing, Z; Haichou, X; Hawdon, J; Zheng, F

    1999-10-15

    Hookworm infection as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic to Sichuan Province in China. In order to research the prevalence and intensity of these infections we visited two villages in Hejiang County (southern Sichuan Province) and Santai County (northwestern Sichuan Province) between July and October of 1997. Fecal examinations were performed on adult villagers over the age of 15 years (currently children under this age are dewormed annually with anthelmintic drugs). Among 310 residents of Lugao Village (Hejiang County), 87, 63 and 60% were infected with hookworm, Ascaris or Trichuris, respectively. The prevalence of hookworm determined to rise linearly with age (r = 0.97). High intensity infections with hookworm still occur in this region as 22% of the residents have over 3000 eggs per gram (PEG) of feces as determined by quantitative egg counts. The majority of these individuals harbored mixed infection with Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale, although the former predominated when adult hookworms were collected from 30 village residents treated with pyrantel pamoate. In contrast, among the 334 Xinjian villagers examined (Santai County) the majority harbored predominantly light hookworm infections--66.1% of the residents has less than 400 EPG by quantitative fecal examination and only 3.7% exhibited greater than 3000 EPG. Again, N. americanus was the predominant hookworm seen after worm expulsion. We have round that despite economic development which is occurring in some parts of China, significant hookworm infections and clinical hookworm anemia still exist in areas of Sichuan Province. In Hejiang County we found that the intensity of hookworm infection has actually risen within the last 10 years. Hookworm is a medical problem among the elderly in Sichuan. PMID:10546842

  20. HCMV Infection Depress NGF Expression in Human Glioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-tao WANG; Bin WANG; Zhi-jun LIU; Zhi-qiang BAI; Ling LI; Dong-meng QIAN; Zhi-yong YAN; Xu-xia SONG

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection, resulting in birth defects such as microcephaly. In this study, RT-PCR and Western Blotting were performed to quantify the regulation of endogenic nerve growth factor expression in neuroglia cells by HCMV infection. The results showed that basal, endogenous NGF expression in U251 was unchanged during early HCMV infection. NGF expression is strongly down-regulated during the latent phase of infection. These results suggest that HCMV can depress the NGF expression in U251 cells.

  1. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19 is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%-0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. CONCLUSION: This is the first example to our knowledge of an "acute" human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation--analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection--is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development.

  2. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells, early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium, using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration, timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury, single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  3. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  4. The homeostasis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M A Mauritz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The asexual reproduction cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for severe malaria, occurs within red blood cells. A merozoite invades a red cell in the circulation, develops and multiplies, and after about 48 hours ruptures the host cell, releasing 15-32 merozoites ready to invade new red blood cells. During this cycle, the parasite increases the host cell permeability so much that when similar permeabilization was simulated on uninfected red cells, lysis occurred before approximately 48 h. So how could infected cells, with a growing parasite inside, prevent lysis before the parasite has completed its developmental cycle? A mathematical model of the homeostasis of infected red cells suggested that it is the wasteful consumption of host cell hemoglobin that prevents early lysis by the progressive reduction in the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host (the colloid-osmotic hypothesis. However, two critical model predictions, that infected cells would swell to near prelytic sphericity and that the hemoglobin concentration would become progressively reduced, remained controversial. In this paper, we are able for the first time to correlate model predictions with recent experimental data in the literature and explore the fine details of the homeostasis of infected red blood cells during five model-defined periods of parasite development. The conclusions suggest that infected red cells do reach proximity to lytic rupture regardless of their actual volume, thus requiring a progressive reduction in their hemoglobin concentration to prevent premature lysis.

  5. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of perianal infections in adult patients with acute leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yuan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perianal infection is a common problem for patients with acute leukemia. However, neutropenia and bleeding tendency are relatively contraindicated to surgical intervention. The epidemiology, microbiology, clinical manifestations and outcomes of perianal infection in leukemic patients are also rarely discussed. METHOD: The medical records of 1102 adult patients with acute leukemia at a tertiary medical center in Taiwan between 2001 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. RESULT: The prevalence of perianal infection was 6.7% (74 of 1102 in adult patients with acute leukemia. Twenty-three (31% of the 74 patients had recurrent episodes of perianal infections. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia had higher recurrent rates than acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients (p = 0.028. More than half (n = 61, 53% of the perianal infections were caused by gram-negative bacilli, followed by gram-positive cocci (n = 36, 31%, anaerobes (n = 18, 15% and Candida (n = 1, 1% from pus culture. Eighteen patients experienced bacteremia (n = 24 or candidemia (n = 1. Overall 41 (68% of 60 patients had polymicrobial infection. Escherichia coli (25% was the most common micro-organism isolated, followed by Enterococcus species (22%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (13%, and Bacteroides species (11%. Twenty-five (34% of 74 patients received surgical intervention. Acute leukemia patients with surgically managed anal fistulas tended to have fewer recurrences (p = 0.067. Four (5% patients died within 30 days after diagnosis of perianal infection. Univariate analysis of 30-day survival revealed the elderly (≧ 65 years (p = 0.015 and patients with shock (p<0.001 had worse outcome. Multivariate analysis showed septic shock to be the independent predictive factor of 30-day crude mortality of perianal infections (p = 0.016. CONCLUSION: Perianal infections were common and had high recurrence rate in adult patients with acute

  6. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Zhu Hongliang; Li Shengli; Yao Xiaobao; Wang Xiaoxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish adult rat auditory epithelial cell culture and try to find precursor cells of auditory hair cells in vitro. Methods With refinement of culture media and techniques, cochlear sensory epithelial cells of adult rat were cultured. Immunocytochemistry and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)labeling were used to detect properties and mitotic status of cultured cells. Results The cultured auditory epithelial cells showed a large, flat epithelial morphotype and expressed F-actin and cytokeratin, a subset of cells generated from auditory epithelium were labeled by calretinin, a specific marker of early hair cell. Conclusion Adult rat auditory epithelium can be induced to generate hair cell-like cells by nature culture, this phenomenon suggests that progenitor cells may exist in rat cochlea and they may give birth to new hair cells. Whether these progenitor cells are tissue specific stem cells is still need more study.

  7. Engineering of the Embryonic and Adult Stem Cell Niches

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinkhani, Mohsen; Shirazi, Reza; Rajaei, Farzad; Mahmoudi, Masoud; Mohammadi, Navid; Abbasi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Context Stem cells have the potential to generate a renewable source of cells for regenerative medicine due to their ability to self-renew and differentiate to various functional cell types of the adult organism. The extracellular microenvironment plays a pivotal role in controlling stem cell fate responses. Therefore, identification of appropriate environmental stimuli that supports cellular proliferation and lineage-specific differentiation is critical for the clinical application of the st...

  8. Distinct immune responses of juvenile and adult oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to viral and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Vergnes, Agnes; Montagnani, Caroline; de Lorgeril, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality events of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been reported worldwide and these disease events are often associated with Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). Epidemiological field studies have also reported oyster age and other pathogens of the Vibrio genus are contributing factors to this syndrome. We undertook a controlled laboratory experiment to simultaneously investigate survival and immunological response of juvenile and adult C. gigas at different time-points post-infection with OsHV-1, Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32 and V. aestuarianus. Our data corroborates epidemiological studies that juveniles are more susceptible to OsHV-1, whereas adults are more susceptible to Vibrio. We measured the expression of 102 immune-genes by high-throughput RT-qPCR, which revealed oysters have different transcriptional responses to OsHV-1 and Vibrio. The transcriptional response in the early stages of OsHV-1 infection involved genes related to apoptosis and the interferon-pathway. Transcriptional response to Vibrio infection involved antimicrobial peptides, heat shock proteins and galectins. Interestingly, oysters in the later stages of OsHV-1 infection had a transcriptional response that resembled an antibacterial response, which is suggestive of the oyster's microbiome causing secondary infections (dysbiosis-driven pathology). This study provides molecular evidence that oysters can mount distinct immune response to viral and bacterial pathogens and these responses differ depending on the age of the host. PMID:27439510

  9. Cervical and Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection in Adult Women in American Samoa

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Ka’opua, Lana S.; Scanlan, Luana; Ah Ching, John; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Zhu, Xuemei; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Tofaeono, Jennifer; Williams, Victor Tofaeono

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cervical and anal human papillomavirus (HPV) and risk factors associated with infections were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 211 adult women in American Samoa. Overall, 53% of women reported ever having a Pap smear. Cervical and anal HPV was detected in 10% and 16% of women, respectively; 4% of women had concurrent cervical and anal HPV. The most common cervical genotypes were HPV 6, HPV 16, and HPV 53. Cutaneous HPV types were detected in 40% of anal infections. Ce...

  10. Bartonella henselae infection presenting with a picture of adult-onset Still's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durey, Areum; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sun Myoung; Baek, JiHyeon; Han, Seung Baik; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture of suggestive for adult-onset Still's Disease (ASOD) due to Bartonella infection. A 42-year-old immunocompetent man was admitted with fever, rash, arthralgia and sore throat. As his clinical picture suggested ASOD except unusual skin manifestation, we treated him on steroid and ibuprofen. His fever and constitutional symptoms responded immediately within 24hrs of commencing therapy, yet rash and leukocytosis remained. Meanwhile, Bartonella infection was proved by culture of bone marrow. Minocyclin treatment started combined with hydroxychloroquine sulfate and the patient discharged with overall improvement. PMID:27000538

  11. Infectious complications of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B J

    1996-07-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) has been etiologically associated with two diseases: adult T cell leukemia and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Increasing evidence suggests that HTLV-I infection may be associated with immunosuppression and, as a consequence, affect the risk and expression of several other infectious diseases, of which the best studied are strongyloidiasis, tuberculosis, and leprosy. In strongyloidiasis, coinfection with HTLV-I appears to result in a higher rate of chronic carriage, an increased parasite load, and a risk of more severe infection. In tuberculosis, a decrease in delayed-type hypersensitivity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been established, but whether this decrease is clinically significant has yet to be determined. In leprosy, an increased risk of disease is suggested, but the published studies are all too poorly controlled to draw definite conclusions. PMID:8816143

  12. Frequent detection of respiratory viruses in adult recipients of stem cell transplants with the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction, compared with viral culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, M.G.J. van; Elden, L.J. van; Loon, A.M. van; Hendriksen, K.A.; Laterveer, L.; Dekker, A.W.; Nijhuis, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory virus infections have been recognized as important causes of severe pneumonia in patients who have undergone stem cell transplantation (SCT). Reported incidences of respiratory virus infection in adult SCT recipients vary in the literature from 3.5% to 36% when determined by

  13. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections among antiretroviral-naive and -experienced HIV co-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Sisay, Zufan; Biadgilign, Sibhatu; Abegaz, Woldaregay Erku

    2014-05-01

    Most HIV positive people have not been tested for viral hepatitis and their treatments have not been optimized for possible co-infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the serological pattern of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among antiretroviral (ARV)-naive and -experienced HIV co-infected adults in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A total of 500 frozen HIV positive serum and plasma samples collected from ARV-naive (n = 250) and -experienced (n = 250) adults were randomly selected and screened for HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg and anti-HCV using rapid two-site sandwich immunochromatographic assay. The test was performed at Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University. Positive specimens for HBsAg and anti-HCV markers were further confirmed using third generation ELISA. Of the 500 specimens tested, 15 (3 %), 58 (11.6 %), 3 (0.6 %), 18 (3.6 %), 3 (0.6 %) and 1 (0.2 %) were positive for HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HCV, HBsAg and HBeAg, and HBsAg and anti-HBs markers, respectively. No specimen tested positive for both HBeAg and anti-HBs, and 442 (88.4 %) individuals were non-immune to HBV. Of the 250 ARV-naive individuals, 8 (3.2 %), 33 (13.2 %), 2 (0.8 %), 10 (4 %), 2 (0.8 %), and 1 (0.4 %) were positive for HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HCV, HBsAg and HBeAg, and HBsAg and anti-HBs markers, respectively. Of the 250 ARV-experienced individuals, 7 (2.8 %), 25 (10 %), 1 (0.4 %), 8 (3.2 %), 1 (0.4 %), and 0 (0 %) were positive for HBsAg, Anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HCV, HBsAg and HBeAg, and HBsAg and anti-HBs markers, respectively. In summary, seroprevalence of HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infections was lower in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, than in Sub-Saharan Africa and globally. HBV and HCV infections were not significantly different between HIV positive subjects who were or who were not on ARV. This suggests that the two groups have equal chance of being infected with these two viruses; despite

  14. Nipah virus infection and glycoprotein targeting in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisner Andrea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV causes fatal respiratory and brain infections in animals and humans. The major hallmark of the infection is a systemic endothelial infection, predominantly in the CNS. Infection of brain endothelial cells allows the virus to overcome the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and to subsequently infect the brain parenchyma. However, the mechanisms of NiV replication in endothelial cells are poorly elucidated. We have shown recently that the bipolar or basolateral expression of the NiV surface glycoproteins F and G in polarized epithelial cell layers is involved in lateral virus spread via cell-to-cell fusion and that correct sorting depends on tyrosine-dependent targeting signals in the cytoplasmic tails of the glycoproteins. Since endothelial cells share many characteristics with epithelial cells in terms of polarization and protein sorting, we wanted to elucidate the role of the NiV glycoprotein targeting signals in endothelial cells. Results As observed in vivo, NiV infection of endothelial cells induced syncytia formation. The further finding that infection increased the transendothelial permeability supports the idea of spread of infection via cell-to-cell fusion and endothelial cell damage as a mechanism to overcome the BBB. We then revealed that both glycoproteins are expressed at lateral cell junctions (bipolar, not only in NiV-infected primary endothelial cells but also upon stable expression in immortalized endothelial cells. Interestingly, mutation of tyrosines 525 and 542/543 in the cytoplasmic tail of the F protein led to an apical redistribution of the protein in endothelial cells whereas tyrosine mutations in the G protein had no effect at all. This fully contrasts the previous results in epithelial cells where tyrosine 525 in the F, and tyrosines 28/29 in the G protein were required for correct targeting. Conclusion We conclude that the NiV glycoprotein distribution is responsible for

  15. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of t...

  16. Therapeutics from Adult Stem Cells and the Hype Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Greg

    2016-05-12

    The Gartner curve for regenerative and stem cell therapeutics is currently climbing out of the "trough of disillusionment" and into the "slope of enlightenment". Understanding that the early years of stem cell therapy relied on the model of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and then moved into a period of the overhype of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), instead of using the model of 40 years of success, i.e. adult stem cells used in bone marrow transplants, the field of stem cell therapy has languished for years, trying to move beyond the early and poorly understood success of bone marrow transplants. Recent studies in the lab and clinic show that adult stem cells of various types, and the molecules that they release, avoid the issues associated with ESCs and iPSCs and lead to better therapeutic outcomes and into the slope of enlightenment. PMID:27190588

  17. Infection Mobilizes Hematopoietic Stem Cells through Cooperative NOD-like Receptor and Toll-like Receptor Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Burberry, Aaron; Zeng, Melody Y.; Ding, Lei; Wicks, Ian; Inohara, Naohiro; Morrison, Sean J; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in specialized niches within the bone marrow under steady-state conditions and mobilized for extramedullary hematopoiesis during periods of stress such as bacterial infections. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We show that systemic infection of mice with Escherichia coli, commonly associated with bacteremia in humans, mobilizes functional HSCs to the spleen. Accumulation of splenic HSCs (CD150+CD48-Lin−/lowScal1+cKit+) was di...

  18. Early infection with respiratory syncytial virus impairs regulatory T cell function and increases susceptibility to allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Khare, Anupriya; Oriss, Timothy B.; Raundhal, Mahesh; Morse, Christina; Yarlagadda, Manohar; Wenzel, Sally E.; Moore, Martin L.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Ray, Anuradha; Ray, Prabir

    2012-01-01

    Immune tolerance is instituted early in life, during which time regulatory T (Treg) cells have an important role. Recurrent infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in early life increase the risk for asthma in adult life. Repeated infection of infant mice tolerized to ovalbumin (OVA) through their mother’s milk with RSV induced allergic airway disease in response to OVA sensitization and challenge, including airway inflammation, hyper-reactivity and higher OVA-specific IgE, as compa...

  19. Tax fingerprint in adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarbachi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In this issue of Blood, Fujikawa et al demonstrate that the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax induces an epigenetic-dependent global modification of host gene expression in adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL). Hence, the fingerprint of Tax is all over ATL and this may be used for finally capturing ATL. PMID:27056993

  20. Maturing from embryonic to adult policy on stem cell therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Greg

    2014-12-11

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) closure of the agency's Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), which focused on therapeutic development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), was caused by the lack of progress in practical development of the iPSs for use in human therapies. As the NIH evaluates priorities in future stem cell therapeutic development, adult stem cell processes in the human body need to be prioritized for a number of key reasons, including (1) adult stem cells release many types of molecules that provide much of the therapeutic benefit of stem cells and (2) adult stem cells and somatic cells exist in a state of dynamic transition between different potency levels and can be naturally driven by the microenvironment to a state of pluripotency. Thus, the study and development of adult stems for therapeutic use can include naturally induced pluripotent stem cells (NiPSs) that lack the problematic genetic and epigenetic reprogramming errors found in iPSs. PMID:25516780

  1. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  2. Ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella septicemia and osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James S; Laber, Damian A

    2006-06-01

    The majority of data evaluating Salmonella infections in sickle cell anemia (SCD) comes from studies performed in children. We report a SCD adult who presented with ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella bacteremia. After appropriate initial therapy, persistent back pain prompted evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging of the spine, which revealed osteomyelitis and a psoas abscess. The patient responded to percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. This report summarizes some of the findings of large SCD studies evaluating Salmonella bacteremia and osteomyelitis, focusing on adults. Our case exemplifies the need for antibiotic coverage for Salmonella species in adult SCD patients with septicemia. We argue that imaging studies looking for osteomyelitis should be done routinely in SCD patients with Salmonella bacteremia. PMID:16800421

  3. Mycobacterium-Infected Dendritic Cells Disseminate Granulomatous Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Jeffrey S; Rayasam, Aditya; Schreiber, Heidi A; Fabry, Zsuzsanna; Sandor, Matyas

    2015-01-01

    The disappearance and reformation of granulomas during tuberculosis has been described using PET/CT/X-ray in both human clinical settings and animal models, but the mechanisms of granuloma reformation during active disease remains unclear. Granulomas can recruit inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) that can regulate local T-cell responses and can carry bacteria into the lymph nodes, which is crucial for generating systemic T-cell responses against mycobacteria. Here, we report that a subset of mycobacterium-infected iDCs are associated with bacteria-specific T-cells in infected tissue, outside the granuloma, and that this results in the formation of new and/or larger multi-focal lesions. Mycobacterium-infected iDCs express less CCR7 and migrate less efficiently compared to the non-infected iDCs, which may support T-cell capture in granulomatous tissue. Capture may reduce antigen availability in the lymph node, thereby decreasing systemic priming, resulting in a possible regulatory loop between systemic T-cell responses and granuloma reformation. T-cell/infected iDCs clusters outside the granuloma can be detected during the acute and chronic phase of BCG and Mtb infection. Our studies suggest a direct role for inflammatory dendritic cells in the dissemination of granulomatous inflammation. PMID:26515292

  4. Acute Parvovirus B19 Infection Leading to Severe Aplastic Anemia in a Previously Healthy Adult Female

    OpenAIRE

    Rajput, Rajesh; Sehgal, Ashish; Jain, Deepak; Sen, Rajeev; Gupta, Abhishek

    2011-01-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 has been linked to a variety of diseases. One of the most common complications is transient aplastic crisis in patients with chronic hemolytic anemia. Very few case reports have implicated this virus as a putative etiology behind hepatitis and severe aplastic anemia in immuno competent individuals. We report a case of severe aplastic anemia in a previously healthy adult female due to acute parvovirus B19 infection. Laboratory examination showed pancytopenia in peripheral ...

  5. Simple Clinical and Laboratory Predictors of Chikungunya versus Dengue Infections in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Vernon J; Chow, Angela; Zheng, Xiaohui; Carrasco, Luis R.; Cook, Alex R.; Lye, David C.; Ng, Lee-Ching; Leo, Yee-Sin

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue and chikungunya are co-circulating vector-borne diseases with substantial overlap in clinical presentations. It is important to differentiate between them during first presentation as their management, especially for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), is different. This study compares their clinical presentation in Singapore adults to derive predictors to assist doctors in diagnostic decision-making. Methods We compared 117 patients with chikungunya infection diagnosed with rev...

  6. Neurocognitive Consequences of HIV Infection in Older Adults: An Evaluation of the “Cortical” Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, J. Cobb; Woods, Steven Paul; Carey, Catherine L.; Weber, Erica; Bondi, Mark W; Grant, Igor; ,

    2010-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of older adults living with HIV infection is increasing. Recent reports of increased neuropathologic and metabolic alterations in older HIV+ samples, including increased cortical beta-amyloid, have led some researchers to suggest that aging with HIV may produce a neuropsychological profile akin to that which is observed in “cortical” dementias (e.g., impairment in memory consolidation). To evaluate this possibility, we examined four groups classified by HIV serost...

  7. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk

    OpenAIRE

    Pull ter Gunne, Albert F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than typical spinal procedures. Previous research has identified risk factors for SSI in spinal surgery, but few studies have looked at adult deformity surgeries. We retrospectively performed a large case...

  8. Cell mechanics and immune system link up to fight infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Andrew; Man, Si Ming; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Achouri, Sarra; Cammarota, Eugenia; Hughes, Katherine; Rizzo, Alessandro; Ng, Gilbert; Guck, Jochen; Bryant, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Infectious diseases, in which pathogens invade and colonize host cells, are responsible for one third of all mortality worldwide. Host cells use special proteins (immunoproteins) and other molecules to fight viral and bacterial invaders. The mechanisms by which immunoproteins enable cells to reduce bacterial loads and survive infections remain unclear. Moreover, during infections, some immunoproteins are known to alter the cytoskeleton, the structure that largely determines cellular mechanical properties. We therefore used an optical stretcher to measure the mechanical properties of primary immune cells (bone marrow derived macrophages) during bacterial infection. We found that macrophages become stiffer upon infection. Remarkably, macrophages lacking the immunoprotein, NLR-C4, lost the stiffening response to infection. This in vitro result correlates with our in vivo data whereby mice lacking NLR-C4 have more lesions and hence increased bacterial distribution and spread. Thus, the immune-protein-dependent increase in cell stiffness in response to bacterial infection (in vitro result) seems to have a functional role in the system level fight against pathogens (in vivo result). We will discuss how this functional link between cell mechanical properties and innate immunity, effected by actin polymerization, reduces the spread of infection.

  9. Human muscle satellite cells as targets of Chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ozden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya (CHIK virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells, and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans.

  10. Dynamics Analysis of an HIV Infection Model including Infected Cells in an Eclipse Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an HIV infection model including an eclipse stage of infected cells is considered. Some quicker cells in this stage become productively infected cells, a portion of these cells are reverted to the uninfected class, and others will be latent down in the body. We consider CTL-response delay in this model and analyze the effect of time delay on stability of equilibrium. It is shown that the uninfected equilibrium and CTL-absent infection equilibrium are globally asymptotically stable for both ODE and DDE model. And we get the global stability of the CTL-present equilibrium for ODE model. For DDE model, we have proved that the CTL-present equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable in a range of delays and also have studied the existence of Hopf bifurcations at the CTL-present equilibrium. Numerical simulations are carried out to support our main results.

  11. In vitro Study on Human Trophoblast Cells Infected with HCMV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖娟; 张丹丹; 陈娟娟; 尹宗智; 刘涛; 艾继辉; 陈素华

    2010-01-01

    Human trophoblast cells were isolated and cultured in vitro in order to investigate possible pathogenesis of intrauterine infection caused by HCMV.Trophoblast cells were obtained by compound enzymes digestion and discontinuous percoll gradient.Cells and purity were identified by using immunocytochemistry assay with anti-CK7,Vim and β-hCG antibodies.HCMV AD169 strain replication in isolated trophoblast cells and cell apoptosis were detected at different time points post infection(p.i.).The results showed tha...

  12. Ectopic Human Fasciola hepatica Infection by an Adult Worm in the Mesocolon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah Jin; Choi, Chang Hwan; Choi, Sun Keun; Shin, Yong Woon; Park, Yun-Kyu; Kim, Lucia; Choi, Suk Jin; Han, Jee Young; Kim, Joon Mee; Chu, Young Chae; Park, In Suh

    2015-12-01

    We report here an ectopic case of Fasciola hepatica infection confirmed by recovery of an adult worm in the mesocolon. A 56-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with discomfort and pain in the left lower quadrant of the abdomen. Abdominal CT showed 3 abscesses in the left upper quadrant, mesentery, and pelvic cavity. On surgical exploration, abscess pockets were found in the mesocolon of the sigmoid colon and transverse colon. A leaf-like worm found in the abscess pocket of the mesocolon of the left colon was diagnosed as an adult fluke of F. hepatica. Histologically, numerous eggs of F. hepatica were noted with acute and chronic granulomatous inflammations in the subserosa and pericolic adipose tissues. Conclusively, a rare case of ectopic fascioliasis has been confirmed in this study by the adult worm recovery of F. hepatica in the mesocolon. PMID:26797440

  13. Seroepidemiology of dengue virus infection in the adult population in tropical Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, L W; Cutter, J; James, L; Goh, K T

    2015-06-01

    To assess the impact of past dengue epidemics in Singapore, we undertook a national seroepidemiological study to determine the prevalence of past dengue virus (DENV) infection in the adult population in 2010 and make comparisons with the seroprevalence in 2004. The study involved residual sera from 3293 adults aged 18-79 years who participated in a national health survey in 2010. The overall prevalence of anti-DENV IgG antibodies was 56·8% (95% confidence interval 55·1-58·5) in 2010. The seroprevalence increased significantly with age. Males had significantly higher seroprevalence than females (61·5% vs. 53·2%). Among the three major ethnic groups, Malays had the lowest seroprevalence (50·2%) compared to Chinese (57·0%) and Indians (62·0%). The age-standardized seroprevalence in adults was significantly lower in 2010 (54·4%) compared to 2004 (63·1%). Older age, male gender, Indian ethnicity, permanent residency and being home-bound were independent risk factors significantly associated with seropositivity. About 43% of the Singapore adult resident population remain susceptible to DENV infection as a result of the successful implementation of a comprehensive nationwide Aedes surveillance and control programme since the 1970s. Vector suppression and concerted efforts of all stakeholders in the community remain the key strategy in the prevention and control of dengue. PMID:25245094

  14. Mechanism of infectivity of a murine leukemia virus in adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of adult BALB/c mice with murine leukemia virus (MuLV) induces typical thymic lymphomas. Expression of virus was measured by using a radioimmunoassay for murine P-30, a virion core protein. Nineteen days after injection of MuLV-S into adult mice, there were 0.3μg P-30/ml of serum. X-irradiation permitted the early expression of high levels of viremia, when given before or after MuLV-S administration, and it also hastened the development of lymphomas. Seventeen to 21 days after injection of MuLV-S into x-irradiated (600 rads) adult mice, there were 2.7 μg of P-30/ml of serum. The virus produced by infected adult mice was infectious and oncogenic when given to newborn mice. Several lines of evidence are presented that suggest the mechanism by which x-irradiation permits early expession of virion proteins and lymphomas is not immunosuppression

  15. Regulatory T cells subsets in filarial infection and their function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eMetenou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Filarial infections in humans are chronic infections that cause significant morbidity. The chronic nature of these infections with continuous antigen release is associated with a parasite-specific T cell hypo-responsiveness that may over time also affect the immune responses to bystander antigens. Previous studies have shown the filarial parasite antigen-specific T cells hypo-responsiveness is mediated by regulatory cytokines -- IL-10 and TGF-β in particular. Recent studies have suggested that the modulated/regulated T cell responses associated with patent filarial infection may reflect an expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs that include both Tregs induced in peripheral circulation or pTregs and the thymus-derived Tregs or tTregs. Although much is known about the phenotype of these regulatory populations, the mechanisms underlying their expansion and their mode of action in filarial and other infections remain unclear. Nevertheless there are data to suggest that while many of these regulatory cells are activated in an antigen-specific manner the ensuing effectors of this activation are relatively non-specific and may affect a broad range of immune cells. This review will focus on the subsets and function of regulatory T cells in filarial infection.

  16. Oral cavity and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in young adults: a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a disease of middle-aged to elderly adults. However, an increased incidence of HNSCC in young people under 45 years of age has been reported recently. In the present review, we focused on the epidemiology and aetiology of HNSCC in adults under 45 years of age. We reviewed literature related to HNSCC in adult patients less than 45 years of age and discussed current treatment options and prognosis. HNSCC in young adults is associated with a higher incidence rate in nonsmokers, lower female-to-male ratio, a higher percentage of oral cavity and oropharynx tumours, and fewer second primary tumours. However, aside from traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol exposure, the causes of these cancers in young adults remain unclear. Agents that might contribute to risk include infection with high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes as well as genetic factors or immunodeficiency status. The expected increase in incidence and mortality of the young with HNSCC may become a major public health concern if current trends persist, particularly lifestyle habits that may contribute to this disease. Given the younger age and potential long-term adverse sequelae of traditional HNSCC treatments, young adults should be treated on a case-by-case basis and post-therapy quality of life must be considered in any treatment-decision making process

  17. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, A; Wickramasinghe, N; Adikari, T N; Gomes, L; Shyamali, N L A; Salio, M; Cerundolo, V; Ogg, G S; Malavige, G Neelika

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 ex-vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha-galactosyl-ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4(+) subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl-6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl-6 and inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4(+) iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  18. Effect of nutritional factors on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults: a case control study in Northern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Berhe, Negassie; Tegabu, Desalegn; Alemayehu, Mekuriaw

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to antiretroviral treatment is critical for suppression of viral replication, reduced destruction of CD4 cells, prevention of viral resistance, promotion of immune reconstitution and slowed disease progression. This study sought to determine the effect of nutritional factors on adherence to ART among HIV-infected adults on ART. Methods Matched case control study design (matched by age and sex) was employed. Data was collected from ART registration chart, pre-tested struct...

  19. The imaging appearances of intracranial CNS infections in adult HIV and AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is broad and comprises predominantly opportunistic infections and neoplasms. It is estimated that approximately one-third of all patients with AIDS develop neurological complications. The organisms responsible for AIDS are human retroviruses: primarily the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). In this review we shall focus on the neurological complications of HIV and AIDS which are applicable to the more frequently occurring intracranial infective organisms. Attention will be paid specifically to those CNS manifestations occurring in the adult HIV and AIDS population as infection in the paediatric HIV and AIDS group, although bearing some similarities, demonstrates some important differences

  20. Induction of apoptosis in frog virus 3-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchar, V G; Bryan, Locke; Wang, J; Long, Scott; Chinchar, G D

    2003-02-15

    The ability of frog virus 3 (FV3), the type species of the family Iridoviridae, to induce apoptosis was examined by monitoring DNA cleavage, chromatin condensation, and cell-surface expression of phosphotidylserine (PS) in fathead minnow (FHM) and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. In productively infected FHM cells, DNA fragmentation was first noted at 6-7 h postinfection and was clearly seen by 17 h postinfection, while chromatin condensation was detected at 8.5 h postinfection. As with some other viruses, FV3-induced apoptosis did not require de novo viral gene expression as both heat-inactivated and UV-inactivated virus readily triggered DNA fragmentation in FHM cells. Moreover, FV3-induced apoptosis was blocked in FHM cells by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, suggesting that virus infection triggers programmed cell death through activation of the caspase cascade. FV3 infection also triggered apoptosis in BHK cells as monitored by TUNEL and annexin V binding assays. To determine whether FV3, similar to other large DNA viruses, encoded proteins that block or delay apoptosis, mock- and FV3-infected FHM cells were osmotically shocked and assayed for DNA fragmentation 3 hours later. DNA fragmentation was clearly seen whether or not shocked cells were previously infected with FV3, indicating that infection with FV3 did not block apoptosis induced by osmotic shock in FHM cells. The above results demonstrate that iridoviruses triggered apoptosis and that the induction of programmed cell death did not require viral gene expression. However, it remains to be determined if virion attachment to target cells is sufficient to induce cell death, or if apoptosis is triggered directly or indirectly by one or more virion-associated proteins. PMID:12642103

  1. Detection of multiple mycoplasma infection in cell cultures by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Timenetsky

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 301 cell cultures from 15 laboratories were monitored for mycoplasma (Mollicutes using PCR and culture methodology. The infection was detected in the cell culture collection of 12 laboratories. PCR for Mollicutes detected these bacteria in 93 (30.9% samples. Although the infection was confirmed by culture for 69 (22.9% samples, PCR with generic primers did not detect the infection in five (5.4%. Mycoplasma species were identified with specific primers in 91 (30.2% of the 98 samples (32.6% considered to be infected. Mycoplasma hyorhinis was detected in 63.3% of the infected samples, M. arginini in 59.2%, Acholeplasma laidlawii in 20.4%, M. fermentans in 14.3%, M. orale in 11.2%, and M. salivarium in 8.2%. Sixty (61.2% samples were co-infected with more than one mycoplasma species. M. hyorhinis and M. arginini were the microorganisms most frequently found in combination, having been detected in 30 (30.6% samples and other associations including up to four species were detected in 30 other samples. Failure of the treatments used to eliminate mycoplasmas from cell cultures might be explained by the occurrence of these multiple infections. The present results indicate that the sharing of non-certified cells among laboratories may disseminate mycoplasma in cell cultures.

  2. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wabik, A.; Jones, P H

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept...

  3. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  4. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  5. A Method to Isolate Viable Schwann Cells from Adult Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 Introduction Schwann cells (SCs) are the glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, which play an important role for repairing nerve injuries and demyelination diseases. The ability to generate large numbers of viable SCs in a short period of time from adult peripheral nerves makes them potential candidates for the clinical application of cell transplantation to enhance remyelination in human demyelinating disease and repair nerve damage. Previously most methods to isolate SCs are not clinically accept...

  6. Maturing From Embryonic to Adult Policy on Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) closure of the agency’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), which focused on therapeutic development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), was caused by the lack of progress in practical development of the iPSs for use in human therapies. As the NIH evaluates priorities in future stem cell therapeutic development, adult stem cell processes in the human body need to be prioritized for a number of key reasons, including (1) ...

  7. Treatment Outcomes for HIV and MDR-TB Co-infected Adults and Children: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaakidis, P.; Casas, E C; Das, M.; Tseretopoulou, X; Ntzani, E E; Ford, N

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is increasing in high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence settings, with high associated mortality. Treatment outcomes in HIV-co-infected adults and children are poorly documented.

  8. Adult stem cell coatings for regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Green, David W.; Gang Li; Bruce Milthorpe; Besim Ben-Nissan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells can become potent tools for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as heart failure, eye disease and osteoarthritis. Housing stem cells inside a hydrogel coating, directly deposited around them individually and in groups, may be an important solution to the problem of increasing stem cell viability and protection in cultivation. Such coatings can target regulatory proteins and genes for maintenance, differentiation and development into tissues. Already polymer coatings are be...

  9. Mycobacterium marinum causes a latent infection that can be reactivated by gamma irradiation in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mataleena Parikka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to latency and reactivation of human tuberculosis are still unclear, mainly due to the lack of standardized animal models for latent mycobacterial infection. In this longitudinal study of the progression of a mycobacterial disease in adult zebrafish, we show that an experimental intraperitoneal infection with a low dose (≈ 35 bacteria of Mycobacterium marinum, results in the development of a latent disease in most individuals. The infection is characterized by limited mortality (25%, stable bacterial loads 4 weeks following infection and constant numbers of highly organized granulomas in few target organs. The majority of bacteria are dormant during a latent mycobacterial infection in zebrafish, and can be activated by resuscitation promoting factor ex vivo. In 5-10% of tuberculosis cases in humans, the disease is reactivated usually as a consequence of immune suppression. In our model, we are able to show that reactivation can be efficiently induced in infected zebrafish by γ-irradiation that transiently depletes granulo/monocyte and lymphocyte pools, as determined by flow cytometry. This immunosuppression causes reactivation of the dormant mycobacterial population and a rapid outgrowth of bacteria, leading to 88% mortality in four weeks. In this study, the adult zebrafish presents itself as a unique non-mammalian vertebrate model for studying the development of latency, regulation of mycobacterial dormancy, as well as reactivation of latent or subclinical tuberculosis. The possibilities for screening for host and pathogen factors affecting the disease progression, and identifying novel therapeutic agents and vaccine targets make this established model especially attractive.

  10. Adenoviruses Expressing PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA Induces the Transdifferentiation of Porcine Neonatal Pancreas Cell Clusters and Adult Pig Pancreatic Cells into Beta-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hye You

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA limitation in the number of insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells is a special feature of diabetes. The identification of alternative sources for the induction of insulin-producing surrogate beta-cells is a matter of profound importance. PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA overexpression have been shown to influence the differentiation and proliferation of pancreatic stem cells. However, few studies have been conducted using adult animal pancreatic stem cells.MethodsAdult pig pancreatic cells were prepared from the non-endocrine fraction of adult pig pancreata. Porcine neonatal pancreas cell clusters (NPCCs were prepared from neonatal pigs aged 1-2 days. The dispersed pancreatic cells were infected with PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA adenoviruses. After infection, these cells were transplanted under the kidney capsules of normoglycemic nude mice.ResultsThe adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA induced insulin gene expression in NPCCs, but not in adult pig pancreatic cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that the number of insulin-positive cells in NPCCs and adult pig pancreatic cells was approximately 2.6- and 1.1-fold greater than those in the green fluorescent protein control group, respectively. At four weeks after transplantation, the relative volume of insulin-positive cells in the grafts increased in the NPCCs, but not in the adult porcine pancreatic cells.ConclusionThese data indicate that PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA facilitate the beta-cell differentiation of NPCCs, but not adult pig pancreatic cells. Therefore PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA-induced NPCCs can be considered good sources for the induction of pancreatic beta-cells, and may also have some utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  11. Adult granulosa cell tumor of the testis masquerading as hydrocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana George Vallonthaiel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult testicular granulosa cell tumor is a rare, potentially malignant sex cord-stromal tumor, of which 30 cases have been described to date. We report the case of a 43-year-old male who complained of a left testicular swelling. Scrotal ultrasound showed a cystic lesion, suggestive of hydrocele. However, due to a clinical suspicion of a solid-cystic neoplasm, a high inguinal orchidectomy was performed, which, on pathological examination, was diagnosed as adult granulosa cell tumor. Adult testicular granulosa cell tumors have aggressive behaviour as compared to their ovarian counterparts. They may rarely be predominantly cystic and present as hydrocele. Lymph node and distant metastases have been reported in few cases. Role of MIB-1 labelling index in prognostication is not well defined. Therefore, their recognition and documentation of their behaviour is important from a diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic point of view.

  12. Discriminating dengue-infected hepatic cells (WRL-68) using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafouz, Bashar; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Rothan, Hussin A; Yusof, Rohana; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2016-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the induced movement of dielectric particles placed in a nonuniform electric field, has been used as a potential technique for manipulation and separation of many biological samples without destructive consequences to the cell. Cells of the same genotype in different physiological and pathological states have unique morphological and structural features, therefore, it is possible to differentiate between them using their DEP responses. This paper reports the experimental discrimination of normal and dengue-infected human hepatic fetal epithelial cells (WRL-68 cells) based on their DEP crossover frequency, at which no resultant movement occurs in the cells in response to the DEP force. A microarray dot electrode was used to conduct the DEP experiments. The DEP forces applied to the cells were quantified by analyzing the light intensity shift within the electrode's dot region based on the Cumulative Modal Intensity Shift image analysis technique. The differences in dielectric properties between infected and uninfected cells were exploited by plotting a unique DEP spectrum for each set of cells. We observed that the crossover frequency decreased from 220 kHz for the normal WRL-68 cells to 140 kHz after infection with the dengue virus in a medium conductivity of 100 μS/cm. We conclude that the change in the DEP crossover frequency between dengue-infected cells and their healthy counterparts should allow direct characterization of these cell types by exploiting their electrophysiological properties. PMID:26530354

  13. Cell competition modifies adult stem cell and tissue population dynamics in a JAKSTAT dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J. E.; Kucinski, Iwo; Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mansour, Sarah; Simons, Benjamin D.; Piddini, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Throughout their lifetime, cells may suffer insults that reduce their fitness and disrupt their function, and it is unclear how these potentially harmful cells are managed in adult tissues. We address this question using the adult Drosophila posterior midgut as a model of homeostatic tissue and ribosomal Minute mutations to reduce fitness in groups of cells. We take a quantitative approach combining lineage tracing and biophysical modeling and address how cell competition affects stem...

  14. Etiology and Clinical Characterization of Respiratory Virus Infections in Adult Patients Attending an Emergency Department in Beijing

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Roujian; Wang, Zhong; Zhu, Na; Wang, Wen; Julian, Druce; Chris, Birch; Lv, Jianxin; Tan, Wenjie

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) represent a serious global health burden. To date, few reports have addressed the prevalence of respiratory viruses (RVs) in adults with ARTIs attending an emergency department (ED). Therefore, the potential impact of respiratory virus infections on such patients remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the epidemiological and clinical profiles of common and recently discovered respiratory viruses in adults with ARTIs a...

  15. CD4+ T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Semmo; Paul Klenerman

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver damage, with virus-induced end-stage disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma resulting in a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Evidence that CD4+ T cell responses to HCV play an important role in the outcome of acute infection has been shown in several studies. However, the mechanisms behind viral persistence and the failure of CD4+ T cell responses to contain virus are poorly understood. During chronic HCV infection, HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses are relatively weak or absent whereas in resolved infection these responses are vigorous and multispecific. Persons with a T-helper type Ⅰ profile, which promotes cellular effector mechanisms are thought to be more likely to experience viral clearance, but the overall role of these cells in the immunopathogenesis of chronic liver disease is not known. To define this, much more data is required on the function and specificity of virus-specific CD4+ T cells,especially in the early phases of acute disease and in the liver during chronic infection. The role and possible mechanisms of action of CD4+ T cell responses in determining the outcome of acute and chronic HCV infection will be discussed in this review.

  16. Multipotent adult progenitor cell and stem cell plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Jahagirdar, Balkrishna N; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by their biological function. A stem cell is an undifferentiated cell that self-renews to maintain the stem cell pool and at the single-cell level differentiates into more than one mature, functional cell. In addition, when transplanted, a stem cell should be capable of replacing a damaged organ or tissue for the lifetime of the recipient. Some would argue that stem cells should also be capable of functionally integrating into nondamaged tissues. Stem cells are critical...

  17. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  18. Properties of Adult Lung Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncello, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    The last decade has seen significant progress in understanding the organisation of regenerative cells in the adult lung. Cell-lineage tracing and in vitro clonogenic assays have enabled the identification and characterisation of endogenous lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Selective lung injury models, and genetically engineered mice have revealed highly conserved gene networks, factors, signalling pathways, and cellular interactions important in maintaining lung homeostasis and regulating lung regeneration and repair following injury. This review describes the current models of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cell organisation in adult mice, and the impediments encountered in translational studies aiming to identify and characterise their human homologs. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2582-2589, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27062064

  19. Adult stem cells and their ability to differentiate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, Maciej; Sieron, Aleksander L

    2006-08-01

    This is a review of the current status of knowledge on adult stem cells as well as the criteria and evidence for their potential to transform into different cell types and cell lineages. Reports on stem cell sources, focusing on tissues from adult subjects, were also investigated. Numerous reports have been published on the search for early markers of both stem cells and the precursors of various cell lineages. The question is still open about the characteristics of the primary stem cell. The existing proofs and hypotheses have not yielded final solutions to this problem. From a practical point of view it is also crucial to find a minimal set of markers determining the phenotypes of the precursor cells of a particular cell lineage. Several lines of evidence seem to bring closer the day when we will be able to detect the right stem cell niche and successfully isolate precursor cells that are needed for the treatment of a particular disorder. Recent reports on cases of cancer in patients subjected to stem cell therapy are yet another controversial issue looked into in this review, although the pros and cons emerging from the results of published studies still do not provide satisfying evidence to fully understand this issue. PMID:16865077

  20. Cryptosporidium suis infection in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing; Wang, Xing-Ye; Chen, Jian-Wen; Ding, Ling; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-02-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., ubiquitous enteric parasitic protozoa of vertebrates, recently emerged as an important cause of economic loss and zoonosis. The present study aimed to determine the distribution and species of Cryptosporidium in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China. A total of 1,337 fresh fecal samples of post-weaned and adult pigs were collected by sterile disposable gloves from 8 areas of Shaanxi province. The samples were examined by Sheather's sugar flotation technique and microscopy at × 400 magnification for Cryptosporidium infection, and the species in positive samples was further identified by PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. A total of 44 fecal samples were successfully amplified by the nested PCR of the partial SSU rRNA, with overall prevalence of 3.3%. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in each pig farms ranged from 0 to 14.4%. Species identification by sequencing of SSU rRNA gene revealed that 42 (3.1%) samples were Cryptosporidium suis and 2 (0.15%) were Cryptosporidium scrofarum. C. suis had the highest prevalence (7.5%) in growers and the lowest in breeding pigs (0.97%). C. suis was the predominant species in pre-weaned and adult pigs, while C. scrofarum infected pigs older than 3 months only. A season-related difference of C. suis was observed in this study, with the highest prevalence in autumn (5.5%) and the lowest (1.7%) in winter. The present study provided basic information for control of Cryptosporidium infection in pigs and assessment of zoonotic transmission of pigs in Shaanxi province, China. PMID:25748718

  1. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignier, Anne C; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2010-02-01

    There are many types of stem cells. All share the characteristics of being able to self-renew and to give rise to differentiated progeny. Over the last decades, great excitement has been generated by the prospect of being able to exploit these properties for the repair, improvement, and/or replacement of damaged organs. However, many hurdles, both scientific and ethical, remain in the path of using human embryonic stem cells for tissue-engineering purposes. In this report we review current strategies for isolating, enriching, and, most recently, inducing the development of human pluripotent stem cells. In so doing, we discuss the scientific and ethical issues associated with this endeavor. Finally, progress in the use of stem cells as therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and various neurologic and immunohematologic disorders, and as vehicles for the delivery of gene therapy, is briefly discussed. PMID:20061008

  2. Adult Limbal Neurosphere Cells: A Potential Autologous Cell Resource for Retinal Cell Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoli; Thomson, Heather; Cooke, J.J.; Scott, Jennifer A; Hossain, Parwez; Lotery, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The Corneal limbus is a readily accessible region at the front of the eye, separating the cornea and sclera. Neural colonies (neurospheres) can be generated from adult corneal limbus in vitro. We have previously shown that these neurospheres originate from neural crest stem/progenitor cells and that they can differentiate into functional neurons in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mouse and human limbal neurosphere cells (LNS) could differentiate towards a retinal linea...

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  4. Interferon-alpha treatment of children and young adults with chronic hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the response of one-year interferon-alpha therapy in hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection in children and young adults at a tertiary care hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Sarwar Zuberi Liver Centre (SZLC), Medical Unit IV, Civil Hospital, Karachi / Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), from June 2009 to July 2010. Methodology: Paediatric patients (< 18 years age) and young adults (18-35 years) presenting were screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HDV sero-markers. HDV anti-body positive by ELISA were further screened for hepatitis D ribonucleic acid (HDV-RNA) by real time PCR. HDV RNA PCR positive patients were treated with INF-a (children 6 MIU/m2/day and adults 5 MIU/day) for a period of one year. Patients were assessed monthly. Haematological parameters and ALT were monitored during treatment. Clinical progress (side effects) and negative HDV RNA were used as response criteria. Results: Overall 49 patients were HDV RNA positive (children: n=15, mean age 15+-2.92 years adults: n=34, mean age 27+-4 years). Eighty percent were male. Treatment was given to 25 patients (children: n=11, adults: n=14). HBV genotype D was the predominant in all HDV RNA positive patients (73%). Eighty percent (20/25) were HDV-RNA negative after one year of treatment, and remaining patients are still under treatment. Side effects were tolerated well and children continued regular activity. Haematological parameters were unremarkable. Children maintained their pre-treatment centile for height and weight (growth parameters). ALT levels were significantly decreased post-treatment. Conclusion: Conventional INF-alpha was safe in children with HDV infection in terms of side effects and growth parameters. Eighty percent were HDV-RNA negative one year after treatment. Further follow-up 2 years post-treatment will give conclusive results. (author)

  5. Angiogenic factors stimulate growth of adult neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Androutsellis-Theotokis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to grow a uniform cell type from the adult central nervous system (CNS is valuable for developing cell therapies and new strategies for drug discovery. The adult mammalian brain is a source of neural stem cells (NSC found in both neurogenic and non-neurogenic zones but difficulties in culturing these hinders their use as research tools. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that NSCs can be efficiently grown in adherent cell cultures when angiogenic signals are included in the medium. These signals include both anti-angiogenic factors (the soluble form of the Notch receptor ligand, Dll4 and pro-angiogenic factors (the Tie-2 receptor ligand, Angiopoietin 2. These treatments support the self renewal state of cultured NSCs and expression of the transcription factor Hes3, which also identifies the cancer stem cell population in human tumors. In an organotypic slice model, angiogenic factors maintain vascular structure and increase the density of dopamine neuron processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate new properties of adult NSCs and a method to generate efficient adult NSC cultures from various central nervous system areas. These findings will help establish cellular models relevant to cancer and regeneration.

  6. Cytomegalovirus infection of murine testicular interstitial Leydig cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Baskar, J F; Stanat, S C; Huang, E S

    1983-01-01

    We studied the susceptibility of mouse testicular interstitial Leydig cells to cytomegalovirus both in vivo and in vitro. The in vivo studies included intratesticular and intraperitoneal infection of 6-week-old mice with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV); the in vitro studies involved an MCMV-Leydig cell interaction using a Leydig tumor cell line (I-10). MCMV-specific antigens were detected in interstitial Leydig cells in sections of MCMV-inoculated testes by an indirect immunofluorescence test. ...

  7. Neural stem cells and the regulation of adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conover Joanne C

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumably, the 'hard-wired' neuronal circuitry of the adult brain dissuades addition of new neurons, which could potentially disrupt existing circuits. This is borne out by the fact that, in general, new neurons are not produced in the mature brain. However, recent studies have established that the adult brain does maintain discrete regions of neurogenesis from which new neurons migrate and become incorporated into the functional circuitry of the brain. These neurogenic zones appear to be vestiges of the original developmental program that initiates brain formation. The largest of these germinal regions in the adult brain is the subventricular zone (SVZ, which lines the lateral walls of the lateral ventricles. Neural stem cells produce neuroblasts that migrate from the SVZ along a discrete pathway, the rostral migratory stream, into the olfactory bulb where they form mature neurons involved in the sense of smell. The subgranular layer (SGL of the hippocampal dentate gyrus is another neurogenic region; new SGL neurons migrate only a short distance and differentiate into hippocampal granule cells. Here, we discuss the surprising finding of neural stem cells in the adult brain and the molecular mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis.

  8. Metabolic stress in infected cells may represent a therapeutic target for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Menéndez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide, there are thousands of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection per day. The effectiveness of current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is relative; to prioritize finding vaccines and/or cure-oriented initiatives should be reinforced because there is little room, if any, for procrastination. Basic and clinical findings on HIV-1 reservoirs suggest that disruption of virus latency is feasible. Because the goal is curing HIV-1 infection, we should be aware that the challenge is to eradicate the viruses of every single infected cell and consequently acting upon virus latency is necessary but not sufficient. The large majority of the virus reservoir, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, is readily accessible but other minor reservoirs, where ART does not diffuse, require innovative strategies. The situation closely resembles that currently faced in the treatment of cancer. Exploiting the fact that histone deacetylase inhibitors, mainly vorinostat, may disrupt the latency of HIV-1, we propose to supplement this effect with a programmed interference in the metabolic stress of infected cells. Metformin and chloroquine are cheap and accessible modulators of pro-survival mechanisms to which viruses are constantly confronted to generate alternative energy sources and maximize virus production. Metformin restrains the use of the usurped cellular biosynthetic machinery by viral genes and chloroquine contributes to death of infected cells. We suggest that the combination of vorinostat, chloroquine and metformin should be combined with ART to pursue viral eradication in infected cells. PMID:23639282

  9. Dynamics of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected adults and children

    OpenAIRE

    Petrara, Maria Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is involved in a wide range of malignancies, particularly in immunocompromised subjects. Besides immunodepression, chronic immune activation may induce B-cell stimulation leading to an expansion of EBV-infected cells, thus increasing the risk of EBV-related malignancies. The factors that may contribute to HIV-1-induced B cell activation and expansion of EBV-infected cells are largely unknown. In Africa EBV primary infection occurs during infancy and early childhood a...

  10. The Impact of Different CD4 Cell-Count Monitoring and Switching Strategies on Mortality in HIV-Infected African Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Application of Dynamic Marginal Structural Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Deborah; Robins, James M; Petersen, Maya L; Gibb, Diana M; Gilks, Charles F; Mugyenyi, Peter; Grosskurth, Heiner; Hakim, James; Katabira, Elly; Babiker, Abdel G; Walker, A Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is delivered with limited laboratory monitoring, often none. In 2003-2004, investigators in the Development of Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa (DART) Trial randomized persons initiating ART in Uganda and Zimbabwe to either laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM). CD4 cell counts were measured every 12 weeks in both groups but were only returned to treating clinicians for management in the LCM group. Follow-up continued through 2008. In observational analyses, dynamic marginal structural models on pooled randomized groups were used to estimate survival under different monitoring-frequency and clinical/immunological switching strategies. Assumptions included no direct effect of randomized group on mortality or confounders and no unmeasured confounders which influenced treatment switch and mortality or treatment switch and time-dependent covariates. After 48 weeks of first-line ART, 2,946 individuals contributed 11,351 person-years of follow-up, 625 switches, and 179 deaths. The estimated survival probability after a further 240 weeks for post-48-week switch at the first CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/mm(3) or non-Candida World Health Organization stage 4 event (with CD4 count findings support a benefit from identifying patients immunologically failing first-line ART at 48 weeks. PMID:26316598

  11. Morphometric study of Schistosoma mansoni adult worms recovered from undernourished infected mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheilla A Oliveira

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Some unfavourable effects of malnutrition of the host on Schistosoma mansoni worm biology and structure have been reported based upon brigthfield microscopy. This paper aims to study by morphometric techniques, some morphological parameters in male and female adult worms recovered from undernourished albino mice in comparison with parasites recovered from well-fed infected mice. Undernourished animals were fed a multideficient and essentially low protein diet (RBD diet and compared to well-fed control mice fed with the commercial diet NUVILAB. Seventy-five days post-infection with 80 cercarie (BL strain animals were sacrificed. All adult worms were fixed in 10% formalin and stained with carmine chloride. One hundred male and 60 female specimens from each group (undernourished and control were examined using an image system analysis Leica Quantimet 500C and the Sigma Scan Measurement System. The following morphometrical parameters were studied: body length and width, oral and ventral suckers, number and area of testicular lobes, length and width of ovary and uterine egg. For statistical analysis, the Student's t test for unpaired samples was applied. Significant differences (p < 0.05 were detected in body length and width, in parameters of suckers, uterine egg width, ovary length and area of testicular lobes, with lower values for specimens from undernourished mice. The nutritional status of the host has negative influence on S. mansoni adult worms, probably through unavailability of essential nutrients to the parasites.

  12. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Huaqi, E-mail: Huaqi.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu [Department of Developmental Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX, 75235 (United States); Edgar, Bruce A., E-mail: b.edgar@dkfz.de [ZMBH-DKFZ Alliance, Im Neuenheimer Feld 282, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98109 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  13. Ultimate erythropoietic repopulating abilities of fetal, young adult, and old adult cells compared using repeated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythropoietic repopulating abilities of fetal liver cells and young and old adult marrow cells were compared as follows: Equal numbers of cells from a donor of each age were mixed with a constant portion of cells pooled from genetically distinguishable competitors. These mixtures were transplanted into stem cell-depleted recipients, and the proportions of recipient hemoglobin that were donor type measured the relative effectiveness of early erythropoietic precursor cells from the various donors. At intervals of 3-6 mo, recipients were sublethally irradiated, requiring a new round of competitive repopulation. When B6 mice were used as donors, with WBB6F1 competitors and recipients, the highest levels of stem cell activity were found using old donors. This was true even with unirradiated, immune-competent W/Wv recipients. When donors and recipients were WBB6F1 hybrids, with B6 competitors, fetal cells initially gave higher levels of repopulating ability, and they were similar to the adult and old marrow cells after 400 d and after recovery from two sublethal irradiations. These effects were mostly insignificant and probably reflect small differences in initial stem cell concentrations that are brought out by the sensitivity of the competitive repopulation assay. Repopulating abilities of 12-d fetal liver cells were not detectable. We also showed that the proportions of newly synthesized hemoglobins made by the two types of stem cells in tetraparental mice remained nearly constant when tested at 3-d intervals over 30 d. Minimum numbers of stem cells producing erythrocytes over a single 3-d period were calculated as 62 and 128, but these are too low, since variances were similar in the tetraparental mice and in the F1 hybrid control. We suggest that erythropoietic stem cells have essentially unlimited proliferative capacities and are found in approximately equal concentrations in the primary erythropoietic organs after 15 or 16 d of fetal life

  14. In vivo dedifferentiation of adult adipose cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjun Liao

    Full Text Available Adipocytes can dedifferentiate into fibroblast-like cells in vitro and thereby acquire proliferation and multipotent capacities to participate in the repair of various organs and tissues. Whether dedifferentiation occurs under physiological or pathological conditions in vivo is unknown.A tissue expander was placed under the inguinal fat pads of rats and gradually expanded by injection of water. Samples were collected at various time points, and morphological, histological, cytological, ultrastructural, and gene expression analyses were conducted. In a separate experiment, purified green fluorescent protein+ adipocytes were transplanted into C57 mice and collected at various time points. The transplanted adipocytes were assessed by bioluminescence imaging and whole-mount staining.The expanded fat pad was obviously thinner than the untreated fat pad on the opposite side. It was also tougher in texture and with more blood vessels attached. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy indicated there were fewer monolocular adipocytes in the expanded fat pad and the morphology of these cells was altered, most notably their lipid content was discarded. Immunohistochemistry showed that the expanded fat pad contained an increased number of proliferative cells, which may have been derived from adipocytes. Following removal of the tissue expander, many small adipocytes were observed. Bioluminescence imaging suggested that some adipocytes survived when transplanted into an ischemic-hypoxic environment. Whole-mount staining revealed that surviving adipocytes underwent a process similar to adipocyte dedifferentiation in vitro. Monolocular adipocytes became multilocular adipocytes and then fibroblast-like cells.Mature adipocytes may be able to dedifferentiate in vivo, and this may be an adipose tissue self-repair mechanism. The capacity of adipocytes to dedifferentiate into stem cell-like cells may also have a more general role in the

  15. Early events associated with infection of Epstein-Barr virus infection of primary B-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Halder

    Full Text Available Epstein Barr virus (EBV is closely associated with the development of a vast number of human cancers. To develop a system for monitoring early cellular and viral events associated with EBV infection a self-recombining BAC containing 172-kb of the Epstein Barr virus genome BAC-EBV designated as MD1 BAC (Chen et al., 2005, J.Virology was used to introduce an expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP by homologous recombination, and the resultant BAC clone, BAC-GFP-EBV was transfected into the HEK 293T epithelial cell line. The resulting recombinant GFP EBV was induced to produce progeny virus by chemical inducer from the stable HEK 293T BAC GFP EBV cell line and the virus was used to immortalize human primary B-cell as monitored by green fluorescence and outgrowth of the primary B cells. The infection, B-cell activation and cell proliferation due to GFP EBV was monitored by the expression of the B-cell surface antigens CD5, CD10, CD19, CD23, CD39, CD40 , CD44 and the intercellular proliferation marker Ki-67 using Flow cytometry. The results show a dramatic increase in Ki-67 which continues to increase by 6-7 days post-infection. Likewise, CD40 signals showed a gradual increase, whereas CD23 signals were increased by 6-12 hours, maximally by 3 days and then decreased. Monitoring the viral gene expression pattern showed an early burst of lytic gene expression. This up-regulation of lytic gene expression prior to latent genes during early infection strongly suggests that EBV infects primary B-cell with an initial burst of lytic gene expression and the resulting progeny virus is competent for infecting new primary B-cells. This process may be critical for establishment of latency prior to cellular transformation. The newly infected primary B-cells can be further analyzed for investigating B cell activation due to EBV infection.

  16. Application of adult stem cells in neural tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihong Piao; Wei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTTIVE:To investigate the progress in finding,isolation and culture.proliferation and differentiation,and application in neural tissue engineering of adult stem cells(ASCs).DATA SOURCES:Using the terms"adult stem cells,nerve,tissue engineering".we searched the PubMed for adult stem ceils-related studies published in English from January 2001 to August 2006.Meanwhile,we also performed a China National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI)search for homochronous correlative literatures on the computer by inputting the terms"adult stem cells,nerve,tissue engineering"in Chinese.texts were searched for.Inclusive criteria:①Literatures about the sources,distribution,culture.proliferation and differentiation.and application in the repair of neural ASCs by tissue engineering.②Articles recommended either by randomized.blind or by other methods were not excluded.Exclusive criteria:①Embryonic stem cells.②Review,repetitive study,case report,Meta analysis. DATA EXTRACTION:Totally 1 278 articles related to ASCs were collected,32 were involved and the other 1 246 were excluded. DATA SYNTHESIS:Adult stem cell has the ability of self-renewal.unceasing proliferation and transdifferentiation.It has wide source,which does not involved in ethical problems.It has advantages over embryonic stem cell.Studies on the isolation and culture,induction and differentiation and application in neural ASCs by tissue engineering contribute to obtaining considerable ASCs,so as to provide experimental and theoretical bases for CONCLUSION:ASCs play a very important role in neural tissue engineering.

  17. Hyperparathyroidism and Complications Associated with Vitamin D Deficiency in HIV-Infected Adults in New York City, New York

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Candice K.; Eckhardt, Benjamin; Baghdadi, Jonathan; Judith A. Aberg

    2012-01-01

    Although recent studies report a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in HIV-infected adults similar to that in the general population, metabolic complications of vitamin D deficiency may be worsened with HIV infection and remain insufficiently characterized. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study to determine prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency and hyperparathyroidism among HIV-infected patients attending an urban clinic. Vitamin D deficiency was defined a...

  18. Medical perspectives of adults and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Lagresle, Chantal; Fischer, Alain

    2002-10-01

    In the last 30 years, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation has become the treatment of choice for many hematologic malignancies or inherited disorders and a number of changes have been registered in terms of long-term survival rate of transplanted patients as well as of available sources of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). In parallel to the publication of better results in HSC transplantation, several recent discoveries have opened a scientific and ethical debate on the therapeutical potential of stem cells isolated from adult or embryonic tissues. One of the major discoveries in this field is the capacity of bone marrow-derived stem cells to treat a genetic liver disease in a mouse model, thus justifying the concept of transdifferentiation of adult stem cell and raising hopes on its possible therapeutical applications. We have tried here to summarise the advances in this field and to discuss the limits of these biological data. PMID:12494504

  19. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  20. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin-specific T cells are normally associated with destruction of myelin and axonal damage. However, in acute MS plaque, remyelination occurs concurrent with T-cell infiltration, which raises the question of whether T cells might stimulate myelin repair. We investiga...... calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  1. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindelöf, B; Forslind, B; Hilliges, M; Johansson, O; Aström, L

    1991-01-01

    A woman with typical skin lesions of histiocytosis X is reported. Electron microscopic and immunohistochemical investigations revealed a large number of markedly long Birbeck Langerhans' cell granulae. During treatment with Interferon alpha -2b, the patient developed infarctus cerebri and died. PMID:1675535

  2. Adult stem cells for chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Ana L; Rojas, Mauricio

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic, progressive and lethal lung diseases. The incidence of IPF and COPD increases with age, independent of exposure to common environmental risk factors. At present, there is limited understanding of the relationship between ageing and the development of chronic lung diseases. One hypothesis is that chronic injury drives to exhaustion the local and systemic repair responses in the lung. These changes are accentuated during ageing where there is a progressive accumulation of senescent cells. Recently, stem cells have emerged as a critical reparative mechanism for lung injury. In this review, we discuss the repair response of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (B-MSC) after lung injury and how their function is affected by ageing. Our own work has demonstrated a protective role of B-MSC in several animal models of acute and chronic lung injury. We recently demonstrated the association, using animal models, between age and an increase in the susceptibility to develop severe injury and fibrosis. At the same time, we have identified functional differences between B-MSC isolated from young and old animals. Further studies are required to understand the functional impairment of ageing B-MSC, ultimately leading to a rapid stem cell depletion or fatigue, interfering with their ability to play a protective role in lung injury. The elucidation of these events will help in the development of rational and new therapeutic strategies for COPD and IPF. PMID:23648014

  3. Outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in immunocompromised adults on a hematology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tomas Ostergaard; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Willenborg, Christiana; Cheung, Carol; Andresen, David; Rawlinson, William; Clezy, Kate

    2016-10-01

    We describe an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on a hematology ward without allogeneic stem cell transplant patients. Twelve patients and one staff member infected with RSV were identified from the laboratory database. Five patients had lower respiratory tract infection, seven had upper respiratory tract infection, one was asymptomatic, and there were two (15.4%) deaths. Most patients had overlapping periods of potential infectiousness on the ward. Sequencing was possible on eight specimens and five of these had identical sequences. Results were consistent with transmission occurring both on the ward and by introduction of RSV from the community. J. Med. Virol. 88:1827-1831, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990584

  4. Translocation Renal Cell Carcinomas in Adults: A Single Institution Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Minghao; De Angelo, Patricia; Osborne, Lisa; Mondolfi, Paniz; Geller, Matthew; Yang, Youfeng; Linehan, W. Marston; Merino, Maria J.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Cai, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Translocation renal cell carcinoma is a newly recognized subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with chromosomal translocations involving TFE3 (Xp11.2) or, less frequently, TFEB (6p21). Xp11 translocation RCC was originally described as a pediatric neoplasm representing 20–40% of pediatric RCCs with a much lower frequency in the adult population. TFEB translocation RCC is very rare, with approximately 10 cases reported in the literature. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of ad...

  5. Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Araujo; Francisco Costa; Joanne Lopes; Ricardo Castro

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocyt...

  6. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that these

  7. Apoptosis in astrovirus-infected CaCo-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell death processes during human astrovirus replication in CaCo-2 cells and their underlying mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical alterations typical of apoptosis were analyzed in infected cells using a combination of techniques, including DAPI staining, the sub-G0/G1 technique and the TUNEL assay. The onset of apoptosis was directly proportional to the virus multiplicity of infection. Transient expression experiments showed a direct link between astrovirus ORF1a encoded proteins and apoptosis induction. A computer analysis of the astrovirus genome revealed the presence of a death domain in the nonstructural protein p38 of unknown function, encoded in ORF1a. Apoptosis inhibition experiments suggested the involvement of caspase 8 in the apoptotic response, and led to a reduction in the infectivity of the virus progeny released to the supernatant. We conclude that apoptotic death of host cells seems necessary for efficient human astrovirus replication and particle maturation

  8. Calcium exchange, structure, and function in cultured adult myocardial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells digested from adult rat heart and cultured for 14 days demonstrate all the structural elements, in mature form, associated with the process of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. The transverse tubular (TT) system is well developed with an extensive junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR). In nonphosphate-containing buffer contraction of the cells is lost as rapidly as zero extracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]0) solution is applied and a negative contraction staircase is produced on increase of stimulation frequency. Structurally and functionally the cells have the characteristics of adult cells in situ. 45Ca exchange and total 45Ca measurement in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-buffered perfusate define three components of cellular Ca: 1) a rapidly exchangeable component accounting for 36% of total Ca, 2) a slowly exchangeable component (t/sub 1/2/ 53 min) accounting for 7% total Ca, and 3) the remaining 57% cellular Ca is inexchangeable (demonstrates no significant exchange within 60 min). The slowly exchangeable component can be increased 10-fold within 60 min by addition of phosphate to the perfusate. The Ca distribution and exchange characteristics are little different from those of 3-day cultures of neonatal rat heart previously studied. The results suggest that the cells are representative of adult cells in situ and that both sarcolemmal-bound and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca contribute to the component of Ca that is rapidly exchangeable

  9. [Serological evaluation of Bordetella pertussis infection in adults with prolonged cough].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Cemile; Çöplü, Nilay; Gözalan, Ayşegül; Yılmaz, Ülkü; Bilekli, Selen; Demirci, Nilgün Yılmaz; Biber, Çiğdem; Erdoğan, Yurdanur; Esen, Berrin; Çöplü, Lütfi

    2016-07-01

    Pertussis is a vaccine-preventable disease that is transmitted from infected to susceptible individuals by respiratory route. Bordetella pertussis infection may occur at any age as neither vaccine nor natural infection induced immunity lasts life-long. This study was planned to demonstrate the serological evidence of infection among adults, to raise awareness among clinicians and to provide data for the development of strategies to protect vulnerable infants. A total of 538 patients (345 female, 193 male) ages between 18-87 years who had a complain of prolonged cough for more than two weeks were included in the study. Anti-pertussis toxin (PT) IgG and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin (FH) IgG levels from single serum samples were measured by an in-house ELISA test which was standardized and shown to be efficient previously. Anti-PT IgG antibody levels of ≥ 100 EU/ml were considered as acute/recent infection with B.pertussis. In our study, 9.7% (52/538) of the patients had high levels of anti-PT IgG (≥ 100 EU/ml) and among those patients 43 (43/52; 82.7%) also had high (≥ 100 EU/ml) anti-FHA IgG levels. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age, gender, education level, DPT (diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus) vaccination history, smoking history or average daily cigarette consumption (p> 0.05) between the cases with high antibody levels (n= 52). When the symptoms and the presence of cases with high antibody levels were evaluated, it was detected that no one parameter was significantly different from others, except that 24.1% of the cases with inspiratory whooping had high anti-PT levels. There was also no statistically significant difference between high anti-PT levels ≥ 100 EU/ml and the patients with risk factors [smoking (21/200; 10.5%), presence of disease that cause chronic cough and/or drug usage (19/171; %11.1), and whole factors which cause chronic cough (32/306; %10.5)] and without risk factors (p= 0.581; p= 0.357; p= 0

  10. In Vivo Dedifferentiation of Adult Adipose Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yunjun Liao; Zhaowei Zeng; Feng Lu; Ziqing Dong; Qiang Chang; Jianhua Gao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adipocytes can dedifferentiate into fibroblast-like cells in vitro and thereby acquire proliferation and multipotent capacities to participate in the repair of various organs and tissues. Whether dedifferentiation occurs under physiological or pathological conditions in vivo is unknown. Methods A tissue expander was placed under the inguinal fat pads of rats and gradually expanded by injection of water. Samples were collected at various time points, and morphological, histologica...

  11. Anti-adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma effects of indole-3-carbinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okudaira Taeko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a malignancy derived from T cells infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, and it is known to be resistant to standard anticancer therapies. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C, a naturally occurring component of Brassica vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprout, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. The aim of this study was to determine the potential anti-ATLL effects of I3C both in vitro and in vivo. Results In the in vitro study, I3C inhibited cell viability of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and ATLL cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, I3C did not exert any inhibitory effect on uninfected T-cell lines and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. I3C prevented the G1/S transition by reducing the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Cdk4 and Cdk6, and induced apoptosis by reducing the expression of XIAP, survivin and Bcl-2, and by upregulating the expression of Bak. The induced apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage. I3C also suppressed IκBα phosphorylation and JunD expression, resulting in inactivation of NF-κB and AP-1. Inoculation of HTLV-1-infected T cells in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency resulted in tumor growth. The latter was inhibited by treatment with I3C (50 mg/kg/day orally, but not the vehicle control. Conclusion Our preclinical data suggest that I3C could be potentially a useful chemotherapeutic agent for patients with ATLL.

  12. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns w...

  13. Preventing Infections in Sickle Cell Disease: The Unfinished Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaro, Stephen K; Tam, P Y Iroh

    2016-05-01

    While encapsulated bacterial agents, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, are recognized as important microbes that are associated with serious illness in hosts with sickle cell disease (SCD), multiple pathogens are implicated in infectious manifestations of SCD. Variations in clinical practice have been an obstacle to the universal implementation of infection preventive management through active, targeted vaccination of these individuals and routine usage of antibiotic prophylaxis. Paradoxically, in low-income settings, there is evidence that SCD also increases the risk for several other infections that warrant additional infection preventive measures. The infection preventive care among patients with SCD in developed countries does not easily translate to the adoption of these recommendations globally, which must take into account the local epidemiology of infections, available vaccines and population-specific vaccine efficacy, environment, health care behaviors, and cultural beliefs, as these are all factors that play a complex role in the manifestation of SCD and the prevention of infectious disease morbidity. PMID:26840500

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... pathways. As such, this review highlights the consequences of H. pylori infection on the integrity of DNA in the host cells. By down-regulating major DNA repair pathways, H. pylori infection has the potential to generate mutations. In addition, H. pylori infection can induce direct changes on the DNA of...... the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  15. The Immunodominant Brugia malayi Paramyosin as a Marker of Current Infection with Wuchereria bancrofti Adult Worms

    OpenAIRE

    Langy, Sandra; Plichart, Catherine; Luquiaud, Patrick; Williams, Steven A.; Nicolas, Luc

    1998-01-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence encoding Brugia malayi L3 paramyosin has been isolated by immunoscreening a cDNA library with a mouse antiserum raised against Wuchereria bancrofti L3 infective larvae. A recombinant truncated form of paramyosin was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein and used to evaluate humoral responses of adults from a W. bancrofti-endemic area in French Polynesia according to their parasitological status. Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) preferentially bound to p...

  16. Smoking behaviors in a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, M.; Penko, J; Vittinghoff, E.; Bangsberg, DR; Miaskowski, C; Kushel, MB

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a longitudinal study of a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults to examine smoking behaviors and factors associated with quitting. We assessed "hardcore" smoking behaviors associated with a low probability of quitting. Of the 296 participants, 218 were current smokers (73.6 %). The prevalence of "hardcore" smoking was high: 59.6 % smoked ≥15 cigarettes per day, and 67.3 % were daily smokers. During the study interval, 20.6 % made at least one quit attempt. Of the...

  17. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis B Infection in an Adult Population in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang, Qingmei Li, Jie Sun, Chunyan Wang, Qing Gu, Xiangwei Feng, Bing Du, Wei Wang, Xiaodong Shi, Siqi Zhang, Wanyu Li, Yanfang Jiang, Junyan Feng, Shumei He, Junqi Niu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: The prevalence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV is higher in adults than in children. We determined the seroepidemiology of HBV infection in an adult population in JiLin, China, to guide effective preventive measures.Methods: A cross-sectional serosurvey was conducted throughout JiLin, China. A total of 3833 people was selected and demographic and behavioral information gathered. Serum samples were tested for HBV markers and liver enzymes.Results: The prevalence of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, the antibody to the hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs, the hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg, the antibody to HBeAg (anti-HBe, and the antibody to the hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc were 4.38%, 35.66%, 1.38%, 6.65%, and 40.88%, respectively. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels were significantly higher among HBsAg (+ than HBsAg (- subjects. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent predictors for chronic HBV infection were smoking, poor sleep quality; occupation as private small-businessmen, laborers, or peasants; male gender; family history of HBV; personal history of vaccination; and older age. Independent predictors for exposure to HBV were large family size, occupation as a private small-businessman, male gender, family history of HBV, personal history of vaccination, and older age. Independent predictors for immunity by vaccination were occupation as a private small-businessman, high income, personal history of vaccination, and young age. Independent predictors for immunity by exposure were drinking, male gender, personal history of vaccination, and older age.Conclusions: The prevalence rate of HBV infection (4.38% was lower than the previous rate of general HBV vaccination. However, 44.59% of the population remained susceptible to HBV. The prevalence of HBV infection was high in young adults, private small-businessmen, peasants, those with a family history of HBV, and

  18. Contribution of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Adult Mouse Inner Ear: Mesenchymal Cells and Fibrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Hainan; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Schmiedt, Richard A.; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Zhou, Daohong; Smythe, Nancy; LIU, LIYA; Ogawa, Makio; Schulte, Bradley A.

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells have shown plasticity with a capacity to differentiate into a variety of specialized cells. To test the hypothesis that some cells in the inner ear are derived from BM, we transplanted either isolated whole BM cells or clonally expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) prepared from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into irradiated adult mice. Isolated GFP+ BM cells also were transplanted into conditioned newborn mice deriv...

  19. Molecular evidence for rhesus lymphocryptovirus infection of epithelial cells in immunosuppressed rhesus macaques.

    OpenAIRE

    Kutok, JL; Klumpp, S.; Simon, M.; MacKey, JJ; Nguyen, V.; Middeldorp, J.M.; Aster, JC; Wang, F.

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with epithelial cell and B-cell malignancies. EBV infection of B lymphocytes is essential for acute and persistent EBV infection in humans; however, the role of epithelial cell infection in the normal EBV life cycle remains controversial. The rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is an EBV-related herpesvirus that naturally infects rhesus macaques and can be used experimentally to model persistent B-cell infection and B-cell lympho...

  20. Molecular Evidence for Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Epithelial Cells in Immunosuppressed Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Kutok, Jeffery L.; Klumpp, Sherry; Simon, Meredith; MacKey, John J.; Nguyen, Van Vuong; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Aster, Jon C.; Wang, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with epithelial cell and B-cell malignancies. EBV infection of B lymphocytes is essential for acute and persistent EBV infection in humans; however, the role of epithelial cell infection in the normal EBV life cycle remains controversial. The rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is an EBV-related herpesvirus that naturally infects rhesus macaques and can be used experimentally to model persistent B-cell infection and B-cell lympho...

  1. Adherence with isoniazid for prevention of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller F James

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV-infected adults in developing countries. Isoniazid (INH is recommended for treatment of latent TB infection, however non-adherence is common. The purpose of this study was to apply in-house prepared isoniazid (INH urine test strips in a clinical setting, and identify predictors of positive test results in an adherence questionnaire in HIV-infected adults taking INH for prevention of TB. Methods Cross-sectional study of adherence using a questionnaire and urine test strips for detection of INH metabolites at two hospitals in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Participants were aged at least 18 years, HIV positive, and receiving INH for prevention of tuberculosis disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses are used to identify factors relevant to adherence. Results 301 consecutive patients were recruited. 28% of participants had negative urine tests. 32 (37.2%, 95% CI25.4, 45.0 of the 86 patients who received INH from peripheral pharmacies said the pharmacy had run out of INH at some time, compared with central hospital pharmacies (p = 0.0001. In univariate analysis, a negative test was associated with self-reported missed INH doses (p = 0.043. Each 12-hour increment since last reported dose increased the likelihood of a negative test by 34% (p = 0.0007. Belief in INH safety was associated with a positive test (p = 0.021. In multivariate analysis, patients who believed INH is important for prevention of TB disease were more likely to be negative (p = 0.0086. Conclusion Adequate drug availability at peripheral pharmacies remains an important intervention for TB prevention. Key questions may identify potentially non-adherent patients. In-house prepared urine tests strips are an effective and cheap method of objectively assessing INH adherence, and could be used an important tool in TB control programs.

  2. Simple clinical and laboratory predictors of Chikungunya versus dengue infections in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue and chikungunya are co-circulating vector-borne diseases with substantial overlap in clinical presentations. It is important to differentiate between them during first presentation as their management, especially for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, is different. This study compares their clinical presentation in Singapore adults to derive predictors to assist doctors in diagnostic decision-making. METHODS: We compared 117 patients with chikungunya infection diagnosed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR with 917 dengue RT-PCR-positive adult patients (including 55 with DHF. We compared dengue fever (DF, DHF, and chikungunya infections by evaluating clinical characteristics of dengue and chikungunya; developing classification tools via multivariate logistic regression models and classification trees of disease etiology using clinical and laboratory factors; and assessing the time course of several clinical variables. FINDINGS: At first presentation to hospital, significantly more chikungunya patients had myalgia or arthralgia, and fewer had a sore throat, cough (for DF, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia or tachycardia than DF or DHF patients. From the decision trees, platelets <118 × 10(9/L was the only distinguishing feature for DF versus chikungunya with an overall correct classification of 89%. For DHF versus chikungunya using platelets <100 × 10(9/L and the presence of bleeding, the overall correct classification was 98%. The time course analysis supported platelet count as the key distinguishing variable. INTERPRETATION: There is substantial overlap in clinical presentation between dengue and chikungunya infections, but simple clinical and laboratory variables can predict these infections at presentation for appropriate management.

  3. Peripheral blood cell signatures of Plasmodium falciparum infection during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibitokou, Samad; Oesterholt, Mayke; Brutus, Laurent;

    2012-01-01

    dendritic cells (DC), more myeloid DC expressing low levels of HLA-DR, and more effector T cells (Teff) compared to uninfected women. Independent associations with an increased risk of anaemia were found for altered antigen-presenting cell frequencies at inclusion, but for an increased frequency of Teff at...... phenotypic composition and activation status of PBMC in selected sub-groups with and without PAM both at inclusion and at delivery in a total of 302 women. Both at inclusion and at delivery PAM was associated with significantly increased frequencies both of B cells overall and of activated B cells. Infection......-related profiles were otherwise quite distinct at the two different time-points. At inclusion, PAM was associated with anaemia, with an increased frequency of immature monocytes and with a decreased frequency of regulatory T cells (Treg). At delivery, infected women presented with significantly fewer plasmacytoid...

  4. Activation of Natural Killer cells during microbial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eHorowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are large granular lymphocytes that express a diverse array of germline encoded inhibitory and activating receptors for MHC Class I and Class I-like molecules, classical co-stimulatory ligands and cytokines. The ability of NK cells to be very rapidly activated by inflammatory cytokines, to secrete effector cytokines and to kill infected or stressed host cells, suggests that they may be among the very early responders during infection. Recent studies have also identified a small number of pathogen-derived ligands that can bind to NK cell surface receptors and directly induce their activation. Here we review recent studies that have begun to elucidate the various pathways by which viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens activate NK cells. We also consider two emerging themes of NK cell-pathogen interactions, namely their contribution to adaptive immune responses and their potential to take on regulatory and immunomodulatory functions.

  5. Characterization of TLX Expression in Neural Stem Cells and Progenitor Cells in Adult Brains

    OpenAIRE

    Shengxiu Li; Guoqiang Sun; Kiyohito Murai; Peng Ye; Yanhong Shi

    2012-01-01

    TLX has been shown to play an important role in regulating the self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem cells in adult brains. However, the cellular distribution of endogenous TLX protein in adult brains remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used immunostaining with a TLX-specific antibody to show that TLX is expressed in both neural stem cells and transit-amplifying neural progenitor cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mouse brains. Then, using a double thymidine analo...

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpas, J S; Norton, A J

    1996-12-01

    A study of 47 well-documented patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) showed a slight female preponderance, with onset as late as the ninth decade. The skin was the commonest site of presentation, but pulmonary and bone involvement was frequent. Patients with single-site disease did best. The worst prognosis was seen in the elderly or those with organ dysfunction. A high incidence of associated malignant disease was seen, which could precede, be coincidental with, or occur after a diagnosis of LCH. PMID:8888814

  7. Molecular analysis of early host cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Villalta, Fernando; Madison, M. Nia; Kleshchenko, Yuliya Y.; Nde, Pius N.; Lima, Maria F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas heart disease, infects heart and other cells leading to cardiac arrest frequently followed by death (1). The disease affects millions of individuals in the Americas and is posing health problems because of blood transmission in the US due to large Latin American immigration (2–3). Since the current drugs present serious side effects and do not cure the chronic infection (4), it is critically important to understand the early process of cellular...

  8. TRIM32-dependent transcription in adult neural progenitor cells regulates neuronal differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hillje, Anna-Lena; Pavlou, Maria Angeliki; Beckmann, Elisabeth; Worlitzer, Maik; Bahnassawy, Lamiaa; Lewejohann, Lars; Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens Christian

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells in the subventricular zone continuously generate new neurons for the olfactory bulb. Cell fate commitment in these adult neural stem cells is regulated by cell fate-determining proteins. Here, we show that the cell fate-determinant TRIM32 is upregulated during differentiation of adult neural stem cells into olfactory bulb neurons. We further demonstrate that TRIM32 is necessary for the correct induction of neuronal differentiation in these cells...

  9. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  10. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics. PMID:27066459

  11. Germ Cell Tumors in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaminus, Gabriele; Joffe, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) represent a group of biologically complex malignancies that affect patients at different sites within the body and at different ages. The varying nature of these tumors reflects their cell of origin which is the primordial germ cell, which normally gives rise to ovarian and testicular egg and sperm producing cells. These cells retain an ability to give rise to all types of human tissues, and this is illustrated by the different kinds of GCTs that occur. In adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients, GCTs predominantly present as testicular, ovarian or mediastinal primary GCTs, and represent some of the most complex therapeutic challenges within any AYA practice. The varying types of GCTs, defined by primary site and/or age at presentation, can look very similar microscopically. However, there is growing evidence that they may have different molecular characteristics, different biology and different requirements for curative treatments. Whilst in adult testicular GCTs there is evidence for an environmental cause during fetal development and a genetic component, these causative factors are much less well understood in other GCTs. GCTs are some of the most curable cancers in adults, but some patients exhibit resistance to standard treatments. Because of this, today's clinical research is directed at understanding how to best utilize toxic therapies and promote healthy survivorship. This chapter explores the biology, behavior and treatment of GCTs and discusses how the AYA group of GCTs may hold some of the keys to understanding fundamental unanswered questions of biological variance and curability in GCTs. PMID:27595361

  12. In vivo cell tracking and quantification method in adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Alt, Clemens; Li, Pulin; White, Richard M.; Zon, Leonard I.; Wei, Xunbin; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-03-01

    Zebrafish have become a powerful vertebrate model organism for drug discovery, cancer and stem cell research. A recently developed transparent adult zebrafish using double pigmentation mutant, called casper, provide unparalleled imaging power in in vivo longitudinal analysis of biological processes at an anatomic resolution not readily achievable in murine or other systems. In this paper we introduce an optical method for simultaneous visualization and cell quantification, which combines the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and the in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC). The system is designed specifically for non-invasive tracking of both stationary and circulating cells in adult zebrafish casper, under physiological conditions in the same fish over time. The confocal imaging part in this system serves the dual purposes of imaging fish tissue microstructure and a 3D navigation tool to locate a suitable vessel for circulating cell counting. The multi-color, multi-channel instrument allows the detection of multiple cell populations or different tissues or organs simultaneously. We demonstrate initial testing of this novel instrument by imaging vasculature and tracking circulating cells in CD41: GFP/Gata1: DsRed transgenic casper fish whose thrombocytes/erythrocytes express the green and red fluorescent proteins. Circulating fluorescent cell incidents were recorded and counted repeatedly over time and in different types of vessels. Great application opportunities in cancer and stem cell researches are discussed.

  13. Loss of Fbw7 Reprograms Adult Pancreatic Ductal Cells into α, δ, and β Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Rocio; Gruber, Ralph; Gu, Guoqiang; Behrens, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The adult pancreas is capable of limited regeneration after injury but has no defined stem cell population. The cell types and molecular signals that govern the production of new pancreatic tissue are not well understood. Here, we show that inactivation of the SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate recognition component Fbw7 induces pancreatic ductal cells to reprogram into α, δ, and β cells. Loss of Fbw7 stabilized the transcription factor Ngn3, a key regulator of endocrine cell differentiation. The induced β cells resemble islet β cells in morphology and histology, express genes essential for β cell function, and release insulin after glucose challenge. Thus, loss of Fbw7 appears to reawaken an endocrine developmental differentiation program in adult pancreatic ductal cells. Our study highlights the plasticity of seemingly differentiated adult cells, identifies Fbw7 as a master regulator of cell fate decisions in the pancreas, and reveals adult pancreatic duct cells as a latent multipotent cell type. PMID:25105579

  14. Embryonic and adult neural stem cell research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Neural stem cells(NSCs) are one specific type of multipotential stem cells that have the ability to proliferate for a long time and to differentiate into neural cells,including neurons,astrocytes and oligodendrocytes.These NSCs exist in both the embryonic and adult central nervous system(CNS) of all mammalian species.Progress has been made in the understanding of the developmental regulation of NSCs and their function in neurogenesis.This review discusses recent progress in this area,with emphasis on work done by investigators in China.

  15. Fatal splenic sequestration crisis in adult sickle cell-beta thalassaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    van Rhee, F; Balsitis, M.; French, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fatal acute splenic sequestration crisis in an adult patient with sickle cell-beta+ thalassaemia is described. To our knowledge fatal splenic sequestration in adult sickle cell-beta thalassaemia has not been previously reported.

  16. Further proof of the plasticity of adult stem cells and their role in tissue repair

    OpenAIRE

    Prockop, Darwin J.

    2003-01-01

    In this issue, De Bari et al. (2003) present elegant data to counter the recent claims that adult stem cells have a limited plasticity. Further, they provide evidence that adult stem cells can seek out damaged tissues and repair them.

  17. Promotion of Cortical Neurogenesis from the Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Mouse Subcallosal Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, Kyuhyun; Shaker, Mohammed R; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Boram; Lee, Eunsoo; Park, Jae-Yong; Lim, Mi-Sun; Park, Chang-Hwan; Shin, Ki Soon; Kim, Hyun; Geum, Dongho; Sun, Woong

    2016-04-01

    Neurogenesis occurs spontaneously in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle in adult rodent brain, but it has long been debated whether there is sufficient adult neurogenesis in human SVZ. Subcallosal zone (SCZ), a posterior continuum of SVZ closely associated with posterior regions of cortical white matter, has also been reported to contain adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in both rodents and humans. However, little is known whether SCZ-derived aNSC (SCZ-aNSCs) can produce cortical neurons following brain injury. We found that SCZ-aNSCs exhibited limited neuronal differentiation potential in culture and after transplantation in mice. Neuroblasts derived from SCZ initially migrated toward injured cortex regions following brain injury, but later exhibited apoptosis. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic bcl-xL in the SCZ by retroviral infection rescued neuroblasts from cell death in the injured cortex, but neuronal maturation was still limited, resulting in atrophy. In combination with Bcl-xL, infusion of brain-derived neurotropic factor rescued atrophy, and importantly, a subset of such SCZ-aNSCs differentiated and attained morphological and physiological characteristics of mature, excitatory neurons. These results suggest that the combination of anti-apoptotic and neurotrophic factors might enable the use of aNSCs derived from the SCZ in cortical neurogenesis for neural replacement therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:888-901. PMID:26701067

  18. Regulation of cell survival and death during Flavivirus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sounak; Ghosh; Roy; Beata; Sadigh; Emmanuel; Datan; Richard; A; Lockshin; Zahra; Zakeri

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses, ss(+) RNA viruses, include many of mankind’s most important pathogens. Their pathogenicity derives from their ability to infect many types of cells including neurons, to replicate, and eventually to kill the cells. Flaviviruses can activate tumor necrosis factor α and both intrinsic(Bax-mediated) and extrinsic pathways to apoptosis. Thus they can use many approaches for activating these pathways. Infection can lead to necrosis if viral load is extremely high or to other types of cell death if routes to apoptosis are blocked. Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Virus can also activate autophagy. In this case the autophagy temporarily spares the infected cell, allowing a longer period of reproduction for the virus, and the autophagy further protects the cell against other stresses such as those caused by reactive oxygen species. Several of the viral proteins have been shown to induce apoptosis or autophagy on their own, independent of the presence of other viral proteins. Given the versatility of these viruses to adapt to and manipulate the metabolism, and thus to control the survival of, the infected cells, we need to understand much better how the specific viral proteins affect the pathways to apoptosis and autophagy. Only in this manner will we be able to minimize the pathology that they cause.

  19. DNA synthesis and cell division in the adult primate brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally accepted that the adult human brain is incapable of producing new neuron. Even cursory examination of neurologic, neuropathologic, or neurobiological textbooks published during the past 50 years will testify that this belief is deeply entrenched. In his classification of cell populations on the basis of their proliferative behavior, Leblond regarded neurons of the central nervous system as belonging to a category of static, nonrenewing epithelial tissue incapable of expanding or replenishing itself. This belief, however needs to re reexamined for two major reasons: First, as reviewed below, a number of reports have provided evidence of neurogenesis in adult brain of several vertebrate species. Second, the capacity for neurogenesis in the adult primate central nervous system has never been examined by modern methods. In this article the author described recent results from an extensive autoradiographic analysis performed on twelve rhesus monkeys injected with the specific DNA precursor [3H] thymidine at ages ranging from 6 postnatal months to 17 years

  20. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns were identified by cell counting with trypan blue under confocal microscopy, and cell cycle changes were investigated by flow cytometry. L6 cells infected with T. gondii showed decreased proliferation compared to uninfected L6 cells and revealed a tendency to stay at S or G2/M cell phase. The treatment of exosomes isolated from T. gondii-infected cells showed attenuation of cell proliferation and slight enhancement of S phase in L6 cells. The cell cycle alteration was not as obvious as reduction of the cell proliferation by the exosome treatment. These changes were transient and disappeared at 48 hr after the exosome treatment. Microarray analysis and web-based tools indicated that various exosomal miRNAs were crucial for the regulation of target genes related to cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the exosomes originating from T. gondii could change the host cell proliferation and alter the host cell cycle. PMID:27180572

  1. Theory of hantavirus infection spread incorporating localized adult and itinerant juvenile mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkre, V. M.; Giuggioli, L.; Abramson, G.; Camelo-Neto, G.

    2007-02-01

    A generalized model of the spread of the Hantavirus in mice populations is presented on the basis of recent observational findings concerning the movement characteristics of the mice that carry the infection. The factual information behind the generalization is based on mark-recapture observations reported in Giuggioli et al. [Bull. Math. Biol. 67, 1135 (2005)] that have necessitated the introduction of home ranges in the simple model of Hantavirus spread presented by Abramson and Kenkre [Phys. Rev. E 66, 11912 (2002)]. The essential feature of the model presented here is the existence of adult mice that remain largely confined to locations near their home ranges, and itinerant juvenile mice that are not so confined, and, during their search for their own homes, move and infect both other juveniles and adults that they meet during their movement. The model is presented at three levels of description: mean field, kinetic and configuration. Results of calculations are shown explicitly from the mean field equations and the simulation rules, and are found to agree in some respects and to differ in others. The origin of the differences is shown to lie in spatial correlations. It is indicated how mark-recapture observations in the field may be employed to verify the applicability of the theory.

  2. Cell therapy: A comparison of adult and embryonic stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla; Kozubenko, Nataliya

    Lille : organizátor symposia, 2010. S1-1-S1-1. [European Symposium on Stem Cell Research for Stroke . 04.05.2010-05.05.2010, Lille] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : cell therapy * stem cells

  3. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and ... Zoonotic Infectious Disease Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch File Formats Help: How do ...

  4. Larval Temperature-Food Effects on Adult Mosquito Infection and Vertical Transmission of Dengue-1 Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Eva A; Alto, Barry W; Lounibos, L Philip

    2016-01-01

    Temperature-food interactions in the larval environment can affect life history and population growth of container mosquitoes Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus Skuse, the primary vectors of chikungunya and dengue viruses. We used Ae. aegypti, Ae. albopictus, and dengue-1 virus (DENV-1) from Florida to investigate whether larval rearing temperature can alter the effects of larval food levels on Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus life history and DENV-1 infection and vertical transmission. Although we found no effect of larval treatments on survivorship to adulthood, DENV-1 titer, or DENV-1 vertical transmission, rates of vertical transmission up to 16-24% were observed in Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti, which may contribute to maintenance of this virus in nature. Larval treatments had no effect on number of progeny and DENV-1 infection in Ae. aegypti, but the interaction between temperature and food affected number of progeny and DENV-1 infection of the female Ae. albopictus parent. The cooler temperature (24°C) yielded the most progeny and this effect was accentuated by high food relative to the other conditions. Low and high food led to the highest (∼90%) and lowest (∼65%) parental infection at the cooler temperature, respectively, whereas intermediate infection rates (∼75-80%) were observed for all food conditions at the elevated temperature. These results suggest that temperature and food availability have minimal influence on rate of vertical transmission and a stronger influence on adults of Ae. albopictus than of Ae. aegypti, which could have consequences for dengue virus epidemiology. PMID:26489999

  5. Mortality by causes in HIV-infected adults: comparison with the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floristan Yugo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared mortality by cause of death in HIV-infected adults in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy with mortality in the general population in the same age and sex groups. Methods Mortality by cause of death was analyzed for the period 1999-2006 in the cohort of persons aged 20-59 years diagnosed with HIV infection and residing in Navarre (Spain. This was compared with mortality from the same causes in the general population of the same age and sex using standardized mortality ratios (SMR. Results There were 210 deaths among 1145 persons diagnosed with HIV (29.5 per 1000 person-years. About 50% of these deaths were from AIDS. Persons diagnosed with HIV infection had exceeded all-cause mortality (SMR 14.0, 95% CI 12.2 to 16.1 and non-AIDS mortality (SMR 6.9, 5.7 to 8.5. The analysis showed excess mortality from hepatic disease (SMR 69.0, 48.1 to 78.6, drug overdose or addiction (SMR 46.0, 29.2 to 69.0, suicide (SMR 9.6, 3.8 to 19.7, cancer (SMR 3.2, 1.8 to 5.1 and cardiovascular disease (SMR 3.1, 1.3 to 6.1. Mortality in HIV-infected intravenous drug users did not change significantly between the periods 1999-2002 and 2003-2006, but it declined by 56% in non-injecting drug users (P = 0.007. Conclusions Persons with HIV infection continue to have considerable excess mortality despite the availability of effective antiretroviral treatments. However, excess mortality in the HIV patients has declined since these treatments were introduced, especially in persons without a history of intravenous drug use.

  6. Intestinal CD103+ dendritic cells are key players in the innate immune control of Cryptosporidium parvum infection in neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Lantier

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite found worldwide, that develops only in the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes profuse diarrhea. Using a mouse model of C. parvum infection, we demonstrated by conditional depletion of CD11c+ cells that these cells are essential for the control of the infection both in neonates and adults. Neonates are highly susceptible to C. parvum but the infection is self-limited, whereas adults are resistant unless immunocompromised. We investigated the contribution of DC to the age-dependent susceptibility to infection. We found that neonates presented a marked deficit in intestinal CD103+ DC during the first weeks of life, before weaning, due to weak production of chemokines by neonatal intestinal epithelial cells (IEC. Increasing the number of intestinal CD103+ DC in neonates by administering FLT3-L significantly reduced susceptibility to the infection. During infections in neonates, the clearance of the parasite was preceded by a rapid recruitment of CD103+ DC mediated by CXCR3-binding chemokines produced by IEC in response to IFNγ. In addition to this key role in CD103+ DC recruitment, IFNγ is known to inhibit intracellular parasite development. We demonstrated that during neonatal infection CD103+ DC produce IL-12 and IFNγ in the lamina propria and the draining lymph nodes. Thus, CD103+DC are key players in the innate immune control of C. parvum infection in the intestinal epithelium. The relative paucity of CD103+ DC in the neonatal intestine contributes to the high susceptibility to intestinal infection.

  7. A modified enrichment protocol for adult caprine skeletal muscle stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Ajai K.; Ramani, Umed V.; Ahir, Viral B.; Rank, Dharamshi N.; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2010-01-01

    To establish an adequate model to study the proliferation and differentiation of adult caprine skeletal muscle in response to bioactive compounds, a pool of satellite cells (SC) was derived from the rectus abdominis muscle of adult goat. Skeletal muscle contains a population of adult stem cells, named as satellite cells that reside beneath the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fiber and other populations of cells. These SC are multipotent stem cells, since cells cultured in the presence of spec...

  8. Multiple helminth infection of the skin causes lymphocyte hypo-responsiveness mediated by Th2 conditioning of dermal myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Cook

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the mammalian host by schistosome larvae occurs via the skin, although nothing is known about the development of immune responses to multiple exposures of schistosome larvae, and/or their excretory/secretory (E/S products. Here, we show that multiple (4x exposures, prior to the onset of egg laying by adult worms, modulate the skin immune response and induce CD4(+ cell hypo-responsiveness in the draining lymph node, and even modulate the formation of hepatic egg-induced granulomas. Compared to mice exposed to a single infection (1x, dermal cells from multiply infected mice (4x, were less able to support lymph node cell proliferation. Analysis of dermal cells showed that the most abundant in 4x mice were eosinophils (F4/80(+MHC-II(-, but they did not impact the ability of antigen presenting cells (APC to support lymphocyte proliferation to parasite antigen in vitro. However, two other cell populations from the dermal site of infection appear to have a critical role. The first comprises arginase-1(+, Ym-1(+ alternatively activated macrophage-like cells, and the second are functionally compromised MHC-II(hi cells. Through the administration of exogenous IL-12 to multiply infected mice, we show that these suppressive myeloid cell phenotypes form as a consequence of events in the skin, most notably an enrichment of IL-4 and IL-13, likely resulting from an influx of RELMα-expressing eosinophils. We further illustrate that the development of these suppressive dermal cells is dependent upon IL-4Rα signalling. The development of immune hypo-responsiveness to schistosome larvae and their effect on the subsequent response to the immunopathogenic egg is important in appreciating how immune responses to helminth infections are modulated by repeated exposure to the infective early stages of development.

  9. AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO HUMAN METAPNEUMOVIRUS INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    X, Bao; T, Liu; L, Spetch; D, Kolli; R.P, Garofalo; A, Casola

    2007-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-κB, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immuno-modulatory mediators. PMID:17655903

  10. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development

  11. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Carol F., E-mail: carol-webb@omrf.org [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ratliff, Michelle L., E-mail: michelle-ratliff@omrf.org [Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Powell, Rebecca, E-mail: rebeccapowell@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R., E-mail: celeste-wirsig@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Lakiza, Olga, E-mail: olga-lakiza@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Obara, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoko-obara@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  12. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlier, C.; O’Dea, S.; Bennett, K.; Dunne, J.; Conlon, N.; Bergin, C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46–2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40–2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22–2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15–2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27580688

  13. Sexual Assault and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Adults, Adolescents, and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seña, Arlene C; Hsu, Katherine K; Kellogg, Nancy; Girardet, Rebecca; Christian, Cindy W; Linden, Judith; Griffith, William; Marchant, Anne; Jenny, Carole; Hammerschlag, Margaret R

    2015-12-15

    Survivors of sexual assault are at risk for acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We conducted literature reviews and invited experts to assist in updating the sexual assault section for the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sexually transmitted diseases (STD) treatment guidelines. New recommendations for STI management among adult and adolescent sexual assault survivors include use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis by vaginal swabs; NAATs for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis from pharyngeal and rectal specimens among patients with a history of exposure or suspected extragenital contact after sexual assault; empiric therapy for gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomoniasis based on updated treatment regimens; vaccinations for human papillomavirus (HPV) among previously unvaccinated patients aged 9-26 years; and consideration for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis using an algorithm to assess the timing and characteristics of the exposure. For child sexual assault (CSA) survivors, recommendations include targeted diagnostic testing with increased use of NAATs when appropriate; routine follow-up visits within 6 months after the last known sexual abuse; and use of HPV vaccination in accordance with national immunization guidelines as a preventive measure in the post-sexual assault care setting. For CSA patients, NAATs are considered to be acceptable for identification of gonococcal and chlamydial infections from urine samples, but are not recommended for extragenital testing due to the potential detection of nongonococcal Neisseria species. Several research questions were identified regarding the prevalence, detection, and management of STI/HIV infections among adult, adolescent, and pediatric sexual assault survivors. PMID:26602623

  14. Noninvasive and label-free determination of virus infected cells by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, Kamila; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Myrzakozha, Diyas; Zhanserkenova, Orik; Andriana, Bibin. B.; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    The present study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the detection of virus-infected cells. Adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells was successfully detected at 12, 24, and 48 h after initiating the infection. The score plot of principal component analysis discriminated the spectra of the infected cells from those of the control cells. The viral infection was confirmed by the conventional immunostaining method performed 24 h after the infection. The newly developed method provides a fast and label-free means for the detection of virus-infected cells.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  16. Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocytes and a late stage with sclerosis of the biliary tree. Pulmonary findings are more common and include multiple nodules in different stages of cavitation, predominantly in the upper lobes. We present a case of adult LCH with pulmonary and biopsy proven liver involvement with resolution of the hepatic findings after treatment.

  17. Adult langerhans cell histiocytosis with hepatic and pulmonary involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Bruno; Costa, Francisco; Lopes, Joanne; Castro, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocytes and a late stage with sclerosis of the biliary tree. Pulmonary findings are more common and include multiple nodules in different stages of cavitation, predominantly in the upper lobes. We present a case of adult LCH with pulmonary and biopsy proven liver involvement with resolution of the hepatic findings after treatment. PMID:25977828

  18. Transplantation of CNTF-expressing adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells promotes remyelination and functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Qilin; He, Qian; Wang, Yaping; Cheng, Xiaoxin; Howard, Russell M.; Yiping ZHANG; DeVries, William H.; Shields, Christopher B.; Magnuson, David S.K.; Xu, Xiaoming; Kim, Dong H.; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Demyelination contributes to the dysfunction after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). We explored whether the combination of neurotrophic factors and transplantation of adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) could enhance remyelination and functional recovery after SCI. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was the most effective neurotrophic factor to promote oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and survival of OPCs in vitro. OPCs were infected with retroviruses expressin...

  19. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Adult Intestinal Stem Cell Development: Mechanisms and Evolutionary Conservations

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guihong; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2012-01-01

    The adult mammalian intestine has long been used as a model to study adult stem cell function and tissue renewal as the intestinal epithelium is constantly undergoing self-renewal throughout adult life. This is accomplished through the proliferation and subsequent differentiation of the adult stem cells located in the crypt. The development of this self-renewal system is, however, poorly understood. A number of studies suggest that the formation/maturation of the adult intestine is conserved ...

  20. Fluoxetine targets early progenitor cells in the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Encinas, Juan M.; Vaahtokari, Anne; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2006-01-01

    Chronic treatment with antidepressants increases neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. This increase in the production of new neurons may be required for the behavioral effects of antidepressants. However, it is not known which class of cells within the neuronal differentiation cascade is targeted by the drugs. We have generated a reporter mouse line, which allows identification and classification of early neuronal progenitors. It also allows accurate quantitation of changes induced by neuro...

  1. Adult Stem Cells for Acute Lung Injury: Remaining Questions & Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Feng, Xiao-mei; Lee, Jae W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology of ALI involves complex interactions between the inciting event, such as pneumonia, sepsis or aspiration, and the host immune response resulting in lung protein permeability, impaired resolution of pulmonary edema, an intense inflammatory response in the injured alveolus and hypoxemia. In multiple pre-clinical studies, adult stem cells h...

  2. Adult type granulosa cell tumor in adult testis: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Song

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Granulosa cell tumors can be classified into juvenile and adult types and more commonly occur in ovaries. Adult testicular granulosa cell tumors are extremely rare and only 29 cases of adult type have previously been reported. We report here a 28-year-old Caucasian man with a left testicular adult type granulosa cell tumor. The tumor measured 2.6 x 2.6 x 2.5 cm and was mitotically active (10/10 HPF. Immunohistochemical stains showed the tumor diffusely positive for inhibin and vimentin, and negative for epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratins, synaptophysin, HMB-45, OCT-4, placental-like alkaline phosphatase and lymphoid markers . The reported granulosa cell tumors in adult testis were briefly reviewed.

  3. Proteoglycans secreted by packaging cell lines inhibit retrovirus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Doux, J M; Morgan, J.R.; Snow, R G; Yarmush, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    Using a model recombinant retrovirus encoding the Escherichia coli lacZ gene, we have found that medium conditioned with NIH 3T3 cells and packaging cell lines derived from NIH 3T3 cells inhibits infection. Most of the inhibitory activity was greater than 100 kDa and was sensitive to chondroitinase ABC digestion, which is consistent with the inhibitor being a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. Proteoglycans secreted by NIH 3T3 cells and purified by anion-exchange chromatography inhibited ampho...

  4. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  5. Epidemiology, outcomes, and predictors of mortality in hospitalized adults with Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Sahil; Gupta, Arjun; Baddour, Larry M; Pardi, Darrell S

    2016-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated an increasing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence in hospitals and the community, with increasing morbidity and mortality. In this study, we analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) to evaluate CDI epidemiology, outcomes, and predictors of mortality in hospitalized adults. We identified cases of CDI (and associated comorbid conditions) from NHDS data from 2005 through 2009 using ICD-9 codes. Weighted univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to ascertain CDI incidence, associations between CDI and outcomes [length of stay (LOS), colectomy, all-cause in-hospital mortality, and discharge to a care facility], and predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Of an estimated 162 million adult inpatients, 1.26 million (0.8 %) had CDI. The overall CDI incidence is 77.8/10,000 hospitalizations, with no statistically significant change over the study period. On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, and comorbid conditions, CDI is an independent predictor of longer LOS (mean difference, 2.35 days), all-cause mortality [odds ratio (OR) 1.45], colectomy (OR 1.41), and discharge to a care facility (OR 2.12) (all P < 0.001). Elderly patients have a higher CDI incidence and worse outcomes than younger adults. The strongest predictors of all-cause mortality in patients with CDI include age 65 years or older, colectomy, and coagulation abnormalities. Despite stable CDI incidence and advances in management, CDI is associated with increased LOS, colectomy, all-cause in-hospital mortality, and discharge to a care facility in hospitalized, especially elderly, adults. Age older than 65 years should be added to the severity criteria for CDI. PMID:26694494

  6. Exosomes released from Mycoplasma infected tumor cells activate inhibitory B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas cause numerous human diseases and are common opportunistic pathogens in cancer patients and immunocompromised individuals. Mycoplasma infection elicits various host immune responses. Here we demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes (myco+ exosomes that specifically activate splenic B cells and induce splenocytes cytokine production. Induction of cytokines, including the proinflammatory IFN-γ and the anti-inflammatory IL-10, was largely dependent on the presence of B cells. B cells were the major IL-10 producers. In splenocytes from B cell deficient μMT mice, induction of IFN-γ+ T cells by myco+ exosomes was greatly increased compared with wild type splenocytes. In addition, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell proliferation was greatly inhibited in the presence of myco+ exosome-treated B cells. Also, anti-CD3-stimulated T cell signaling was impaired by myco+ exosome treatment. Proteomic analysis identified mycoplasma proteins in exosomes that potentially contribute to the effects. Our results demonstrate that mycoplasma-infected tumor cells release exosomes carrying mycoplasma components that preferentially activate B cells, which in turn, are able to inhibit T cell activity. These results suggest that mycoplasmas infecting tumor cells can exploit the exosome pathway to disseminate their own components and modulate the activity of immune cells, in particular, activate B cells with inhibitory activity.

  7. Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Giroglou, Tzenan; Florin, Luise; Schäfer, Frank; Streeck, Rolf E.; Sapp, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Using pseudoinfection of cell lines, we demonstrate that cell surface heparan sulfate is required for infection by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) and HPV-33 pseudovirions. Pseudoinfection was inhibited by heparin but not dermatan or chondroitin sulfate, reduced by reducing the level of surface sulfation, and abolished by heparinase treatment. Carboxy-terminally deleted HPV-33 virus-like particles still bound efficiently to heparin. The kinetics of postattachment neutralization by antis...

  8. Invariant NKT Cell Response to Dengue Virus Infection in Human

    OpenAIRE

    Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Chan-in, Wilawan; Opasawaschai, Anunya; Pongchaikul, Pisut; Tangthawornchaikul, Nattaya; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue viral infection is a global health threat without vaccine or specific treatment. The clinical outcome varies from asymptomatic, mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). While adaptive immune responses were found to be detrimental in the dengue pathogenesis, the roles of earlier innate events remain largely uninvestigated. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells represent innate-like T cells that could dictate subsequent adaptive response but their rol...

  9. Regulatory T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Stoop (Jeroen Nicolaas)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide 400 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 1 million people die annually from HBV-related disease. To clear HBV, an effective immune response, in which several cell types and cytokines play a role, is important. It is known that p

  10. Point-of-care lateral flow assays for tuberculosis and cryptococcal antigenuria predict death in HIV infected adults in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari C Manabe

    Full Text Available Mortality in hospitalized, febrile patients in Sub-Saharan Africa is high due to HIV-infected, severely immunosuppressed patients with opportunistic co-infection, particularly disseminated tuberculosis (TB and cryptococcal disease. We sought to determine if a positive lateral flow assay (LFA result for urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM and cryptococcal antigenuria was associated with mortality.351 hospitalized, HIV-positive adults with symptoms consistent with TB and who were able to provide both urine and sputum specimens were prospectively enrolled at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Uganda as part of a prospective accuracy evaluation of the lateral flow Determine TB LAM test. Stored frozen urine was retrospectively tested for cryptococcal antigen (CRAG using the LFA. We fitted a multinomial logistic regression model to analyze factors associated with death within 2 months after initial presentation.The median CD4 of the participants was 57 (IQR: 14-179 cells/µl and 41% (145 were microbiologically confirmed TB cases. LAM LFA was positive in 38% (134, 7% (25 were CRAG positive, and 43% (151 were positive for either test in urine. Overall, 21% (75 died within the first 2 months, and a total of 32% (114 were confirmed dead by 6 months. At 2 months, 30% of LAM or CRAG positive patients were confirmed dead compared to 15.0% of those who were negative. In an adjusted model, LAM or CRAG positive results were associated with an increased risk of death (RRR 2.29, 95% CI: 1.29, 4.05; P = 0.005.In hospitalized HIV-infected patients, LAM or CRAG LFA positivity was associated with subsequent death within 2 months. Further studies are warranted to examine the impact of POC diagnostic 'test and treat' approach on patient-centered outcomes.

  11. Adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia presenting as isolated central nervous system T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Li; Li, Chi-Cheng; Yu, Shan-Chi; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a T-cell neoplasm, associated with infection by the retrovirus human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Central nervous system (CNS) involved by ATLL is often occurred in advanced disease, such as acute and lymphomatous variants. On the other hand, isolated CNS lymphoma is rare. We repot a 50-year-old woman who presented with multiple infiltrative brain lesions on the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Results of initial biopsy of brain tumor indicated CNS vasculitis. The patient received one course of high-dose methotrexate and MR imaging of brain revealed remission of infiltrative lesions. Two years later, new brain lesions were detected. Histopathologic examination of specimens via craniotomy revealed T-cell lymphoma. The patient responded poorly to subsequent chemotherapy, and salvage whole-brain irradiation was performed. Six months later, the patient had hepatosplenomegaly, hypercalcemia, and multiple lymphocytes with a cloverleaf appearance in circulation. Results of flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood indicated ATLL and antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) were detected. Clinicians should screen HTLV-1 infection when patients are diagnosed with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Combined antiviral therapy and intensive chemotherapy may improve the outcomes of ATLL. PMID:25587470

  12. Adult T-Cell Lymphoma/Leukemia Presenting as Isolated Central Nervous System T-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a T-cell neoplasm, associated with infection by the retrovirus human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1. Central nervous system (CNS involved by ATLL is often occurred in advanced disease, such as acute and lymphomatous variants. On the other hand, isolated CNS lymphoma is rare. We repot a 50-year-old woman who presented with multiple infiltrative brain lesions on the magnetic resonance (MR imaging. Results of initial biopsy of brain tumor indicated CNS vasculitis. The patient received one course of high-dose methotrexate and MR imaging of brain revealed remission of infiltrative lesions. Two years later, new brain lesions were detected. Histopathologic examination of specimens via craniotomy revealed T-cell lymphoma. The patient responded poorly to subsequent chemotherapy, and salvage whole-brain irradiation was performed. Six months later, the patient had hepatosplenomegaly, hypercalcemia, and multiple lymphocytes with a cloverleaf appearance in circulation. Results of flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood indicated ATLL and antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 were detected. Clinicians should screen HTLV-1 infection when patients are diagnosed with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Combined antiviral therapy and intensive chemotherapy may improve the outcomes of ATLL.

  13. Procalcitonin versus C-reactive protein for predicting pneumonia in adults with lower respiratory tract infection in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anette; Pedersen, Svend S; Nexoe, Joergen;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of procalcitonin in diagnosing bacterial infection has mainly been studied in patients with severe infections. There is no study on the value of procalcitonin measurements in adults with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) treated in primary care. AIM: To evaluate the...... accuracy of plasma procalcitonin in predicting radiographic pneumonia, bacterial infection, and adverse outcome in a population of adults with LRTI treated in primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: Forty-two general practices and an outpatient clinic at the Department of...... Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. METHOD: A total of 364 patients with LRTI were prospectively enrolled from 42 general practices. Patients were examined with chest radiography, microbiological analyses, and measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin. The outcome...

  14. Primary care providers' judgments of opioid analgesic misuse in a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, M.; Penko, J; D. Guzman; Miaskowski, C; Kushel, MB

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care providers (PCPs) must balance treatment of chronic non-cancer pain with opioid analgesics with concerns about opioid misuse. OBJECTIVE: We co-enrolled community-based indigent adults and their PCPs to determine PCPs' accuracy of estimating opioid analgesic misuse and illicit substance use. DESIGN: Patient-provider dyad study. PARTICIPANTS: HIV-infected, community-based indigent adults ('patients') and their PCPs. MAIN MEASURES: Using structured interviews, we queried ...

  15. Impact of Gastrointestinal Bacillus anthracis Infection on Hepatic B Cells

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    Natacha Colliou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of Bacillus anthracis results in rapid gastrointestinal (GI infection, known as GI anthrax. We previously showed that during GI anthrax, there is swift deterioration of intestinal barrier function leading to translocation of gut-associated bacteria into systemic circulation. Additionally, we described dysfunction in colonic B cells. In concordance with our previous studies, here, we report early migration of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis along with other gut-resident bacteria into the infected murine liver. Additionally, despite a global decrease in the B cell population, we observed an increase in both B-1a and marginal zone (MZ-like B cells. Both of these cell types are capable of producing immunoglobulins against common pathogens and commensals, which act as a general antibody barrier before an antigen-specific antibody response. Accumulation of these cells in the liver was associated with an increase in chemokine expression. These data suggest that the presence of Sterne and other commensals in the liver trigger migration of MZ-like B cells from the spleen to the liver to neutralize systemic spread. Further research is required to evaluate the possible cause of their failure to clear the infection within the liver, including the potential role of dysfunctional mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling.

  16. Brefeldin A inhibits pestivirus release from infected cells, without affecting its assembly and infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enveloped bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the Pestivirus genus within the Flaviviridae family. While considerable information has been gathered on virus entry into the host cell, genome structure and protein function, little is known about pestivirus morphogenesis and release from cells. Here, we analyzed the intracellular localization, N-glycan processing and secretion of BVDV using brefeldin A (BFA), which blocks protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and causes disruption of the Golgi complex with subsequent fusion of its cis and medial cisternae with the ER. BFA treatment of infected cells resulted in complete inhibition of BVDV secretion and increased co-localization of the envelope glycoproteins with the cis-Golgi marker GM 130. Processing of the N-linked glycans was affected by BFA, however, virus assembly was not perturbed and intracellular virions were fully infectious, suggesting that trafficking beyond the cis-Golgi is not a prerequisite for pestivirus infectivity

  17. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of nosocomial super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis

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    Chang Chiung-Chih

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM is a condition wherein the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF grows new pathogen(s during the therapeutic course of meningitis. It is an uncommon but clinically important condition rarely examined in literature. Methods Twenty-seven episodes of super-infection states in 21 ABM patients collected in a 9.5-year study period (January 2001 to June 2010 were evaluated. The clinical characteristics, implicated pathogens, results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and therapeutic outcomes were analyzed. Results Twenty-one patients (13 men, 8 women aged 25-73 years (median, 45 years had post-neurosurgical state as the preceding event and nosocomial infection. The post-neurosurgical states included spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH with craniectomy or craniotomy with extra-ventricular drainage (EVD or ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VPS in 10 patients, traumatic ICH with craniectomy or craniotomy with EVD or VPS in 6 patients, hydrocephalus s/p VPS in 2 patients, and one patient each with cerebral infarct s/p craniectomy with EVD, meningeal metastasis s/p Omaya implant, and head injury. All 21 patients had EVD and/or VP shunt and/or Omaya implant during the whole course of ABM. Recurrent fever was the most common presentation and the implicated bacterial pathogens were protean, many of which were antibiotic resistant. Most patients required adjustment of antibiotics after the pathogens were identified but even with antimicrobial therapy, 33.3% (7/21 died. Morbidity was also high among survivors. Conclusions Super-infection in ABM is usually seen in patients with preceding neurosurgical event, especially insertion of an external drainage device. Repeat CSF culture is mandatory for diagnostic confirmation because most of the implicated bacterial strains are non-susceptible to common antibiotics used. Unusual pathogens like anaerobic bacteria and fungi may also appear. Despite

  18. Serum metabolome and lipidome changes in adult patients with primary dengue infection.

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    Liang Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue virus (DENV is the most widespread arbovirus with an estimated 100 million infections occurring every year. Endemic in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world, dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF is emerging as a major public health concern. The complex array of concurrent host physiologic changes has hampered a complete understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms of dengue pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Systems level characterization of serum metabolome and lipidome of adult DF patients at early febrile, defervescence, and convalescent stages of DENV infection was performed using liquid chromatography- and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The tractability of following metabolite and lipid changes in a relatively large sample size (n = 44 across three prominent infection stages allowed the identification of critical physiologic changes that coincided with the different stages. Sixty differential metabolites were identified in our metabolomics analysis and the main metabolite classes were free fatty acids, acylcarnitines, phospholipids, and amino acids. Major perturbed metabolic pathways included fatty acid biosynthesis and β-oxidation, phospholipid catabolism, steroid hormone pathway, etc., suggesting the multifactorial nature of human host responses. Analysis of phospholipids and sphingolipids verified the temporal trends and revealed association with lymphocytes and platelets numbers. These metabolites were significantly perturbed during the early stages, and normalized to control levels at convalescent stage, suggesting their potential utility as prognostic markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: DENV infection causes temporally distinct serum metabolome and lipidome changes, and many of the differential metabolites are involved in acute inflammatory responses. Our global analyses revealed early anti-inflammatory responses working in concert to modulate early pro-inflammatory processes

  19. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  20. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dinh Phu

    Full Text Available Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs. We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs across Vietnam.Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included.Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing. Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012 of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012] were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855 acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855 developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76, urinary catheter (OR 2.12, no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94, and surgery after admission (OR 1.66. 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%], and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%], with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287 patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively.A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts.

  1. Proliferation of subependymal cells in the adult primate CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New formation of stem cells in the subependymal brain layer of a normal adult primate has been documented by light and electron microscopy and trough 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) uptake studies. Serial sections (1.5 μm) prepared for autoradiography were examined under the light microscope and then reembedded for electron microscopy. In individual sections subependymal cells did not appear labeled; however, serial sections revealed that many cells were slightly labeled indicating a low level of 3H-TdR incorporating during DNA synthesis. Dividing subependymal cells were also observed by light and electron microscopy. The poor incorporation of intraperitoneally injected 3H-TdR is due to the blood-brain barrier toward 3H-TdR. Rat experiments with the thymidine analogue, 123I-iododeoxyuridine (IUDR-125I) showed that after intraventricular injection of IUDR-125I about ninety times more radioactivity is incorporated into dividing stem cells of the brain than after an intraperitoneal injection of IUDR-125I. Differential corporation of 3H-TdR seems to depend on the type of stem cells, i.e., whether a stem cell may be precursor for glial or neuronal brain cells. Changes in membrane permeability, intracellular DNA activity as well as difference in locally available 'cold' thymidine may be a reason for differential uptake of radioactive thymidine. Differential uptake of 3H-TdR needs consideration when autoradiography is applied on brain cells. (author)

  2. Reduced mucosal associated invariant T-cells are associated with increased disease severity and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

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    Daniel J Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary defects in host immune responses have been hypothesised to contribute towards an inability of subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF to effectively clear pulmonary infections. Innate T-lymphocytes provide rapid pathogen-specific responses prior to the development of classical MHC class I and II restricted T-cell responses and are essential to the initial control of pulmonary infection. We aimed to examine the relationship between peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype and clinical outcomes in adults with CF. METHODS: We studied 41 subjects with CF and 22, age matched, non-smoking healthy control subjects. Lymphocytes were extracted from peripheral blood samples and phenotyped by flow-cytometry. Lymphocyte phenotype was correlated with sputum microbiology and clinical parameters. RESULTS: In comparison to healthy control subjects, mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT-lymphocytes were significantly reduced in the peripheral blood of subjects with CF (1.1% versus 2.0% of T-lymphocytes, P = 0.002. MAIT cell concentration was lowest in CF subjects infected with P. aeruginosa and in subjects receiving treatment for a pulmonary exacerbation. Furthermore a reduced MAIT cell concentration correlated with severity of lung disease. CONCLUSION: Reduced numbers of MAIT cells in subjects with CF were associated with P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection, pulmonary exacerbations and more severe lung disease. These findings provide the impetus for future studies examining the utility of MAIT cells in immunotherapies and vaccine development. Longitudinal studies of MAIT cells as biomarkers of CF pulmonary infection are awaited.

  3. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  4. Adult Stem Cells as a Renewable Source of Insulin-Producing Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Hee-Sook; Park, Eun-Young

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder resulting from an inadequate mass of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. The replacement or restoration of damaged beta cells would be considered the optimal therapeutic options. Islet transplantation seems to be a promising approach for replacement therapy; however, the main obstacle is the shortage of organ donors. As mature beta cells have been shown to be difficult to expand in vitro, regeneration of beta cells from embryonic or adult stem ce...

  5. Relative concentrations of serum neutralizing antibody to VP3 and VP7 proteins in adults infected with a human rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, R. L.; Knowlton, D R; Schiff, G M; Hoshino, Y.; Greenberg, H B

    1988-01-01

    Two outer capsid rotavirus proteins, VP3 and VP7, have been found to elicit neutralizing-antibody production, but the immunogenicity of these proteins during human rotavirus infection has not been determined. The relative amounts of serum neutralizing antibody against the VP3 and VP7 proteins of the CJN strain of human rotavirus were, therefore, determined in adult subjects before and after infection with this virus. Reassortant strains of rotavirus that contained the CJN gene segment for onl...

  6. Aetiologies of Central Nervous System infections in adults in Kathmandu, Nepal: A prospective hospital-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Giri, Abhishek; Arjyal, Amit; Koirala, Samir; Karkey, Abhilasha; Dongol, Sabina; Thapa, Sudeep Dhoj; Shilpakar, Olita; Shrestha, Rishav; Van Tan, Le; Thi Thuy Chinh, Bkrong Nguyen; Krishna K. C., Radheshyam; Pathak, Kamal Raj; Shakya, Mila; Farrar, Jeremy; Van Doorn, H. Rogier

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a prospective hospital based study from February 2009-April 2011 to identify the possible pathogens of central nervous system (CNS) infections in adults admitted to a tertiary referral hospital (Patan Hospital) in Kathmandu, Nepal. The pathogens of CNS infections were confirmed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using molecular diagnostics, culture (bacteria) and serology. 87 patients were recruited for the study and the etiological diagnosis was established in 38% (n = 33). The bacter...

  7. The Epidemiology, Virology and Clinical Findings of Dengue Virus Infections in a Cohort of Indonesian Adults in Western Java

    OpenAIRE

    Herman Kosasih; Bachti Alisjahbana; Nurhayati,; Quirijn de Mast; Irani F Rudiman; Susana Widjaja; Ungke Antonjaya; Harli Novriani; Susanto, Nugroho H.; Hadi Jusuf; Andre van der Ven; Beckett, Charmagne G.; Blair, Patrick J; Burgess, Timothy H.; Maya Williams

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue has emerged as one of the most important infectious diseases in the last five decades. Evidence indicates the expansion of dengue virus endemic areas and consequently the exponential increase of dengue virus infections across the subtropics. The clinical manifestations of dengue virus infection include sudden fever, rash, headache, myalgia and in more serious cases, spontaneous bleeding. These manifestations occur in children as well as in adults. Defining the epidemiology o...

  8. A Strong Immune Response in Young Adult Honeybees Masks Their Increased Susceptibility to Infection Compared to Older Bees

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, James C.; Ryabov, Eugene V.; Gill Prince; Andrew Mead; Cunjin Zhang; Baxter, Laura A.; Pell, Judith K.; Osborne, Juliet L; Dave Chandler

    2012-01-01

    Honeybees, Apis mellifera, show age-related division of labor in which young adults perform maintenance ("housekeeping") tasks inside the colony before switching to outside foraging at approximately 23 days old. Disease resistance is an important feature of honeybee biology, but little is known about the interaction of pathogens and age-related division of labor. We tested a hypothesis that older forager bees and younger "house" bees differ in susceptibility to infection. We coupled an infect...

  9. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan induces apoptosis and autophagy in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Soeda, Shuhei; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Arima, Naomichi; Kuroki, Ayako; Hirata, Shinya; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Imakyure, Osamu; Tone, Nanako; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Soeda, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term infection with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1), requires new treatments. Drug repositioning, reuse of a drug previously approved for the treatment of another condition to treat ATL, offers the possibility of reduced time and risk. Among clinically available angiotensin II receptor blockers, telmisartan is well known for its unique ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, which plays various roles in lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, telmisartan reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptotic cells via caspase activation in ex vivo peripheral blood monocytes from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) or via caspase-independent cell death in acute-type ATL, which has a poor prognosis. Telmisartan also induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in leukemia cell lines via caspase activation, whereas other angiotensin II receptor blockers did not induce cell death. Interestingly, telmisartan increased the LC3-II-enriched protein fraction, indicating autophagosome accumulation and autophagy. Thus, telmisartan simultaneously caused caspase activation and autophagy. A hypertension medication with antiproliferation effects on primary and leukemia cells is intriguing. Patients with an early diagnosis of ATL are generally monitored until the disease progresses; thus, suppression of progression from AC and indolent ATL to acute ATL is important. Our results suggest that telmisartan is highly effective against primary cells and leukemia cell lines in caspase-dependent and -independent manners, and its clinical use may suppress acute transformation and improve prognosis of patients with this mortal disease. This is the first report demonstrating a cell growth-inhibitory effect of telmisartan in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients. PMID:27419050

  10. Cuban experience with the therapeutic use of adult stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic and clinical researches carried out during past years on the stem cells and its therapeutic possibilities are at present times, one of the most interesting subjects of the contemporaneous medicine. There are advances in the study and application of adult stem cells showing remarkable advantages on the embryonic ones, since its handling is more simple, economic and they are obtained from the own subject to be treated. For the introduction in Cuba of the regenerative cellular therapy in the Institute of Hematology and Immunology the cellular sources selected were the adult stem cells derived from bone marrow and the mobilized ones to the peripheral blood. To make easy the expansion of treatment to other hospital centers, authors standardized a technique for the mobilization of the hematopoietic stem cells to peripheral blood using a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Filgrastim, of national production) developing a simple, economic and more tolerable method for patients. In this way, the cellular therapy has been expanded to 6 Cuban provinces and until April, 2009 562 cases with autologous adult stem cells transplant have been treated, from which the 81.7% to correspond to patients presenting with Angiology diseases with a significant reduction of major amputations. Also, the results have been very promising in the bone lesions and periodontal processes among other diseases treated. The results obtained until now may be considered as a new achievement of revolutionary science and of our national health systems and of science and technique. The method used is an economic and feasible procedure for the institutions with scarce resources

  11. Incidence and risk factors of chronic renal disease in a cohort of Greek HIV-1-infected adults

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    V Sakka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD in HIV-infected patients is associated with both HIV and non-HIV-related factors. Initial renal dysfunction is silent and detectable only by laboratory tests such as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Our objective was to assess possible risk factors for CKD in a cohort of Greek HIV-1-infected adults. Methods Patients in the AMACS (Athens Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study cohort with at least two available creatinine values were enrolled in the study. Renal dysfunction was defined as eGFR below 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. The Kaplan-Meier estimator and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to analyze the occurrence and predictors of renal dysfunction. Results A total of 1073 patients were enrolled in the study; 255 (23.76% had baseline eGFR below 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 and were excluded. Characteristics of the study population: men 88.4%, MSM 62.6%, median baseline age, CD4+count and viral load were 32.6 years, 413 cells/µL and 3.77 log10 copies/mL, respectively. 240 (29.3% patients experienced an eGFR decrease below 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 during follow-up period. Older age, female gender, heterosexual mode of transmission, lower baseline eGFR (all p<0.001, lower baseline CD4+(p=0.001, stage C (p=0.023, administration of cART (p<0.001 or other nephrotoxic agent (p=0.035 were the major risk factors in univariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified older age [hazard ratio (HR 1.289 per 10 years, p<0.001] and female gender (HR vs male: 1.899, p<0.001, as the major factors associated with increased hazard of developing CRD, whereas baseline eGFR <110 (HR vs eGFR <110: 0.245, p<0.001 and current CD4+count ≥350 cells/µL (HR 0.564, p=0.003 were significant protective factors. Conclusion In this large cohort of HIV-infected Greek patients, almost one-third (29.3% experienced some degree of renal dysfunction during HIV infection. Older age and female gender were major

  12. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speziali, Craig; Paulson, Kristjan; Seftel, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    The majority of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia will achieve a first complete remission (CR). However relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure. Outcomes after relapse remain poor, with long-term survival in the order of 10 %. Treatment decisions made at the time of first complete remission are thus critical to ensuring long-term survival. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is effective at preventing relapse in many transplant recipients but is also associated with significant treatment related morbidity and mortality. Alternatively, ongoing systemic chemotherapy offers lower toxicity at the expense of increased relapse rates. Over the past decades, both the safety of transplant and the efficacy of non-transplant chemotherapy have improved. Emerging data show substantially improved outcomes for young adults treated with pediatric-inspired chemotherapy regimens that question the role of HCT in the upfront setting. In this review, we review the data supporting the role of allogeneic transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and we propose a therapeutic algorithm for upfront therapy of adults with ALL. PMID:26984203

  13. 6K2-induced vesicles can move cell to cell during turnip mosaic virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-FrançoisLaliberté; HuanquanZheng

    2013-01-01

    To successfully infect plants, viruses replicate in an initially infected cell and then move to neighboring cells through plasmodesmata (PDs). However, the nature of the viral entity that crosses over the cell barrier into non-infected ones is not clear. The membrane-associated 6K2 protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) induces the formation of vesicles involved in the replication and intracellular movement of viral RNA. This study shows that 6K2-induced vesicles trafficked towards the plasma ...

  14. Differential proteome analysis of chikungunya virus infection on host cells.

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    Christina Li-Ping Thio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused multiple unprecedented and re-emerging outbreaks in both tropical and temperate countries. Despite ongoing research efforts, the underlying factors involved in facilitating CHIKV replication during early infection remains ill-characterized. The present study serves to identify host proteins modulated in response to early CHIKV infection using a proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The whole cell proteome profiles of CHIKV-infected and mock control WRL-68 cells were compared and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE. Fifty-three spots were found to be differentially modulated and 50 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Eight were significantly up-regulated and 42 were down-regulated. The mRNA expressions of 15 genes were also found to correlate with the corresponding protein expression. STRING network analysis identified several biological processes to be affected, including mRNA processing, translation, energy production and cellular metabolism, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP and cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a first attempt to investigate alteration of the host cellular proteome during early CHIKV infection. Our proteomics data showed that during early infection, CHIKV affected the expression of proteins that are involved in mRNA processing, host metabolic machinery, UPP, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 regulation (in favour of virus survival, replication and transmission. While results from this study complement the proteomics results obtained from previous late host response studies, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles during early CHIKV infection in humans.

  15. Infectivity of wild-type rubella virus in fibrochondrocyte cells

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    Cristina A Figueiredo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the rapid growth of the rubella virus in samples of a primary fibrochondrocyte cell culture with the development of a cytopathic effect (CPE, in response to infection by the rubella virus. The cells were isolated from the meniscus joint of a rabbit after enzymatic extraction and incubated at 37°C with a Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. A total of six clinical samples from urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were inoculated in the fibrochondrocyte and the cell lines of the African green monkey kidney - ATCC CCL-81 (Vero. The fibrochondrocyte cell showed CPE after 24 hours and virus growth was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Nested PCR. The cells inoculated with samples were examined by phase contrast microscopy and showed characteristic rounding, along with bipolar and multipolar cells. The infection curve increased during the five days of observation, showing that the titers in fibrochondrocyte cells were then higher than those observed in Vero cell lines.

  16. Giardia infection: Protein-losing enteropathy in an adult with immunodeficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandre Khodr Furtado; Virginia Lucia Ribeiro Cabral; Thiago Nunes Santos; Eli Mansour; Cristiane Kibune Nagasako; Sonia Leticia Lorena; Rogerio Antunes Pereira-Filho

    2012-01-01

    The case of a 52-year-old woman with a past history of thymoma resection who presented with chronic diarrhea and generalized edema is the focal point of this article.A diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infection was established,which was complicated by protein-losing enteropathy and severely low serum protein level in a patient with no urinary protein loss and normal liver function.After anti-helmintic treatment,there was recovery from hypoalbuminemia,though immunoglobulins persisted at low serum levels leading to the hypothesis of an immune system disorder.Good's syndrome is a rare cause of immunodeficiency characterized by the association of hypogammaglobulinemia and thymoma.This primary immune disorder may be complicated by severe infectious diarrhea secondary to disabled humoral and cellular immune response.This is the first description in the literature of an adult patient with an immunodeficiency syndrome who presented with protein-losing enteropathy secondary to giardiasis.

  17. Adult human neural stem cell therapeutics: Currentdevelopmental status and prospect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun Nam; Kee-Hang Lee; Do-Hyun Nam; Kyeung Min Joo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, regenerative therapies usingstem cell technologies have been developed for variousneurological diseases. Although stem cell therapy is anattractive option to reverse neural tissue damage and torecover neurological deficits, it is still under developmentso as not to show significant treatment effects in clinicalsettings. In this review, we discuss the scientific andclinical basics of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs), andtheir current developmental status as cell therapeuticsfor neurological disease. Compared with other typesof stem cells, aNSCs have clinical advantages, suchas limited proliferation, inborn differentiation potentialinto functional neural cells, and no ethical issues. Inspite of the merits of aNSCs, difficulties in the isolationfrom the normal brain, and in the in vitro expansion,have blocked preclinical and clinical study using aNSCs.However, several groups have recently developed noveltechniques to isolate and expand aNSCs from normaladult brains, and showed successful applications ofaNSCs to neurological diseases. With new technologiesfor aNSCs and their clinical strengths, previous hurdlesin stem cell therapies for neurological diseases could beovercome, to realize clinically efficacious regenerativestem cell therapeutics.

  18. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-04-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation. PMID:25486871

  19. Cloned goats (Capra hircus) from adult ear cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Jitong(郭继彤); AN; Zhixing(安志兴); LI; Yu(李煜); LI; Xuefeng(李雪峰); LI; Yuqiang(李裕强); GUO; Zekun(郭泽坤); ZHANG; Yong(张涌)

    2002-01-01

    The average number of available oocytes recovered per ovary collected during the breeding season in dairy goats was 5.5 (1815/330). 66.17% (1201/1815) of oocytes extruded the first polar body after maturation in vitro for 20 h. 75.44% (906/1201) of matured oocytes with membrane evagination around the MⅡchromosomes were enucleated. Ear skin fibroblast cells were derived from an adult female Jining Grey goat (C. hircus). The cells were cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen after passage 2. Thawed cells were further cultured for 3-6 passages and were subjected to serum starvation by 0.5% FBS for 2-10 d, then used as donor cells for nuclear transfer. 98.12% (889/906) of the enucleated oocytes were reconstructed by intracytoplasmic injection of karyoplast. The reconstructed embryos were activated by 5 μmol/L ionomycin for 4.5 min and further activated by culturing with 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) for 3 h. After 36 h of culture in mCR1aaBF, 76.69% (645/841) of the cloned embryos cleaved. There were no significant differences in development in vitro between the cloned embryos derived from donor cells precooled at 4℃ for 24 h and nonprecooled donor cells. The cleavage rates, 4-cell development, and blastocyst development of reconstructed embryos were 72.48% (79/109), 53.16% (42/79), and 19.05% (8/42) in precooled group; 68.5% (211/308), 59.72% (126/211), and 17.46% (22/126) in nonprecooled group, respectively. Eighteen cloned 4-cell embryos derived from precooled donor cells were transferred and one cloned kid was born. Eighty-four cloned 4-cell embryos derived from nonprecooled donor cells were transferred and no offspring were produced. Of 18 cloned morale from nonprecooled donor cells transferred, one kid was born. The results of microsatellite DNA analyses indicated that the two cloned kids were from the same donor fibroblast cell line derived from an adult goat ear skin.

  20. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  1. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornara, O; Rahbar, A; Odeberg, J;

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express......-expression of these two proteins predicted poor patient survival. Infection of GBM cells with HCMV led to upregulation of CD133 and other GSCS markers (Notch1, Sox2, Oct4, Nestin). HCMV infection also promoted the growth of GBM cells as neurospheres, a behavior typically displayed by GCSCs, and this phenotype...... of GBM cells to promote GCSC features and may thereby increase the aggressiveness of this tumor....

  2. Autonomous interconversion between adult pancreatic α-cells and β-cells after differential metabolic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng Ye

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: We identify the origins and fates of adult β-cells upon post-challenge upon autonomous regeneration of islet mass and establish the quantitative contributions of the different cell types using a lineage tracing system with high temporal resolution.

  3. Robust G2 pausing of adult stem cells in Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzgariu, Wanda; Crescenzi, Marco; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Hydra is a freshwater hydrozoan polyp that constantly renews its two tissue layers thanks to three distinct stem cell populations that cannot replace each other, epithelial ectodermal, epithelial endodermal, and multipotent interstitial. These adult stem cells, located in the central body column, exhibit different cycling paces, slow for the epithelial, fast for the interstitial. To monitor the changes in cell cycling in Hydra, we established a fast and efficient flow cytometry procedure, which we validated by confirming previous findings, as the Nocodazole-induced reversible arrest of cell cycling in G2/M, and the mitogenic signal provided by feeding. Then to dissect the cycling and differentiation behaviors of the interstitial stem cells, we used the AEP_cnnos1 and AEP_Icy1 transgenic lines that constitutively express GFP in this lineage. For the epithelial lineages we used the sf-1 strain that rapidly eliminates the fast cycling cells upon heat-shock and progressively becomes epithelial. This study evidences similar cycling patterns for the interstitial and epithelial stem cells, which all alternate between the G2 and S-phases traversing a minimal G1-phase. We also found interstitial progenitors with a shorter G2 that pause in G1/G0. At the animal extremities, most cells no longer cycle, the epithelial cells terminally differentiate in G2 and the interstitial progenitors in G1/G0. At the apical pole ~80% cells are post-mitotic differentiated cells, reflecting the higher density of neurons and nematocytes in this region. We discuss how the robust G2 pausing of stem cells, maintained over weeks of starvation, may contribute to regeneration. PMID:24703763

  4. Discovery and Validation of Prognostic Biomarker Models to Guide Triage among Adult Dengue Patients at Early Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Thein, Tun-Linn; Naim, Ahmad Nazri Mohamed; Ling, Ling; Chow, Angelia; Chen, Mark I-Cheng; Ooi, Eng Eong; Leo, Yee Sin; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue results in a significant public health burden in endemic regions. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the use of warning signs (WS) to stratify patients at risk of severe dengue disease in 2009. However, WS is limited in stratifying adult dengue patients at early infection (Day 1–3 post fever), who require close monitoring in hospitals to prevent severe dengue. The aim of this study is to identify and validate prognostic models, built with differentially expressed biomarkers, that enable the early identification of those with early dengue infection that require close clinical monitoring. Methods RNA microarray and protein assays were performed to identify differentially expressed biomarkers of severity among 92 adult dengue patients recruited at early infection from years 2005–2008. This comprised 47 cases who developed WS after first presentation and required hospitalization (WS+Hosp), as well as 45 controls who did not develop WS after first presentation and did not require hospitalization (Non-WS+Non-Hosp). Independent validation was conducted with 80 adult dengue patients recruited from years 2009–2012. Prognostic models were developed based on forward stepwise and backward elimination estimation, using multiple logistic regressions. Prognostic power was estimated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results The WS+Hosp group had significantly higher viral load (Pdengue patients at early infection, with sensitivity and specificity up to 83% and 84%, respectively. These results were tested in the independent validation group, showing sensitivity and specificity up to 96% and 54.6%, respectively. Conclusions At early infection, adult dengue patients who later presented WS and require hospitalization have significantly different pathophysiology compared with patients who consistently presented no WS and / or require no hospitalization. The molecular prognostic models developed and validated here

  5. A Descriptive Study of Nosocomial Infections in an Adult Intensive Care Unit in Fiji: 2011-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshni Naidu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections in an intensive care unit (ICU are common and associated with a high mortality but there are no published data from the Oceania region. A retrospective study in Fiji’s largest ICU (2011-12 reported that 114 of a total 663 adult ICU admissions had bacteriological culture-confirmed nosocomial infection. The commonest sites of infection were respiratory and bloodstream. Gram negative bacteria were the commonest pathogens isolated, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae (extended-spectrum β-Lactamase-producing, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species. Mortality for those with a known outcome was 33%. Improved surveillance and implementation of effective preventive interventions are needed.

  6. High-resolution CT of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in adult CF patients: diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the detection of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection (NTM) in adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Twenty-seven CF patients with sputum-culture-proven NTM (NTM+) underwent HRCT. An age, gender and spirometrically matched group of 27 CF patients without NTM (NTM-) was included as controls. Images were randomly and blindly analysed by two readers in consensus and scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Significant differences were seen between NTM (+) and NTM (-) patients in the severity of the bronchiectasis subscore [45 % (1.8/4) vs. 35 % (1.4/4), P = 0.029], collapse/consolidation subscore [33 % (1.3/3) vs. 15 % (0.6/3)], tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules subscore [43 % (1.7/3) vs. 25 % (1.0/3), P = 0.002] and the total CT score [56 % (18.4/33) vs. 46 % (15.2/33), P = 0.002]. Binary logistic regression revealed BMI, peribronchial thickening, collapse/consolidation and tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules to be predictors of NTM status (R2 = 0.43). Receiver-operator curve analysis of the regression model showed an area under the curve of 0.89, P < 0.0001. In adults with CF, seven or more bronchopulmonary segments showing tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules on HRCT is highly suggestive of NTM colonisation. (orig.)

  7. High-resolution CT of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in adult CF patients: diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, Sinead; Lavelle, Lisa; Kilcoyne, Aoife; McCarthy, Colin; Dodd, Jonathan D. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); DeJong, Pim A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles G. [St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine and National Referral Centre for Adult Cystic Fibrosis, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-12-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for the detection of nontuberculous mycobacterium infection (NTM) in adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Twenty-seven CF patients with sputum-culture-proven NTM (NTM+) underwent HRCT. An age, gender and spirometrically matched group of 27 CF patients without NTM (NTM-) was included as controls. Images were randomly and blindly analysed by two readers in consensus and scored using a modified Bhalla scoring system. Significant differences were seen between NTM (+) and NTM (-) patients in the severity of the bronchiectasis subscore [45 % (1.8/4) vs. 35 % (1.4/4), P = 0.029], collapse/consolidation subscore [33 % (1.3/3) vs. 15 % (0.6/3)], tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules subscore [43 % (1.7/3) vs. 25 % (1.0/3), P = 0.002] and the total CT score [56 % (18.4/33) vs. 46 % (15.2/33), P = 0.002]. Binary logistic regression revealed BMI, peribronchial thickening, collapse/consolidation and tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules to be predictors of NTM status (R{sup 2} = 0.43). Receiver-operator curve analysis of the regression model showed an area under the curve of 0.89, P < 0.0001. In adults with CF, seven or more bronchopulmonary segments showing tree-in-bud/centrilobular nodules on HRCT is highly suggestive of NTM colonisation. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of cell-surface determinants important for baculovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, H; Nishijima, M; Ushijima, H; Miyamura, T; Matsuura, Y

    2001-01-01

    Baculovirus gp64 envelope glycoprotein is a major component of the envelope of the budded virus and is involved in virus entry into the host cells by endocytosis. To investigate the cell-surface molecules important for infection of baculovirus into mammalian cells, we constructed a recombinant baculovirus, Ac64-CAluc, which has gp64 and luciferase genes under the polyhedrin and the CAG promoter, respectively. For controls, we constructed recombinant viruses possessing vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) S protein, or green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene under the polyhedrin promoter and the luciferase gene under the CAG promoter (AcVSVG-CAluc, AcMHVS-CAluc, and AcGFP-CAluc). Treatment of HepG2 cells with phospholipase C markedly reduced the reporter gene expression by Ac64-CAluc or AcVSVG-CAluc in a dose-dependent manner, whereas AcMHVS-CAluc was shown to be resistant to the treatment. Inhibition with purified lipids and susceptibility to the mutant CHO hamster cell lines deficient in phospholipids synthesis suggest that the interaction of gp64 and phospholipids on the cell surface might play an important role in baculovirus infection into mammalian cells. PMID:11145915

  9. Clinical Predictors for the Etiology of Peripheral Lymphadenopathy in HIV-Infected Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I.; Andrews, Jason R.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Rivera, Anna Maria; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Stone, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the etiology and clinical predictors of peripheral lymphadenopathy in HIV-infected individuals during the antiretroviral (ARV) era in a non-Tuberculosis endemic setting. Methods Multi-centered, retrospective cohort study of peripheral lymph node biopsies in HIV-positive adults. 107 charts were identified and reviewed for clinical features, lymphadenopathy size, ARV use and duration. Biopsy results were categorized, and multivariate logistic regression determined independent predictors of lymphadenopathy etiology. Results Evaluation of 107 peripheral lymph node biopsies revealed 42.9% due to malignancy, 49.5% reactive changes, and 7.5% infections, with only 2.8% of all cases secondary to tuberculosis. Fevers, weight loss, ARV use, and lower viral loads are significantly associated with non-reactive lymphadenopathy. Conclusion Lymphadenopathy is likely to be reactive or malignant in non-Tuberculosis endemic regions. Readily available clinical features can aid clinicians in predicting the underlying etiology, those at risk for malignancy, and who to biopsy. PMID:22805116

  10. Correlates of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Mahoney, Christine; Catz, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-infected older African Americans experience higher mortality rates compared to their white counterparts. This disparity may be partly attributable to the differences in ART adherence by different racial and gender groups. The purpose of this study was to describe demographic, psychosocial, and HIV disease-related factors that influence ART adherence and to determine whether race and gender impact ART adherence among HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older. Methods This descriptive study involved a secondary analysis of baseline data from 426 participants in “PRIME,” a telephone-based ART adherence and quality-of-life intervention trial. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between independent variables and ART adherence. Results Higher annual income and increased self-efficacy were associated with being ≥95% ART adherent. Race and gender were not associated with ART adherence. Conclusion These findings indicated that improvements in self-efficacy for taking ART may be an effective strategy to improve adherence regardless of race or gender. PMID:27071744

  11. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja;

    2016-01-01

    . Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone......The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of...... debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts...

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of sleep disturbances in a large HIV-infected adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Allavena

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sleep disturbances are frequently reported in HIV-infected patients but there is a lack of large studies on prevalence and risk factors, particularly in the context of current improved immuno-clinical status and use of the newest antiretrovirals (ARV. Method: Cross-sectional study to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sleep disturbance in adult HIV-infected patients in six French centres of the region “Pays de la Loire”. Patients filled a self-administered questionnaire on their health behaviour, sleep attitudes (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index PSQI, quality of life (WHO QOL HIV BREF questionnaire and depression (Beck depression Inventory (BDI-II questionnaire. Socio-demographic and immunovirologic data, medical history, ARVs were collected. Results: From November 2012 to May 2013, 1354 consecutive non-selected patients were enrolled. Patients’ characteristics were: 73.5% male, median age 47 years, active employment 56.7%, France-native 83% and Africa-native 14.7%, CDC stage C 21%, hepatitis co-infection 13%, lipodystrophy 11.8%, dyslipidemia 20%, high BP 15.1%, diabetes 3%, tobacco smokers 39%, marijuana and cocaine users, 11.7% and 1.7% respectively, and excessive alcohol drinkers 9%. Median (med duration of HIV infection was 12.4 years, med CD4 count was 604/mm3; 94% of Patients were on ARVs, 87% had undetectable viral load. Median sleeping time was 7 hours. Sleep disturbances (defined as PSQI score >5 were observed in 47% of the patients, more frequently in female (56.4% than in male (43.9% (p19 in 19.7% of the patients. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with sleep disturbances (p10 vs. <10 y. (OR 1.5; CI 1.1–2.0, ARV regimen containing nevirapine (OR 0.7; CI 0.5–0.9 or efavirenz (OR 0.5; CI 0.3–0.7. Conclusions: Prevalence of sleep disturbances is high in this HIV population and roughly similar to the French population. Associated factors are rather related to social and psychological

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi: single cell live imaging inside infected tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Bianca Lima; Orikaza, Cristina Mary; Cordero, Esteban Mauricio; Mortara, Renato Arruda

    2016-06-01

    Although imaging the live Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is a routine technique in most laboratories, identification of the parasite in infected tissues and organs has been hindered by their intrinsic opaque nature. We describe a simple method for in vivo observation of live single-cell Trypanosoma cruzi parasites inside mammalian host tissues. BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice infected with DsRed-CL or GFP-G trypomastigotes had their organs removed and sectioned with surgical blades. Ex vivo organ sections were observed under confocal microscopy. For the first time, this procedure enabled imaging of individual amastigotes, intermediate forms and motile trypomastigotes within infected tissues of mammalian hosts. PMID:26639617

  14. Bovine aortic endothelial cells are susceptible to Hantaan virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantavirus serotype Hantaan (HTN) is one of the causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS, lethality up to 10%). The natural host of HTN is Apodemus agrarius. Recent studies have shown that domestic animals like cattle are sporadically seropositive for hantaviruses. In the present study, the susceptibility of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) expressing αVβ3-integrin to a HTN infection was investigated. Viral nucleocapsid protein and genomic RNA segments were detected in infected BAEC by indirect immunofluorescence assay, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The results of this study strongly support our previous observation on Puumala virus (PUU) that has been propagated efficiently in BAEC. These findings open a new window to contemplate the ecology of hantavirus infection and transmission route from animal to man

  15. Changes in cell adhesion molecule expression on T cells associated with systemic virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O;

    1994-01-01

    -4, LFA-1, and ICAM-1, are up-regulated on CD8+ cells, whereas the lymph node homing receptor MEL-14 is down-regulated during the infection; only marginal changes were observed for CD4+ cells. Basically similar but less marked results were obtained in mice infected with Pichinde virus. Further......, it was found that up-regulation of VLA-4 expression on splenic T cells correlated with influx of inflammatory cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of intracerebrally infected animals, and that the number of CD8+VLA-4hi cells increased from lymph nodes and spleen to blood and cerebrospinal fluid. These...... results support the hypothesis that up-regulation of VLA-4 is important for effector T cell homing to sites of inflammation....

  16. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien; Emerence Laudet; Virginie Neirinckx; Bernard Rogister

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In th...

  17. Isolation of alveolar epithelial type II progenitor cells from adult human lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Fujino, Naoya; Kubo, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takaya; Ota, Chiharu; Hegab, Ahmed E.; He, Mei; Suzuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Takashi; Kato, Hidemasa; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2010-01-01

    Resident stem/progenitor cells in the lung are important for tissue homeostasis and repair. However, a progenitor population for alveolar type II (ATII) cells in adult human lungs has not been identified. The aim of this study is to isolate progenitor cells from adult human lungs with the ability to differentiate into ATII cells. We isolated colony-forming cells that had the capability for self-renewal and the potential to generate ATII cells in vitro. These undifferentiated progenitor cells ...

  18. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Coyne G; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and encounters the

  19. A Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model To Study Enterovirus Infection of Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Coyne G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite serving as the primary entry portal for coxsackievirus B (CVB), little is known about CVB infection of the intestinal epithelium, owing at least in part to the lack of suitable in vivo models and the inability of cultured cells to recapitulate the complexity and structure associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here, we report on the development of a three-dimensional (3-D) organotypic cell culture model of Caco-2 cells to model CVB infection of the gastrointestinal epithelium. We show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor recapitulate many of the properties of the intestinal epithelium, including the formation of well-developed tight junctions, apical-basolateral polarity, brush borders, and multicellular complexity. In addition, transcriptome analyses using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) revealed the induction of a number of genes associated with intestinal epithelial differentiation and/or intestinal processes in vivo when Caco-2 cells were cultured in 3-D. Applying this model to CVB infection, we found that although the levels of intracellular virus production were similar in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures, the release of infectious CVB was enhanced in 3-D cultures at early stages of infection. Unlike CVB, the replication of poliovirus (PV) was significantly reduced in 3-D Caco-2 cell cultures. Collectively, our studies show that Caco-2 cells grown in 3-D using the RWV bioreactor provide a cell culture model that structurally and transcriptionally represents key aspects of cells in the human GI tract and can thus be used to expand our understanding of enterovirus-host interactions in intestinal epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B (CVB), a member of the enterovirus family of RNA viruses, is associated with meningitis, pericarditis, diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, among other pathologies. CVB is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and

  20. Identifying Factors Associated with Changes in CD4+ Count in HIV-Infected Adults in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Hunt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of clinical and social factors unique to HIV-infected adults in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, regarding the rate of CD4+ count change, and to identify factors associated with a risk of CD4+ count decline.

  1. Optimal Use of Raltegravir (Isentress® in the Treatment of HIV-Infected Adults – Canadian Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Rachlis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A meeting of a Canadian group with significant experience and knowledge in HIV management, consisting of five physicians, a pharmacist and an AIDS researcher, was convened. Their goal was to develop guidance for Canadian HIV-treating physicians on the appropriate use of raltegravir (MK-0518, Isentress®, Merck Frosst Canada Inc in HIV-infected adults.

  2. Study Development of Adult Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection%成人肺炎支原体感染研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易海峰

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common pathogen of respiratory tract, which is frequently complicated with respiratory infections and extrapulmonary disorders.Adult Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection has been increasingly recognized.Adult form is significantly different from pediatric form.Due to the small number of studies, more concepts of adult Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection require to be supplemented and standardized.This article reviews epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, laboratory diagnosis, and pharmacotherapy of adult Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.%肺炎支原体是呼吸道常见致病原,常引起呼吸道感染及各种肺外并发症.近年来成人肺炎支原体感染受到重视,成人肺炎支原体感染在许多方面有其不同于儿童的特点,由于研究相对较少,许多认识有待完善和统一,现就成人肺炎支原体感染的流行病学、致病机制、临床表现、实验诊断、药物治疗等方面的研究进展予以简要综述.

  3. Screening of early antigen genes of adult-stage Trichinella spiralis using pig serum from different stages of early infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this work was to identify novel, early antigens present in Trichinella spiralis. To this end, a cDNA library generated from 3-day old adult worms (Ad3) was immunologically screened using serum from a pig infected with 20,000 muscle larvae. The serum was obtained from multiple, time cours...

  4. Ultrastructural analysis of primary human urethral epithelial cell cultures infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H A; Ketterer, M R; Preston, A; Lubaroff, D; Williams, R; Apicella, M A

    1997-06-01

    In men with gonococcal urethritis, the urethral epithelial cell is a site of infection. To study the pathogenesis of gonorrhea in this cell type, we have developed a method to culture primary human urethral epithelial cells obtained at the time of urologic surgery. Fluorescent analysis demonstrated that 100% of the cells stained for keratin. Microscopic analyses indicated that these epithelial cells arrayed in a pattern similar to that seen in urethral epithelium. Using immunoelectron and confocal microscopy, we compared the infection process seen in primary cells with events occurring during natural infection of the same cell type in men with gonococcal urethritis. Immunoelectron microscopy studies of cells infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae 1291 Opa+ P+ showed adherence of organisms to the epithelial cell membrane, pedestal formation with evidence of intimate association between the gonococcal and the epithelial cell membranes, and intracellular gonococci present in vacuoles. Confocal studies of primary urethral epithelial cells showed actin polymerization upon infection. Polyclonal antibodies to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) demonstrated the presence of this receptor on infected cells in the primary urethral cell culture. In situ hybridization using a fluorescent-labeled probe specific to the ASGP-R mRNA demonstrated this message in uninfected and infected cells. These features were identical to those seen in urethral epithelial cells in exudates from males with gonorrhea. Infection of primary urethral cells in culture mimics events seen in natural infection and will allow detailed molecular analysis of gonococcal pathogenesis in a human epithelial cell which is commonly infected. PMID:9169783

  5. The role of virus-specific human T cells in influenza A virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Jing; 管静

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus infection is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. T cell immunity is believed to play critical roles for host defenses against influenza A infection. Once intracellular influenza A infection is established, viral clearance is mainly dependent on virus-specific CD8+ T cells. CD4+ T cells are important for adaptive immunity to natural influenza A infection or vaccination by providing help to B cells for antibody production and also providing help...

  6. Human herpesvirus 6 infects cervical epithelial cells and transactivates human papillomavirus gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, M.; Popescu, N; Woodworth, C; Berneman, Z; M. Corbellino; Lusso, P.; Ablashi, D V; Dipaolo, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    To examine whether human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is capable of infecting human cervical epithelial cells and altering expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) genes, HPV-immortalized or -transformed carcinoma cell lines were infected with HHV-6 variant A. No cytopathic effect was observed in infected cervical cells. However, immunofluorescence indicated that infected cells expressed early-late proteins of HHV-6 by day 3 postinfection. HHV-6 DNA was also detected by Southern blot hybridization a...

  7. A tubular segmented-flow bioreactor for the infection of insect cells with recombinant baculovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yu-Chen; Wang, Ming-Ying; Bentley, William E.

    1997-01-01

    A continuous process of insect cell (S f9) growth and baculovirus infection is tested with the sequential combination of a CSTR and a tubular reactor. A tubular infection reactor enables continuous introduction of baculovirus and therefore avoids the ‘passage effect’ observed in two-stage CSTR systems. Moreover, a tubular reactor can be used to test cell infection kinetics and the subsequent metabolism of infected insect cells. Unlike batch and CSTR culture, cells in a horizontally positioned...

  8. Acceptability of bone antiresorptive therapy among HIV-infected adults at different stages of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras J

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jillian Taras,1 Gordon Arbess,1,2 James Owen,1,2 Charlie B Guiang,1,2 Darrell H S Tan1,3 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Family Medicine, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Purpose: Both HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART are associated with ­significant decreases in bone mineral density (BMD and increased fracture rates. To prepare for a randomized controlled trial of prophylactic bone antiresorptive therapy during ART initiation, we assessed the acceptability of this strategy, bone health knowledge, and fracture risk among HIV-infected adults.Methods: HIV-infected adults with no history of osteoporosis were recruited from one tertiary and one primary care HIV clinic. Participants completed a questionnaire and underwent chart review. The primary outcome was the proportion of respondents expressing interest in taking prophylactic bone antiresorptive therapy in conjunction with ART.Results: Of 112 respondents, 25.0% were ART naïve, 23.2% had been taking ART for ≤1 year, and 51.8% had been taking ART for >1 year. Half (51.9% indicated interest in taking short-course prophylactic bone antiresorptive therapy; this did not differ by ART status (53.6% among ART-naïve, 51.3% among ART-treated; P=0.84, chi-square test. In exploratory multivariable analysis adjusted for ART status, a greater number of pills taken per day was positively associated with this outcome (adjusted odds ratio [OR] =1.12 per pill, 95% confidence limit [CL] =1.01, 1.25, while male sex was inversely associated (adjusted OR =0.05, 95% CL =0.01, 0.24. Among those willing to take therapy, most (80.4% were willing to do so for “as long as needed” and preferred weekly dosing (70.9% to daily dosing (12.7%.Conclusions: Half of this sample would be willing to take bone antiresorptive therapy together with ART, with preferences

  9. The Drosophila hindgut lacks constitutively active adult stem cells but proliferates in response to tissue damage

    OpenAIRE

    D.T., Fox; Spradling, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The adult Drosophila hindgut was recently reported to contain active, tissue-replenishing stem cells, like those of the midgut, but located within an anterior ring so as to comprise a single giant crypt. In contrast to this view, we observed no active stem cells and little cell turnover in adult hindgut tissue based on clonal marking and BrdU incorporation studies. Again contradicting the previous proposal, we showed that the adult hindgut is not generated by anterior stem cells during larval...

  10. Sustained Arc expression in adult-generated granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meconi, Alicia; Lui, Erika; Marrone, Diano F

    2015-08-31

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a critical role in memory formation and maintenance. Fitting this specialized role, the DG has many unique characteristics. In addition to being one of the few places in which new neurons are continually added in adulthood, the region also shows a unique long-term sustained transcriptional response of the immediate-early gene Arc to sensory input. Although we know that adult-generated granule cells are reliably recruited into behaviorally-driven neuronal network, it remains unknown whether they display robust late-phase sustained transcription in response to activity like their developmentally-generated counterparts. Since this late-phase of transcription is required for enduring plasticity, knowing if sustained transcription appears as soon as these cells are incorporated provides information on their potential for plasticity. To address this question, adult F344 rats were injected with BrdU (50mg/kg/day for 5 days) and 4 weeks later explored a novel environment. Arc expression in both BrdU- and BrdU+ neurons was determined 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h, 8h, 12h, or 24h following this behavior. Recently-generated granule cells showed a robust sustained Arc expression following a discrete behavioral experience. These data provide information on a potential mechanism to sculpt the representations of events occurring within hours of each other to create uncorrelated representations of episodes despite a highly excitable population of neurons. PMID:26219984

  11. Molecular Diversity Subdivides the Adult Forebrain Neural Stem Cell Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachino, Claudio; Basak, Onur; Lugert, Sebastian; Knuckles, Philip; Obernier, Kirsten; Fiorelli, Roberto; Frank, Stephan; Raineteau, Olivier; Alvarez–Buylla, Arturo; Taylor, Verdon

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the ventricular domain of the subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of rodents produce neurons throughout life while those in humans become largely inactive or may be lost during infancy. Most adult NSCs are quiescent, express glial markers, and depend on Notch signaling for their self-renewal and the generation of neurons. Using genetic markers and lineage tracing, we identified subpopulations of adult V-SVZ NSCs (type 1, 2, and 3) indicating a striking heterogeneity including activated, brain lipid binding protein (BLBP, FABP7) expressing stem cells. BLBP+ NSCs are mitotically active components of pinwheel structures in the lateral ventricle walls and persistently generate neurons in adulthood. BLBP+ NSCs express epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, proliferate in response to EGF, and are a major clonogenic population in the SVZ. We also find BLBP expressed by proliferative ventricular and sub-ventricular progenitors in the fetal and postnatal human brain. Loss of BLBP+ stem/progenitor cells correlates with reduced neurogenesis in aging rodents and postnatal humans. These findings of molecular heterogeneity and proliferative differences subdivide the NSC population and have implications for neurogenesis in the forebrain of mammals during aging. PMID:23964022

  12. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria. PMID:21327755

  13. Incidence of Dengue Virus Infection in Adults and Children in a Prospective Longitudinal Cohort in the Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Theresa Alera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mean age of dengue has been increasing in some but not all countries. We sought to determine the incidence of dengue virus (DENV infection in adults and children in a prospective cohort study in the Philippines where dengue is hyperendemic.A prospective cohort of subjects ≥6 months old in Cebu City, Philippines, underwent active community-based surveillance for acute febrile illnesses by weekly contact. Fever history within the prior seven days was evaluated with an acute illness visit followed by 2, 5, and 8-day, and 3-week convalescent visits. Blood was collected at the acute and 3-week visits. Scheduled visits took place at enrolment and 12 months that included blood collections. Acute samples were tested by DENV PCR and acute/convalescent samples by DENV IgM/IgG ELISA to identify symptomatic infections. Enrolment and 12-month samples were tested by DENV hemagglutination inhibition (HAI assay to identify subclinical infections. Of 1,008 enrolled subjects, 854 completed all study activities at 12 months per-protocol undergoing 868 person-years of surveillance. The incidence of symptomatic and subclinical infections was 1.62 and 7.03 per 100 person-years, respectively. However, in subjects >15 years old, only one symptomatic infection occurred whereas 27 subclinical infections were identified. DENV HAI seroprevalence increased sharply with age with baseline multitypic HAIs associated with fewer symptomatic infections. Using a catalytic model, the historical infection rate among dengue naïve individuals was estimated to be high at 11-22%/year.In this hyperendemic area with high seroprevalence of multitypic DENV HAIs in adults, symptomatic dengue rarely occurred in individuals older than 15 years. Our findings demonstrate that dengue is primarily a pediatric disease in areas with high force of infection. However, the average age of dengue could increase if force of infection decreases over time, as is occurring in some hyperendemic

  14. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions (≥3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  15. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilseyar Akhmetzyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  16. Association between human papillomavirus infection and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Kamal

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using two methods: PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (PCR/DEIA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for detection of HPV in specimens of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and to correlate the presence of HPV with the epidemiological and clinicopathological features of recurrence and survival. HPV DNA was amplified from 93 paraffin-embedded laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma tissue specimens by the short PCR fragment (SPF 10) primer set using PCR/DNA method. HPV detection using monoclonal anti-human papilloma virus antibodies Clone K1H8 for IHC reaction was performed on 130 specimens. HPV was identified in 35.5% of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using PCR/DEIA and 27.7% using IHC. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of HPV and the epidemiological and clinicopathological features and recurrence. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of HPV and overall survival nor disease specific survival. Statistically significant correlation between HPV detection using PCR/DEIA technique and IHC technique was found. The presence of HPV infection in 27.7% and 38.9% of the patients suggests a possible role in the etiology of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The SPF(10) PCR/DEIA technique is the most accurate method for detection of HPV in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:20419817

  17. Turnover rates of B cells, T cells, and NK cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Mohri, H.; Ho, D.D.; Perelson, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We determined average cellular turnover rates by fitting mathematical models to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine measurements in SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. The daily turnover rates of CD4(+) T cells, CD4(-) T cells, CD20(+) B cells, and CD16(+) NK cells in normal uninfected rhesus macaques

  18. Comparison of the Immunogenicity and Reactogenicity of Cervarix and Gardasil Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in HIV-Infected Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Toft; Storgaard, Merete; Müller, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®) Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in HIV-infected adults.Methods. A double-blind, controlled trial randomizing HIV-positive adults to receive three doses of Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®) at 0, 1.5 and 6 months.......Results. Ninety-two participants were included in the study. Anti-HPV-18 antibody titers were higher in the Cervarix(®) group compared with the Gardasil(®) group at 7 and 12 months. No significant differences in anti-HPV-16 antibody titers were found among vaccine groups. Among Cervarix(®) vaccinees, women had.......Conclusions. Both vaccines were immunogenic and well tolerated. Compared with Gardasil(®), Cervarix(®) induced superior vaccine responses among HIV-infected women whereas in HIV-infected men the difference in immunogenicity was less pronounced....

  19. PROPHYLACTIC ADMINISTRATION OF DOXYCYCLINE REDUCES CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Kharfan-Dabaja

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells are usually transfused through a central venous catheter (CVC, which also facilitates administration of medications and intravenous fluids. We had observed high rate of catheter-related blood-stream infection (CR-BSI at our Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT unit despite prescribing fluoroquinolones for anti-bacterial prophylaxis. Accordingly, we implemented prophylactic use of a relatively inexpensive broad spectrum antibiotic, namely doxycycline to address this problem. We wanted to investigate whether doxycycline prophylaxis reduces CR-BSI rate. Data was collected retrospectively on 54 consecutive patients, 26 of whom received doxycycline (doxycycline group, and we compared their outcomes to a previous cohort of 28 patients who did not receive doxycycline (comparison group. The groups were comparable in regards to age, gender, hematopoietic cell transplant type, and primary diagnosis. No CVC infection (0% was observed in the doxycycline group, while 5 infection episodes (18.5% occurred in 4 patients in the comparison group (p<0.001. Episodes of CR-BSI were due to: Escherichia-coli (EC=1, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus-spp (CNSS=2, both EC & CNSS=1. Our results demonstrate that CR-BSI was reduced significantly after introducing doxycycline. This finding suggests a beneficial role for systemic use of doxycycline prophylaxis to prevent CR-BSI in adult BMT patients. Nevertheless, a randomized controlled study is warranted to confirm these findings.

  20. Determinants for tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia: a multicentre case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Yihun Mulugeta; Awoke, Worku; Wilder-Smith, Annalies

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify determinants for tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults in Northwest Ethiopia. Design Case–control study. Setting Three hospitals and 10 health centres in Northwest Ethiopia. Participants A total of 446 individuals consented to participate in the study (150 cases and 296 controls). Cases were HIV-infected adults diagnosed with active TB, and controls were HIV-infected adults without active TB. Main outcome measure The link between TB and determinants was assessed using logistic regression. Determinants were categorised as sociodemographic, host-related, clinical and environmental. Results Smoking (adjusted OR (AOR) 5.47; 95% CI 2.26 to 13.22), presence of a TB patient in the family (AOR 2.66; 95% CI 1.25 to 5.66), alcohol consumption (AOR 2.49; 95% CI 1.29 to 4.80) and chewing khat (AOR 2.22; 95% CI 1.11 to 4.41) were independent determinants for increased occurrence of TB. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (AOR 0.25; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.51), isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.41) and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (AOR 0.32; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.55) had a protective effect against TB. Conclusions HIV-infected adults with substance abuse (tobacco smoking, khat chewing and alcohol) should be prioritised for TB screening. This study reaffirmed that HAART and IPT are some of the best strategies for reducing TB occurrence in HIV-infected adults. These findings provide impetus to intensify tracing of TB household contacts. PMID:27084271

  1. Infection strategies of intestinal parasite pathogens and host cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Martorell Di Genova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading cause worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, Giardiasis, Cryptosporidiosis and Amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these tree pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways and cell death.

  2. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  3. Hypoglycaemia induced by Trichinella infection is due to the increase of glucose uptake in infected muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Nagano, I; Kajita, K; Nishina, M; Takahashi, Y

    2009-03-01

    The present study investigates how Trichinella infection induces host hypoglycaemia and explores a potential relationship between infection and the insulin signalling pathway. The results showed that mice infected with Trichinella spiralis or Trichinella pseudospiralis exhibited a temporary decrease in blood glucose level between 8 and 28 days p.i. and the kinetics of the glucose levels corresponded to the process of muscle larval growth and development. Histochemical results showed that glycogen accumulation increased in infected muscle cells during the period of hypoglycaemia. Analysis of gene expression profiles with quantitative PCR demonstrated that insulin signalling pathway-related genes, such as insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substance 1 (IRS-1), IRS-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 2 (Akt2) were up-regulated in infected muscle cells during infection and these expression changes correlated with the kinetics of blood glucose level, glycogen accumulation and the process of larval growth and development in infected muscle cells. Western blot analysis clarified that the expression of IR and Akt2 proteins increased in muscle tissues infected with both species of Trichinella. This study suggests that hypoglycaemia induced by Trichinella infection is the result of an increase in glucose uptake by infected muscle cells via up-regulation of insulin signalling pathway factors. PMID:18838075

  4. Monocyte Phenotype and Polyfunctionality Are Associated With Elevated Soluble Inflammatory Markers, Cytomegalovirus Infection, and Functional and Cognitive Decline in Elderly Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo-Bernal, Rebeca Sara; Cañizares, Julio; Rosado, Isaac; Galvá, María Isabel; Alvarez-Ríos, Ana Isabel; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Rafii-El-Idrissi Benhnia, Mohammed; Pacheco, Yolanda María; Ramos, Raquel; Leal, Manuel; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel

    2016-05-01

    Monocytes are mediators of the inflammatory response and include three subsets: classical, intermediate, and nonclassical. Little is known about the phenotypical and functional age-related changes in monocytes and their association with soluble inflammatory biomarkers, cytomegalovirus infection, and functional and mental decline. We assayed the activation ex vivo and the responsiveness to TLR2 and TLR4 agonists in vitro in the three subsets and assessed the intracellular production of IL1-alpha (α), IL1-beta (β), IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 of elderly adults (median 83 [67-90] years old;n= 20) compared with young controls (median 35 [27-40] years old;n= 20). Ex vivo, the elderly adults showed a higher percentage of classical monocytes that expressed intracellular IL1-α (p= .001), IL1-β (p= .001), IL-6 (p= .002), and IL-8 (p= .007). Similar results were obtained both for the intermediate and nonclassical subsets and in vitro. Polyfunctionality was higher in the elderly adults. The functionality ex vivo was strongly associated with soluble inflammatory markers. The activation phenotype was independently associated with the anti-cytomegalovirus IgG levels and with functional and cognitive decline. These data demonstrate that monocytes are key cell candidates for the source of the high soluble inflammatory levels. Our findings suggest that cytomegalovirus infection might be a driving force in the activation of monocytes and is associated with the functional and cognitive decline. PMID:26286603

  5. Human herpesvirus 6 infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fu-Zhang

    1999-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a lymphotropic virus mainly infecting T lymphocytes but also other types of cells. Seroepidemiological studies have shown that more than 90% of individuals older than 2 years are seropositive for HHV-6. There are two variants (A and B) of HHV-6, and variant B has been much more often coupled to diseases than variant A. The prevalence of the two variants is still not known since the serological responses can not be differentiated by currently av...

  6. First report of Toxoplasma gondii infection in market-sold adult chickens, ducks and pigeons in northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasma gondii infection is a global concern, affecting a wide range of warm-blooded animals and humans worldwide, including poultry. Domestic and companion birds are considered to play an important role in the transmission of T. gondii to humans and other animals. However, little information on T. gondii infection in domestic birds in Lanzhou, northwest China was available. Therefore, this study was performed to determine the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in domestic birds in Lanzhou, northwest China. Methods In the present study, the seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in 413 (305 caged and 108 free-range adult chickens, 334 (111 caged and 223 free-range adult ducks and 312 adult pigeons in Lanzhou, northwest China, were examined using the modified agglutination test (MAT. Results 30 (7.26% chickens, 38 (11.38% ducks and 37 (11.86% pigeons were found to be positive for T. gondii antibodies at the cut-off of 1:5. The prevalences in caged and free-range chickens were 6.23% and 10.19% respectively, however, statistical analysis showed that the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. The seroprevalences in caged and free-range ducks were 6.31% and 13.90% respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Conclusions The results of the present survey indicated the presence of T. gondii infection in adult chickens, ducks and pigeons sold for meat in poultry markets in Lanzhou, northwest China, which poses a potential risk for T. gondii infection in humans and other animals in this region. This is the first seroprevalence study of T. gondii infection in domestic birds in this region.

  7. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  8. Loss of Fbw7 Reprograms Adult Pancreatic Ductal Cells into α, δ, and β Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sancho, Rocio; Gruber, Ralph; Gu, Guoqiang; Behrens, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The adult pancreas is capable of limited regeneration after injury but has no defined stem cell population. The cell types and molecular signals that govern the production of new pancreatic tissue are not well understood. Here, we show that inactivation of the SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate recognition component Fbw7 induces pancreatic ductal cells to reprogram into α, δ, and β cells. Loss of Fbw7 stabilized the transcription factor Ngn3, a key regulator of endocrine cell diff...

  9. Isolation and Culture of Adult Epithelial Stem Cells from Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zhiru; Draheim, Kyle; Lyle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The homeostasis of all self-renewing tissues is dependent on adult stem cells. As undifferentiated stem cells undergo asymmetric divisions, they generate daughter cells that retain the stem cell phenotype and transit-amplifying cells (TA cells) that migrate from the stem cell niche, undergo rapid proliferation and terminally differentiate to repopulate the tissue.

  10. Tissue Distribution of Memory T and B Cells in Rhesus Monkeys following Influenza A Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichyangkul, Sathit; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Boonnak, Kobporn; Thitithayanont, Arunee; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Wiboon-ut, Suwimon; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Spring, Michele; Chuang, Ilin; Mason, Carl J; Saunders, David L

    2015-11-01

    Studies of influenza-specific immune responses in humans have largely assessed systemic responses involving serum Ab and peripheral blood T cell responses. However, recent evidence indicates that tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells play an important role in local murine intrapulmonary immunity. Rhesus monkeys were pulmonary exposed to 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus at days 0 and 28 and immune responses in different tissue compartments were measured. All animals were asymptomatic postinfection. Although only minimal memory immune responses were detected in peripheral blood, a high frequency of influenza nucleoprotein-specific memory T cells was detected in the lung at the "contraction phase," 49-58 d after second virus inoculation. A substantial proportion of lung nucleoprotein-specific memory CD8(+) T cells expressed CD103 and CD69, phenotypic markers of TRM cells. Lung CD103(+) and CD103(-) memory CD8(+) T cells expressed similar levels of IFN-γ and IL-2. Unlike memory T cells, spontaneous Ab secreting cells and memory B cells specific to influenza hemagglutinin were primarily observed in the mediastinal lymph nodes. Little difference in systemic and local immune responses against influenza was observed between young adult (6-8 y) and old animals (18-28 y). Using a nonhuman primate model, we revealed substantial induction of local T and B cell responses following 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection. Our study identified a subset of influenza-specific lung memory T cells characterized as TRM cells in rhesus monkeys. The rhesus monkey model may be useful to explore the role of TRM cells in local tissue protective immunity after rechallenge and vaccination. PMID:26408671

  11. 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using 18F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in patients

  12. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrosky, Brian M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari L.; Fenton, Laura Z. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in

  13. Optimal therapy for adults with Langerhans cell histiocytosis bone lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Cantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is little data on treatment of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH in adults. Available data is on small numbers of patients with short follow-up times and no comparison of results from different treatment regimens. We analyzed the responses of adult LCH patients with bone lesions to three primary chemotherapy treatments to define the optimal one. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fifty-eight adult patients with bone lesions, either as a solitary site or as a component of multisystem disease, were analyzed for disease location and response to surgery, curettage, steroids, radiation, vinblastine/prednisone, 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA, or cytosine arabinoside (ARA-C. The mean age of patients was 32 years, with equal gender distribution. Twenty-nine patients had 1 lesion; 16, 2 lesions; 5, 3 lesions; and 8 had 4 or more. Most bone lesions were in the skull, spine, or jaw. Chemotherapy, surgery, curettage, or radiation, but not steroids alone, achieved improvement or resolution of lesions in a majority of patients. Comparison of the three chemotherapy regimens revealed 84% of patients treated with vinblastine/prednisone either did not respond or relapsed within a year, whereas 59% of patients treated with 2-CdA and 21% treated with ARA-C failed. Toxicity was worse with the vinblastine/prednisone group as 75% had grade 3-4 neuropathy. Grade 3-4 cytopenias occurred in 37% of the 2-CdA -treated patients and 20% of the ARA-C-treated patients. The major limitation of this study is it is retrospective and not a clinical trial. CONCLUSIONS: ARA-C is an effective and minimally toxic treatment for LCH bone lesions in adults. In contrast, vinblastine/prednisone results in poor overall responses and excessive toxicity.

  14. Epithelial cells with hepatobiliary phenotype: Is it another stem cell candidate for healthy adult human liver?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dung Ngoc Khuu; Mustapha Najimi; Etienne M Sokal

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence and role of liver epithelial cells in the healthy human adult liver.METHODS: Fifteen days after human hepatocyte primary culture, epithelial like cells emerged and started proliferating. Cell colonies were isolated and sub-cultured for more than 160 d under specific culture conditions. Cells were analyzed for each passage using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESULTS: Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that liver epithelial cells expressed common markers for hepatic and stem cells such as CD90, CD44 and CD29 but were negative for CD34 and CD117. Using immunofluorescence we demonstrated that liver epithelial cells expressed not only immature (a-fetoprotein) but also differentiated hepatocyte (albumin and CK-18) and biliary markers (CK-7 and 19), whereas they were negative for OV-6. RT-PCR analysis confirmed immunofluorescence data and revealed that liver epithelial cells did not express mature hepatocyte markers such as CYP2B6, CYP3A4 and tyrosine amino-transferase. Purified liver epithelial cells were transplanted into SCID mice. One month after transplantation, albumin positive cell foci were detected in the recipient mouse parenchyma.CONCLUSION: According to their immature and bipotential phenotype, liver epithelial cells might represent a pool of precursors in the healthy human adult liver other than oval cells.

  15. Monkeypox Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques Induces Massive Expansion of Natural Killer Cells but Suppresses Natural Killer Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Haifeng; Josleyn, Nicole; Janosko, Krisztina; Skinner, Jeff; Reeves, R. Keith; Cohen, Melanie; Jett, Catherine; Johnson, Reed; Blaney, Joseph E.; Bollinger, Laura; Jennings, Gerald; Jahrling, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV) infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results show...

  16. The Multiplicity of Cellular Infection Changes Depending on the Route of Cell Infection in a Plant Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Serafín; Pirolles, Elodie; Yvon, Michel; Baecker, Volker; Michalakis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The multiplicity of cellular infection (MOI) is the number of virus genomes of a given virus species that infect individual cells. This parameter chiefly impacts the severity of within-host population bottlenecks as well as the intensity of genetic exchange, competition, and complementation among viral genotypes. Only a few formal estimations of the MOI currently are available, and most theoretical reports have considered this parameter as constant within the infected host. Nevertheless, the colonization of a multicellular host is a complex process during which the MOI may dramatically change in different organs and at different stages of the infection. We have used both qualitative and quantitative approaches to analyze the MOI during the colonization of turnip plants by Turnip mosaic virus. Remarkably, different MOIs were observed at two phases of the systemic infection of a leaf. The MOI was very low in primary infections from virus circulating within the vasculature, generally leading to primary foci founded by a single genome. Each lineage then moved from cell to cell at a very high MOI. Despite this elevated MOI during cell-to-cell progression, coinfection of cells by lineages originating in different primary foci is severely limited by the rapid onset of a mechanism inhibiting secondary infection. Thus, our results unveil an intriguing colonization pattern where individual viral genomes initiate distinct lineages within a leaf. Kin genomes then massively coinfect cells, but coinfection by two distinct lineages is strictly limited. IMPORTANCE The MOI is the size of the viral population colonizing cells and defines major phenomena in virus evolution, like the intensity of genetic exchange and the size of within-host population bottlenecks. However, few studies have quantified the MOI, and most consider this parameter as constant during infection. Our results reveal that the MOI can depend largely on the route of cell infection in a systemically

  17. GREAT PROMISE OF TISSUE-RESIDENT ADULT STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS IN TRANSPLANTATION AND CANCER THERAPIES

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great prom...

  18. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  19. Neuro-muscular differentiation of adult porcine skin derived stem cell-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to the genetic relationship to humans, porcine stem cells are a very important model system to investigate cell differentiation, associated cell signaling pathways, and cell fate. Porcine skin derived stem cells have been isolated from mid-gestation porcine fetus recently. To our knowledge, stem cells from the skin of the adult porcine organism have not been isolated until now. Hence, to our knowledge, we here describe the isolation, expansion, characterization and differentiation of multipotent porcine skin derived stem cell-like cells (pSSCs from the adult porcine organism for the first time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: pSSCs had a spindle shaped morphology similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 120 days and were able to form colonies from single cells. pSSCs expressed Sox2 and Oct3/4, both transcription factors essential to the pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes of embryonic stem cells, which recently gained attention due to their function in inducing pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, the expression of the progenitor marker nestin, the somatic stem cell markers Bcrp1/ABCG2, Bmi1, and Stat3 was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in undifferentiated pSSCs. Flow cytometry revealed the expression of the MSC related proteins CD9, CD29, CD44 and CD105, but not CD90. After neuronal differentiation cells with a characteristic morphology of neuronal and smooth muscle-like cells were present in the cultures. Subsequent immunochemistry and flow cytometry revealed the down-regulation of nestin and the up-regulation of the neuron specific protein beta-III-tubulin and the astrocyte marker GFAP. Also, alpha-SMA expressing cells increased during differentiation suggesting the neuro-muscular differentiation of these skin derived cells. pSSCs could also be induced to differentiate into adipocyte-like cells when cultured under

  20. HSV-1 infection of human corneal epithelial cells: Receptor-mediated entry and trends of re-infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Arpeet; Farooq, Asim V; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Kim, Min-Jung; Shukla, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The human cornea is a primary target for herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection. The goals of the study were to determine the cellular modalities of HSV-1 entry into human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. Specific features of the study included identifying major entry receptors, assessing pH dependency, and determining trends of re-infection. Methods A recombinant HSV-1 virus expressing beta-galactosidase was used to ascertain HSV-1 entry into HCE cells. Viral replication within cell...

  1. Transition of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma clones during clinical progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Sakura; Firouzi, Sanaz; López, Yosvany; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakano, Kazumi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utusnomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by the transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells. ATLL, especially its aggressive form, is known for its poor prognosis, even with intensive chemotherapy. ATLL cells are considered to be monoclonal; however, multiclonal proliferation or emergence of a new clone over time has been reported based on Southern blot analysis, although direct molecular evidence remains elusive. Furthermore, it is thought that clonal change may be a cause of early drug resistance in ATLL. To directly analyze potential clonal changes in ATLL during its clinical course, we used inverse PCR to detect integration sites in combination with a newly developed method using next-generation sequencing, and compared ATLL cell clonality at different time points. The results of inverse PCR indicated that the major clone was altered in three of 19 patients. Together with results from five patients, using this new method, we found direct evidence of clonal change occurring during the clinical course or in response to chemotherapy in ATLL. These results also highlight the importance of clonality analysis for understanding the mechanisms of ATLL development and drug resistance. PMID:27383637

  2. Susceptibility of human primary neuronal cells to Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related (XMRV virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girisetty Mohan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related (XMRV virus is a recently identified mouse gammaretrovirus that has the ability to infect certain human cells. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of primary neuronal cell types to infection with XMRV. Findings We observed that the human primary progenitors, progenitor-derived neurons, and progenitor-derived astrocytes supported XMRV multiplication. Interestingly, both progenitors and progenitor-derived neurons were more susceptible compared with progenitor-derived astrocytes. In addition, XMRV-infected Jurkat cells were able to transmit infection to neuronal cells. Conclusions These data suggest that neuronal cells are susceptible for XMRV infection.

  3. Association of low level viremia with inflammation and mortality in HIV-infected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Eastburn

    Full Text Available Whether HIV viremia, particularly at low levels is associated with inflammation, increased coagulation, and all-cause mortality is unclear.The associations of HIV RNA level with C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen, interleukin (IL-6 and mortality were evaluated in 1116 HIV-infected participants from the Study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV infection. HIV RNA level was categorized as undetectable (i.e., "target not detected", 1-19, 20-399, 400-9999, and ≥ 10,000 copies/ml. Covariates included demographics, lifestyle, adipose tissue, and HIV-related factors.HIV RNA level had little association with CRP. Categories of HIV RNA below 10,000 copies/ml had similar levels of IL-6 compared with an undetectable HIV RNA level, while HIV RNA ≥ 10,000 copies/ml was associated with 89% higher IL-6 (p<0.001. This association was attenuated by ~50% after adjustment for CD4+ cell count. Higher HIV RNA was associated with higher fibrinogen. Compared to an undetectable HIV RNA level, fibrinogen was 0.6%, 1.9%, 4.5%, 4.6%, and 9.4% higher across HIV RNA categories, respectively, and statistically significant at the highest level (p = 0.0002 for HIV RNA ≥ 10,000 copies/ml. Higher HIV RNA was associated with mortality during follow-up in unadjusted analysis, but showed little association after adjustment for CD4+ cell count and inflammation.HIV RNA ≥ 10,000 copies/ml was associated with higher IL-6 and fibrinogen, but lower levels of viremia appeared similar, and there was little association with CRP. The relationship of HIV RNA with IL-6 was strongly affected by CD4 cell depletion. After adjustment for CD4+ cell count and inflammation, viremia did not appear to be substantially associated with mortality risk over 5 years.

  4. Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Weilin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L, a fatal lymphoproliferative disorder, and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system after a long period of latent infection. Although the mechanism of transformation and leukemogenesis is not fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that the viral oncoprotein Tax plays a crucial role in these processes through the regulation of several pathways including NF-κB and the cell cycle pathways. The observation that NF-κB, which is strongly induced by Tax, is indispensable for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HTLV-1 by regulating the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis provides a possible molecular target for these infected cells. To develop potential new therapeutic strategies for HTLV-1 infected cells, in this present study, we initially screened a battery of NF-κB and CDK inhibitors (total of 35 compounds to examine their effects on the growth and survival of infected T-cell lines. Two drugs namely BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A exhibited higher levels of growth inhibition and apoptosis in infected cell as compared to uninfected cells. BMS-345541 inhibited IKKβ kinase activity from HTLV-1 infected cells with an IC50 (the 50% of inhibitory concentration value of 50 nM compared to 500 nM from control cells as measured by in vitro kinase assays. The effects of Purvalanol A were associated with suppression of CDK2/cyclin E complex activity as previously shown by us. Combination of both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A showed a reduced level of HTLV-1 p19 Gag production in cell culture. The apparent apoptosis in these infected cells were associated with increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. The potent and selective apoptotic effects of these drugs suggest that both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A

  5. Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; Yeh, Wen-I; Berro, Reem; Klase, Zachary; Pedati, Caitlin; Kehn-Hall, Kyleen; Wu, Weilin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L), a fatal lymphoproliferative disorder, and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system after a long period of latent infection. Although the mechanism of transformation and leukemogenesis is not fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that the viral oncoprotein Tax plays a crucial role in these processes through the regulation of several pathways including NF-kappaB and the cell cycle pathways. The observation that NF-kappaB, which is strongly induced by Tax, is indispensable for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HTLV-1 by regulating the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis provides a possible molecular target for these infected cells. To develop potential new therapeutic strategies for HTLV-1 infected cells, in this present study, we initially screened a battery of NF-kappaB and CDK inhibitors (total of 35 compounds) to examine their effects on the growth and survival of infected T-cell lines. Two drugs namely BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A exhibited higher levels of growth inhibition and apoptosis in infected cell as compared to uninfected cells. BMS-345541 inhibited IKKbeta kinase activity from HTLV-1 infected cells with an IC50 (the 50% of inhibitory concentration) value of 50 nM compared to 500 nM from control cells as measured by in vitro kinase assays. The effects of Purvalanol A were associated with suppression of CDK2/cyclin E complex activity as previously shown by us. Combination of both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A showed a reduced level of HTLV-1 p19 Gag production in cell culture. The apparent apoptosis in these infected cells were associated with increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. The potent and selective apoptotic effects of these drugs suggest that both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A, which target

  6. Elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in adults with severe dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Preeti; Chakravarti, Anita; Aggarwal, Sunita; Uppal, Beena; Bhalla, Preena

    2016-03-01

    The immune pathogenesis of dengue involves antibody production, B cell and T cell response and various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. VEGF, a potent permeability enhancing cytokine, is thought to play a pivotal role in mediating plasma leakage in DHF. It is a member of growing family of related proteins that includes VEGF B, VEGF C, VEGF D and placental growth factor. It promotes angiogenesis and vascular integrity. In addition to its role in promoting endothelial permeability & proliferation, it may contribute to inflammation and coagulation. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of VEGF in the patients with dengue infection. Sera were collected from 106 patients with various grades of dengue illness and 40 healthy controls and tested for VEGF levels using commercial ELISA kits. Viral serotypes were detected using specific primers. The results showed very low levels of VEGF (3.493 ± 1.982 pg/ml) in healthy controls. Levels of VEGF were higher in patients with severe dengue (428.170 ± 224.61 pg/ml) as compared to patients with non severe dengue with and without warning signs (290.407 ± 167.17 pg/ml). Significant correlation (p dengue fever to severe dengue infection. PMID:26925444

  7. Development and application of human adult stem or progenitor cell organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Schutgens, Frans; Verhaar, Marianne C; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem or progenitor cell organoids are 3D adult-organ-derived epithelial structures that contain self-renewing and organ-specific stem or progenitor cells as well as differentiated cells. This organoid culture system was first established in murine intestine and subsequently developed for sever

  8. Cytomegalovirus-infected cells express Leu-M1 antigen. A potential source of diagnostic error.

    OpenAIRE

    Rushin, J. M.; Riordan, G. P.; Heaton, R. B.; Sharpe, R. W.; Cotelingam, J. D.; Jaffe, E S

    1990-01-01

    The authors examined cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected tissues and Hodgkin's Disease (HD) cases with immunohistochemical assays for Leu-M1 and CMV. The cytologic characteristics were correlated with immunostaining patterns. Cytomegalovirus-infected cells in lymph node, lung, and esophagus sections showed Cowdry type A inclusions, and many had granular cytoplasmic inclusions. All infected cells showed nuclear staining with an anti-CMV antibody. Leu-M1 reacted with CMV-infected cells in cytoplasmi...

  9. The epidemiology, evaluation and treatment of stroke in adults with sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Strouse, John J.; Lanzkron, Sophie; Urrutia, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent and severe complication in adults with sickle cell disease. Ischemic stroke often causes physical and cognitive disability, while hemorrhagic stroke has a high mortality rate. As more children survive, the number of strokes in adults is increasing, yet stroke remains poorly understood. We review the epidemiology of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in adults with sickle cell disease and outline a practical approach to the evaluation of stroke including both sickle cell dise...

  10. Sox17 Dependence Distinguishes the Transcriptional Regulation of Fetal from Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Injune; Saunders, Thomas L.; Morrison, Sean J

    2007-01-01

    Fetal stem cells differ phenotypically and functionally from adult stem cells in diverse tissues. However, little is known about how these differences are regulated. To address this we compared the gene expression profiles of fetal versus adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and discovered that the Sox17 transcriptional regulator is specifically expressed in fetal and neonatal but not adult HSCs. Germline deletion of Sox17 led to severe fetal hematopoietic defects, including a lack of detect...

  11. Memory CD8+ T cell differentiation in viral infection: A cell for all seasons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Radziewicz; Luke Uebelhoer; Bertram Bengsch; Arash Grakoui

    2007-01-01

    Chronic viral infections such as hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are major global health problems affecting more than 500 million people worldwide. Virus-specific CD8+ T cells play an important role in the course and outcome of these viral infections and it is hypothesized that altered or impaired differentiation of virusspecific CD8+ T cells contributes to the development of persistence and/or disease progression. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms responsible for functional differentiation of CD8+ T cells is essential for the generation of successful therapies aiming to strengthen the adaptive component of the immune system.

  12. Hemolytic anemia due to acute cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent adult: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noto Pasquale

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cytomegalovirus is a common virus responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations. Hemolysis is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of cytomegalovirus infection, described mostly in immunocompromised patients, the pathogenesis of which is still unclear. We performed a review of the literature regarding cases of hemolytic anemia during acute cytomegalovirus infection in apparently immunocompetent individuals. We searched for relevant articles in PubMed for the period of 1980 through 2008. Case presentation We describe a case of Coombs-negative hemolytic anemia in a 44-year-old Caucasian immunocompetent man with acute cytomegalovirus infection. Conclusion Clinicians should consider cytomegalovirus infection in the differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia in immunocompetent adults. Possible therapeutic options include antiviral therapy and steroids, although the best treatment strategy is still controversial.

  13. Differentiation of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into Schwann-like cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-ye; ZHENG Jia-kun; WANG Chao-yang; LI Wen-yu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differentiative capability of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into Schwann-like cells. Methods: Bone marrows were aspirated from healthy donors and mononuclear cells were separated by Percoll lymphocytes separation liquid (1.073 g/ml) with centrifugation, cells were cultured in DMEM/F12 (1:1) medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 20 ng/ml epidermal growth factor (EGF) and 20 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cells of passage 1 were identified with immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: Bone marrow contains the stem cells with the ability of differentiating into Schwann-like cells, which may represent an alternative stem cell sources for neural transplantation.

  14. CD64 and Group II Secretory Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) as Biomarkers for Distinguishing Adult Sepsis and Bacterial Infections in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Toh Leong; Ahmad, Nurul Saadah; Nasuruddin, Dian Nasriana; Ithnin, Azlin; Tajul Arifin, Khaizurin; Zaini, Ida Zarina; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early diagnosis of sepsis and bacterial infection is imperative as treatment relies on early antibiotic administration. There is a need to develop new biomarkers to detect patients with sepsis and bacterial infection as early as possible, thereby enabling prompt antibiotic treatment and improving the survival rate. Methods Fifty-one adult patients with suspected bacterial sepsis on admission to the Emergency Department (ED) of a teaching hospital were included into the study. All relevant cultures and serology tests were performed. Serum levels for Group II Secretory Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) and CD64 were subsequently analyzed. Results and Discussion Sepsis was confirmed in 42 patients from a total of 51 recruited subjects. Twenty-one patients had culture-confirmed bacterial infections. Both biomarkers were shown to be good in distinguishing sepsis from non-sepsis groups. CD64 and sPLA2-IIA also demonstrated a strong correlation with early sepsis diagnosis in adults. The area under the curve (AUC) of both Receiver Operating Characteristic curves showed that sPLA2-IIA was better than CD64 (AUC = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.83–0.97 and AUC = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.82–0.99, respectively). The optimum cutoff value was 2.13μg/l for sPLA2-IIA (sensitivity = 91%, specificity = 78%) and 45 antigen bound cell (abc) for CD64 (sensitivity = 81%, specificity = 89%). In diagnosing bacterial infections, sPLA2-IIA showed superiority over CD64 (AUC = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.85–0.96, and AUC = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93–1.00, respectively). The optimum cutoff value for bacterial infection was 5.63μg/l for sPLA2-IIA (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 94%) and 46abc for CD64 (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 83%). Conclusions sPLA2-IIA showed superior performance in sepsis and bacterial infection diagnosis compared to CD64. sPLA2-IIA appears to be an excellent biomarker for sepsis screening and for diagnosing bacterial infections, whereas CD64 could be used for

  15. Pluripotency of adult stem cells derived from human and rat pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, C.; Birth, M.; Rohwedel, J.; Assmuth, K.; Goepel, A.; Wedel, T.

    Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells found within fully developed tissues or organs of an adult individuum. Until recently, these cells have been considered to bear less self-renewal ability and differentiation potency compared to embryonic stem cells. In recent studies an undifferentiated cell type was found in primary cultures of isolated acini from exocrine pancreas termed pancreatic stellate cells. Here we show that pancreatic stellate-like cells have the capacity of extended self-renewal and are able to differentiate spontaneously into cell types of all three germ layers expressing markers for smooth muscle cells, neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, chondrocytes and secretory cells (insulin, amylase). Differentiation and subsequent formation of three-dimensional cellular aggregates (organoid bodies) were induced by merely culturing pancreatic stellate-like cells in hanging drops. These cells were developed into stable, long-term, in vitro cultures of both primary undifferentiated cell lines as well as organoid cultures. Thus, evidence is given that cell lineages of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal origin arise spontaneously from a single adult undifferentiated cell type. Based on the present findings it is assumed that pancreatic stellate-like cells are a new class of lineage uncommitted pluripotent adult stem cells with a remarkable self-renewal ability and differentiation potency. The data emphasize the versatility of adult stem cells and may lead to a reappraisal of their use for the treatment of inherited disorders or acquired degenerative diseases.

  16. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  17. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy. PMID:22319243

  18. Cell cycle restriction by histone H2AX limits proliferation of adult neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, R. N.; Eleuteri, B.; Abdelhady, S.; Nussenzweig, A; Andang, M; Ernfors, P.

    2011-01-01

    Adult neural stem cell proliferation is dynamic and has the potential for massive self-renewal yet undergoes limited cell division in vivo. Here, we report an epigenetic mechanism regulating proliferation and self-renewal. The recruitment of the PI3K-related kinase signaling pathway and histone H2AX phosphorylation following GABAA receptor activation limits subventricular zone proliferation. As a result, NSC self-renewal and niche size is dynamic and can be directly modulated in both directio...

  19. The Epidemiology, Virology and Clinical Findings of Dengue Virus Infections in a Cohort of Indonesian Adults in Western Java.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Kosasih

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue has emerged as one of the most important infectious diseases in the last five decades. Evidence indicates the expansion of dengue virus endemic areas and consequently the exponential increase of dengue virus infections across the subtropics. The clinical manifestations of dengue virus infection include sudden fever, rash, headache, myalgia and in more serious cases, spontaneous bleeding. These manifestations occur in children as well as in adults. Defining the epidemiology of dengue in a given area is critical to understanding the disease and devising effective public health strategies.Here, we report the results from a prospective cohort study of 4380 adults in West Java, Indonesia, from 2000-2004 and 2006-2009. A total of 2167 febrile episodes were documented and dengue virus infections were confirmed by RT-PCR or serology in 268 cases (12.4%. The proportion ranged from 7.6 to 41.8% each year. The overall incidence rate of symptomatic dengue virus infections was 17.3 cases/1,000 person years and between September 2006 and April 2008 asymptomatic infections were 2.6 times more frequent than symptomatic infections. According to the 1997 WHO classification guidelines, there were 210 dengue fever cases, 53 dengue hemorrhagic fever cases (including one dengue shock syndrome case and five unclassified cases. Evidence for sequential dengue virus infections was seen in six subjects. All four dengue virus serotypes circulated most years. Inapparent dengue virus infections were predominantly associated with DENV-4 infections.Dengue virus was responsible for a significant percentage of febrile illnesses in an adult population in West Java, Indonesia, and this percentage varied from year to year. The observed incidence rate during the study period was 43 times higher than the reported national or provincial rates during the same time period. A wide range of clinical severity was observed with most infections resulting in asymptomatic disease. The

  20. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication

  1. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S., E-mail: rveazey@tulane.edu

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  2. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Helene F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner.

  3. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors

  4. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Carol Ann, E-mail: carol.greene@auckland.ac.nz; Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  5. A novel single virus infection system reveals that influenza virus preferentially infects cells in g1 phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Ueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza virus attaches to sialic acid residues on the surface of host cells via the hemagglutinin (HA, a glycoprotein expressed on the viral envelope, and enters into the cytoplasm by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The viral genome is released and transported in to the nucleus, where transcription and replication take place. However, cellular factors affecting the influenza virus infection such as the cell cycle remain uncharacterized. METHODS/RESULTS: To resolve the influence of cell cycle on influenza virus infection, we performed a single-virus infection analysis using optical tweezers. Using this newly developed single-virus infection system, the fluorescence-labeled influenza virus was trapped on a microchip using a laser (1064 nm at 0.6 W, transported, and released onto individual H292 human lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, the influenza virus attached selectively to cells in the G1-phase. To clarify the molecular differences between cells in G1- and S/G2/M-phase, we performed several physical and chemical assays. Results indicated that: 1 the membranes of cells in G1-phase contained greater amounts of sialic acids (glycoproteins than the membranes of cells in S/G2/M-phase; 2 the membrane stiffness of cells in S/G2/M-phase is more rigid than those in G1-phase by measurement using optical tweezers; and 3 S/G2/M-phase cells contained higher content of Gb3, Gb4 and GlcCer than G1-phase cells by an assay for lipid composition. CONCLUSIONS: A novel single-virus infection system was developed to characterize the difference in influenza virus susceptibility between G1- and S/G2/M-phase cells. Differences in virus binding specificity were associated with alterations in the lipid composition, sialic acid content, and membrane stiffness. This single-virus infection system will be useful for studying the infection mechanisms of other viruses.

  6. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  7. Recent Progress on Tissue-Resident Adult Stem Cell Biology and Their Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of the stem cell research has given new hopes to treat and even cure diverse degenerative disorders and incurable diseases in human. Particularly, the identification of a rare population of adult stem cells in the most tissues/organs in human has emerged as an attractive source of multipotent stem/progenitor cells for cell replacement-based therapies and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. The tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells offer the possibil...

  8. Immunogenicity and Safety of the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine versus the 23-Valent Polysaccharide Vaccine in Unvaccinated HIV-Infected Adults: A Pilot, Prospective Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Francesca; Belmonti, Simone; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Morandi, Matteo; Rossetti, Barbara; Tordini, Giacinta; Cauda, Roberto; De Luca, Andrea; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Montagnani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Definition of the optimal pneumococcal vaccine strategy in HIV-infected adults is still under evaluation. We aimed to compare immunogenicity and safety of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) versus the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) in HIV-infected adults. Methods We performed a pilot, prospective controlled study enrolling HIV-infected pneumococcal vaccine-naïve outpatients, aged 18–65 years with CD4 counts ≥200 cells/μL. Eligible subjects were recruited into two parallel groups: group 1 (n = 50) received two doses of PCV13 eight weeks apart, and group 2 (n = 50) received one dose of PPSV23, as part of their standard of care. Anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide immunoglobulin G concentrations were quantified by ELISA at baseline, 8, 24 and 48 weeks. Clinical and viro-immunological follow-up was performed at the same time points. Unvaccinated, age-matched HIV-negative adults (n = 100) were also enrolled as baseline controls. Results Pre-vaccination specific IgG titers for each pneumococcal antigen did not differ between study groups but they were constantly lower than those from the HIV-negative controls. After immunization, significant increases in IgG titers were observed in both study groups at each time point compared to baseline, but response to serotype 3 was blunted in group 1. Antibody titers for each antigen did not differ between study groups at week 48. Overall, the proportion of subjects achieving seroprotection and seroconversion to all serotypes was comparable between groups. A marked decrease in IgG levels over time was observed with both vaccines. No relevant adverse reactions were reported in either group. Conclusions In this population with favorable immune profile, no relevant differences were observed in immunogenicity between PCV13 and PPSV23. Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02123433 PMID:27258647

  9. Immunogenicity and Safety of the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine versus the 23-Valent Polysaccharide Vaccine in Unvaccinated HIV-Infected Adults: A Pilot, Prospective Controlled Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Lombardi

    Full Text Available Definition of the optimal pneumococcal vaccine strategy in HIV-infected adults is still under evaluation. We aimed to compare immunogenicity and safety of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 versus the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 in HIV-infected adults.We performed a pilot, prospective controlled study enrolling HIV-infected pneumococcal vaccine-naïve outpatients, aged 18-65 years with CD4 counts ≥200 cells/μL. Eligible subjects were recruited into two parallel groups: group 1 (n = 50 received two doses of PCV13 eight weeks apart, and group 2 (n = 50 received one dose of PPSV23, as part of their standard of care. Anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide immunoglobulin G concentrations were quantified by ELISA at baseline, 8, 24 and 48 weeks. Clinical and viro-immunological follow-up was performed at the same time points. Unvaccinated, age-matched HIV-negative adults (n = 100 were also enrolled as baseline controls.Pre-vaccination specific IgG titers for each pneumococcal antigen did not differ between study groups but they were constantly lower than those from the HIV-negative controls. After immunization, significant increases in IgG titers were observed in both study groups at each time point compared to baseline, but response to serotype 3 was blunted in group 1. Antibody titers for each antigen did not differ between study groups at week 48. Overall, the proportion of subjects achieving seroprotection and seroconversion to all serotypes was comparable between groups. A marked decrease in IgG levels over time was observed with both vaccines. No relevant adverse reactions were reported in either group.In this population with favorable immune profile, no relevant differences were observed in immunogenicity between PCV13 and PPSV23. Both vaccines were safe and well tolerated.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02123433.

  10. Comparison of immunogenicity and safety of four doses and four double doses vs. standard doses of hepatitis B vaccination in HIV-infected adults: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokporn Chaiklang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HBV vaccination is recommended in HIV-infected adults with CD4+ cell count >200/mm(3 although the efficacy is only 33.3% -65%. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of three regimens of HBV vaccination at Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. METHODS: From February 4, 2011 to May 4, 2012, 132 HIV-infected adults with CD4+ cell counts >200 cells/mm(3, undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA, and negative for all HBV markers were randomly assigned to receive one of three recombinant vaccine (Hepavax-Gene(® Berna, Korea regimens: 20 μg IM at months 0, 1, and 6 (Standard doses group, n=44, 20 μg IM at months 0, 1, 2, 6 (four doses group, n=44, or 40 μg IM at months 0, 1, 2, and 6 (four double doses group, n=44. The primary outcomes were to compare the immunogenicity and safety between the four-doses groups with the Standard doses group. RESULTS: At months 7 and 12, the percentages of responders (anti-HBs ≥ 10 mIU/mL were 88.6% and 70.4% in the Standard doses group, 93.2% and 86.4% in the four doses group, (P=0.713 and 0.119, and 95.4% and 88.6% in the four double doses group, (P=0.434 and 0.062, respectively. Factors associated with a high titer level (anti-HBs ≥ 100 mIU/mL were vaccination schedule and younger age. The most common adverse event was pain at the injection site (42.4%; this was significantly more frequent in the four double doses group compared to the Standard doses group. No serious adverse events were observed. CONCLUSIONS: In Northern Thailand, the standard three-doses HBV vaccination in HIV-infected adults with CD4+ cell counts >200 cells/mm(3 and undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA is highly effective. Although regimens of four injections of either standard or double doses could not significantly increase the response rate, these regimens may induce higher levels of antibody to the virus. TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT1289106; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2

  11. Regulation of T cell migration during viral infection: role of adhesion molecules and chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, Anneline; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard;

    2003-01-01

    T cell mediated immunity and in particular CD8+ T cells are pivotal for the control of most viral infections. T cells exclusively exert their antiviral effect through close cellular interaction with relevant virus-infected target cells in vivo. It is therefore imperative that efficient mechanisms...

  12. Low Counts of B Cells, Natural Killer Cells, Monocytes, Dendritic Cells, Basophils, and Eosinophils are Associated with Postengraftment Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Peter J; Pratt, Laura M; Liu, Yiping; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Luider, Joanne; Auer-Grzesiak, Iwona; Mansoor, Adnan; Williamson, Tyler S; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Khan, Faisal M; Larratt, Loree; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Stewart, Douglas A; Russell, James A; Daly, Andrew; Storek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are immunocompromised and thus predisposed to infections. We set out to determine the deficiency of which immune cell subset(s) may predispose to postengraftment infections. We determined day 28, 56, 84, and 180 blood counts of multiple immune cell subsets in 219 allogeneic transplant recipients conditioned with busulfan, fludarabine, and Thymoglobulin. Deficiency of a subset was considered to be associated with infections if the low subset count was significantly associated with subsequent high infection rate per multivariate analysis in both discovery and validation cohorts. Low counts of monocytes (total and inflammatory) and basophils, and low IgA levels were associated with viral infections. Low plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) counts were associated with bacterial infections. Low inflammatory monocyte counts were associated with fungal infections. Low counts of total and naive B cells, total and CD56(high) natural killer (NK) cells, total and inflammatory monocytes, myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs), PDCs, basophils and eosinophils, and low levels of IgA were associated with any infections (due to any pathogen or presumed). In conclusion, deficiencies of B cells, NK cells, monocytes, MDCs, PDCs, basophils, eosinophils, and/or IgA plasma cells appear to predispose to postengraftment infections. PMID:26363444

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  14. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ullum, Henrik; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2013-02-20

    CD8 Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are not described. CD3CD8CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of interleukin (IL)-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-hepatitis C virus co-infected patients, and healthy controls. Depletion of CD3CD8CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of IL-17 in HIV-infected patients were found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the CD4 cell count in treated patients. PMID:23135168

  15. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus on hepatitis B virus serologic status in co-infected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Landrum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors associated with serologic hepatitis B virus (HBV outcomes in HIV-infected individuals remain incompletely understood, yet such knowledge may lead to improvements in the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: HBV-HIV co-infected cohort participants were retrospectively analyzed. HBV serologic outcomes were classified as chronic, resolved, and isolated-HBcAb. Chronic HBV (CHBV was defined as the presence of HBsAg on two or more occasions at least six months apart. Risk factors for HBV serologic outcome were assessed using logistic regression. Of 2037 participants with HBV infection, 281 (14% had CHBV. Overall the proportions of HBV infections classified as CHBV were 11%, 16%, and 19% for CD4 cell count strata of > or =500, 200-499, and or =500 cells/microL where 21% of those with HBV after HIV diagnosis had CHBV compared with 9% for all other cases of HBV infection in this stratum (p = 0.0004. Prior receipt of HAART was associated with improved HBV serologic outcome overall (p = 0.012, and specifically among those with HBV after HIV (p = 0.002. In those with HBV after HIV, HAART was associated with reduced risk of CHBV overall (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.04-0.79; including reduced risk in the subsets with CD4 > or =350 cells/microL (p or =500 cells/microL (p = 0.01 where no cases of CHBV were seen in those with a recent history of HAART use. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical indicators of immunologic status in HIV-infected individuals, such as CD4 cell count, are associated with HBV serologic outcome. These data suggest that immunologic preservation through the increased use of HAART to improve functional anti-HBV immunity, whether by improved access to care or earlier initiation of therapy, would likely improve HBV infection outcomes in HIV-infected individuals.

  16. Murine granulated metrial gland cells are susceptible to Chlamydia psittaci infection in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, J.; Buendía, A.J.; Salinas, J.; Bernabé, A.; Rodolakis, A; Stewart, I J

    1996-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are the most numerous lymphoid cells in the uteroplacental unit in rodent pregnancy. In an experimental murine model of abortion-causing infection, we have studied the responses of GMG cells to Chlamydia psittaci. Chlamydial inclusions have been found within GMG cells, both in apparently healthy cells and in cells with degenerative changes. Establishing the existence of GMG cells infected by C. psittaci opens a new and interesting chapter in the study of t...

  17. Efficiency of AUY922 in mice with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISHIKAWA, CHIE; SENBA, MASACHIKA; MORI, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATLL is associated with poor prognosis mainly due to resistance to chemotherapy, which highlights the requirement for alternative therapies. The chaperone heat shock protein (HSP) 90 assist proteins involved in the onset and progression of ATLL. In the present study, the efficacy of a second generation HSP90 inhibitor termed AUY922 was investigated in ATLL. In vitro, AUY922 induced marked inhibition of cell viability in the HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines HUT-102 and MT-4. In immunodeficient mice bearing HUT-102 xenotransplants, AUY922 markedly retarded tumor growth, compared with the control group. Apoptosis was evident in hematoxylin and eosin stained- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling-labeled tissue sections from AUY922-treated mice. In addition, AUY922 significantly reduced the serum levels of the surrogate tumor markers soluble interleukin-2 receptor and soluble cluster of differentiation 30. Overall, the present results demonstrate that AUY922 has potent anti-ATLL activity, thus providing a rationale for continuing the clinical development of HSP90 inhibitors in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with ATLL. PMID:27347156

  18. Respiratory viral infections and effects of meteorological parameters and air pollution in adults with respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency room

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Denise R.; Viana, Vinícius P; Müller, Alice M; Livi, Fernando P; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso R

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory viral infections (RVIs) are the most common causes of respiratory infections. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in adults is underestimated. Meteorological variations and air pollution are likely to play a role in these infections. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the number of emergency visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) and to evaluate the association between ILI/SARI, RVI prevalence, and ...

  19. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  20. Loss of deformability of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. Majid; Feng, James

    2012-11-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is largely due to stiffening of the infected red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary understanding ascribes the loss of RBC deformability to a 10-fold increase in membrane stiffness caused by extra cross-linking in the spectrin network. Local measurements by micropipette aspiration, however, have reported only an increase of 3-fold in the shear modulus. We believe the discrepancy stems from the rigid parasite particles inside infected cells, and have carried out numerical simulations to demonstrate this mechanism. The cell membrane is represented by a set of discrete particles connected by linearly elastic springs. The cytosol is modeled as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid, and discretized by particles as in standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The malaria parasite is modeled as an aggregate of particles constrained to rigid-body motion. We simulate RBC stretching tests by optical tweezers in three dimensions. The results demonstrate that the presence of a sizeable parasite greatly reduces the ability of RBCs to deform under stretching. With the solid inclusion, the observed loss of deformability can be predicted quantitatively using the local membrane elasticity measured by micropipettes.

  1. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the atlas in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wo Quan; Jiang, Liang; Ma, Qing Jun; Liu, Zhong Jun; Liu, Xiao Guang; Wei, Feng; Yuan, Hui Shu; Dang, Geng Ting

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis X, is a rare disorder (approximately 1:1,500,000 inhabitants) characterized by clonal proliferation and excess accumulation of pathologic Langerhans cells causing local or systemic effects. The exact etiology of LCH is still unknown. LCH could affect patients of any age, although most present when they are children. The most frequent sites of the bony lesions are the skull, femur, mandible, pelvis and spine. A variety of treatment modalities has been reported, but there was no evidence suggesting that any one treatment was more advantageous than another. We present an adult with LCH of the atlas. A 26-year-old young man presented with a 2-month history of neck pain and stiffness. CT revealed osteolytic lesion in the left lateral mass of atlas with compression fracture. Histopathological diagnosis was Langerhans cell histiocytosis by percutaneous needle biopsy under CT guidance. The patient underwent conservative treatment, including Halo-vest immobilization and radiotherapy. At 7-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic except for mild motion restriction of the neck. CT revealed a significant reconstruction of the C1 lateral mass. PMID:19844749

  2. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    KhalidAhmedAl-Anazi; ASMAMAL-JASSER; KhalidAlsaleh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10–40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between

  3. No genetic evidence for involvement of Deltaretroviruses in adult patients with precursor and mature T-cell neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoelzer Dieter

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Deltaretrovirus genus comprises viruses that infect humans (HTLV, various simian species (STLV and cattle (BLV. HTLV-I is the main causative agent in adult T-cell leukemia in endemic areas and some of the simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses have been implicated in the induction of malignant lymphomas in their hosts. BLV causes enzootic bovine leukosis in infected cattle or sheep. During the past few years several new Deltaretrovirus isolates have been described in various primate species. Two new HTLV-like viruses in humans have recently been identified and provisionally termed HTLV-III and HTLV-IV. In order to identify a broad spectrum of Deltaretroviruses by a single PCR approach we have established a novel consensus PCR based on nucleotide sequence data obtained from 42 complete virus isolates (HTLV-I/-II, STLV-I/-II/-III, BLV. The primer sequences were based on highly interspecies-conserved virus genome regions. We used this PCR to detect Deltaretroviruses in samples from adult patients with a variety of rare T-cell neoplasms in Germany. Results The sensitivity of the consensus PCR was at least between 10-2 and 10-3 with 100% specificity as demonstrated by serial dilutions of cell lines infected with either HTLV-I, HTLV-II or BLV. Fifty acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL samples and 33 samples from patients with various rare mature T-cell neoplasms (T-PLL, Sézary syndrome and other T-NHL were subsequently investigated. There were no cases with HTLV-I, HTLV-II or any other Deltaretroviruses. Conclusion The results rule out a significant involvement of HTLV-I or HTLV-II in these disease entities and show that other related Deltaretroviruses are not likely to be involved. The newly established Deltaretrovirus PCR may be a useful tool for identifying new Deltaretroviruses.

  4. Role of mannose-binding lectin deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in a rural adult population in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutendo B L Zinyama-Gutsire

    Full Text Available Polymorphism in the MBL2 gene lead to MBL deficiency, which has been shown to increase susceptibility to various bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. We assessed role of MBL deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in Zimbabwean adults enrolled in the Mupfure Schistosomiasis and HIV Cohort (MUSH Cohort.HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections were determined at baseline. Plasma MBL concentration was measured by ELISA and MBL2 genotypes determined by PCR. We calculated and compared the proportions of plasma MBL deficiency, MBL2 structural variant alleles B (codon 54A>G, C (codon 57A>G, and D (codon 52T>C as well as MBL2 promoter variants -550(H/L, -221(X/Y and +4(P/Q between HIV-1 and schistosoma co-infection and control groups using Chi Square test.We assessed 379 adults, 80% females, median age (IQR 30 (17-41 years. HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni prevalence were 26%, 43% and 18% respectively in the MUSH baseline survey. Median (IQR plasma MBL concentration was 800μg/L (192-1936μg/L. Prevalence of plasma MBL deficiency was 18% with high frequency of the C (codon 57G>A mutant allele (20%. There was no significant difference in median plasma MBL levels between HIV negative (912μg/L and HIV positive (688μg/L, p = 0.066. However plasma MBL levels at the assay detection limit of 20μg/L were more frequent among the HIV-1 infected (p = 0.007. S. haematobium and S. mansoni infected participants had significantly higher MBL levels than uninfected. All MBL2 variants were not associated with HIV-1 infection but promoter variants LY and LL were significantly associated with S. haematobium infection.Our data indicate high prevalence of MBL deficiency, no evidence of association between MBL deficiency and HIV-1 infection. However, lower plasma MBL levels were protective against both S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections and MBL2 promoter and variants LY and LL increased susceptibility to S. haematobium infection.

  5. Ex vivo Expansion of Human Adult Pancreatic Cells with Properties of Distributed Stem Cells by Suppression of Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Paré, JF; Sherley, JL

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for type I diabetes (T1D) might be improved if pancreatic stem cells were readily available for investigation. Unlike macroscopic islets, pancreatic tissue stem cells could more easily access the retroperitoneal pancreatic environment and thereby might achieve more effective pancreatic regeneration. Unfortunately, whether the adult pancreas actually contains renewing stem cells continues as a controversial issue in diabetes research. We evaluated a new method developed...

  6. Incidence of Dengue Virus Infection in Adults and Children in a Prospective Longitudinal Cohort in the Philippines.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Theresa Alera; Anon Srikiatkhachorn; John Mark Velasco; Tac-An, Ilya A.; Catherine B Lago; Hannah E Clapham; Stefan Fernandez; Levy, Jens W; Butsaya Thaisomboonsuk; Chonticha Klungthong; Macareo, Louis R.; Ananda Nisalak; Laura Hermann; Daisy Villa; In-Kyu Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The mean age of dengue has been increasing in some but not all countries. We sought to determine the incidence of dengue virus (DENV) infection in adults and children in a prospective cohort study in the Philippines where dengue is hyperendemic.A prospective cohort of subjects ≥6 months old in Cebu City, Philippines, underwent active community-based surveillance for acute febrile illnesses by weekly contact. Fever history within the prior seven days was evaluated with an acute illness visit f...

  7. Occurrence of Urinary Tract Infection in Adolescent and Adult Women of Shanty Town in Dhaka City, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Sabita Rezwana; Ahmed, M Firoz; Begum, Aleya

    2014-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is commonly experienced by women of various age groups especially elderly ones. We planned to find out the prevalent microbial strains causing UTI in slum inhabitant adolescent and adult women in Dhaka City, Bangladesh. Methods and materials Urine sample was collected from 462 UTI suspected female subjects. Pathogenic bacteria were identified using standard microbiological tests, and antimicrobial sensitivity profiles of the pathogens were determined. ...

  8. Significant pharmacokinetic interactions between artemether/lumefantrine and efavirenz or nevirapine in HIV-infected Ugandan adults

    OpenAIRE

    Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Lamorde, Mohammed; Mayito, Jonathan; Nabukeera, Lillian; Namakula, Rhoda; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Katabira, Elly; Ntale, Muhammad; Pakker, Nadine; Ryan, Mairin; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas; de Vries, Peter J; Khoo, Saye

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Co-administration of artemether/lumefantrine with antiretroviral therapy has potential for pharmacokinetic drug interactions. We investigated drug–drug interactions between artemether/lumefantrine and efavirenz or nevirapine. Methods We performed a cross-over study in which HIV-infected adults received standard six-dose artemether/lumefantrine 80/480 mg before and at efavirenz or nevirapine steady state. Artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, efavirenz and nevirapine plasma ...

  9. Incidence of Dengue Virus Infection in Adults and Children in a Prospective Longitudinal Cohort in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Theresa Alera; Anon Srikiatkhachorn; John Mark Velasco; Ilya A Tac-An; Lago, Catherine B.; Clapham, Hannah E; Stefan Fernandez; Levy, Jens W.; Butsaya Thaisomboonsuk; Chonticha Klungthong; Macareo, Louis R.; Ananda Nisalak; Laura Hermann; Daisy Villa; In-Kyu Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The mean age of dengue has been increasing in some but not all countries. We sought to determine the incidence of dengue virus (DENV) infection in adults and children in a prospective cohort study in the Philippines where dengue is hyperendemic. Methodology/Principal Findings A prospective cohort of subjects ≥6 months old in Cebu City, Philippines, underwent active community-based surveillance for acute febrile illnesses by weekly contact. Fever history within the prior seven days ...

  10. Mindfulness meditation training effects on CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infected adults: A small randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Creswell, J. David; Myers, Hector F.; Cole, Steven W.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation training has stress reduction benefits in various patient populations, but its effects on biological markers of HIV-1 progression are unknown. The present study tested the efficacy of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation program compared to a 1-day control seminar on CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in stressed HIV infected adults. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with enrollment and follow-up occurring between November 2005 and...

  11. Human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently kill influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    LI Hong; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Ting; Li, Jinrong; Liu, Yinping; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Yin, Zhongwei; Yu, Meixing; Shen, Chongyang; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    γδ-T cells play an indispensable role in host defense against different viruses, including influenza A virus. However, whether these cells have cytotoxic activity against influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and subsequently contribute to virus clearance remains unknown. Using influenza virus-infected A549 cells, human lung alveolar epithelial cells, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of aminobisphosphonate pamidronate (PAM)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells and their under...

  12. Measuring T Cell-to-T Cell HIV-1 Transfer, Viral Fusion, and Infection Using Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Natasha D; Chen, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    Direct T cell-to-T cell HIV-1 infection is a distinct mode of HIV-1 infection that requires physical contact between an HIV-1-infected "donor" cell and an uninfected, CD4-expressing "target" cell. In vitro studies indicate that HIV-1 cell-to-cell infection is much more efficient than infection by cell-free viral particles; however, the exact mechanisms of the enhanced efficiency of this infection pathway are still unclear. Several assays have been developed to study the mechanism of direct cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission and to assess sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies and pharmacologic inhibitors. These assays are based on the coculture of donor and target cells. Here, we describe methods that utilize flow cytometry, which can discriminate donor and target cells and can assess different stages of entry and infection following cell-to-cell contact. HIV Gag-iGFP, a clone that makes fluorescent virus particles, can be used to measure cell-to-cell transfer of virus particles. HIV NL-GI, a clone that expresses GFP as an early gene, facilitates the measure of productive infection after cell-to-cell contact. Lastly, a variation of the β-lactamase (BlaM)-Vpr fusion assay can be used to measure the viral membrane fusion process after coculture of donor and target cells in a manner that is independent of cell-cell fusion. These assays can be performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies/inhibitors to determine the 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50) required to block infection specifically in the target cells. PMID:26714702

  13. Oral manifestations of HIV infection in children and adults receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy [HAART] in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikx Frans HM

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence and types of HIV-related oral lesions between children and adult Tanzanian patients on HAART with those not on HAART and to relate the occurrence of the lesions with anti-HIV drug regimen, clinical stage of HIV disease and CD4+ cell count. Methods Participants were 532 HIV infected patients, 51 children and 481 adults, 165 males and 367 females. Children were aged 2–17 years and adults 18 and 67 years. Participants were recruited consecutively at the Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH HIV clinic from October 2004 to September 2005. Investigations included; interviews, physical examinations, HIV testing and enumeration of CD4+ T cells. Results A total of 237 HIV-associated oral lesions were observed in 210 (39.5% patients. Oral candidiasis was the commonest (23.5%, followed by mucosal hyperpigmentation (4.7%. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of oral candidiasis (χ2 = 4.31; df = 1; p = 0.03 and parotid enlargement (χ2 = 36.5; df = 1; p = 0.04 between children and adults. Adult patients who were on HAART had a significantly lower risk of; oral lesions (OR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.22 – 0.47; p = 0.005, oral candidiasis (OR = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.18 – 0.44; p = 0.003 and oral hairy leukoplakia (OR = 0.18; 95% CI = 0.04 – 0.85; p = 0.03. There was no significant reduction in occurrence of oral lesions in children on HAART (OR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.11–1.14; p = 0.15. There was also a significant association between the presence of oral lesions and CD4+ cell count 3 (χ2 = 52.4; df = 2; p = 0.006 and with WHO clinical stage (χ2 = 121; df = 3; p = 0.008. Oral lesions were also associated with tobacco smoking (χ2 = 8.17; df = 2; p = 0.04. Conclusion Adult patients receiving HAART had a significantly lower prevalence of oral lesions, particularly oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia. There was no significant change in occurrence of oral lesions in children

  14. Mogamulizumab for the treatment of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimitsu M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Yoshimitsu, Naomichi Arima Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan Abstract: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by latent infection of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. The outcome for ATLL is very poor, with a 3-year overall survival of approximately 24% with conventional chemotherapy; thus, there is an unmet need for developing new treatment options. Defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 antibody (KW-0761, mogamulizumab has been clinically available for the treatment of relapsed or refractory ATLL in Japan since 2012, and a Phase II study of mogamulizumab for patients with relapsed CCR4+ ATLL demonstrated a 50% objective response, a 30.8% complete response, and an acceptable safety profile. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used to treat patients with ATLL, and mogamulizumab in combination with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used successfully in a limited number of patients to treat refractory or relapsed ATLL. The efficacy of combining mogamulizumab with standard chemotherapy (mLSG15 for patients with ATLL has also been examined, and the results have shown higher rates of complete response with the combined therapy (52% compared with for chemotherapy alone (33%. Mogamulizumab also has potential application in the treatment of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical paraparesis, Epstein–Barr virus-associated T-cell and natural killer-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, and peripheral and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Possible adverse events of mogamulizumab have been reported, such as cutaneous adverse reactions (including Stevens–Johnson syndrome, diffuse panbronchiolitis, reactivation of hepatitis B, and opportunistic infections. The treatment outcome of patients

  15. B cells and platelets harbor prion infectivity in the blood of deer infected with chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiason, Candace K; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Hays, Sheila A; Powers, Jenny; Osborn, David A; Dahmes, Sallie J; Miller, Karl V; Warren, Robert J; Mason, Gary L; Telling, Glenn C; Young, Alan J; Hoover, Edward A

    2010-05-01

    Substantial evidence for prion transmission via blood transfusion exists for many transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. Determining which cell phenotype(s) is responsible for trafficking infectivity has important implications for our understanding of the dissemination of prions, as well as their detection and elimination from blood products. We used bioassay studies of native white-tailed deer and transgenic cervidized mice to determine (i) if chronic wasting disease (CWD) blood infectivity is associated with the cellular versus the cell-free/plasma fraction of blood and (ii) in particular if B-cell (MAb 2-104(+)), platelet (CD41/61(+)), or CD14(+) monocyte blood cell phenotypes harbor infectious prions. All four deer transfused with the blood mononuclear cell fraction from CWD(+) donor deer became PrP(CWD) positive by 19 months postinoculation, whereas none of the four deer inoculated with cell-free plasma from the same source developed prion infection. All four of the deer injected with B cells and three of four deer receiving platelets from CWD(+) donor deer became PrP(CWD) positive in as little as 6 months postinoculation, whereas none of the four deer receiving blood CD14(+) monocytes developed evidence of CWD infection (immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis) after 19 months of observation. Results of the Tg(CerPrP) mouse bioassays mirrored those of the native cervid host. These results indicate that CWD blood infectivity is cell associated and suggest a significant role for B cells and platelets in trafficking CWD infectivity in vivo and support earlier tissue-based studies associating putative follicular B cells with PrP(CWD). Localization of CWD infectivity with leukocyte subpopulations may aid in enhancing the sensitivity of blood-based diagnostic assays for CWD and other TSEs. PMID:20219916

  16. The safety of adult male circumcision in HIV-infected and uninfected men in Rakai, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Kigozi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of the study was to compare rates of adverse events (AEs related to male circumcision (MC in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men in order to provide guidance for MC programs that may provide services to HIV-infected and uninfected men. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 2,326 HIV-negative and 420 HIV-positive men (World Health Organization [WHO] stage I or II and CD4 counts > 350 cells/mm3 were circumcised in two separate but procedurally identical trials of MC for HIV and/or sexually transmitted infection prevention in rural Rakai, Uganda. Participants were followed at 1-2 d and 5-9 d, and at 4-6 wk, to assess surgery-related AEs, wound healing, and resumption of intercourse. AE risks and wound healing were compared in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men. Adjusted odds ratios (AdjORs were estimated by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for baseline characteristics and postoperative resumption of sex. At enrollment, HIV-positive men were older, more likely to be married, reported more sexual partners, less condom use, and higher rates of sexually transmitted disease symptoms than HIV-negative men. Risks of moderate or severe AEs were 3.1/100 and 3.5/100 in HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants, respectively (AdjOR 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47-1.74. Infections were the most common AEs (2.6/100 in HIV-positive versus 3.0/100 in HIV-negative men. Risks of other complications were similar in the two groups. The proportion with completed healing by 6 wk postsurgery was 92.7% in HIV-positive men and 95.8% in HIV-negative men (p = 0.007. AEs were more common in men who resumed intercourse before wound healing compared to those who waited (AdjOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.33. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the safety of MC was comparable in asymptomatic HIV-positive and HIV-negative men, although healing was somewhat slower among the HIV infected. All men should be strongly counseled to refrain from intercourse until full wound

  17. Prosthetic graft infection: limitations of indium white blood cell scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of a rapid, noninvasive, and accurate method to confirm or rule out prosthetic graft infection continues to constitute a compelling and vexing clinical problem. A host of adjunctive diagnostic techniques has been used in the past, but early promising results subsequently have usually not yielded acceptable sensitivity (reflecting false negatives) and specificity (reflecting false positive) data. White blood cell (WBC) indium 111 scanning has recently been added to this list. The utility and accuracy of 111In WBC scans were assessed by retrospective review of WBC scan results in 70 patients undergoing evaluation for possible prosthetic graft infection over a 7-year period. Operative and autopsy data (mean follow-up, 18 months for survivors with negative scans) were used to confirm the 22 positive, 45 negative, and three equivocal WBC scans. The false positive rate (+/- 70% confidence limits) was 36% +/- 6% (n = 8) among the 22 patients with positive scans (44% +/- 6% [11 of 25] if the three equivocal scans are included as false positive), yielding a specificity of 85% +/- 5% and an overall accuracy rate of 88% +/- 4% (80% +/- 5% and 84% +/- 5%, respectively, if the three equivocal cases are considered as false positive). All three patients with equivocal scans ultimately were judged not to have prosthetic graft infection. As implied by the high accuracy rate, the sensitivity of the test was absolute (100% [14 of 14]); there were no false negative results

  18. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Potential Hazards Exposure of employees to community and nosocomial infections, e.g., Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) . Nosocomial infections are infections that occur from exposure to infectious ...

  19. Zika Kills Vital Nervous System Cells in Adult Mice, Study Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160505.html Zika Kills Vital Nervous System Cells in Adult Mice, ... 2016 THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus kills neural stem cells in the brains ...

  20. Transcriptional adaptation of pneumococci and human pharyngeal cells in the presence of a virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kimaro Mlacha, SZ; Peret, TC; Umar, N; Romero-Steiner, S.; Dunning Hotopp, JC; N. Ishmael; Grinblat-Huse, V; Riley, DR; Erdman, DD; Carlone, GM; Sampson, J; Scott, JA; Tettelin, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Viral upper respiratory tract infections are associated with increased colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae but the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. The objective of this study is to describe a comprehensive picture of the cellular interaction between the adhering bacteria and host cells in the presence or absence of a viral co-infection. RESULTS Gene expression profiles of Detroit-562 pharyngeal cells, which were either mock-infected or infected with h...