WorldWideScience

Sample records for adtt

  1. ADTT safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thedeen, T.

    1997-01-01

    Beside the technical problems of ADTT which remain to be solved it is crucial for the ADTT progress that safety and economical aspects are considered already during the research and planning phases. Safety here stands for the converse of risk, negative consequences for human life and health and the environment together with the corresponding probabilities. The system to be considered includes all phases of an ADTT plant, a life cycle analysis (LCA). The risk analysis is useful for two purposes: comparison with other ways of handling nuclear waste, e.g. geological repository and for valuation of different construction designs. Due to lack of precise plans and adequate data the analysis will be more of a qualitative than quantitative type. The main risks appear in connection with repair and replacement work. 2 refs., 1 fig

  2. Specialized beam diagnostic measurements for an ADTT accelerator funnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1995-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm{sup 2}. The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is to provide sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the projected centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Because of the high specific energy loss in materials at beam energies less than 20 MeV, interceptive measurements such as wire scanners or fluors cannot be used to determine beam profiles or centroids. Therefore, noninterceptive techniques must be used for on-line diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies. The beam funnel area of these proposed accelerator facilities provide a particular interesting beam measurement challenge. In this area of the accelerator, beam measurements must also sense how well the two funnel-input-beams are matched to each other in phase space. This paper will discuss some of the measurement requirements for these proposed accelerator facilities and the various noninterceptive techniques to measure dual-beam funnel operation.

  3. Impact of ADTT concepts on the management of global plutonium inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.W.; Krakowski, R.A.; Arthur, E.D.

    1996-01-01

    The impact of a number of current and future nuclear systems on global plutonium inventories is assessed under realistic forecasts of nuclear power growth. Advanced systems, such as those employing Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT) and liquid metal reactors, show significant promise for meeting future plutonium management needs. These analyses also indicate requirements for a higher level of detail in the nuclear fuel cycle model and for development of a metric to more quantitatively assess the proliferation risk of plutonium arising from the civilian fuel cycle

  4. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziomek, C.D.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Bowling, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feed forward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrix x software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system

  5. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A. [Grumman Research and Development Center, Princeton, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G.H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.

  6. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.; Reusch, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities

  7. Accelerator system model (ASM): A unique tool in exploring accelerator driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) system trade space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, T.J.; Favale, A.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Burger, E.C.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A.; Piaszczyk, C.M.; Piechowiak, E.M.; Rathke, J.W. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States). Advanced Technology and Development Center

    1997-09-01

    To aid in the development and optimization of emerging Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) concepts, the Northrop Grumman Corporation, working together with G.H. Gillespie Associates and Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a computational tool which combines both accelerator physics layout/analysis capabilities with engineering analysis capabilities to create a standardized platform to compare and contrast accelerator system configurations. In this context, the accelerator system configuration includes not only the accelerating structures, but also the major support systems such as the vacuum, thermal control, RF power, and cryogenic subsystem (if superconducting accelerator operation is investigated) as well as estimates of the costs for enclosures (accelerating tunnel and RF halls). This paper presents an overview of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code flow, as well as a discussion of the data and analysis upon which it is based. Also presented is material which addresses the development of the evaluation criteria employed by this code including a presentation of the economic analysis methods, and a discussion of the cost database employed. The paper concludes with examples depicting completed and planned trade studies for both normal and superconducting accelerator applications. 8 figs.

  8. Future directions for ADTT concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miliekowski, C. [Scandatronix Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This presentation is the collection of viewgraphs used by the author to summarize the future for accelerator based systems for transmutation technologies. The author also emphasizes points which need short term effort to provide critical information necessary for modeling, and planning for future work. The author points out how the value of this technology varies depending upon the political and economic factors which are driving the necessity of dealing with radioactive materials. The issues of feasibility, safety, proliferation, cost, and public perception are also addressed.

  9. ECN contributions to ADTT `96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koning, A.J.

    1996-07-01

    An outline is presented of the status of nuclear data evaluation for accelerator-driven systems. The international effort consists mainly of measuring, compiling and calculating nuclear data for elements and isotopes relevant for transmutation of radioactive waste (ATW), energy amplification and other accelerator-related nuclear applications. We argue that input for global, macroscopic calculation schemes for hybrid nuclear systems basically should consist of three types of nuclear data: (a) High-energy transport codes for energies above about 150 MeV, (b) neutron and proton transport data files for energies below about 150 MeV and (c) neutron and proton transmutation/activation libraries below about 150 MeV. Our specific contribution to the field concerns (b) and (c). The progress of the evaluation of high-energy nuclear data files for the most important materials and the related compilation of nuclear reaction information is reported. The evaluated data are calculated with the computer codes ECIS95, MINGUS and GNASH and are stored in ENDF6-format. We illustrate the library production with a short outline of the employed physical methods. Finally, we briefly discuss the application of the activation/transmutation library ECNAF96. (orig.).

  10. Developments of linacs for ADTT in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.

    1997-01-01

    Interesting developments in linear accelerators have been attained over the past 45 years. The status of linear accelerators and future possibilities will be described in context of demanding applications and technology maturity. Features of industrial or factory-type applications are high availability, economic operations, low investment cost and ease of running the facility. All have been demonstrated in one manner or another at large operating facilities for the research community within a different context that has been argued in the past to be not as demanding as for a factory installation. In addition, comments will be made relative to intense beam power levels and choices that can be made for power levels below 10 MW on the assumption that a cw beam is required

  11. Molten Salt Fuel Cycle Requirements for ADTT Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.; Williams, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The operation of an ADT system with the associated nuclear reactions has a profound effect upon the chemistry of the fuel - especially with regards to container compatibility and the chemical separations that may be required. The container can be protected by maintaining the redox chemistry within a relatively narrow, non-corrosive window. Neutron economy as well as other factors require a sophisticated regime of fission product separations. Neither of these control requirements has been demonstrated on the scale or degree of sophistication necessary to support an ADT device. We review the present situation with respect to fluoride salts, and focus on the critical issues in these areas which must be addressed. One requirement for advancement in this area - a supply of suitable materials - will soon be fulfilled by the remediation of ORNLs Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, and the removal of a total of 11,000 kg of enriched (Li-7 > 99.9%) coolant, flush, and fuel salts

  12. Research and development of pyrochemical technologies for ADTT systems in NRI Rez plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, J.

    1999-01-01

    The activities within the Czech national Partitioning and Transmutation program are oriented mainly toward the following areas: (i) ADS flowsheeting working out a proposal for a suitable technological flowsheet for treating spent fuel into a form fitted for transmutation reactor, including separation procedures before transmutation (Front-end) and separation processes after passage of fuel through the transmutor (Back-end). (ii) Technological research into the uranium component separation from spent fuel by the Fluoride Volatility Method semi-pilot-plant technological research based on the application of experience from spent fuel fluoride reprocessing. (iii) Laboratory research into electro-separation methods for the separation of fission products, plutonium and minor actinides from the fluoride melt. Selection of a suitable matrix composition of fluoride melts based on studies of their physicochemical properties and design of laboratory electro-separation facility. (iv) Development of materials and equipment for molten fluoride salts based ADS technologies, i.e. construction materials development, research into the corrosion resistance and development of equipment for molten fluoride salts technologies. The NRI Rez plc cooperates in this area with the SKODA Nuclear Machinery company

  13. Safety aspects of targets for ADTT: Activity, volatile products, residual heat release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, E.V.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Lunev, V.P.; Shubin, Yu.N.

    1999-01-01

    Safety aspects of heavy metal liquid targets for the accelerator driven systems connected with the activity accumulation and residual energy release due to the irradiation with high energy proton beam are discussed. The results obtained for the lead-bismuth target that are under construction in IPPE now in the frame of ISTC Project No. 559 are briefly presented. The calculations and the analysis of the accumulation of the spallation reaction products, activity and energy release at various moments after the accelerator shutdown are presented. The concentrations of the reaction products, the total and partial activities, the activities of volatile products are determined. The contributions of the short-lived nuclides important for the prediction of the facility behaviour in regimes with the accelerator beam trips. The calculations and analysis of the residual energy release due to different decay type have been performed. The conclusions are as follows. The obtained results showed that long lived radioactivity accumulates mainly due to primary nuclear reactions. Secondary reactions are responsible for the production of small number of long-lived isotopes Bi-207, Po-210 and some others, being generated by radiative capture of low energy neutrons. It is possible to make a conclusion that neutrons in the energy range 20 - 800 MeV and protons with energy above 100 MeV give main contribution to the total activity generation although these parts of spectra inside the target give comparatively small contribution to the total flux. The correct consideration of short-lived nuclides contribution is the main problem in the analysis of the target behaviour in the case of short accelerator shutdowns. They make the determining contribution to the both activity and the heat release at the first moments after the accelerator shutdown, creating the intermediate links and additional channels for the long-lived nuclides accumulation chains. The strong dependence of calculated concentrations of short-lived nuclides on the choice of the cross section data library for the determining of the reaction rates was noted . The calculations and analysis of residual heat release have been performed for two regimes also. The contributions of different radiation modes were determined. The residual heat release at the accelerator shutdown is due to beta-decays of short-lived nuclides mainly. In the case of β + -decay the total heat release is due to gamma-radiation (directly or as a result of positron-electron annihilation), so this radiation gives more than 90 % of heat release at the first days of cooling

  14. Important requirements for RF generators for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-01-01

    All Accelerator-Driven Transmutation applications require very large amounts of RF Power. For example, one version of a Plutonium burning system requires an 800-MeV, 80-mA, proton accelerator running at 100% duty factor. This accelerator requires approximately 110-MW of continuous RF power if one assumes only 10% reserve power for control of the accelerator fields. In fact, to minimize beam spill, the RF controls may need as much as 15 to 20% of reserve power. In addition, unlike an electron accelerator in which the beam is relativistic, a failed RF station can disturb the synchronism of the beam, possibly shutting down the entire accelerator. These issues and more lead to a set of requirements for the RF generators which are stringent, and in some cases, conflicting. In this paper, we will describe the issues and requirements, and outline a plan for RF generator development to meet the needs of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies. The key issues which will be discussed include: operating efficiency, operating linearity, effect on the input power grid, bandwidth, gain, reliability, operating voltage, and operating current

  15. Closed ThUOX Fuel Cycle for LWRs with ADTT (ATW) Backend for the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, D.E.; Sailor, W.C.; Venneri, F.

    1998-01-01

    A future nuclear energy scenario with a closed, thorium-uranium-oxide (ThUOX) fuel cycle and new light water reactors (TULWRs) supported by Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) systems could provide several improvements beyond today's once-through, UO 2 -fueled nuclear technology. A deployment scenario with TULWRs plus ATWs to burn the actinides produced by these LWRs and to close the back-end of the ThUOX fuel cycle was modeled to satisfy a US demand that increases linearly from 80 GWe in 2020 to 200 GWe by 2100. During the first 20 years of the scenario (2000-2020), nuclear energy production in the US declines from today's 100 GWe to about 80 GWe, in accordance with forecasts of the US DOE's Energy Information Administration. No new nuclear systems are added during this declining nuclear energy period, and all existing LWRs are shut down by 2045. Beginning in 2020, ATWs that transmute the actinides from existing LWRs are deployed, along with TULWRs and additional ATWs with a support ratio of 1 ATW to 7 TULWRs to meet the energy demand scenario. A final mix of 174 GWe from TULWRs and 26 GWe from ATWs provides the 200 GWe demand in 2100. Compared to a once-through LWR scenario that meets the same energy demand, the TULWR/ATW concept could result in the following improvements: depletion of natural uranium resources would be reduced by 50%; inventories of Pu which may result in weapons proliferation will be reduced in quantity by more than 98% and in quality because of higher neutron emissions and 50 times the alpha-decay heating of weapons-grade plutonium; actinides (and possibly fission products) for final disposal in nuclear waste would be substantially reduced; and the cost of fuel and the fuel cycle may be 20-30% less than the once-through UO 2 fuel cycle

  16. AIP conference on accelerator driven transmutation technologies and applications, Las Vegas, Nevada, July 25-29, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriber, S.O.; Arthur, E.; Rodriguez, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This conference was the first to bring together US and foreign researchers to define Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) concepts in several important national and international application areas - nuclear waste transmutation, minimizing of world plutonium inventories, and long-term energy production. The conference covered a number of diverse technological areas - accelerators, target/blankets, separations, materials - that make up ADTT systems. The meeting provided one of the first opportunities for specialists in these technologies to meet together and learn about system requirements, components, and interface issues. It was also an opportunity to formulate plans for future developments in ADTT. During the conference over one hundred technical presentations were made describing ADTT system and technology concepts as well as the impact of ADTT on issues related to global plutonium management and the high-level nuclear waste problem areas. Separate abstracts have been entered into the database for articles from this report.

  17. AIP conference on accelerator driven transmutation technologies and applications, Las Vegas, Nevada, July 25-29, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.; Arthur, E.; Rodriguez, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This conference was the first to bring together US and foreign researchers to define Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) concepts in several important national and international application areas - nuclear waste transmutation, minimizing of world plutonium inventories, and long-term energy production. The conference covered a number of diverse technological areas - accelerators, target/blankets, separations, materials - that make up ADTT systems. The meeting provided one of the first opportunities for specialists in these technologies to meet together and learn about system requirements, components, and interface issues. It was also an opportunity to formulate plans for future developments in ADTT. During the conference over one hundred technical presentations were made describing ADTT system and technology concepts as well as the impact of ADTT on issues related to global plutonium management and the high-level nuclear waste problem areas. Separate abstracts have been entered into the database for articles from this report

  18. Summary of the separations breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Separations Breakout Group reviewed the wide spectrum of separations technologies available for application to ADTT systems. Separations processes play a key role in areas associated with preparation of feed materials for introduction into ADTT, removal of fission products and other transmutation byproducts that build into the fuel during operation, and in the preparation of wastes ({open_quotes}polishing{close_quotes}) for discharge from ADTT systems so as to meet appropriate waste disposal criteria. General separations technologies addressed by the group included aqueous, fluoride salt, and chloride salt approaches.

  19. Prompt nuclear analytical techniques for material research in accelerator driven transmutation technologies: Prospects and quantitative analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Cervena, J.; Perina, V.; Mach, R.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerator driven transmutation technology (ADTT) is a promising way toward liquidation of spent nuclear fuel, nuclear wastes and weapon grade Pu. The ADTT facility comprises a high current (proton) accelerator supplying a sub-critical reactor assembly with spallation neutrons. The reactor part is supposed to be cooled by molten fluorides or metals which serve, at the same time, as a carrier of nuclear fuel. Assumed high working temperature (400-600 C) and high radiation load in the subcritical reactor and spallation neutron source put forward the problem of optimal choice of ADTT construction materials, especially from the point of their radiation and corrosion resistance when in contact with liquid working media. The use of prompt nuclear analytical techniques in ADTT related material research is considered and examples of preliminary analytical results obtained using neutron depth profiling method are shown for illustration. (orig.)

  20. A long view of global plutonium management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.L. Jr. [Kaman Sciences Corporation, Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Dealing with the large and growing world inventories of fissile materials from all sources is a major part of the long term challenge of limiting the danger from nuclear weapons. Providing clean, safe nuclear power may also be needed to prevent conditions from arising which could lead to large scale nuclear weapon (re)armament. ADTT technologies might reconcile the seeming dilemma of providing nuclear power while maintaining a very low world inventory of nuclear materials which can be used in weapons. This vision for ADTT should be tested in a variety of ways, including comparisons with competing approaches and with other objectives. Such testing is one part of constructing a path for a decades-long, worldwide implementation campaign for ADTT.

  1. ADTTA '99 - 3rd international conference on accelerator driven transmutation techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The conference dealt with the following topics: (A) Strategy for the back-end of the fuel cycle; (B) National and laboratory research and development programmes and existing collaborations. (C) Activities on collection and improvements of basic nuclear data. (D) Technical aspects of the accelerator part. (E) ADTT targets. (F) Technical aspects of the subcritical reactor part. (G) Reprocessing of fuel based on traditional and advanced technology. (H) Structural materials, developments and testing. (I) Safety aspects of ADTT. (J) Non-proliferation and political aspects. (K) Economic aspects of the closed fuel cycle. (L) Public relations. From among the contributions presented, 128 have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  2. The Los Alamos accelerator driven transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) concept development of the ATW target/blanket system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, F.; Williamson, M.A.; Ning, L.

    1997-01-01

    The studies carried out in the frame of the Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) program developed at Los Alamos in order to solve the nuclear waste problem and to build a new generation of safer and non-proliferant nuclear power plants, are presented

  3. Experimental investigations of the accelerator-driven transmutation technologies at the subcritical facility ''Yalina''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigrinov, S.E.; Kiyavitskaya, H.I.; Serafimovich, I.G.; Rakhno, I.L.; Rutkovskaia, Ch.K.; Fokov, Y.; Khilmanovich, A.M.; Marstinkevich, B.A.; Bournos, V.V.; Korneev, S.V.; Mazanik, S.E.; Kulikovskaya, A.V.; Korbut, T.P.; Voropaj, N.K.; Zhouk, I.V.; Kievec, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    The investigations on accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) focus on the reduction of the amount of long-lived wastes and the physics of a subcritical system driven with an external neutron source. This paper presents the experimental facility 'Yalina' which was designed and created at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus in the framework of the ISTC project no. B-070 to study the peculiarities of ADTT in thermal spectrum. A detailed description of the assembly, neutron generator and a preliminary analysis of some calculated and experimental data (multiplication factor, neutron flux density distribution in the assembly, transmutation rates of some long-lived fission products and minor actinides) are presented. (authors)

  4. Review of ORNL's MSR technology and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Gat, U.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Williams, D.F.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of molten salt reactor development is discussed with reference to the experience from the Oak Ridge Molten Salt Reactor Experiment. Assessment of the future for this reactor system is reviewed with consideration of both advantages and disadvantages. Application of this concept to ADTT (accelerator driven transmutation technology) needs appears to be feasible by drawing on the MSRE experience. Key chemical considerations remain as: solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity and their importance to ADTT planning is briefly explained. Priorities in the future development of molten salts for these applications are listed, with the foremost being the acceptance of the 2LiF-BeF 2 solvent system. 8 refs, 2 figs

  5. Summary of experiments and data breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Experiments and Data Breakout Group addressed status of experiments directed towards, or relevant to, ADTT system development. Such experiments are the bridge between ideas and reality. They simultaneously cross cut all major technology and components of ADTT systems - accelerators, target/blanket, separations, and materials. At this Conference the large majority of papers dealing with experiments were on nuclear data and cross sections. No separate papers were presented on materials experiments although data were included in papers presented at the several sessions on materials. Beginning engineering experiments were also discussed which could address issues such as neutronics performance and code benchmarking, handling of special products through processes such as sparging of volatiles, determination of thermal hydraulics performance, and beginning safety performance. One recommendation from this group was the formation of a group to collate and prioritize data needs and to provide input to existing data centers.

  6. The physics design of accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, F.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear systems under study in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology program (ADTT) will allow the destruction of nuclear spent fuel and weapons-return plutonium, as well as the production of nuclear energy from the thorium cycle, without a long-lived radioactive waste stream. The subcritical systems proposed represent a radical departure from traditional nuclear concepts (reactors), yet the actual implementation of ADTT systems is based on modest extrapolations of existing technology. These systems strive to keep the best that the nuclear technology has developed over the years, within a sensible conservative design envelope and eventually manage to offer a safer, less expensive and more environmentally sound approach to nuclear power

  7. The physics design of accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear systems under study in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology program (ADTT) will allow the destruction of nuclear spent fuel and weapons-return plutonium, as well as the production of nuclear energy from the thorium cycle, without a long-lived radioactive waste stream. The subcritical systems proposed represent a radical departure from traditional nuclear concepts (reactors), yet the actual implementation of ADTT systems is based on modest extrapolations of existing technology. These systems strive to keep the best that the nuclear technology has developed over the years, within a sensible conservative design envelope and eventually manage to offer a safe, less expensive and more environmentally sound approach to nuclear power.

  8. Basis and objectives of the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) Project carries three approaches for dealing with waste from the defense and commercial nuclear energy enterprise. First, the problem of excess weapons plutonium in the US and Russia originating both from stockpile reductions and from defense production site clean-up is one of significant current and long-term concern. The ADTT technology offers the possibility of almost complete destruction of this plutonium by fission. The technology might be particularly effective for destruction of the low quality plutonium from defense site clean-up since the system does not require the fabrication of the waste into fuel assemblies, does not require reprocessing and refabrication, and can tolerate a high level of impurities in the feed stream. Second, the ADTT system also can destroy the plutonium, other higher actinide, and long-lived fission product from commercial nuclear waste which now can only be dealt with by geologic storage. And finally, and probably most importantly the system can be used for the production of virtually unlimited electric power from thorium with concurrent destruction of its long-lived waste components so that geologic containment for them is not required. In addition plutonium is not a significant byproduct of the power generation so that non-proliferation concerns about nuclear power are almost completely eliminated. All of the ADTT systems operate with an accelerator supplementing the neutrons which in reactors are provided only by the fission process, and therefore the system can be designed to eliminate the possibility for a runaway chain reaction. The means for integration of the accelerator into nuclear power technology in order to make these benefits possible is described including estimates of accelerator operating parameters required for the three objectives

  9. Basis and objectives of the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation technology project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1995-09-01

    The Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) Project carries three approaches for dealing with waste from the defense and commercial nuclear energy enterprise. First, the problem of excess weapons plutonium in the U.S. and Russia originating both from stockpile reductions and from defense production site clean-up is one of significant current and long-term concern. The ADTT technology offers the possibility of almost complete destruction of this plutonium by fission. The technology might be particularly effective for destruction of the low quality plutonium from defense site clean-up since the system does not require the fabrication of the waste into fuel assemblies, does not require reprocessing and refabrication, and can tolerate a high level of impurities in the feed stream. Second, the ADTT system also can destroy the plutonium, other higher actinide, and long-lived fission product from commercial nuclear waste which now can only be dealt with by geologic storage. And finally, and probably most importantly the system can be used for the production of virtually unlimited electric power from thorium with concurrent destruction of its long-lived waste components so that geologic containment for them is not required. In addition plutonium is not a significant byproduct of the power generation so that non-proliferation concerns about nuclear power are almost completely eliminated. All of the ADTT systems operate with an accelerator supplementing the neutrons which in reactors are provided only by the fission process, and therefore the system can be designed to eliminate the possibility for a runaway chain reaction. The means for integration of the accelerator into nuclear power technology in order to make these benefits possible is described including estimates of accelerator operating parameters required for the three objectives.

  10. The Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW) concept development of the ATW target/blanket system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, F.; Williamson, M.A.; Ning, L.

    1997-01-01

    In the past several years, the Los Alamos ADTT program has conducted studies of an innovative technology for solving the nuclear waste problem and building a new generation of safer and non-proliferant nuclear power plants. The ATW concept destroys higher actinides, plutonium and selected fission products in a liquid-fuel subcritical assembly. In this paper special attention is given to the basic design of the ATW Molten Salt concept and the safety perspective. 40 refs., 11 figs

  11. Summary of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanger, T.P.

    1995-10-01

    During the past 15 years many advances have been made in the technology of high-power accelerators, and in the understanding of the beam-physics issues associated with their high-performance requirements. These developments have contributed significantly to the high level of confidence in the practicality of the applications that were the central point of the international Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT) Conference. Even so, there are many accelerator topics that needed to be addressed, and the Conference provided the opportunity to address these issues.

  12. Liquid fuel concept benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, M.

    1996-01-01

    There are principle drawbacks of any kind of solid nuclear fuel listed and analyzed in the first part of the paper. One of the primary results of the analyses performed shows that the solid fuel concept, which was to certain degree advantageous in the first periods of a nuclear reactor development and operation, has guided this branch of a utilization of atomic nucleus energy to a death end. On the background of this, the liquid fuel concept and its benefits are introduced and briefly described in the first part of the paper, too. As one of the first realistic attempts to utilize the advantages of liquid fuels, the reactor/blanket system with molten fluoride salts in the role of fuel and coolant simultaneously, as incorporated in the accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) being proposed and currently having been under development in the Los Alamos National Laboratory, will be studied both theoretically and experimentally. There is a preliminary design concept of an experimental assembly LA-O briefly introduced in the paper which is under preparation in the Czech Republic for such a project. Finally, there will be another very promising concept of a small low power ADTT system introduced which is characterized by a high level of safety and economical efficiency. In the conclusion, the overall survey of principal benefits which may be expected by introducing liquid nuclear fuel in nuclear power and research reactor systems is given and critically analyzed. 7 refs, 4 figs

  13. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF 2 molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized

  14. A new approach to modeling linear accelerator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Jameson, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A novel computer code is being developed to generate system level designs of radiofrequency ion accelerators with specific applications to machines of interest to Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT). The goal of the Accelerator System Model (ASM) code is to create a modeling and analysis tool that is easy to use, automates many of the initial design calculations, supports trade studies used in accessing alternate designs and yet is flexible enough to incorporate new technology concepts as they emerge. Hardware engineering parameters and beam dynamics are to be modeled at comparable levels of fidelity. Existing scaling models of accelerator subsystems were used to produce a prototype of ASM (version 1.0) working within the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Code (SPARC) graphical user interface. A small user group has been testing and evaluating the prototype for about a year. Several enhancements and improvements are now being developed. The current version of ASM is described and examples of the modeling and analysis capabilities are illustrated. The results of an example study, for an accelerator concept typical of ADTT applications, is presented and sample displays from the computer interface are shown

  15. Experimental facilities for research of properties and behaviour of fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Jilek, M.; Kroc, V.; Pedal, L.; Valenta, V.; Vodicka, J.

    1999-01-01

    SKODA JS s.r.o. (Czech leading nuclear technology manufacturer) prepared and manufactured experimental loops for research and verification of properties and behaviour of fluoride salts for primary and secondary circuit, construction materials and ADTT systems technological components for the operation in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc fluorine chemistry laboratory. This paper presents charts and experimental program for molten fluoride salts experimental loops with natural circulation. Further on, the paper describes extension of the loops for research with forced circulation and next works for steam generator model verification and connection with the loop of Energovyzkum Brno. The loops are designed and constructed to obtain a sufficient amount of experience on ADTT technology. The research and utilisation program covers questions of corrosion and intergranular corrosion of structural materials, research of material properties and welding, research of fluoride fluid properties, measuring of thermo-hydraulic properties of molten salt fluoride fluids, heat transfer and hydraulics, development and tests of some plant components (steam generators, heat exchangers, pumps, valves) and other engineering issues. Two electrolyzers have been manufactured for the research of fuel/coolant fluoride salts mixture purification. One for the production of hydrogen fluoride, and the other for the research of salts purification. (author)

  16. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF 2 molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized

  17. Why have we stopped research on liquid centrifugal separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.

    1996-01-01

    Using high-temperature high-speed liquid centrifuges for lanthanides and actinides separation was originally proposed as a physical separation method in the Los Alamos ADTT/ATW concept [C. Bowman, LA-UR-92-1065 (1992)]. The authors investigated centrifugal separation in a concerted effort of experiments, theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. They discovered that owing to the ionic-composition-dependence of the sedimentation coefficients for the fission products and actinides, separation by grouping of molecular densities would not work in general in the molten salt environment. Alternatively the lanthanides and actinides could be transferred to a liquid metal carrier (e.g. bismuth) via reductive extraction and then separated by liquid centrifuges, but the material and technical challenges are severe. Meanwhile the authors have established that the reductive extraction procedure itself can be used for desired separations. Unlike conventional aqueous-based reprocessing technologies, reductive extraction separation uses only reagent (Li) that reconstitutes carrier salts (LiF-BeF 2 ) and a processing medium (Bi) that can be continuously recycled and reused, with a nearly-pure fission products waste stream. The processing units are compact and reliable, and can be built at relatively low cost while maintaining high throughput. Therefore the research effort on developing liquid centrifuges for separations in ADTT/ATW was terminated in late 1995. This paper will discuss the various aspects involved in reaching this decision

  18. Separations technology development to support accelerator-driven transmutation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, F.; Arthur, E.; Bowman, C.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project investigated separations technology development needed for accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) concepts, particularly those associated with plutonium disposition (accelerator-based conversion, ABC) and high-level radioactive waste transmutation (accelerator transmutation of waste, ATW). Specific focus areas included separations needed for preparation of feeds to ABC and ATW systems, for example from spent reactor fuel sources, those required within an ABC/ATW system for material recycle and recovery of key long-lived radionuclides for further transmutation, and those required for reuse and cleanup of molten fluoride salts. The project also featured beginning experimental development in areas associated with a small molten-salt test loop and exploratory centrifugal separations systems

  19. The current status and possible future of the Los Alamos spallation radiation effects facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borden, M.J.; Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has been configured for both proton and spallation neutron irradiations since 1985. The facility makes use of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility 1 mA 800 MeV proton beam. Environment controlled proton and neutron irradiations have been demonstrated over the past nine years. The current copper beam stop configuration produces a maximum measured neutron flux of 4.6 x 10{sup 17} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} for energies greater than 1 KeV. The maximum proton flux at the center of Gaussian shaped beam is 1.2 x 10{sup 14} protons cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} with beam spot diameter of 3.5 cm at 2{sigma}. Previously published work has shown that the neutron flux can be increased by a factor of ten by changing the beam stop to tungsten and decreasing the diameter. Expertise exists at Los Alamos to further optimize this design to tailor neutron production and spectrum. Consideration and preliminary planning has also been done for increasing the LAMPF proton current from 1 mA to a few mA with a possible maximum of 10 mA. An upgrade of this type would produce current densities comparable to those proposed for the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT) programs.

  20. Measurement of solubility of plutonium trifluoride and rare-earth fluorides in molten LiF-BeF2-ZrF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, V.S.; Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.

    1996-12-01

    Data on behavior of plutonium fluoride and fission products (FP) dissolved in fuel composition are needed to calculate the duration of an operating cycle of the ADTT facility (Accelerator-Driver Transmutation Technologies) and to determine the effect of their equilibrium concentrations on nuclear-physical characteristics of reactor operation. The data on the FP fluoride solubility in the molten salts are of great important for some industrial processes (electrolytical metal deposition, development of physical-chemical mean for processes of chemical technology, etc.) As noted above, some information on this question is given in monography and articles. Data concerning fluoride salts are given in reports. However, it was impossible to make the substantial analysis of mutual solubility of fluoride melts. The primary investigation of CeF 3 and neodymium, samarium and lanthanum fluorides showed that the solubility of the melt LiF-BeF 2 and LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 was a linear function of reverse temperature and increases from lanthanum to samarium in the row of rare-earth elements. Disagreement in estimation of plutonium trifluoride solubility and incomplete data on the solubility of rare-earth elements prompted this study

  1. Accelerator-driven transmutation: a high-tech solution to some nuclear waste problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechanova, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses current technical and political issues regarding the innovative concept of using accelerator-driven transmutation processes for nuclear waste management. Two complex and related issues are addressed. First, the evolution and improvements of the design technologies are identified to indicate that there has been sufficient technological advancement with regard to a 1991 scientific peer review to warrant the advent of a large-scale national research and development program. Second, the economics and politics of the transmutation system are examined to identify non-technical barriers to the implementation of the program. Transmutation of waste has been historically viewed by nuclear engineers as one of those technologies that is too good to be true and probably too expensive to be feasible. The concept discussed in the present paper uses neutrons ( which result from protons accelerated into spallation targets)to transmute the major very long-lived hazardous materials such as the radioactive isotopes of technetium, iodine, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Although not a new concept, accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) lead by a team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has made some significant advances which are discussed in the present paper. (authors)

  2. Aerospace Engineering Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDalsem, William R.; Livingston, Mary E.; Melton, John E.; Torres, Francisco J.; Stremel, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement of aerospace product development processes is a driving requirement across much of the aerospace community. As up to 90% of the cost of an aerospace product is committed during the first 10% of the development cycle, there is a strong emphasis on capturing, creating, and communicating better information (both requirements and performance) early in the product development process. The community has responded by pursuing the development of computer-based systems designed to enhance the decision-making capabilities of product development individuals and teams. Recently, the historical foci on sharing the geometrical representation and on configuration management are being augmented: Physics-based analysis tools for filling the design space database; Distributed computational resources to reduce response time and cost; Web-based technologies to relieve machine-dependence; and Artificial intelligence technologies to accelerate processes and reduce process variability. Activities such as the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed (ADTT) project at NASA Ames Research Center study the strengths and weaknesses of the technologies supporting each of these trends, as well as the overall impact of the combination of these trends on a product development event. Lessons learned and recommendations for future activities will be reported.

  3. Aerospace Engineering Systems and the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDalsem, William R.; Livingston, Mary E.; Melton, John E.; Torres, Francisco J.; Stremel, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement of aerospace product development processes is a driving requirement across much of the aerospace community. As up to 90% of the cost of an aerospace product is committed during the first 10% of the development cycle, there is a strong emphasis on capturing, creating, and communicating better information (both requirements and performance) early in the product development process. The community has responded by pursuing the development of computer-based systems designed to enhance the decision-making capabilities of product development individuals and teams. Recently, the historical foci on sharing the geometrical representation and on configuration management are being augmented: 1) Physics-based analysis tools for filling the design space database; 2) Distributed computational resources to reduce response time and cost; 3) Web-based technologies to relieve machine-dependence; and 4) Artificial intelligence technologies to accelerate processes and reduce process variability. The Advanced Design Technologies Testbed (ADTT) activity at NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to study the strengths and weaknesses of the technologies supporting each of these trends, as well as the overall impact of the combination of these trends on a product development event. Lessons learned and recommendations for future activities are reported.

  4. A repository released-dose model for the evaluation of long-lived fission product transmutation effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology has been developed to quantify the total integrated dose due to a radionuclide species i emplaced in a geologic repository; the focus is on the seven long-lived fission products (LLFPs). The methodology assumes continuous exposure water contaminated with species i at the accessible environment (i.e., just beyond the geologic barrier afforded by the geologic repository). The dose integration is performed out to a reference post-release time. The integrated dose is a function of the total initial inventory of radionuclide i the repository, the time at which complete and instantaneous failure of the engineered barrier (e.g., waste canister) in, a geologic repository occurs, the fractional dissolution rate (from waste solid form) of radionuclide i in ground water, the ground water travel time to the accessible environment, the retardation factor (sorption on the geologic media) for radionuclide i, the time after radionuclide begins to enter the biosphere. In order to assess relative dose, the ratio of total integrated dose to that for a reference LLFP species j (e.g., 99 Tc) was defined. This ratio is a measure of the relative benefit of transmutation of other LLFPs compared to 99 Tc. This methodology was further developed in order to quantify the integrated dose reduction per neutron utilized for LLFP transmutation in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT). This measure of effectiveness is a function of the integrated dose due to LLFP species i, the number of total captures in LLFP species i chain per LLFP nuclide fed to the chain at equilibrium, and the number of total captures in related transmutation product (TP) chains per capture in the LLFP species i chain. To assess relative transmutation effectiveness, the ratio of integrated dose reduction per neutron utilization to that for a reference LLFP species j (e.g., 99 Tc) was defined. This relative measure of effectiveness was evaluated LLFP transmutation strategy

  5. Analytical and experimental analysis of YALINA-Booster and YALINA-Thermal assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Mazanik, S.; Khilmanovich, A.; Martsinkevich, B.; Routkovskaya, Ch.; Edchik, I.; Fokov, Y.; Sadovich, S.; Fedorenko, A.; Gohar, Y.; Talamo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) may play an important role in future nuclear fuel cycles to reduce the longterm radiotoxicity and volume of spent nuclear fuel. It is proposed that ADS will produce energy and incinerate radioactive waste. This technology was called Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT). The most important problems of this technology are monitoring of a reactivity level in on-line regime, a choice of neutron spectrum appropriate for incineration of Minor Actinides (MA) and transmutation of Long Lived Fission Products (LLFP) and etc. Before the designing and construction of an installation it is necessary to carry out R and D to validate codes, nuclear data libraries and other instrumentations. The YALINA facility is designed to study the ADS physics and to investigate the transmutation reaction rates of MA and LLFP. The main objective of the YALINA benchmark is to compare the results from different calculation methods with each other and experimental data. The benchmark is based on the current YALINA facility configuration, which provides the opportunity to verify the prediction capability of the different methods. The experimental data have been obtained in the frame of the ISTC Projects B1341 'Analytical and experimental evaluation of the possibility to create a universal volume source of neutrons in the sub-critical booster assembly with low enrichment uranium fuel driven by a neutron generator' and B1732P 'Analytical and experimental evaluating the possibility of creation of universal volume source of neutrons in the sub-critical booster assembly with low enriched uranium fuel driven by the neutron generator'. In this paper a comparison of the experimental and calculated data obtained for YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly with a fuel of different enrichment and for YALINA-Thermal with a different number of control rods (216, 245 and 280) will be done.

  6. Extensive utilization of training reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, Karel; Sklenka, Lubomir

    2003-01-01

    to provide special training for selected specialists from Czech and Slovak Nuclear Power Plants. Scientific research respects reactor parameters and requirements of the so-called clean reactor core (free from a major effect of the fission products). Research on VR-1 is mainly aimed at the preparation and testing of new educational methodologies, investigation of reactor lattice parameters, reactor dynamics study, research in the control equipment field, neutron detector calibration, etc. Information services and promotional activities in the nuclear power field are important parts of the reactor operation. Many visitors, mainly high school students, come to the reactor. The reactor staff prepares an attractive program including reactor operation. Every year, more than 1500 high school students come to visit the reactor, as do many foreigner visitors. The plan for the training reactor VR-1 for the next 10 years covers essential activities (less important activities describes the annual plan for each year) in five fields: education activities, research activities, public relation activities, international cooperation, and human resources, innovation and new equipment.Education activities: Keeping the current state in the field number of user schools, number of students and number of offered experimental exercises; Improving existing experimental exercises and establishing new according requests users from Universities and Nuclear Engineering companies, for example: study of neutron noise and it's application, study of thermal effects, study of digital control systems, study of transmutation technologies ADTT, study of neutron detectors. Research activities: Seeking research activities which can use advantages of 'clean' core without temperature, pressure, burn-up feedback etc.; Continuing in study of the digitally controlled nuclear research reactors; Continuing development of control equipment the VR-1 reactor; Continuing wide co-operation with Czech and Slovak

  7. High priority nuclear data request list. The data for long-lived fission products, minor actinides and the thorium cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlands, J. [Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-07-01

    fission products, minor actinides and the thorium cycle'' (J.L. Rowlands, OECD-NEA) and ''the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's working groups on nuclear data'' (C. Nordborg, OECD-NEA), and all the available transparencies of this workshop: ''radiation-induced damage to structural materials and related needs for structural data in ADTT design''; ''a CERN-PS experimental campaign to measure neutron cross sections from 1 eV to 250 MeV with high resolution''; ''program for neutron data measurements in the fast neutron region (0.1 to 3 MeV)'' (CEN-Bordeaux Gradignan); ''integral experiments: the physics approach'' (CEA-DRN),; ''Mini-Inca, integral measurement relevant for nuclear waste transmutation systems'' (CEA-Saclay/DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN and Inst. Laue Langevin, Grenoble); ''experimental check of neutron cross-sections using slowing down spectrometer (SDS) and accurate Monte-Carlo simulation calculation'' (IN2P3-ISN Grenoble and TARC collaboration); ''recent experimental results on spallation target related data'' (GSI); ''measurements of (n,px), (n,dx), (n,tx) and (n,{alpha}x) reactions between 25 and 70 MeV at Louvain-la-Neuve (IPN Louvain-la-Neuve); ''the Subatech and LPCC-Caen proposals''; and ''the proton elastic measurements at AGOR in the range 120-200 MeV (IPN-Orsay)''. (J.S.)

  8. Review of national accelerator driven system programmes for partitioning and transmutation. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    : Comprehensive presentations from groups conducting the most active research and development projects (Prof. Rubbia (on behalf of the '3 countries initiative': French-Italian-Spanish collaboration), CERN, CEA, JAERI, USA (LANL, BNL, LLNL, ANL, ONL), EC ADS-project (TARC, IABAT), Russian Federation. The presentations centered on the following issues: General issues and motivations: national/international views, specifically: Why is ADS needed for the country; Role of ADS in future nuclear cycles and waste management; General safety issues and requirements of ADS; Public acceptance; ADS Technology; Accelerators for ADTT (cyclotrons and linacs); Specific requirements and features of ADS accelerators; Reliability of operation; Design efficiency; Development of ADS-oriented codes and methods; Benchmark reports; Experiments and validation of codes; Deterministic and Monte-Carlo codes; Coupling of high and low energy transport; Static and dynamic methods for subcritical systems; Spallation and fission product modeling; Targets and nuclear assemblies for ADS; ADS Targets (solid and liquid); Damage to materials (Materials irradiation in Proton field, High energy neutron field, Temperature/shock effects, etc., experiments related to Technology of heavy liquid metals, Thermohydraulics, Corrosion); Experiments (Hg target experiments at BNL; Subcritical cores, Fuels and fuel processes, Molten salt reactors)

  9. Project EROS development of a new reactor concept with liquid fuel based on molten fluorides for reducing the amount and hazard of nuclear waste. Demonstration of promising P and T technology at small scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, Miloslav J.

    2005-01-01

    There have been new tendencies of significant decreasing of amount and potential danger of nuclear waste getting up in the world of nuclear power during the last decade. The development of a convenient for those purposes technology has been in fact a rehabilitation of the so called nuclear transmutation technologies well known since the beginning of the first nuclear era, however, having been evaluated in those times as technologically and therefore even economically demanding to a non-acceptable level. Therefore, an attempt to develop new modifications of those technologies under different conditions at the end of the first nuclear era has been supposed to be promising and acceptable for an efficient closing of nuclear fuel cycle. These new modified transmutation technologies should make it possible to return a fuel component contained in nuclear fuel burned up in conventional nuclear reactors back to nuclear fuel cycle and to turn a significant part of long-lived nuclear waste (heavy metals from the transuranium region) to useful energy without rests and by an irreversible way. This could be, besides other positive features, a way, which according to our contemporary knowledge could exclude or at least minimize a non-desirable misusing of those nuclear materials. A series of national projects started at the end of 80s and beginning of 90s of the last century. For all of them, at least two should be mentioned: The Japanese project OMEGA and the ADTT project of LANL, USA. There has been such a project, which follows namely the tendencies established by Charles Bowman in LANL, started also in the Czech Republic in the middle of 90s. The project, latter on called SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX), has focused on the development of a burner for spent fuel from PWRs having been operated in this and some other central European countries. The principle feature of the adopted transmuter concept has been, since the very beginning of the project, the