WorldWideScience

Sample records for adult barnacle balanus

  1. Construction of an adult barnacle (Balanus amphitrite cDNA library and selection of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess J Grant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Balanus amphitrite is a barnacle commonly used in biofouling research. Although many aspects of its biology have been elucidated, the lack of genetic information is impeding a molecular understanding of its life cycle. As part of a wider multidisciplinary approach to reveal the biogenic cues influencing barnacle settlement and metamorphosis, we have sequenced and annotated the first cDNA library for B. amphitrite. We also present a systematic validation of potential reference genes for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR data obtained from different developmental stages of this animal. Results We generated a cDNA library containing expressed sequence tags (ESTs from adult B. amphitrite. A total of 609 unique sequences (comprising 79 assembled clusters and 530 singlets were derived from 905 reliable unidirectionally sequenced ESTs. Bioinformatics tools such as BLAST, HMMer and InterPro were employed to allow functional annotation of the ESTs. Based on these analyses, we selected 11 genes to study their ability to normalize qRT-PCR data. Total RNA extracted from 7 developmental stages was reverse transcribed and the expression stability of the selected genes was compared using geNorm, BestKeeper and NormFinder. These software programs produced highly comparable results, with the most stable gene being mt-cyb, while tuba, tubb and cp1 were clearly unsuitable for data normalization. Conclusion The collection of B. amphitrite ESTs and their annotation has been made publically available representing an important resource for both basic and applied research on this species. We developed a qRT-PCR assay to determine the most reliable reference genes. Transcripts encoding cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 were expressed most stably, although other genes also performed well and could prove useful to normalize gene expression studies.

  2. Influence of diatom exopolymers and biofilms on metamorphosis in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    ) films and EPS(greater than 1000 molecular weight) on metamorphosis in the acorn barnacle Balanus amphitrite Darwin, a dominant fouling organism, using axenic and non-axenic films, and free and biofilm EPS, of 5 species of pennate diatoms: Amphora...

  3. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2012-02-13

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus (= Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca 2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. © 2012 Chen et al.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Xing-Cheng

    2012-10-02

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Cheng Yan

    Full Text Available The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in

  6. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  7. Presence and distribution of serotonin immunoreactivity in the cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Gallus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the presence and distribution of serotonin in the cyprid of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite were investigated by immunohistochemical methods. Serotonin-like immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies were detected in the central nervous system only. Various clusters of immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies are distributed in the brain (protocerebrum, deutocerebrum, optical lobes, and at least, four pairs of neuronal cell bodies were detected in the centrally positioned neuropil of the posterior ganglion. Rich plexuses of immunoreactive nerve fibers in the neuropil area were also observed. Furthermore, bundles of strongly immunoreactive nerve fibers surrounding the gut wall were localized, and immunoreactive nerve terminals in the antennules and compound eyes were observed. These data demonstrate the presence of a serotonin-like immunoreactive substance in the barnacle cyprids; furthermore, its immunolocalization in the cephalic nerve terminals allows us to postulate the involvement of this bioactive molecule in substrate recognition during the settlement process.

  8. Antifouling Activity of Simple Synthetic Diterpenoids against Larvae of the Barnacle Balanus albicostatus Pilsbry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Qing Feng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Five new pimarane diterpenoids 1-5 were synthesized using ent-8(14-pimarene-15R,16-diol as starting material. The structures were elucidated by means of extensive NMR and MS analysis. The antifouling activity against larval settlement of the barnacle Balanus albicostatus were evaluated using capsaicin as a positive control. Compounds 1-3 and 5 showed more potent antifouling activity than capsaicin. Compound 5, which exhibited almost the same antifouling activity as starting material, showed better stability than starting material. These compounds all showed antifouling activity in a non-toxic way against larval settlement of the barnacle B. albicostatus. Analysis of structure-activity relationships (SAR demonstrated that the substituents on the C-15 and C-16 position of pimarane diterpenoid were responsible for the antifouling activity.

  9. Response of cyprid specific genes to natural settlement cues in the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Honglei

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR was used to further our understanding of the molecular processes involved in the attachment and metamorphosis of larval barnacles. We report the effects of natural settlement cues (microbial biofilms and conspecific settlement-inducing factor) on the expression profiles of six barnacle cyprid specific (bcs) genes in cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite Darwin. Genes bcs-1 to bcs-5 all showed marked decreases in their expression between initial cyprid attachment and the completion of metamorphosis, whereas bcs-6 showed significant up-regulation. Generally, settlement cues exerted no significant effect on the decreasing trend of bcs-1 to bcs-5 expression during attachment and metamorphosis. However, the expression of bcs-6 increased prior to cyprid attachment in response to both settlement cues. This elevated expression of bcs-6 gene indicates the importance and key regulatory role of this specific gene to larval attachment and metamorphosis in this barnacle species. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative proteomics study of larval settlement in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2014-02-13

    Barnacles are major sessile components of the intertidal areas worldwide, and also one of the most dominant fouling organisms in fouling communities. Larval settlement has a crucial ecological effect not only on the distribution of the barnacle population but also intertidal community structures. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stage remain largely unclear. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomic profiles of stage II nauplii, stage VI nauplii, cyprids, and juveniles of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite using label-free quantitative proteomics, followed by the measurement of the gene expression levels of candidate proteins. More than 700 proteins were identified at each stage; 80 were significantly up-regulated in cyprids and 95 in juveniles vs other stages. Specifically, proteins involved in energy and metabolism, the nervous system and signal transduction were significantly up-regulated in cyprids, whereas proteins involved in cytoskeletal remodeling, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and differentiation, and biomineralization were up-regulated in juveniles, consistent with changes associated with larval metamorphosis and tissue remodeling in juveniles. These findings provided molecular evidence for the morphological, physiological and biological changes that occur during the transition process from the larval to the juvenile stages in B. amphitrite. © 2014 Chen et al.

  11. Exploration and metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia ; Thoracica) cyprids: significance of sugars and adult extract

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    promotion of Balanus amphitrite. The barnacle cyprid, while exploring some surfaces, leaves behind 'footprints' of temporary adhesive. In the absence of AE, sugar-treated cyprids did not deposit footprints. Concurrently, the sugar-treated cyprids deposited...

  12. Comparative Proteome and Phosphoproteome Analyses during Cyprid Development of the Barnacle Balanus ( =Amphibalanus ) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-06-04

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite) is a major marine biofouling invertebrate worldwide. It has a complex life cycle during which the larva (called a nauplius) molts six times before transforming into the cyprid stage. The cyprid stage in B. amphitrite is the critical stage for the larval decision to attach and metamorphose. In this study, proteome and phosphoproteome alterations during cyprid development/aging and upon treatment with the antifouling agent butenolide were examined with a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) multiplexed fluorescent staining approach. Optimized protein separation strategies, including solution-phase isoelectric fractionation and narrow-pH-range 2-DE, were used in a proteomic analysis. Our results show that the differential regulation of the target proteins is highly dynamic on the levels of both protein expression and posttranslational modification. Two groups of proteins, stress-associated and energy metabolism-related proteins, are differentially expressed during cyprid development. Comparison of the control and treatment groups suggests that butenolide exerts its effects by sustaining the expression levels of these proteins. Altogether, our data suggest that proteins involved in stress regulation and energy metabolism play crucial roles in regulating larval attachment and metamorphosis of B. amphitrite. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Can body burden in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite indicate seasonal variation in cadmium concentrations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Eduardo Teixeira; Ridd, Michael; Klumpp, David

    2005-10-01

    Two three-month sampling programs measuring Cd in the environment and a biomonitor ( Balanus amphitrite) were undertaken in the austral winter of 2002 and summer of 2004 in Ross Creek, North Queensland, Australia. The objective was to test whether the burden of Cd in the biomonitor responded to any variation in the dissolved and particulate phase Cd concentrations in Ross Creek, caused by rainfall variation. The barnacles from the most Cd contaminated site were exposed to a total Cd concentration twice that in winter (93.6 ng L -1) than in summer (45.6 ng L -1). However, no significant variation was identified for the Cd concentration in the biomonitor between winter (8.4 mg kg -1) and summer (7.4 mg kg -1). A budget analysis based on a bioenergetic kinetic model indicated that Cd flux from food contributes >80% to the Cd concentration in B. amphitrite. A sensitivity analysis showed that physiological characteristics of the biomonitor are the key parameters controlling Cd accumulation in B. amphitrite, rather than the metal concentration in the dissolved or particulate phases. These two model's outcomes suggest that a tight coupling between Cd in the biomonitor and its availability in the environment does not occur.

  14. Transcriptome and proteome dynamics in larvae of the barnacle Balanus Amphitrite from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli

    2015-12-15

    Background The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is widely distributed in marine shallow and tidal waters, and has significant economic and ecological importance. Nauplii, the first larval stage of most crustaceans, are extremely abundant in the marine zooplankton. However, a lack of genome information has hindered elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of development, settlement and survival strategies in extreme marine environments. We sequenced and constructed the genome dataset for nauplii to obtain comprehensive larval genetic information. We also investigated iTRAQ-based protein expression patterns to reveal the molecular basis of nauplii development, and to gain information on larval survival strategies in the Red Sea marine environment. Results A nauplii larval transcript dataset, containing 92,117 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), was constructed and used as a reference for the proteome analysis. Genes related to translation, oxidative phosphorylation and cytoskeletal development were highly abundant. We observed remarkable plasticity in the proteome of Red Sea larvae. The proteins associated with development, stress responses and osmoregulation showed the most significant differences between the two larval populations studied. The synergistic overexpression of heat shock and osmoregulatory proteins may facilitate larval survival in intertidal habitats or in extreme environments. Conclusions We presented, for the first time, comprehensive transcriptome and proteome datasets for Red Sea nauplii. The datasets provide a foundation for future investigations focused on the survival mechanisms of other crustaceans in extreme marine environments.

  15. Characterisation of the bacteria associated with barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, shell and their role in gregarious settlement of cypris larvae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    BacchettiDeGregoris, T.; Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Mesbahi, E.; Burgess, J.G.; Clare, A.S.

    that differences were present at lower taxonomic levels. The capacity of these communities to influence larval settlement was assessed by growing multispecies biofilms on artificial medium, obtained by extracting nutrients from adult barnacles. Biofilms composed...

  16. Influence of temperature on the starvation threshold of nauplii of barnacle Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    An evaluation of starvation threshold of the newly hatched Balanus amphitrite nauplii (instar, II) has been made at three different temperatures (5, 15 and 25°C). Earlier studies on starvation in crustacean larvae demonstrated Point of No Return...

  17. Larval vision contributes to gregarious settlement in barnacles: adult red fluorescence as a possible visual signal

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumura, K.

    2014-02-26

    Gregarious settlement, an essential behavior for many barnacle species that can only reproduce by mating with a nearby barnacle, has long been thought to rely on larval ability to recognize chemical signals from conspecifics during settlement. However, the cyprid, the settlement stage larva in barnacles, has one pair of compound eyes that appear only at the late nauplius VI and cyprid stages, but the function(s) of these eyes remains unknown. Here we show that cyprids of the intertidal barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite can locate adult barnacles even in the absence of chemical cues, and prefer to settle around them probably via larval sense of vision. We also show that the cyprids can discriminate color and preferred to settle on red surfaces. Moreover, we found that shells of adult B. amphitrite emit red auto-fluorescence and the adult extracts with the fluorescence as a visual signal attracted cyprid larvae to settle around it. We propose that the perception of specific visual signals can be involved in behavior of zooplankton including marine invertebrate larvae, and that barnacle auto-fluorescence may be a specific signal involved in gregarious larval settlement.

  18. Settlement and recruitment of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite from a tropical environment influenced by monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.A; Anil, A

    Studies on the settlement and the subsequent recruitment of intertidal organisms are crucial steps in understanding their population structure in a particular bioregion. However, studying the recruitment of intertidal organisms such as barnacles...

  19. The Story of a Hitchhiker: Population Genetic Patterns in the Invasive Barnacle Balanus(Amphibalanus improvisus Darwin 1854.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lisa Wrange

    Full Text Available Understanding the ecological and evolutionary forces that determine the genetic structure and spread of invasive species is a key component of invasion biology. The bay barnacle, Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus, is one of the most successful aquatic invaders worldwide, and is characterised by broad environmental tolerance. Although the species can spread through natural larval dispersal, human-mediated transport through (primarily shipping has almost certainly contributed to the current global distribution of this species. Despite its worldwide distribution, little is known about the phylogeography of this species. Here, we characterize the population genetic structure and model dispersal dynamics of the barnacle B. improvisus, and describe how human-mediated spreading via shipping as well as natural larval dispersal may have contributed to observed genetic variation. We used both mitochondrial DNA (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I: COI and nuclear microsatellites to characterize the genetic structure in 14 populations of B. improvisus on a global and regional scale (Baltic Sea. Genetic diversity was high in most populations, and many haplotypes were shared among populations on a global scale, indicating that long-distance dispersal (presumably through shipping and other anthropogenic activities has played an important role in shaping the population genetic structure of this cosmopolitan species. We could not clearly confirm prior claims that B. improvisus originates from the western margins of the Atlantic coasts; although there were indications that Argentina could be part of a native region. In addition to dispersal via shipping, we show that natural larval dispersal may play an important role for further colonisation following initial introduction.

  20. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Profiling of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite in Response to the Antifouling Compound Meleagrin

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Zhuang

    2013-05-03

    Marine biofouling refers to the unwanted accumulation of fouling organisms, such as barnacles, on artificial surfaces, resulting in severe consequences for marine industries. Meleagrin is a potential nontoxic antifoulant that is isolated from the fungus Penicillium sp.; however, its mechanistic effect mode of action on larval settlement remains unknown. Here, we applied iTRAQ coupled with 2D LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis to investigate the effect of meleagrin on the proteomic expression profile of cyprid development and aging in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. Fifty proteins were differentially expressed in response to treatment with meleagrin, among which 26 proteins were associated with cyprid development/aging and 24 were specifically associated with the meleagrin treatment. The 66 proteins that were associated with aging only remained unaltered during exposure to meleagrin. Using KEGG analysis, those proteins were assigned to several groups, including metabolic pathways, ECM-receptor interactions, and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Among the 24 proteins that were not related to the development/aging process, expression of the cyprid major protein (CMP), a vitellogenin-like protein, increased after the meleagrin treatment, which suggested that meleagrin might affect the endocrine system and prevent the larval molting cycle. With the exception of the chitin binding protein that mediates the molting process and ATPase-mediated energy processes, the majority of proteins with significant effects in previous studies in response to cyprid treatment with butenolide and polyether B remained unchanged in the present study, suggesting that meleagrin may exhibit a different mechanism. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Role of conspecific cues and sugars in the settlement of cyprids of the barnacle, Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    dark photoperiod. They were monitored for a period of 24h, cyprids that had metamorphosed into juvenile barnacles were counted. Treatment of cyprids with sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides) The cyprids were immersed for 5min (Neal & Yule, 1996... maintained and monitored as described above. Treatment of cyprids with Concanavalin A In order to show that sugar is bound to cyprid antennules, the cyprids were stained using an FITC-conjugated lectin, Concanavalin A, which binds specifically to D...

  2. Multi-seasonal barnacle (Balanus improvisus) protection achieved by trace amounts of a macrocyclic lactone (ivermectin) included in rosin-based coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinori, Emiliano; Berglin, Mattias; Brive, Lena M; Hulander, Mats; Dahlström, Mia; Elwing, Hans

    2011-10-01

    Rosin-based coatings loaded with 0.1% (w/v) ivermectin were found to be effective in preventing colonization by barnacles (Balanus improvisus) both on test panels as well as on yachts for at least two fouling seasons. The leaching rate of ivermectin was determined by mass-spectroscopy (LC/MS-MS) to be 0.7 ng cm(-2) day(-1). This low leaching rate, as deduced from the Higuchi model, is a result of the low loading, low water solubility, high affinity to the matrix and high molar volume of the model biocide. Comparison of ivermectin and control areas of panels immersed in the field showed undisturbed colonisation of barnacles after immersion for 35 days. After 73 days the mean barnacle base plate area on the controls was 13 mm(2), while on the ivermectin coating it was 3 mm(2). After 388 days, no barnacles were observed on the ivermectin coating while the barnacles on the control coating had reached a mean of 60 mm(2). In another series of coated panels, ivermectin was dissolved in a cosolvent mixture of propylene glycol and glycerol formal prior to the addition to the paint base. This method further improved the anti-barnacle performance of the coatings. An increased release rate (3 ng cm(-2) day(-1)) and dispersion of ivermectin, determined by fluorescence microscopy, and decreased hardness of the coatings were the consequences of the cosolvent mixture in the paint. The antifouling mechanism of macrocyclic lactones, such as avermectins, needs to be clarified in further studies. Beside chronic intoxication as ivermectin is slowly released from the paint film even contact intoxication occurring inside the coatings, triggered by penetration of the coating by barnacles, is a possible explanation for the mode of action and this is under investigation.

  3. The regulatory role of the NO/cGMP signal transduction cascade during larval attachment and metamorphosis of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Y.

    2012-08-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is among the most dominant fouling species on intertidal rocky shores in tropical and subtropical areas and is thus a target organism in antifouling research. After being released from adults, the swimming nauplius undertakes six molting cycles and then transforms into a cyprid. Using paired antennules, a competent cyprid actively explores and selects a suitable substratum for attachment and metamorphosis (collectively known as settlement). This selection process involves the reception of exogenous signals and subsequent endogenous signal transduction. To investigate the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) during larval settlement of B. amphitrite, we examined the effects of an NO donor and an NO scavenger, two nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor on settling cyprids. We found that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibited larval settlement in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, both the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO and the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine hemisulfate (AGH) and S-methylisothiourea sulfate (SMIS) significantly accelerated larval settlement. Suppression of the downstream guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity using a GC-selective inhibitor ODQ could also significantly accelerate larval settlement. Interestingly, the settlement inhibition effects of SNP could be attenuated by ODQ at all concentrations tested. In the developmental expression profiling of NOS and sGC, the lowest expression of both genes was detected in the cyprid stage, a crucial stage for the larval decision to attach and metamorphose. In summary, we concluded that NO regulates larval settlement via mediating downstream cGMP signaling.

  4. Three-dimensional computer-aided reconstruction of FMRFamide immunopositive neuron distribution in the ventral ganglion of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia, Crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Gallus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have implemented a simple program to solve three of the problems related to 3D reconstruction (3D-Rec of soft tissues: alignment of sections, distortions, and estimation of the spatial position of elements of interest inside the tissues. As a model, we chose the distribution of FMRFamide-like immunopositive neurons in the ventral ganglion of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite collected during different seasonal periods. Images of immunostained sections were acquired by means of a CCDcamera- equipped microscope and a PC and the reference points were taken inside the sections. The FMRFamide-like immunopositive neurons detected in the barnacle ventral ganglion were grouped into four different classes according to size, shape and staining intensity. More numerous FMRFamide- like immunopositive neurons were detected in the autumn-collected barnacle than in the summer counterpart. The two 3D reconstructions obtained from transverse and longitudinal ventral ganglion sections were efficaciously compared after 90° rotation of one of them. Comparison of these two 3D-Rec suggests the presence of at least two groups of FMRFamide-like immunopositive neurons that are seasonally-related and probably involved in reproduction.

  5. Larval development, sensory mechanisms and physiological adaptions in acorn barnacles with special reference to Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Baragi, L.V.; Gaonkar, C.

    onto the antennular attachment disc (Nott and Foster, 1969). The exploratory behavior and subsequent settlement of cyprid when subjected simultaneously to sugars and adult extract (AE) showed that sugar-treated cyprids did not deposit foot...-prints in the absence of AE. However, sugar-treated cyprids deposited foot-prints when exposed to adult extract (Khandeparker et al., 2002a). As earlier hypothesized (Yule and Walker, 1987), that sugars in solution adsorb electrostatically through –OH groups to polar...

  6. On the roles of serotonin and dopamine in the settlement of the cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite (= Amphibalanus amphitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gallus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the cyprid of Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite was investigated by settlement tests the role of serotonin, related substances and dopamine. The results indicate an activity of serotonin in B. amphitrite cyprid as settlement inhibitors.

  7. Influence of bacterial exopolymers and the adult extract of Balanus amphitrite and Cthamalus sp. on cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Mitbavkar, S.; Wagh, A.B.

    Balanus amphitrite in nature on the cyprid metamorphosis of B. amphitrite has been examined. The experiments were carried out in polystyrene multiwells. A similar set of experiments was also repeated with the extract of Cthamalus sp. which co...

  8. Quantification of the energy required for the destruction of Balanus Amphitrite larva by ultrasonic treatment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Seth, N.; Chakravarty, P.; Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Pandit, A.B.

    Ultrasonic treatment, a relatively less explored technology in water disinfection, was used to quantify the energy required for the destruction of larvae of barnacle Balanus amphitrite, which is a major marine fouling and a potential invasive...

  9. The effect of butenolide on behavioral and morphological changes in two marine fouling species, the barnacle Balanus amphitrite and the bryozoan Bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi Fan

    2011-05-23

    Butenolide [5-octylfuran-2(5H)-one] is a very promising antifouling compound. Here, the effects of butenolide on larval behavior and histology are compared in two major fouling organisms, viz. cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite and swimming larvae of Bugula neritina. Butenolide diminished the positive phototactic behavior of B. amphitrite (EC50=0.82 μg ml(-1)) and B. neritina (EC50=3 μg ml(-1)). Its effect on the attachment of cyprids of B. amphitrite was influenced by temperature, and butenolide increased attachment of larvae of B. neritina to the bottom of the experimental wells. At concentrations of 4 μg ml(-1) and 10 μg ml(-1), butenolide decreased attachment of B. amphitrite and B. neritina, respectively, but the effects were reversible within a certain treatment time. Morphologically, butenolide inhibited the swelling of secretory granules and altered the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in the cement gland of B. amphitrite cyprids. In B. neritina swimming larvae, butenolide reduced the number of secretory granules in the pyriform-glandular complex.

  10. Influence of elevated temperature, pCO2, and nutrients on larva-biofilm interaction: Elucidation with acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragi, Lalita V.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2017-02-01

    Selection of optimal habitat by larvae of sessile organism is influenced by cues offered by the biofilm. Ocean warming and acidification are likely to enforce changes in the biofilm community and inturn influence the settlement process. Hence, we evaluated the influence of biofilm (multispecies and unialgal) and diet-mediated changes on the settlement of Balanus amphitrite cyprids (presettlement non-feeding larval stage) under different combinations of temperature (28, 30, 32 and 34 °C), pCO2 (400, 750 and 1500 μatm) and nutrient (unenriched and f/2 enriched). Nutrient enrichment enhanced the diatom and bacterial abundance at ambient temperature (30 °C) and pCO2 (400 μatm), which inturn increased larval settlement. Elevated pCO2 (750 and 1500 μatm) had no direct effect but a variable cascading effect on the settlement via biofilm-mediated changes was observed, depending on the type of biofilm. In contrast, elevated temperature (32 and 34 °C), either individually or in combination with elevated pCO2 had direct negative effect on settlement. However, biofilm-mediated changes compensated this negative effect. The larval settlement was also influenced by changes in the larval diet. Under elevated temperature and pCO2, cyprids raised with a feed (Chaetoceros calcitrans) from ambient temperature and pCO2 were of poor quality (lower RNA:DNA ratio, lower protein synthetic capacity) and yielded lower settlement. However, cyprids raised with a feed from elevated temperature and pCO2 were of better quality (higher RNA:DNA ratio, higher protein synthetic capacity) and yielded higher settlement. Overall, the observations from the present study provide insights into the significance of biotic interactions on the coastal biofouling communities under future climatic scenario and emphasise the need for future experiments on these aspects.

  11. Gut fluorescence analysis of barnacle larvae: An approach to quantify the ingested food

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.A; Anil, A

    Gut fluorescence analysis can provide a snapshot of ingested food and has been employed in feeding studies of various organisms. In this study we standardized the gut fluorescence method using laboratory-reared barnacle larvae (Balanus amphitrite...

  12. Trace metals in barnacles: the significance of trophic transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip; S.; RAINBOW; WANG; Wen-Xiong

    2005-01-01

    Barnacles have very high accumulated trace metal body concentrations that vary with local trace metal bioavailabilities and represent integrated measures of the supply of bioavailable metals. Pioneering work in Chinese waters in Hong Kong highlighted the potential value of barnacles (particularly Balanus amphitrite) as trace metal biomonitors in coastal waters,identifying differences in local trace metal bioavailabilities over space and time. Work in Hong Kong has also shown that although barnacles have very high rates of trace metal uptake from solution, they also have very high trace metal assimilation efficiencies from the diet. High assimilation efficiencies coupled with high ingestion rates ensure that trophic uptake is by far the dominant trace metal uptake route in barnacles, as verified for cadmium and zinc. Kinetic modelling has shown that low efflux rate constants and high uptake rates from the diet combine to bring about accumulated trace metal concentrations in barnacles that are amongst the highest known in marine invertebrates.

  13. Repetitive testing of TBTO, Sea-Nine 211 and farnesol using Balanus Amphitrite (Darwin) cypris larvae: variability in larval sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, P.R.; Overbeke, J.C.; Suurmond, A.

    1998-01-01

    Settlement inhibition assays with mass cultured cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite are widely used in (anti)fouling research. In this study, TBTO, Sea-Nine 211 and farnesol were tested repeatedly using multiple batches of larvae to study variability in larval sensitivity. There were si

  14. Biomineral Structure and Strength of Barnacle Exoskeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Nathan

    2011-03-01

    Studying the construction of organic-inorganic compound structures through biomineralization is potentially very useful. During biomineral formation, organisms restructure naturally occurring minerals in conjunction with their own organically produced minerals to create new structures. While there is extensive knowledge about material properties and structure of the raw minerals themselves, insight into how specific biomineral structures and compounds contribute to an object's mechanical properties is lacking. In this study, the exoskeletons of barnacles from the genus Balanus were examined, both for their physical structure (how they're put together) and for their mechanical properties (strength, hardness, and elasticity). Scanning electron microscopy produced close-up, detailed images of the inner shell structure to determine what type of structure barnacles build during exoskeleton formation. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to map the elemental components of the shells. Nanoindentation tested the mechanical properties of these mapped structures to determine how certain characteristics of the exoskeleton contribute to its mechanical properties.

  15. 'Flying barnacles'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Anders P; Chan, Benny K K; Koskinen, Hannu;

    2010-01-01

    in temperate areas spreading widely over inland and marine habitats outside the breeding season. The species is known to perform long-distance migration to Africa and the Middle East. Combining present knowledge on the birds' migratory pattern and the home range of the barnacle species, it is concluded...... as invasive species....

  16. Chemical Component and Proteomic Study of the Amphibalanus (= Balanus amphitrite Shell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Zhang

    Full Text Available As typical biofoulers, barnacles possess hard shells and cause serious biofouling problems. In this study, we analyzed the protein component of the barnacle Amphibalanus (= Balanus amphitrite shell using gel-based proteomics. The results revealed 52 proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. Among them, 40 proteins were categorized into 11 functional groups based on KOG database, and the remaining 12 proteins were unknown. Besides the known proteins in barnacle shell (SIPC, carbonic anhydrase and acidic acid matrix protein, we also identified chorion peroxidase, C-type lectin-like domains, serine proteases and proteinase inhibitor proteins in the A. Amphitrite shell. The sequences of these proteins were characterized and their potential functions were discussed. Histology and DAPI staining revealed living cells in the shell, which might secrete the shell proteins identified in this study.

  17. Balanus amphitrite or Amphibalanus amphitrite?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clare, Anthony S; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2008-01-01

    In a recent revision of the Balanidae based on morphological systematics, the much studied fouling species Balanus amphitrite was renamed Amphibalanus amphitrite. Here, the case is made for retaining the former nomenclature. Taxonomists are urged to exercise caution before introducing new formal ...

  18. Recyclable plastics as substrata for settlement and growth of bryozoans Bugula neritina and barnacles Amphibalanus amphitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng-Xiang; Orihuela, Beatriz; Zhu, Mei; Rittschof, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Plastics are common and pervasive anthropogenic debris in marine environments. Floating plastics provide opportunities to alter the abundance, distribution and invasion potential of sessile organisms that colonize them. We selected plastics from seven recycle categories and quantified settlement of (i) bryozoans Bugula neritina (Linnaeus, 1758) in the lab and in the field, and of (ii) barnacles Amphibalanus (= Balanus) amphitrite (Darwin, 1854) in the field. In the laboratory we cultured barnacles on the plastics for 8 weeks and quantified growth, mortality, and breaking strength of the side plates. In the field all recyclable plastics were settlement substrata for bryozoans and barnacles. Settlement depended on the type of plastic. Fewer barnacles settled on plastic surfaces compared to glass. In the lab and in the field, bryozoan settlement was higher on plastics than on glass. In static laboratory rearing, barnacles growing on plastics were initially significantly smaller than on glass. This suggested juvenile barnacles were adversely impacted by materials leaching from the plastics. Barnacle mortality was not significantly different between plastic and glass surfaces, but breaking strength of side plates of barnacles on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polycarbonate (PC) were significantly lower than breakage strength on glass. Plastics impact marine ecosystems directly by providing new surfaces for colonization with fouling organisms and by contaminants shown previously to leach out of plastics and impact biological processes.

  19. Effects of poly-ether B on proteome and phosphoproteome expression in biofouling Balanus amphitrite cyprids

    KAUST Repository

    Dash, Swagatika

    2012-04-01

    Biofouling is ubiquitous in marine environments, and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite is one of the most recalcitrant and aggressive biofoulers in tropical waters. Several natural antifoulants that were claimed to be non-toxic have been isolated in recent years, although the mechanism by which they inhibit fouling is yet to be investigated. Poly-ether B has shown promise in the non-toxic inhibition of larval barnacle attachment. Hence, in this study, multiplex two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied in conjunction with mass spectrometry to investigate the effects of poly-ether B on barnacle larvae at the molecular level. The cyprid proteome response to poly-ether B treatment was analyzed at the total proteome and phosphoproteome levels, with 65 protein and 19 phosphoprotein spots found to be up- or down-regulated. The proteins were found to be related to energy-metabolism, oxidative stress, and molecular chaperones, thus indicating that poly-ether B may interfere with the redox-regulatory mechanisms governing the settlement of barnacle larvae. The results of this study demonstrate the usefulness of the proteomic technique in revealing the working mechanisms of antifouling compounds. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  20. Evidence for the involvement of p38 MAPK activation in barnacle larval settlement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Sheng He

    Full Text Available The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts.

  1. Evidence for the Involvement of p38 MAPK Activation in Barnacle Larval Settlement

    KAUST Repository

    He, Li-Sheng

    2012-10-24

    The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK) from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts.

  2. Cryoperservation of Balanus amphitrite nauplii

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Tulaskar, A.S.; Khandeparker, D.C.; Wagh, A.B.

    –140 (1997) ARTICLE NO. CY961991 Cryopreservation of Balanus amphitrite nauplii A. C. ANIL, A. S. TULASKAR, D. C. KHANDEPARKAR, AND A. B. WAGH Marine Corrosion and Materials Research Division, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India... it possible to establish a larval bank of fouling organisms and thereby make the foul-commercial or research objectives, is often de- pendent on a natural source of brood stock. ing larvae available for antifouling studies at any time of the year...

  3. Fouling acorn barnacles in China——a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Wenhao; YAN Tao; LI Zufu; LI Jing; CHENG Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    We review the species composition,distribution,and seasonal variation of fouling acorn barnacles in Chinese waters—from Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea to East and South China Seas.Thirty-two species of acorn barnacles were found,of which,the dominant species are Amphibalanus amphitrite,A.reticulatus,A.variegates,Balanus trigonus,Fistulobalanus kondakovi,Megabalanus tintinnabulum,Striatobalanus amaryllis,and Eurapha withersi in the fouling communities.A.amphitrite is the dominant species in the coastal waters of Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea and A.reticulatus is dominant in the East and South China Seas.The settlement period of fouling acorn barnacles is usually in summer and autumn.From north to south with the decrease of latitude,their settlement period obviously extends,even to the whole year,and the species number also increases.Other environmental factors,such as salinity and distance from shore,also play an important role in the distribution of fouling acorn barnacles.

  4. Effects of barnacle epibionts on the periwinkle Littorina littorea (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschbaum, C.; Reise, K.

    1999-08-01

    In a sandy bay with mussel beds in the Wadden Sea (Island of Sylt, eastern North Sea), periwinkles Littorina littorea (L.) were often strongly overgrown with the barnacle Balanus crenatus Bruguière in the lower intertidal zone. Consequences of this epibiosis on mobility, reproduction and mortalityof the snail were examined. B. crenatus growing on L. littorea increased snail volume up to 4-fold and weight up to 3.5-fold and crawling speed of fouled L. littorea was significantly slowed down. The epibiotic structure also caused a decrease in reproductive output. In laboratory experiments, egg production of fouled L. littorea was significantly lower than in snails free of barnacles. Presumably, copulation of the periwinkles is hampered by the voluminous and prickly cover of barnacles. Field studies demonstrated an increased mortality of overgrown L. littorea. A decrease in reproductive output and a lower survival of snails with a cover of barnacles suggest that B. crenatus epibionts may have a significant impact on the population of L. littorea.

  5. Increased algal fouling on mussels with barnacle epibionts: a fouling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Jorge L.; Palomo, M. Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    If the external surfaces of epibionts are more suitable to other fouling species than those of their basibionts, a 'fouling cascade' might occur where epibionts facilitate secondary colonization by other epibionts. Here we evaluate whether the presence of epibiotic barnalces (Balanus glandula) influences the probability of mussel (Brachidontes rodriguezii) fouling by ephemeral red algae (Porphyra sp.) in a Southwestern Atlantic rocky shore. Mussels with barnacle epibionts showed a higher prevalence of Porphyra sp. fouling (32-40% depending on sampling date) than mussels without them (3-7%). Two lines of evidence indicate that barnacles facilitate Porphyra sp. fouling. First, most Porphyra sp. thalli in mussels with barnacle epibionts were attached to barnacle shells (75-92% of cases). Secondly, Porphyra sp. associated with mussels with barnacle epibionts in a proportion that significantly exceeded that expected under random co-occurrence. These results suggest the occurrence of a fouling cascade where barnacle epibiosis on mussels facilitates subsequent algal fouling. Recognizing the occurrence of such fouling cascades is important because they might explain the non-random aggregation of multiple epibiotic species onto a proportionally few individuals of the host species.

  6. Precisely proportioned: intertidal barnacles alter penis form to suit coastal wave action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Christopher J; Palmer, A Richard

    2008-05-07

    For their size, barnacles possess the longest penis of any animal (up to eight times their body length). However, as one of few sessile animals to copulate, they face a trade-off between reaching more mates and controlling ever-longer penises in turbulent flow. We observed that penises of an intertidal barnacle (Balanus glandula) from wave-exposed shores were shorter than, stouter than, and more than twice as massive for their length as, those from nearby protected bays. In addition, penis shape variation was tightly correlated with maximum velocity of breaking waves, and, on all shores, larger barnacles had disproportionately stouter penises. Finally, field experiments confirmed that most of this variation was due to phenotypic plasticity: barnacles transplanted to a wave-exposed outer coast produced dramatically shorter and wider penises than counterparts moved to a protected harbour. Owing to the probable trade-off between penis length and ability to function in flow, and owing to the ever-changing wave conditions on rocky shores, intertidal barnacles appear to have acquired the capacity to change the size and shape of their penises to suit local hydrodynamic conditions. This dramatic plasticity in genital form is a valuable reminder that factors other than the usual drivers of genital diversification--female choice, sexual conflict and male-male competition--can influence genital form.

  7. Toward an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barnacle larval settlement: A comparative transcriptomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2011-07-29

    Background: The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed biofouler and a model species in intertidal ecology and larval settlement studies. However, a lack of genomic information has hindered the comprehensive elucidation of the molecular mechanisms coordinating its larval settlement. The pyrosequencing-based transcriptomic approach is thought to be useful to identify key molecular changes during larval settlement. Methodology and Principal Findings: Using 454 pyrosequencing, we collected totally 630,845 reads including 215,308 from the larval stages and 415,537 from the adults; 23,451 contigs were generated while 77,785 remained as singletons. We annotated 31,720 of the 92,322 predicted open reading frames, which matched hits in the NCBI NR database, and identified 7,954 putative genes that were differentially expressed between the larval and adult stages. Of these, several genes were further characterized with quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization, revealing some key findings: 1) vitellogenin was uniquely expressed in late nauplius stage, suggesting it may be an energy source for the subsequent non-feeding cyprid stage; 2) the locations of mannose receptors suggested they may be involved in the sensory system of cyprids; 3) 20 kDa-cement protein homologues were expressed in the cyprid cement gland and probably function during attachment; and 4) receptor tyrosine kinases were expressed higher in cyprid stage and may be involved in signal perception during larval settlement. Conclusions: Our results provide not only the basis of several new hypotheses about gene functions during larval settlement, but also the availability of this large transcriptome dataset in B. amphitrite for further exploration of larval settlement and developmental pathways in this important marine species. © 2011 Chen et al.

  8. Antifouling effect of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata and different species of bacterial film on larval attachment of Balanus amphitrite (cirripedia, crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswambaran Ganapiriya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antifouling activity of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata (Dendy and five species of bacterial biofilm were studied. Larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cyprids and nauplii were used to monitor the settlement inhibition and the extent to which inhibition was due to toxicity. The crude extract and partially purified fractions of A.elongata showed significant inhibition over the settlement individually, and with the interaction of bacterial species. No bacterial film stimulated the barnacle settlement. The high but variable levels of antifouling activity in combination with less amount of toxicity showed the potential of these metabolites in environmentally-friendly antifouling preparations.

  9. Epibiotic community on the acorn barnacle (Balanus amphitrite) from a monsoon-influenced tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sahoo, G.; Khandeparker, L.

    of Phycology, 23(3), 434-441. Ianora, A., A. Miralto (2010) Toxigenic effects of diatoms on grazers, phytoplankton and other microbes: a review. Ecotoxicology, 19(3), 493-511. Jackson, D., S.P. Leys, V.F. Hinman, R. Woods, M.F. Lavin, B.M. Degnan (2002...

  10. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    the cement proteins of M. rosa were separated using reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and previously unidentified protein named 20 kDa M. rosa cement protein (Mrcp-20k) was found [67]. Its primary structure was revealed by cloning... to be an effective method of combating fouling. Barnacle adhesion strength was used to screen seventy-seven polydimethylsiloxane elastomeric coatings for fouling-release properties. Optimum fouling- release performance was dependent on the interaction of fluid type...

  11. Reversible anti-settlement activity against Amphibalanus (= Balanus ) amphitrite, Bugula neritina , and Hydroides elegans by a nontoxic pharmaceutical compound, mizolastine

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Xiaojian

    2009-11-01

    Mizolastine, an antihistamine pharmaceutical, was found to significantly inhibit larval settlement of the barnacle Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite, the bryozoan Bugula neritina, and the polychaete Hydroides elegans with EC50 values of 4.2, 11.2, and 4.1 mg ml-1, respectively. No toxicity against the larvae of these three species was observed at the concentration range tested during incubations with mizolastine. To determine whether the anti-settlement activity of mizolastine is reversible, recovery bioassays using these three species were conducted. More than 70% of the larvae that had been exposed for 4 h to mizolastine at concentrations four-fold greater than their respective EC50 values completed normal metamorphosis. The results of the recovery bioassay provide evidence that the antisettlement effect of mizolastine is reversible in addition to being nontoxic. The anti-settlement activities of several intermediates of the synthesis process of mizolastine were also examined. One of the intermediates, 2-chloro-1-(4- fluorobenzyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole, inhibited larval settlement and metamorphosis with low toxicity. These results may improve the understanding of the key functional group responsible for the anti-settlement activity of mizolastine. © 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  12. Barnacles and their significance in biofouling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.; Gaonkar, C.A.

    on the known living species and two on fossil species, summarily titled Monographs of the sub-class Cirripedia (Darwin 1851a,b; Darwin 1854a,b). He became the world’s foremost barnacle expert. Barnacles have relatively recent evolutionary radiation...

  13. Recruitment of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite Darwin in a tropical estuary: implications of environmental perturbation, reproduction and larval ecology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D; Anil, A.C.

    in monsoon and late pre-monsoon months (June 1998 to August 1998 and April 1999 to September 1999). The results of the dendrogram to identify the pattern in the monthly abundance of cirripede larvae showed three clusters (Figure 1D&I). The first peak... during September 1998 and November 1998 formed one cluster, followed by second peak during October 1998 and March 1999. Rest of the months, which had less number of larvae, grouped separately (Figure 1D&I). Reproduction The percentages of individuals...

  14. Inhibitory effect of Indian sponge extracts on bacterial strains and larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus Amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LimnaMol, V.P.; Raveendran, T.V.; Abhilash, K.R.; Parameswaran, P.S.

    , antifungal, antimalarial, antituberculosis and anti rat brain nitric oxide synthase activities (Venkateswarlu et al., 1994; Rao et al., 1998; Orabi et al., 2002; Liu et al., 2004); Oceanapia sp. and Iotrochota sp. are known for cytotoxicity (Venkateswarlu...., Fusetani, N. 2010. Natural products as antifouling compounds: recent progress and future perspectives. Biofouling. 26, 223–234. 22. Rao, V.J., Desaiah, D., Vig, P., Venkateswarlu, Y., 1998. Marine biomolecules inhibit rat brain nitric oxide synthase...

  15. The Mode of Action of Isocyanide in Three Aquatic Organisms, Balanus amphitrite, Bugula neritina and Danio rerio

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi-Fan

    2012-09-18

    Isocyanide is a potential antifouling compound in marine environments. In this study, we investigated its mode of action in three aquatic organisms. Two of them, the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, are major marine fouling invertebrates, and the other organism is the non-target species zebrafish Danio rerio. In the swimming larvae of B. neritina, isocyanide did not affect the total attachment rate (≤50 µg ml^(−1)), but it did change the attachment site by increasing the percentage of attachment on the bottom of the container rather than on the wall or air-water inter-surface. Isocyanide binds several proteins in B. neritina as identified via SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS: 1) a 30 kD protein band containing two proteins similar to voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC), which control the direct coupling of the mitochondrial matrix to the energy maintenance of the cytosol and the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria of mammalian cells; and 2) an unknown 39 kD protein. In B. amphitrite cyprids, the isocyanide binding protein were 1) a protein similar to NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, which is the “entry enzyme” of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria; and 2) cytochrome P450. In Danio rerio embryos, isocyanide caused “wavy” notochords, hydrocephalus, pericardial edema, poor blood circulation, and defects in pigmentation and hematopoiesis, which phenocopied copper deficiency. This is the first report on isocyanide binding proteins in fouling organisms, as well as the first description of its phenotype and potential toxicology in zebrafish.

  16. The mode of action of isocyanide in three aquatic organisms, Balanus amphitrite, Bugula neritina and Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fan Zhang

    Full Text Available Isocyanide is a potential antifouling compound in marine environments. In this study, we investigated its mode of action in three aquatic organisms. Two of them, the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, are major marine fouling invertebrates, and the other organism is the non-target species zebrafish Danio rerio. In the swimming larvae of B. neritina, isocyanide did not affect the total attachment rate (≤50 µg ml(-1, but it did change the attachment site by increasing the percentage of attachment on the bottom of the container rather than on the wall or air-water inter-surface. Isocyanide binds several proteins in B. neritina as identified via SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS: 1 a 30 kD protein band containing two proteins similar to voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC, which control the direct coupling of the mitochondrial matrix to the energy maintenance of the cytosol and the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria of mammalian cells; and 2 an unknown 39 kD protein. In B. amphitrite cyprids, the isocyanide binding protein were 1 a protein similar to NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, which is the "entry enzyme" of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria; and 2 cytochrome P450. In Danio rerio embryos, isocyanide caused "wavy" notochords, hydrocephalus, pericardial edema, poor blood circulation, and defects in pigmentation and hematopoiesis, which phenocopied copper deficiency. This is the first report on isocyanide binding proteins in fouling organisms, as well as the first description of its phenotype and potential toxicology in zebrafish.

  17. Investigating a possible role for the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones in Balanus improvisus cyprid settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Karen; Havenhand, Jon

    2013-05-01

    Increased settlement on bacterial biofilms has been demonstrated for a number of marine invertebrate larvae, but the nature of the cue(s) responsible is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that the bay barnacle Balanus improvisus utilizes the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as a cue for the selection of sites for permanent attachment. Single species biofilms of the AHL-producing bacteria Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas hydrophila and Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 were attractive to settling cypris larvae of B. improvisus. However, when AHL production was inactivated, either by mutation of the AHL synthetic genes or by expression of an AHL-degrading gene (aiiA), the ability of the bacteria to attract cyprids was abolished. In addition, cyprids actively explored biofilms of E. coli expressing the recombinant AHL synthase genes luxI from Vibrio fischeri (3-oxo-C6-HSL), rhlI from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (C4-HSL/C6-HSL), vanI from V. anguillarum (3-oxo-C10-HSL) and sulI from Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 (C4-HSL, 3-hydroxy-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and 3-hydroxy-C10-HSL), but not E. coli that did not produce AHLs. Finally, synthetic AHLs (C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C10-HSL and C12-HSL) at concentrations similar to those found within natural biofilms (5 μm) resulted in increased cyprid settlement. Thus, B. improvisus cypris exploration of and settlement on biofilms appears to be mediated by AHL-signalling bacteria in the laboratory. This adds to our understanding of how quorum sensing inhibition may be used as for biofouling control. Nonetheless, the significance of our results for larvae settling naturally in the field, and the mechanisms that underlay the observed responses to AHLs, is as yet unknown.

  18. Relevance of biofilm bacteria in modulating the larval metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    Balanus amphitrite, on its larval metamorphosis. The effect of multispecies bacterial film was also assessed. The production of different molecules by the bacteria was influenced by the nutrient media under which they were grown. It was observed...

  19. Transcriptome and Proteome Studies Reveal Candidate Attachment Genes during the Development of the Barnacle Amphibalanus Amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Aqeel, Sarah

    2016-09-21

    The acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. In the present study we profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI, and cyprid) from the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41%. We identified 65,784 expressed contigs, and a total of 1387 expressed proteins measured by quantitative proteomics. We found that osmotic stress, salt stress, hyperosmotic response and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated during the planktonic stage, while the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development genes were down-regulated. In the transition stage between the nauplius VI and the cyprid, genes that are involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development and eggshell formation were highly up-regulated, while the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding response in marine invertebrates, was down-regulated. We are able to report for the first time that sound sensory system proteins are highly abundant in the nauplius VI stage, implying that these proteins are good targets for the development of new antifouling compounds. The results presented here together with the new genome-wide datasets for a non-model specie represent an important resource for the study of biofouling and development. Proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004679.

  20. Transcriptome and proteome studies reveal candidate attachment genes during the development of the barnacle Amphibalanus Amphitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Al-Aqeel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. In the present study we profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI and cyprid from the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41‰. We identified 65,784 expressed contigs, and a total of 1,387 expressed proteins measured by quantitative proteomics. We found that osmotic stress, salt stress, hyperosmotic response and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated during the planktonic stage, while the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development genes were down-regulated. In the transition stage between the nauplius VI and the cyprid, genes that are involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development and eggshell formation were highly up-regulated, while the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding response in marine invertebrates, was down-regulated. We are able to report for the first time that sound sensory system proteins are highly abundant in the nauplius VI stage, implying that these proteins are good targets for the development of new antifouling compounds. The results presented here together with the new genome-wide datasets for a non-model specie represent an important resource for the study of biofouling and development.

  1. Sojourner, Barnacle Bill, Yogi, & Couch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    At center, Sojourner has traveled off the lander's rear ramp and onto the surface of Mars. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The rock Barnacle Bill is to the left of Sojourner, and the large rock Yogi is at upper right. On the horizon sits the rock dubbed 'Couch.' A deflated airbag sits at lower right.The image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  2. The tempo and mode of barnacle evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Harp, Margaret; Høeg, Jens T

    2008-01-01

    (outgroup) species representing almost all the Thoracica families to assess the tempo and mode of barnacle evolution. Using phylogenetic methods of maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference and 14 fossil calibrations, we found that: (1) Iblomorpha form a monophyletic group; (2......) pedunculated barnacles without shell plates (Heteralepadomorpha) are not ancestral, but have evolved, at least twice, from plated forms; (3) the ontogenetic pattern with 5-->6-->8-->12+ plates does not reflect Thoracica shell evolution; (4) the traditional asymmetric barnacles (Verrucidae) and the Balanomorpha......) the Thoracica suborders evolved since the Early Carboniferous (340mya) with the final radiation of the Sessilia in the Upper Jurassic (147mya). These results, therefore, reject many of the underlying hypotheses about character evolution in the Cirripedia Thoracica, stimulate a variety of new thoughts...

  3. Antennular specialization in cyprids of coral associated barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinckner, I.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2010-01-01

    barnacles that use the antennule for active penetration of cuticles. Compared to the third segment, the ¿rst, second and fourth segments exhibit no obvious specializations, and the armament of sensory setae is also as very comparable to that seen in balanomorphan cirripedes. The coral barnacles also have...... the nauplius eye, compound eyes, frontal ¿laments, lattice organs and cement glands known from other barnacles. Only T. sarae differed by having two unusually shaped setae terminally on the fourth segment. Video observations showed that the coral barnacle cyprids display the exploratory walking behaviour known...

  4. Darwin's "beloved barnacles": tough lessons in variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    In 1846, burdened by insecurity and self-doubt, and having been convinced that he needed to study some group of organisms closely, Darwin embarked on an eight-year odyssey in the protean and perplexing world of barnacles. At the time, he was searching for evidence in support of his theory of evolution by natural selection. In the course of his long study of barnacles, however, he was not just validating his preexisting theoretical system, but was also modifying his views on such fundamental aspects as the universality of individual variation, which is the focus of this paper. According to this notion, the members of any population of living things are expected to exhibit sufficient differences from one another for natural selection to operate. By emphasizing the theoretical value of the barnacle project, my analysis contributes to the historiographic tradition which highlights the significance of the period between the first comprehensive formulation of the theory of evolution by natural selection in 1844 and its urgent publication in the late 1850s. In the course of these years, Darwin's theory was not just accumulating empirical laurels, but was also expected to adapt to a changing conceptual landscape.

  5. Phylogeny and evolution of life history strategies of the Parasitic Barnacles (Crustacea, Cirripedia, Rhizocephala)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, Henrik; Hebsgaard, Martin Bay

    2006-01-01

    The barnacles (Crustacea, Cirripedia) consist of three well-defined orders: the conventional filter-feeding barnacles (Thoracica), the burrowing barnacles (Acrothoracica), and the parasitic barnacles (Rhizocephala). Thoracica and Acrothoracica feed by catching food particles from the surrounding ...... crustaceans (Anomura), which includes hermit crabs and squat lobsters....

  6. Gut fluorescence analysis of barnacle larvae: An approach to quantify the ingested food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Chetan A.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2012-10-01

    Gut fluorescence analysis can provide a snapshot of ingested food and has been employed in feeding studies of various organisms. In this study we standardised the gut fluorescence method using laboratory-reared barnacle larvae (Balanus amphitrite) fed with mono-algal diet Chaetoceros calcitrans, a unicellular diatom at a cell concentration of 2 × 105 cells ml-1. The gut fluorescence of IV-VI instar nauplii was found to be 370(±12) ng chlorophyll a larva-1 and in faecal pellets it was 224(±63) ng chlorophyll a larva-1. A phaeopigment concentration in larval gut was found to be 311(±13) ng larva-1 and in faecal pellets it was 172(±61) ng larva-1. The study also analysed larval samples collected from the field during different seasons from a tropical environment influenced by monsoons (Dona Paula bay, Goa, west coast of India), with characteristic temporal variations in phytoplankton abundance and diversity. Gut fluorescence of larvae obtained during the post-monsoon season was consistently higher when compared to the pre-monsoon season, suggesting the predominance of autotrophic forms in the larval gut during the post-monsoon season. Whereas, the low gut fluorescence obtained during the pre-monsoon season indicated the ingestion of food sources other than autotrophs. Such differences observed in the feeding behaviour of larvae could be due to differential availability of food for the larvae during different seasons and indicate the capability of larvae to feed on wide range of food sources. This study shows the value of the fluorescence method in feeding studies of planktotrophic organisms and in the evaluation of ecosystem dynamics.

  7. A System-Wide Approach to Identify the Mechanisms of Barnacle Attachment: Toward the Discovery of New Antifouling Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Aqeel, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Biofouling is a significant economic problem, particularly for marine and offshore oil industries. The acorn barnacle (Amphibalanus (Balanus) amphitrite) is the main biofouling organism in marine environments. Environmental conditions, the physiology of the biofouling organism, the surrounding microbial community, and the properties of the substratum can all influence the attachment of biofouling organisms to substrates. My dissertation investigated the biological processes involved in B. amphitrite development and attachment in the unique environment of the Red Sea, where the average water surface temperature is 34°C and the salinity reaches 41‰. I profiled the transcriptome and proteome of B. amphitrite at different life stages (nauplius II, nauplius VI, and cyprid) and identified 65,784 expressed contigs and 1387 expressed proteins by quantitative proteomics. During the planktonic stage, genes related to osmotic stress, salt stress, the hyperosmotic response, and the Wnt signaling pathway were strongly up-regulated, hereas genes related to the MAPK pathway, lipid metabolism, and cuticle development were down-regulated. In the transition from the nauplius VI to cyprid stages, there was up-regulation of genes involved in blood coagulation, cuticle development, and eggshell formation, and down-regulation of genes in the nitric oxide pathway, which stimulates the swimming and feeding responses of marine invertebrates. This system-wide integrated approach elucidated the development and attachment pathways important in B. amphitrite. Enzymes and metabolites in these pathways are potential molecular targets for the development of new antifouling compounds.

  8. Larval development and settlement of a whale barnacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogata, Yasuyuki; Matsumura, Kiyotaka

    2006-03-22

    Larval development and settlement of whale barnacles have not previously been described, unlike intertidal barnacles. Indeed, the mechanisms of the association between barnacles and whales have not been studied. Here we describe the larval development and settlement of the whale barnacle, Coronula diadema, and possible involvement of a cue from the host in inducing larval settlement. Eight-cell stage embryos were collected from C. diadema on a stranded humpback whale, incubated in filtered seawater for 7 days, and nauplius larvae hatched out. When fed with Chaetoceros gracilis, the nauplii developed to stage VI, and finally metamorphosed to the cypris stage. The larval development looked similar to that of intertidal barnacles with planktotrophic larval stages. The cyprids did not settle in normal seawater, but did settle in polystyrene Petri dishes when incubated in seawater with a small piece of skin tissue from the host whale. This strongly suggests the involvement of a chemical cue from the host whale tissue to induce larval settlement.

  9. An original procedure for balanus repair with transposition of the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kurbatov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the unique clinical experience of successful sexual rehabilitation of a patient who has undergone penile amputation for cancer. Complex reconstruction of all parts of the lost organ, by using known methods and those proposed for the first time in global practice (balanus repair with transposition of the testis, was performed in the patient.

  10. Cypris settlement and dwarf male formation in the barnacle Scalpellum scalpellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spremberg, U.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Buhl-Mortensen, L.;

    2012-01-01

    Cypris settlement and metamorphosis into dwarf males were studied in the androdioecious barnacle Scalpellum scalpellum using field collected samples from the North Sea, and experiments with laboratory reared larvae, observed with video. In the field sample, dwarf males were always situated...... surfaces of the adults, or on their hydroid substratum, always developed into hermaphrodites. The numbers settling as males did not differ significantly from those settling as hermaphrodites, suggesting that genetic sex determination may operate in S. scalpellum. The N. Sea sample comprised 52 adult...

  11. Identification of Balanus amphitrite larvae from field zooplankton using species-specific primers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.C.; Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    -based Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method for the specific identification of the barnacle, B. amphitrite, from the heterogeneous zooplankton sample. This method is reliable and accurate thereby overcoming taxonomic ambiguity. Sequence alignment of the 18S rRNA...

  12. The impact of food type, temperature and starvation on larval development of Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    The impact of diatom food species (Chaetoceros calcitrans and Skeletonema costatum), temperature and starvation on the larval development of Balanus amphitrite was evaluated. Starvation threshold levels for different ages of larvae (0- to 5-day...

  13. Adaptive evolution of sexual systems in pedunculate barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusa, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Mai; Kitaura, Jun;

    2012-01-01

    How and why diverse sexual systems evolve are fascinating evolutionary questions, but few empirical studies have dealt with these questions in animals. Pedunculate (gooseneck) barnacles show such diversity, including simultaneous hermaphroditism, coexistence of dwarf males and hermaphrodites...

  14. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+ Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liang

    Full Text Available The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed "barnacle cement". In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+ plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as "Trx-Balcp19k gel", and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany. Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials.

  15. Algal epibiosis on Megabalanus tintinnabulum and its role in segregation of the Balanus amphitrite population

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Eswaran, R.; Khandeparker, L.

    . Ecol. (Evol. Persp.), vol.35(4); 2014; 492-505 Algal epibiosis on Megabalanus tintinnabulum and its role in segregation of Balanus amphitrite population Ranjith E and Lidita Khandeparker* Council of Scientific and Industrial Research... & BPA were maintained on ZMA and BPA slants as described by Konya et al. (1995). The isolated bacteria (Table I) were identified following ‘Bergey’s manual of systematic bacteriology (Holt et al. 1994) and manual for the identification of medical...

  16. Stable isotopic analysis of Barnacle larvae and their faecal pellets to evaluate the ingested food

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.A.; Anil, A.C.

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are useful in the evaluation of food web dynamics and have been used extensively in the feeding studies. Barnacles are dominant component of the intertidal and bio-fouling communities. Life cycle of barnacles...

  17. Temporal and spatial variability in the recruitment of barnacles and the local dominance of Elminius modestus Darwin in SW Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Douglas I.; O'Riordan, Ruth M.; Barnes, David K. A.; Cross, Tom

    2005-04-01

    Deployment of processed natural substrata is a common method of investigating early settlement and recruitment processes, but has been under-utilised as a multi-depth method for barnacle study and analysis. Replicate, machined-slate panels (15 cm×15 cm×1 cm) were placed at 0 m (lower portion of the intertidal with ≈2 h emersion per tidal cycle), 6 m and 12 m at two sites of differing flow rate in Lough Hyne, SW Ireland. These panels were replaced serially every 30-60 days for a period of 3 years (2000-2003) to give monthly recruitment rates. Panels were also submersed for 60-120 days (Whirlpool Cliff, two locations) to show seasonal patterns and 370-400 days (Labhra Cliff) to show annual recruitment and survival patterns. The number, percentage cover and identity of all cirripede recruits were recorded. The greatest source of variability was with depth: between the intertidal (with many recruits) and the subtidal zones (few recruits). In general, intertidal recruitment was dominated by the introduced barnacle Elminius modestus Darwin. The high degree of water retention in Lough Hyne, combined with the high reproductive potential of E. modestus, has led to it becoming a self-perpetuating and locally dominant population. Balanus crenatus and Verruca stroemia dominated the longer immersed panels, highlighting the importance of post-recruitment processes to the survival of E. modestus recruits in the subtidal. Although E. modestus were found on subtidal monthly and seasonal panels, none were present on the subtidal annual panels. Temporally, month, season and time of placement were all found to be significant in explaining recruit number variability. Spatially, depth explained most variability of recruit numbers (6 m spatial separation), whilst site (≈200 m spatial separation) only ever being significant in combination with other factors, as was location (≈50 m spatial separation). The work highlights the importance of examining both temporal and spatial scales

  18. First study on gene expression of cement proteins and potential adhesion-related genes of a membranous-based barnacle as revealed from Next-Generation Sequencing technology

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Hsiu Chin

    2013-12-12

    This is the first study applying Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to survey the kinds, expression location, and pattern of adhesion-related genes in a membranous-based barnacle. A total of 77,528,326 and 59,244,468 raw sequence reads of total RNA were generated from the prosoma and the basis of Tetraclita japonica formosana, respectively. In addition, 55,441 and 67,774 genes were further assembled and analyzed. The combined sequence data from both body parts generates a total of 79,833 genes of which 47.7% were shared. Homologues of barnacle cement proteins - CP-19K, -52K, and -100K - were found and all were dominantly expressed at the basis where the cement gland complex is located. This is the main area where transcripts of cement proteins and other potential adhesion-related genes were detected. The absence of another common barnacle cement protein, CP-20K, in the adult transcriptome suggested a possible life-stage restricted gene function and/or a different mechanism in adhesion between membranous-based and calcareous-based barnacles. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  19. Barnacle cement: an etchant for stainless steel 316L?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, R; Kumar, R; Doble, M; Venkatesan, R

    2010-09-01

    Localized corrosion of stainless steel beneath the barnacle-base is an unsolved issue for the marine industry. In this work, we clearly bring out for the first time the role of the barnacle cement in acting as an etchant, preferentially etching the grain boundaries, and initiating the corrosion process in stainless steel 316L. The investigations include structural characterization of the cement and corroded region, and also chemical characterization of the corrosion products generated beneath the barnacle-base. Structural characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the morphological changes in the cement structure across the interface of the base-plate and the substrate, modification of the steel surface by the cement and the corrosion pattern beneath the barnacle-base. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the corrosion products show that they are composed of mainly oxides of iron thereby implying that the corrosion is aerobic in nature. A model for the etching and corrosion mechanism is proposed based on our observations.

  20. Diversification of Chilean aquaculture: the case of the giant barnacle Austromegabalanus psittacus (Molina, 1782 Diversificación de la acuicultura chilena: el caso del cirripedio gigante Austromegabalanus psittacus (Molina, 1782

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A López

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is presented supporting the technical and economic possibilities of giant barnacle Austromegabalanuspsittacus (Molina, 1782 culture, one of the main alternatives for diversifying aquaculture in Chile. Spat collection from the wild varied between different sites in the north and south of the country and according to type of artificial collector. Growth also varied between sites (greater in the north, technological systems (greater in tubular systems and depths (greater at 4 m. Average commercial size in the national market was reached over a period between 18 and 24 months. A long-line can produce between 7 to 10 gross ton during this period, therefore average annual fisheries production can be reached with only 10 to 30 long-lines, in an area of 1 to 3 ha. There is demand for this resource in the external market, particularly in the Japanese market, either as product similar to "fujit subo" (Balanus rostratus, or as a new resource; the relationship between production costs and price determines that giant barnacle culture has commercial potential. Economic indicators for cultured giant barnacle were as follows: net present value (NPV: US$ 490,000; internal rate of return (IRR: 32%; discounted payback period (DPBP: 4 years. Results obtained suggest the natural bank repopulation option, and the development of mass cultures. Giant barnacle culture is based on biological characteristics that differentiate it from other crustaceans species, as well as simple and economic production technologies and favourable economic projections on external markets.Se presentan evidencias de las posibilidades técnicas y económicas del cultivo del cirripedio gigante o "picoroco", Austromegabalanus psittacus (Molina, 1782. Esta especie es una de las principales alternativas para la diversificación de la acuicultura en Chile. La captación de semilla desde el ambiente varió entre distintos sitios del norte y sur del país y según el tipo de colector

  1. Video observation of surface exploration in cyprids of Balanus amphitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maruzzo, Diego; Conlan, Sheelagh; Aldred, Nick;

    2011-01-01

    Video microscopy of cyprids of Balanus amphitrite was used to monitor the action of antennular setae during the exploratory behaviour prior to attachment. In addition, SEM was used to provide a revised description of all antennular setae for that species. The videos describe if a particular seta...... touches the substratum and the area it can cover during surface exploration. On the fourth segment, the plumose terminal setae A and B are never in contact with the substratum, lack a terminal pore and it is argued that they sense hydrodynamic forces. The aesthetasc-like terminal seta D is likewise held...... free in the water at all times and it is speculated that it senses dissolved substances, but, since it contains a scolopale rod, it must also have a mechano-receptive function. All remaining antennular setae on the second, third and fourth segments have a terminal pore and it is argued...

  2. Records of Australian Fouling Organisms: Sessile Barnacles (Crustacea, Cirripedia),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Dr. W.A. Newman) Laboratorio de Ensayo de Materiales e Investigaciones Tecnologicas (LEMIT), Argentina. (Attention: Dr. V. Rascio) Dept. of Zoology...AD-A105 265 MATERIALS RESEARCH LABS ASCOT VALE (AUSTRALIA) FIG B/1 RECORDS OF AUSTRALIAN FOULING ORGANISMS: SESSILE BARNACLES (CRU--ETC(U) APR 81 J A...SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA REPORT . MRL-R-809 RECORDS OF AUSTRALIAN FOULING ORGANISMS: SESSILE

  3. MKK3 Was Involved in Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite through Activating the Kinase Activity of p38MAPK

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Gen

    2013-07-29

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) plays a key role in larval settlement of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. To study the signaling pathway associated with p38MAPK during larval settlement, we sought to identify the upstream kinase of p38MAPK. Three MKKs (MKK3, MKK4 and MKK7) and three MAPKs (p38MAPK, ERK and JNK) in A. amphitrite were cloned and recombinantly expressed in E. coli. Through kinase assays, we found that MKK3, but not MKK4 or MKK7, phosphorylated p38MAPK. Furthermore, MKK3 activity was specific to p38MAPK, as it did not phosphorylate ERK or JNK. To further investigate the functional relationship between MKK3 and p38MAPK in vivo, we studied the localization of phospho-MKK3 (pMKK3) and MKK3 by immunostaining. Consistent with the patterns of p38MAPK and phospho-p38MAPK (pp38MAPK), pMKK3 and MKK3 mainly localized to the antennules of the cyprids. Western blot analysis revealed that pMKK3 levels, like pp38MAPK levels, were elevated at cyprid stage, compared to nauplii and juvenile stages. Moreover, pMKK3 levels increased after treatment with adult barnacle crude extracts, suggesting that MKK3 might mediate the stimulatory effects of adult barnacle extracts on the p38MAPK pathway. © 2013 Zhang et al.

  4. Adhesive proteins of stalked and acorn barnacles display homology with low sequence similarities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie-Leigh Jonker

    Full Text Available Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins 'sticky' has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes. It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa. Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7-16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes. Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18-26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa.

  5. Telomere dynamics in a long-lived bird, the barnacle goose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliny Angela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theories of ageing predict a trade-off between metabolism, reproduction, and maintenance. Species with low investment in early reproduction are thus expected to be able to evolve more efficient maintenance and repair mechanisms, allowing for a longer potential life span (intrinsic longevity. The erosion of telomeres, the protective caps at the ends of linear chromosomes, plays an important role in cellular and organismal senescence, signalling the onset of age-related disease due to accumulation of unrepaired somatic damage. Using extensive longitudinal data from a long-term study of a natural population of barnacle geese Branta leucopsis, we investigated individual rates of telomere length changes over two years in 34 birds between 0 and 22 years of age, covering almost 80% of the species’ lifespan. Results We show that telomeres in this long-lived bird are very well maintained, as theoretically expected, with an average loss rate of only 5 base pairs per year among adults. We thus found no significant relationship between change in telomere length and age. However, telomeres tended to shorten at a faster pace in juveniles compared to adults. For the first time, we demonstrate a faster telomere attrition rate in females compared to males. We found no correlation between telomere loss rate and adult survival or change in body mass. Conclusions Our results add further support for a link between longevity and telomere maintenance, and highlight the complexities of telomere dynamics in natural populations.

  6. Calcium-dependent potassium current in barnacle photoreceptor

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    When barnacle lateral eye photoreceptors are depolarized to membrane potentials of 0 to +50 mV in the dark, the plot of outward current through the cell membrane against time has two distinct maxima. The first maximum occurs 5-10 ms after the depolarization began. The current then decays to a minimum at approximately 500 ms after the onset of depolarization, and then increases to a second maximum 4-6 s after the depolarization began. If depolarization is maintained, the current again decays t...

  7. Desenvolvimento larvário de Balanídeos em laboratório - Balanus amphitrite (Var. amphitrite Larval development of Balanids reared in laboratory: Balanus amphitrite var. amphitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyrce Lacombe

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available É descrita a técnicade criação de balanus amphitrite var. amphitrite em laboratório, sob condições controladas, que permitem observações das mudas, do número de estágios e, ainda são apresentadas as características de cada estágio. Balanus amphitrite amphitrite é criado pela primeira vez em laboratório com sucesso. Dos 200 Nauplii obtidos da eclosão dos ovos das lamelas dos adultos, conseguiu-se a fixação de 120 cypris e o crescimento de 78 Balanus pelo período de três meses. A alimentação usada foi Cyclotella nana, proveniente do New York Aquarium. A fase larvária de Balanus amphitrite amphitrite consiste de seis estágios de Nauplii e um estágio de Cypris. A disposição, forma, tamanho, número de setas, sétulas e espinhos diferem entre os 6 estágios. São apresentados todos os detalhes de microanatomia de cada estágio. A setação é critério valioso para a identificação dos Nauplii e pode ser usada para separar certos estágios especiais. A duração dos seis estágios é a seguinte: o primeiro estágio leva, aproximadamente, de 15 a 20 minutos; 2º estágio de 2 até 4 dias a partir do nascimento dos Nauplii; 3º estágio vai até ao 6º dia; 4º estágio é encontrado a partir do 7º dia de eclosão; 5º estágio varia entre o 9º ao 11º dia e, finalmente, o 6º estágio até o aparecimento do Cypris que se faz no 12º dia de criação. O tempo necessário para o completo desenvolvimento larvários em laboratório estende-se de 12 até 14 dias, aproximadamente. O estudo da metamorfose do Cypris, e o crescimento dos Balanídeos foi realizado por um período de tres meses no frasco de criação.We described the technique for the creation of the Nauplii of Balanus amphitrite amphitrite under controlled laboratory condictions, which permits observations of the moltings, the number of stages, and the characteristics of each stages. It was for the firt time that Balanus amphitrite amphitrite was reared in

  8. Preliminary results on the anatomy of the larval musculature of Balanus improvisus (Darwin, 1854) (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Thecostraca) using phalloidin staining in combination with confocal laserscanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Scholtz, Gerhard;

    2006-01-01

    The anatomy of the larval muscular systems in Balanus improvisus (Darwin, 1854) was investigated by using phalloidin staining to visualize filamentous F-actin in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The larval musculature contains an anterior muscle complex associated with ...

  9. Worldwide genetic differentiation in the common fouling barnacle, Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hsi-Nien

    2014-10-21

    © 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Amphibalanus amphitrite is a common fouling barnacle distributed globally in tropical and subtropical waters. In the present study, the genetic (mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I) and morphological differentiation in A. amphitrite from 25 localities around the world were investigated. The results revealed three clades within A. amphitrite with a genetic divergence of ~ 4% among clades, whereas there were no diagnostic morphological differences among clades. Clade 1 is widely distributed in both temperate and tropical waters, whereas Clade 3 is currently restricted to the tropical region. The deep divergence among clades suggests historical isolation within A. amphitrite; thus, the present geographical overlaps are possibly a result of the combined effects of rising sea level and human-mediated dispersals. This study highlights the genetic differentiation that exists in a common, widely distributed fouling organism with great dispersal potential; future antifouling research should take into account the choice of lineages.

  10. Antennular specialization in cyprids of coral associated barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinckner, I.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2010-01-01

    from cyprids settling on hard bottom substrata. We interpret the pointed structure of the third antennular segment as an adaptation to penetrate through live coral tissue. Projecting this character ono a recent phylogenetic tree of balanomorphan species indicates that it is an apomorphy for a large......We used video, light and scanning electron microscopy to study the cypris larvae in species of coral inhabiting barnacles (Pyrgomatidae) in search of adaptations to settlement on their highly unusual substratum. Species studied were Savignium crenatum, Trevathana jensi, Trevathana margaretae......, Trevathana mizrachae and Trevathana sarae. In all ¿ve species the third antennular segment was shaped like a spearhead with only an extremely narrow attachment disc. This morphology represents the most extreme antennular specialization known from cirripedes, and it is not even matched by those parasitic...

  11. Antifouling Activity of Synthetic Alkylpyridinium Polymers Using the Barnacle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Piazza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS isolated from the Mediterranean marine sponge, Haliclona (Rhizoniera sarai, effectively inhibit barnacle larva settlement and natural marine biofilm formation through a non-toxic and reversible mechanism. Potential use of poly-APS-like compounds as antifouling agents led to the chemical synthesis of monomeric and oligomeric 3-alkylpyridinium analogues. However, these are less efficient in settlement assays and have greater toxicity than the natural polymers. Recently, a new chemical synthesis method enabled the production of poly-APS analogues with antibacterial, antifungal and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities. The present study examines the antifouling properties and toxicity of six of these synthetic poly-APS using the barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite as a model (cyprids and II stage nauplii larvae in settlement, acute and sub-acute toxicity assays. Two compounds, APS8 and APS12-3, show antifouling effects very similar to natural poly-APS, with an anti-settlement effective concentration that inhibits 50% of the cyprid population settlement (EC50 after 24 h of 0.32 mg/L and 0.89 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity of APS8 is negligible, while APS12-3 is three-fold more toxic (24-h LC50: nauplii, 11.60 mg/L; cyprids, 61.13 mg/L than natural poly-APS. This toxicity of APS12-3 towards nauplii is, however, 60-fold and 1200-fold lower than that of the common co-biocides, Zn- and Cu-pyrithione, respectively. Additionally, exposure to APS12-3 for 24 and 48 h inhibits the naupliar swimming ability with respective IC50 of 4.83 and 1.86 mg/L.

  12. Coumarins from the Herb Cnidium monnieri and Chemically Modified Derivatives as Antifoulants against Balanus albicostatus and Bugula neritina Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Chang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the search for new environmental friendly antifouling (AF agents, four coumarins were isolated from the herbal plant Cnidium monnieri, known as osthole (1, imperatorin (2, isopimpinellin (3 and auraptenol (4. Furthermore, five coumarin derivatives, namely 8-epoxypentylcoumarin (5, meranzin hydrate (6, 2'-deoxymetranzin hydrate (7, 8-methylbutenalcoumarin (8, and micromarin-F (9 were synthesized from osthole. Compounds 1, 2, 4, 7 showed high inhibitory activities against larval settlement of Balanus albicostatus with EC50 values of 4.64, 3.39, 3.38, 4.67 μg mL−1. Compound 8 could significantly inhibit larval settlement of Bugula neritina with an EC50 value of 3.87 μg mL−1. The impact of functional groups on anti-larval settlement activities suggested that the groups on C-5' and C-2'/C-3' of isoamylene chian could affect the AF activities.

  13. Calcium-dependent potassium current in barnacle photoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsover, S R

    1981-12-01

    When barnacle lateral eye photoreceptors are depolarized to membrane potentials of 0 to +50 mV in the dark, the plot of outward current through the cell membrane against time has two distinct maxima. The first maximum occurs 5-10 ms after the depolarization began. The current then decays to a minimum at approximately 500 ms after the onset of depolarization, and then increases to a second maximum 4-6 s after the depolarization began. If depolarization is maintained, the current again decays to reach a steady value approximately 1 min after depolarization began. The increase in current to the maximum at 4-6s from the minimum at approximately 500 ms is termed the "late current." It is maximum for depolarizations to around +25 mV and is reduced in amplitude at more positive potentials. It is not observed when the membrane is depolarized to potentials more positive than +60 mV. The late current is inhibited by external cobaltous ion and external tetraethylammonium ion, and shows a requirement for external calcium ion. When the calcium-sequestering agent EGTA is injected, the late current is abolished. Illumination of a cell under voltage clamp reduces the amplitude of the late current recorded subsequently in the dark. On the basis of the voltage dependence and pharmacology of the late current, it is proposed that the current is a calcium-dependent potassium current.

  14. Unusual adhesive production system in the barnacle Lepas anatifera: an ultrastructural and histochemical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; von Byern, Janek; Flammang, Patrick; Klepal, Waltraud; Power, Anne Marie

    2012-12-01

    Adhesives that are naturally produced by marine organisms are potential sources of inspiration in the search for medical adhesives. Investigations of barnacle adhesives are at an early stage but it is becoming obvious that barnacles utilize a unique adhesive system compared to other marine organisms. The current study examined the fine structure and chemistry of the glandular system that produces the adhesive of the barnacle Lepas anatifera. All components for the glue originated from large single-cell glands (70-180 μm). Staining (including immunostaining) showed that L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and phosphoserine were not present in the glue producing tissues, demonstrating that the molecular adhesion of barnacles differs from all other permanently gluing marine animals studied to date. The glandular tissue and adhesive secretion primarily consisted of slightly acidic proteins but also included some carbohydrate. Adhesive proteins were stored in cytoplasmic granules adjacent to an intracellular drainage canal (ICC); observations implicated both merocrine and apocrine mechanisms in the transport of the secretion from the cell cytoplasm to the ICC. Inside the ICC, the secretion was no longer contained within granules but was a flocculent material which became "clumped" as it traveled through the canal network. Hemocytes were not seen within the adhesive "apparatus" (comprising of the glue producing cells and drainage canals), nor was there any structural mechanism by which additions such as hemocytes could be made to the secretion. The unicellular adhesive gland in barnacles is distinct from multicellular adhesive systems observed in marine animals such as mussels and tubeworms. Because the various components are not physically separated in the apparatus, the barnacle adhesive system appears to utilize completely different and unknown mechanisms for maintaining the liquid state of the glue within the body, as well as unidentified mechanisms for the conversion of

  15. Bored to Death: Community-Wide Effect of Predation on a Foundation Species in a Low-Disturbance Arctic Subtidal System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeniy Yakovis

    Full Text Available The strength of top-down control by consumers is predicted to decrease with latitude, but most data confirming this assumption come from latitudes <60°, while empirical studies of predation in sub-arctic and arctic marine habitats are few. A barnacle Balanus crenatus is a native foundation species in the shallow subtidal of the White Sea (65° N, hosting a diverse (250+ species assemblage of macrobenthic organisms. On mixed sediments live barnacles share primary substrates (shells and gravel with numerous empty barnacle tests, 7% of which had drill holes of an unidentified origin. We manipulated the densities of (i adult muricid whelks Boreotrophon clathratus (of previously unknown feeding habits, to check if they prey on barnacles, (ii other predators to reveal their effect on juvenile Boreotrophon, and (iii empty tests to assess the community-wide effect of predation on barnacles. The abundance of drilled empty tests in the field correlated with that of Boreotrophon. A year-long caging experiment clearly confirmed predation, showing the highest barnacle mortality and proportion of drilled tests in whelk enclosures, and the lowest--in predator exclosure treatments. Boreotrophon preferred the barnacles attached to conspecifics to those from primary substrates. Because of its scarcity Boreotrophon had a minor direct effect on barnacle abundance in the field. Yet, initially defaunated empty tests and live barnacles developed markedly different macrobenthic assemblages, suggesting a strong indirect effect of the predation. Juvenile Boreotrophon were 5-6 times less abundant in open and partial cages than in exclosures and enclosures, which indicates that the recruitment and, consequently, the abundance of Boreotrophon and its predation on Balanus are top-down controlled by apex predators. In contrast, in tropical and temperate intertidal the predation on barnacles is stronger and primarily limited by environmental stress and prey availability.

  16. Barnacle larval transport in the Mandovi–Zuari estuarine system, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    George, G.; Desai, D.V.; Gaonkar, C.A.; Aboobacker, V.M.; Vethamony, P.; Anil, A.C.

    water has a net movement landward and surface water seaward when averaged over a number of tides. Larval longevity and water movement establish the potential for dispersal, whereas larval behavior often determines the actual degree of spread. Two... that the spawning sites may vary remarkably from the modelled sites. Any stony substratum inhabiting barnacles may also form source of the larvae. It may be noted that a study 12    carried out in the laboratory showed the minimum age of barnacles to release...

  17. Mg/Ca and isotopic high resolution record of deep-sea hydrothermal barnacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, A.-V.; Bojar, H.-P.; Tufar, W.

    2012-04-01

    Barnacles are crustaceans adapted to a sessile existence and cemented to a substrate by a protein complex. Most of the known species inhabit shallow marine environment, less than 2% of the species are found at depths between 100 and 2500 m. The shell of barnacles has a great adaptive significance, the shell of some barnacle species have been already investigated for microstructure. In this study we investigated the shell microstructure as well as the Mg/Ca and stable isotope distribution of barnacles found at a depth of around 2500m at a black smoker from the Manus Spreading centre, north-east of Papua New Guinea. The shell consists of three substructures: an outer layer with pores and aragonite crystals, a massive interior mass and an inner layer with pores. The shell shows grown lines and the outer layer exhibits longitudinal striation from base to apex. The pores have a medium size of 0.8 microns. The size of the calcitic microcrystals are in the range of 0.2 to 0.5 microns, beside, larger aragonite crystals, with size of c. 10 microns are present. The massive interior mass has a compact structure, no pores or channels could be observed. Oxygen stable isotope data of barnacle shell were performed from the centre to the border of the calcitic shells, along profiles. Within one shell, the isotope values show variations of max. 0.6 ‰. The calculated temperatures from the stable isotope data consistently indicate that the barnacles populate sites with low temperature values, up to a few °C. The calculated temperatures from the isotope data are also in agreement with the reported habitat from the North Fiji and Lau Basins, where temperatures of max. 6°C were measured at sites populated by barnacles. Both calculated and measured temperatures of a few degrees indicate that at the sites where barnacles live, hydrothermal fluid input is present, as ambient temperature is around 1.5°C. Electron-microbeam analyses were done along the interior layer of the shell. The

  18. Analysis of the behaviours mediating barnacle cyprid reversible adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Nick; Høeg, Jens T; Maruzzo, Diego; Clare, Anthony S

    2013-01-01

    When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic 'walking' behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as 'footprints' on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic 'suction cup'. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous 'temporary adhesive', 'dry' adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface - presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond - seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion, inherently sticky and

  19. Analysis of the behaviours mediating barnacle cyprid reversible adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Aldred

    Full Text Available When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic 'walking' behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as 'footprints' on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic 'suction cup'. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous 'temporary adhesive', 'dry' adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface - presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond - seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion

  20. Darwin taxonomist: Barnacles and shell burrowing barnacles Darwin taxónomo: cirrípedos y cirrípedos perforadores de conchas

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This bibliographic review revisits circumstances in which the wharf, shell burrowing barnacle, Cryptophialus minutus, was first collected by Charles Darwin in southern Chile, in 1836. Further, explores how its collection marked Darwin's taxonomical interest in Cirripedia. A short review analyzes the initial number of extant species of Cirripedia, as described by Darwin and the present situation, with emphasis on recent collections of C. minutus in the southern tip of South America.Esta revisi...

  1. Gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp. ingest microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam C. Goldstein

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Substantial quantities of small plastic particles, termed “microplastic,” have been found in many areas of the world ocean, and have accumulated in particularly high densities on the surface of the subtropical gyres. While plastic debris has been documented on the surface of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG since the early 1970s, the ecological implications remain poorly understood. Organisms associated with floating objects, termed the “rafting assemblage,” are an important component of the NPSG ecosystem. These objects are often dominated by abundant and fast-growing gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp., which predate on plankton and larval fishes at the sea surface. To assess the potential effects of microplastic on the rafting community, we examined the gastrointestinal tracts of 385 barnacles collected from the NPSG for evidence of plastic ingestion. We found that 33.5% of the barnacles had plastic particles present in their gastrointestinal tract, ranging from one plastic particle to a maximum of 30 particles. Particle ingestion was positively correlated to capitulum length, and no blockage of the stomach or intestines was observed. The majority of ingested plastic was polyethylene, with polypropylene and polystyrene also present. Our results suggest that barnacle ingestion of microplastic is relatively common, with unknown trophic impacts on the rafting community and the NPSG ecosystem.

  2. Gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp.) ingest microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial quantities of small plastic particles, termed “microplastic,” have been found in many areas of the world ocean, and have accumulated in particularly high densities on the surface of the subtropical gyres. While plastic debris has been documented on the surface of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) since the early 1970s, the ecological implications remain poorly understood. Organisms associated with floating objects, termed the “rafting assemblage,” are an important component of the NPSG ecosystem. These objects are often dominated by abundant and fast-growing gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp.), which predate on plankton and larval fishes at the sea surface. To assess the potential effects of microplastic on the rafting community, we examined the gastrointestinal tracts of 385 barnacles collected from the NPSG for evidence of plastic ingestion. We found that 33.5% of the barnacles had plastic particles present in their gastrointestinal tract, ranging from one plastic particle to a maximum of 30 particles. Particle ingestion was positively correlated to capitulum length, and no blockage of the stomach or intestines was observed. The majority of ingested plastic was polyethylene, with polypropylene and polystyrene also present. Our results suggest that barnacle ingestion of microplastic is relatively common, with unknown trophic impacts on the rafting community and the NPSG ecosystem. PMID:24167779

  3. The benefit of large broods in barnacle geese : a study using natural and experimental manipulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, MJJE; Bruinzeel, LW; Black, JM; Drent, RH

    1999-01-01

    1. In precocial birds, where the young feed themselves, the costs and benefits of brood size are still poorly understood. An experimental manipulation of brood size was employed to examine the effects of brood size on both parents and young in a wild population of barnacle geese [Branta leucopsis (B

  4. Bryophyte DNA sequences from faeces of an arctic herbivore, barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stech, M.; Kolvoort, E.; Loonen, M. J. J. E.; Vrieling, K.; Kruijer, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    We tested DNA extraction methods and PCR conditions for the amplification of bryophyte DNA from barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis) faeces collected from Spitsbergen (Svalbard). Both the Qiagen stool kit and a silica-based extraction method received sufficient DNA from fresh and older droppings, as in

  5. The morphological development of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of the migratory barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bishop, CM; Butler, PJ; ElHaj, AJ; Egginton, S; Loonen, MJJE

    1996-01-01

    The masses of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of wild barnacle goose goslings, from a migratory population, were examined systematically during development and their values compared to those of pre-migratory geese. Pre-flight development was typified by approximately linear increases of body, leg,

  6. Breeding barnacle geese in Kolokolkova Bay, Russia : number of breeding pairs, reproductive success and morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Jeugd, HP; Gurtovaya, E; Eichhorn, G; Litvin, KY; Mineev, OY; van Eerden, M

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of an expedition to a barnacle-goose (Branta leucopsis) breeding area in Kolokolkova Bay, west of the lower Pechora delta in northern Russia, undertaken in July 2002. In total, 6 breeding colonies were found within the study area, harbouring 1,324 nests. Mean clutch size was 2.

  7. Isolation of living Algae growing in the shells of Molluscs and Barnacles with EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prud’homme van Reine, W.F.; Hoek, van den C.

    1966-01-01

    Several decalcifying mixtures or aqueous solutions of inorganic or organic acids are generally used for releasing algae growing in the shells of molluscs and barnacles, for instance dilute hydrochloric, nitric, citric, or acetic acid (4), a mixture of nitric acid, chromic acid and alcolhol (1), nitr

  8. Morphometric and molecular identification of individual barnacle cyprids from wild plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hsi-Nien; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Chan, Benny K.K.

    2013-01-01

    The present study used DNA barcodes to identify individual cyprids to species. This enables accurate quantification of larvae of potential fouling species in the plankton. In addition, it explains the settlement patterns of barnacles and serves as an early warning system of unwanted immigrant spe...

  9. Predation danger can explain changes in timing of migration: the case of the Barnacle goose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, R.M.; Eichhorn, G.; Langevelde, van F.; Bauer, S.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding stopover decisions of long-distance migratory birds is crucial for conservation and management of these species along their migratory flyway. Recently, an increasing number of Barnacle geese breeding in the Russian Arctic have delayed their departure from their wintering site in the Ne

  10. Predation danger can explain changes in timing of migration: the case of the barnacle goose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy M Jonker

    Full Text Available Understanding stopover decisions of long-distance migratory birds is crucial for conservation and management of these species along their migratory flyway. Recently, an increasing number of Barnacle geese breeding in the Russian Arctic have delayed their departure from their wintering site in The Netherlands by approximately one month and have reduced their staging duration at stopover sites in the Baltic accordingly. Consequently, this extended stay increases agricultural damage in The Netherlands. Using a dynamic state variable approach we explored three hypotheses about the underlying causes of these changes in migratory behavior, possibly related to changes in (i onset of spring, (ii potential intake rates and (iii predation danger at wintering and stopover sites. Our simulations showed that the observed advance in onset of spring contradicts the observed delay of departure, whereas both increased predation danger and decreased intake rates in the Baltic can explain the delay. Decreased intake rates are expected as a result of increased competition for food in the growing Barnacle goose population. However, the effect of predation danger in the model was particularly strong, and we hypothesize that Barnacle geese avoid Baltic stopover sites as a response to the rapidly increasing number of avian predators in the area. Therefore, danger should be considered as an important factor influencing Barnacle goose migratory behavior, and receive more attention in empirical studies.

  11. Setal morphology and cirral setation of thoracican barnacle cirri: adaptations and implications for thoracican evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, B.K.K.; Garm, A.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2008-01-01

    in the mantle cavity using the setae on their three pairs of maxillipeds. Our results indicate that in thoracican barnacles, adaptations in feeding behaviour are associated with changes in the setation pattern of the cirri. In addition, the setal types and their distribution on the cirri are potential new...

  12. Effects of predation risk on site selection of barnacle geese during brood-rearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, J; Loonen, MJJE; Mehlum, F; Black, JM; Madsen, J

    1998-01-01

    Barnacle geese Branta leucopsis breed on small islands in the Kongsfjorden area, Spitsbergen. Shortly after hatching, families approach feeding sites at the mainland coast in the close surroundings of the village Ny-Alesund. The goslings are subject to predation by arctic foxes Alopex lagopus throug

  13. The development of a genome wide SNP set for the Barnacle goose Branta leucopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy M Jonker

    Full Text Available Migratory birds are of particular interest for population genetics because of the high connectivity between habitats and populations. A high degree of connectivity requires using many genetic markers to achieve the required statistical power, and a genome wide SNP set can fit this purpose. Here we present the development of a genome wide SNP set for the Barnacle Goose Branta leucopsis, a model species for the study of bird migration. We used the genome of a different waterfowl species, Mallard Anas platyrhynchos, as a reference to align Barnacle Goose second generation sequence reads from an RRL library and detected 2188 SNPs genome wide. Furthermore, we used chimeric flanking sequences, merged from both Mallard and Barnacle Goose DNA sequence information, to create primers for validation by genotyping. Validation with a 384 SNP genotyping set resulted in 374 (97% successfully typed SNPs in the assay, of which 358 (96% were polymorphic. Additionally, we validated our SNPs on relatively old (30 years museum samples, which resulted in a success rate of at least 80%. This shows that museum samples could be used in standard SNP genotyping assays. Our study also shows that the genome of a related species can be used as reference to detect genome wide SNPs in birds, because genomes of birds are highly conserved. This is illustrated by the use of chimeric flanking sequences, which showed that the incorporation of flanking nucleotides from Mallard into Barnacle Goose sequences lead to equal genotyping performance when compared to flanking sequences solely composed of Barnacle Goose sequence.

  14. Influence of bacterial exopolymers, conspecific adult extract and salinity on the cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, R.

    the metamorphosis rate. The interaction between these two variables, however, did not change in any combination, irrespective of the bacterial strain used. The Pseudomonas epm promoted metamorphosis at 15 ppt, but was inhibitory at 45 ppt. The Acinetobacter epm...

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the naupliar musculature and a scanning electron microscopy atlas of nauplius development of Balanus improvisus (Crustacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    An atlas of the naupliar development of the cirripede Balanus improvisus Darwin, 1854 using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is provided. Existing spikes on the hindbody increase in number with each moult and are an applicable character for identification of the different nauplius stages......, as is the setation pattern of the first antennae. The naupliar musculature of B. improvisus was stained with phalloidin to visualise F-actin, followed by analysis using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with subsequent application of 3D imaging software. The larval musculature is already fully established...

  16. New alien barnacles in the Azores and some remarks on the invasive potential of Balanidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Paulo; Costa, Ana Cristina; Dionísio, Maria Ana

    2012-12-01

    Global homogenization of biota is underway through worldwide introduction and establishment of non-indigenous (exotic) species. Organisms fouling ship hulls are continually in transit and can affect communities through biodiversity loss and serious damage to economy and public health. In the Azores, for the first time, underwater alien species prospection was conducted in marinas and recreational harbours, at São Miguel Island. Populations of three locally previously unknown barnacle species were found: Amphibalanus amphitrite, Amphibalanus eburneus and Perforatus perforatus. These species account for the more than 50% of alien barnacles worldwide that belong to Balanidae family. Hence, some considerations about morphology and life cycle of this family are advanced, discussed and related to their invasive potential.

  17. Sequence basis of Barnacle Cement Nanostructure is Defined by Proteins with Silk Homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Christopher R.; Fears, Kenan P.; Leary, Dagmar H.; Scancella, Jenifer M.; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Jinny L.; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittschof, Dan; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Wahl, Kathryn J.

    2016-11-01

    Barnacles adhere by producing a mixture of cement proteins (CPs) that organize into a permanently bonded layer displayed as nanoscale fibers. These cement proteins share no homology with any other marine adhesives, and a common sequence-basis that defines how nanostructures function as adhesives remains undiscovered. Here we demonstrate that a significant unidentified portion of acorn barnacle cement is comprised of low complexity proteins; they are organized into repetitive sequence blocks and found to maintain homology to silk motifs. Proteomic analysis of aggregate bands from PAGE gels reveal an abundance of Gly/Ala/Ser/Thr repeats exemplified by a prominent, previously unidentified, 43 kDa protein in the solubilized adhesive. Low complexity regions found throughout the cement proteome, as well as multiple lysyl oxidases and peroxidases, establish homology with silk-associated materials such as fibroin, silk gum sericin, and pyriform spidroins from spider silk. Distinct primary structures defined by homologous domains shed light on how barnacles use low complexity in nanofibers to enable adhesion, and serves as a starting point for unraveling the molecular architecture of a robust and unique class of adhesive nanostructures.

  18. Harvest locations of goose barnacles can be successfully discriminated using trace elemental signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Rui; Queiroga, Henrique; Swearer, Stephen E.; Calado, Ricardo; Leandro, Sérgio M.

    2016-06-01

    European Union regulations state that consumers must be rightfully informed about the provenance of fishery products to prevent fraudulent practices. However, mislabeling of the geographical origin is a common practice. It is therefore paramount to develop forensic methods that allow all players involved in the supply chain to accurately trace the origin of seafood. In this study, trace elemental signatures (TES) of the goose barnacle Pollicipes pollicipes, collected from ten sites along the Portuguese coast, were employed to discriminate individual’s origin. Barium (Ba), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lithium (Li), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorous (P), lead (Pb), strontium (Sr) and zinc (Zn) - were quantified using Inductively Coupled Plasma‑Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Significant differences were recorded among locations for all elements. A regularized discriminant analysis (RDA) revealed that 83% of all individuals were correctly assigned. This study shows TES can be a reliable tool to confirm the geographic origin of goose barnacles at fine spatial resolution. Although additional studies are required to ascertain the reliability of TES on cooked specimens and the temporal stability of the signature, the approach holds great promise for the management of goose barnacles fisheries, enforcement of conservation policies and assurance in accurate labeling.

  19. Cool barnacles: Do common biogenic structures enhance or retard rates of deterioration of intertidal rocks and concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Martin A; Viles, Heather A; Naylor, Larissa A; La Marca, Emanuela Claudia

    2017-02-15

    Sedentary and mobile organisms grow profusely on hard substrates within the coastal zone and contribute to the deterioration of coastal engineering structures and the geomorphic evolution of rocky shores by both enhancing and retarding weathering and erosion. There is a lack of quantitative evidence for the direction and magnitude of these effects. This study assesses the influence of globally-abundant intertidal organisms, barnacles, by measuring the response of limestone, granite and marine-grade concrete colonised with varying percentage covers of Chthamalus spp. under simulated, temperate intertidal conditions. Temperature regimes at 5 and 10mm below the surface of each material demonstrated a consistent and statistically significant negative relationship between barnacle abundance and indicators of thermal breakdown. With a 95% cover of barnacles, subsurface peak temperatures were reduced by 1.59°C for limestone, 5.54°C for concrete and 5.97°C for granite in comparison to no barnacle cover. The amplitudes of short-term (15-30min) thermal fluctuations conducive to breakdown via 'fatigue' effects were also buffered by 0.70°C in limestone, 1.50°C in concrete and 1.63°C in granite. Furthermore, concentrations of potentially damaging salt ions were consistently lower under barnacles in limestone and concrete. These results indicate that barnacles do not enhance, but likely reduce rates of mechanical breakdown on rock and concrete by buffering near-surface thermal cycling and reducing salt ion ingress. In these ways, we highlight the potential role of barnacles as agents of bioprotection. These findings support growing international efforts to enhance the ecological value of hard coastal structures by facilitating their colonisation (where appropriate) through design interventions.

  20. Some biological consequences of environmental change: a study using barnacles (Cirripedia: Balanomorpha) and gum trees (Angiospermae: Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, John S

    2010-06-01

    Uniformitarianism permits understanding of the past on the basis of the present, and modeling the future through consideration of the fossil record. The present paper addresses the impact environmental (climatic) change has had on acorn barnacles and eucalyptus trees. Acorn barnacles (Balanomorpha) are first recorded after the K/T mass-extinction event. In the Paleogene, rapid radiation resulted in their occupying most marine environments. That balanomorphs survived both the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum and the Pleistocene glaciation is testament to their ability to adapt to opportunities; they are known from the littoral (Chamaesipho) to depths of 3600 m (Tetrachaelasma) and within this from diverse substrates: rock, wood and miscellaneous flotsam, plus in symbiosis or commensalism with most larger marine organisms. Darwin's (1854) view of the late Tertiary as the age of barnacles is reflected in their diversity, distribution and biomass. Barnacles are contrasted with the Australian Myrtaceae: plants ranging from woody shrubs to tall trees. The most significant is Eucalyptus sensu lato, which typifies Australia's flora, and is characterized by aromatic leaves that produce eucalyptol. Eucalyptus has evolved strategies that result in its domination of Australian open woodlands: these include production of highly flammable eucalyptol oil (with a flashpoint of 49 °C) and an unprecedented ability to regenerate following forest fires. Gum trees and barnacles first appear in the Paleogene, their earliest records are Australasian, and they both demonstrate extraordinary resilience when environmental conditions are optimal.

  1. Terpenes from the red alga Sphaerococcus coronopifolius inhibit the settlement of barnacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Veronica; Roussis, Vassilios; Garaventa, Francesca; Greco, Giuliano; Smyrniotopoulos, Vangelis; Vagias, Constantinos; Faimali, Marco

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we screened eight terpenes isolated from the organic extract of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius for their antifouling activity in order to find possible new sources of non-toxic or less toxic bioactive antifoulants. The anti-settlement activity (EC₅₀) and the degree of toxicity (LC₅₀) of S. coronopifolius metabolites was evaluated using larvae of the cirriped crustacean Amphibalanus (Balanus) amphitrite (cyprids and nauplii) as model organism. For five of eight tested metabolites EC₅₀ was lower than 5 mg/L. The most promising results were observed for bromosphaerol (3), which expressed an EC₅₀ value of 0.23 mg/L, in combination with low toxicity levels (LC₅₀ > 100 mg/L). The therapeutic ratio--an index used to estimate whether settlement inhibition is due to toxicity or other mechanisms--is also calculated and discussed.

  2. Deeply hidden inside introduced biogenic structures - Pacific oyster reefs reduce detrimental barnacle overgrowth on native blue mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschbaum, Christian; Cornelius, Annika; Goedknegt, M. Anouk

    2016-11-01

    In sedimentary coastal ecosystems shells of epibenthic organisms such as blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) provide the only major attachment surface for barnacle epibionts, which may cause detrimental effects on their mussel basibionts by e.g. reducing growth rate. In the European Wadden Sea, beds of native blue mussels have been invaded by Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas, which transformed these beds into mixed reefs of oysters with mussels. In this study, we determined the spatial distribution of M. edulis and their barnacle epibionts (Semibalanus balanoides) within the reef matrix. Mean mussel density near the bottom was about twice as high compared to the mussel density near the top of an oyster reef, whereas barnacles on mussels showed a reversed pattern. Barnacle dry weight per mussel was on average 14 times higher near the top than at the bottom. This pattern was confirmed by experimentally placing clean M. edulis at the top and on the bottom of oyster reefs at two sites in the Wadden Sea (island of Texel, The Netherlands; island of Sylt, Germany). After an experimental period of five weeks (April and May 2015, the main settlement period of S. balanoides), the number of barnacles per mussel was at both sites significantly higher on mussels near the top compared to near the bottom. We conclude that the oyster reef matrix offers a refuge for M. edulis: inside reefs they are not only better protected against predators but also against detrimental barnacle overgrowth. This study shows that alien species can cause beneficial effects for native organisms and should not be generally considered as a risk for the recipient marine ecosystems.

  3. Instantaneous Flow Structures and Opportunities for Larval Settlement: Barnacle Larvae Swim to Settle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann I Larsson

    Full Text Available Water flow affects settlement of marine larvae on several scales. At the smallest scale local flow regime may control the probability of adhesion to the substrate. Our aim was to mechanistically understand the transition from suspended to attached larvae in turbulent flow. Recently it was proposed that opportunities for larval settlement in turbulent boundary layers depend on time windows with suitable instantaneous flow properties. In flume flow we characterized the proportion of suitable time windows in a series of flow velocities with focus on the near-bed flow. The change in the proportion of potential settling windows with increasing free-stream velocities was compared to the proportion of temporary attachment of barnacle cypris larvae at different flow velocities. We found large instantaneous flow variations in the near-bed flow where cyprid attachment took place. The probability of temporary attachment in cyprids declined with local flow speed and this response was compatible with a settling window lasting at least 0.1 s with a maximum local flow speed of 1.9-2.4 cm s-1. Cyprids swam against the near-bed flow (negative rheotaxis and the swimming speed (1.8 cm s-1 was close to the critical speed that permitted temporary attachment. We conclude that temporary attachment in barnacle cyprids requires upstream swimming to maintain a fixed position relative to the substrate for at least 0.1 s. This behaviour may explain the ability of barnacles to recruit to high-flow environments and give cyprids flexibility in the pre-settlement choice of substrates based on flow regime.

  4. Gregarine Cephaloidophora communis mawrodiadi, 1908 in the barnacle Euraphia rhyzophorae, Oliveira, 1940 from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacombe Dyrce

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The gregarine Cephaloidophora communis was observed for the first time in Brazil in the barnacles Euraphia rhyzophorae collected in Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 1990 and 1996. Histological studies showed growth phases of the parasite in specific parts of the digestive system. The intracellular forms occurred in the vacuoles of the intestinal cells. Syzygy was frequent, and the most common form following syzygy was cylindrical, with a single membrane. The cytoplasm of the gregarines was always irregular, dense, and occasionally presenting a dark stoch area.

  5. Travel schedules to the high arctic : barnacle geese trade-off the timing of migration with accumulation of fat deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prop, J; Black, JM; Shimmings, P

    2003-01-01

    On their way from the wintering area to the breeding grounds in Spitsbergen, barnacle geese Branta leucopsis stage on islands off the coast of Norway. The aim of this study was to describe when the geese migrate in relation to the body stores deposited and explore questions related to the concept of

  6. Skipping the Baltic : the emergence of a dichotomy of alternative spring migration strategies in Russian barnacle geese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichhorn, Goetz; Drent, Rudolf H.; Stahl, Julia; Leito, Aivar; Alerstam, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, an increasing proportion of barnacle geese, Branta leucopsis, bound for breeding sites in the Russian Arctic delay their departure from the wintering quarters in the Wadden Sea by 4 weeks. These late-migrating geese skip spring stopover sites in the Baltic traditionally used b

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of Darwin's "Mr. Arthrobalanus": The burrowing barnacles (Cirripedia: Acrothoracica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Chin; Kobasov, Gregory A; Chan, Benny K K

    2016-07-01

    The barnacles of the superorder Acrothoracica are small, burrowing, epibiotic, and dioecious (large female with dwarf male) crustaceans largely found in the carbonate sediments and skeletons of marine invertebrates. The acrothoracicans represent the Cirripedia with the most plesiomorphic characters and have prominently featured in phylogenetic speculations concerning these crustaceans. Traditionally, Acrothoracica was divided into two main orders, Pygophora and Apygophora. The Apygophora had uniramus cirri and no anus. The Pygophora had biramus terminal cirri and an anus and was further divided into two families, Lithoglyptidae and Cryptophialidae. Kolbasov (2009) revised the superorder Acrothoracica on the basis of morphological examinations of females, dwarf males, and cyprids and rearranged the acrothoracican species into two new orders, Lithoglyptida and Cryptophialida. The present study is the first attempt to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of acrothoracican barnacles by sequencing two mitochondrial (cytochrome C oxidase I and 16S ribosomal DNA) and two nuclear (18S ribosomal DNA and histone H3) markers of 8 of the 11 genera comprising 23 acrothoracican species. All monophylies of the eight acrothoracican genera sampled in this study were strongly supported. The deep interfamilial relationship constructed is consistent with the recent morphological phylogenetic relationship proposed by Kolbasov, Newman, and Høeg (Kolbasov, 2009) that Cryptophialidae (order Cryptophialida) is the sister group to all other acrothoracicans (order Lithoglyptida). According to an ancestral character state reconstruction analysis, the posterior lobes of females; armament of opercular bars, attachment stalk, lateral projections of the body, and aperture slits in dwarf males; and habitat use appear to have phylogenetic importance.

  8. Significance of the conformation of building blocks in curing of barnacle underwater adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamino, Kei; Nakano, Masahiro; Kanai, Satoru

    2012-05-01

    Barnacles are a unique sessile crustacean that attach irreversibly and firmly to foreign underwater surfaces. Its biological underwater adhesive is a peculiar extracellular multi-protein complex. Here we characterize one of the two major proteins, a 52 kDa protein found in the barnacle cement complex. Cloning of the cDNA revealed that the protein has no homolog in the nonredundant database. The primary structure consists of four long sequence repeats. The process of dissolving the protein at the adhesive joint of the animal by various treatments was monitored in order to obtain insight into the molecular mechanism involved in curing of the adhesive bulk. Treatments with protein denaturant, reducing agents and/or chemical-specific proteolysis in combination with 2D diagonal PAGE indicated no involvement of the protein in intermolecular cross-linkage/polymerization, including formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. As solubilization of the proteins required high concentrations of denaturing agents, it appears that both the conformation of the protein as building blocks and non-covalent molecular interactions between the building blocks, possibly hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds, are crucial for curing of the cement. It was also suggested that the protein contributes to surface coupling by an anchoring effect to micro- to nanoscopic roughness of surfaces.

  9. The structural, compositional and mechanical features of the calcite shell of the barnacle Tetraclita rufotincta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astachov, Liliana; Nevo, Zvi; Brosh, Tamar; Vago, Razi

    2011-09-01

    The microstructure and chemical composition of the calcite shell of the sea barnacle Tetraclita rufotincta (Pilsbry, 1916) were investigated using microscopic and analytical methods. The barnacle shell was separated mechanically into its three substructural units: outer, interior, and inner layers. The organic matrices of these structural parts were further separated into soluble and insoluble constituents and their characteristic functional groups were studied by FTIR. Investigation of the mechanical properties of the interior mass of the shell reveals remarkable viscoelastic behavior. In general, the mechanical behavior of the shell is a function of its geometry as well as of the material, of which it is constructed. In the case of T. rufotincta, as calcite is a brittle material, the elastic behavior of the shell is apparently related to its micro- and macroarchitecture. The latter enables the shell to fulfill its primary function which is to protect the organism from a hostile environment and enables its survival. Our detailed identification of the similarities and differences between the various structural components of the shell in regard to the composition and properties of the organic component will hopefully throw light on the role of organic matrices in biomineralization processes.

  10. Evolution of sex determination and sexually dimorphic larval sizes in parasitic barnacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sachi; Høeg, Jens T; Iwasa, Yoh

    2014-04-21

    The parasitic (rhizocephalan) barnacles include species of which larval sex is determined by the mother (genetic sex determination, GSD), male larvae are larger than female larvae, and a female accepts only two dwarf males who sire all the eggs laid by her. In contrast, other species of parasitic barnacles exhibit monomorphic larvae that choose to become male or female depending on the condition of the host they settle (environmental sex determination, or ESD), and a female accepts numerous dwarf males. Here, we ask why these set of traits are observed together, by examining the evolution of sex determination and the larval size. ESD has an advantage over GSD because each larva has a higher chance of encountering a suitable host. On the other hand, GSD has two advantages over ESD: the larval size can be chosen differently between sexes, and their larvae can avoid spending time for sex determination on the host. We conclude that, in species whose female accepts only two males, the male larvae engage in intense contest competition for reproductive opportunities, and male's success-size relation is very different from female's. Then, larvae with predetermined sex (GSD) with sexually dimorphic larvae is more advantageous than ESD. In contrast, in species whose females accept many dwarf males, the competition among males is less intense, and producing larvae with undetermined sex should evolve. We also discuss the condition for females to evolve receptacles to limit the number of males she accepts.

  11. Darwin taxonomist: Barnacles and shell burrowing barnacles Darwin taxónomo: cirrípedos y cirrípedos perforadores de conchas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN CARLOS CASTILLA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This bibliographic review revisits circumstances in which the wharf, shell burrowing barnacle, Cryptophialus minutus, was first collected by Charles Darwin in southern Chile, in 1836. Further, explores how its collection marked Darwin's taxonomical interest in Cirripedia. A short review analyzes the initial number of extant species of Cirripedia, as described by Darwin and the present situation, with emphasis on recent collections of C. minutus in the southern tip of South America.Esta revisión bibliográfica describe las circunstancias en el que el cirrípedo enano, Crypophialus minutus, perforador de conchas, fue recolectado por Charles Darwin en el sur de Chile, en 1836. Además, cómo esta recolección marcó el interés taxonómico de Darwin en Cirripedia. Se presenta una revisión resumida sobre el número inicial de especies vivas de Cirripedia, como fueron descritas por Darwin, y la situación actual, con énfasis en recolecciones recientes de C. minutus en el cono sur de Suramérica.

  12. Biodiversity and Biogeography of Chthamalid Barnacles from the North-Eastern Pacific (Crustacea Cirripedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny K K Chan

    Full Text Available The biogeography and ecology of the species of Chthamalus present on the west coast of America are described, using data from 51 localities from Alaska to Panama, together with their zonation on the shore with respect to that of other barnacles. The species present were C. dalli, Pilsbry 1916, C. fissus, Darwin, 1854, C. anisopoma Pilsbry 1916 and four species in the C. panamensis complex. The latter are C. panamensis Pilsbry, 1916, C. hedgecocki, Pitombo & Burton, 2007, C. alani nom. nov. (formerly C. southwardorum Pitombo & Burton, 2007 and C. newmani sp. nov.. These four species were initially separated by enzyme electrophoresis. They could only be partially separated by DNA bar coding but may be separated using morphological characters.

  13. Molecular phylogeny and character evolution of the chthamaloid barnacles (Cirripedia:Thoracica)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Crandall, Keith A.;

    2012-01-01

    of the Chthamaloidea has been debated since Darwin's seminal monographs. Theories of morphological and ontogenetic evolution suggest that the group could have evolved multiple times from pedunculated relatives and that shell plate number diminished gradually (8¿6¿4) from an ancestral state with eight wall plates......The Chthamaloidea (Balanomorpha) present the most plesiomorphic characters in shell plates and cirri, mouthparts, and oral cone within the acorn barnacles (Thoracica: Sessilia). Due to their importance in understanding both the origin and diversification of the Balanomorpha, the evolution...... surrounded by whorls of small imbricating plates; but this hypothesis has never been subjected to a rigorous phylogenetic test. Here we used multilocus sequence data and extensive taxon sampling to build a comprehensive phylogeny of the Chthamaloidea as a basis for understanding their morphological evolution...

  14. Biodiversity and Biogeography of Chthamalid Barnacles from the North-Eastern Pacific (Crustacea Cirripedia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benny K K; Chen, H-N; Dando, P R; Southward, A J; Southward, E C

    2016-01-01

    The biogeography and ecology of the species of Chthamalus present on the west coast of America are described, using data from 51 localities from Alaska to Panama, together with their zonation on the shore with respect to that of other barnacles. The species present were C. dalli, Pilsbry 1916, C. fissus, Darwin, 1854, C. anisopoma Pilsbry 1916 and four species in the C. panamensis complex. The latter are C. panamensis Pilsbry, 1916, C. hedgecocki, Pitombo & Burton, 2007, C. alani nom. nov. (formerly C. southwardorum Pitombo & Burton, 2007) and C. newmani sp. nov.). These four species were initially separated by enzyme electrophoresis. They could only be partially separated by DNA bar coding but may be separated using morphological characters.

  15. Enhancement of local species richness in tundra by seed dispersal through guts of muskox and barnacle goose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Henrik; Lundgren, Rebekka; Philipp, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    The potential contribution of vertebrate-mediated seed rain to the maintenance of plant community richness in a High Arctic ecosystem was investigated. We analyzed viable seed content in dung of the four numerically most important terrestrial vertebrates in Northeast Greenland - muskox (Ovibos...... moschatus), barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis), Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) and Arctic hare (Lepus arcticus). High numbers of plant propagules were found in the dung of muskox and barnacle goose. Seeds of many plant species were found in the faeces of one vertebrate species only. Propagule composition...... indices), and dung deposition, especially by muskox, often brought new species to the receiving community. The results suggest that endozoochorous propagule dispersal in the Arctic has a great potential in the generation and maintenance of local species richness, albeit being little specialized...

  16. Effects of food availability on growth and reproduction of the deep-sea pedunculate barnacle Heteralepas canci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Natsumi; Miyamoto, Norio; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Tomoko; Yusa, Yoichi

    2016-02-01

    Sessile animals living on continental shelves or slopes may adjust their growth and reproduction according to temporally and spatially variable food availability, but little information is available on these animals to date. We collected the pedunculate barnacle Heteralepas canci on a continental slope at a depth of 229 m off Cape Nomamisaki in southern Japan. We developed a rearing method for the barnacles and studied their growth and reproduction at different food levels in the laboratory. A total of 136 individual H. canci were fed with Artemia salina larvae and brewer's yeast at three different food levels for 100 days. Both the growth and the ovary development were delayed when food availability was low, whereas the survival rate was lower at the high food level. In addition, an individual survived under complete starvation for 167 days. We concluded that H. canci has plastic life history traits that are adaptive for variable food availability.

  17. Elemental microchemistry, fatty acid profile and geometric morphometrics signatures of goose barnacles (Pollicipes pollicipes reveal their place of origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Albuquerque

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Seafood plays an important role in the socioeconomic, gastronomy and cultural heritage of Portuguese coastal communities. In the Iberian Peninsula, the goose barnacle Pollicipes pollicipes is the intertidal biological resource most heavily exploited by man, resulting on overexploitation of stocks. In the MPA of BNR P.pollicipes harvesting is however strictly regulated, making it a good example of marine resources management. Analytical methods able to identify the origin of goose barnacle would be an important tool to help the management of the trade. For such purpose, we investigated whether P. pollicipes have site-specific differences based on its elemental microchemistry (EM, fatty acid profile (FA and capitulum shape (CS. The analysis was performed on specimens collected from 3 sites in the BNR and 7 along a 300 km stretch of the Portuguese coast. For each individual we analysed the largest lateral shell for EM using ICP-MS, the FA content of the muscle using GC-FID, and the CS using geometric morphometrics. Discriminant function analyses (DFA for both EM and FA separately provided a high reclassification success (77.6% and 99% respectively, of cross-validated cases correctly classified, while for EM combined with FA allowed for a 100% reclassification success. DFA analysis based only on CS, revealed a low classification success (29.6%. These results show that EM and FA signatures can be a powerful tool to infer goose barnacles origin. Such “fingerprinting” approach can be used to track and identify goose barnacles origin, helping in establishing an origin certificate and increasing the potential value of biological resources from Portuguese MPAs.

  18. Understanding species-microplastics interactions : a laboratory study on the effects of microplastics on the Azorean barnacle, Megabalanus azoricus

    OpenAIRE

    Hentschel, Lisa-Henrike, 1987-

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the impact of microplastics on the marine environment, wildlife and humans is a complex issue. Effects of contaminated microplastics (polyvinylchloride (PVC), mean size 1.5 µm) on the Azorean barnacle (Megabalanus Azoricus) were investigated within a global research project (GAME), in which akin experiments were conducted simultaneously at seven different sites worldwide in order to obtain comparable data for a range of benthic invertebrates. During a six weeks laboratory experi...

  19. The effect of water temperature and flow on respiration in barnacles: patterns of mass transfer versus kinetic limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Michael T; Carrington, Emily

    2014-06-15

    In aquatic systems, physiological processes such as respiration, photosynthesis and calcification are potentially limited by the exchange of dissolved materials between organisms and their environment. The nature and extent of physiological limitation is, therefore, likely to be dependent on environmental conditions. Here, we assessed the metabolic sensitivity of barnacles under a range of water temperatures and velocities, two factors that influence their distribution. Respiration rates increased in response to changes in temperature and flow, with an interaction where flow had less influence on respiration at low temperatures, and a much larger effect at high temperatures. Model analysis suggested that respiration is mass transfer limited under conditions of low velocity (mass transfer and kinetic limitation are important. Behavioral monitoring revealed that barnacles fully extend their cirral appendages at low flows and display abbreviated 'testing' behaviors at high flows, suggesting some form of mechanical limitation. In low flow-high temperature treatments, however, barnacles displayed distinct 'pumping' behaviors that may serve to increase ventilation. Our results suggest that in slow-moving waters, respiration may become mass transfer limited as temperatures rise, whereas faster flows may serve to ameliorate the effects of elevated temperatures. Moreover, these results underscore the necessity for approaches that evaluate the combined effects of multiple environmental factors when examining physiological and behavioral performance.

  20. Stable isotopes in barnacles as a tool to understand green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) regional movement patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detjen, M.; Sterling, E.; Gómez, A.

    2015-12-01

    Sea turtles are migratory animals that travel long distances between their feeding and breeding grounds. Traditional methods for researching sea turtle migratory behavior have important disadvantages, and the development of alternatives would enhance our ability to monitor and manage these globally endangered species. Here we report on the isotope signatures in green sea-turtle (Chelonia mydas) barnacles (Platylepas sp.) and discuss their potential relevance as tools with which to study green sea turtle migration and habitat use patterns. We analyzed oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios in barnacle calcite layers from specimens collected from green turtles captured at the Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (PANWR) in the central Pacific. Carbon isotopes were not informative in this study. However, the oxygen isotope results suggest likely regional movement patterns when mapped onto a predictive oxygen isotope map of the Pacific. Barnacle proxies could therefore complement other methods in understanding regional movement patterns, informing more effective conservation policy that takes into account connectivity between populations.

  1. The state of the fishery, conservation and management of the stalked barnacle Pollicipes pollicipes in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Teresa; Jacinto, David; Sousa, Alina; Penteado, Nélia; Pereira, Diana; Fernandes, Joana N; Silva, Teresa; Castro, João J

    2015-12-01

    The stalked barnacle Pollicipes pollicipes is the most important intertidal economical resource in Portugal. The assessment of the state of the fishery, conservation and management of P. pollicipes in Portugal was made for the first time in three regions with different regulations regarding this fishery: two marine protected areas ("Reserva Natural das Berlengas", RNB; and "Parque Natural do Sudoeste Alentejano e Costa Vicentina", PNSACV); and the Center coast. Different approaches (independent observations, inquiries, logbooks) and sources of data (past and recent) were used. An overall negative tendency of the state of the fishery and conservation of this resource was observed in all regions, with the exception of the stable tendency detected in PNSACV when using the inquiries approach. A weak management was considered to be in practice at Center and at PNSACV, while an acceptable management was inferred for RNB. We recommend a change into a co-management system that should be tested in pilot regions as RNB and/or PNSACV.

  2. Tissue-specific effects of hypothyroidism on postnatal muscle development in the barnacle goose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, K E; Bishop, C M; Butler, P J

    1998-03-01

    The hypothesis that tissue-specific levels of thyroid hormones may be required for normal locomotor muscle development was investigated in the barnacle goose Branta leucopsis. Hypothyroidism was induced in goslings by treatment with methimazole from either 3 days or 2 weeks of age, and birds were killed at 7 weeks of age. The masses of the pectoralis, iliofibularis, semimembranosus and cardiac ventricle muscles were measured, and samples from these tissues were analysed for the mass-specific activity of the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase (CS). An ultrastructural electron micrograph analysis of the pectoralis was also carried out. No significant differences were found between the two hypothyroid groups except for the effect on the relative mass of the iliofibularis muscle. Developmental responses to hypothyroidism were found to be tissue-specific. Hypothyroidism resulted in a significantly lower relative cardiac ventricle mass (by 17 %) and CS activity of the leg muscles (by 34 %), while absolute leg muscle mass was not affected. The relative mass of the pectoralis was significantly lower (by 57 %) in hypothyroid birds and showed a significant, uniformly lower CS activity (by 60-83 %) as a result of a lower mitochondrial fractional volume. Haematocrit and capillary-to-fibre ratio in the pectoralis were also significantly lower in hypothyroid birds, and skeletal growth and plumage development were affected.

  3. Self-assembling peptide inspired by a barnacle underwater adhesive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahiro; Shen, Jian-Ren; Kamino, Kei

    2007-06-01

    An underwater bioadhesive generally comprises a multiprotein complex that provides a molecular basis for self-assembly. We report here a new class of self-assembling peptide inspired by a 20 kDa barnacle cement protein. Studies on the chemically synthesized 24-residue peptide have revealed that (1) it underwent irreversible self-assembly upon the addition of salt, (2) the self-assembly was started at a salt concentration close to that of seawater with noncovalent intermolecular interactions, (3) the self-assembled material resembled a macroscopic membrane of interwoven nanofilaments, (4) incubation in an alkaline pH range formed the intramolecular disulfide bond of a peptide molecule, thus triggering a conformation change of the molecule, and (5) conformational change of the building block promoted the formation of a nanofiber, resulting in the display of a three-dimensional meshlike mesoscopic structure with defined pores having a diameter of approximately 200 nm. The peptide is likely to provide a suitable basis for further development of peptide-based materials.

  4. Effects of local anesthetics and hemicholinium-3 on 45-Ca efflux in barnacle muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S S

    1975-04-01

    Benzocaine, which occurs in the uncharged form in the physiological range of pH, caused inhibition of 45-Ca efflux in branacle muscle fibers. By contrast, in the presence of a low external Ca-2+ concentration it produced stimulation of the efflux. Both the inhibitory and stimulatory actions of benzocaine appeared to be less potent than those of procaine. Hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), on the other hand, which exists only in the charged form, caused a large stimulation of the 45-Ca efflux following microinjection, and the potency of this action was found to be at least 10 times greater than that of procaine. External application of HC-3 produced inhibition occasionally. Effects of tetracaine were similar to those produced by procaine; however, its inhibitory action was greater in more alkaline solution, which is the opposite of that observed with procaine. Lidocaine produced a less consistent effect than procaine; the inhibitory action of the former was less potent but the stimulatory action of the two anesthetics were comparable, p-Aminobenzoic acid was without effect on 45-Ca efflux. These results indicate that both the charged and uncharged forms of local anesthetics are capable of causing stimulatory and inhibitory effects on 45-Ca efflux in barnacle muscle fibers, and that the inhibition produced is the result of action on the CA-Ca exchange system whereas the stimulation is the result of release of Ca from internal storage sites.

  5. Phylogeographic structure and northward range expansion in the barnacle Chthamalus fragilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette F. Govindarajan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The barnacle Chthamalus fragilis is found along the US Atlantic seaboard historically from the Chesapeake Bay southward, and in the Gulf of Mexico. It appeared in New England circa 1900 coincident with warming temperatures, and is now a conspicuous member of rocky intertidal communities extending through the northern shore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The origin of northern C. fragilis is debated. It may have spread to New England from the northern end of its historic range through larval transport by ocean currents, possibly mediated by the construction of piers, marinas, and other anthropogenic structures that provided new hard substrate habitat. Alternatively, it may have been introduced by fouling on ships originating farther south in its historic distribution. Here we examine mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I sequence diversity and the distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes of C. fragilis from 11 localities ranging from Cape Cod, to Tampa Bay, Florida. We found significant genetic structure between northern and southern populations. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three well-supported reciprocally monophyletic haplogroups, including one haplogroup that is restricted to New England and Virginia populations. While the distances between clades do not suggest cryptic speciation, selection and dispersal barriers may be driving the observed structure. Our data are consistent with an expansion of C. fragilis from the northern end of its mid-19th century range into Massachusetts.

  6. siRNA transfection in larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, G.

    2015-06-25

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides an efficient and specific technique for functional genomic studies. Yet, no successful application of RNAi has been reported in barnacles. In this study, siRNA against p38 MAPK was synthesized and then transfected into A. amphitrite larvae at either the nauplius or cyprid stage, or at both stages. Effects of siRNA transfection on the p38 MAPK level were hardly detectable in the cyprids when they were transfected at the nauplius stage. In contrast, larvae that were transfected at the cyprid stage showed lower levels of p38 MAPK than the blank and reagent controls. However, significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) and reduced settlement rates were observed only in ‘double transfections’, in which larvae were exposed to siRNA solution at both the nauplius and cyprid stages. A relatively longer transfection time and more larval cells directly exposed to siRNA might explain the higher efficiency of double transfection experiments.

  7. Can ocean acidification affect population dynamics of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides at its southern range edge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Helen S; Burrows, Michael T; Kendall, Michael A; Spicer, John I; Widdicombe, Stephen

    2010-10-01

    The global ocean and atmosphere are warming. There is increasing evidence suggesting that, in addition to other environmental factors, climate change is affecting species distributions and local population dynamics. Additionally, as a consequence of the growing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), the oceans are taking up increasing amounts of this CO2, causing ocean pH to decrease (ocean acidification). The relative impacts of ocean acidification on population dynamics have yet to be investigated, despite many studies indicating that there will be at least a sublethal impact on many marine organisms, particularly key calcifying organisms. Using empirical data, we forced a barnacle (Semibalanus balanoides) population model to investigate the relative influence of sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean acidification on a population nearing the southern limit of its geographic distribution. Hindcast models were compared to observational data from Cellar Beach (southwestern United Kingdom). Results indicate that a declining pH trend (-0.0017 unit/yr), indicative of ocean acidification over the past 50 years, does not cause an observable impact on the population abundance relative to changes caused by fluctuations in temperature. Below the critical temperature (here T(crit) = 13.1 degrees C), pH has a more significant affect on population dynamics at this southern range edge. However, above this value, SST has the overriding influence. At lower SST, a decrease in pH (according to the National Bureau of Standards, pHNBs) from 8.2 to 7.8 can significantly decrease the population abundance. The lethal impacts of ocean acidification observed in experiments on early life stages reduce cumulative survival by approximately 25%, which again will significantly alter the population level at this southern limit. Furthermore, forecast predictions from this model suggest that combined acidification and warming cause this local population to die out 10 years earlier than

  8. Crustacean parasites associated with hermit crabs from the western Mediterranean Sea, with first documentation of egg predation by the burrowing barnacle Trypetesa lampas (Cirripedia: Acrothoracica: Trypetesidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason D; Gallardo, Alejandra; Murphy, Angela E

    2011-03-01

    Parasitic isopods (family Bopyridae) and burrowing barnacles (family Trypetesidae) infesting hermit crabs were investigated from shallow subtidal collections made along the southeastern coast of Spain in 2009. A total of 713 specimens of Clibanarius erythropus (Latreille, 1818) and 82 Calcinus tubularis (L., 1767) were examined. Gastropod shells and worm tubes inhabited by hermit crabs were collected by hand while snorkeling and were cracked to determine host species, size, sex and presence of eggs. Two species of bopyrid isopods were found on C. erythropus: the branchial parasite Bopyrissa fraiseii (Carayon, 1943) and the abdominal parasite Parathelges cardonae Codreanu and Codreanu in Codreanu, 1968. Among all C. erythropus examined, Bopyrissa fraiseii was found on 0.6% of hermit crabs and P. cardonae was found on 0.3%. A redescription of P. cardonae is provided and the species is documented with light and scanning electron microscopy for the first time. No Calcinus tubularis harbored parasitic isopods, but one specimen was parasitized by an unidentified rhizocephalan barnacle of the genus Septosaccus (1.2%). The burrowing barnacle Trypetesa lampas (Hancock, 1849) was found associated with both hermit crab species and evidence of predation on host eggs by this barnacle is shown for the first time. Trypetesa lampas was found in 4.2% of the shells collected. The present study expands our knowledge of the parasite fauna of hermit crabs from the Mediterranean Sea and indicates that additional research is needed to determine the impact of trypetesid egg predators on hermit crab populations.

  9. Comparison of Population Genetic Structure of Two Seashore-Dwelling Animal Species, Periwinkle Littorina brevicula and Acorn Barnacle Fistulobalanus albicostatus from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim, Yuhyun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic structure of marine animals that inhabit the seashore is affected by numerous factors. Of these, gene flow and natural selection during recruitment have strong influences on the genetic structure of seashore-dwelling species that have larval periods. Relative contributions of these two factors to the genetic structure of marine species would be determined mainly by the duration of larval stage. The relationship between larval period and genetic structure of population has been rarely studied in Korea. In this study, genetic variations of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI were analyzed in two dominant species on rocky shore habitats in the Korean peninsula: periwinkle Littorina brevicula and acorn barnacle Fistulobalanus albicostatus. Both species are not strongly structured and may have experienced recent population expansion. Unlike periwinkle, however, barnacle populations have considerable genetic variation, and show a bimodal pattern of mismatch distribution. These results suggest that barnacle populations are more affected by local adaptation rather than gene flow via larval migration. The bimodal patterns of barnacle populations observed in mismatch distribution plots imply that they may have experienced secondary contact. Further studies on seashore-dwelling species are expected to be useful in understanding the evolution of the coastal ecosystem around Korean waters.

  10. Chlorine dioxide as an alternative antifouling biocide for cooling water systems: Toxicity to larval barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus (Utinomi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatnarayanan, Srinivas; Sriyutha Murthy, P; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2017-01-19

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is seen as an effective alternative to chlorine, which is widely used as an antifouling biocide. However, data on its efficacy against marine macrofoulants is scanty. In this study, acute toxicity of ClO2 to larval forms of the fouling barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus was investigated. ClO2 treatment at 0.1mg/L for 20min elicited 45-63% reduction in naupliar metamorphosis, 70% inhibition of cyprid settlement and 80% inhibition of metamorphosis to juveniles. Increase in concentration to 0.2mg/L did not result in any significant difference in the settlement inhibition or metamorphosis. Treatment with 0.2mg/L of ClO2 elicited substantial reduction in the settlement of barnacle larvae compared to control. The study indicates the possibility of using ClO2 as an alternative antifouling biocide in power plant cooling water systems. However, more work needs to be done on the environmental effects of such switchover, which we are currently undertaking.

  11. Cypris Larvae in Polysaccus Mediterraneus and Mycetomorpha Vancouverensis: Their Importance in Analyzing the Phylogeny and Sexual Evolution of Parasitic Barnacles (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Rybakov, AV

    2007-01-01

    We used SEM to investigate the cypris larvae in two species of parasitic barnacles, Polysaccus mediterraneus (Polysaccidae) from the eastern Mediterranean and Mycetomorpha vancouverensis (Mycetomorphidae) from the northern Pacific. Both species belong to the rhizocephalan suborder Akentrogonida a...

  12. Adult Demography and Larval Processes in Coastal Benthic Populations: Intertidal Barnacles in Southern California and Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    WHOI Academic Programs Office, and through a Presidential Fellowship (Beca Presidente de la Reptiblica) from the Chilean Ministerio de Planificaci6n y...Planificaci6n y Cooperaci6n), which provided funds for the first three years of my doctoral studies through a Presidential Fellowship (Beca Presidente de la...Punta Baja (29°57.25’N, 115󈧴.64’W) in Baja California, Mexico (Fig. 4.1). Seven sites were visited approximately monthly over 16-month period (Table

  13. Assessing the sustainability and adaptive capacity of the gooseneck barnacle co-management system in Asturias, N. Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Antonella; Gelcich, Stefan; García-Flórez, Lucía; Acuña, José Luis

    2016-03-01

    The gooseneck barnacle fishery in Asturias (N. Spain) has undergone three important changes: (1) the early implementation of a co-management system based on Territorial User Rights for Fishing, (2) a change in management measures (due to a decrease in landings), and (3) an economic crisis. This has allowed us to analyze the systems' sustainability in time through examining five critical variables: landings, effort, catch per unit effort (CPUE), mean market prices, and annual revenue. Additionally, we used focus groups and questionnaires to determine the response of the system to these three changes. Co-management has succeeded in maintaining or increasing CPUE throughout all management areas and produced stable mean market prices. This was achieved through flexible management policies and adaptive strategies adopted by the fishers, such as increased selectivity and diversification. The analysis of this fishery provides important lessons regarding the need to understand the evolutionary dynamics of co-management and the importance of embracing adaptive capacity.

  14. Prevalence of the commensal barnacle Xenobalanus globicipitis on cetacean species in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, and a review of global occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Distribution and prevalence of the phoretic barnacle Xenobalanus on cetacean species are reported for 22 cetaceans in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (21 million km2). Four cetacean species are newly reported hosts for Xenobalanus: Bryde’s whale (Balaenoptera edeni), long-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus capensis), humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), and spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris). Sightings of Xenobalanus in pelagic waters are reported for the first time, and concentr...

  15. Predicting free-space occupancy on novel artificial structures by an invasive intertidal barnacle using a removal experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A Bracewell

    Full Text Available Artificial structures can create novel habitat in the marine environment that has been associated with the spread of invasive species. They are often located in areas of high disturbance and can vary significantly in the area of free space provided for settlement of marine organisms. Whilst correlation between the amount of free space available and recruitment success has been shown in populations of several marine benthic organisms, there has been relatively little focus on invasive species, a group with the potential to reproduce in vast numbers and colonise habitats rapidly. Invasion success following different scales of disturbance was examined in the invasive acorn barnacle, Austrominiusmodestus, on a unique art installation located in Liverpool Bay. Population growth and recruitment success were examined by comparing recruitment rates within disturbance clearings of 4 different sizes and by contrasting population development with early recruitment rates over a 10 week period. Disturbed areas were rapidly recolonised and monocultures of A. modestus formed within 6 weeks. The size of patch created during disturbance had no effect on the rate of recruitment, while a linear relationship between recruit density and patch size was observed. Density-dependent processes mediated initial high recruitment resulting in population stability after 8-10 weeks, but densities continued to greatly exceed those reported in natural habitats. Given that artificial structures are likely to continue to proliferate in light of climate change projections, free-space is likely to become more available more frequently in the future supporting the expansion of fast-colonising species.

  16. Host-specific phenotypic plasticity of the turtle barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria: a widespread generalist rather than a specialist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chiu Cheang

    Full Text Available Turtle barnacles are common epibionts on marine organisms. Chelonibia testudinaria is specific on marine turtles whereas C. patula is a host generalist, but rarely found on turtles. It has been questioned why C. patula, being abundant on a variety of live substrata, is almost absent from turtles. We evaluated the genetic (mitochondrial COI, 16S and 12S rRNA, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP and morphological differentiation of C. testudinaia and C. patula from different hosts, to determine the mode of adaptation exhibited by Chelonibia species on different hosts. The two taxa demonstrate clear differences in shell morphology and length of 4-6(th cirri, but very similar in arthropodal characters. Moreover, we detected no genetic differentiation in mitochondrial DNA and AFLP analyses. Outlier detection infers insignificant selection across loci investigated. Based on combined morphological and molecular evidence, we proposed that C. testudinaria and C. patula are conspecific, and the two morphs with contrasting shell morphologies and cirral length found on different host are predominantly shaped by developmental plasticity in response to environmental setting on different hosts. Chelonibia testudinaria is, thus, a successful general epibiotic fouler and the phenotypic responses postulated can increase the fitness of the animals when they attach on hosts with contrasting life-styles.

  17. Influence of upwelling and tropical environments on the breeding development of the intertidal barnacle Tetraclita stalactifera (Lamarck, 1818

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Skinner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cabo Frio, with its unique oceanographic conditions, is an important biogeographical transitional region between tropical and sub-tropical waters. This is due to the presence of upwelling from the Central Water of the South Atlantic (CWSA, and the presence of tropical waters from the Brazilian Current (BC and Coastal Water (CW. The intertidal barnacle, Tetraclita stalactifera, and its brooding stages were analyzed to correlate environmental conditions with reproductive development. Two thermal contrasting sites were chosen: Ponta da Cabeça (PC, which is under the influence of seasonal upwelling, and Ponta da Fortaleza (PF which experiences tropical influences. At each site, T. stalactifera specimens were collected monthly and their egg lamellae conditions classified into stages from 0 (empty to IV (ready to release. Our results show a seasonal effect on brooding at the PC site and a continuous development at the PF site. Nauplii larval availability also followed this trend. Differences between the sites could be due to ecological differences related to water temperature and the ecological-physiological response of the barnacles to these differences.Cabo Frio, devido suas características oceanográficas, causado pela é uma importante região biogeográfica transicional entre águas tropicais e sub-tropicais. Isto é ressurgência da Água Central do Atlântico Sul (ACAS e a presença de águas tropicais da Corrente do Brasil (CB e de Água Costeira (AC. A craca do mediolitoral Tetraclita stalactifera e seus estágios de maturação larval foram analisados a fim de serem correlacionados às condições ambientais. Dois locais com características termais contrastantes foram escolhidos: a Ponta da Cabeça (PC, que está sobre influência sazonal da ressurgência e a Ponta da Fortaleza (PF, sob influência da água tropical. Em cada local, indivíduos de T. stalactifera foram coletados mensalmente e a condição de suas lamellas ovígeras aferida

  18. The whale barnacle Cryptolepas rhachianecti (Cirripedia: Coronulidae), a phoront of the grey whale Eschrichtius robustus (Cetacea: Eschrichtiidae), from a sandy beach in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosselaers, Mark; Collareta, Alberto

    2016-08-22

    An isolated compartment of a whale barnacle is herein described from Recent beach deposits in Zoutelande (Walcheren, The Netherlands). This specimen is identified as belonging to the extant coronulid species Cryptolepas rhachianecti, currently known as an epizoic symbiont of the grey whale Eschrichtius robustus. This find represents the first occurrence of C. rhachianecti outside the North Pacific, and the first one as a (sub)fossil. In view of the fact that E. robustus, which is currently confined to the North Pacific, is known as a subfossil from the northeastern Atlantic between late Late Pleistocene (c. 45,000 years ago) and historical (c. 1700 AD) times, we propose a similar (late Quaternary) age for the isolated compartment. The find indicates that the extinct late Quaternary northeastern Atlantic population of E. robustus was infected by Cryptolepas rhachianecti. Our find is, therefore, compatible with the hypothesis of an ancient grey whale migration route running between the subtropical/temperate waters of the northeast Atlantic (or Mediterranean Basin), and the cold waters of the Baltic Sea (or southern Arctic Ocean), through the southern North Sea. Finally, we discuss the systematic placement of the fossil barnacle species Cryptolepas murata and propose the possibility of its removal from the genus Cryptolepas pending further investigations.

  19. On the morphology of antennular sensory and attachment organs in cypris larvae of the deep-sea vent/seep barnacles, Ashinkailepas and Neoverruca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorisue, Takefumi; Chan, Benny K K; Kado, Ryusuke; Watanabe, Hiromi; Inoue, Koji; Kojima, Shigeaki; Høeg, Jens T

    2016-05-01

    Barnacle cypris larvae show high morphological variation in the organs used in search of and attaching to a substratum. This variation may represent adaptation to the habitat of the species. Here, we studied SEM level morphologies of cypris antennular sensory and attachment organs in a deep-sea vent endemic species (Neoverruca sp.) and a vent/seep inhabiting species (Ashinkailepas seepiophila). We compare them with three species from other environments. The antennular morphologies of Neoverruca sp. and A. seepiophila were similar, which is consistent with recent molecular studies showing a close relationship of the two species. The setation pattern of the antennules was very conservative among species from various environments. In contrast, striking differences were observed in the structure of the attachment organ (the third antennular segment). Neoverruca sp. and A. seepiophila had no velum or a skirt surrounding the attachment disc on the third segment, while other cirripede cyprids almost always have either of these structures. In addition, both cyprids of A. seepiophila and Neoverruca sp. had the attachment disc angled toward the substratum, whereas it faces distally in cyprids from hard bottom inhabiting barnacles. We suggest that both velum/skirt and the angle of the attachment disc play an important role, when the antennules are contacting the substratum during surface exploration. Differences in attachment organ structures may be highly adaptive, enabling cirripede species to enter new habitats during evolution.

  20. Numerical simulations of barnacle larval dispersion coupled with field observations on larval abundance, settlement and recruitment in a tropical monsoon influenced coastal marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Chetan A.; Samiksha, S. V.; George, Grinson; Aboobacker, V. M.; Vethamony, P.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2012-06-01

    Larval abundance in an area depends on various factors which operate over different spatial and temporal scales. Identifying the factors responsible for variations in larval supply and abundance is important to understand the settlement and recruitment variability of their population in a particular area. In view of this, observations were carried out to monitor the larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles on a regular basis for a period of two years. The results were then compared with the numerical modelling studies carried out along the west coast of India. Field observations of larval abundance showed temporal variations. The least abundance of larvae was mostly observed during the monsoon season and the peak in abundance was mostly observed during the pre-monsoon season. Numerical simulations also showed a seasonal change in larval dispersion and retention patterns. During pre-monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards south and the larvae released from the northern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuaries, whereas during the monsoon season the larval movement was mostly found towards north and the larvae released from southern release sites contributed to larval abundance within the estuary. During post-monsoon season, the larval movement was found towards the north in the beginning of the season and is shifted towards the south at the end of the season, but the movement was mostly restricted near to the release sites. Larval supply from the adjacent rocky sites to the estuaries was higher during the pre-monsoon season and the retention of larvae released from different sites within the estuaries was found to be highest during the late post-monsoon and early pre-monsoon season. Maximum larval supply and retention during the pre-monsoon season coincided with maximum larval abundance, settlement and recruitment of barnacles observed in the field studies. These observations showed that the pattern of

  1. A comparative study of the accumulation of metals in the barnacle (Tetraclita serrata and the black mussel (Choromytilis meridionalis in False Bay, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan J. Reinecke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods to monitor the South African coastal waters offer major challenges. Knowledge and availability of suitable species that may serve as biomonitors will be valuable to obtain information to support good management decisions. It is therefore important to identify local species that show the basic characteristics required for biomonitoring. The aim of this study was to compare, as part of a wider seasonal field study of metals in the intertidal zone of False Bay, South Africa, the body loads of copper (Cu, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd and zinc (Zn in the black mussel (C. meridionalis and the barnacle (T. serrata, and to compare these with environmental concentrations. Also to draw conclusions about the animals’ relative abilities to accumulate priority metals. Specimens of both species were collected over several seasons at different points in False Bay and analysed chemically. The mean body load (soft tissue and shell of metals was higher in the black mussel than in the barnacle during all seasons. A comparison between the body loads and environmental concentrations in water and sediment showed that the priority metals Cd, Ni and Pb are accumulated strongly by both C. meridionalis and T. serrata. The mean Cd body loads varied between 6.43 µg/g and 14.73 µg/g for the various seasons but was not statistically significantly different between seasons. Metal concentrations were in most cases highest during winter. Multiple regression analysis showed a strong correlation between body load of metals in the black mussel and the environmental concentration for most seasons, which indicates that the black mussel can be useful as an active rather than a passive biomonitor. The concept of biomonitoring has merit because it may show long-term tendencies, but it does not offer an absolute measure of immediate, varying pollution levels. It could serve as an additional management tool in a national marine programme for the

  2. Comprehensive Assessment of Marine Coatings in the Laboratory and Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-27

    NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Dean E. Wendt 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 805-756-2988 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI...approximately 50% and the percentage of settled larvae was calculated and compared to that of the controls. Laboratory Rearing of Juvenile Barnacles...Newly metamorphosed juvenile barnacles {Balanus amphitrite) were transferred on their respective coatings to growth chambers where they were fed the

  3. The selective advantage of host feminization: a case study of the green crab Carcinus maenas and the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tommy; Nielsen, Anders Isberg; Stig-Jørgensen, Anders Isak

    2012-01-01

    Male crabs infected by parasitic barnacles (Rhizocephala) are known to be morphologically feminized. Here, we investigate morphological chances in green crabs, Carcinus maenas, induced by the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini. Infected males acquire a broader, longer and segmented abdomen......, fringed with marginal setae. Copulatory appendages and pereopods are reduced in length, and the chelae become smaller. The feminization show great individual variation. Males with scars from lost externae, the parasites reproductive organ situated under the abdomen, are less modified than males carrying...... an externa, and the feminization is more pronounced in smaller than in larger males. No super-feminization is evident in female crabs that remain morphologically unaffected by infection. The protective value of a parasitically induced enlargement of the male abdomen may constitute an adaptation...

  4. Habitat traits and food availability determine the response of marine invertebrates to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansch, Christian; Schaub, Iris; Havenhand, Jonathan; Wahl, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Energy availability and local adaptation are major components in mediating the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on marine species. In a long-term study, we investigated the effects of food availability and elevated pCO2 (ca. 400, 1000 and 3000 μatm) on growth of newly settled Amphibalanus (Balanus) improvisus to reproduction, and on their offspring. We also compared two different populations, which were presumed to differ in their sensitivity to pCO2 due to differing habitat conditions: Kiel Fjord, Germany (Western Baltic Sea) with naturally strong pCO2 fluctuations, and the Tjärnö Archipelago, Sweden (Skagerrak) with far lower fluctuations. Over 20 weeks, survival, growth, reproduction and shell strength of Kiel barnacles were all unaffected by elevated pCO2 , regardless of food availability. Moulting frequency and shell corrosion increased with increasing pCO2 in adults. Larval development and juvenile growth of the F1 generation were tolerant to increased pCO2 , irrespective of parental treatment. In contrast, elevated pCO2 had a strong negative impact on survival of Tjärnö barnacles. Specimens from this population were able to withstand moderate levels of elevated pCO2 over 5 weeks when food was plentiful but showed reduced growth under food limitation. Severe levels of elevated pCO2 negatively impacted growth of Tjärnö barnacles in both food treatments. We demonstrate a conspicuously higher tolerance to elevated pCO2 in Kiel barnacles than in Tjärnö barnacles. This tolerance was carried over from adults to their offspring. Our findings indicate that populations from fluctuating pCO2 environments are more tolerant to elevated pCO2 than populations from more stable pCO2 habitats. We furthermore provide evidence that energy availability can mediate the ability of barnacles to withstand moderate CO2 stress. Considering the high tolerance of Kiel specimens and the possibility to adapt over many generations, near future OA alone does not seem to

  5. Massive recruitment of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides in the Clyde Sea (Scotland, UK) in the spring of 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, L.J.; Hudson, I.R.; Seddon, R.J.;

    2003-01-01

    in the plankton, as well as massive settlement, with recruits found on adults and in the splash zone. The maximum density recorded was 109 settlers cm(-2). Over the next 60 d mortality averaged 85%, resulting in a mean density of 8.4 recruits cm(-2) in June 2000. Recruitment varied spatially at the kin...

  6. Invasion and Morphological Variation of the Non- Indigenous BarnacleChthamalus challengeri(Hoek, 1883) in Yangshan Port and its Surrounding Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan; XUE Junzeng; LIN Junda; WU Huixian

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species generally possess unique characteristics that allow them to survive the invasion process in order to es-tablish and spread in new habitats. Successful invaders must resist both physical and physiological stresses associated with the changing environment. A common littoral barnacle,Chthamalus challengeri Hoek, 1883 (Crustacea, Cirripedia), which is native to Japan, South Korea and northern China, has become established in the high-littoral zone adjacent to Yangshan Port, Shanghai, China. A comparison of the morphology ofChthamlus species from Zhoushan archipelago with previous description indicates the occur-rence of C. challengeri.The new immigrant becomes a dominant species in certain high-intertidal habitats of the adjacent area to of Yangshan Port.C. challengeri was found in part of sampling sites in Zhoushan in 2010; however, it dispersed to all the eleven sam-pling sites in 2012. Densities ofC.challengerihad increased over 10 times in the last 2 years, with the highest mean value reaching 39533±6243ind.m-2 in the new habitat. The specific ratios of both operculum area (Sa) to base area (SA) and average height of pa-rietal plates (H) to length of base (L) revealed thatC. Challengeri displays morphological changes to resist stronger currents in the new habitats for invasion.

  7. Adult Strabismus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause. Is eye straightening as an adult strictly cosmetic? No. Eye alignment surgery is performed in adults for several reasons. Adults ... this surgery? Eye muscle surgery is reconstructive (not cosmetic). In ... will cover strabismus surgery in adults, however, one should check with their ...

  8. Adult Education and Adult Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Knud

    Kort beskrivelse Bogen, 'Adult Education og Adult Learning', giver et fyldestgørende overblik over forståelsen af voksenuddannelse og læring. Abstract I "Adult Education and Adult Learning' ser Knud Illeris på voksenuddannelse fra to perspektiver. På den ene side beskrives de aktuelle udfordringer...

  9. Polymyositis - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash is a sign of a similar condition, dermatomyositis . Common symptoms include: Muscle weakness in the shoulders ... in the treatment of refractory adult and juvenile dermatomyositis and adult polymyositis: a randomized, placebo-phase trial. ...

  10. Seasonal, annual, and spatial variation in the development of hard bottom communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, J.; Anger, K.

    1983-06-01

    The development of hard bottom communities has been studied on test panels in Helgoland Harbour (German Bight) since 1977. Settlement and growth of epibenthic species was examined monthly. Natural variation in different seasons, years, and at three stations (the latter, only in 1981 and 1982) was investigated. At Station A (Binnenhafen), barnacles (Balanus crenatus) and polychaetes (Polydora ciliata) were always among the first settlers in spring. They were followed by other barnacles (Elminius modestus, Balanus improvisus) and by colonial ascidians (Botryllus schlosseri). The latter species often dominated from August to October, and tended to overgrow the barnacle populations. E. modestus showed strong annual variation, probably due to extremely low winter temperatures: after the cold winter of 1978/79, its populations were less dense than in previous years. In 1981 they recovered, and settlement increased again, but the cold winter 1981/82 damaged the population again. At Station B (Nordosthafen), mussels (Mytilus edulis) soon covered barnacles and empty space. By October they had monopolized the fouling community. At Station C (Südhafen), barnacle settlement in spring was followed by an overgrowth of hydrozoans ( Laomedea spec.). In summer, ascidians ( Ciona intestinalis and Ascidiella aspersa) settled and began to dominate. Barnacles were weaker in the competition for space as opposed to later colonizers at all three stations.

  11. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  12. Major Depression Among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  13. Adult teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Lund

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I examine the research into the process of adult teachers’ practice-based learning as a part of an on-going project titled “Competence development through practice-based learning – a study of adult teacher’s learning processes”. The project relies on the notion of the adult teacher...... as a 'reflective practitioner’, who develops 'the language of practice’, through experience and learns when she is exposed to 'disjuncture’. Research done on continuing professional development and the inquiries done in the field of teacher thinking and within this the research on novices becoming expert...

  14. Barnacles Tell no Lies - Bioclastic deposits and in-situ balanid colonies delineate shorelines of the Holocene palaeolake at Tayma (NW Saudi Arabia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; Frenzel, Peter; Pint, Anna; Dinies, Michèle; Gleixner, Gerd; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Neugebauer, Ina; Plessen, Birgit; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    The reconstruction of abrupt and gradual climatic changes of the recent geologic past is key to understand patterns of landscape change, prehistoric human migration and settlement, in particular within sensitive arid environments. While a considerable number of Late Pleistocene to Holocene climate records exist from the Sahara, the Levant, and the southern Arabian Peninsula, Northern Arabia is understudied. Moreover, reliable records of environmental changes are strongly required as inferences on perennial lake bodies in the wake of the early to mid-Holocene pluvial phase in Arabia have recently been challenged and the magnitude of this phase is still under debate (Enzel et al. 2015). The continental sabkha of Tayma is one of very few North Arabian sites, where substantial landscape changes are recorded in a laminated lacustrine sequence, disjunct balanid and gastropod shell accumulations (Engel et al. 2012), and pollen spectra (Dinies et al. 2015). Here, we report on a recent mapping campaign of early to mid-Holocene shoreline features of a palaeolake, supposedly fed by both groundwater and enhanced precipitation. Shoreline index points include (i) in-situ populations of Amphibalanus amphitrite, a barnacle originating from marginal marine habitats, either attached to Ordovician bedrock or parautochthonous bedrock clasts, and (ii) in-situ or parautochthonous sequences of varying percentages and taphonomic states of shell detritus from A. amphitrite, gastropods (Melanoides tuberculatus, Hydrobia sp.), marginal marine foraminifers, the brackish water ostracod Cyprideis torosa, and quartz sand. Their thickness reaches up to >2.50 m and they occur either as laterally confined pockets or more extensive sheets. Despite strong wadi dynamics, widespread aeolian deposition, and the actively retreating escarpment framing the palaeolake basin in the north, a remarkably high number of remnant shoreline features is still preserved at elevations between 808-813 m a.s.l. Based on

  15. A new 1,2-ethanedione benzofurane derivative from Tephrosia purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Chen, Yinning; Gao, Chenghai; Yan, Tao; Cao, Wenhao; Huang, Riming

    2014-01-01

    A new 1,2-ethanedione benzofurane derivative, purpdione (1), was isolated from Tephrosia purpurea, together with seven known flavonoids, purpurenone (2), pongamol (3), ovalitenin A (4), karanjin (5), lanceolatin B (6), tachrosin (7) and villosinol (8). The new structure was elucidated based on the analysis of its spectroscopic data. The structures of the known compounds were identified by comparing their spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature. The isolates exhibited marginal ability to inhibit the settlement of barnacle (Balanus reticulatus).

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  17. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  18. Adult flatfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toullec, E

    2015-02-01

    Adult flatfoot is defined as a flattening of the medial arch of the foot in weight-bearing and lack of a propulsive gait. The 3 lesion levels are the talonavicular, tibiotarsal and midfoot joints. The subtalar joint is damaged by the consequent rotational defects. Clinical examination determines deformity and reducibility, and assesses any posterior tibialis muscle deficit, the posterior tibialis tendon and spring ligament being frequently subject to degenerative lesions. Radiographic examination in 3 incidences in weight-bearing is essential, to determine the principal level of deformity. Tendon (posterior tibialis tendon) and ligamentous lesions (spring ligament and interosseous ligament) are analyzed on MRI or ultrasound. In fixed deformities, CT explores for arthritic evolution or specific etiologies. 3D CT reconstruction can analyze bone and joint morphology and contribute to the planning of any osteotomy. Medical management associates insoles and physiotherapy. Acute painful flatfoot requires strict cast immobilization. Surgical treatment associates numerous combinations of procedures, currently under assessment for supple flatfoot: for the hindfoot: medial slide calcaneal osteotomy, calcaneal lengthening osteotomy, or arthroereisis; for the midfoot: arthrodesis on one or several rays, or first cuneiform or first metatarsal osteotomy; for the ankle: medial collateral ligament repair with tendon transfer. Fixed deformities require arthrodesis of one or several joint-lines in the hindfoot; for the ankle, total replacement after realignment of the foot, or tibiotalocalcaneal fusion or ankle and hindfoot fusion; and, for the midfoot, cuneonavicular or cuneometatarsal fusion. Tendinous procedures are often associated. Specific etiologies may need individualized procedures. In conclusion, adult flatfoot tends to be diagnosed and managed too late, with consequent impact on the ankle, the management of which is complex and poorly codified.

  19. Distribution patterns of the barnacle, Chelonibia testudinaria, on juvenile green turtles (Chelonia mydas in Bahia Magdalena, Mexico Patrones de distribución del balano, Chelonibia testudinaria, en tortugas verdes (Chelonia mydas juveniles en bahía Magdalena, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nájera-Hillman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The barnacle, Chelonibia testudinaria, is an obligate commensal of sea turtles that may show population variability according to the physical characteristics of the environment and properties of turtle hosts; therefore, we characterized the distributional patterns and the potential effects on health of C. testudinaria on juvenile green turtles in Bahia Magdalena, Mexico. Barnacle attachment position, abundance, and size-class structure were described, while the relationship between barnacle abundance and turtle health condition and size was explored through generalized linear models. Juvenile green turtles of Bahía Magdalena offered an appropriate habitat for C. testudinaria as their frequency of occurrence was high and their abundance was similar to that found in other green turtle populations. Barnacles showed an aggregated distribution that may be facilitating their reproduction during the warm summer months. Barnacle abundance is unaffected by turtle size or seasonality, while their attachment position appears to be influenced by water flow over the turtle carapace and by plastron abrasion by the turtle against the sea floor. Healthier turtles exhibited a decreased barnacle load; therefore we suggest that C. testudinaria abundance may be a useful indicator of health for juvenile green turtles.El balano Chelonibia testudinaria es un comensal obligado de tortugas marinas que puede presentar variaciones poblacionales de acuerdo a características ambientales y de las tortugas que coloniza; por lo tanto, caracterizamos su distribución y el efecto sobre la salud de tortugas verdes (Chelonia mydas juveniles en bahía Magdalena, México. Se describieron la posición de adherencia, la abundancia y la estructura de tallas de C. testudinaria, mientras que la relación entre su abundancia y la salud y el tamaño de las tortugas se exploró a través de modelos lineales generalizados. Las tortugas verdes ofrecieron un hábitat adecuado para C

  20. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  1. Adult Still's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  2. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  3. Studies on some ecological aspects of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.

    been made by several researchers in view of addressing antifouling issues. The larval rearing experiments indicated that larvae in the field experience a nutritional stress. However this stress did not translate proportionately to the well-fed larvae...

  4. Starvation threshold of Balanus amphitrite larvae in relation to temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.

    Energy content in the non-feeding (lecithotrophic) cyprid larvae of B. amphitrite plays an important role in determining its metamorphic characteristics. In this context it is important to understand the energy transformed to this stage from...

  5. Adult Neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Fernández-Hernández; Christa Rhiner; Eduardo Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been linked to several cognitive functions and neurological disorders. Description of adult neurogenesis in a model organism like Drosophila could facilitate the genetic study of normal and abnormal neurogenesis in the adult brain. So far, formation of new neurons has not been detected in adult fly brains and hence has been thought to be absent in Drosophila. Here, we used an improved lineage-labeling method to show that, surprisingly, adult neurogenesis occurs in the m...

  6. Young Adult Literature for Young Adult Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Sam D.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that young adult literature can play a significant role in the emotional and mental health of an adolescent as well as help young males become more literate. Offers a 19-item annotated list of young adult novels with male protagonists, sorted by themes: nature and adventure stories, sports stories, genre stories, historical stories, and…

  7. Clueless? Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a list of adult mystery titles for young adult readers. Includes first titles in a series (for reading in order); new and lesser-known mystery authors' works are the focus. Annotations include plot summary. The rest of each annotation is for professional use (includes date and name of award bestowed). (AEF)

  8. Adults Role in Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  9. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  10. Adult Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miser, Rifat; Ural, Ozana; Ünlühisarýklý, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the situation and practices of adult education in Turkey in terms of (a) participants, (b) providers, and (c) program areas. The data were derived from published statistical data and one-to-one interaction with adult education providers when such data are unavailable. Turkey has a long tradition of adult education with…

  11. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  12. The Adult Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive lung disease - adults - discharge; Chronic bronchitis - adults - discharge; Emphysema - adults - discharge; Bronchitis - ...

  14. Adult attachment styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Žvelc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Theory of attachment primarily described early relationships between a child and his caretakers. In the last twenty years there is a growing interest in adult attachment research. Theories and research findings of adult attachment stem from two different methodological approaches. The first approach measures adult attachment through Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; Main, 1991 where the attachment is assessed through the narratives of adult people of their early child experiences with their primary caretakers. The second approach measures adult attachment with the help of self-evaluative questionnaires, developed by (a Hazan and Shaver (1987 who started this approach in the field of personality and social psychology, and (b Bartholomew and Horowitz (1991. Research shows that there is significant correlation between early and adult attachment style. Attachment styles are passed from generation to generation. Basic adult attachment styles are: securely attached, preoccupied, fearful-avoidant, dismissing-avoidant and disorganized. Previous research using Barholomew and Horowitz (1991 Relationship Questionnaire on 176 Slovenian students showed that 48% students are securely attached, 29% are fearful-avoidant, 10% are dismissing-avoidant, and 13% have preoccupied attachment style. Theory of attachment is very useful for understanding the behavior and subjective experiences of children and adults. It is applicable to different contexts (psychotherapy, counseling, education .... The paper proposes further research focused on integration of adult attachment styles and types of object relations measured by Test of object relations (Žvelc, 1998 and Pictorial test of Separation and Individuation (Žvelc, 2003.

  15. Metamorphosis in balanomorphan, pedunculated, and parasitic barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Maruzzo, Diego; Okano, Keiju

    2012-01-01

    carapace in Lepas. In M. rosa, the free juvenile retains its very thin cuticle and flexible shape for some time, and shell plates do not appear until sometime after shedding of the cypris cuticles. In Sacculina carcini, the cypris settles at the base of a seta on the host crab and remains quiescent...

  16. Personality differences explain leadership in barnacle geese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Eijkelenkamp, B.; Van Oers, K.; van Lith, B.; van Wieren, S.E.; Ydenberg, R.C.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2009-01-01

    Personality in animal behaviour describes the observation that behavioural differences between individuals are consistent over time and context. Studies of group-living animals show that movement order among individuals is also consistent over time and context, suggesting that some individuals lead

  17. Metamorphosis in balanomorphan, pedunculated, and parasitic barnacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Maruzzo, Diego; Okano, Keiju;

    2012-01-01

    carapace in Lepas. In M. rosa, the free juvenile retains its very thin cuticle and flexible shape for some time, and shell plates do not appear until sometime after shedding of the cypris cuticles. In Sacculina carcini, the cypris settles at the base of a seta on the host crab and remains quiescent...... and aligned at an angle of ~60° to the crab's cuticle. The metamorphosis involves two molts, resulting in the formation of an elongated kentrogon stage with a hollow injection stylet. Due to the orientation of the cyprid, the stylet points directly towards the base of the crab's seta. Approximately 60¿h after...

  18. Barnacle muscle: Ca2+, activation and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, C C; Griffiths, P J; Lea, T J; Mulligan, I P; Palmer, R E; Simnett, S J

    1993-01-01

    In this review, aspects of the ways in which Ca2+ is transported and regulated within muscle cells have been considered, with particular reference to crustacean muscle fibres. The large size of these fibres permits easy access to the internal environment of the cell, allowing it to be altered by microinjection or microperfusion. At rest, Ca2+ is not in equilibrium across the cell membrane, it enters the cell down a steep electrochemical gradient. The free [Ca2+] at rest is maintained at a value close to 200 nM by a combination of internal buffering systems, mainly the SR, mitochondria, and the fixed and diffusible Ca(2+)-binding proteins, as well as by an energy-dependent extrusion system operating across the external cell membrane. This system relies upon the inward movement of Na+ down its own electrochemical gradient to provide the energy for the extrusion of Ca2+ ions. As a result of electrical excitation, voltage-sensitive channels for Ca2+ are activated and permit Ca2+ to enter the cell more rapidly than at rest. It has been possible to determine both the amount of Ca2+ entering by this step, and what part this externally derived Ca2+ plays in the development of force as well as in the free Ca2+ change. The latter can be determined directly by Ca(2+)-sensitive indicators introduced into the cell sarcoplasm. A combination of techniques, allowing both the total and free Ca2+ changes to be assessed during electrical excitation, has provided valuable information as to how muscle cells buffer their Ca2+ in order to regulate the extent of the change in the free Ca2+ concentration. The data indicate that the entering Ca2+ can only make a small direct contribution to the force developed by the cell. The implication here is that the major source of Ca2+ for contraction must be derived from the internal Ca2+ storage sites within the SR system, a view reinforced by caged Ca2+ methods. The ability to measure the free Ca2+ concentration changes within a single cell during activation has also provided the opportunity to analyse, in detail, the likely relations between free Ca2+ and the process of force development in muscle. The fact that the free Ca2+ change precedes the development of force implies that there are delays in the mechanism, either at the site of Ca2+ attachment on the myofibril, or at some later stage in the process of force development that were not previously anticipated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  19. Phenylketonuria (PKU in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Martínez-Pardo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring phenylketonuria adult patients is an important subject which has created considerable interest in specialized metabolic clinics. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of the experience with these patients in the Unit of Metabolic Diseases at the Hospital Ramon y Cajal; the use of sapropterin in adults is included.

  20. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  1. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  2. Adult learning in modernity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    The paper discusses the conditions for the growth of adult education in modern societies. It is argued that in modern adult life individual biographical reflection plays an increasing role, not only for educational and occupational choice but also in the process of identity formation and emotional...

  3. Participation in adult learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This entry presents an internationally comparative overview of adult learning patterns. Emphasis is placed on who is participating in adult learning and the observed unequal chances to participate. The entry covers three overarching questions that are central to participation research: a) What...

  4. Tracking adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snippert, Hugo J; Clevers, Hans

    2011-02-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context, rather than outside their natural environment. The mouse is an attractive model in which to study adult mammalian stem cells, as numerous experimental systems and genetic tools are available. In this review, we describe strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells in mice and discuss their potential, limitations and interpretations, as well as how they have informed our understanding of adult stem-cell biology. An accurate interpretation of physiologically relevant stem-cell assays is crucial to identify adult stem cells and elucidate how they self-renew and give rise to differentiated progeny.

  5. Adult and lifelong education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Holford, John; Mohorčič Špolar, Vida

    2014-01-01

    The contributions published in this special issue of Globalisation, Societies and Education draw from an international conference “Trans-nationalization of Educational Policy Making: Implications for Adult and Lifelong Learning”, held in Nottingham on 10-12 February 2012. The conference...... was organised by the Research Network on Policy Studies on Adult Education, established under the auspices of the European Society for the Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA). The aim of the conference was to explore how globalisation affects agency and policy processes in the area of adult and lifelong...... education, and the conditions or structures under which policy processes occur. The objective was to deepen understanding of how scientific inquiry – as a means of comprehending and interpreting current processes and their implications – can accompany and support contemporary developments in adult...

  6. Schizophrenia in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Elizabeth; Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2011-11-01

    Although the number of people older than 55 with schizophrenia is expected to double during the next 20 years, the research data on older adults with schizophrenia are limited. This appears to be because until the middle of the 20th century, it was assumed that mental illness in older adults was a part of the aging process and because older adults are often excluded from research investigations. Nursing research is needed to explore how people with schizophrenia learn to manage their problems as they age, as well as how those who are first diagnosed with schizophrenia in later life adapt to their illness. Mental health nurses need to be cautious in assigning premature labels to older adults with mental illness that may lead to unsubstantiated assumptions about levels of disability. Instead, nurses should realize individual potential regarding undiscovered strengths and should attempt to create interventions that recognize and foster personal development for older adults with schizophrenia.

  7. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr 24,2014 From the Committee on ... below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: Adults with Congenital Heart Defects Introduction: ...

  8. College-Age & Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Related Topics » College-Age & Young Adults College-Age & Young Adults Email Facebook Twitter Daily marijuana use ... the country. Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2015 Infographic View Full Infographic Monitoring ...

  9. English in Adult Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrowska, Katarzyna, 1985-

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of a specialized program to meet the needs of adults who have diverse English skills and use English as a Lingua Franca. The program was developed for Menntastoðir, an adult education program in Reykjanesbær. Menntastoðir is an adult education institution that provides opportunities for improving adults’ knowledge and competences. The purpose of the study is to map out the type and amount of English exposure among Menntastoðir ...

  10. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Everyone: Easy-to-read Schedules Infants and Children Preteens and Teens Adults Display Immunization Schedules and Quiz ... file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file ...

  11. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  12. Older Adults and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  13. Information for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... occurrence. Well, so much for statistics! Life seemed unjust again! I had not chosen this! Through much ... to the cleft may help. Facial Appearance Surgical Considerations in the Adult Patient Input and Surgeon Selection ...

  14. Older Adults and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Certain health problems are common in older adults. Heavy drinking can make these problems worse, including: Diabetes High blood pressure Congestive heart failure Liver problems Osteoporosis Memory problems Mood disorders Bad Interactions with Medications ...

  15. Adult Neurogenesis in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Julia; Brand, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Teleost fish have a remarkable neurogenic and regenerative capacity in the adult throughout the rostrocaudal axis of the brain. The distribution of proliferation zones shows a remarkable conservation, even in distantly related teleost species, suggesting a common teleost ground plan of proliferation zones. There are different progenitor populations in the neurogenic niches-progenitors positive for radial glial markers (dorsal telencephalon, hypothalamus) and progenitors with neuroepithelial-like characteristics (ventral telencephalon, optic tectum, cerebellum). Definition of these progenitors has allowed studying their role in normal growth of the adult brain, but also when challenged following a lesion. From these studies, important roles have emerged for intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals controlling the activation of adult neurogenesis that enable regeneration of the adult brain to occur, opening up new perspectives on rekindling regeneration also in the context of the mammalian brain.

  16. Young Adult Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Connie C.

    1987-01-01

    Considers the similarities between science fiction writing and young adult literature, and points out that several well-known authors, such as Robert Heinlein and Jane Yolen, write in both genres. (NKA)

  17. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  18. Urinary tract infection - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000521.htm Urinary tract infection - adults To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection, or UTI, is an infection of the urinary ...

  19. Mosquito, adult (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. ( ...

  20. Motivation and Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. Rodney

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews theories of human motivation: Lewin's force field analysis, Skinner's operant reinforcement theory, and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He then extracts the implications of these theories for adult learning. SK)

  1. NOHSS Adult Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999, 2002-2014 (even years). Data from BRFSS for indicators of adult oral health for 1999 and even years from 2002 through 2014. National estimates are represented...

  2. NOHSS Adult Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2012-2014 (even years). Data from BRFSS for indicators of adult oral health for even years from 2012 through 2014. National estimates are represented by the median...

  3. Falls and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Falls and Older Adults About Falls Risk Increases With Age Many people have a ... problems -- rises with age. Click for more information Falls Lead to Fractures, Trauma Each year, more than ...

  4. About BMI for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs About Adult BMI ... Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Language: English Español ( ...

  5. Speech impairment (adult)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003204.htm Speech impairment (adult) To use the sharing features on ... 2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  6. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  7. Adult onset tic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Chouinard, S; Ford, B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tic disorders presenting during adulthood have infrequently been described in the medical literature. Most reports depict adult onset secondary tic disorders caused by trauma, encephalitis, and other acquired conditions. Only rare reports describe idiopathic adult onset tic disorders, and most of these cases represent recurrent childhood tic disorders.
OBJECTIVE—To describe a large series of patients with tic disorders presenting during adulthood, to compare cl...

  8. Adult extracardiac rhabdomyoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal Sørensen, Kristine; Godballe, Christian; Ostergaard, Birthe;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present two cases of adult rhabdomyoma in the parapharyngeal space. They are rare benign tumors with a characteristic histologic appearance. METHODS: The tumors were studied by light and immunohistochemical analysis using stains characteristic of striated muscle fibers. RESULTS...... slight proliferation with incipient differentiation in an otherwise mature tumor. CONCLUSION: The head and neck area harbors 90% of adult rhabdomyomas and should be considered in a differential diagnosis in this region. Immunohistochemistry confirms that the tumors are almost totally mature neoplasms...

  9. Adult educators' core competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  10. Chemical constituents of soft coral Sarcophyton infundibuliforme from the South China Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chang Yun

    2011-08-01

    Chemical investigation on soft coral Sarcophyton infundibuliforme collected from the South China Sea led to the isolation and identification of 14 secondary metabolites, including ten cembrene diterpenoids (1-10), one α-tocopheryl quinone derivative (11), one prostaglandin (12), one lipid (13) and one carotinoid (14). Their structures were determined by extensive analysis of their spectroscopic data. All of these metabolites were isolated from this species for the first time. Diterpenoids 1, 2, 7 and 10 showed potent antifouling activity against the larval settlement of barnacle Balanus amphitrite. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of cationic micropeptides derived from the innate immune system as inhibitors of marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepos, Rozenn; Cervin, Gunnar; Pile, Claire; Pavia, Henrik; Hellio, Claire; Svenson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    A series of 13 short synthetic amphiphilic cationic micropeptides, derived from the antimicrobial iron-binding innate defence protein lactoferrin, have been evaluated for their capacity to inhibit the marine fouling process. The whole biofouling process was studied and microfouling organisms such as marine bacteria and microalgae were included as well as the macrofouling barnacle Balanus improvisus. In total 19 different marine fouling organisms (18 microfoulers and one macrofouler) were included and both the adhesion and growth of the microfoulers were investigated. It was shown that the majority of the peptides inhibited barnacle cyprid settlement via a reversible nontoxic mechanism, with IC50 values as low as 0.5 μg ml(-1). Six peptides inhibited adhesion and growth of microorganisms. Two of these were particularly active against the microfoulers with MIC-values ranging between 0.01 and 1 μg ml(-1), which is comparable with the commercial reference antifoulant SeaNine.

  12. Hypertension in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Venecia, Toni; Lu, Marvin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension remains a major societal problem affecting 76 million, or approximately one third, of US adults. While more prevalent in the older population, an increasing incidence in the younger population, including athletes, is being observed. Active individuals, like the young and athletes, are viewed as free of diseases such as hypertension. However, the increased prevalence of traditional risk factors in the young, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and renal disease, increase the risk of developing hypertension in younger adults. Psychosocial factors may also be contributing factors to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the younger population. Increased left ventricular wall thickness and mass are increasingly found in young adults on routine echocardiograms and predict future cardiovascular events. This increasing incidence of hypertension in the young calls for early surveillance and prompt treatment to prevent future cardiac events. In this review we present the current epidemiological data, potential mechanisms, clinical implications, and treatment of hypertension in young patients and athletes.

  13. Electroporation of adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Madhusudhana; Rambabu, K Murali; Rao, S Harinarayana

    2008-01-01

    We generated transient transgenic zebrafish by applying electrical pulses subsequent to injection of DNA into muscle tissue of 3-6-month old adult zebrafish. Electroporation parameters, such as number of pulses, voltage, and amount of plasmid DNA, were optimized and found that 6 pulses of 40 V/cm at 15 mug/fish increased the luciferase expression by 10-fold compared with those in controls. By measuring the expression of luciferase, in vivo by electroporation in adult zebrafish and in vitro using fish cell line (Xiphophorus xiphidium A2 cells), the strength of three promoters (CMV, human EF-1alpha, and Xenopus EF-1alpha) was compared. Subsequent to electroporation after injecting DNA in the mid region of zebrafish, expression of green fluorescent protein was found far away from the site of injection in the head and the tail sections. Thus, electroporation in adult zebrafish provides a rapid way of testing the behavior of gene sequences in the whole organism.

  14. Back pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  15. Dance for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Dance programs for older adults that encourage exercise and socializing are described in six articles. Program guidelines of the American Alliance Committee on Aging are explained, and other articles emphasize a movement education approach that may involve intergenerational contact. A dance program held in a worship setting is also discussed. (PP)

  16. Inguinal Herniography in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B. T.; Park, K. J. [57th Evacuation Hospital, Korea Army, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    Inguinal hernia in children is easily diagnosed in most cases: however, it is sometimes different or impossible to detect by physical examination. The some is true of a contralateral asymptomatic hernia. White have reported that herniography is easy to perform and has a high degree of accuracy and minimal morbidity. The diagnostic accuracy of herniography in detection of patent process vaginalis is 95-98% by white. Rowe found 40% of children over age of of 2 years and adults with a unilateral congenital hernia had an open process vaginalis in contralateral normal site and concluded that 20% of patients with a unilateral hernia will develop a contralateral hernia sometimes during life. It is necessary to check the condition of the normal site before surgery in unilateral hernia by herniogram. But in adults, the hernigraphy was not performed due to some reason. We found that the herniography in adults is also easy ro perform and high degree of accuracy. The results are: 1. Total number of studies are 25 patient of unilateral inguinal hernia. 2. We found 32% of adults male with unilateral hernia had an open process viginalis in contralateral normal site. 3. Slight more abdominal disconfort than children is noted during injection of Hypaque. 4. Prominent lateral recess of Douglaspouch and poor coating of contrast media to peritoneum are different radiologic finding from children.

  17. Facilitation of Adult Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  18. Police and Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Vic

    The literature on adult education for police is reviewed and criticized. Among the publications that have been influential in debating the need for police education are Charles B. Saunder's "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" (1976), which endorses the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement's recommendations regarding the vital…

  19. Adult onset Leigh syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit Lekha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh syndrome is a rare progressive mitochondrial disorder of oxidative metabolism. Though it has been reported in infancy and childhood, it is rarely described in adults. The authors describe a patient who had clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features diagnostic of Leigh syndrome, with supportive biochemical and muscle histochemistry evidence.

  20. Adult issues in phenylketonuria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeks, M.P.; Heijer, M. den; Janssen, M.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a classical example of an inherited metabolic disease, in which mental retardation can be prevented successfully by using a diet. However, in adult PKU new problems occur, such as vitamin deficiencies, osteoporosis and the maternal PKU syndrome. The aim of this review articl

  1. Adult intergenerational relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmijn, M.; Treas, J.; Scott, J.; Richards, M.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of research on the relationships between parents and their adult, grown-up children. Interest in intergenerational ties has increased again as a result of the aging of Western societies. The chapter discusses the following topics in the literature: (i) the degree to wh

  2. Depression - older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slowly than in younger adults. To better manage depression at home: Exercise regularly, if the provider says it is OK. Surround yourself with caring, positive people and do fun activities. ... signs of depression, and know how to react if these occur. ...

  3. Smoking and Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-27

    This podcast discusses the importance of older adults quitting smoking and other tobacco products. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 10/27/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/20/2008.

  4. Migration and Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  5. Tracking adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context,

  6. Adult Education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministerio da Educacao e Cultura, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

    The status and goals of adult education programs in Brazil are discussed in this report. Supplemental systems such as the Brazilian Literacy Movement (Mobral) and their results are described and evaluated. Charts detailing the evolution of literacy are shown and priorities in education are suggested. The progress of other educational entities is…

  7. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core...

  8. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  9. Adult Education in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    The Chinese University of Science and Technology, Management and Administration, run by the local people, has achieved great success in adult edu cation. Jiang Shuyun (3rd L), head of the university, won the title of advanced industrialist from the State Science and Technology Commission.

  10. Teaching Nontraditional Adult Students: Adult Learning Theories in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    As the USA experiences rapid growth of nontraditional adult students in higher education, educators and institutions will increasingly need to look beyond the traditional youth-centric educational models to better address adult learning needs. To date, no research has been conducted examining the learning experiences of adult students enrolled in…

  11. Stages of Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  12. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  13. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  14. Spleen removal - open - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splenectomy - adult - discharge; Spleen removal - adult - discharge ... You had surgery to remove your spleen. This operation is called splenectomy . The surgeon made a cut (incision) in the middle of your belly or on the left side ...

  15. Adult Education for Social Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Luis

    1981-01-01

    Suggests some ideas that could stimulate and be incentives for defining programs of adult education in the future. These involve changing priorities, developing a framework which allows adult education programs to be established, and managing decision-making processes. (CT)

  16. Stroke: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure High Blood Pressure Managing Multiple Health Problems Osteoporosis Urinary Incontinence Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Stroke Unique to Older Adults This section provides information to help older adults ...

  17. Older Adults (and Oral Health)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Sorted by ... > OlderAdults Older Adults and Oral Health Main Content ​ Is dry mouth a natural part ... from fiction by reading this web page about oral health and growing older. Having the right information can ...

  18. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  19. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  1. Facilitating Creativity in Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity in education research has received increasing attention, although the major focus of this research has been on children. Despite pleas by several adult educators for promoting creativity, very few studies have focused on adult learners, leaving to it to be explored what approaches are useful for adult educators to facilitate creativity…

  2. Becoming adult educators in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Søgaard Lund, Lise

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of identity-construction processes among adult educators in Denmark and we address the question how adult educators develop professionalism, not least by taking advantage of existing opportunity structures for current and prospective adult educators. A between...

  3. Adult Learning Center Curriculum Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Univ. of New York, Bronx. Herbert H. Lehman Coll. Inst. for Literacy Studies.

    These curriculum materials were collected from teachers in the Lehman College Adult Learning Center (New York). They include various activities and resources, such as a series of questions about the aims of teaching adults, a list of sources for adult basic education (ABE) materials, poems, and autobiographical materials. Teaching suggestions and…

  4. Proteomic analysis during larval development and metamorphosis of the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa

    KAUST Repository

    Mok, Flora SY

    2009-12-14

    Background: While the larval-juvenile transition (metamorphosis) in the spionid polychaete Pseudopolydora vexillosa involves gradual morphological changes and does not require substantial development of juvenile organs, the opposite occurs in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. We hypothesized that the proteome changes during metamorphosis in the spionids are less drastic than that in the barnacles. To test this, proteomes of pre-competent larvae, competent larvae (ready to metamorphose), and juveniles of P. vexillosa were compared using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and they were then compared to those of the barnacle.Results: Unlike the significant changes found during barnacle metamorphosis, proteomes of competent P. vexillosa larvae were more similar to those of their juveniles. Pre-competent larvae had significantly fewer protein spots (384 spots), while both competent larvae and juveniles expressed about 660 protein spots each. Proteins up-regulated during competence identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis included a molecular chaperon (calreticulin), a signal transduction regulator (tyrosin activation protein), and a tissue-remodeling enzyme (metallopeptidase).Conclusions: This was the first time to study the protein expression patterns during the metamorphosis of a marine polychaete and to compare the proteomes of marine invertebrates that have different levels of morphological changes during metamorphosis. The findings provide promising initial steps towards the development of a proteome database for marine invertebrate metamorphosis, thus deciphering the possible mechanisms underlying larval metamorphosis in non-model marine organisms. © 2009 Mok et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. Spatially regulated adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rikani, Azadeh A.; Choudhry, Zia; Choudhry, Adnan M; Zenonos, Georgios; Tariq, Sadaf; Mobassarah, Nusrat J

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been the center of attention for decades. Neuroscientists hope to understand the mechanism underlying this phenomenon that might provide a unique perception of brain repair in future. Neurogenesis is referred to the process in which neuronal stem cells and progenitors generate new neurons in non-pathologic setting. Although there are some similarities between two neurogenetic regions including hippocampus and olfactory bulb, however there are some important differences....

  6. Cochlear Implant in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Samadi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the result of a great combination and collaboration of engineering and medicine. It is mainly because it has the most conflict with the human nervous system among all prosthesis. Cochlear implant helps a child with profound hearing loss to understand and articulate speech and let an adult person with hearing loss communicate with people by phone. Although these wonderful results could not be seen in all patients, will let us know about the great scientific findings.

  7. Adults Need Immunizations, Too!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-19

    In this podcast, Dr. Andrew Kroger from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases discusses simple, safe, and effective ways adults can help protect themselves, their family, and their community from serious and deadly diseases.  Created: 3/19/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 3/19/2012.

  8. Adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, S; Talboys, R; Paspula, C; Prempeh, E M; Fanous, R; Ail, D

    2017-01-01

    Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has now been described as a sequela to such diverse conditions as burns, amniotic fluid embolism, acute pancreatitis, trauma, sepsis and damage as a result of elective surgery in general. Patients with ARDS require immediate intubation, with the average patient now being ventilated for between 8 and 11 days. While the acute management of ARDS is conducted by the critical care team, almost any surgical patient can be affected by the condition and we believe that it is important that a broader spectrum of hospital doctors gain an understanding of the nature of the pathology and its current treatment.

  9. Bochdalek hernia in adult

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Daniel Riccioppo C.F. de; Aldo Junqueira Rodrigues Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Bochdalek´s hernia is a congenital malformation of the posterolateral diaphragm region. It is more common on the left and more frequently seen in newborns and rare in adults, with over a few 100 reported cases. We present a case of Bochdalek´s hernia in a 49-year-old patient with long term dyspeptic symptoms. The upper endoscopy showed a gastric fundus herniation sliding into the chest through the diaphragmatic defect. The patient also presented with a rare pulmonary malformation ...

  10. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  11. MIO-PLIOCENE CRUSTACEANS FROM THE CANARY ISLANDS, SPAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN FRANCISCO BETANCORT

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There are few previous references to fossil crustaceans for the Neogene marine layers of the Canary Islands (Spain. The Mio-Pliocene marine sedimentary layers in the eastern islands (Gran Canaria, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote were previously characterised by the presence of numerous fossil fauna, mainly anthozoans and molluscs, which correspond to an equatorial-typepalaeoclimate, warmer than the present climate. This Mio-Pliocene transition dated between 9.3 and 4.1 Ma. In this paper, 12 fossil crustacean taxa are identified and classified, including decapods and barnacles: Balanus concavus Bronn, 1831, Balanus spongicola Brown, 1827, Balanus perforatus Bruguière, 1789, Chenolobia testudinaria Linnè, 1767, Tetraclita cf. rubescens Darwin, 1854, Callianassa matsoni Rathbun, 1935, Callianassa sp., Upogebia sp, Eriphia aff. verrucosa (Forskal, 1775 , Maja sp., Scylla michelini Milne-Edwards, 1861 and Ocypode sp. Some of these taxa mean new references for the Atlantic islands and the North African Atlantic and definitely enlarge the palaeographic distribution of Neogene crustaceans beyond the Mediterranean region, extending it to the North Atlantic. Particularly significant are the presence of Tetraclita cf. rubescens ,this being the first reported fossil occurrence of this barnacle outside the North America Pacific coasts, and Chenolobia testudinaria , indicating for the first time the existence of marine turtles in these islands during the Neogene. These results are coherent with previous research hypothesising the existence of a flow of surface water between the Pacific and Atlantic in the Mio-Pliocene transition (Central American Seaway, CAS which explains the arrival of organisms, in larval stage, from Central America to the Canary Islands.

  12. Adult autoimmune enteropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that autoimmune enteropathy involving the small bowel may occur in adults as well as in children. Apparently, the endoscopic and histological changes are similar to celiac disease before treatment, but these are not altered by any form of dietary restriction, including a gluten-free diet. As in celiac disease, histologic changes in gastric and colonic biopsies have also been recorded. Anti enterocyte antibodies detected with immunofluorescent methods have been reported by a few laboratories, but these antibodies appear not to be specific and may simply represent epiphenomena. A widely available, reproducible and quantitative anti-enterocyte antibody assay is needed that could be applied in small bowel disorders that have the histological appearance of celiac disease, but fail to respond to a gluten-free diet.

  13. Sexuality in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Sapetti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Just as the body and its functions undergo changes with age, in the same way sexuality shares this aging process. However, remember a golden rule that we are sexual since we are born until we die; only possibilities are modified with the passage of the years. This article intends to show the changes that occur in the sexual response of the elderly. If sexual life during youth was pleasant and satisfactory this will condition sexuality in the socalled third age and the elderly seek to maintain it, this is not the case for those who had a dysfunctional past. This article briefly describes the andropause and the SIM, vicissitudes, changes and differences in sexual response and chances to maintain eroticism in the older adult

  14. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance.

  15. [Vesicoureteral reflux in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollino, Cristiana; D'Urso, Leonardo; Beltrame, Giulietta; Ferro, Michela; Quattrocchio, Giacomo; Quarello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) may be congenital or acquired. The most frequent form of congenital VUR is primary VUR. Its prevalence in adults is not exactly known, but it is higher in women, whose greater propensity for urinary tract infections increases the likelihood of an instrumental examination leading to the diagnosis of less severe cases. In men, even severe VUR may go undiagnosed for a long time. Primary VUR is due to a defect in the valve mechanism of the ureterovesical junction. In physiological conditions, the terminal ureter enters the bladder wall obliquely and bladder contraction leads to compression of this intravesical portion. Abnormal length of the intravesical portion of the ureter due to a genetic mutation (whose location is yet to be established) leads to VUR. In its less severe forms VUR may be asymptomatic, but in 50-70% of cases it manifests with recurrent cystitis or pyelonephritis. The manifestations leading to a diagnosis of VUR in adults, besides urinary tract infections, are proteinuria, renal failure and hypertension. The gold-standard diagnostic examination is a micturating cystourethrogram. Reflux nephropathy develops as a result of a pathogenetic mechanism unrelated to high cavity pressure or urinary tract infections but due to reduced formation of the normal renal parenchyma (hypoplasia or dysplasia). Abnormal renal parenchyma development is attributable to the same genes that control the development of the ureters and ureterovesical junction. VUR is considered only a marker of this abnormal development, playing no role in scar formation. There is no conclusive evidence regarding the indications for VUR correction. However, the risk that VUR leads to recurrent pyelonephritis and reflux nephropathy must be kept in mind. VUR certainly has to be corrected in women who contemplate pregnancy.

  16. Clinical Interviewing with Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Jan; Sirota, Karen Gainer; Papp, Laszlo A.; Staples, Alison M.; King, Arlene; Gorenstein, Ethan E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the next few decades the older adult population will increase dramatically, and prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders are also expected to increase in the elderly cohort. These demographic projections highlight the need for diagnostic instruments and methods that are specifically tailored to older adults. The current paper discusses the…

  17. Adult-onset tic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eapen, [No Value; Lees, AJ; Lakke, JPWF; Trimble, MR; Robertson, MM

    2002-01-01

    We report on 8 patients with adult-onset motor tics and vocalisations. Three had compulsive tendencies in childhood and 3 had a family history of tics or obsessive-compulsive behaviour. In comparison with DSM-classified, younger-onset Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, adult-onset tic disorders are mor

  18. Adult Learning Opportunities in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Krishna; Regmi, Sharada

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the initial findings from a study of education system in Nepal. This paper examines the adult learning opportunities within the educational and cultural contexts by reviewing available literature relevant to Nepal. Findings show that there are wider opportunities for adult learning than those considered from education and…

  19. Segmenting the Adult Education Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurand, Tim

    1994-01-01

    Describes market segmentation and how the principles of segmentation can be applied to the adult education market. Indicates that applying segmentation techniques to adult education programs results in programs that are educationally and financially satisfying and serve an appropriate population. (JOW)

  20. Professionalisation processes among adult educators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Larson, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In light of the increased interest in adult education and training (AET) in the EU as well as in national policy, the article looks into policy and practice when it comes to the professionalisation of those responsible for providing the AET – the adult educators. The article takes its theoretical...

  1. Understanding Adult Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    This book introduces readers to issues, debates and literatures related to a number of central areas of practice in adult education and training, especially in Australia. It is intended as a first attempt to define the field of adult education in Australia in an analytical and theoretical, as opposed to a theoretical and practical sense. Written…

  2. The Politics of Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Art

    2016-01-01

    Art Ellison is longtime advocate for adult education, having managed numerous advocacy campaigns over the past forty years on the state and national levels. Prior to his employment in 1980 as the NH State Director of Adult Education he worked for many years as a high school teacher and as a community organizer. In this article, Ellison offers some…

  3. Work, Experience and Adult Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt.......A presentation and discussion of the theories of work, experience and adult education developed by the German philosopher and sociologist Oskar Negt....

  4. Sibling Status Effects: Adult Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskett, Linda Musun

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine what expectations or beliefs adults might hold about a child based on his or her sibling status alone. Ratings on 50 adjective pairs for each of three sibling status types, only, oldest, and youngest child, were assessed in relation to adult expectations, birth order, and parental status of rater. (Author/DST)

  5. Book Display as Adult Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Matthew S.

    1997-01-01

    Defines book display as an adult service as choosing and positioning adult books from the library collection to increase their circulation. The author contrasts bookstore arrangement for sales versus library arrangement for access, including contrasting missions, genre grouping, weeding, problems, and dimensions. (Author/LRW)

  6. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Roger; Meghani, Rehana; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This report is primarily concerned with reporting on the normative results obtained on a large sample of serious adult offenders. An expanded Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery was administered to 584 adult offenders (OF), 132 normal controls (NC), and 494 acute psychiatric patients (PP). Subjects were between 18 and 44 years of age.…

  7. Adult Learning, Economy and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2010-01-01

    The article relates the different types of adult education, continuing education and training to an overall societal context of socio-economic modernization by focussing on the multiple functions of adult learning. Each of well known empirical categories is seen in its historical relation to mode...

  8. Just How Adult Is This Young Adult Book: Young Adult Books for the Junior High Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Charlotte

    1999-01-01

    Discusses young adult novels and presents a bibliography to acquaint librarians with titles and authors that are suitable for emerging young adult readers in grades five through nine. Subject categories include realistic fiction, in the news, historical fiction, short stories, legendary characters, mysteries, science fiction/fantasy/horror, and…

  9. Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults with Cancer Reports, Research, and Literature Quiz Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer View this video ... Fund for Young Adults Vital Options Teens and Adolescents CureSearch Starlight Children's Foundation Teens Living with Cancer ...

  10. Coaching as a Strategy for Helping Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Dorothy M.; Wertheim, Judith

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of coaching for adult learners, the specific characteristics adults bring to the learning environment, and strategies for dealing with the obstacles adult learners may face.

  11. Vitalistic thinking in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stuart

    2013-11-01

    Vitalistic thinking has traditionally been associated with reasoning about biological phenomena. The current research aimed to investigate a broader range of vitalistic thinking than previously studied. Esoteric notions of 'energy' are frequently used by individuals when making causal attributions for strange occurrences, and previous literature has linked such thinking with paranormal, magical, and superstitious beliefs. Two experiments are described that aim to investigate whether adults are vitalistic when asked to make causal judgments, and whether this can be predicted by thinking styles and prior paranormal belief. Experiment 1 asked participants to rate three causal options (one of which was vitalistic) for six vignettes. Scores on one dimension of paranormal belief (New Age Philosophy) and analytical thinking significantly predicted vitalism, but scores on intuitive thinking and Traditional Paranormal Beliefs did not. Experiment 2 extended the findings by asking participants to generate their own causal responses. Again, paranormal belief was found to be the best predictor of vitalism, but this time Traditional Paranormal Beliefs were associated with vitalistic responses whilst both intuitive and analytical thinking were unable to significantly predict classification. Results challenge previous findings, suggesting that vitalistic thinking may operate differently when applied to everyday causal reasoning.

  12. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ismail Yasawy; Ulrich Richard Folsch; Wolfgang Eckhard Schmidt; Michael Schwend

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an underrecognized,preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting,abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to Ⅳ fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  13. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasawy, Mohamed Ismail; Folsch, Ulrich Richard; Schmidt, Wolfgang Eckhard; Schwend, Michael

    2009-05-21

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an under-recognized, preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting, abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to IV fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  14. Clueless: Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    This annotated bibliography includes adult mysteries that appeal to teen readers under the categories of Sherlock Holmes; reference sources; private investigators; amateur sleuths; historical sleuths; suspense and thrillers; police procedurals; mystery blends; and anthologies. (LRW)

  15. Down Syndrome in Adults: Staying Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortfall Questionnaire Home Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Down Syndrome in Adults: Staying Healthy Down Syndrome in Adults: Staying Healthy Family HealthPrevention and WellnessStaying ...

  16. Chronic disease in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Durán, Adriana; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Valderrama, Laura; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Uribe, Ana Fernanda; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; González, Angélica; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Máximo Molina, Juan; Agencia de Evaluación de Tecnologías Sanitarias de Andalucía (AETSA)

    2016-01-01

    Methodology: A sample of 500 older adults was selected, between 60 and 96 years of age. A questionnaire of psychosocial factors in older adults designed by Baca, Gonzalez, and Uribe was used. Results: Hypertension, diabetes and osteoporosis were the most frequent diseases in older adults, although the greater percentage of this population did not refer any pathology. Married and widowers individuals presented more diseases as compared to unmarried, separated and people who live together.Concl...

  17. Computational models of adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2005-10-01

    Experimental results in recent years have shown that adult neurogenesis is a significant phenomenon in the mammalian brain. Little is known, however, about the functional role played by the generation and destruction of neurons in the context of an adult brain. Here, we propose two models where new projection neurons are incorporated. We show that in both models, using incorporation and removal of neurons as a computational tool, it is possible to achieve a higher computational efficiency that in purely static, synapse-learning-driven networks. We also discuss the implication for understanding the role of adult neurogenesis in specific brain areas like the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus.

  18. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... International TSC Research Conference Text Size Get Involved EPILEPSY IN ADULTS WITH TSC Download a PDF of ... age, including either new-onset seizures or ongoing epilepsy. Recent studies indicate that more than 80% of ...

  19. The human adult cardiomyocyte phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bird, SD; Doevendans, PA; van Rooijen, MA; de la Riviere, AB; Hassink, RJ; Passier, R; Mummery, CL

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Determination of the phenotype of adult human atrial and ventricular myocytes based on gene expression and morphology. Methods: Atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery using a modified isolation procedure. Myocytes were isolated and cultured

  20. Dementia: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to complications too. These include malnutrition, falls, osteoporosis (“thinning bones”), bone fractures, frailty, sleep problems, anxiety, agitation, delirium, and disturbed behavior. Caring for an older adult with dementia and other health problems can be ...

  1. Paediatric and adult malignant glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Chris; Perryman, Lara; Hargrave, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas in children differ from their adult counterparts by their distribution of histological grade, site of presentation and rate of malignant transformation. Although rare in the paediatric population, patients with high-grade gliomas have, for the most part, a comparably dismal clinical outcome...... to older patients with morphologically similar lesions. Molecular profiling data have begun to reveal the major genetic alterations underpinning these malignant tumours in children. Indeed, the accumulation of large datasets on adult high-grade glioma has revealed key biological differences between...... the adult and paediatric disease. Furthermore, subclassifications within the childhood age group can be made depending on age at diagnosis and tumour site. However, challenges remain on how to reconcile clinical data from adult patients to tailor novel treatment strategies specifically for paediatric...

  2. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy in Adults with TSC Individuals with tuberous sclerosis ... being well controlled for long periods of time. Epilepsy and Seizures Epilepsy is any brain disorder that ...

  3. Nutrition: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nutrition Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... teeth that are needed for grinding up food, nutrition suffers. If you are unable to chew and ...

  4. Understanding Adult Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources ​​. Alternate Language URL Understanding Adult Overweight and Obesity Page Content How can I tell if I ... type 2 diabetes. [ Top ] How are overweight and obesity treated? The best way to control your weight ...

  5. Backtalk: Adult Services in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblon, Della L.

    1979-01-01

    Initiates a new state emphasis for the column by highlighting recent public library programs and services for adults in Florida. Music, photography, and women's programs offered by the Leon County Public Library are described in more detail. (JD)

  6. Quitting Smoking for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Quitting Smoking for Older Adults Quitting When You’re Older ... may wonder if it’s too late to quit smoking. Or you may ask yourself if it’s even ...

  7. Osteoporosis: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Osteoporosis Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... and widely-prescribed medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. Some serious side effects of these medication have ...

  8. Researching participation in adult education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    It is a widespread perception that the challenge of increasing participation in adult education and training has intensified due to the transformation from industrial to knowledge based societies and the transformation implies that it becomes pivotal to increase the supply of highly qualified...... labour. This has fostered an interest in examining why and how people engage in adult education, how participation and especially non-participation in adult education can be explained and how participation rates can be increased. In this paper I outline different traditions within research on recruitment...... to and participation in adult education and training focusing primarily on unskilled and low skilled workers. I present how the traditions contribute to the perception of what effects participation and argue that the existing traditions must be extended and a new framework must be applied in order to understand how...

  9. Bilateral Morgagni Hernia in Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Celik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available       Morgagni hernia is a congenital anterior diaphragma hernias. Although it generally seen in childhood and on the right side, rarely seen bilaterally and adult. Computarize tomography is helpful in diagnosis for this lesions asymptomatic in adult. In this article, bilaterally morgagni hernia diagnosed a sixty-five year old male patient looked for due to dyspne was presented.

  10. Adult Learning Program Service (ALPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Robert

    The Adult Learning Program Service (ALPS) aims to reach eight and a half million adults between ages 25 and 44 and teach them reading and math skills they can use at home and on the job. ALPS proposes to reach those who have never finished high school but do have at least a sixth-grade reading level. They could use their new skills to prepare for…

  11. Adult attachment and psychosocial functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Pielage, Suzanne Brenda

    2006-01-01

    In the trilogy Attachment, Separation and Loss (1969, 1973, 1980), Bowlby theorized that early experiences with caregivers affect the quality of individuals’ later (romantic) relationships and, consequently, their mental health. The current thesis set out to examine the relationships between adult attachment and psychosocial functioning, predominately in the realm of close relationships. In the first part of the thesis, the focus lay on the assessment of the adult attachment construct. In Cha...

  12. What Does It Take to Be an Adult in Austria? Views of Adulthood in Austrian Adolescents, Emerging Adults, and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsch, Ulrike; Dreher, Eva; Mayr, Eva; Willinger, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the defining features of emerging adulthood, subjects' conceptions of the transition to adulthood, and the perceived adult status in Austria. The sample consisted of 775 subjects (226 adolescents, 317 emerging adults, 232 adults). Results showed that most Austrian emerging adults feel themselves to be between adolescence…

  13. Severe sepsis in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umberger, Reba; Callen, Bonnie; Brown, Mary Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis may be underrecognized in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review special considerations related to early detection of severe sepsis in older adults. Normal organ changes attributed to aging may delay early detection of sepsis at the time when interventions have the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. Systems are reviewed for changes. For example, the cardiovascular system may have a limited or absent compensatory response to inflammation after an infectious insult, and the febrile response and recruitment of white blood cells may be blunted because of immunosenescence in aging. Three of the 4 hallmark responses (temperature, heart rate, and white blood cell count) to systemic inflammation may be diminished in older adults as compared with younger adults. It is important to consider that older adults may not always manifest the typical systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Atypical signs such as confusion, decreased appetite, and unsteady gait may occur before sepsis related organ failure. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and a comparison of organ failure criteria were reviewed. Mortality rates in sepsis and severe sepsis remain high and are often complicated by multiple organ failures. As the numbers of older adults increase, early identification and prompt treatment is crucial in improving patient outcomes.

  14. Antifouling sesquiterpene from the Indian soft coral, Sinularia kavarattiensis Alderslade and Prita

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LimnaMol, V.P.; Raveendran, T.V.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Kunnath, R.J.; Sathyan, N.

    . MS and NMR (latter in CDCl3 solution) spectra were recorded on Shimadzu GC-MS Model QP 2010 and BRUKER Avance 300 MHz NMR spectrometers respectively. Larval Settlement Inhibition Assay and Determination of EC50 Maintenance of Adult Barnacles...

  15. 38 CFR 18.438 - Adult education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adult education. 18.438 Section 18.438 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Adult Education § 18.438 Adult education. A recipient that provides adult education may not, on...

  16. Training of adult education teachers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    The article presents the Danish adult educational system, the extend of adult learning and the objectives of the adult education program. It presents the teacher training institutions and programs and the programs for continuing education in practice. Further on the article presents and discus...... the pedagogical principles and theories behind the training of teachers in adult education....

  17. LGBT Adult Immigrants in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    There are approximately 267,000 LGBT-identified individuals among the adult undocumented immigrant population and an estimated 637,000 LGBT-identified individuals among the adult documented immigrant population. The report finds that approximately 71 percent of undocumented LGBT adults are Hispanic and 15 percent of undocumented LGBT adults are Asian or Pacific Islander.

  18. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  19. Physiological responses to hypoxia and anoxia in Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Prakash, S.

    collected at different tidal levels was observed. Enzyme activity increased with increase in the duration of tidal exposure, suggesting a capability to adapt to stress in different niches. Nauplii showed antioxidant defense (increased enzyme activity) under...

  20. Influence of temperature and salinity on larval development of Balanus amphitrite: Implications in fouling ecology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Chiba, K.; Okamoto, K.; Kurokura, H.

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Mar_Ecol_Prog_Ser_118_159.pdf.txt stream_source_info Mar_Ecol_Prog_Ser_118_159.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  1. Reproduction in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica); influence of temperature and food concentration

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.; Venkat, K.

    obligatory cross-fertilizing hermaphrodite, self-fertilization was observed. The rise in temperature from 20 to 30°C resulted in a longer interbreeding interval (6 to 7 days, 200 Artemia ind-1 day-1; 11 to 13 days, 50 Artemia ind-1 day-1). Computed carbon...

  2. Significance of biofilm proteins in modulating cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; KrishnaKumar, S.

    amphitrite, whereas monospecies biofilms did not. The treatment of biofilms with protease resulted in a decline in metamorphosis, except in B. brevis, where although metamorphosis was negated initially, it increased with the protease concentration...

  3. Studies on some cues regulating metamorphosis of the larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.

    to carry out the assays. Rittschof et al. (1984) have described these methods in detail. 14 2.2.3 Treatment with sugars The cyprids were immersed in seawater containing different concentrations (10-8, 10-7, 10-5 or 10-3M) of D-glucose, D-galactose or D... introduced into wells of 24-well plates coated with AE and to non-coated multiwells (Corning-430262) along with 2 ml of autoclaved, filtered seawater at 35? (Maki et al. 1990). The above treatments were repeated employing a single cyprid (single cyprid...

  4. Influence of food concentration, temperature and salinity on the larval development of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Kurian, J.

    ) was examined. The mortality rate at 20 degrees C was lower than at 30 degrees C in general. INcrease in food concentration from 0.5 to 1 x 10 sup(5) cells ml sup(-1) . The results indicate that food availability and temperature jointly determine the energy...

  5. Immunocytochemical studies on the naupliar nervous system of Balanus improvisus (Crustacea, Cirripedia, Thecostraca)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Wanninger, Andreas; Høeg, Jens T;

    2008-01-01

    neurons in the protocerebrum, along the circumoesophageal connectives and in the mandibular ganglion stain only for serotonin. Due to the almost complete absence of comparable data on the neuroanatomy of early (naupliar) stages in other Crustacea, we include immunocytochemical data on the larvae...

  6. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  7. Surgical Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Kyu-Jung; Kim, Young-tae; Shin, Sang-hyun; Suk, Se-Il

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase of elderly population has resulted in increased prevalence of adult scoliosis. Adult scoliosis is divided into adult idiopathic scoliosis and adult degenerative scoliosis. These two types of scoliosis vary in patient age, curve pattern and clinical symptoms, which necessitate different surgical indications and options. Back pain and deformity are major indications for surgery in adult idiopathic scoliosis, whereas radiating pain to the legs due to foraminal stenosis is what...

  8. Defining Cigarette Smoking Status in Young Adults: A Comparison of Adolescent vs Adult Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnevo, Cristine D.; Lewis, M. Jane; Kaufman, Ira; Abatemarco, Diane J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the agreement between 2 measures (adult vs adolescent) of current cigarette smoking among young adults. Methods: We examined data from 1007 young adults from the New Jersey Adult Tobacco Survey. The adult measure incorporates lifetime and present use, whereas the adolescent measure assesses past 30-day use. The kappa…

  9. MRI of medulloblastoma in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malheiros, S.M.F.; Santos, A.J.; Borges, L.R.R.; Guimaraes, I.F.; Franco, C.M.R.; Gabbai, A.A. [Department of Neurology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carrete, H. [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Stavale, J.N.; Pelaez, M.P. [Department of Pathology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Medulloblastoma has variable appearances on MRI in both children and adults. Adults are more likely to have heterogeneous cerebellar hemisphere tumours, and this is thought to be related to the greater prevalence of desmoplastic tumours in adulthood. Few studies have addressed the MRI features of adult medulloblastoma and the specific characteristics of desmoplastic and classic tumours have not been analysed. Our aim was to analyse the imaging characteristics of desmoplastic (DM) and classic (CM) medulloblastomas in adult. We retrospectively studied preoperative MRI of six men and three women, median age 33 years, range 23-53 years, with pathologically proved medulloblastomas. There were six (67%) with DM. The tumour was in the cerebellar hemisphere in eight patients (89%), including the three with CM, one of which was bilateral. All tumours were heterogeneous, giving predominantly low or isointense signal on T1- and isointense signal on T2-weighted images. Cystic or necrotic areas in all patients were particularly visible on T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement was absent in one DM and varied from slight to intense in eight (three CM), homogeneous in one DM and patchy in seven. All tumours extended to the surface of the cerebellum and two had well-defined margins. MRI does not allow a clear distinction between DM and CM in adults. (orig.)

  10. Weight Management in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Lydia E.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Batsis, John A.

    2017-01-01

    As the number of older adults increases rapidly, the national epidemic of obesity is also affecting our aging population. This is particularly concerning given the numerous health risks and increased costs associated with this condition. Weight management is extremely important for older adults given the risks associated with abdominal adiposity, which is a typical fat redistribution during aging, and the prevalence of comorbid conditions in this age group. However, approaches to weight loss must be considered critically given the dangers of sarcopenia (a condition that occurs when muscle mass and quality is lost), the increase risk of hip fracture with weight loss, and the association between reduced mortality and increased BMI in older adults. This overview highlights the challenges and implications of measuring adiposity in older adults, the dangers and benefits of weight loss in this population, and provides an overview of the new Medicare Obesity Benefit. In addition we provide a summary of outcomes from successful weight loss interventions for older adults and discuss implications for advancing clinical practice. PMID:26627496

  11. Age-dependent zonation of the periwinkle Littorina littorea (L.) in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, Bettina

    2000-12-01

    On sedimentary tidal flats near the island of Sylt (German Bight, North Sea) abundance and size distribution of periwinkles, Littorina littorea L., were studied in low intertidal and in shallow and deep subtidal mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis L.). In low intertidal mussel beds, surveys revealed that high densities (1,369±571 m-2) of juvenile snails (≤13 mm) were positively correlated with strong barnacle epigrowth ( Semibalanus balanoides L. and Balanus crenatus Bruguière) on mussels. A subsequent field experiment showed that recruitment of L. littorea was restricted to the intertidal zone. Abundances of periwinkles (213±114 m-2) and barnacles abruptly decreased in the adjacent shallow subtidal zone, which served as a habitat for older snails (>13 mm). L. littorea was completely absent from disjunct deep (5 m) subtidal mussel beds. Snail abundance varied seasonally with maxima of >4,000 m-2 in low intertidal mussel beds in October and minima in July, just before the onset of new recruitment. I suggest that the presence of cracks and crevices among the dense barnacle overgrowth in intertidal mussel beds favoured recruitment and survival of juvenile snails. Larger (older) specimens are assumed to actively migrate to the less favourable adjacent subtidal. Therefore, intertidal mussel beds are considered as nurseries for the population of L. littorea in the Wadden Sea.

  12. Layer-by-layer click deposition of functional polymer coatings for combating marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen Jing; Pranantyo, Dicky; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Rittschof, Daniel

    2012-09-10

    "Click" chemistry-enabled layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of multilayer functional polymer coatings provides an alternative approach to combating biofouling. Fouling-resistant azido-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate-based polymer chains (azido-poly(PEGMA)) and antimicrobial alkynyl-functionalized 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride-based polymer chains (alkynyl-poly(META)) were click-assembled layer-by-layer via alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The polymer multilayer coatings are resistant to bacterial adhesion and are bactericidal to marine Gram-negative Pseudomonas sp. NCIMB 2021 bacteria. Settlement of barnacle ( Amphibalanus (= Balanus ) amphitrite ) cyprids is greatly reduced on the multilayer polymer-functionalized substrates. As the number of the polymer layers increases, efficacy against bacterial fouling and settlement of barnacle cyprids increases. The LBL-functionalized surfaces exhibit low toxicity toward the barnacle cyprids and are stable upon prolonged exposure to seawater. LBL click deposition is thus an effective and potentially environmentally benign way to prepare antifouling coatings.

  13. Adult-onset food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivity, Shmuel

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is increasing in both the pediatric and adult populations. While symptom onset occurs mostly during childhood, there are a considerable number of patients whose symptoms first begin to appear after the age of 18 years. The majority of patients with adult-onset food allergy suffer from the pollen-plant allergy syndromes. Many of them manifest their allergy after exercise and consuming food to which they are allergic. Eosinophilic esophagitis, an eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus affecting individuals of all ages, recently emerged as another allergic manifestation, with both immediate and late response to the ingested food. This review provides a condensed update of the current data in the literature on adult-onset allergy.

  14. Music for insomnia in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kira V; Koenig, Julian; Jennum, Poul

    2015-01-01

    : To assess the effects of listening to music on insomnia in adults and to assess the influence of specific variables that may moderate the effect. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, PubMed, Embase, nine other databases and two trials registers in May 2015. In addition, we handsearched specific music......BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a common sleep disorder in modern society. It causes reduced quality of life and is associated with impairments in physical and mental health. Listening to music is widely used as a sleep aid, but it remains unclear if it can actually improve insomnia in adults. OBJECTIVES...... the effects of listening to music with no treatment or treatment-as-usual on sleep improvement in adults with insomnia. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently screened abstracts, selected studies, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data from all studies eligible for inclusion. Data on pre...

  15. Why Teach mathematics to Adults?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Lene Østergaard

    2008-01-01

         This Thesis focuses on the justification problem and especially the question Why teach mathematics  to adults with lack of basic mathematical skills? Reasons for mathematics education are seldom explicitly formulated, often the reasons are implicit and only in rare cases, we have direct access...... to reasons for mathematics education. When the Danish Government, in the autumn 1999, presented a coming reform of the Adult educational system including a brand new numeracy course for adults, PAE-mathematics, I felt that this could be the rare case. The research question of this thesis is answered through...... an analysis of the development of this new mathematics course. I have focused on reasons given by three different groups of active partners in the curriculum development process. I have focused on: (1) Politicians and Officials (2) The Curriculum Planners of PAE-mathematics (3) A selected group of mathematics...

  16. Facial cystic lymphangioma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasotto, Matteo; Clozza, Emanuele; Tirelli, Giancarlo

    2012-07-01

    Lymphangiomas are uncommon congenital malformations of the lymphatic system, generally diagnosed during childhood. These malformations are rarely seen in adults, and the literature provides poor guidelines for treatment options that must be carefully applied to the facial region. Diagnosis in adult subjects is difficult to achieve, and also management of these conditions is still challenging because they tend to infiltrate adjacent tissues, causing frequent relapses. Radical surgery is the main form of treatment, avoiding the sacrifice of function or aesthetics of the patient. Two cases of cystic lymphangioma of the facial region found in adults are described from a clinical and pathologic point of view. The aim of this article was to point out that an early recognition of cystic lymphangioma is a crucial goal to initiate a prompt treatment avoiding serious complication.

  17. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  18. Adult Onset Langerhans’ Cell Histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime İnci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis (LCH is a group of diseases of unknown cause resulting from abnormal proliferation of bone marrow-originated dendritic cells called histiocytes. The incidence is between 0.5-5.4 per million. More common in childhood, it is extremely rare in adults. In adults, pulmonary involvement with Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis usually occurs as a single-system disease. In this article, the clinical, radiological and histopathological findings of a 51-year-old male patient with both skin, bone and pulmonary involvement were presented and discussed with recent literature.

  19. Intravitreal live adult Brugian filariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Nageswar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human ocular infestation by live filarial worm is a rare occurrence and has been reported mostly form South-East Asia. It involves the eyelids, conjunctiva, cornea, anterior chamber and uvea. No case of intravitreal Brugian microfilaria / adult worm has been found by Medline search. Here we report a case of live intravitreal adult Brugian filaria, where the parasite was successfully removed by pars plana vitrectomy. Identification of the worm was done by light microscopy and confirmed by immuno chromatographic test.

  20. Water intoxication in adult cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Naoya; Ofuji, Sosuke; Abe, Sakae; Tanaka, Ai; Uematsu, Masami; Ogata, Yoshimi

    2016-05-01

    Water intoxication is a common disorder in calves and is usually characterized by transient hemoglobinuria. In contrast, the condition is very rare in adult cattle, with few reports on naturally occurring cases. In the present report, four female Japanese Black cattle, aged 16-25 months, showed neurological signs when they drank water following a water outage. Hemoglobinuria was not grossly observed, while severe hyponatremia was revealed by laboratory tests. Autopsy indicated cerebral edema with accumulation of serous fluid in expanded Virchow-Robin spaces. These results indicate the possibility of water intoxication associated with cerebral edema due to severe dilutional hyponatremia in adult cattle.

  1. Urinary tract infections in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Tan, Chee; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with...

  2. Book Display as Adult Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Moore

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available 無Book display as an adult service is defined as choosing and positioning adult books from the collection to increase their circulation. The author contrasts bookstore arrangement for sales versus library arrangement for access. The paper considers the library-as-a-whole as a display, examines the right size for an in-library display, and discusses mass displays, end-caps, on-shelf displays, and the Tiffany approach. The author proposes that an effective display depends on an imaginative, unifying theme, and that book displays are part of the joy of libraries.

  3. Clueless? Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    1999-01-01

    Presents an annual list of adult mystery titles (in print as of September 1999) to recommend to teenagers, as well as recently published mystery readers advisory sources or nonfiction mystery-related titles that school and public libraries may want for their collections. (AEF)

  4. Geographic distribution and description of four pelagic barnacles along the south east Pacific coast of Chile - a zoogeographical approximation Distribución geográfica y descripción de cuatro especies de cirripedios pelágicos a lo largo de la costa chilena del Pacífico sur este - una aproximación zoogeográfica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVÁN HINOJOSA

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of zoogeographic studies along the Chilean Pacific coast have focused on benthic organisms and oceanographic conditions are considered the main factors influencing their distributions. Herein we examined the geographic distribution of pelagic barnacles of the family Lepadidae collected from floating macroalgae at seven sampling areas between 23 and 50° S. Four species were encountered and they are briefly described herein. The most abundant northern species was Lepas anatifera, and it diminished in abundance towards the south (33° S. Moreover, this species was not found in waters with a sea surface temperature (SST of less than ~18 °C. Lepas australis, primarily a circumpolar West Wind Drift species, diminished in abundance towards the north (33° S. This species was restricted to waters of La mayoría de los estudios de zoogeografía a lo largo de la costa chilena del Pacífico sur este se han enfocado en organismos bentónicos y las condiciones oceanográficas se sugieren como factores principales que modulan su distribución. Aquí examinamos la distribución geográfica de especies de cirripedios pelágicos de la familia Lepadidae, asociadas a macroalgas flotando a la deriva, en siete áreas de muestreo entre los 23 y 50° S. Se encontraron cuatro especies de cirripedios lepádidos y cada una se describe brevemente. La especie del norte más abundantes fue Lepas anatifera y disminuye su abundancia hacia el sur (33° S. Además, esta especie no se encontró en temperatura superficial del mar (SST inferior a ~18 °C. Lepas australis, que posee una distribución circumpolar, atenúa su abundancia hacia el norte (33° S. Esta especie se restringe a SST < 18 °C. La tercera especie, L. pectinata se extiende en la mayor parte del área de estudio, pero posee su mayor abundancia relativa en el área central, entre 29 y 33° S. La cuarta especie, Dosima fascicularis, solo se encontró en dos lugares de muestreo, en 27 y 33° S, y es

  5. Multitasking in adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrilow, Caterina; Merkt, Julia; Goossens-Merkt, Heinrich; Bodenburg, Sebastian; Wendt, Mike

    2011-09-01

    Adults with ADHD have problems in everyday multitasking situations presumably because of deficits in executive functions. The present study aims to find out (a) whether adults with ADHD show deficient multitasking performance in a standardized task, (b) how they perceive the multitasking situation, and (c) which task structure might be beneficial for them as compared with adults without ADHD. Therefore, we experimentally compared task performance, mood, and motivation in a group of 45 men with ADHD (M-age = 34.47, SD = 9.95) with a comparison group of 42 men without ADHD (M-age = 31.12, SD = 10.59) in three conditions: (a) a multitasking paradigm, (b) an interleaving condition in which tasks had to be performed without planning or monitoring, and (c) a non-interleaving condition. Our results showed no impaired multitasking performance in adults with ADHD. However, they showed better mood and more motivation in the non-interleaving condition.

  6. Adult attachment and psychosocial functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielage, Suzanne Brenda

    2006-01-01

    In the trilogy Attachment, Separation and Loss (1969, 1973, 1980), Bowlby theorized that early experiences with caregivers affect the quality of individuals’ later (romantic) relationships and, consequently, their mental health. The current thesis set out to examine the relationships between adult a

  7. Visuomotor Binding in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloesch, Emily K.; Abrams, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Action integration is the process through which actions performed on a stimulus and perceptual aspects of the stimulus become bound as a unitary object. This process appears to be controlled by the dopaminergic system in the prefrontal cortex, an area that is known to decrease in volume and dopamine functioning in older adults. Although the…

  8. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adel Ben; Bagnis, Corinne Isnard

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections in adults are frequent and can induce several septic situations. Their economic cost (drugs, microbiologic samples, consultations and/or hospitalizations and stop working) and ecologic cost (second reasons of antibiotic prescription in winter and first in the rest of the year) are important. A better respect of recommendations can improve the outcome of this different infections and decrease their cost.

  9. Cardiac Rehabilitation in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopfer, David W; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    The biology of aging and the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) overlap, with the effect that CVD is endemic in the growing population of older adults. Moreover, CVD in older adults is usually complicated by age-related complexities, including multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, and other intricacies that add to the risks of ambiguous symptoms, deconditioning, iatrogenesis, falls, disability, and other challenges. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a comprehensive lifestyle program that can have particular benefit for older patients with cardiovascular conditions. Although CR was originally designed primarily as an exercise training program for younger adults after a myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass surgery, it has evolved as a comprehensive lifestyle program (promoting physical activity as well as education, diet, risk reduction, and adherence) for a broader range of CVD (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and valvular heart disease). It provides a valuable opportunity to address and moderate many of the challenges pertinent for the large and growing population of older adults with CVD. Cardiac rehabilitation promotes physical function (cardiorespiratory fitness as well as strength and balance) that helps overcome disease and deconditioning as well as related vulnerabilities such as disability, frailty, and falls. Similarly, CR facilitates education, monitoring, and guidance to reduce iatrogenesis and promote adherence. Furthermore, CR fosters cognition, socialization, and independence in older patients. Yet despite all its conceptual benefits, CR is significantly underused in older populations. This review discusses benefits and the paradoxical underuse of CR, as well as evolving models of care that may achieve greater application and efficacy.

  10. Adult Career Assessment: Personality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansickle, Timothy R.; Russell, Mary T.

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of five assessment instruments and discusses their contribution to adult career development: (1) California Personality Inventory; (2) Myers-Briggs Type Indicator; (3) Personality Research Form; (4) Occupational Stress Inventory; and (5) Personal Career Development Profile. Includes information about publishers, intended…

  11. Teachers of adults as learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Lea

    need can be taught in formal settings, but in most teaching settings, the teachers act alone and develop their pedagogical approaches/-teaching strategies with no synchronous sparring from a colleague. Adult learners have particular needs and characteristics that their teachers must be able to address...

  12. Motivational Profiles of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothes, Ana; Lemos, Marina S.; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated profiles of autonomous and controlled motivation and their effects in a sample of 188 adult learners from two Portuguese urban areas. Using a person-centered approach, results of cluster analysis and multivariate analysis of covariance revealed four motivational groups with different effects in self-efficacy, engagement,…

  13. Adult Education in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Tim D.; Algren, Mark S.

    Religion pervades all aspects of Saudi Arabia, the conservative home of Islam, where the constitution is the Quran and law is interpreted by religious scholars. A formal adult basic education program was initiated in 1960. As part of the country's modernization since the early 1970s, the Saudi government has begun an enormous nation-building plan…

  14. Intelligence Differentiation in Adult Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Francisco J.; Colom, Robert; Juan-Espinosa, Manuel; Garcia, Luis F.

    2003-01-01

    Results for 3,340 participants taking a battery of cognitive tests and an analysis of the Spanish standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III support the differentiation of intelligence across the range of ability, with WAIS-III results more supportive of the differentiation theory. (SLD)

  15. Sexuality in Older Adults (65+)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Træen, Bente; Carvalheira, Ana; Kvalem, Ingela Lundin

    2017-01-01

    marginal. Conclusion: Older age can affect sexual satisfaction on individual, interpersonal, and culture-related levels. Future research in older adults' sexuality should focus on sexual well-being in women who are without partners, sexual satisfaction among aging lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender...... individuals and couples, the relationship between religiosity and sexual satisfaction, and employ a comparative, cross-cultural approach....

  16. Wider benefits of adult education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuller, Tom; Desjardins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the measurement of the social outcomes of learning. It extends the discussion beyond employment and labor market outcomes to consider the impact of adult learning on social domains, with particular focus on health and civic engagement. It emphasizes the distinction between...

  17. Older Adults and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health in people with conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Depression can complicate the treatment of these conditions, including ... an antidepressant was effective in preventing relapse in patients 60 years and older who had had a ... Antipsychotics Use Among Older Adults Increases ...

  18. Walking Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most ppular form of exercise among older adults and it's a great choice. What can walking do for you? strengthen muscles help prevent weight gain lower risks of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and osteoporosis improve balance lower the likelihood of falling If ...

  19. Heat Stress in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  20. Assessing Adult Literacy by Telephone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticht, Thomas G.; Hofstetter, C. Richard; Hofstetter, Carolyn H.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the construct and action validity of the use of simple checklists to assess the declarative knowledge component of adult's literacy by telephone. Finds significant relationships among knowledge when assessed either by listening (telephone) or by reading (mailed questionnaire) modality. Concludes that the telephone method may provide a…

  1. [Autism spectrum disorders in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.C.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Gaag, R.J. van der

    2008-01-01

    Early infantile autism' as defined by Kanner has grown into a spectrum of autistic disorders. The recognition of Asperger's disorder and of pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), has led to increased demand for appropriate diagnostic assessment of autism in adults. The e

  2. Communication Technology for Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, S.

    1979-01-01

    The author draws attention to the quantitative and qualitative targets set for achievement by the National Adult Education Programme in India. She recommends a thorough and extensive use of educational media, not merely for motivational purposes, but for raising awareness and training the large numbers of instructors required to run the program.…

  3. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  4. Young Adults' Choices for 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents annotations of 30 trade books on the 2008 list of Young Adults' Choices that are the result of voting by students in five different regions of the United States. Trade books (books other than textbooks) published in 2006 were submitted by more than 50 publishers. Each book had to have at least two positive reviews from…

  5. Oral Health and Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-27

    This podcast discusses the importance of older adults maintaing good oral health habits. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 10/27/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/27/2008.

  6. Health Literacy in Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-09-20

    In this podcast, Dr. Lynda Anderson, former Director of CDC’s Healthy Aging Program, discusses the importance of improving health literacy among older adults.  Created: 9/20/2011 by Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/20/2011.

  7. Flexible provisioning for adult learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Henry; Janssen, José; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    In adult education there is a continuous, growing demand for learning opportunities that fit the specific characteristics and preferences of particular learner groups or individual learners. This requires educational institutions to rethink their business and educational models, and develop more fle

  8. Women in Adult Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Rosemarie J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of adult basic education (ABE) program directors in five states revealed that most ABE teachers are women and work part-time without benefits while most ABE administrators are men who are employed full-time. Concludes that women employed in ABE are victims of discrimination. (EM)

  9. Adult education for democratic citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report presents, in brief, the findings from the study of research literature on Adult Education for Democratic Citizenship, which was carried out in the nine EU member states represented by the project: Austria, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, Spain and United Kingdom...

  10. Adult Vaccination--A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, vaccines have been associated with childhood. Historically, many of the most-feared communicable diseases attacked infants and toddlers, and those who survived were generally protected from those diseases as adults. During the past century tremendous advances in vaccination spared millions the morbidity and mortality associated with…

  11. Young adults as users of adult healthcare: experiences of young adults with complex or life-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Stuttard, L

    2014-08-01

    Awareness is growing that young adults may have distinctive experiences of adult healthcare and that their needs may differ from those of other adult users. In addition, the role of adult health teams in supporting positive transitions from paediatrics is increasingly under discussion. This paper contributes to these debates. It reports a qualitative study of the experiences of young adults - all with complex chronic health conditions - as users of adult health services. Key findings from the study are reported, including an exploration of factors that help to explain interviewees' experiences. Study findings are discussed in the context of existing evidence from young adults in adult healthcare settings and theories of 'young adulthood'. Implications for training and practice are considered, and priorities for future research are identified.

  12. Young Adults' Implicit and Explicit Attitudes towards the Sexuality of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ashley E; O'Sullivan, Lucia F; Byers, E Sandra; Shaughnessy, Krystelle

    2014-09-01

    Sexual interest and capacity can extend far into later life and result in many positive health outcomes. Yet there is little support for sexual expression in later life, particularly among young adults. This study assessed and compared young adults' explicit and implicit attitudes towards older adult sexuality. A sample of 120 participants (18-24 years; 58% female) completed a self-report (explicit) measure and a series of Implicit Association Tests capturing attitudes towards sexuality among older adults. Despite reporting positive explicit attitudes, young people revealed an implicit bias against the sexual lives of older adults. In particular, young adults demonstrated implicit biases favouring general, as compared to sexual, activities and young adults as compared to older adults. Moreover, the bias favouring general activities was amplified with regard to older adults as compared to younger adults. Our findings challenge the validity of research relying on self-reports of attitudes about older adult sexuality.

  13. CPR - adult and child 9 years and older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - adult; Rescue breathing and chest compressions - adult; Resuscitation - cardiopulmonary - adult; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - child 9 years and older; Rescue breathing ...

  14. Treatment Options for Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  15. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ... Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides & Sézary Syndrome Treatment Primary CNS Lymphoma Treatment ...

  17. Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults is available for download and contains physiological parameters values for healthy older human adults (age 60...

  18. Senior Health: Older Adults and Newer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Director Senior Health: Older Adults and Newer Technology Volume 15 · Issue 6 · November/December 2005 Text ... adults who struggle to stand and walk. New technology includes knee units, shock-absorbing pylons, and other ...

  19. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z High Blood Pressure Hypertension Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... Pressure Targets are Different for Very Old Adults High blood pressure (also called hypertension) increases your chance of having ...

  20. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery En Español What kinds of anesthesia are available for adults having eye surgery? A “general”, “local”, or “topical” anesthesia is necessary ...

  1. How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talk to your doctor about whether you have osteoporosis. Read More "Preventing Falls" Articles Preventing Falls / Great Help for Older Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements ...

  2. Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Infographic

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Infographic which outlines key facts related to current smoking among adults. For accessibility issues contact...

  3. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  4. Choking - adult or child over 1 year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal thrusts - adult or child over 1 year; Heimlich maneuver - adult or child over 1 year: Choking - back ... back blows, or both. To perform abdominal thrusts (Heimlich maneuver): Stand behind the person and wrap your arms ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft ... dye reacts to the light. Certain factors affect treatment options and prognosis (chance of recovery). The treatment ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft ... dye reacts to the light. Certain factors affect treatment options and prognosis (chance of recovery). The treatment ...

  8. Professionalisation of adult educators in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Anne; Milana, Marcella

    2011-01-01

    Increasing interest in lifelong learning has led to increasing interest in adult education and training and, at European level, increasing interest in the qualification of those who are going to teach the growing number of adults expected to take part in adult education and training. The article......, which is based on the Danish results of a European project on the qualification of (prospective) adult educators, shows that in spite of a long tradition of adult education, this increased interest in the qualification of adult educators is only vaguely mirrored in Danish plans and strategies for adult...... education, where quality is mainly defined in terms of usefulness for the labour market. The study is carried out as a combination of document analysis of relevant policy papers and narrative interviews with participants in qualification programmes for adult educators....

  9. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy c

  10. The Dynamic Mandala of Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Outlines basic assumptions and principles underlying adult education and describes today's challenges: maintaining democracy, technological changes, explosion of information, global competition/cooperation, environment, and universal human rights. Advocates a holistic world view of adult education. (SK)

  11. Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Healthcare Professionals Weakened Immune System and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... up to age 26 years Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  12. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  13. Ideas on Reform of Adult English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁桂春

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyzes the situation of adult English teaching and proves that adult English teaching is time-consuming with low efficiency. To meet the need of the future society in China and the economic globalization in 21st century and the features of adult English learners, we should use practical English teaching materials and communication approach to improve the quality of adult English teaching.

  14. Adult learning and naval leadership training

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Adult learning embraces andragogy, constructivism, Transformative Learning Theory, praxis, and the understanding that not all adults are prepared initially for complete learning autonomy. The concept of andragogy can be traced to the Nineteenth Century, and the volume of follow-on research has reinforced the basic tenants of adult learning. It is, therefore, valid to expect that adherence to adult learning will indicate one measure of ...

  15. Cochlear implantation in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank R; Chien, Wade W; Li, Lingsheng; Clarrett, Danisa M; Niparko, John K; Francis, Howard W

    2012-09-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe to profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation (CI) is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should CI be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12-year experience with CI in adults aged ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that CI in adults aged ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores, with a mean increase of 60.0% (SD 24.1) on HINT (Hearing in Noise Test) sentences in quiet. The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation, such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1.3 percentage points less (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.6-1.9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40% and 60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10.0 percentage points (95% CI, 0.4-19.6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after CI, with possible implications for current United States Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into account the broad cognitive, social, and physical functioning outcomes that are likely detrimentally affected by hearing loss and may be mitigated by CI.

  16. What do barnacle larvae feed on ? Implications in biofouling ecology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaonkar, C.; Anil, A.C.

    and diversity indicated that the percentage of defaecating larvae (an indicator of food consumed) was comparatively higher during the pre-monsoon season. Generally this season is characterized by lower chlorophyll-a concentration. However, the average number...

  17. Comparative ultrastructure of the root system in rhizocephalan barnacles (Crustacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, J; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2001-01-01

    the rootlets towards the external reproductive body. In C. delagei the single, bladder-shaped rootlet lacks both the apical projections in the epidermis, the electron-dense cuticle layer, and the microcuticular projections. We review previous studies on the rhizocephalan root system and discuss functional...

  18. Barnacle larval destination: piloting possibilities by bacteria and lectin interaction

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    the signals or cues. Microscale patchiness of bacteria is also evident on surfaces in the sea. The availability of conflicting cues in patches may help pilot the larvae to their settlement destination. Understanding these controlling mechanisms and interfering...

  19. Suggestions for a Realistic Adult Education Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Philip H.

    1985-01-01

    Five sets of implementation problems of adult education are examined: (1) diffusion of organizational responsibility, (2) lack of an integrated approach, (3) aims and priorities of adult education and the lack of learner motivation, (4) resource requirements, and (5) the imposition by formal education of constraints upon adult education. (RM)

  20. Older Adults and Gambling: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses the social cognitive theory model to review the literature on older adult gambling, and related personal and environment characteristics. Results show that lottery is the kind of gambling most frequently played by older adults, followed by casino games. Older adults take trips to casinos to socialize, find excitement, and win…

  1. Participation in Adult Education: Attitudes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeren, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we control the intention theory of Fishbein and Ajzen (1980) for the participation in an adult education course. Based on the Flemish Eurostat Adult Education Survey, we reveal that participants in adult education have a more positive attitude towards learning and that within the group of non-participants, those who formulate an…

  2. Globalisation, Transnational Policies and Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milana, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    Globalisation, transnational policies and adult education--This paper examines policy documents produced by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the European Union (EU) in the field of adult education and learning. Both these entities address adult education as an explicit object of policy. This paper…

  3. Changing Medical Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants…

  4. Children Grow Up: Autism in Adolescents & Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Kathleen; Griesman, Brenda

    The booklet examines issues associated with autism in adolescents and adults. Teenagers with autism exhibit behaviors not unlike their nondisabled peers, and standard definitions of the syndrome may not be relevant at that age. Brief articles explore the range of emotions families may encounter with a young adult or adult who has autism, typical…

  5. Critical Discourse Analysis, Adult Education and "Fitba"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Player, John

    2013-01-01

    In this article I will use an example of current adult education practice, the Glory and Dismay Football Literacies Programme (GDFLP) to appraise the value of critical discourse analysis (CDA) for adult learners, both individually and collectively, and for adult education practitioners with an interest in developing critical literacy skills. The…

  6. 78 FR 32116 - TRICARE Young Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB48 TRICARE Young Adult AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (NDAA for FY11). It establishes the TRICARE Young Adult... worldwide. TYA is similar to young adult coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,...

  7. Raising "Hot Topics" through Young Adult Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenke, Susan; Maples, Joellen; Henderson, Jill

    2010-01-01

    While young adult literature increases adolescents' motivation to read, and adolescents choose to read young adult novels over more canonical works when given opportunities to choose, the authors present yet another reason for teaching young adult literature in the middle school classroom: it provides a medium through which adolescents and their…

  8. Adult Learners, Learning and Public Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Elizabeth J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Ten articles focusing on adult learning services in public libraries highlight global trends, support for intentional change, counseling and information needs of adult learners, adult learner services at Pratt Library and North York (Ontario) library, process of learning, administrative considerations, political factors, and implications for…

  9. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  10. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five…

  11. Strengths and Satisfaction across the Adult Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Vaillant, George E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2003-01-01

    Positive psychology has recently developed a classification of human strengths (Peterson & Seligman, in press). We aimed to evaluate these strengths by investigating the strengths and life satisfaction in three adult samples recruited from the community (young adult, middle-aged, and older adult), as well as in the surviving men of the Grant study…

  12. A Public View of Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Mike; Newsom, Ron

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of 228 magazine articles indexed by adult education in "Reader's Guide" (1970-87) indicated that, although accurately portraying the field for the most part, articles largely ignore self-directed learning, adult education as a field of university study, and the existence of professional adult educators. (SK)

  13. Recognition and Adult Education: An Incongruent Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Building on narratives of students in adult education in Sweden, where the majority of the students are young adults, this paper argues that adult education has both negative and positive aspects in helping individuals to be recognised as valuable. Students, often part of the precariat class, have not always been able to survive in the job market…

  14. Mentoring during Adolescence and Adult Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakacki, Pola Christina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a significant relationship between mentoring and adult resilience, specifically adults that were mentored as adolescents. The study sample comprised of 657 adults from various locations across the country. For this quantitative study, they completed a two-part questionnaire made up of the…

  15. Audiovocal Integration in Adults Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Torrey; Chon, HeeCheong; Han, Woojae

    2012-01-01

    Background: Altered auditory feedback can facilitate speech fluency in adults who stutter. However, other findings suggest that adults who stutter show anomalies in "audiovocal integration", such as longer phonation reaction times to auditory stimuli and less effective pitch tracking. Aims: To study audiovocal integration in adults who stutter…

  16. CT evaluation of acetabular dysplasta in adults.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate methods of measurement by CT and their clinical significance for acetabular dysplasia(AD) in adults. Methods: CT imaging was examined and measured in 33 adult patients with AD, compared with the normal control group of 210 adults. Results: This study showed the results of AD patients

  17. An adult intussusception mimicking early appendicitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Chun Tseng; Cheng-Ting Hsiao; Yu-Cheng Hung

    2012-01-01

    Adult intussusception is rare with variable clinical presentation. We reported a case of adult intussusception presenting with symptoms mimicking acute appendicitis. The patient presented as an abdominal pain from epigastric area with shifting gradually to RLQ. The atypical presentation of adult intussusception remains a diagnostic challenge to the emergency physician.

  18. Empowering the Older Adult through Folklore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Dorothy Anne

    2006-01-01

    An opportunity exists for those working with older adults in nursing homes to significantly encourage independence in the older adult using a creative approach. The use of folklore is suggested as a means for assisting the older adult toward a reconnection with the individuation process.

  19. Effective Literacy Instruction for Adults with Specific Learning Disabilities: Implications for Adult Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Adults with learning disabilities (LD) attending adult basic education, GED programs, or community colleges are among the lowest performers on measures of literacy. For example, on multiple measures of reading comprehension, adults with LD had a mean reading score at the third grade level, whereas adults without LD read at the fifth grade level.…

  20. Policy Review on Adult Learning: The Adult Non-Formal Education Policy of Mali, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadio, Moussa

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the issue of policy development for adult learning in Mali, West Africa. On January 2007, the Malian government adopted the "Adult Non-formal Education Policy Document," which was intended to regulate the adult learning sector and federate the actions of policy makers, adult education providers, and adult…

  1. Ageing adults and digital games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Sara Mosberg

    of the elderly, three dominant discourses are identified. These are concerned with a generational digital divide, maintenance of health and general wellbeing as well as the ageing adults as an attractive marked. Notions of economical productivity inform most of the available work, often explicitly and at other......On the basis of Foucauldian notions of power, discipline and discourse it is here examined how ageing adults are constituted in relation to digital games within the existing research. Reviewing the available literature with a focus on justifications for research, aims and the portrayal...... times more implicitly. On this basis, the analysed research tends to offer digital games as disciplinary means to maintain, correct or tame the aging citizens. Either as technologies of the self, used in the individual’s self shaping, or as ways to contain and maintain the “disobedient” bodies and minds...

  2. The Danish adult diabetes registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Kristensen, Jette K.; Husted, Gitte Reventlov

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database: The aim of the Danish Adult Diabetes Registry (DADR) is to provide data from both the primary health care sector (general practice [GP]) and the secondary sector (specialized outpatient clinics) to assess the quality of treatment given to patients with diabetes. The indicators...... represent process and outcome indicators selected from the literature. Study population: The total diabetes population in Denmark is estimated to be ∼300,000 adult diabetes patients. Approximately 10% have type 1 diabetes, which is managed mainly in the secondary sector, and 90% have type 2 diabetes......, glucose-, blood pressure-, and lipid-lowering treatment (yes/no), insulin pump treatment (yes/ no), and date of last eye and foot examination. Descriptive data: In 2014, the annual report included data regarding over 38,000 patients from outpatient clinics, which is assumed to have included almost all...

  3. Sexuality in Older Adults (65+)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Træen, Bente; Hald, Gert Martin; Graham, Cynthia A;

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the current article was to provide an overview of literature on sexual function and sexual difficulties in older adults. Method: The authors conducted a narrative review of papers published in English between January 2005 and July 2015 based on an extensive search in Psyc......INFO. Results: The review showed that although common biological changes may adversely affect sexual function in old age, sexual experience seems to also be affected by psychological and interpersonal factors. Conclusions: Greater life expectancy and better medical care will result in older individuals...... with chronic diseases living longer. The need for help to cope with changes in sexual health is likely to increase in older adults, as sexuality may be negatively affected through several pathways....

  4. Participation patterns in adult education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard; Rubenson, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    of investment in the development and maintenance of skills over the lifespan of individuals is to a large extent interconnected with a high-level of non-market coordination via institutional arrangements and/or specific public policy measures. Such arrangements and measures are seen to alleviate coordination......This article focuses on evidence regarding cross-national patterns of participation in adult education and an interpretation of these patterns from an institutional and public policy perspective. The interpretation follows from the perspective that sustaining high and widely distributed levels...... problems that otherwise lead to underinvestment in skills and/or inequity in the distribution of access to education and training and hence skills. Hence, it is argued that institutional contexts and public policy measures condition participation patterns in adult education, and are thus worthwhile...

  5. Indwelling urethral catheters in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Calleja, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on indwelling urethral catheters in adults, their indications for the short and long term use, the types of urinary catheters available in Malta, an overview of the basic structure of a catheter, and the complications of urinary catheter insertion and maintenance. An attempt has been made to address in some depth the most common complication of indwelling catheters – catheter associated urinary tract infection in terms of pathophysiology and its management. Simple but cru...

  6. [Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a life-long disease requiring an integrated therapy. It may negatively influence the quality of life. In childhood, the main problems of the care of these patients involve sex determination and ensuring optimum growth and puberty. The therapeutic goals for adults are the prevention of Addisonian crisis and ensuring the best possible quality of life, including fertility.Key words: androgens - cardiovascular risk - congenital adrenal hyperplasia - bone density - testicular rest tumors.

  7. WILMS’ TUMOUR IN YOUNG ADULT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilvel Arumugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilms’ tumour also called as nephroblastoma is a malignant renal neoplasm of childhood that arises from remnant of immature kidney. About 80% of Wilms’ tumour cases occur before age 5 with a median age of 3.5 years. But adult Wilms’ tumour can occur at any age from 16 to 70 years, the median age in young adult is around 24. CASE REPORT A 16-year-old girl came with history of mass right abdomen, which she noticed for 1 week duration; no urinary symptoms. Her recent blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg. Per abdomen a 10 x 9 cm mass palpable in the right lumbar region, surface smooth, firmto-hard in consistency, non-tender, well defined, no bruit. Urine routine examination was normal; urine culture was sterile; renal and liver function tests were within normal limits; Sr. calcium 9.5 mg/dL. CT abdomen plain and contrast showed a 10 x 9 cm heterodense lesion equivocal with renal cell carcinoma and angiomyolipoma. MR angiogram was done. It showed well-defined encapsulated heterointense mass of size 12 x 8 x 7cm, IVC and bilateral renal vein normal. Since findings were inconclusive, we did a CT-guided biopsy and report came as feature positive for small round cell tumour. Hence, proceeded with right radical nephrectomy. The final histopathology report came as Wilms’ tumour spindle cell variant. Margins clear and ureter not involved. She was then started on adjuvant chemotherapy Inj. Vincristine 2 mg weekly for 27 weeks. She is on regular followup now. CONCLUSION Wilms’ tumour should be considered in a patient who presents with a renal mass with or without loin pain, haematuria especially in young adults. Every attempt should be made to differentiate it from renal cell carcinoma. The outcome for adult Wilms’ tumour is steadily improving with current multimodality treatment approach.

  8. Navy Careers and Adult Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    family categories. 12 A. PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT In Childhood and Society Erik Erikson broke new ground by proposing that development...a description of the mid-life crisis as any. The idea that adults may have stages in their life de- velopment was given formal legitimacy by Erik ... Erikson in his 7 book, Childhood and Society, first published in 1950. In that work Erikson proposed that there are eight stages in life, three of them in

  9. Sexuality in Nigerian older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatayo, Adeoti Adekunle; Kubwa, Ojo Osaze; Adekunle, Ajayi Ebenezer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oftentimes the older adults are assumed to be asexual as few studies explore into the sexuality of this age group worldwide and even in Nigeria. It is an important aspect of quality of life which is often neglected by people in this age group, attending physicians and the society as a whole. The study was aimed at determining the perception of older adults about sexuality, identify the factors that could militate against sexuality and fill any void in information in this regard. Methods Descriptive study conducted in one hundred older adults. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to consenting participants between 1st of September 2013 and 31st of March 2014. Results Mean age of respondents was 66.42± 5.77 years. Seventy-eight percent of the male respondents considered engaging in sexual activity as safe compared to 45.8% of the female respondents. More of the women (33.3%) regarded sexuality in the older adults as a taboo when compared to the men (5.4%). However, the men were more favourably disposed to discussing sexual problems than the women with their spouses (42% vs 20%) and Physicians (23.2% vs 0.0%). Major factors responsible for sexual inactivity were participants’ medical ailments (65%), partners’ failing health (15%) as well as anxiety about sexual performance (25%) in the men and dyspareunia (25%) in women. Conclusion There is an urgent need to correct the misconception about sexuality in this age group especially among the women and for the physicians to explore the sexual history of every patient. PMID:26977224

  10. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-01

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.).

  11. Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Shi Zhang; Nai-Kang Zhou; Chang-Hai Yu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae in adults. METHODS: Eleven adult cases of congenital bronchoesophageal fistula diagnosed and treated in our hospital between May 1990 and August 2010 were reviewed. Its clinical presentations, diagnostic methods, anatomic type, treatment, and follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: Of the chief clinical presentations, nonspecific cough and sputum were found in 10 (90.9%), recurrent bouts of cough after drinking liquid food in 6 (54.6%), hemoptysis in 6 (54.6%), low fever in 4 (36.4%), and chest pain in 3 (27.3%) of the 11 cases, respectively. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis ranged 5-36.5 years. The diagnosis of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae was established in 9 patients by barium esophagography, in 1 patient by esophagoscopy and in 1 patient by bronchoscopy, respectively. The congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae communicated with a segmental bronchus, a main bronchus, and an intermediate bronchus in 8, 2 and 1 patients, respectively. The treatment of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae involved excision of the fistula in 10 patients or division and suturing in 1 patient. The associated lung lesion was removed in all patients. No long-term sequelae were found during the postoperative follow-up except in 1 patient with bronchial fistula who accepted reoperation before recovery. CONCLUSION: Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula is rare in adults. Its most useful diagnostic method is esophagography. It must be treated surgically as soon as the diagnosis is established.

  12. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient.

  13. Opportunities of Continuing Adult Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Ušeckienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available After becoming the member state of the European Union, Lithuania undertook all the obligations of a member state. One of them is the implementation of The Lisbon Strategy aiming at the worlds most dynamic and competitive knowledge– based economy by 2010. Under the strategy, a stronger economy will drive job creation, sustainable development, and social inclusion. These changes demand the modernisation of education systems in the E U states, Lithuania among them. To achieve this objective, political forces came to an agreement on the future of Lithuanian education. In 2003 The Seimas of the Republic of Lithuania approved of National Education Strategy 2003–2012. This strategy is special not only because it is based on the experiences of the reform, addresses current and future world’s challenges and opportunities, maintains links with other strategic national reforms, but also emphasises efforts to ensure quality lifelong education for Lithuanian population and striving to become a partner in modern knowledge-based economy. Therefore, an extensive discussion on lifelong education strategies on individual and institution levels in all spheres of social and personal life has started in the E U and Lithuania. Nowadays lifelong learning is not just one aspect of education and training; it gradually is becoming the most important principle in the continuum of complex learning contexts. Such vision must be implemented this decade. The object of the research: the preconditions for the development of continuing adult education. The aim of the research: to examine the peculiarities of the preconditions for the development of continuing adult education in Pakruojis region. The methods of the research: analysis of references and documents on education; an anonymous survey in written form (a questionnaire; statistical analysis of data. The sample. The research was conducted in Pakruojis region in January-April, 2006. 300 respondents of different age

  14. Adult Education in the Danish Modernization Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2014-01-01

    at local participants and contexts and a globalization process which redefines the cultural environment and presents a new and challenging agenda for adult learning. I will apply a rather general framework of historical analysis of adult education which is derived from and related to European modernization......The aim of this article is to provide an input for a discussion about the situation of a Danish (Nordic) model of adult education in the context of European policy as well as globalization. The article will seek to conceptualize the tension between adult education which is founded in and aiming...... (Salling Olesen 2009) on the history of Danish adult education and the possible contemporary impacts of this history (Salling Olesen 1985;1989). It looks at the societal nature of adult learning and hence the societal functions of adult education, and emphasizes the historical dimension in the sense...

  15. [Adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milke-García, María Del Pilar

    2016-09-01

    Adulthood starts after youth and is characterized by the completion of growth and the achievement of organic and psychological maturity. Obesity and other preventable diseases related to lifestyle are common at this age. A complete, balanced and sufficient diet, together with exercise are important in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Several studies have brought about the mechanisms by which the incorporation of milk and dairy products to diet is beneficial in order to prevent and treat these diseases. Milk also contributes to the improvement of dental, bone and intestinal health, theoretically helps in body weight control, has a definite role on the muscular and bone mass maintenance and is an option for hydration during exercise, this being as important as diet for overweight, obesity, diabetes, dislipidemias and hypertension control.

  16. The Future of Adult Education in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharakis, Jeffrey; Van Der Werff, Jay A.

    2012-01-01

    The future of adult education in the military is in many ways tied to the future of adult education. If adult educators limit their vision of what adult education is to adult learning principles, to facilitated learning, to adult basic education, and to training and education, they limit the potential of what they can do and how they do it. Adult…

  17. Effective literacy instruction for adults with specific learning disabilities: implications for adult educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Adults with learning disabilities (LD) attending adult basic education, GED programs, or community colleges are among the lowest performers on measures of literacy. For example, on multiple measures of reading comprehension, adults with LD had a mean reading score at the third grade level, whereas adults without LD read at the fifth grade level. In addition, large numbers of adults perform at the lowest skill levels on quantitative tasks. Clearly, significant instructional challenges exist for adults who struggle with literacy issues, and those challenges can be greater for adults with LD. In this article, the literature on adults with LD is reviewed, and evidenced-based instructional practices that significantly narrow the literacy achievement gap for this population are identified. Primary attention is given to instructional factors that have been shown to affect literacy outcomes for adults with LD. These factors include the use of explicit instruction, instructional technology, and intensive tutoring in skills and strategies embedded in authentic contexts.

  18. Reading Comprehension Strategies for Adult Literacy Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Mike; Mellard, Daryl

    2005-11-01

    Although research on improving child literacy is converging, no such body of research exists for adult literacy. Yet the need is no less significant. This study extends the knowledge garnered with younger populations by determining the reading comprehension strategies most important to adults' success on adult literacy outcome measures and aligning them with previously researched interventions. According to an analysis of key adult literacy outcome measures (i.e., competency-based, standardized tests of literacy commonly accepted as reasonable proxies for the global construct of adult literacy: Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System [CASAS], General Educational Development [GED], and National Assessment of Educational Progress [NAEP]), adults should benefit from strategies that teach looking for clues in or generating questions about a text. Additionally, adults need to learn how to summarize and draw inferences in order to address higher-level literacy demands. Adult learners also need a metacognitive strategy to self-regulate reading behavior (e.g., choose a strategy to use, evaluate its effectiveness, and abandon and choose another strategy if necessary.) Furthermore, when using a competency-based standardized test, adult learners need to be coincidentally taught test-taking skills to reduce the test-related task demands and produce a better index of a learner's reading comprehension skills.

  19. Vision Loss in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Allen L; Rojas-Roldan, Ledy; Coffin, Janis

    2016-08-01

    Vision loss affects 37 million Americans older than 50 years and one in four who are older than 80 years. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concludes that current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for impaired visual acuity in adults older than 65 years. However, family physicians play a critical role in identifying persons who are at risk of vision loss, counseling patients, and referring patients for disease-specific treatment. The conditions that cause most cases of vision loss in older patients are age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, ocular complications of diabetes mellitus, and age-related cataracts. Vitamin supplements can delay the progression of age-related macular degeneration. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor can preserve vision in the neovascular form of macular degeneration. Medicated eye drops reduce intraocular pressure and can delay the progression of vision loss in patients with glaucoma, but adherence to treatment is poor. Laser trabeculoplasty also lowers intraocular pressure and preserves vision in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, but long-term studies are needed to identify who is most likely to benefit from surgery. Tight glycemic control in adults with diabetes slows the progression of diabetic retinopathy, but must be balanced against the risks of hypoglycemia and death in older adults. Fenofibrate also slows progression of diabetic retinopathy. Panretinal photocoagulation is the mainstay of treatment for diabetic retinopathy, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors slow vision loss resulting from diabetic macular edema. Preoperative testing before cataract surgery does not improve outcomes and is not recommended.

  20. [The intraosseous infusion in adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancade, D; Rüttimann, M; Wagnon, G; Landy, C; Schaeffer, E; Gagnon, N; Nadaud, J; Favier, J-C

    2013-05-01

    Intraosseous infusion is an old knowledge, abandoned in the 1950s in favor of the peripheral vein, and it was essentially described in pediatrics and military medicine. Since 2005, this way is experiencing a resurgence of interest in emergency medicine particularly in adults after the failure's installation of a peripheral vein in order not to waste the time of care and administration of treatment. New devices that allow intraosseous infusion are currently used in humans. We propose to review the different kind of catheters used, to know the main technical characteristics, indications, contraindications and potential complications. We propose a comparison with the peripheral vein and a comparison between the different catheters.

  1. Adult mortality in preindustrial Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Lacroix - - - Bertrand Desjardins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main results of a detailed study on adult mortality in French Canadians born before 1750 and having married inthe colony of New France. Using data from parish registers, mortality is studied using abridged life tables, with staggered entries according to age at first marriage. Survival tables and log-Rank tests are used to support the results. Three features were selected for the study of differential mortality: gender, type of residence area (urban or rural, and cohort. The mortality of French Canadians is compared to that of their French contemporaries.

  2. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies.

  3. Guiding young adults at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Rasmussen, Palle Damkjær; Ydesen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    in the project and by the youths participating in the project. The project was designed to facilitate and support transition to an adult life by giving participants social support, feedback, experiences, room for reflection and feeling of acceptance and inclusion. In Denmark all social work with young people...... at risk involves guidance to “the right path”, since individual guidance seems to be the key asset in mobilizing young person’s needs and experiences. The article indicates important elements in the guidance of youth at risk, such as psychological intervention and personal support, support from...

  4. Antifouling Metabolites from the Mangrove Plant Ceriops tagal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ming Lin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The new diterpene methoxy-ent-8(14-pimarenely-15-one (1 and three knownmetabolites: ent-8(14-pimarene-15R,16-diol (2, stigmasterol (3 and β-sitosterol (4, wereisolated from the roots of the mangrove plant Ceriops tagal. Their structures and relativestereochemistry were elucidated by means of extensive NMR, IR and MS analysis.Compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4 exhibited significant antifouling activities against cyprid larvaeof the barnacle Balanus albicostatus Pilsbry, with EC50 values of 0.32 ± 0.01, 0.04 ± 0.00,4.05 ± 0.15 and 18.47 ± 0.40 μg/cm2, respectively, whereas their toxicities towards cypridswere very low, with LC50 values all above 10 μg/cm2.

  5. Minimal incorporation of Deepwater Horizon oil by estuarine filter feeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Brian; Anderson, Laurie C

    2014-03-15

    Natural abundance carbon isotope analyses are sensitive tracers for fates and use of oil in aquatic environments. Use of oil carbon in estuarine food webs should lead to isotope values approaching those of oil itself, -27‰ for stable carbon isotopes reflecting oil origins and -1000‰ for carbon-14 reflecting oil age. To test for transfer of oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill into estuarine food webs, filter-feeding barnacles (Balanus sp.) and marsh mussels (Geukensia demissa) were collected from Louisiana estuaries near the site of the oil spill. Carbon-14 analyses of these animals from open waters and oiled marshes showed that oil use was <1% and near detection limits estimated at 0.3% oil incorporation. Respiration studies showed no evidence for enhanced microbial activity in bay waters. Results are consistent with low dietary impacts of oil for filter feeders and little overall impact on respiration in the productive Louisiana estuarine systems.

  6. Chemical study and antifouling activity of Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata;Estudio quimico y evaluacion de la actividad antifouling del octocoral caribeno Eunicea laciniata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuadrado Silva, Carmen Tatiana; Castellanos Hernandez, Leonardo; Osorno Reyes, Oscar Eduardo; Ramos Rodriguez, Freddy Alejandro; Duque Beltran, Carmenza, E-mail: lcastellanosh@bt.unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Fac. de Ciencias. Dept. de Quimica; Puyana Hegedus, Monica [Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano, Bogota (Colombia)

    2010-07-01

    The bioassay guided purification of the octocoral Eunicea laciniata organic extract, collected at Santa Marta bay, Colombia, allowed the isolation of the new compound (-)-3beta-pregna-5,20-dienyl-beta-D-arabinopyranoside (1), along with the known compounds 1(S{sup *}),11(R{sup *})-dolabell-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (2), 13-keto-1(S),11(R)-dolabell-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (3), cholest- 5,22-dien-3beta-ol (4), cholesterol (5), y brassicasterol (6). The structure and absolute configuration of 1 was determined on based spectroscopic analyses (NMR and CD). The extract showed antifouling activity against five strains of marine bacteria associated to heavy fouled surfaces. Also showed activity against the cypris of the cosmopolitan barnacle Balanus amphitrite, and low toxicity in Artemia salina test. (author)

  7. Screening Of Marine Bacteria For Pharmacological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vijayalakshmi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The symbiotic and associated four marine bacteria BR1 Flavobacterium sp. isolated from Barnacle Balanus amphitriteEM13 Micrococus sp. from Seaweed Enteromorpha compressaPC4 Alcaligenes sp. from Ascidian Polyclinum constellatum and SW12 Bacillus sp. from seawater were cultured and extracted for pharmacological activities. The ethyl acetate extracts of these marine bacterial culture supernatants were screened for pharmacological activities such as Anti inflammatory Analgesic and CNS depressant activities using experimental animal model. In this studySW12 exhibited high activity for both Anti inflammatory and Analgesic. Especially which exhibited highest analgesic activity than standard drug pethidine. Another one PC4 showed highest analgesic activity similar to standard drug. Other two extracts EM13 and BR1 showed high activity in CNS depressant. Based on the result SW12 is a highly potent strain it may produce novel compound for pharmacological drug.

  8. Habitat segregation of sessile marine organisms; Kaiyo fuchaku seibutsu no sumiwake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoai, A. [Asahi Glass Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kawahara, H.; Shizuri, Y.

    1996-08-01

    In order to develop the safe control agent of sessile marine organisms, the mechanism of habitat segregation of them has been investigated. Among various marine organisms, around 120 species of Porifera and Coelenterata accompanied with less the other sessile organisms were collected, to examine the adhesion prevention activity of their extracts against barnacles and Mytilus edulis. As a result, this activity was found out for 33% of Porifera and 27% of Coelenterata specimens. This means these organisms contain the adhesion prevention substances, and it is considered these chemical substances are practically used for the habitat segregation. Isolation structures of the chemical substances used for the habitat segregation were determined from these organisms. It was made clear that two acceptor genes successfully cloned from Balanus amphitrate are new G-protein coupling type acceptors having similar homology to the adrenaline and serotonin acceptors. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Characteristics of adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Manuel A; Bernad, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their unlimited ability to divide specifically; a stem cell is capable of making an immense number of copies of itself, maintaining the same characteristics. Moreover, these cells are able to generate several of the cell lineages which make up the body, including cells from the heart, liver, kidney, neurons, and muscles. Investigation of the mechanisms through which this differentiation occurs, the genes involved and the possibility of increasing the efficiency with which stem cells can be isolated and/or characterized are currently among the most important fields in biology and biomedicine.To date, stems cells have been identified from four different sources: Embryonic stem cells (ESC), germinal stem cells, and those derived from embryonic carcinomas (teratocarcinomas) and from somatic tissues (somatic stem cells). The latter are called adult stem cells (ASC) when they are found in postnatal tissues. We now know that there is a great diversity among ASC, with some tissues, such as the bone marrow, containing more than one type of ASC. Adult stem cells have several characteristics that make them to be the main players in current regenerative medicine and are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for a wide variety of diseases. Specifically, HSC and MSC are being assessed in increasing numbers of clinical trials.

  10. Environment and asthma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moual, Nicole; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Dumas, Orianne; Kauffmann, Francine; Nadif, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    The present review addresses recent advances and especially challenging aspects regarding the role of environmental risk factors in adult-onset asthma, for which the causes are poorly established. In the first part of the review, we discuss aspects regarding some environmental risk factors for adult-onset asthma: air pollution, occupational exposures with a focus on an emerging risk represented by exposure to cleaning agents (both at home and in the workplace), and lifestyle and nutrition. The second part is focused on perspectives and challenges, regarding relevant topics on which research is needed to improve the understanding of the role of environmental factors in asthma. Aspects of exposure assessment, the complexity of multiple exposures, the interrelationships of the environment with behavioral characteristics and the importance of studying biological markers and gene-environment interactions to identify the role of the environment in asthma are discussed. We conclude that environmental and lifestyle exposures play an important role in asthma or related phenotypes. The changes in lifestyle and the environment in recent decades have modified the specific risk factors in asthma even for well-recognized risks such as occupational exposures. To better understand the role of the environment in asthma, the use of objective (quantitative measurement of exposures) or modern tools (bar code, GPS) and the development of multidisciplinary collaboration would be very promising. A better understanding of the complex interrelationships between socio-economic, nutritional, lifestyle and environmental conditions might help to study their joint and independent roles in asthma.

  11. Sexual activity of Polish adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pastwa-Wojciechowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of this research was to explore the subject of sexual activity in the Polish population, with special focus on age and gender differences, and sexual infidelity. Sexual activity is one of the basic factors in initiating and maintaining relationships. On the one hand, sexual activity enables us to meet natural needs and maintain an intimate relationship with another human being; on the other, it may allow us to overcome loneliness and social isolation by providing the opportunity to express feelings of closeness and unity. Material and method. The research was conducted on a representative group of 3,200 Poles aged between 15–49, with the support of a well-known Polish research company – TNS OBOP. Face-to-face and Pencil and Paper (PAPI interviews were carried out. Results. The results focus on two main issues: the age and motives of sexual initiation among teenagers (with a significant percentage starting their sexual activity at the age of 15, and the quality of the sexual lives of adults (average number of sexual partners, sexual infidelity and sexual satisfaction. Conclusion. There is dependence between the type of relationship and the performance or non-performance of sexual activity, as well as the quality of the relationship. Among both adolescents and adults, remaining in a stable relationship (partnership or marriage promotes loyalty. The performance of sexual goals turns out to be an important mechanism regulating the interpersonal aspects of a relationship, influencing their perception and evaluation.

  12. Osteoporosis in unstable adult scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velis, K.P.; Healey, J.H.; Schneider, R.

    1988-12-01

    New noninvasive techniques as well as conventional methods were used to evaluate skeletal mass in the following three populations of adult white women as follows: (1) 79 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis designated as unstable (US) because of the associated presence in the lumbar spine of lateral spondylolisthesis with segmental instability; (2) 67 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis without lateral spondylolisthesis designated as stable (SS); and (3) 248 age-matched nonscoliotic controls. Ages in all three groups were categorized into premenopausal (25-44 years), perimenopausal (45-54 years), and postmenopausal (55-84 years). The results showed higher scoliosis morbidity in the US compared to the SS populations. The prevalence and severity of osteoporosis were markedly increased in US versus SS populations. Femoral neck density determined by dual-photon absorptiometry techniques averaged 26% to 48% lower in all age categories of US patients compared to controls. These changes were found in the youngest age groups, indicating reductions in bone mineral content earlier in the adult life of white women with a specific type of high-morbidity US characterized by the marker of lateral spondylolisthesis.

  13. Treatment of epilepsy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakgazi, Evren; French, Jacqueline A

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder in adults and requires treatment with antiepileptic medication. While the majority of patients with epilepsy can be treated with medication, about one third will fail on medical treatment. Therefore, other treatment options such as surgery, devices, and the ketogenic diet are other options to consider, in addition to medical treatment. The treatment of epilepsy requires many other factors to be taken into consideration, and these include, but are not limited to, age, gender, coexistent medical conditions, and the use of concomitant medications. The goal of treatment is to provide optimal seizure control while using the least possible number of medications, particularly for young females at reproductive age or the elderly who may suffer from other medical diseases and receive other concomitant medications. Certain conditions may co-exist with epilepsy, such as migraine, mood disorder, and memory disturbances, therefore the decision to choose the most appropriate medication for epilepsy patients should also involve treatment of these conditions. Here, we review current clinical practice in epilepsy and focus on the most common problems and conditions that clinicians face on a daily basis to treat adult patients with epilepsy. Side effect profiles, spectrum of efficacy and optimal choices per predominant type of seizures are summarized and can be used for educational purposes.

  14. Energy requirements of adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Emma N; Thomas, David G; Morris, Penelope J; Hawthorne, Amanda J

    2010-04-01

    A meta-analysis was carried out in order to establish the energy requirements of adult cats. Publications that identified cat body weight (BW) were used to generate allometric relationships between energy requirements and BW of healthy adult cats, using log-log linear regression. Energy requirements were expressed in kcal/kg BW to be consistent with those reported by the National Research Council. Mean maintenance energy requirements were 55.1 (se 1.2) kcal/kg BW (115 treatment groups). Three allometric equations were identified to predict the energy requirements for maintenance of BW in the cat based on BW: light (53.7 kcal/kg BW- 1.061), normal (46.8 kcal/kg BW- 1.115) and heavy (131.8 kcal/kg BW- 0 .366). When reported on lean mass, the allometric equation revealed maintenance requirements were 58.4 kcal/kg lean mass- 1.140 (adjusted R2 0.694; thirty-six treatment groups). The present review suggests that values for maintenance energy requirements based on BW alone may not be an accurate prediction and more detailed information on the age, sex and neuter status, BW and composition would enhance the ability to interpret the maintenance energy requirements of cats.

  15. Korean Adults' Attitudes towards Varieties of English

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young Soo

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates 43 Korean adults’ attitudes towards native and non-native varieties of English in relation to the perspective of EIL (English as an international language). This study addresses three research questions: 1) do Korean adults prefer certain varieties of English? 2) do Korean adults at least accept non-native varieties of English?, and 3) are Korean adults aware of different varieties of English? In order to examine participants’ language attitudes, this study employed bo...

  16. Franklian psychotherapy with adults molested as children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, J; Lantz, J

    1992-12-01

    A Franklian approach to treatment with adults who were molested as children recognizes that the trauma client's experiences of trauma and terror as a child can be transformed to discover real meaning potentials in the adult's daily life. In this paper the authors present a five-stage treatment approach based upon the Logotherapy concepts of Viktor Frankl which they have found to be helpful with adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Case material is presented to illustrate the described intervention approach.

  17. Kingella kingae intervertebral diskitis in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meis, J F; Sauerwein, R W; Gyssens, I C; Horrevorts, A M; van Kampen, A

    1992-09-01

    Kingella kingae rarely causes infection and is mainly associated with endocarditis and septic arthritis in adults. The organism is also capable of causing intervertebral diskitis in children, but thus far, no reports of this infection occurring in adults have been published. A case of diskitis due to K. kingae in an adult is reported for the first time, and the literature on this infection in children is reviewed.

  18. Neocuproine Ablates Melanocytes in Adult Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly-Pol, Thomas; Johnson, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    The simplest regeneration experiments involve the ablation of a single cell type. While methods exist to ablate the melanocytes of the larval zebrafish,1,2 no convenient method exists to ablate melanocytes in adult zebrafish. Here, we show that the copper chelator neocuproine (NCP) causes fragmentation and disappearance of melanin in adult zebrafish melanocytes. Adult melanocytes expressing eGFP under the control of a melanocyte-specific promoter also lose eGFP fluorescence in the presence of...

  19. Urinary tract infection in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based ap...

  20. Adult neurogenesis: integrating theories and separating functions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The continuous incorporation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus raises exciting questions about memory and learning, and has inspired new computational models to understand the function of adult neurogenesis. These theoretical approaches suggest distinct roles for new neurons as they slowly integrate into the existing dentate gyrus network: immature adult-born neurons appear to function as pattern integrators of temporally adjacent events, thereby enhancing pattern s...

  1. Young Adult Failure to Thrive Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    W.C. Sanderson; Skirbekk, V.; Stonawski, M.

    2011-01-01

    Many young working age adults in developed countries are failing to thrive in economic, demographic and social terms. Their 'failure to thrive' is a relatively new phenomenon that has not been widely recognized, but it affects young adults in virtually all the more developed countries for which we have relevant data. Young adults nowadays are more often in poverty. They are leaving their parental homes at ever later ages and in some countries the frequency of psychological problems increased....

  2. Simulation Frames: Young Adult Dystopian Cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Alison Tedman

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which Young Adult dystopian film Divergent (2014) successfully repurposes dystopia for a young demographic, making dystopia an aesthetically appealing space for heroic adventure. The film recombines Young Adult literary tropes with film conventions including those of science fiction. Divergent and other Young Adult dystopian films modify the potential for social critique associated with canonic dystopian fiction. The article’s critical framework includes t...

  3. Adult education policy and the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The European Union is now a key player in making lifelong learning and adult education policy: this is the first book to explore a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives researchers can use to investigate its role. Chapters by leading experts and younger scholars from across Europe...... to this field. This is the first book in a new series from the European Society for Research in the Education of Adults, and draws on work within its Network on Policy Studies in Adult Education....

  4. Imaginary companions in childhood and adult creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W A

    1979-01-01

    Case material is presented to illustrate the thesis that the ability to create an imaginary companion during childhood is an early expression of the special ego aptitudes found in creative individuals in adult life. Such "companions" allow these children to attempt to master creatively a variety of narcissistic mortifications suffered in reality and to displace unacceptable affects. In creative adults who had imaginary companions in childhood, the early fantasies serve as an organizing schema in memory for the childhood traumata. Stimuli in adult life which evoke the earlier traumata may revive the original imaginary companion fantasies. These then serve as nodal bases for the creation of specific adult works of art.

  5. Adult Food Intake Patterns Are Related to Adult and Childhood Socioeconomic Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare-Bruun, Helle; Togo, Per; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the influence of adult and childhood socioeconomic status (SES) on attained adult food intake patterns. We used data from a 20- to 22-y follow-up study of 1904 Danish teenagers. The baseline survey was conducted partly in 1983 and partly in 1985 and the follow-up survey...... to the traditional-western food pattern. High adherence to the green food pattern was positively related to high adult SES in both sexes. Among women, those with high SES in childhood had higher green food pattern factor scores than those with low childhood SES, regardless of adult SES. Among men, those with high...... adult SES had higher green food pattern factor scores than those with low adult SES, regardless of childhood SES. In conclusion, socioeconomic position is important for the development of adult food intake patterns. However, childhood SES seems more important for adult female food intake patterns...

  6. Characterization of two 20kDa-cement protein (cp20k homologues in Amphibalanus amphitrite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Sheng He

    Full Text Available The barnacle, Amphibalanus amphitrite, is a common marine fouling organism. Understanding the mechanism of barnacle adhesion will be helpful in resolving the fouling problem. Barnacle cement is thought to play a key role in barnacle attachment. Although several adult barnacle cement proteins have been identified in Megabalanus rosa, little is known about their function in barnacle settlement. In this study, two homologous 20k-cement proteins (cp20k in Amphibalanus amphitrite, named Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2, were characterized. The two homologues share primary sequence structure with proteins from other species including Megabalanus rosa and Fistulobalanus albicostatus. The conserved structure included repeated Cys domains and abundant charged amino acids, such as histidine. In this study we demonstrated that Bamcp20k-1 localized at the α secretory cells in the cyprid cement gland, while Bamcp20k-2 localized to the β secretory cells. The differential localizations suggest differential regulation for secretion from the secretory cells. Both Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2 from cyprids dissolved in PBS. However, adult Bamcp20k-2, which was dominant in the basal shell of adult barnacles, was largely insoluble in PBS. Solubility increased in the presence of the reducing reagent Dithiothreitol (DTT, suggesting that the formation of disulfide bonds plays a role in Bamcp20k-2 function. In comparison, Bamcp20k-1, which was enriched in soft tissue, could not be easily detected in the shell and base by Western blot and easily dissolved in PBS. These differential solubilities and localizations indicate that Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2 have distinct functions in barnacle cementing.

  7. Characterization of Two 20kDa-Cement Protein (cp20k) Homologues in Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    He, Li-Sheng

    2013-05-22

    The barnacle, Amphibalanus amphitrite, is a common marine fouling organism. Understanding the mechanism of barnacle adhesion will be helpful in resolving the fouling problem. Barnacle cement is thought to play a key role in barnacle attachment. Although several adult barnacle cement proteins have been identified in Megabalanus rosa, little is known about their function in barnacle settlement. In this study, two homologous 20k-cement proteins (cp20k) in Amphibalanus amphitrite, named Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2, were characterized. The two homologues share primary sequence structure with proteins from other species including Megabalanus rosa and Fistulobalanus albicostatus. The conserved structure included repeated Cys domains and abundant charged amino acids, such as histidine. In this study we demonstrated that Bamcp20k-1 localized at the α secretory cells in the cyprid cement gland, while Bamcp20k-2 localized to the β secretory cells. The differential localizations suggest differential regulation for secretion from the secretory cells. Both Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2 from cyprids dissolved in PBS. However, adult Bamcp20k-2, which was dominant in the basal shell of adult barnacles, was largely insoluble in PBS. Solubility increased in the presence of the reducing reagent Dithiothreitol (DTT), suggesting that the formation of disulfide bonds plays a role in Bamcp20k-2 function. In comparison, Bamcp20k-1, which was enriched in soft tissue, could not be easily detected in the shell and base by Western blot and easily dissolved in PBS. These differential solubilities and localizations indicate that Bamcp20k-1 and Bamcp20k-2 have distinct functions in barnacle cementing. © 2013 He et al.

  8. Chromium in water, suspended particles, sediments and biota in the Iraja River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W.C.; Fiszman, M.; de Lacerda, L.D.; van Weerfelt, M.; Carbonell, N.

    1982-11-01

    Analyses of chromium concentrations in waters, suspended particles, bottom sediments, fish (Poecilia reticulata), plants (Paspalum vaginatum, Sesuvium portulacastrum, Philoxeros vermicularis), soils and barnacles (Balanus sp.) were performed from August 1976 to September 1980 in samples collected from the Iraja River and inside its estuary in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Sediments and water from the Iraja River showed chromium concentrations of 17536 and 23.39 ppm--a thousand times higher than the published data for freshwater systems. Chromium removed from solution by bottom sediments reaches Guanabara Bay linked to particulate matter. Fish and emergent grass inside the river concentrate chromium from water and/or sediment, returning the metal to the system as detritus. Soil and plants inside the estuary concentrate chromium thirty and ten times higher than in the control area. The vegetal community exhibits a concentration factor smaller than that related to soil and prevents the return of chromium to the estuarine waters. Inside the Guanabara Bay, Balanus sp. appears to be an effective biological monitor as it concentrates chromium in soft tissues 10/sup 3/ times higher than values found in suspended particles (0.012 ..mu..g ml/sup -1/).

  9. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients: comparing adults and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henyse Gómez Valiente da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category Methods: Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. Results: A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p < 0.01 and a lower frequency of being overweight (7% vs. 15.1%, p < 0.01 than adults. Both, adult and older adults had a high frequency of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. The older adults had lower consumption of calories, intake of iron and folic acid. Inadequacy of vitamin intake was observed in both groups; respectively, 52%, 43%, 95%, 76% and 88% for Vitamin A, C, D, E and folic acid. The older adults had a higher folic acid and calcium inadequacy than the adults (97% vs 82%, p <0.01; 88% vs 72%, p < 0.01. There was no association of micronutrient intake with cancer, nor with nutritional status. Conclusion: The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category.

  10. The contribution of childhood and adult socioeconomic position to adult obesity and smoking behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Power, Chris; Graham, Hilary; Due, Pernille

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the contribution of childhood and adult socioeconomic position (SEP) to adult obesity and smoking behaviour, in particular to establish the role of childhood circumstances across different studies in Europe and the US.......Our objective was to investigate the contribution of childhood and adult socioeconomic position (SEP) to adult obesity and smoking behaviour, in particular to establish the role of childhood circumstances across different studies in Europe and the US....

  11. An Autoethnographic Exchange: Exploring the Dynamics of Selves as Adult Learners and Adult Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhotnik, Maria S.; Delgado, Antonio; Seepersad, Rehana

    2015-01-01

    This article explores four former doctoral students' perceptions about their selves as adult learners and adult educators through the use of autoethnography and reflective dialogue. The dynamics between the two selves were explored to identify emerging themes and implications for practice in adult education. The duality of their roles as learners…

  12. Characterizing upper limb muscle volume and strength in older adults: a comparison with young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidt, Meghan E; Daly, Melissa; Miller, Michael E; Davis, Cralen C; Marsh, Anthony P; Saul, Katherine R

    2012-01-10

    Aging is associated with the loss of muscle volume (MV) and force leading to difficulties with activities of daily living. However, the relationship between upper limb MV and joint strength has not been characterized for older adults. Quantifying this relationship may help our understanding of the functional declines of the upper limb that older adults experience. Our objective was to assess the relationship between upper limb MV and maximal isometric joint moment-generating capacity (IJM) in a single cohort of healthy older adults (age ≥ 65 years) for 6 major functional groups (32 muscles). MV was determined from MRI for 18 participants (75.1±4.3 years). IJM at the shoulder (abduction/adduction), elbow (flexion/extension), and wrist (flexion/extension) was measured. MV and IJM measurements were compared to previous reports for young adults (28.6±4.5 years). On average older adults had 16.5% less total upper limb MV compared to young adults. Additionally, older adult wrist extensors composed a significantly increased percentage of upper limb MV. Older adult IJM was reduced across all joints, with significant differences for shoulder abductors (pIJM was accounted for by MV changes (p≤0.027), compared to 81.0% in young adults. We conclude that for older adults, MV and IJM are, on average, reduced but the significant linear relationship between MV and IJM is maintained. These results suggest that older adult MV and IJM cannot be simply scaled from young adults.

  13. Adults' Participation in Informal Learning Activities: Key Findings from the Adult Education Participation Survey in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Horng-Ji; Wu, Ming-Lieh; Li, Ai-Tzu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the informal learning experiences expressed by Taiwanese adults (aged from 16 to 97) and examined their involvement related to selected socio-demographic characteristics. Data of the 2008 Adult Education Participation Survey in Taiwan and Fujian Area were used to look at different variables of adults' demographic…

  14. Differential Outcomes of Adult Education on Adult Learners' Increase in Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Greef, Maurice; Verté, Dominique; Segers, Mien

    2015-01-01

    To date a significant share of the European population can be considered at risk of social exclusion. It has been argued that adult education programmes are a powerful tool to support vulnerable adults increasing their social inclusion. This study aims to answer the question if and which subgroups of vulnerable adults experience an increase in…

  15. The Relationships among Anomia, Attitude toward Adult Education, and Nonparticipation in Formal Adult Education Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, Mark W.

    A study was conducted to explore the relationship between anomia (a feeling of alienation, of being cut off from society), attitude toward adult education, and nonparticipation in formal adult education activities. The subjects of the study were adults who lived in a specific area in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which had the following characteristics:…

  16. Radiological changes of adult sprue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neutard, E.; Kluge, F.

    1981-08-01

    Radiological findings of 10 adult patients with sprue were compared with histology. Patients suffering from subtotal villous atrophy were showing distinct radiological changes. The most important finding of sprue is the dilatation of the small intestine. Further typical changes are segmentations and fragmentations as well as mucous hypertrophy and the sign of moulage. In a 57-year-old female patient who was suffering from sprue for 35 years, a carcinoma of the small bowl was found and was resected during laparatomy. Sprue is a premalignant disease; therefore radiological investigations are of special importance. Therapy by a diet without gluten can reduce the radiological changes to normal very bad changes rarely can be reduced totally. Radiological changes are not significant, but the diagnosis can be made in most cases by investigation with barium.

  17. Management of adult diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosival V

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Viktor Rosival SYNLAB, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Dérer's Hospital, Bratislava, Slovakia In the article “Management of adult diabetic ketoacidosis” by Gosmanov et al1 there are some discrepancies with the literature. The authors write, “Insulin deficiency […] which underlie the pathophysiology of DKA [diabetic ketoacidosis]”, and on page 258, they write, “Insulin administration is essential in DKA treatment [...]”.1 Since the Nobel prize was awarded in 1977 to Rosalyn S Yalow for the development of new methods of biochemical analysis that make it possible to measure insulin concentration in human plasma, these methods have been used worldwide. In 1981, the monograph Diabetic Coma: Ketoacidotic and Hyperosmolar was published,2 and on page 67, Figure 6.3 has the names of 12 authors who have reported sufficient amounts of plasmatic insulin in patients with DKA.Read the original article

  18. Parental antecedents of adult codependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, M; Warren, L W

    1996-03-01

    Two aspects of codependency were investigated among 442 undergraduates. First, parental antecedents were examined by subjects completing measures of codependency, perceived parental dysfunctions (compulsivity, chemical dependency, and codependency), and parental styles (coercion, control, and non-nurturance). As expected, correlations between adult codependency and parental coercion, control, non-nurturance, and maternal compulsivity were significant. However, correlations between codependency and parental chemical dependency were not significant. A multiple regression analysis identified parental codependency and maternal coercion as significant predictors of subject codependency. To examine the second aspect of codependency, which assumes that codependency was identified over 40 years ago by Karen Horney, subjects completed a loss of self measure which correlated highly with codependency.

  19. Flashbulb memories in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, G; Conway, M A; Maylor, E A

    1994-09-01

    In this study of age differences in flashbulb memory, groups of young and older adults gave detailed accounts of how they heard the news of the resignation of the British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. They were tested within 14 days after the event and again 11 months later. They also gave ratings for the encoding variables (surprise, emotion, importance, knowledge, and interest) and for frequency of rehearsal. Memories that met a strict criterion of consistency between the original and delayed responses were classified as flashbulb memories. Although 90% of young Ss had flashbulb memories, only 42% of the elderly met the criterion. The age groups also differed in the type of details remembered and in the relationship between the encoding and rehearsal variables and the occurrence of flashbulb memory. The age-related deficit in flashbulb memory is related to source amnesia and to a deficit in memory for context.

  20. [Acne tarda. Acne in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, T; Janßen, O E; Plewig, G

    2013-04-01

    Acne is one of the most common skin diseases in the general population, especially among adolescents. Acne tarda (adult acne) is defined as acne that develops (late-onset acne) or continues (persistent acne) after 25 years of age. The disease is more common in women. The clinical features are quite specific: inflammatory acne in the lower facial region or macrocomedones (microcysts) spread over the face. Involvement of the trunk is much more common in men. The etiology of acne tarda is still controversial, as cosmetics, drugs, smoking, stress, diet, and endocrine abnormalities have been implicated. Women with acne tarda and other symptoms of hyperandrogenism have a high probability of endocrine abnormalities such as polycystic ovary syndrome. Treatment is similar to that of acne in adolescence. Long-term treatment over years or decades may be required.

  1. Infant Cries Rattle Adult Cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Dudek

    Full Text Available The attention-grabbing quality of the infant cry is well recognized, but how the emotional valence of infant vocal signals affects adult cognition and cortical activity has heretofore been unknown. We examined the effects of two contrasting infant vocalizations (cries vs. laughs on adult performance on a Stroop task using a cross-modal distraction paradigm in which infant distractors were vocal and targets were visual. Infant vocalizations were presented before (Experiment 1 or during each Stroop trial (Experiment 2. To evaluate the influence of infant vocalizations on cognitive control, neural responses to the Stroop task were obtained by measuring electroencephalography (EEG and event-related potentials (ERPs in Experiment 1. Based on the previously demonstrated existence of negative arousal bias, we hypothesized that cry vocalizations would be more distracting and invoke greater conflict processing than laugh vocalizations. Similarly, we expected participants to have greater difficulty shifting attention from the vocal distractors to the target task after hearing cries vs. after hearing laughs. Behavioral results from both experiments showed a cry interference effect, in which task performance was slower with cry than with laugh distractors. Electrophysiology data further revealed that cries more than laughs reduced attention to the task (smaller P200 and increased conflict processing (larger N450, albeit differently for incongruent and congruent trials. Results from a correlation analysis showed that the amplitudes of P200 and N450 were inversely related, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between attention and conflict processing. The findings suggest that cognitive control processes contribute to an attention bias to infant signals, which is modulated in part by the valence of the infant vocalization and the demands of the cognitive task. The findings thus support the notion that infant cries elicit a negative arousal bias that is

  2. Placing Advocacy at the Heart of Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Adult educators know that adults and families change their lives through adult education. Adult education also positively impacts a host of social and economic issues. Yet this fact is largely unknown or misunderstood by the general public. Resources have become increasingly scarce, while at the same time adult educators are asked to do more with…

  3. Some Adult Educational Elements in Ancient Eastern Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Norman

    The existence of adult educational elements in acient India, China, Judea, and Arabia is demonstrated in this paper. Hindu and Buddhist adult education is discussed first, followed by Chinese adult education, Jewish adult education, and Islamic adult education. Conclusions of the study on which this paper reports are: (1) the existence of the…

  4. Adult immunization in India: Importance and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is recommended throughout life to prevent infectious diseases and their sequelae. Vaccines are crucial to prevent mortality in that >25% of deaths are due to infections. Vaccines are recommended for adults on the basis of a range of factors. Substantial improvement and increases in adult vaccination are needed to reduce the health consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Incomplete and inadequate immunization in India against these communicable diseases results in substantial and unnecessary costs both in terms of hospitalization and treatment. The government of India as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) consider childhood vaccination as the first priority, but there is not yet focus on adult immunization. Adult immunization in India is the most ignored part of heath care services. The Expert Group recommended that data on infectious diseases in India should be updated, refined, and reviewed periodically and published regularly. This group suggested that the consensus guidelines about adult immunization should be reviewed every 3 years to incorporate new strategies from any emerging research from India. There is an immediate need to address the problem of adult immunization in India. Although many issues revolving around efficacy, safety, and cost of introducing vaccines for adults at the national level are yet to be resolved, there is an urgent need to sensitize the health planners as well as health care providers regarding this pertinent issue.

  5. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

  6. Decision Making in Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montyla, Timo; Still, Johanna; Gullberg, Stina; Del Missier, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined decision-making competence in ADHD by using multiple decision tasks with varying demands on analytic versus affective processes. Methods: Adults with ADHD and healthy controls completed two tasks of analytic decision making, as measured by the Adult Decision-Making Competence (A-DMC) battery, and two affective…

  7. Predictors of Transience among Homeless Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2014-01-01

    This study identified predictors of transience among homeless emerging adults in three cities. A total of 601 homeless emerging adults from Los Angeles, Austin, and Denver were recruited using purposive sampling. Ordinary least squares regression results revealed that significant predictors of greater transience include White ethnicity, high…

  8. Interpretations of Child Behavior by Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Constance R.; Docherty, Edward M., Jr.

    This study examined sex-role typing in older adults' interpretations of young children's behavior. Participants were 48 older adults averaging 64.7 years of age. Videotapes were made of the play behavior of each of two toddlers, a female and a male matched in body type, hair length, dress (plain tee shirt and shorts), and in the activities in…

  9. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

  10. Multicultural Literature for Children and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    In the selection of multicultural literature for children and young adults, educators and researchers focus on two main controversial issues--authority and authenticity--that the authors portray in their writing. What type of author can accurately portray realistic pictures of minority cultures in multicultural literature for young adults? Must it…

  11. Adult Education in Radiologic Technology: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Steven B.

    In almost all its aspects, radiologic technology education is adult education. Boyle's (1981) adult learning model has four components: (1) the learner in terms of motivation; (2) learning as a change process; (3) the experiential role of education; and (4) the facilitative role of the educator. Andragogy, as defined by Knowles (1977, 1980), is a…

  12. Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile…

  13. Regional Development, Inequality and Adult Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Hans Jørgen; Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    the growing social and educational divide between the peripheral areas in the region and the largest city center as a major challenge for the society as a whole and for adult education in particular. In this perspective, we describe the present structures of adult education in the region and the strategies...

  14. Adult and Christian Self-Improvement Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Many adults search for spiritual guidance and direction and persist in seeking answers to life in today's fast-paced world. With burgeoning economic challenges, political corruption, war in Iraq, poverty, health care concerns, environmental concerns, rising fuel costs, violence, racism, and oppression, many adults seek solace and greater…

  15. Enterobiasis: a neglected infection in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Megumi; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Pubampen, Somchit; Kusolsuk, Teera

    2008-03-01

    In this study, adult patients were treated with praziquantel to expel intestinal flukes. Unexpectedly, dozens of adult Enterobius vermicularis worms with disfigured morphology, which had not been detected on fecal examination using Kat's modified thick-smear technique, were expelled from 6 of 33 patients.

  16. Psychological Resources of Adults with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockiewicz, Marta; Bogdanowicz, Katarzyna M.; Bogdanowicz, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe specific psychological resources of adults with developmental dyslexia and compare them with psychological resources of adults without developmental dyslexia. Potential differences were analyzed in visual-spatial, creative, and motivational abilities. No evidence was found for either creative, or visuospatial…

  17. Reading Difficulties in Spanish Adults with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Coalla, Paz; Cuetos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show that dyslexia persists into adulthood, even in highly educated and well-read people. The main characteristic that adults with dyslexia present is a low speed when reading. In Spanish, a shallow orthographic system, no studies about adults with dyslexia are available; and it is possible that the consistency of the orthographic…

  18. Best Books for Young Adults. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Betty

    This book presents an annotated listing of the Young Adult Library Services Association's "Best Books for Young Adults" (BBYA) from 1966-99. Selected books are listed in topical bibliographies under the following subjects: Too Good To Miss; Adventure; Animals; Family; Fantasy; Friendship; Historical Fiction; The Holocaust; Humor;…

  19. Transfer in adult and further training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    The Danish sociologist Bjarne Wahlgren has identified 12 factors that provide effective ' transfer '- transfer from education to work. Read Bjarne Wahlgrens publication "Transfer ... Wahlgren "Transfer in adult further training".......The Danish sociologist Bjarne Wahlgren has identified 12 factors that provide effective ' transfer '- transfer from education to work. Read Bjarne Wahlgrens publication "Transfer ... Wahlgren "Transfer in adult further training"....

  20. Bender Gestalt Performance of Normal Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Patricia; Storandt, Martha

    1982-01-01

    Provides normative data on the Bender Gestalt Test (BGT) with a sample of 334 normal older adults. Showed that these older adults do not perform on the BGT in a manner that can be called brain damaged. Use of the cut-off score developed with younger persons appears appropriate. (Author)