WorldWideScience

Sample records for adsorbed hydrogen technical

  1. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  2. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  3. HYDROGEN BONDING IN POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS BASED ADSORPTION AND SEPARATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMancai; SHIZuoqing; 等

    2000-01-01

    After a concise introduction of hydrogen bonding effects in solute-solute and solute-solvent bonding,the design of polymeric adsorbents based on hydrogen bonding ,selectivity in adsorption through hydrogen bonding,and characterization of hydrogen bonding in adsorption and separation were reviewed with 28 references.

  4. Low Pressure Adsorbent for Recovery & Storage Vented Hydrogen Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance fullerene-based adsorbent is proposed for recovery and storage hydrogen and separating helium via pressure-swing-adsorption (PSA) process....

  5. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap identifies research pathways leading to hydrogen production technologies that produce near-zero net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from highly efficient and diverse renewable energy sources. This roadmap focuses on initial development of the technologies, identifies their gaps and barriers, and describes activities by various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offices to address the key issues and challenges.

  6. High-capacity hydrogen storage in Al-adsorbed graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Z. M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    A high-capacity hydrogen storage medium—Al-adsorbed graphene—is proposed based on density-functional theory calculations. We find that a graphene layer with Al adsorbed on both sides can store hydrogen up to 13.79wt% with average adsorption energy -0.193eV/H2 . Its hydrogen storage capacity is in excess of 6wt% , surpassing U. S. Department of Energy (DOE’s) target. Based on the binding-energy criterion and molecular-dynamics calculations, we find that hydrogen storage can be recycled at near ambient conditions. This high-capacity hydrogen storage is due to the adsorbed Al atoms that act as bridges to link the electron clouds of the H2 molecules and the graphene layer. As a consequence, a two-layer arrangement of H2 molecules is formed on each side of the Al-adsorbed graphene layer. The H2 concentration in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the change in the conductivity of the graphene layer.

  7. Hydrogen molecule on lithium adsorbed graphene: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Gaganpreet, Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations for the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on lithium (Li) decorated and pristine graphene have been studied systematically using SIESTA code [1] within the framework of the first-principle DFT under the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)[2], including spin polarization. The energy of adsorption of hydrogen molecule on graphene is always enhanced by the presence of co-adsorbed lithium. The most efficient adsorption configuration is when H2 is lying parallel to lithium adsorbed graphene which is in contrast to its adsorption on pristine graphene (PG) where it prefers perpendicular orientation.

  8. Infrared overtone spectroscopy of adsorbed hydrogen in MOF-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Stephen A.; Nelson, Jocienne N.; Gilmour, Elizabeth; Rowsell, Jesse L. C.

    2015-01-01

    Overtone spectroscopy is used to observe the rovibrational spectra of the hydrogen isotopologues H2, HD, and D2 adsorbed in the metal-organic framework known as MOF-5. It is shown that the overtone spectrum facilitates the identification of hydrogen modes which are obscured in the fundamental region by the presence of MOF-5 features. Further, the overtone spectrum of H2 at the primary adsorption site is greatly enhanced relative to other sites, and thus ambiguities about feature assignment can be avoided. The frequency (wavenumber) of the overtone modes are in good agreement with a Buckingham perturbative model while the relative intensity of the Q2 (0) pure vibrational mode is found to be anomalously large, most likely arising through mode coupling to the MOF-5 framework.

  9. ADSORPTION OF CAFFEINE BY HYDROGEN DONATING ADSORBENTS BASED ON HYDROGEN BONDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMancai; SHIZuoqing; 等

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of caffeine from aqueous solution onto three hydrogen donating adsorbents-hydroxypolystyrene,polystryene-azo-pyrogallol,and D72 resin-were measured.The adsorption enthalpies calculated from the isotherms according to the Clausisu-Clapeyron equation were -24-36kJ/mol,-32-37kJ/mol,and -19-24kJ/mol respectively.These values implied that the adsorption processes were based on hydrogen bonding.Furthermore.the mechanism of the adsorption of caffeine onto D72 resin was studied by IR spectra and the small molecular model experiments,and the results showed that the adsorption of caffeine onto hydrogen donating adsorbents was based on hydrogen bonding.

  10. A Comprehensive Study of Hydrogen Adsorbing to Amorphous Water ice: Defining Adsorption in Classical Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, John L.; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-11-01

    Gas-grain and gas-phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas-grain reactions require a substrate (e.g., a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas-grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking probabilities and coefficients. Here, using our new definition of a sticking event, we report sticking probabilities and sticking coefficients for nine different incident kinetic energies of hydrogen atoms [5-400 K] across seven different temperatures of dust grains [10-70 K]. We find that probabilities and coefficients vary both as a function of grain temperature and incident kinetic energy over the range of 0.99-0.22.

  11. Phase diagram of hydrogen adsorbed on Ni(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Yuichi; Nakamura, Takashi

    1984-08-01

    The phase diagram for the H/Ni(111) system is calculated by treating a lattice gas on a honeycomb lattice through the position-space renormalization-group theory with prefacing transformation. The following interparticle interactions are considered: (A) nearest-neighbor exclusion, second-neighbor repulsion, and third-neighbor attraction, which was previously proposed by Domany et al.; (B) nearest-neighbor exclusion, second- and third-neighbor repulsions, and further-neighbor interactions up to the sixth-neighbor one. When the interaction parameters involved are suitably adjusted, both the interactions (A) and (B) lead to the phase diagrams in good agreement with the experimental one by Christmann et al. The change of the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption with the adsorbed amount is also calculated. The result obtained from interaction (B) is consistent with experiment, whereas that from interaction (A) is not.

  12. Dimeric configurations of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on a monolayer hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianzhang; Hao, Ruirui; Ji, Linan; Feng, Shujian; Sun, Tianye

    2017-10-01

    Atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the two-dimensional monolayer hexagonal boron nitride is systematically discussed based on dispersion-corrected density function theory (DFT-D). Main emphasis has been placed on aggregation states of two hydrogen atoms, including equal or ectopic adsorption with single side, and double-sided adsorption. The hydrogen atoms are chemisorbed on the top of boron sites, while they are physisorbed on the top of nitrogen or honeycomb sites. Furthermore, two adsorbed hydrogen atoms are most likely to keep close to form meta-TB dimer with single side. Besides, a possible stabilizing mechanism related to the adsorbed performance is investigated.

  13. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  14. Isotope tracer study of hydrogen spillover on carbon-based adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachawiec, Anthony J; Yang, Ralph T

    2008-06-17

    A composite material comprising platinum nanoparticles supported on molecular sieve templated carbon was synthesized and found to adsorb 1.35 wt % hydrogen at 298 K and 100 atm. The isosteric heat of adsorption for the material at low coverage was approximately 14 kJ/mol, and it approached a value of 10.6 kJ/mol as coverage increased for pressures at and above 1 atm. The increase in capacity is attributed to spillover, which is observed with the use of isotopic tracer TPD. IRMOF-8 bridged to Pt/C, a material known to exhibit hydrogen spillover at room temperature, was also studied with the hydrogen-deuterium scrambling reaction for comparison. The isotherms were reversible. For desorption, sequential doses of H2 and D2 at room temperature and subsequent TPD yield product distributions that are strong indicators of the surface diffusion controlled reverse spillover process.

  15. Linear hydrogen adsorbate structures on graphite induced by self-assembled molecular monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Sljivancanin, Zeljko; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Combined scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations reveal a method to induce linear structures of hydrogen adsorbates on graphite by covering the surface with a self-assembled molecular monolayer of cyanuric acid and exposing it to atomic hydrogen...

  16. Interaction between adsorbed hydrogen and potassium on a carbon nanocone containing material as studied by photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiaofeng [Nesna University College, 8700 Nesna (Norway); Raaen, Steinar, E-mail: sraaen@ntnu.no [Physics Department, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-09-14

    Hydrogen adsorption on a potassium doped carbon nanocone containing material was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and work function measurement. The valence band spectra indicate that there is charge transfer from potassium to carbon. Upon deposition on carbon potassium is in its ionic state for lower doping and shows both ionic and metallic behavior at higher doping. Adsorption of hydrogen facilitates diffusion of potassium on the carbon material as seen by changes in the K{sub 2p} core level spectrum. Variations in the measured sample work function indicate that hydrogen initially adsorb on the K dopants and subsequently adsorb on the carbon cone containing material.

  17. Hydrogen Technical Analysis -- Dissemination of Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Kervitsky, Jr.

    2006-03-20

    SENTECH is a small energy and environmental consulting firm providing technical, analytical, and communications solutions to technology management issues. The activities proposed by SENTECH focused on gathering and developing communications materials and information, and various dissemination activities to present the benefits of hydrogen energy to a broad audience while at the same time establishing permanent communications channels to enable continued two-way dialog with these audiences in future years. Effective communications and information dissemination is critical to the acceptance of new technology. Hydrogen technologies face the additional challenge of safety preconceptions formed primarily as a result of the crash of the Hindenburg. Effective communications play a key role in all aspects of human interaction, and will help to overcome the perceptual barriers, whether of safety, economics, or benefits. As originally proposed SENTECH identified three distinct information dissemination activities to address three distinct but important audiences; these formed the basis for the task structure used in phases 1 and 2. The tasks were: (1) Print information--Brochures that target the certain segment of the population and will be distributed via relevant technical conferences and traditional distribution channels. (2) Face-to-face meetings--With industries identified to have a stake in hydrogen energy. The three industry audiences are architect/engineering firms, renewable energy firms, and energy companies that have not made a commitment to hydrogen (3) Educational Forums--The final audience is students--the future engineers, technicians, and energy consumers. SENTECH will expand on its previous educational work in this area. The communications activities proposed by SENTECH and completed as a result of this cooperative agreement was designed to compliment the research and development work funded by the DOE by presenting the technical achievements and validations

  18. 77 FR 50488 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Energy... open meeting (Webinar) of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). The Federal..., DC 20585. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

  19. A Comprehensive Study of Hydrogen Adsorbing to Amorphous Water-Ice: Defining Adsorption in Classical Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuy, John L; Stancil, P C

    2016-01-01

    Gas-grain and gas-phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas-grain reactions require a substrate (e.g. a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas-grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking ...

  20. Carbon nanofibers as hydrogen adsorbing materials for power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, M.O.; Kolbasov, G.Ya. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Prospekt Palladina 32/34, Kyiv 142 (Ukraine); Melezhyk, A.V. [TM Spetsmash Ltd., vul. Viskoznaya 5, build. 23, 02660 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2008-01-21

    Porous carbon nanofibers are synthesized by CVD method from acetylene with use of iron-containing catalysts. Activation of the nanofibers in melted potassium hydroxide results in increasing surface area from initial 300-400 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} to 1700 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. As follows from XRD data, activated nanofibers do not contain regular packages of graphene layers, but retain high electric conductivity. Deposition of copper improves electrochemical hydrogen storing characteristics of carbon nanofibers. Carbon nanomaterials obtained can be used as hydrogen storing materials in batteries instead of hydride forming metals. (author)

  1. Helium and Hydrogen Adsorbed on Spheres and Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, E. S.; Szybisz, L.

    2014-07-01

    We examine the metastable and unstable regimes of condensation of superfluid helium and parahydrogen on spheres and cylinders at finite temperatures, employing finite range density functionals. The goal is to compare calculations of sizes and spreads of films at the onset of metastability and of instability with the predictions of a simple phenomenological model that contemplates the curvature of the substrate. We have focused on two cases, helium on nanospheres and nanocylinders of different materials, and hydrogen on fullerenes. We are able to locate the onset of metastability and of spinodal instability in the adsorption isotherms of every sample and to extract the width of the condensed fluid. It is shown that the predictions of the so-called simple model agree surprisingly well with the more elaborate calculations.

  2. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  3. A Luminescence Characterization of Adsorbed Hydrogen Atoms on Plasma Facing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grankin, V.P. [Azov Sea State Technical Univ., Mariupol (Ukraine). Computer Science Dept.; Styrov, V.V. [Azov Sea State Technical Univ., Mariupol (Ukraine). Phisics Dept.

    2004-06-01

    An atomic probe technique for characterization of hydrogen atoms on fusion related materials is described. The technique for determining surface coverage by hydrogen atoms or isotopes under both non-steady-state and stationary conditions is based on detection of heterogeneous chemiluminescence (HCL) excited in the interaction between adsorbed atoms and the pulsed normalized probing atomic flow. The recombination of hydrogen atoms from the gas phase was found to occur in general case via both collision Rideal-Eley (RE) and diffusion Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanisms. The instantaneous optical response allows extracting the contributions of these two mechanisms to the overall reaction rate for various experimental conditions. The HCL method is also applicable for quick measurement of the reactivity of adatoms (in terms of the recombination coefficient {gamma}) for all the materials including metals. The spectra and kinetics of HCL are useful for estimation of heats of adsorption for hydrogen atoms or isotopes.

  4. Technical suitability mapping of feedstocks for biological hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Karaoglanoglou, L.S.; Koullas, D.P.; Bakker, R.R.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Koukios, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to map and compare the technical suitability of different raw materials for biological hydrogen production. Our model was based on hydrogen yield potential, sugar mobilization efficiency, fermentability and coproduct yield and value. The suitability of the studied r

  5. Removal of hydrogen sulfide using palygorskite in a fixed bed adsorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, T; Zhang, Q; Sekine, M; Imai, T; Yamamoto, K

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the use of a novel palygorskite, a type of magnesium aluminium silicate clay possessing a high specific surface area and pore surface activity, as a low cost and highly efficient adsorbent for hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) removal. Adsorption of H(2)S on palygorskite pretreated with acid or base was investigated in a fixed bed adsorber. The samples after base pretreatment had better dynamic adsorption performances than raw material and samples pretreated with acid. The H(2)S adsorption capacity decreased with an increase in inlet H(2)S concentration. This can be interpreted by the fact that H(2)S adsorption on the surface of palygorskite is chemisorption. The adsorption capacity increased from 25 to 50 °C, then decreased from 50 to 100 °C, which indicates that chemisorption took place and its better reaction temperature was around 50 °C.

  6. Surface atomic relaxation and magnetism on hydrogen-adsorbed Fe(110) surfaces from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chohan, Urslaan K.; Jimenez-Melero, Enrique [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Koehler, Sven P.K., E-mail: sven.koehler@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Potential energy surfaces for H diffusion on Fe(110) calculated. • Full vibrational analysis of surface modes performed. • Vibrational analysis establishes lb site as a transition state to the 3f site. • Pronounced buckling observed in the Fe surface layer. - Abstract: We have computed adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, surface relaxation and buckling for hydrogen adsorbed on a body-centred-cubic Fe(110) surface as a function of the degree of H coverage. This adsorption system is important in a variety of technological processes such as the hydrogen embrittlement in ferritic steels, which motivated this work, and the Haber–Bosch process. We employed spin-polarised density functional theory to optimise geometries of a six-layer Fe slab, followed by frozen mode finite displacement phonon calculations to compute Fe–H vibrational frequencies. We have found that the quasi-threefold (3f) site is the most stable adsorption site, with adsorption energies of ∼3.0 eV/H for all coverages studied. The long-bridge (lb) site, which is close in energy to the 3f site, is actually a transition state leading to the stable 3f site. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies collectively span from 730 to 1220 cm{sup −1}, for a range of coverages. The increased first-to-second layer spacing in the presence of adsorbed hydrogen, and the pronounced buckling observed in the Fe surface layer, may facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into the bulk, and therefore impact the early stages of hydrogen embrittlement in steels.

  7. Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Karen I.

    2007-05-12

    This project contributed significantly to the development of new codes and standards, both domestically and internationally. The NHA collaborated with codes and standards development organizations to identify technical areas of expertise that would be required to produce the codes and standards that industry and DOE felt were required to facilitate commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and infrastructure. NHA staff participated directly in technical committees and working groups where issues could be discussed with the appropriate industry groups. In other cases, the NHA recommended specific industry experts to serve on technical committees and working groups where the need for this specific industry expertise would be on-going, and where this approach was likely to contribute to timely completion of the effort. The project also facilitated dialog between codes and standards development organizations, hydrogen and fuel cell experts, the government and national labs, researchers, code officials, industry associations, as well as the public regarding the timeframes for needed codes and standards, industry consensus on technical issues, procedures for implementing changes, and general principles of hydrogen safety. The project facilitated hands-on learning, as participants in several NHA workshops and technical meetings were able to experience hydrogen vehicles, witness hydrogen refueling demonstrations, see metal hydride storage cartridges in operation, and view other hydrogen energy products.

  8. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  9. Increasing the density of adsorbed hydrogen with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Kabbour, Houria; Brown, Craig M; Neumann, Dan A; Ahn, Channing C

    2008-05-06

    Storing molecular hydrogen in porous media is one of the promising avenues for mobile hydrogen storage. In order to achieve technologically relevant levels of gravimetric density, the density of adsorbed H2 must be increased beyond levels attained for typical high surface area carbons. Here, we demonstrate a strong correlation between exposed and coordinatively unsaturated metal centers and enhanced hydrogen surface density in many framework structures. We show that the MOF-74 framework structure with open Zn(2+) sites displays the highest surface density for physisorbed hydrogen in framework structures. Isotherm and neutron scattering methods are used to elucidate the strength of the guest-host interactions and atomic-scale bonding of hydrogen in this material. As a metric with which to compare adsorption density with other materials, we define a surface packing density and model the strength of the H(2-)surface interaction required to decrease the H(2)-H(2) distance and to estimate the largest possible surface packing density based on surface physisorption methods.

  10. Hydrogen bonding with adsorbent during storage governs drug dissolution from solid-dispersion granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manish K; Tseng, Yin-Chao; Goldman, David; Bogner, Robin H

    2002-11-01

    To investigate changes in drug dissolution on storage of ternary solid-dispersion granules containing poorly water-soluble drugs. Hot-melt granulation was used to prepare ternary solid-dispersion granules in which the drug was dispersed in a carrier and coated onto an adsorbent. Seven drugs including four carboxylic acid-containing drugs (BAY 12-9566, naproxen, ketoprofen, and indomethacin). a hydroxyl-containing drug (testosterone), an amide-containing drug (phenacetin), and a drug with no proton-donating group (progesterone) were studied. Gelucire 50/13 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 8000 were used as dispersion carriers whereas Neusilin US2 (magnesium aluminosilicate) was used as the surface adsorbent. Two competing mechanisms have been proposed to explain the complex changes observed in drug dissolution upon storage of solid dispersion granules. Conversion of the crystalline drug to the amorphous hydrogen bonded (to Neusilin) state seems to increase dissolution, whereas, the phenomenon of Ostwald ripening can be used to explain the decrease in drug dissolution upon storage. The solubility of the drug in Gelucire is a crucial factor in determining the predominant mechanism by governing the flux toward the surface of Neusilin. The mobility for this phenomenon was provided by the existence of the eutectic mixture in the molten liquid state during storage. A competitive balance between hydrogen bonding of the drugs with Neusilin and Ostwald ripening determines drug dissolution from solid-dispersion granules upon storage.

  11. Properties of SBA-15 modified by iron nanoparticles as potential hydrogen adsorbents and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouazizi, N.; Ouargli, R.; Nousir, S.; Slama, R. Ben; Azzouz, A.

    2015-02-01

    SBA-15-Fe was synthesized via the incorporation of Fe0 nanoparticles (Fe(0)-Nps) in the mesoporous channels. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that dispersion of fine iron NPs occurs mainly inside the channels of SBA-15, producing a slight structure compaction. This was accompanied by a significant improvement of both the affinity towards hydrogen and electrical conductivity, as supported by hydrogen adsorption tests and impedance measurements. CO2 thermal programmed desorption measurements revealed an attenuation of the acid character of the solid surface. This was explained in terms of strong iron interaction with the lattice oxygen atoms that reduces the SiO-H bond polarity. The close vicinity of fine Fe(0)-Nps combined with the large pore size of SBA-15 appear to contribute to a synergistic improvement of the electrical conductivity. The results reported herein open new prospects for SBA-15 as potential adsorbents for hydrogen storage and carriers for hydrogen sensors. The use of iron in lieu of noble metals for designing such materials is a novelty, because such applications of iron-loaded silica have not been envisaged so far due to the high reactivity of iron towards air and water. The development of such technologies, if any, should address this issue.

  12. Chiral modification of platinum by co-adsorbed cinchonidine and trifluoroacetic acid: origin of enhanced stereocontrol in the hydrogenation of trifluoroacetophenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meemken, Fabian; Baiker, Alfons; Schenker, Sebastian; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-01-27

    Cinchonidine (CD) adsorbed onto a platinum metal catalyst leads to rate acceleration and induces strong stereocontrol in the asymmetric hydrogenation of trifluoroacetophenone. Addition of catalytic amounts of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) significantly enhances the enantiomeric excess from 50 to 92%. The origin of the enantioselectivity bestowed by co-adsorbed CD and TFA is investigated by using in situ attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy and modulation excitation spectroscopy. Molecular interactions between the chiral modifier (CD), acid additive (TFA) and the trifluoro-activated substrate at the solid-liquid interface are elucidated under conditions relevant to catalytic hydrogenations, that is, on a technical Pt/Al2O3 catalyst in the presence of H2 and solvent. Monitoring of the unmodified and modified surface during the hydrogenation provides an insight into the phenomenon of rate enhancement and the crucial interactions of CD with the ketone, corresponding product alcohol, and TFA. Comparison of the diastereomeric interactions occurring on the modified surface and in the liquid solution shows a striking difference for the chiral preferences of CD. The spectroscopic data, in combination with calculations of molecular structures and energies, sheds light on the reaction mechanism of the heterogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation of trifluoromethyl ketones and the involvement of TFA in the diastereomeric intermediate surface complex: the quinuclidine N atom of the adsorbed CD forms an N-H-O-type hydrogen-bonding interaction not only with the trifluoro-activated ketone but also with the corresponding alcohol and the acid additive. Strong evidence is provided that it is a monodentate acid/base adduct in which the carboxylate of TFA resides at the quinuclidine N-atom of CD, which imparts a better stereochemical control.

  13. Optimization of the elaboration conditions of an adsorber for the hydrogen storage; Optimisation des conditions d'elaboration d'un adsorbant pour le stockage d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, V.; Mareche, J.F.; Furdin, G. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henri Poincare, UMR - CNRS 7555, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Szczurek, A.; Albiniak, A. [Wroclaw Univ. of Technology, Laboratory for Lignites and Carbon Adsorbents, Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Petroleum and Coal (Poland); Latroche, M. [Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, ICMPE, UMR 7182, CNRS, 94 - Thiais (France); Celzard, A. [Nancy-Univ., ENSTIB, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR CNRS 7555, 88 - Epinal (France)

    2008-07-01

    The microporous carbon are very efficient adsorbents for the hydrogen storage, because of pores size under 2 nm. This study describes the optimization of the elaboration conditions for a carbon adsorbent for the hydrogen storage by adsorption. The storage capacity has been measured at 25 C for 20 MPa and also at 77 K for pressures between 6 and 9 MPa. the porous texture characterization has been realized by four molecule probes of increasing diameter: CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, C{sub 6}H{sub 6} and CCl{sub 4}. (A.L.B.)

  14. KARAKTERISASI BENTONIT TEKNIS SEBAGAI ADSORBEN INDIGO BIRU (Characterisation of Technical Bentonite as Indigo Blue Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toeti Koestiari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui karakter Bentonit teknis yang dapat digunakan untuk menyerap sisa-sisa Indigo bim di lingkungan. Penelitian eksperimental laboratoris dilakukan melalui dua tahap, yaitu karakterisasi Bentonit teknis menggunakan SEM-Edx, Spektrofotometer IR, Gas Sorption Analyzer, dan proses adsorpsi Indigo bim oleh Bentonit teknis pada pH sistem 1, 5, 7, dan 9. Hasil penelitian menggunakan SEM-Edx menunjukkan bahwa Bentonit teknis mengandung senyawa Na20:2,64%, Ah03: 20,75%, Si02: 57,55%, dan FeO : 13,73%. Melalui spektrofotometer IR diketahui bahwa Bentonit teknis mengandung senyawa kimia yang merniliki vibrasi H-O-H, ikatan CO2, deformasi H-O-H, regang Si-O, vibrasi AI-OH atau deformasi OH-kation, deformasi SiO. Menggunakan Gas Sorption Analyzer diketahui bahwa luas permukaan Bentonit teknis : 51,935 m2/g, volume pori total: 1,302 x 10-1 cc/g dengan radius pori: <1013,9 A. Kemampuan adsorpsi Bentonit teknis terhadap 56,761 ppm Indigo bim pada pH 1, 5, 7, dan 9 berturut-tumt : 5,78; 7,89; 8,84; dan 9,64%. ABSTRACT The objective of this research was to determine the Technical Bentonite characters that can be used to adsorb the pollutant of Indigo blue in the environment. Laboratory experimental study consist of two stages, characterization phase of Technical Bentonite using SEM-EDX , IR spectrophotometer, Gas Analyzer sorption, and proses of adsorption Indigo blue by technical Bentonite at pH sistem1, 5, 7, and 9. By using SEM EDX showed that the technical Bentonite contain compounds as Na2O: 2.64%,  Al2O3: 20.75%,  SiO2: 57.55%, and FeO: 13.73%. Through IR spectro- photometer, the functional group of compound in technical Bentonite are H-O-H vibration, CO2 bonding, H-O-H deformation, Si-O stretcing, Al-OH vibration or deformation OH-cation, SiO deformation. By using Gas Sorption Analyzer is known that the surface area of technical Bentonite: 51.935 m2 / g, total pore volume: 1.302 x 10-1 cc / g with pore

  15. Correlation of adsorption isotherms of hydrogen isotopes on mordenite adsorbents using reactive vacancy solution theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, K.; Nakamura, A. [Faculty of Engineering and Ressource Science, Akita University, Akita-shi, Akita (Japan); Kawamura, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency -JAEA, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The authors have applied the isotherm equations derived from the reactive vacancy solution theory (RVST) to correlation of experimental and highly non-ideal adsorption isotherms of hydrogen and deuterium on a mordenite adsorbent, and have examined the ability of the isotherm equations to match this correlation. Several isotherm equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Toth, Vacancy Solution Theory and so forth were also tested, but they did not work. For the Langmuir-Freundlich equation tests have indicated that its 'ability to correlate' of the adsorption isotherms is not satisfactory. For the multi-site Langmuir-Freundlich (MSLF) equation the correlation of the isotherms appears to be somewhat improved but remains unsatisfactory. The results show that the isotherm equations derived from RVST can better correlate the experimental isotherms.

  16. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beida Information Research (BIR), Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p{sub z} atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  17. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  18. Heat capacity of quantum adsorbates: Hydrogen and helium on evaporated gold films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birmingham, J.T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1996-06-01

    The author has constructed an apparatus to make specific heat measurements of quantum gases adsorbed on metallic films at temperatures between 0.3 and 4 K. He has used this apparatus to study quench-condensed hydrogen films between 4 and 923 layers thick with J = 1 concentrations between 0.28 and 0.75 deposited on an evaporated gold surface. He has observed that the orientational ordering of the J = 1 molecules depends on the substrate temperature during deposition of the hydrogen film. He has inferred that the density of the films condensed at the lowest temperatures is 25% higher than in bulk H{sub 2} crystals and have observed that the structure of those films is affected by annealing at 3.4 K. The author has measured the J = 1 to J = 0 conversion rate to be comparable to that of the bulk for thick films; however, he found evidence that the gold surface catalyzes conversion in the first two to four layers. He has also used this apparatus to study films of {sup 4}He less than one layer thick adsorbed on an evaporated gold surface. He shows that the phase diagram of the system is similar to that for {sup 4}He/graphite although not as rich in structure, and the phase boundaries occur at different coverages and temperatures. At coverages below about half a layer and at sufficiently high temperatures, the {sup 4}He behaves like a two-dimensional noninteracting Bose gas. At lower temperatures and higher coverages, liquidlike and solidlike behavior is observed. The Appendix shows measurements of the far-infrared absorptivity of the high-{Tc} superconductor La{sub 1.87}Sr{sub 0.13}CuO{sub 4}.

  19. Chiral modification of platinum: ab initio study of the effect of hydrogen coadsorption on stability and geometry of adsorbed cinchona alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Konstanze R; Seitsonen, Ari P; Baiker, Alfons

    2015-11-01

    The cinchona alkaloids cinchonidine and cinchonine belong to the most efficient chiral modifiers for the noble metal-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of C=O and C=C bonds. Under reaction conditions these modifiers are coadsorbed on the noble metal surface with hydrogen. Using density functional theory, we studied the effect of coadsorbed hydrogen on the adsorption mode of cinchonidine and cinchonine on a Pt(111) surface at different hydrogen coverages. The theoretical study indicates that the presence of coadsorbed hydrogen affects both the adsorption geometry as well as the stability of the adsorbed cinchona alkaloids. At all hydrogen coverages the cinchona alkaloids are found to be adsorbed via anchoring of the quinoline moiety. In the absence of hydrogen as well as at low hydrogen coverage the quinoline moiety adsorbs nearly parallel to the surface, whereas at higher hydrogen coverage it becomes tilted. Higher hydrogen coverage as well as partial hydrogenation of the quinoline part of the cinchona alkaloid and hydrogen transfer to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond at 10, 11 position of the quinuclidine moiety destabilize the adsorbed cinchona alkaloid, whereas hydrogen transfer to the nitrogen atom of the quinoline and the quinuclidine moiety stabilizes the adsorbed molecule. The stability as well as the adsorption geometry of the cinchona alkaloids are affected by the coadsorbed hydrogen and are proposed to influence the efficiency of the enantiodifferentiating ability of the chirally modified platinum surface.

  20. 78 FR 18578 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC... Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory...

  1. Technical files. Hydrogen memento; Fiches techniques. Memento de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a compilation of 30 technical files about hydrogen and its related technologies. These files cover the following aspects: general considerations (world energy consumption growth, contribution of developing countries, atmospheric pollution and greenhouse effect, health impacts, actions implemented at the world scale, role of hydrogen); glossary and acronyms; units used and conversions; world energy situation (primary production, sectoral consumption, demand trends, environmental impact, situation of fossil fuel reserves); French energy situation (primary sources, energy independence ratio, electric power status, evolutions and trends of the French energy demand); fuel cells; basic data on hydrogen (thermodynamic properties and data); hydrogen production by water electrolysis, application to small capacity systems; thermochemical water dissociation; water photo-electrolysis; hydrogen pipeline networks in the world; mechanical energy production; hydrogen thermal engines; aeronautic applications; research laboratories; industrial actors of the hydrogen sector (companies, activities, geographical situation, financial structure, strategy, R and D, cooperations, projects etc..); hydrogen flammability and explosiveness; transport and storage safety; standards and regulations about hydrogen safety in France, in Europe and in the rest of the world; hydrogen programs in the world; the programs financed by the European Union; the German programs; the programs in Island, France and UK; the programs in North America; the Japanese programs; table of the main recent R and D projects per type of program; light vehicles with fuel cells; the Daimler-Chrysler program. (J.S.)

  2. STM observation of the chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen on the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takuma; Yamada, Masamichi; Komori, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reaction of atomic hydrogen with the N-adsorbed Cu(001) surfaces was investigated at room temperature by scanning tunnel microscopy. At the low exposure of atomic hydrogen, it reacted with the N atoms and turned to be the NH species on the surface. The reaction rate is proportional to the amount of the unreacted N atoms. By increasing the exposure of atomic hydrogen from this condition, the amount of nitrogen species on the surface decreased. This is attributed to the formation of ammonia and its desorption from the surface. The NH species on the surface turn to NH3 through the surface NH2 species by atomic hydrogen. Coexistence of the clean Cu surface enhances the rate of ammonia formation owing to atomic hydrogen migrating on the clean surface.

  3. Hydrogen Monitoring Requirements in the Global Technical Regulation on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Hartmann, Kevin; Bubar, Max; Post, Matthew; Boon-Brett, Lois; Weidner, Eveline; Moretto, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    The United Nations Global Technical Regulation (GTR) Number 13 (Global Technical Regulation on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles) is the defining document regulating safety requirements in hydrogen vehicles, and in particular fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). GTR Number 13 has been formally implemented and will serve as the basis for the national regulatory standards for FCEV safety in North America (Canada, United States), Japan, Korea, and the European Union. The GTR defines safety requirement for these vehicles, including specifications on the allowable hydrogen levels in vehicle enclosures during in-use and post-crash conditions and on the allowable hydrogen emissions levels in vehicle exhaust during certain modes of normal operation. However, in order to be incorporated into national regulations, that is, in order to be binding, methods to verify compliance to the specific requirements must exist. In a collaborative program, the Sensor Laboratories at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the United States and the Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport in the Netherlands have been evaluating and developing analytical methods that can be used to verify compliance to the hydrogen release requirement as specified in the GTR.

  4. 77 FR 65542 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC... Meeting. SUMMARY: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) was established under... web at: http://hydrogen.energy.gov ). Public Comment DOE Program Updates Congressional Fuel...

  5. 77 FR 18243 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC); Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC); Notice of Open Meeting AGENCY: Office of Energy... announces a meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). The Federal Advisory...., Washington, DC 20585. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The Hydrogen and Fuel...

  6. 78 FR 6086 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... announces an open meeting (Webinar) of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). The..., DC 20585. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

  7. 78 FR 60866 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... open meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). The Federal Advisory... Avenue, Washington, DC 20585. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The Hydrogen and...

  8. 76 FR 28759 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC... meeting. SUMMARY: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) was established under... address: HTAC@nrel.gov or check the Web site at: hydrogen.energy.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  9. 76 FR 4645 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Energy... the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). HTAC was established under section 807... posted on http://hydrogen.energy.gov and copies of the final agenda will available the date of...

  10. A theoretical study of the interaction of hydrogen and oxygen with palladium or gold adsorbed on pyridine-like nitrogen-doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Magana, Luis Fernando; Sansores, Luis Enrique

    2014-12-15

    The interaction of H2 and O2 molecules in the presence of nitrogen-doped graphene decorated with either a palladium or gold atom was investigated by using density functional theory. It was found that two hydrogen molecules were adsorbed on the palladium atom. The interaction of these adsorbed hydrogen molecules with two oxygen molecules generates two hydrogen peroxide molecules first through a Eley-Rideal mechanism and then through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The barrier energies for this reaction were small; therefore, we expect that this process may occur spontaneously at room temperature. In the case of gold, a single hydrogen molecule is adsorbed and dissociated on the metal atom. The interaction of the dissociated hydrogen molecule on the surface with one oxygen molecule generates a water molecule. The competitive adsorption between oxygen and hydrogen molecules slightly favors oxygen adsorption.

  11. Texas Hydrogen Education Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, David; Bullock, Dan

    2011-06-30

    , and hydrogen fueling) are effective for engaging target audiences, and (3) a clear path forward is needed for state and local agencies interested in project implementation (funding, financing, preliminary design, technical assistance, etc.).

  12. 77 FR 2714 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Energy... open meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). The HTAC was... EPACT. Tentative Agenda: (Subject to change; updates will be posted on...

  13. Technical analysis of photovoltaic/wind systems with hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Vukman V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical analysis of a hybrid wind-photovoltaic energy system with hydrogen gas storage was studied. The market for the distributed power generation based on renewable energy is increasing, particularly for the standalone mini-grid applications. The main design components of PV/Wind hybrid system are the PV panels, the wind turbine and an alkaline electrolyzer with tank. The technical analysis is based on the transient system simulation program TRNSYS 16. The study is realized using the meteorological data for a Typical Metrological Year (TMY for region of Novi Sad, Belgrade cities and Kopaonik national park in Serbia. The purpose of the study is to design a realistic energy system that maximizes the use of renewable energy and minimizes the use of fossil fuels. The reduction in the CO2 emissions is also analyzed in the paper. [Acknowledgment. This paper is the result of the investigations carried out within the scientific project TR33036 supported by the Ministry of Science of the Republic of Serbia.

  14. 75 FR 59705 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell... will be posted on the web at http://hydrogen.energy.gov and copies of the final agenda will...

  15. Evaluating topologically diverse metal–organic frameworks for cryo-adsorbed hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Colón, Yamil J.; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Timothy C.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hupp, Joseph T.; Yildirim, Taner; Farha, Omar K.; Zhang, Jian; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2016-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials synthesized by combining inorganic and organic molecular building blocks into crystalline networks of distinct topologies. Due to the combinatorial possibilities, there are millions of possible MOF structures. Aiming to exploit their exceptional tunability, surface areas and pore volumes, researchers have investigated MOFs for storage of gaseous fuels such as hydrogen for over a decade, but a suitable MOF to store hydrogen at ambient conditions has not yet been found. Here, we sought to rapidly determine the viability of using MOFs for hydrogen storage at recently proposed, cryogenic operating conditions. We constructed a large and structurally diverse set of 13 512 potential MOF structures based on 41 different topologies and used molecular simulation to determine MOF hydrogen deliverable capacities between 100 bar/77 K and 5 bar/160 K. The highest volumetric deliverable capacity was 57 g L-1 of MOF, which surpasses the 37 g L-1 of tank of the incumbent technology (compressing hydrogen to 700 bar at ambient temperature). To validate our in silico MOF construction method, we synthesized a new isoreticular family of MOFs (she-MOF-x series) based on the she topology, which is extremely rare among MOFs. To validate our hydrogen storage predictions, we activated and measured hydrogen adsorption on she-MOF-1 and NU-1103. The latter MOF showed outstanding stability and a good combination of volumetric and gravimetric performance, presenting 43.2 g L-1 of MOF and 12.6 wt% volumetric and gravimetric deliverable capacities, respectively.

  16. A Technical and Economic Review of Solar Hydrogen Production Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Erik; Fowler, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen energy systems are being developed to replace fossil fuels-based systems for transportation and stationary application. One of the challenges facing the widespread adoption of hydrogen as an energy vector is the lack of an efficient, economical, and sustainable method of hydrogen production. In the short term, hydrogen produced from…

  17. Theoretical study of the dynamics of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on graphene multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaied, Mohammed; Moreno, J. A.; Caturla, M. J.; Ynduráin, Félix; Palacios, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dynamics of H atoms adsorbed on graphene bilayers with Bernal stacking. First, through extensive density functional theory calculations, including van der Waals interactions, we obtain the activation barriers involved in the desorption and migration processes of a single H atom. These barriers, along with attempt rates and the energetics of H pairs, are used as input parameters in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to study the time evolution of an initial random distribution of adsorbed H atoms. The simulations reveal that, at room temperature, H atoms occupy only one sublattice before they completely desorb or form clusters. This sublattice selectivity in the distribution of H atoms may last for sufficiently long periods of time upon lowering the temperature down to 0 ∘C . The final fate of the H atoms, namely, desorption or cluster formation, depends on the actual relative values of the activation barriers which can be tuned by doping. In some cases, a sublattice selectivity can be obtained for periods of time experimentally relevant even at room temperature. This result shows the possibility for observation and applications of the ferromagnetic state associated with such distribution.

  18. H2 at Scale: Benefitting our Future Energy System - Update for the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2016-12-06

    Hydrogen is a flexible, clean energy carrying intermediate that enables aggressive market penetration of renewables while deeply decarbonizing our energy system. H2 at Scale is a concept that supports the electricity grid by utilizing energy without other demands at any given time and also supports transportation and industry by providing low-priced hydrogen to them. This presentation is an update to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC).

  19. Technical Breakthrough Points and Opportunities in Transition Scenarios for Hydrogen as Vehicular Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakov, V.; Ruth, M.; James, B.; Perez, J.; Spisak, A.

    2011-12-01

    This technical reports is about investigating a generic case of hydrogen production/delivery/dispensing pathway evolution in a large population city, assuming that hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) will capture a major share of the vehicle market by the year 2050. The range of questions that are considered includes (i) what is the typical succession of hydrogen pathways that minimizes consumer cost? (ii) what are the major factors that will likely influence this sequence?

  20. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  1. Removal of hydrogen sulfide by clinoptilolite in a fixed bed adsorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasyerli, S.; Ar, I.; Dogu, G.; Dogu, T. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2002-11-01

    Due to its toxic and corrosive nature, H{sub 2}S should be safely removed from the gases produced in gasification or combustion processes. In this study, adsorption of hydrogen sulfide was investigated on a natural zeolite, namely clinoptilolite. H{sub 2}S adsorption characteristics of Western Anatolian clinoptilolite was studied in a fixed-bed system at different temperatures between 100 and 600{sup o}C at atmospheric pressure. H{sub 2}S adsorption capacity of clinoptilolite was found to be about 0.03 g S/g clinoptilolite at 600{sup o}C. A deactivation model considering concentration dependence of activity term was applied to experimental results and adsorption rate constant and activation energy values were evaluated. Good agreement of the experimental breakthrough curves with the model predictions was observed.

  2. Separation of Rebaudiana A from Steviol glycoside using a polymeric adsorbent with multi-hydrogen bonding in a non-aqueous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Jing; Zhang, Na; Yao, Lijuan; Ma, Ning; Wang, Chunhong

    2014-11-15

    Rebaudioside A (RA) and stevioside (SS) are the primary effective glycoside components in Stevia Rebaudiana. The RA glycoside is sweeter, and it tastes similarly to sucrose. Because extracts with a high RA content can be used as natural sweeteners for food additives approved by the FAO and FDA, RA should generate high market demand. In this study, an efficient method for separating RA was established based on the synergistic multi-hydrogen bonding interaction between a polymeric adsorbent and the RA glycoside. To overcome the destruction of the hydrophobic affinity required for the selective adsorption of RA, an innovative non-aqueous environment was established for adsorption and separation. To this end, an initial polymeric adsorbent composed of a glycidyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (GMA-co-TMPTMA) copolymer matrix was synthesized, and polyethylene polyamine was employed as a functional reagent designed to react with the epoxy group on GME-co-TMPTMA to form a highly selective macroporous adsorbent. The effects of the different functional reagents and the solvent polarity on the adsorption selectivity for RA and SS, respectively, were investigated. Matching the structure of the polyethylene polyamine and sugar ligand on the glycoside molecule was essential in ensuring that the maximum synergistic interaction between adsorbent and adsorbate would be achieved. Moreover, the hydrogen-bonding force was observed to increase when the polarity of the adsorption solvent decreased. Therefore, among the synthesized macroporous polymeric adsorbents, the GTN4 adsorbent-bonding tetraethylenepentamine functional group provided the best separation in an n-butyl alcohol solution. Under the optimized gradient elution conditions, RA and SS can be effectively separated, and the contents of RA and SS increased from 33.5% and 51.5% in the initial crude extract to 95.4% and 78.2% after separation, respectively. Compared to conventional methods, the adsorption

  3. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Thanh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, Matt [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, Stephen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, Karen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, Jayanti [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  4. UN Global Technical Regulation for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Yuntang; Zheng Jinyang; Ou Kesheng

    2012-01-01

    1.Background Along with the gradual depletion of fossil energy such as petrol,coal and natural gas and the increasing attention paid to the environment problems,hydrogen energy as the important secondary energy source is developing at amazing pace.Since 1990s,the research on the application of hydrogen energy in transport has been increasingly vigorous,which is now one of the most active research areas for hydrogen energy.With the advantages of high energy conversion rate,good economical efficiency of the fuel,zero emission,etc.,hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have attracted the close concern and support from many countries,enterprises and academies.In recent years,our HFCV technologies have experienced rapid development,with joint efforts of production,teaching and research and continuous enhancement of international cooperation.

  5. FTIR spectroscopy and thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorbed in a cross-linked polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, Giuseppe; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Damin, Alessandro; Bonino, Francesca; Zecchina, Adriano

    2007-09-28

    The adsorption of H(2) in a cross-linked poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (St-DVB) microporous polymer (BET surface area 920 m(2) g(-1)) is studied by volumetric and gravimetric methods, FTIR spectroscopy at variable temperature (300-14 K) and ab initio calculations. At 77 K the polymer reversibly stores up to 1.3 mass% H(2) at a pressure of 1 bar and 1.8 mass% at 10 bar. The adsorption process involves the specific interaction of H(2) with the structural phenyl rings through weak dispersive forces. The interacting molecules become IR active and give rise to vibrational and rotational-vibrational manifestations which are affected by the temperature, the contact time and the H(2) equilibrium pressure. The spectra of the H(2)/St-DVB system reported here represent the first IR evidence of the adsorption of hydrogen on unsaturated molecules. The adsorption enthalpy is evaluated by the VTIR (variable temperature IR spectroscopy) method (C. Otero Areán et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2007, DOI: 10.1039/b615535a) and compared with the results of ab initio calculations for the H(2)/benzene interaction and with literature data.

  6. Hydrogen vibrational density of states of adsorbed water on rare-earth modified zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loong, C.K.; Iton, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ozawa, Masakuni [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gifu (Japan)

    1994-07-20

    Rare-earth (RE) doped ZrO{sub 2} prepared by a method of coprecipitation from aqueous solution shows many properties such as good thermal stability and large surface area ({approximately}80 m{sup 2}/g) that are suitable for use as catalyst supports and sorbents for a variety of molecules. The authors have measured the vibrational densities of states of surface hydroxyl groups as well as physisorbed water molecules in La{sub 0.1}Zr{sub 0.9}O{sub 1.95} and Nd{sub 0.1}Zr{sub 0.9}O{sub 1.95} by inelastic neutron scattering. The spectrum of dry RE-ZrO{sub 2} exhibits a peak at about 455 meV characteristic of the O-H stretch vibrations of surface hydroxyl groups. At a submonolayer coverage of H{sub 2}O this peak broadens and shifts to a slightly lower energy. At higher coverage three bands, corresponding to the O-H stretch ({approximately}430 meV), H-O-H bend ({approximately}200 meV) and librational motion ({approximately}80 meV), were observed. The decreasing energy and larger width of the OH stretch band with increasing H{sub 2}O coverage indicate the influence of hydrogen bonding on the motion of water molecules.

  7. Steam reforming of technical bioethanol for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Johansson, Roger; Møller, Martin Hulbek;

    2008-01-01

    Essentially all work on ethanol steam reforming so far has been carried out using simulated bioethanol feedstocks, which means pure ethanol mixed with water. However, technical bioethanol consists of a lot of different components including sugars, which cannot be easily vaporized and steam reformed....... For ethanol steam reforming to be of practical interest, it is important to avoid the energy-intensive purification steps to fuel grade ethanol. Therefore, it is imperative to analyze how technical bioethanol, with the relevant impurities, reacts during the steam reforming process. We show how three different...... distillation fractions of technical 2nd generation bioethanol, produced in a pilot plant, influence the performance of nickel- and ruthenium-based catalysts during steam reforming, and we discuss what is required to obtain high activity and long catalyst lifetime. We conclude that the use of technical...

  8. The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H[2]Sim) technical description.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Scott A.; Kamery, William; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.; Lutz, Andrew E.; Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to become an integral part of our energy transportation and heat and power sectors in the coming decades and offers a possible solution to many of the problems associated with a heavy reliance on oil and other fossil fuels. The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H2Sim) was developed to provide a high level, internally consistent, strategic tool for evaluating the economic and environmental trade offs of alternative hydrogen production, storage, transport and end use options in the year 2020. Based on the model's default assumptions, estimated hydrogen production costs range from 0.68 $/kg for coal gasification to as high as 5.64 $/kg for centralized electrolysis using solar PV. Coal gasification remains the least cost option if carbon capture and sequestration costs ($0.16/kg) are added. This result is fairly robust; for example, assumed coal prices would have to more than triple or the assumed capital cost would have to increase by more than 2.5 times for natural gas reformation to become the cheaper option. Alternatively, assumed natural gas prices would have to fall below $2/MBtu to compete with coal gasification. The electrolysis results are highly sensitive to electricity costs, but electrolysis only becomes cost competitive with other options when electricity drops below 1 cent/kWhr. Delivered 2020 hydrogen costs are likely to be double the estimated production costs due to the inherent difficulties associated with storing, transporting, and dispensing hydrogen due to its low volumetric density. H2Sim estimates distribution costs ranging from 1.37 $/kg (low distance, low production) to 3.23 $/kg (long distance, high production volumes, carbon sequestration). Distributed hydrogen production options, such as on site natural gas, would avoid some of these costs. H2Sim compares the expected 2020 per mile driving costs (fuel, capital, maintenance, license, and registration) of current technology internal combustion engine (ICE

  9. Hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles: A technical and economic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1997-12-31

    All fuel cells currently being developed for near term use in vehicles require hydrogen as a fuel. Hydrogen can be stored directly or produced onboard the vehicle by reforming methanol, ethanol or hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil (e.g., Diesel, gasoline or middle distillates). The vehicle design is simpler with direct hydrogen storage, but requires developing a more complex refueling infrastructure. In this paper, the authors compare three leading options for fuel storage onboard fuel cell vehicles: compressed gas hydrogen storage; onboard steam reforming of methanol; onboard partial oxidation (POX) of hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil. Equilibrium, kinetic and heat integrated system (ASPEN) models have been developed to estimate the performance of onboard steam reforming and POX fuel processors. These results have been incorporated into a fuel cell vehicle model, allowing us to compare the vehicle performance, fuel economy, weight, and cost for various fuel storage choices and driving cycles. A range of technical and economic parameters were considered. The infrastructure requirements are also compared for gaseous hydrogen, methanol and hydrocarbon fuels from crude oil, including the added costs of fuel production, storage, distribution and refueling stations. Considering both vehicle and infrastructure issues, the authors compare hydrogen to other fuel cell vehicle fuels. Technical and economic goals for fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen technologies are discussed. Potential roles for hydrogen in the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles are sketched.

  10. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, M. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  11. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  12. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of H2 adsorbed to lithium-doped benzene: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoy, Lachlan P.; Kolmann, Stephen J.; D'Arcy, Jordan H.; Crittenden, Deborah L.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2015-11-01

    Finite temperature quantum and anharmonic effects are studied in H2-Li+-benzene, a model hydrogen storage material, using path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations on an interpolated potential energy surface refined over the eight intermolecular degrees of freedom based upon M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) density functional theory calculations. Rigid-body PIMC simulations are performed at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 150 K, producing both quantum and classical probability density histograms describing the adsorbed H2. Quantum effects broaden the histograms with respect to their classical analogues and increase the expectation values of the radial and angular polar coordinates describing the location of the center-of-mass of the H2 molecule. The rigid-body PIMC simulations also provide estimates of the change in internal energy, ΔUads, and enthalpy, ΔHads, for H2 adsorption onto Li+-benzene, as a function of temperature. These estimates indicate that quantum effects are important even at room temperature and classical results should be interpreted with caution. Our results also show that anharmonicity is more important in the calculation of U and H than coupling—coupling between the intermolecular degrees of freedom becomes less important as temperature increases whereas anharmonicity becomes more important. The most anharmonic motions in H2-Li+-benzene are the "helicopter" and "ferris wheel" H2 rotations. Treating these motions as one-dimensional free and hindered rotors, respectively, provides simple corrections to standard harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor thermochemical expressions for internal energy and enthalpy that encapsulate the majority of the anharmonicity. At 150 K, our best rigid-body PIMC estimates for ΔUads and ΔHads are -13.3 ± 0.1 and -14.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol-1, respectively.

  13. Hydrogen adsorbed in a metal organic framework-5: coupled translation-rotation eigenstates from quantum five-dimensional calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matanović, Ivana; Belof, Jonathan L; Space, Brian; Sillar, Kaido; Sauer, Joachim; Eckert, Juergen; Bačić, Zlatko

    2012-07-07

    We report rigorous quantum five-dimensional (5D) calculations of the coupled translation-rotation (T-R) eigenstates of a H(2) molecule adsorbed in metal organic framework-5 (MOF-5), a prototypical nanoporous material, which was treated as rigid. The anisotropic interactions between H(2) and MOF-5 were represented by the analytical 5D intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) used previously in the simulations of the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption in this system [Belof et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 113, 9316 (2009)]. The global and local minima on this 5D PES correspond to all of the known binding sites of H(2) in MOF-5, three of which, α-, β-, and γ-sites are located on the inorganic cluster node of the framework, while two of them, the δ- and ε-sites, are on the phenylene link. In addition, 2D rotational PESs were calculated ab initio for each of these binding sites, keeping the center of mass of H(2) fixed at the respective equilibrium geometries; purely rotational energy levels of H(2) on these 2D PESs were computed by means of quantum 2D calculations. On the 5D PES, the three adjacent γ-sites lie just 1.1 meV above the minimum-energy α-site, and are separated from it by a very low barrier. These features allow extensive wave function delocalization of even the lowest translationally excited T-R eigenstates over the α- and γ-sites, presenting significant challenges for both the quantum bound-state calculations and the analysis of the results. Detailed comparison is made with the available experimental data.

  14. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

    2008-07-31

    DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

  15. 75 FR 2860 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... University of California (UC) Davis Electric Drive Vehicle Study Overview National Renewable Energy... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open...

  16. 75 FR 26743 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... No: 2010-11288] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open... Budget Process Overview; Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance Update; University of California (UC...

  17. Final Technical Report for GO17004 Regulatory Logic: Codes and Standards for the Hydrogen Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakarado, Gary L. [Regulatory Logic LLC, Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are to: develop a robust supporting research and development program to provide critical hydrogen behavior data and a detailed understanding of hydrogen combustion and safety across a range of scenarios, needed to establish setback distances in building codes and minimize the overall data gaps in code development; support and facilitate the completion of technical specifications by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for gaseous hydrogen refueling (TS 20012) and standards for on-board liquid (ISO 13985) and gaseous or gaseous blend (ISO 15869) hydrogen storage by 2007; support and facilitate the effort, led by the NFPA, to complete the draft Hydrogen Technologies Code (NFPA 2) by 2008; with experimental data and input from Technology Validation Program element activities, support and facilitate the completion of standards for bulk hydrogen storage (e.g., NFPA 55) by 2008; facilitate the adoption of the most recently available model codes (e.g., from the International Code Council [ICC]) in key regions; complete preliminary research and development on hydrogen release scenarios to support the establishment of setback distances in building codes and provide a sound basis for model code development and adoption; support and facilitate the development of Global Technical Regulations (GTRs) by 2010 for hydrogen vehicle systems under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations and Working Party on Pollution and Energy Program (ECE-WP29/GRPE); and to Support and facilitate the completion by 2012 of necessary codes and standards needed for the early commercialization and market entry of hydrogen energy technologies.

  18. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  19. Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

    2014-05-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

  20. The role of surface oxygenated-species and adsorbed hydrogen in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism and product selectivity on Pd-based catalysts in acid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, R; Singh, R K; Bera, B; Devivaraprasad, R; Neergat, M

    2015-06-21

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated on bulk PdO-based catalysts (oxides of Pd and Pd3Co) in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M HClO4 to establish the role of surface oxides and adsorbed hydrogen in the activity and product selectivity (H2O/H2O2). The initial voltammetric features suggest that the oxides are inactive toward ORR. The evolution of the ORR voltammograms and potential-dependent H2O2 generation features on the PdO catalyst suggest gradual and parallel in situ reduction of the bulk PdO phase below ∼0.4 V in the hydrogen underpotential deposition (Hupd) region; the reduction of the bulk PdO catalyst is confirmed from the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. The potential-dependent H2O2 generation features originate due to the presence of surface oxides and adsorbed hydrogen; this is further confirmed using halide ions (Cl(-) and Br(-)) and peroxide as the external impurities.

  1. Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Newhouse, Norman L. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Led by PPG and partnered with Hexagon Lincoln and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the team recently carried out a project “Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass”. The project was funded by DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, starting on September 1, 2014 as a two-year project to assess technical and commercial feasibilities of manufacturing low-cost, high-strength glass fibers to replace T700 carbon fibers with a goal of reducing the composite total cost by 50% of the existing, commercial 700 bar hydrogen storage tanks used in personal vehicles.

  2. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  3. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  4. Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

  5. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Technical report describing DOE's Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence investigation into various adsorbent and chemisorption materials and progress towards meeting DOE's hydrogen storage targets. The report presents a review of the material status as related to DOE hydrogen storage targets and explains the basis for the down select decisions.

  6. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Technical report describing DOE's Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence investigation into various adsorbent and chemisorption materials and progress towards meeting DOE's hydrogen storage targets. The report presents a review of the material status as related to DOE hydrogen storage targets and explains the basis for the down select decisions.

  7. Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.

    2008-09-30

    -efficiency CIGS and a-Si:H with operating features compatible with high-efficiency photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. The objective of one activity under the hydrogen production from biomass task was to conduct parametric testing of the Pearson gasifier and to determine the effects of gasifier operating conditions on the gas yields and quality. The hydrogen yield from this gasifier was evaluated in a parametric test series over a range of residence times from 0.8 to 2.2 seconds. H2 concentrations as high as 55% (volume) were measured in the product gas at the longer residence times and this corresponds to a hydrogen yield of 90 kg per tonne of bagasse without gas upgrading. The objective of another activity was to develop hot gas clean-up capabilities for the HNEI gasifier test facility to support hydrogen-from-biomass research. The product gas stream at the outlet of the hot gas filter was characterized for concentrations of permanent gas species and contaminants. Biomass feedstock processing activity included a preliminary investigation into methods for processing sugar cane trash at the Puunene Sugar Factory on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The objective of the investigation was to explore treatment methods that would enable the successful use of cane trash as fuel for the production of hydrogen via gasification. Analyses were completed for the technical and economic feasibility of producing biofuel from photosynthetic marine microbes on a commercial scale. Results included estimates for total costs, energy efficiency, and return on investment. The biohydrogen team undertook a comprehensive review of the field and came to what is considered a realistic conclusion. To summarize, continued research is recommended in the fundamentals of the science related to genetic engineering and specific topics to cover knowledge gaps. In the meantime, the team also advocates continued development of related processes which can be linked to pollution control and other real world

  8. Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.

    2008-09-30

    -efficiency CIGS and a-Si:H with operating features compatible with high-efficiency photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting. The objective of one activity under the hydrogen production from biomass task was to conduct parametric testing of the Pearson gasifier and to determine the effects of gasifier operating conditions on the gas yields and quality. The hydrogen yield from this gasifier was evaluated in a parametric test series over a range of residence times from 0.8 to 2.2 seconds. H2 concentrations as high as 55% (volume) were measured in the product gas at the longer residence times and this corresponds to a hydrogen yield of 90 kg per tonne of bagasse without gas upgrading. The objective of another activity was to develop hot gas clean-up capabilities for the HNEI gasifier test facility to support hydrogen-from-biomass research. The product gas stream at the outlet of the hot gas filter was characterized for concentrations of permanent gas species and contaminants. Biomass feedstock processing activity included a preliminary investigation into methods for processing sugar cane trash at the Puunene Sugar Factory on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The objective of the investigation was to explore treatment methods that would enable the successful use of cane trash as fuel for the production of hydrogen via gasification. Analyses were completed for the technical and economic feasibility of producing biofuel from photosynthetic marine microbes on a commercial scale. Results included estimates for total costs, energy efficiency, and return on investment. The biohydrogen team undertook a comprehensive review of the field and came to what is considered a realistic conclusion. To summarize, continued research is recommended in the fundamentals of the science related to genetic engineering and specific topics to cover knowledge gaps. In the meantime, the team also advocates continued development of related processes which can be linked to pollution control and other real world

  9. Two-step adsorption on jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers: dependence on hydrogen-bonding capability of adsorbates, ligand-substituent effect, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Yukari; Onishi, Fumiaki; Kita, Hidetoshi; Ebihara, Masahiro

    2010-11-01

    A preliminary study of isopropanol (IPA) adsorption/desorption isotherms on a jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymer, [Zn(2)(bdc)(2)(dabco)](n) (1, H(2)bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane), showed unambiguous two-step profiles via a highly shrunk intermediate framework. The results of adsorption measurements on 1, using probing gas molecules of alcohol (MeOH and EtOH) for the size effect and Me(2)CO for the influence of hydrogen bonding, show that alcohol adsorption isotherms are gradual two-step profiles, whereas the Me(2)CO isotherm is a typical type-I isotherm, indicating that a two-step adsorption/desorption is involved with hydrogen bonds. To further clarify these characteristic adsorption/desorption behaviors, selecting nitroterephthalate (bdc-NO(2)), bromoterephthalate (bdc-Br), and 2,5-dichloroterephthalate (bdc-Cl(2)) as substituted dicarboxylate ligands, isomorphous jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers, {[Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (2 ⊃ solvents), {[Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (3 ⊃ solvents), and {[Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (4 ⊃ solvents), were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analyses. Thermal gravimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and N(2) adsorption at 77 K measurements reveal that [Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (2), [Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)](n) (3), and [Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (4) maintain their frameworks without guest molecules with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of 1568 (2), 1292 (3), and 1216 (4) m(2) g(-1). As found in results of MeOH, EtOH, IPA, and Me(2)CO adsorption/desorption on 2-4, only MeOH adsorption on 2 shows an obvious two-step profile. Considering the substituent effects and adsorbate sizes, the hydrogen bonds, which are triggers for two-step adsorption, are formed between adsorbates and carboxylate groups at the corners in the pores, inducing wide pores to become narrow pores. Interestingly, such

  10. Technical Analysis of Projects Being Funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward G. Skolnik

    2006-02-10

    In July 2000, Energetics began a project in which we performed site-visit based technical analyses or evaluations on hydrogen R&D projects for the purpose of providing in-depth information on the status and accomplishments of these projects to the public, and especially to hydrogen stakeholders. Over a three year period, 32 site-visit analyses were performed. In addition two concepts gleaned from the site visits became subjects of in depth techno-economic analyses. Finally, Energetics produced a compilation document that contains each site-visit analysis that we have performed, starting in 1996 on other contracts through the end of Year One of the current project (July 2001). This included 21 projects evaluated on previous contracts, and 10 additional ones from Year One. Reports on projects visited in Years One and Two were included in their respective Annual Reports. The Year Two Report also includes the two In-depth Analyses and the Compilation document. Reports in Year three began an attempt to perform reviews more geared to hydrogen safety. This Final Report contains a summary of the overall project, all of the 32 site-visit analyses and the two In-depth Analyses.

  11. Technical and economic evaluation of hydrogen storage systems based on light metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepsen, Julian

    2014-07-01

    Novel developments regarding materials for solid-state hydrogen storage show promising prospects. These complex hydrides exhibit high mass-related storage capacities and thus great technical potential to store hydrogen in an efficient and safe way. However, a comprehensive evaluation of economic competitiveness is still lacking, especially in the case of the LiBH4 / MgH2 storage material. In this study, an assessment with respect to the economic feasibility of implementing complex hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is presented. The cost structure of hydrogen storage systems based on NaAlH4 and LiBH4 / MgH2 is discussed and compared with the conventional high pressure (700 bar) and liquid storage systems. Furthermore, the properties of LiBH4 / MgH2, so-called Li-RHC (Reactive Hydride Composite), are scientifically compared and evaluated on the lab and pilot plant scale. To enhance the reaction rate, the addition of TiCl3 is investigated and high energy ball milling is evaluated as processing technique. The effect of the additive in combination with the processing technique is described in detail. Finally, an optimum set of processing parameters and additive content are identified and can be applied for scaled-up production of the material based on simple models considering energy input during processing. Furthermore, thermodynamic, heat transfer and kinetic properties are experimentally determined by different techniques and analysed as a basis for modelling and designing scaled-up storage systems. The results are analysed and discussed with respect to the reaction mechanisms and reversibility of the system. Heat transfer properties are assessed with respect to the scale-up for larger hydrogen storage systems. Further improvements of the heat transfer were achieved by compacting the material. In this regard, the influence of the compaction pressure on the apparent density, thermal conductivity and sorption behaviour, was investigated in detail. Finally, scaled

  12. Quantum chemical investigation on the role of Li adsorbed on anatase (101) surface nano-materials on the storage of molecular hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasadesikan, V; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-06-01

    Lithiation of TiO2 has been shown to enhance the storage of hydrogen up to 5.6 wt% (Hu et al. J Am Chem Soc 128:11740-11741, 2006). The mechanism for the process is still unknown. In this work we have carried out a study on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the surface and migration into subsurface layers of anatase (101) by periodic density functional theory calculations implementing on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U). The model consists of 24 [TiO2] units with 11.097 × 7.655 Å(2) surface area. Adsorption energies have been calculated for different Li atoms (1-14) on the surface. A maximum of 13 Li atoms can be accommodated on the surface at two bridged O, Ti-O, and Ti atom adsorption sites, with 83 kcal mol(-1) adsorption energy for a single Li atom adsorbed between two bridged O atoms from where it can migrate into the subsurface layer with 27 kcal mol(-1) energy barrier. The predicted adsorption energies for H2 on the lithiated TiO2 (101) surface with 1-10 Li atoms revealed that the highest adsorption energies occurred on 1-Li, 5-Li, and 9-Li surfaces with 3.5, 4.4, and 7.6 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The values decrease rapidly with additional H2 co-adsorbed on the lithiated surfaces; the maximum H2 adsorption on the 9Li-TiO2(a) surface was estimated to be only 0.32 wt% under 100 atm H2 pressure at 77 K. The result of Bader charge analysis indicated that the reduction of Ti occurred depending on the Li atoms covered on the TiO2 surface.

  13. The Use of Adsorbent Materials of Improving the Characteristics of Polluted Soils, Part 1 Phytoremediation of Soils Polluted with Oil Products, Cultivated with Technical Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Masu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study are presented in pot experimental variants regarding alternatives to improve the characteristics of soils polluted with 74.12 ± 3.50 g·kg-1 D.M. total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH in order to apply the phytoremediation process using technical plants from the common flax (Linum usitatissimum. The harmful effects of TPH polluted soils to plants was reduced by using fly ash from thermal plant as temporary adsorbent of non-polar pollutants, petroleum products. The increase of water retention capacity of the soil was achieved by treatments with indigenous volcanic tuff. The lack of nutrients, based on N and P in soils contaminated with TPH rich in C compounds are completed using sewage sludge anaerobically stabilized. The use of appropriate amounts of fly ash and fertilizer agents in the presence of volcanic tuff caused the formation of strong networks of roots and rich harvests of plants, stems and seeds from the treated soil. The TPH reduction efficiency of TPH polluted soils treated with fly ash (TPH soil: fly ash ratio 12:1 wt. / wt. and anaerobically stabilized sewage sludge respectively indigenous volcanic tuff during one vegetative cycle of crops was in the range of 56.2 - 63.25 %.

  14. Dramatic effect of pore size reduction on the dynamics of hydrogen adsorbed in metal–organic materials

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, Patrick

    2014-07-21

    The effects of pore size reduction on the dynamics of hydrogen sorption in metal-organic materials (MOMs) were elucidated by studying SIFSIX-2-Cu and its doubly interpenetrated polymorph SIFSIX-2-Cu-i by means of sorption, inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and computational modeling. SIFSIX-2-Cu-i exhibits much smaller pore sizes, which possess high H2 sorption affinity at low loadings. Experimental H2 sorption measurements revealed that the isosteric heat of adsorption (Qst) for H2 in SIFSIX-2-Cu-i is nearly two times higher than that for SIFSIX-2-Cu (8.6 vs. 4.6 kJ mol-1). The INS spectrum for H2 in SIFSIX-2-Cu-i is rather unique for a porous material, as only one broad peak appears at low energies near 6 meV, which simply increases in intensity with loading until the pores are filled. The value for this rotational transition is lower than that in most neutral metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), including those with open Cu sites (8-9 meV), which is indicative of a higher barrier to rotation and stronger interaction in the channels of SIFSIX-2-Cu-i than the open Cu sites in MOFs. Simulations of H2 sorption in SIFSIX-2-Cu-i revealed two hydrogen sorption sites in the MOM: direct interaction with the equatorial fluorine atom (site 1) and between two equatorial fluorine atoms on opposite walls (site 2). The calculated rotational energy levels and rotational barriers for the two sites in SIFSIX-2-Cu-i are in good agreement with INS data. Furthermore, the rotational barriers and binding energies for site 2 are slightly higher than that for site 1, which is consistent with INS results. The lowest calculated transition for the primary site in SIFSIX-2-Cu is also in good agreement with INS data. In addition, this transition in the non-interpenetrating material is higher than any of the sites in SIFSIX-2-Cu-i, which indicates a significantly weaker interaction with the host as a result of the larger pore size. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  15. Behavior of adsorbed diphenyl-sulfide on the Pd/C catalyst for o-chloronitrobenzene hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Su; Xiao-Nian Li; Qun-Feng Zhang; Lei Ma; Chun-Shan Lu; Feng Feng

    2013-01-01

    A series of diphenyl-sulfide (Ph2S)-immobilized Pd/C catalysts (Pd-Ph2S(x)/C) were prepared using the wetness-impregnation and immobilization method.Pd-Ph2S(x)/C catalysts employed for the hydrogenation of o-chloronitrobenzene showed very high selectivity.The structure of Pd-Ph2S(x)/C with different molar ratio of ligand (x-values) was characterized by XPS and TG-DSC-MS.The results suggest a "saturated" surface ratio of Ph2S/Pd (about 0.3) was formed on the Pd-Ph2S(x)/C catalysts surface.The Ph2S immobilized on the Pd particle is quite stable,and the desorption of Ph2S or dissociative loss of phenyl group was only found at temperatures above 500 K.The possible catalytic mechanism of the Pd-Ph2S(x)/C catalyst was also discussed.

  16. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  17. The kinetics of the hydrogen chloride oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Martinez Isai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen chloride (HCl oxidation has been investigated on technical membrane electrode assemblies in a cyclone flow cell. Influence of Nafion loading, temperature and hydrogen chloride mole fraction in the gas phase has been studied. The apparent kinetic parameters like reaction order with respect to HCl, Tafel slope and activation energy have been determined from polarization data. The apparent kinetic parameters suggest that the recombination of adsorbed Cl intermediate is the rate determining step.

  18. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  19. Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A. [Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA (United States); Schoenung, S.M. [Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper discusses the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to supplying pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supplying distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking needs to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs.

  20. High flux ceramic membrane for hydrogen separation. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Durai-Swamy

    1999-05-04

    Fuel cells that convert hydrogen to electricity will play an increasingly important role in the generation of future electric power for stationary and transportation sector applications. However, more economic methods to produce hydrogen from fossil fuels are needed. This project addresses the need to develop low cost ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation from reformed fuels.

  1. Methodology for assessing the safety of Hydrogen Systems: HyRAM 1.1 technical reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, Katrina; Hecht, Ethan; Reynolds, John Thomas; Blaylock, Myra L.; Erin E. Carrier

    2017-03-01

    The HyRAM software toolkit provides a basis for conducting quantitative risk assessment and consequence modeling for hydrogen infrastructure and transportation systems. HyRAM is designed to facilitate the use of state-of-the-art science and engineering models to conduct robust, repeatable assessments of hydrogen safety, hazards, and risk. HyRAM is envisioned as a unifying platform combining validated, analytical models of hydrogen behavior, a stan- dardized, transparent QRA approach, and engineering models and generic data for hydrogen installations. HyRAM is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the U. S. De- partment of Energy to increase access to technical data about hydrogen safety and to enable the use of that data to support development and revision of national and international codes and standards. This document provides a description of the methodology and models contained in the HyRAM version 1.1. HyRAM 1.1 includes generic probabilities for hydrogen equipment fail- ures, probabilistic models for the impact of heat flux on humans and structures, and computa- tionally and experimentally validated analytical and first order models of hydrogen release and flame physics. HyRAM 1.1 integrates deterministic and probabilistic models for quantifying accident scenarios, predicting physical effects, and characterizing hydrogen hazards (thermal effects from jet fires, overpressure effects from deflagrations), and assessing impact on people and structures. HyRAM is a prototype software in active development and thus the models and data may change. This report will be updated at appropriate developmental intervals.

  2. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Pratapas; Daniel Mather; Anton Kozlovsky

    2007-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen's significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  3. Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education (H2E3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Peter A.; Cashman, Eileen; Lipman, Timothy; Engel, Richard A.

    2011-09-15

    Schatz Energy Research Center's Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education curriculum development project delivered hydrogen energy and fuel cell learning experiences to over 1,000 undergraduate engineering students at five California universities, provided follow-on internships for students at a fuel cell company; and developed commercializable hydrogen teaching tools including a fuel cell test station and a fuel cell/electrolyzer experiment kit. Monitoring and evaluation tracked student learning and faculty and student opinions of the curriculum, showing that use of the curriculum did advance student comprehension of hydrogen fundamentals. The project web site (hydrogencurriculum.org) provides more information.

  4. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratapas, John; Mather, Daniel; Kozlovsky, Anton

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen’s significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  5. Experimental hydrogen-fueled automotive engine design data-base project. Volume 2. Main technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R.; Adt, R.R. Jr.; Pappas, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    Operational performance and emissions characteristics of hydrogen-fueled engines are reviewed. The project activities are reviewed including descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained. Analyses of other hydrogen engine project data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort.

  6. Technical and economic analyses of hydrogen production via indirectly heated gasification and pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Technoeconomic analyses have been conducted on two processes to produce hydrogen from biomass: indirectly-heated gasification of biomass followed by steam reforming of the syngas, and biomass pyrolysis followed by steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil. The analysis of the gasification-based process was highly detailed, including a process flowsheet, material and energy balances calculated with a process simulation program, equipment cost estimation, and the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen. The pyrolysis-based process analysis was of a less detailed nature, as all necessary experimental data have not been obtained; this analysis is a follow-up to the preliminary economic analysis presented at the 1994 Hydrogen Program Review. A coproduct option in which pyrolysis oil is used to produce hydrogen and a commercial adhesive was also studied for economic viability. Based on feedstock availability estimates, three plant sizes were studied: 907 T/day, 272 T/day, and 27 T/day. The necessary selling price of hydrogen produced by steam reforming syngas from the Battelle Columbus Laboratories indirectly heated biomass gasifier falls within current market values for the large and medium size plants within a wide range of feedstock costs. Results show that the small scale plant does not produce hydrogen at economically competitive prices, indicating that if gasification is used as the upstream process to produce hydrogen, local refueling stations similar to current gasoline stations, would probably not be feasible.

  7. Hydrogen initiative: An integrated approach toward rational nanocatalyst design for hydrogen production. Technical Report-Year 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlachos, Dionisios G. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Buttrey, Douglas J. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Lauterbach, Jochen A. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2007-03-29

    The overall objective of this grant is to develop a rational framework for the discovery of low cost, robust, and active nano-catalysts that will enable efficient hydrogen production. Our approach will be the first demonstration of integrated multiscale model, nano-catalyst synthesis, and nanoscale characterization assisted high throughput experimentation (HTE). We will initially demonstrate our approach with ammonia decomposition on noble metal catalysts. Our research focuses on many elements of the Hydrogen Initiative in the Focus Area of “Design of Catalysts at the Nanoscale’. It combines high-throughput screening methods with various nanostructure synthesis protocols, advanced measurements, novel in situ and ex situ characterization techniques, and multiscale theory, modeling and simulation. This project directly addresses several of the long-term goals of the DOE/BES program. In particular, new nanoscale catalytic materials will be synthesized, characterized and modeled for the production of hydrogen from ammonia and a computational framework will be developed for efficient extraction of information from experimental data and for rational design of catalysts whose impact goes well beyond the proposed hydrogen production project. In the first year of the grant, we have carried out HTE screening using a 16 parallel microreactor coupled with an FTIR analysis system. We screened nearly twenty single metals and several bimetallic catalysts as a function of temperature, catalyst loading, inlet composition, and temperature (order of 400 experiments). We have found that Ru is the best single metal catalyst and no better catalysts were found among the library of bimetallics we have created so far. Furthermore, we have investigated promoting effects (i.e., K, Cs, and Ba) of the Ru catalyst. We have found that K is the dominant promoter of increased Ru activity. Response surface experimental design has led to substantial improvements of the Ru catalyst with promotion

  8. Final Technical Report: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Grasman

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-FC36-04GO14285 by Mercedes-Benz & Research Development, North America (MBRDNA), Chrysler, Daimler, Mercedes Benz USA (MBUSA), BP, DTE Energy and NextEnergy to validate fuel cell technologies for infrastructure, transportation as well as assess technology and commercial readiness for the market. The Mercedes Team, together with its partners, tested the technology by operating and fueling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under real world conditions in varying climate, terrain and driving conditions. Vehicle and infrastructure data was collected to monitor the progress toward the hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure performance targets of $2.00 to 3.00/gge hydrogen production cost and 2,000-hour fuel cell durability. Finally, to prepare the public for a hydrogen economy, outreach activities were designed to promote awareness and acceptance of hydrogen technology. DTE, BP and NextEnergy established hydrogen filling stations using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage and dispensing. DTE established a hydrogen station in Southfield, Michigan while NextEnergy and BP worked together to construct one hydrogen station in Detroit. BP constructed another fueling station in Burbank, California and provided a full-time hydrogen trailer at San Francisco, California and a hydrogen station located at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern, California. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2011. The Team deployed 30 Gen I Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) in the beginning of the project. While 28 Gen I F-CELLs used the A-Class platform, the remaining 2 were Sprinter delivery vans. Fuel cell vehicles were operated by external customers for real-world operations in various regions (ecosystems) to capture various driving patterns and climate conditions (hot, moderate and cold). External operators consisted of F-CELL partner organizations in California and Michigan

  9. The hydrogen resource. Productive, technical and economic analysis; La risorsa idrogeno: analisi produttiva tecnica ed economica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Fronzo, G. [Lecce Univ., Lecce (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Economiche, Matematico-Statistiche, Economici-Aziendali

    2000-02-01

    Diffusion of hydrogen as an energetic vector meets with a lot of obstacles that don't depend on available raw material, but on hydrogen combination with other elements. It is necessary, therefore, to separate hydrogen picking out the available different technologies to have different pure hydrogen of variable quantities. Besides, its diffusion as fuel is limited because of the great production cost compared to fuels sprung from petroleum. Hydrogen used on a large scale could have advantages on the environment and occupation, but there are economic and politic obstacles to limit its diffusion. Future of economic system, based on hydrogen as the main energetic vector, will depend on the programme that national and international qualified governing bodies will be able to do. [Italian] L'articolo analizza l'uso dell'idrogeno come risorsa dal punto di vista tecnico ed economico. Si discute la relazione con i programmi che governi nazionali sapranno mettere in campo per il suo sfruttamento.

  10. Improvement of hydrogen solubility and entrainment in hydrocracker feedstocks. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1997-02-01

    The project consisted of two tasks: (1) development of a thermodynamic model for hydrogen solubility in hydrocarbons and extension of this model to predict solubility of hydrogen in hydrocracker feedstocks at conditions similar to those of hydrocracking operations, and (2) design and construction of a gas solubility apparatus to measure solubility of hydrogen in hydrocarbons and in hydrocracker feedstocks. The theoretical work proposed was fully accomplished by developing a sophisticated model for hydrogen solubility in hydrocarbons and in hydrocracker feedstocks at advanced temperatures and pressures. The proposed experimental work ran into a number of obstacles, especially to get the original and newly designed on-line sampling technique to function properly. A number of calibrations and tests for reproducibility were necessary to assure the accuracy of measured data. Although a very well designed gas solubility apparatus was built, not much time was left to generate significant hydrogen solubility data. The plans are to use the apparatus in future to measure hydrogen solubility data in liquid fuels to facilitate more efficient design of fuel conversion systems.

  11. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

    2010-03-03

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  12. Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, David

    2012-06-29

    The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations

  13. Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (TIAX, LLC)

    2011-02-09

    The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

  14. TECHNICAL NOTE: Development of a SMH actuator system using hydrogen-absorbing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae Kyu; Pang, Du Yeol; Choi, Kwang-Hun; Yook Kim, Yong; Lee, Seong Cheol; Kim, Nam Gyun

    2006-10-01

    A special type of metal hydride (SMH) actuator has been developed and the pressure response inside the actuator has been studied against changing temperature controlled by Peltier elements. The newly developed SMH actuator is characterized by its smaller size, lower weight, noiseless operation, and compliance similar to that of human bodies. The simple SMH actuator, consisting of powdered hydrogen-absorbing alloys as a source of mechanical power, Peltier elements as a thermal source, and a cylinder with metal bellows as a mechanical element, has been developed. An assembly of copper pipes, which has good thermal conductivity, has been constructed to contain hydrogen-absorbing alloys. Hydrogen-absorbing alloys can reversibly absorb and desorb a large volume of hydrogen, more than about one thousand times their own volume. The new SMH actuator utilizes the reversible reactions between thermal energy and mechanical energy of hydrogen-absorbing alloys. Furthermore, the characteristics of the actuator for different temperature, pressure, and external loads were studied and explored to allow the developed SMH actuator to be used in medical and rehabilitation applications.

  15. Adsorptive Removal of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Water with Functionalized Metal-organic Frameworks: Remarkable Adsorbents with Hydrogen-bonding Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pill Won; Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Ahmed, Imteaz; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-10-01

    Adsorption of typical pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) (such as naproxen, ibuprofen and oxybenzone) from aqueous solutions was studied by using the highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-101 with and without functionalization. Adsorption results showed that MIL-101s with H-donor functional groups such as -OH and -NH2 were very effective for naproxen adsorption, despite a decrease in porosity, probably because of H-bonding between O atoms on naproxen and H atoms on the adsorbent. For this reason, MIL-101 with two functional groups capable of H-bonding (MIL-101-(OH)2) exhibited remarkable adsorption capacity based on adsorbent surface area. The favorable contributions of -OH and -(OH)2 on MIL-101 in the increased adsorption of ibuprofen and oxybenzone (especially based on porosity) confirmed again the importance of H-bonding mechanism. The adsorbent with the highest adsorption capacity, MIL-101-OH, was very competitive when compared with carbonaceous materials, mesoporous materials, and pristine MIL-101. Moreover, the MIL-101-OH could be recycled several times by simply washing with ethanol, suggesting potential application in the adsorptive removal of PPCPs from water.

  16. Adsorptive Removal of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Water with Functionalized Metal-organic Frameworks: Remarkable Adsorbents with Hydrogen-bonding Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pill Won; Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Ahmed, Imteaz; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of typical pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) (such as naproxen, ibuprofen and oxybenzone) from aqueous solutions was studied by using the highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-101 with and without functionalization. Adsorption results showed that MIL-101s with H-donor functional groups such as –OH and –NH2 were very effective for naproxen adsorption, despite a decrease in porosity, probably because of H-bonding between O atoms on naproxen and H atoms on the adsorbent. For this reason, MIL-101 with two functional groups capable of H-bonding (MIL-101-(OH)2) exhibited remarkable adsorption capacity based on adsorbent surface area. The favorable contributions of –OH and –(OH)2 on MIL-101 in the increased adsorption of ibuprofen and oxybenzone (especially based on porosity) confirmed again the importance of H-bonding mechanism. The adsorbent with the highest adsorption capacity, MIL-101-OH, was very competitive when compared with carbonaceous materials, mesoporous materials, and pristine MIL-101. Moreover, the MIL-101-OH could be recycled several times by simply washing with ethanol, suggesting potential application in the adsorptive removal of PPCPs from water. PMID:27695005

  17. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K; Tysoe, Wilfred T

    2016-08-04

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEA+MP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O····H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. The combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations.

  18. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-08-01

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEA+MP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O....H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. The combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations.

  19. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, David

    2012-06-29

    The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations

  1. Final Technical Report for EE0006091: H2Pump Hydrogen Recycling System Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudt, Rhonda [H2Pump LLC, Latham, NY (United States)

    2017-02-21

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the product readiness and to quantify the benefits and customer value proposition of H2Pump’s Hydrogen Recycling System (HRS-100™) by installing and analyzing the operation of multiple prototype 100-kg per day systems in real world customer locations. The data gathered will be used to measure reliability, demonstrate the value proposition to customers, and validate our business model. H2Pump will install, track and report multiple field demonstration systems in industrial heat treating and semi-conductor applications. The customer demonstrations will be used to develop case studies and showcase the benefits of the technology to drive market adoption.

  2. Solar thermal hydrogen production process. Annual technical progress report, January-December, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    Westinghouse is currently under contract to DOE for technology development of the Sulfur Cycle, a hybrid thermochemical-electrochemical process for the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water. Operational studies have been conducted and have resulted in definitions of operating modes for solar/hydrogen plants and in assessments of the day/night and annual variations in performance that will influence the operating modes and the sizing of plant subsystems. Conceptual design studies have been conducted for process components that interface with the solar receiver. From related trade-off studies, a preferred configuration emerged that involves an intermediate working fluid (e.g., hot gas) between the solar receiver and the sulfuric acid decomposition reactor. The design of the reactor has been based on a shell and tube type heat exchanger configuration with catalyst placement on the shell side. A number of candidate materials for structural use in the acid decomposition reactor also have been evaluated experimentally. Screening tests and endurance tests with potential catalysts (to accelerate the rate of sulfur trioxide cracking) have been conducted with encouraging results. Approximately three dozen candidate materials for use in constructing the acid vaporizer have been tested for corrosion resistance to the expected environment. Detailed discussions of the results obtained during 1979 are presented.

  3. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  4. The Dynamics and Structures of Adsorbed Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Ellenson, W. D.; McTague, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    of molecules such as NH3 or the internal modes of adsorbed molecules such as C4H10. Neutron scattering measurements where substrates other than graphite products are used as the adsorbents will not be reviewed here. However, the power of the technique will be demonstrated in an example of H2 physisorbed...... to activated alumina and in an example where hydrogen is chemisorbed to Raney nickel...

  5. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-12-31

    During the last quarter several high performance membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The heat-resistant resin poly(etherimide) has been selected as the polymer with the most outstanding properties for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Flat sheet and hollow fiber poly(etherimide) membranes have been prepared and evaluated with pure gases and gas mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures. Multilayer composite poly(ether-ester-amide) membranes were also developed. These membranes are useful for the separation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide hydrogen. They have very high selectivities and extremely high normalized carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide fluxes. Separation of carbon dioxide/hydrogen streams is a key problem in hydrogen production from coal. The development of the two membranes now gives us two approaches to separate these gas streams, depending on the stream`s composition. If the stream contains small quantities of hydrogen, the hydrogen- permeable poly(etherimide) membrane would be used to produce a hydrogen-enriched permeate. If the stream contains small quantities of carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide, the poly(ether-ester-amide) membrane would be used to produce a carbon dioxide/hydrogen sulfide-free, hydrogen-enriched residue stream. 6 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with pico- and femtosecond laser pulses. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.S.

    1989-12-01

    This thesis presents a theoretical study of the interaction of atomic hydrogen with coherent laser pulses in the 5 femtosecond to 10 picosecond range, in the weak-field limit, and in intense fields. We approach the problem in the weak-field limit by studying the relationship between the Fourier relation of the laser pulse (Delta omega Delta t) and the (Delta E Delta t) relation of the atomic Rydberg wave packet generated by the laser pulse. A derivation of the wave packet based on the WKB approximation is given, permitting the quantity Delta t to be derived for the quantum state, with the conclusion that under certain circumstances a transform-limited laser pulse (satisfying Delta omega Delta t = 1/2) can generate a transform-limited electron (satisfying Delta E Delta t/h = 1/2). A population-trapping effect is found numerically and modeled theoretically. Despite the high field intensities, population representing the excited electron is recaptured from the ionization continuum by bound states during the excitation. Population returns to the atom with just the right phase to strongly inhibit ionization. A theory is presented that models this effect for a variety of laser pulse shapes, with and without the rotating-wave approximation. The numerical integration reveals that a certain amount of above-threshold ionization (ATI) occurs.

  7. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  8. Onboard Hydrogen/Helium Sensors in Support of the Global Technical Regulation: An Assessment of Performance in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Crash Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, M. B.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; O' Malley, K.; Ruiz, A.

    2012-09-01

    Automobile manufacturers in North America, Europe, and Asia project a 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell powered light-duty road vehicles. These vehicles will be for general consumer applications, albeit initially in select markets but with much broader market penetration expected by 2025. To assure international harmony, North American, European, and Asian regulatory representatives are striving to base respective national regulations on an international safety standard, the Global Technical Regulation (GTR), Hydrogen Fueled Vehicle, which is part of an international agreement pertaining to wheeled vehicles and equipment for wheeled vehicles.

  9. Technical feasibility and economics of tertiary oil recovery combined with hydrogen recovery from the resulting petroleum gas. Vol. 1. Technical aspects. Technische Machbarkeit und Wirtschaftlichkeit der kombinierten Tertiaeroelfoerderung mit Wasserstoffgewinnung aus dem anfallenden Erdoelgas. Bd. 1. Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    The report investigates the technical feasibility of using the HTR modular reactor for steam supply to tertiary oil recovery, and for hydrogen recovery from the resulting petroleum gas. The report focusses on the design of the two main components, HTR modular reactor with a steam generator, and HTR modular reactor with a steam reformer, and on explaining the alternative system concepts feasible by varying the mode of combination of the two main components. Also, the design concept of a system for heat transport using nuclear long-distance energy (ADAM and EVE) is explained. The technical aspects of the required water treatment system and of the gas production unit for hydrogen recovery are discussed. (orig.).

  10. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites.

  11. Energy policy conference on the technical-economical stakes of hydrogen as future energy vector; Conference de politique energetique sur les enjeux technico-economiques de l'hydrogene comme vecteur energetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-01-01

    This document is the report of the conference meeting jointly organized by the French general plan commission and the general direction of energy and raw materials on the technical-economical stakes of hydrogen as future energy source, and in particular of hydrogen fuel-cells for cogeneration and vehicle applications: 1 - presentation of the general context: status of the hydrogen industry, French R and D and industrial actors, international status; 2 - competition or association with fossil fuels: which opportunities for hydrogen, recall of the 2020 and 2050 energy prospects, impact of hydrogen on climate change, energy efficiency reference of vehicles, CO{sub 2} emissions 'from the well to the wheel' for the different energy sources, perspectives of hydrogen fuels; 3 - main results of the study carried out by the CEREN on the prospects of stationary fuel cells in France: description of the study, concrete case of a 500 beds hospital, economic and environmental conclusions. The transparencies corresponding to the 3 points above are attached to the report. (J.S.)

  12. Theoretical Insight of Physical Adsorption for a Single Component Adsorbent + Adsorbate System: II. The Henry Region

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2009-07-07

    The Henry coefficients of a single component adsorbent + adsorbate system are calculated from experimentally measured adsorption isotherm data, from which the heat of adsorption at zero coverage is evaluated. The first part of the papers relates to the development of thermodynamic property surfaces for a single-component adsorbent + adsorbate system1 (Chakraborty, A.; Saha, B. B.; Ng, K. C.; Koyama, S.; Srinivasan, K. Langmuir 2009, 25, 2204). A thermodynamic framework is presented to capture the relationship between the specific surface area (Ai) and the energy factor, and the surface structural and the surface energy heterogeneity distribution factors are analyzed. Using the outlined approach, the maximum possible amount of adsorbate uptake has been evaluated and compared with experimental data. It is found that the adsorbents with higher specific surface areas tend to possess lower heat of adsorption (ΔH°) at the Henry regime. In this paper, we have established the definitive relation between Ai and ΔH° for (i) carbonaceous materials, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), carbon nanotubes, zeolites + hydrogen, and (ii) activated carbons + methane systems. The proposed theoretical framework of At and AH0 provides valuable guides for researchers in developing advanced porous adsorbents for methane and hydrogen uptake. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  14. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-12-31

    This report summarizes the development of polymer membranes useful in the separation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas during period 1 October 1985--30 September 1986. During the last year several high performance membranes were developed for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. The heat resistant resins poly(methyl pentene) (TPX), Mitsui Petrochemical Industries, New York, NY and poly(etherimide) (ULTEM, General Electric, Pittsfield, MA) have been selected as polymers with outstanding properties for membrane preparation. The properties of membranes prepared from these polymers are presented. TPX is an example of a moderately selective and highly permeable membrane; the poly(etherimide) membranes are more selective but have lower fluxes. These membranes will cover the range of properties required in our hydrogen separation program and the bulk of our future work will be on these membranes. A few experiments with palladium/silver membranes are also planned, as described in the Test Plan.

  15. TESTING OF CARBONACEOUS ADSORBENTS FOR REMOVAL OF POLLUTANTS FROM WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAISA NASTAS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Testing of carbonaceous adsorbents for removal of pollutants from water. Relevant direction for improving of quality of potable water is application of active carbons at various stages of water treatments. This work includes complex research dealing with testing of a broad spectrum of carbonaceous adsorbents for removal of hydrogen sulfide and nitrite ions from water. The role of the surface functional groups of carbonaceous adsorbents, their acid-basic properties, and the influence of the type of impregnated heteroatom (N, O, or metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, on removal of hydrogen sulfide species and nitrite ions have been researched. The efficiency of the catalyst obtained from peach stones by impregnation with Cu2+ ions of oxidized active carbon was established, being recommended for practical purposes to remove the hydrogen sulfide species from the sulfurous ground waters. Comparative analysis of carbonaceous adsorbents reveals the importance of surface chemistry for oxidation of nitrite ions.

  16. Technical economical analysis on recycling technology of hydrogen purification%氢气提浓回收工艺的技术经济分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄风林; 刘立业; 刘菊荣; 刘向迎; 唐璇

    2013-01-01

    提高氢气利用率,降低生产成本已成为提升生产清洁燃料的加氢工艺装置效益的关键.通过分析低体积分数含氢气体的性质,结合TSA、PSA、深冷分离、膜分离等提浓工艺的特点、使用条件,对不同提浓工艺进行了技术经济分析,提出膜分离+ PSA耦合工艺在提高低体积分数氢气有效利用方面的积极作用,为实现节能减排的目标提供参考.%Improving utilization of hydrogen and reducing production cost have become the key of increasing the benefit of hydrogenation process device that produces clean fuel. Based on the analysis on the properties of low volume fraction hydrogen,the technical economical analysis is performed in combination with the characteristics and application conditions of TSA (Temperature Swing Adsorption) ,PSA (Pressure Swing Adsorption),cryogenic separation,membrane separation,etc. The positive role of combination of membrane separation and PSA in improving the efficient utilization of low volume fraction hydrogen is put forward, which can provide reference to achieve the purpose of energy saving and emission reduction.

  17. Final Technical Report for GO15056 Millennium Cell: Development of an Advanced Chemical Hydrogen Storage and Generation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Oscar [Millennium Cell Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are to increase system storage capacity by improving hydrogen generation from concentrated sodium borohydride, with emphasis on reactor and system engineering; to complete a conceptual system design based on sodium borohydride that will include key technology improvements to enable a hydrogen fuel system that will meet the systembased storage capacity of 1.2 kWh/L (36 g H2/L) and 1.5 kWh/kg (45 g H2/kg), by the end of FY 2007; and to utilize engineering expertise to guide Center research in both off-board chemical hydride regeneration and on-board hydrogen generation systems.

  18. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending March 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-12-31

    The goal of this program is to develop polymer membranes useful in the preparation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. During this quarter the first experiment were aimed at developing high performance composite membranes for the separation of hydrogen from nitrogen and carbon monoxide. Three polymers have been selected as materials for these membranes: polyetherimide cellulose acetate and ethylcellulose. This quarter the investigators worked on polyetherimide and cellulose acetate membranes. The overall structure of these membranes is shown schematically in Figure 1. As shown, a microporous support membrane is first coated with a high flux intermediate layer then with an ultrathin permselective layer and finally, if necessary, a thin protective high flux layer. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  19. Low cost hydrogen/novel membranes technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    During this quarter, work continued on the development of high-flux palladium-silver membranes for the separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide. Palladium-silver/poly(etherimide) composite membranes were prepared by a vacuum sputtering technique. The influence of different poly(etherimide) support membranes on the performance of palladium-silver membranes was investigated. All membranes tested showed a hydrogen/carbon dioxide selectivity lower than that of the uncoated poly(etherimide)/poly(dimethylsiloxane) membranes. This is probably due to damage of the skin layer of the asymmetric poly(etherimide) support membranes during the palladium-silver electron bombardment. Polysulfone/poly(dimethylsiloxane) / poly(ether-ester-amide) composite membranes were also prepared. Membrane samples consistently showed a carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity of 9 to 10 and a normalized carbon dioxide flux of 2 to 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} cm{sup 3} (STP)/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec{center_dot}cmHg. These are extremely good values, superior to any commercially available membranes for this separation. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Production of Hydrogen by Superadiabatic Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide - Final Technical Report for the Period June 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachid B. Slimane; Francis S. Lau; Javad Abbasian

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this program is to develop an economical process for hydrogen production, with no additional carbon dioxide emission, through the thermal decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in H{sub 2}S-rich waste streams to high-purity hydrogen and elemental sulfur. The novel feature of the process being developed is the superadiabatic combustion (SAC) of part of the H{sub 2}S in the waste stream to provide the thermal energy required for the decomposition reaction such that no additional energy is required. The program is divided into two phases. In Phase 1, detailed thermochemical and kinetic modeling of the SAC reactor with H{sub 2}S-rich fuel gas and air/enriched air feeds is undertaken to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on exit gas products and conversion efficiency, and to identify key process parameters. Preliminary modeling results are used as a basis to conduct a thorough evaluation of SAC process design options, including reactor configuration, operating conditions, and productivity-product separation schemes, with respect to potential product yields, thermal efficiency, capital and operating costs, and reliability, ultimately leading to the preparation of a design package and cost estimate for a bench-scale reactor testing system to be assembled and tested in Phase 2 of the program. A detailed parametric testing plan was also developed for process design optimization and model verification in Phase 2. During Phase 2 of this program, IGT, UIC, and industry advisors UOP and BP Amoco will validate the SAC concept through construction of the bench-scale unit and parametric testing. The computer model developed in Phase 1 will be updated with the experimental data and used in future scale-up efforts. The process design will be refined and the cost estimate updated. Market survey and assessment will continue so that a commercial demonstration project can be identified.

  1. Results of a technical analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope nickel-cadmium and nickel-hydrogen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Program Office requested the expertise of the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Steering Committee (NAFBSSC) in the conduct of an independent assessment of the HST's battery system to assist in their decision of whether to fly nickel-cadmium or nickel-hydrogen batteries on the telescope. In response, a subcommittee to the NAFBSSC was organized with membership comprised of experts with background in the nickel-cadmium/nickel-hydrogen secondary battery/power systems areas. The work and recommendations of that subcommittee are presented.

  2. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-04ER86191 Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-05-07

    The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

  3. Hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

  4. EFFECT OF WEAK INTERACTIONS ON PHENOL ADSORPTION FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY AMINATED POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ming Zhang; Jin-long Chen; Ai-min Li; Bing-cai Pan; Qun Chen; Ming-yang He; Quan-xing Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption behaviors of phenol from aqueous solutions have been investigated in batch systems at 303 K and 318 K respectively, using hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent (CHA 111), aminated hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbents (NDA101, NDA 103, NDA105) and weakly basic polymeric adsorbent (D301) with a view to studying the effect of hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions between adsorbate and the adsorbent. All adsorption isotherms can be well fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich equations. Compared with D301 driven by hydrogen bonding interaction only and CHA111 driven by Van der Waals interaction only, phenol adsorption on aminated adsorbents driven by both hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions were apparently different, i.e., negative effect for NDA105, positive effect for NDA101 and synergistic effect for NDA103. In this synergistic action, some weak interactions would contribute more or less to the adsorption than they work individually.

  5. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  6. Hydrogen storage: beyond conventional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebrook, Andrew F; Gan, Weijia; Grasemann, Martin; Moret, Séverine; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2013-10-09

    The efficient storage of hydrogen is one of three major hurdles towards a potential hydrogen economy. This report begins with conventional storage methods for hydrogen and broadly covers new technology, ranging from physical media involving solid adsorbents, to chemical materials including metal hydrides, ammonia borane and liquid precursors such as alcohols and formic acid.

  7. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  8. Health effects associated with short-term exposure to low levels of hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S): A technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, D. B. [Cantox Environmental Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-10-01

    A comprehensive review of the health effects information currently available for hydrogen sulphide was commissioned by Alberta Health and Wellness in response to a recommendation of the provincial Advisory Committee on Public Safety and Sour Gas. The focus of the review was to be on the health effects of acute or short-term exposure to hydrogen sulphide, focusing on extant full-length, primary scientific papers describing original work. The review was conducted under the auspices of an Expert Panel, with members drawn from government, industry and other stakeholders. Studies were identified by means of a staged search strategy, with primary reliance placed on electronic databases accessed through the DIALOG Information Retrieval Service. Forty-five studies have been identified as meeting the criteria laid out in the Terms of Reference. Each of the 45 papers were subjected to an independent review by two members of the consultant's team, followed by a critical review of the findings from each study, and assessment of the toxicological significance and clinical relevance of any observed responses. Fifty per cent of the studies were rated of being of 'low' technical quality on the basis of weaknesses such as failure to follow conventional testing protocols; use of single exposure concentration only; use of single sex only; use of too few test subjects; lack of routine measures of toxicity; or inadequate description of exposure conditions. In addition, many of the studies were devoted to understanding the mechanism of action of hydrogen sulphide at the cellular level rather than health effects per se. Health effects information revealed no deaths in any of the clinical or case-control studies reviewed, no subjective complaints by young, healthy male and female subjects to hydrogen sulphide up to 10 ppm for 15-20 minutes, only one complaint of eye irritation, no airway symptoms nor changes in pulmonary function reported in clinical studies involving

  9. Hazards assessment and technical actions due to the production of pressured hydrogen within a pilot photovoltaic-electrolyser-fuel cell power system for agricultural equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pascuzzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A pilot power system formed by photovoltaic panels, alkaline electrolyser and fuel cell stacks was designed and set up to supply the heating system of an experimental greenhouse. The aim of this paper is to analyse the main safety aspects of this power system connected to the management of the pressured hydrogen, such as the explosion limits of the mixture hydrogen-oxygen, the extension of the danger zone, the protection pressure vessels and the system to make unreactive the plant. The electrolyser unit is the core of this plant and from the safety point of view has been equipped with devices able to highlight the malfunctions before they cause damages. Alarm situations are highlighted and the production process is cut off in safe conditions in the event that the operational parameters have an abnormal deviation from the design values. Also the entire power system has been designed so that any failure to its components does not compromise the workers’ safety even if the risk analysis is in progress because technical operations are being carried out for enhancing the plant functionality, making it more suitable to the designed task of supplying electrically the greenhouse heating system during cold periods. Some experimental data pertinent to the solar radiation and the corresponding hydrogen production rate are also reported. At present it does not exist a well-established safety reference protocol to design the reliability of these types of power plants and then the assumed safety measures even if related to the achieved pilot installation, can represent an original base of reference to set up guidelines for designing the safety of power plants in the future available for agricultural purposes.

  10. Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge. Project Final Technical Report (May 2, 2005-Dec. 31, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabasso, Israel; Yuan, Youxin

    2013-02-27

    Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

  11. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  13. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayes, Richard T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Janke, Christopher James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Das, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liao, W. -P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Jordana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Byers, Maggie Flicker [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Schneider, Eric [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  14. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michling, R.; Braun, A.; Cristescu, I.; Dittrich, H.; Gramlich, N.; Lohr, N. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Glugla, M.; Shu, W.; Willms, S. [ITER Organization, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h{sup -1} and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  15. High performance Mo adsorbent PZC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-10-01

    We have developed Mo adsorbents for natural Mo(n, {gamma}){sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generator. Among them, we called the highest performance adsorbent PZC that could adsorb about 250 mg-Mo/g. In this report, we will show the structure, adsorption mechanism of Mo, and the other useful properties of PZC when you carry out the examination of Mo adsorption and elution of {sup 99m}Tc. (author)

  16. SYNTHESIS OF SPHERICAL MACROPOROUS ADSORBENT BASED ON UREA—FORMALDEHYDE CONDENSED POLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMingcheng; XUMancai; 等

    2000-01-01

    Spherical macroporous adsorbents with active sites capable of hydrogen bonding adsorption based on urea-formaldehyde condensed polymer were synthesized via reversed suspension polymerization.The properties of the obtained adsorbent were also investigated in detail.The results showed that the water permeability could be improved by adding hydroxyl-contatining organic compound moiety into the adsorbent.The specific surface area and average pore diameter of these adsorbents increaswed while the porosity first increased then decreased with the increase of the amount of the added hydroxyl-containing compound.

  17. Symmetry-Driven Band Gap Engineering in Hydrogen Functionalized Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Holm; Grubisic Cabo, Antonija; Balog, Richard;

    2016-01-01

    Band gap engineering in hydrogen functionalized graphene is demonstrated by changing the symmetry of the functionalization structures. Small differences in hydrogen adsorbate binding energies on graphene on Ir(111) allow tailoring of highly periodic functionalization structures favoring one disti...

  18. SYNERGISTIC INTERACTIONS ON PHENOL ADSORPTION FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ming Zhang; Jin-long Chen; Bing-cai Pan; Quan-xing Zhang; Bo Zhang; Fan Wang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the adsorption behaviors of phenol on polymeric adsorbents (Amberlite XAD4, NDA101, and D301)were investigated in batch system at 293, 303, and 313 K, respectively. As the results shown, the adsorption isotherms of phenol on all adsorbents can be well fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich equations, which indicate a favorable and exothermic process. The adsorption capacity on a newly developed aminated adsorbent, NDA101, on which adsorption could be achieved by both hydrogen bonding interaction and π-π interaction, are higher than that on a weak base adsorbent, D301, on which adsorption could be achieved by hydrogen bonding interaction only, and on a nonpolar adsorbent, XAD4, on which adsorption could be achieved by π-π interaction only. The results of this paper indicate that the synergistic effect of some weak interactions, which occur simultaneously would contribute more to the adsorption than that occur individually.

  19. ADSORPTION OF PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS ONTO THE SPHERICAL MACROPOROUS ADSORBENT BASED ON UREA—FORMALDEHYDE CONDENSED POLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuMingcheng; XUMancai; 等

    2000-01-01

    Adsorption of phenol,catechol and resorcinol,which vary in their ability to interact with the adsorbent through hydrogen bond,were used to investigate the adsorption mechanistic interaction.The adsorption enthalpies of the above mentioned compound onto the adsorbent were calculated and thermodynamic analysis was carried out.The results showed the adsorbent with the lowest adsorption enthalpies for the sorbate such as catechol with intermolecular hydrogen bond also display the lowest adsorption affinity.On the other hand,the more of the groups available for hydrogen bond interaction,the higher of the adsorption affinity.These observations support the contention that phenol adsorption is driven predominantly by specific interaction of the solute with active sites on the surface of the adsorbent.

  20. Substrate-adsorbate coupling in CO-adsorbed copper

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, S P; Lewis, Steven P.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational properties of carbon monoxide adsorbed to the copper (100) surface are explored within density functional theory. Atoms of the substrate and adsorbate are treated on an equal footing in order to examine the effect of substrate--adsorbate coupling. This coupling is found to have a significant effect on the vibrational modes, particularly the in-plane frustrated translation, which mixes strongly with substrate phonons and broadens into a resonance. The predicted lifetime due to this harmonic decay mechanism is in excellent quantitative agreement with experiment.

  1. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil. In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Adsorptive Desulfurization of JP-8 Fuel Using Ag+/Silica Based Adsorbents at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    cell-quality hydrogen is liquid phase desulfurization (figure 1). Any organic sulfur compounds in the fuel are converted into hydrogen sulfide in...the fuel processing reformer, resulting in poisoning the reformation catalysts as well as poisoning downstream operations. Therefore, it is essential...the reformation catalysts from potential poisoning (1). Figure 1. Schematic diagram of logistic fuel processing. Adsorbents with a high

  3. ADSORPTION OF DINITROPHENOLS ONTO POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS AND ITS MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIZuoqing; XUMancai; 等

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption of 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2,6-dinitrophenol on non-polar and polar adsorbents was studied.The results showed that the equilibrium adsorption did not comply with the Langmuir equation and was not mono-layer adsorption .It is of interest to notice that the effect of pH on the adsorption of 2,4-or 2,6-dinitrophenol onto ADS-7 and ADS-21 was very small,The result is explained by hydrogen bonding interaction between 2,4-or 2,6-dinitrophenol and the adsorbent ADS-21.The large adsorption capacity of dinitrophenol onto ADS-21,which was about 500mg/g at an equilibrium concentration of 400mg/L,and the small dinitrophenol leakage in the effluent from ADS-21 column presented a good prospect for treatment of wastewater containing dinitrophenol with adsorbent ADS-21.

  4. Evaluation of a diffusion/trapping model for hydrogen ingress in high-strength alloys. Annual technical report Sep-Nov 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, B.G.

    1991-11-21

    A potentiostatic pulse technique was used to study the ingress of hydrogen in titanium (pure and grade 2) in an acetate buffer. Hydrogen ingress did not occur with pure titanium, indicating that the surface oxide is an effective barrier to hydrogen entry. In contrast, the data for Ti grade 2 were shown to fit a model for hydrogen diffusion and trapping, allowing values to be determined for the irreversible trapping constant (k) and the flux of hydrogen into the metal. Two values of k were obtained, depending on the level of hydrogen present in the metal. The density of irreversible traps calculated from k for low hydrogen levels suggests that the principal irreversible traps may be interstitial nitrogen, but grain boundaries are another possibility. The additional trapping constant obtained for high hydrogen levels is thought to be associated with hydride formation. The irreversible trapping constants for Ti grade 2 are consistent with its susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement relative to that of other alloys. The results demonstrate that multiple irreversible traps can be distinguished by using the diffusion/trapping model.

  5. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    advantages that oil palm biomass has includes the following:available and exists in abundance, appears to be effective technically, and can be integrated into existing processes. Despite these advantages, oil palm biomasses have disadvantages such as low adsorption capacity, increased COD, BOD and TOC. These disadvantages can be overcome by modifying the biomass either chemically or thermally. Such modification creates a charged surface and increases the heavy metal ion binding capacity of the adsorbent.

  6. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  7. Materials for hydrogen storage: current research trends and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Annemieke W C; Areán, Carlos Otero

    2008-02-14

    Storage and transport of hydrogen constitutes a key enabling technology for the advent of a hydrogen-based energy transition. Main research trends on hydrogen storage materials, including metal hydrides, porous adsorbents and hydrogen clathrates, are reviewed with a focus on recent developments and an appraisal of the challenges ahead. .

  8. Selective excitation of adsorbate vibrations on dissipative surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The selective infrared (IR) excitation of molecular vibrations is a powerful tool to control the photoreactivity prior to electronic excitation in the ultraviolet / visible (UV/Vis) light regime ("vibrationally mediated chemistry"). For adsorbates on surfaces it has been theoretically predicted that IR preexcitation will lead to higher UV/Vis photodesorption yields and larger cross sections for other photoreactions. In a recent experiment, IR-mediated desorption of molecular hydrogen from a S...

  9. 可用于小型铅铋冷快堆的核能制氢技术分析%Technical Analysis of Nuclear Hydrogen Production in Small Pb-Bi Cooled Fast Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙征; 吴晓春; 李龙; 邵静

    2016-01-01

    核能制氢作为一种有前景的大规模制氢方法,得到广泛研究。该文介绍了适用于核能制氢的反应堆堆型,以及可用于核能制氢的主要方法,并对可用于小型铅铋冷快堆的核能制氢技术进行了分析。分析结果表明,小型铅铋冷快堆制氢的潜在技术路线为热化学裂解水溴钙循环或甲烷直接裂解法。%As a promising massive way,nuclear hydrogen production is being extensively investigated across the world.In this paper,the reactor types and main methods which could be used in nuclear hydrogen production were introduced,and the techniques used in Small Pb-Bi cooled fast reactor for nuclear hydrogen production were investigated.As a result,the potential technical path in Small Pb-Bi cooled fast reactor for nuclear hydrogen production were Ca-Br-Fe thermo-chemical process and methane direct pyrolysis method.

  10. Enhanced Hydrogen Dipole Physisorption, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Channing [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-01-03

    The hydrogen gas adsorption effort at Caltech was designed to probe and apply our understanding of known interactions between molecular hydrogen and adsorbent surfaces as part of a materials development effort to enable room temperature storage of hydrogen at nominal pressure. The work we have performed over the past five years has been tailored to address the outstanding issues associated with weak hydrogen sorbent interactions in order to find an adequate solution for storage tank technology.

  11. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayes, Richard T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Janke, Christopher James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Das, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liao, W. -P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Jordana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Byers, Maggie Flicker [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Schneider, Eric [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  12. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  13. Membrane adsorber for endotoxin removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Moita de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface of flat-sheet nylon membranes was modified using bisoxirane as the spacer and polyvinyl alcohol as the coating polymer. The amino acid histidine was explored as a ligand for endotoxins, aiming at its application for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the membrane adsorber, analysis of the depyrogenation procedures and the evaluation of endotoxin removal efficiency in static mode are discussed. Ligand density of the membranes was around 7 mg/g dry membrane, allowing removal of up to 65% of the endotoxins. The performance of the membrane adsorber prepared using nylon coated with polyvinyl alcohol and containing histidine as the ligand proved superior to other membrane adsorbers reported in the literature. The lack of endotoxin adsorption on nylon membranes without histidine confirmed that endotoxin removal was due to the presence of the ligand at the membrane surface. Modified membranes were highly stable, exhibiting a lifespan of approximately thirty months.

  14. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  15. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  16. Economic and Technical Comparison of Three Typical Coal Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen Preparation%3种典型煤气化技术制备氢气经济技术比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘华; 王乔炜

    2016-01-01

    According to coal quality analyzing data, this paper selects three suitable coal gasification technologies to conduct a comprehensive analysis and comparison of the technical characteristics, processing parameters, consumption indexes and techno-economics of three coal gasification technologies for hydrogen preparation, the results of which show that the crushed coal’s pressurized gasification technology for hydrogen preparation is the most competitive technology among the three coal gasification technologies for hydrogen preparation.%根据煤质分析数据,选择适宜的3种典型气化技术,对3种气化方式制氢的技术特点、工艺参数和消耗指标以及技术经济性进行全面的分析比较,结果显示碎煤加压气化制备氢气是3种煤制氢技术中最具有竞争力的技术。

  17. Technical roadmap and prospect of hydrogen generation by NaBH4%硼氢化钠制氢的技术路线与发展前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方朝君; 闫常峰; 郭常青

    2011-01-01

    硼氢化钠(NaBH,)催化水解制氢技术安全可靠.能够即时制氢和即时供氢.可方便地为燃料电池等便携式装置提供氢能,故成为氢源研究的热点课题.考察了硼氢化钠制氢的发展历史,着重分析了三种硼氢化钠水解制氢技术路线和不同制氢催化剂的优势和需要解决的问题,并展望其应用前景.%The method using catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH4), which provides a safe and practical means of producing hydrogen, makes it an attractive source to supply hydrogen for fuel cells and other portable applications, The history and recent development of different technique routings of hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride hydrolysis were reviewed comprehensively. The advantages and problems of technical roadnaps and heterogeneous catalysts were analyzed in detail and their prospects of practical application were discussed.

  18. High and rapid hydrogen release from thermolysis of ammonia borane near PEM fuel cell operating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Arvind; Hwang, Hyun Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    A system for generating and purifying hydrogen. To generate hydrogen, the system includes inlets configured to receive a hydrogen carrier and an inert insulator, a mixing chamber configured to combine the hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, a heat exchanger configured to apply heat to the mixture of hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, wherein the applied heat results in the generation of hydrogen from the hydrogen carrier, and an outlet configured to release the generated hydrogen. To purify hydrogen, the system includes a primary inlet to receive a starting material and an ammonia filtration subassembly, which may include an absorption column configured to absorb the ammonia into water for providing purified hydrogen at a first purity level. The ammonia filtration subassembly may also include an adsorbent member configured to adsorb ammonia from the starting material into an adsorbent for providing purified hydrogen at a second purity level.

  19. High and rapid hydrogen release from thermolysis of ammonia borane near PEM fuel cell operating temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Arvind; Hwang, Hyun Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    A system for generating and purifying hydrogen. To generate hydrogen, the system includes inlets configured to receive a hydrogen carrier and an inert insulator, a mixing chamber configured to combine the hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, a heat exchanger configured to apply heat to the mixture of hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, wherein the applied heat results in the generation of hydrogen from the hydrogen carrier, and an outlet configured to release the generated hydrogen. To purify hydrogen, the system includes a primary inlet to receive a starting material and an ammonia filtration subassembly, which may include an absorption column configured to absorb the ammonia into water for providing purified hydrogen at a first purity level. The ammonia filtration subassembly may also include an adsorbent member configured to adsorb ammonia from the starting material into an adsorbent for providing purified hydrogen at a second purity level.

  20. Controlling Hydrogenation of Graphene on Ir(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Andersen, Mie; Jørgensen, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    Combined fast X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations reveal the presence of two types of hydrogen adsorbate structures at the graphene/ Ir(111) interface, namely, graphane-like islands and hydrogen dimer structures. While the former give rise to a periodic...

  1. Evaluation of a diffusion/trapping model for hydrogen ingress in high-strength alloys. Final technical report, November 1988-November 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, B.G.

    1990-11-14

    The objective of this research was to obtain the hydrogen ingress and trapping characteristics for a range of microstructures and so identify the dominant type of irreversible trap in different alloys. A diffusion/trapping model was used in conjunction with a potentiostatic pulse technique to study the ingress of hydrogen in three precipitation-hardened alloys (Inconel 718, Incoloy 925, and 18Ni maraging steel), two work-hardened alloys (Inconel 625 and Hastelloy C-276), titanium (pure and grade 2), and copper-enriched AISI 4340 steel in 1 mol/L acetic acid-1 mol/L sodium acetate containing 15 ppm arsenic oxide. In all cases except pure titanium, the data were shown to fit the interface-control form of the model and values were determined for the irreversible trapping constants (k) and the flux of hydrogen into the alloys. The density of irreversible trap defects were calculated from k and generally found to be in close agreement with the concentration of a specific heterogeneity in each alloy. Moreover, the trapping constants for the alloys were found to be consistent with their relative susceptibilities to hydrogen embrittlement.

  2. Black Sprayable Molecular Adsorber Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This novel molecular adsorber coating would alleviate the size, weight, and complexity issues of traditional molecular adsorber puck.  A flexible tape version...

  3. Electronic structures of graphane with vacancies and graphene adsorbed with fluorine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-Ru Wu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic structure of graphane with hydrogen vacancies, which are supposed to occur in the process of hydrogenation of graphene. A variety of configurations is considered and defect states are derived by density functional calculation. We find that a continuous chain-like distribution of hydrogen vacancies will result in conduction of linear dispersion, much like the transport on a superhighway cutting through the jungle of hydrogen. The same conduction also occurs for chain-like vacancies in an otherwise fully fluorine-adsorbed graphene. These results should be very useful in the design of graphene-based electronic circuits.

  4. Mechanism of dialkyl phthalates removal from aqueous solution using γ-cyclodextrin and starch based polyurethane polymer adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chukwunonso Peter; Adewuyi, Gregory Olufemi; Zhang, Qian; Diagboya, Paul N; Guo, Qingjun

    2014-12-19

    Phthalate esters have been known as potent endocrine disruptors and carcinogens; and their removal from water have been of considerable concern recently. In the present study, γ-cyclodextrin polyurethane polymer (GPP), γ-cyclodextrin/starch polyurethane copolymer (GSP), and starch polyurethane polymer (SPP) have been synthesized and characterized. Their adsorption efficiencies for the removal of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP) from aqueous solutions were investigated. The characterization results showed the success of the synthesis. The isotherms were L-type, and both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm gave good fittings to the adsorption data. Adsorption mechanisms suggested that these adsorbents spontaneously adsorb phthalate molecules driven mainly by enthalpy change, and the adsorption process was attributed to multiple adsorbent-adsorbate interactions such as hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking, and pore filling. The results showed that starch and γ-cyclodextrin polyurethane polymer adsorbents have excellent potential as adsorbent materials for the removal of phthalates from the contaminated water.

  5. Topological features of engineered arrays of adsorbates in honeycomb lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Arraga, Luis A., E-mail: ludovici83@gmail.com [IMDEA Nanociencia, Calle de Faraday, 9, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lado, J.L. [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), Av. Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Guinea, Francisco [IMDEA Nanociencia, Calle de Faraday, 9, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen adatoms are one of the most the promising proposals for the functionalization of graphene. The adatoms induce narrow resonances near the Dirac energy, which lead to the formation of magnetic moments. Furthermore, they also create local lattice distortions which enhance the spin–orbit coupling. The combination of magnetism and spin–orbit coupling allows for a rich variety of phases, some of which have non-trivial topological features. We analyze the interplay between magnetism and spin–orbit coupling in ordered arrays of adsorbates on honeycomb lattice monolayers, and classify the different phases that may arise. We extend our model to consider arrays of adsorbates in graphene-like crystals with stronger intrinsic spin–orbit couplings. We also consider a regime away from half-filling in which the Fermi level is at the bottom of the conduction band, we find a Berry curvature distribution corresponding to a Valley–Hall effect.

  6. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Tan, Teck L; Johnson, Duane D

    2015-11-14

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd-Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites that is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. The method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.

  7. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  8. Hydrogen storage by adsorption on activated carbon: investigation of the thermal effects during the charging process; Stockage de l'hydrogene par adsorption sur charbon actif: etude des effets thermiques lors de la charge dynamique d'un reservoir a lit fixe adsorbant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermosilla-Lara, G

    2007-02-15

    This work presents an experimental and numerical investigation of the thermal effects occurring during the charge of adsorbent fixed bed tank. The influence of these thermal effects, which result from the exothermal character of the adsorption process and the pressure forces work, on the storage capacity is specially analysed. An experimental setup allowing the dynamic measurements of the temperature and pressure profiles has been used. Then the numerical protocol with the Fluent software, has been validated by comparison of the simulated pressure, flow rate and temperature fields in the tank with the results obtained from an experimental investigation carried out the dynamic storage. Several predictive simulations have been carried out in order to study the effect of the boundary conditions, as the wall temperature or effective thermal conductivity of the porous bed, on the storage capacity of the reservoir. We searched the optimal geometry of an interbed thermal dissipator for a given industrial tank. To do this we made vary the H/L ratio, which represents the ratio of the height of an elementary stage and the total length of the tank. We could determine an optimal geometry which corresponds to the value 1/3 of the ratio H/L. From this optimum we studied the effect of five additional cooling tubes on the tank storage capacity. The stored mass is 15 % higher than that obtained without these tubes. (author)

  9. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  10. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V.; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M.; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of ‘extra adsorption domains’—that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  11. The comparison of Cu(Ⅱ) adsorption capability of baker's yeast, nano-titania and their composite adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YunSong; WANG RenGuo; WANG XianXiang; LEI SanZhong; TONG DongMei

    2008-01-01

    The anatase nano-TiO2 powder, with crystal size between 40 and 80 nm, was prepared by the liquid phase hydrolysis of TiOCI4. At the same time, the nano-TiO2was utilized with the baker's yeast biomass as a composite adsorbent to adsorb the Cu ions in the artificial aqueous solution. The investigation showed that the composite adsorbent had a fine adsorption efficiency. The TiO2 in the composite ad-sorbent could cooperate well with baker's yeast to improve the adsorbing capability of Cu2+ under the following experimental conditions as well: a quantity of composite adsorbent of 5 g·L-1, pH≥4.0, an adsorption time of 40 rain and an initial concentration of Cu ions of 10 mg·L-1. In addition, the results of measurements, obtained with a scanning electron microscope, an infrared spectrophotometer and a Zeta potential analyzer, revealed that the baker's yeast and nano-TiO2 produced the composite ad-sorbent through coordination and hydrogen bonds in particular, etc. The stability of the composite adsorbent and the amount of titania loaded were largely dependent on the concentration of hydrogen ion in the solution.

  12. Carbon-mineral adsorbents prepared by pyrolysis of waste materials in the presence of tetrachloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboda, Roman; Charmas, Barbara; Skubiszewska-Zieba, Jadwiga; Chodorowski, Stanislaw; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Gun'ko, Vladimir M; Pokrovskiy, Valery A

    2005-04-01

    Natural bentonite spent in the process of plant oil bleaching was used as an initial material for preparation of carbon-mineral adsorbents. The spent bleaching earth was treated using four procedures: T (thermal treatment); H (hydrothermal treatment); C (thermal treatment with addition of CCl4 vapor); M (modification of porous structure). Raw bentonite, RB (raw bleaching earth), and carbon materials prepared using plant oil were compared. The physicochemical characteristics of the adsorbents were determined using different methods: nitrogen adsorption/desorption, XRD, TEM, and MS-TPD. Carbon-mineral adsorbents contain from 5.23 to 19.92% C (w/w) and carbon adsorbents include from 84.2 to 91.18% C (w/w). Parallel processes of organic substance carbonization, porous structure modification, sublimation or evaporation of metal chlorides, and removal of hydrogen chloride take place during pyrolysis of waste mineral materials in the CCl4 atmosphere.

  13. Microscopic analyses of complexes formed in adsorbent for Mo and Zr separation chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ryoji; Nagoshi, Kohei; Arai, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Sou; Sano, Yuichi; Matsuura, Haruaki; Takagi, Hideaki; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Koka, Masashi; Sato, Takahiro

    2017-08-01

    Molybdenum and zirconium obstruct the efficient recovery of minor actinides (MA(III): Am(III) and Cm(III)) by extraction chromatography; hence, the removal of these elements prior to MA(III) recovery is desirable. The use of an adsorbent impregnated with bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) for Mo and Zr decontamination was evaluated in this report. The adsorption/elution and column separation experiments showed that Mo and Zr in the simulated HLLW were selectively adsorbed on the particles, and that Mo was eluted by H2O2. EXAFS analysis and SAXS patterns of the adsorbent containing Zr revealed that the Zr-HDEHP complex had a crystal-like periodic structure similar to the structure of the precipitate produced in the solvent extraction system. Micro-PIXE analysis revealed that distribution of the residual Zr on the adsorbent was uniform.

  14. A Hydrogen Utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Robert Stephen; Reynolds, Bruce Allen

    2004-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation and stationary applications is receiving much favorable attention as a technical and policy issue. However, the widespread introduction of this technology is likely also to have negative consequences that are not being actively discussed in broad public forums. Such possibilities include, among others, delayed development of other energy alternatives, hazards of catalyst or hydride metals, disruptive employment shifts, land usage conflicts, and increased vehicle usage. Even though hydrogen is likely to be beneficial in its overall societal and environmental effects, hydrogen technology advocates must understand the range of problematic issues and prepare to address them.

  15. A hydrogen utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Robert S. [National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC (United States)

    2004-02-01

    The use of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation and stationary applications is receiving much favorable attention as a technical and policy issue. However, the widespread introduction of this technology is likely also to have negative consequences that are not being actively discussed in broad public forums. Such possibilities include, among others, delayed development of other energy alternatives, hazards of catalyst or hydride metals, disruptive employment shifts, land usage conflicts, and increased vehicle usage. Even though hydrogen is likely to be beneficial in its overall societal and environmental effects, hydrogen technology advocates must understand the range of problematic issues and prepare to address them. (Author)

  16. Molecular simulation studies of metal organic frameworks focusing on hydrogen purification

    OpenAIRE

    Banu, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The process of purifying hydrogen gas using pressure swing adsorption columns heavily relies on highly efficient adsorbents. Such materials must be able to selectively adsorb a large amount of impurities, and must also be regenerated with ease. The work presented in this thesis focuses on a novel class of porous solids, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and their potential for use as adsorbents in hydrogen purification processes. MOFs are tuneable structures, a property that can...

  17. Hydrogen Fuel Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

  18. Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R.

    1998-03-31

    This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that

  19. Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    2009-08-31

    Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory

  20. Palladium based nanomaterials for enhanced hydrogen spillover and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Konda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage remains one of the most challenging prerequisites to overcome toward the realization of a hydrogen based economy. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier for fuel cell applications has been limited by the lack of safe and effective hydrogen storage materials. Palladium has high affinity for hydrogen sorption and has been extensively studied, both in the gas phase and under electrochemical conditions. In this review, recent advancements are highlighted and discussed in regard to palladium based nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, as well as the effects of hydrogen spillover on various adsorbents including carbons, metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks, and other nanomaterials.

  1. Surface composition of Pt-Pd alloys treated in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, A.; Paál, Z.; Szász, A.; Kojnok, J.; Fabian, D. J.

    1989-11-01

    Pd enrichment is observed in Pd-Pt alloy sheets when heated in He and in H 2. The surface composition was monitored by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) and by work function measurements. A regular solution model is used to calculate the expected composition of the surface atomic layers, with and without adsorbed hydrogen, and the calculated and measured values for Pd-enrichment are compared. The possible effect of subsurface adsorbed hydrogen is discussed.

  2. Comparison of adsorbents for H2S and D4 removal for biogas conversion in a solid oxide fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigot, Léa; Ducom, Gaëlle; Benadda, Belkacem; Labouré, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Biogas contains trace compounds detrimental for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application, especially sulphur-containing compounds and volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs). It is therefore necessary to remove these impurities from the biogas for fuelling an SOFC. In this paper, dynamic lab-scale adsorption tests were performed on synthetic polluted gas to evaluate the performance of a polishing treatment to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S - sulphur compound) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 - VOSiC). Three kinds of adsorbents were tested: an activated carbon, a silica gel (SG) and a zeolite (Z). Z proved to be the best adsorbent for H2S removal, with an adsorbed quantity higher than [Formula: see text] at the SOFC tolerance limit. However, as concerns D4 removal, SG was the most efficient adsorbent, with an adsorbed quantity of about 184 mgD4/gSG at the SOFC tolerance limit. These results could not be explained by structural characteristics of the adsorbents, but they were partly explained by chemical interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent. In these experiments, internal diffusion was the controlling step, Knudsen diffusion being predominant to molecular diffusion. As Z was also a good adsorbent for D4 removal, competition phenomena were investigated with Z for the simultaneous removal of H2S and D4. It was shown that H2S retention was dramatically decreased in the presence of D4, probably due to D4 polymerization resulting in pore blocking.

  3. Effect of piezoelectric material on hydrogen adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering School, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100083 (China); Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Shi, Shangzhao; Sun, Xiang; Zhang, Zheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    In hydrogen storage applications, the primary issue for physisorption of hydrogen onto solid-state materials is the weak interaction force between hydrogen molecules and the adsorbents. It is found that enhanced adsorption can be obtained under an external electric field, because it appears the electric field increases the hydrogen adsorption energy. Experiments were carried out to determine hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon using the piezoelectric material PMN-PT as the charge supplier under hydrogen pressure. Results indicate that more than 20% hydrogen adsorption enhancement was obtained. Parameters related to hydrogen adsorption enhancement include the amount of the charge and temperature. Higher voltage and lower temperature promote the increase of adsorption capacity but room temperature results are very encouraging. (author)

  4. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, T.A. [Chemica Technologies, Inc., Bend, OR (United States)

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  5. Development Trends in Porous Adsorbents for Carbon Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasulu, Bolisetty; Sreedhar, Inkollu; Suresh, Pathi; Raghavan, Kondapuram Vijaya

    2015-11-03

    Accumulation of greenhouse gases especially CO2 in the atmosphere leading to global warming with undesirable climate changes has been a serious global concern. Major power generation in the world is from coal based power plants. Carbon capture through pre- and post- combustion technologies with various technical options like adsorption, absorption, membrane separations, and chemical looping combustion with and without oxygen uncoupling have received considerable attention of researchers, environmentalists and the stake holders. Carbon capture from flue gases can be achieved with micro and meso porous adsorbents. This review covers carbonaceous (organic and metal organic frameworks) and noncarbonaceous (inorganic) porous adsorbents for CO2 adsorption at different process conditions and pore sizes. Focus is also given to noncarbonaceous micro and meso porous adsorbents in chemical looping combustion involving insitu CO2 capture at high temperature (>400 °C). Adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods are discussed. Attention is given to isosteric heats and characterization techniques. The options to enhance the techno-economic viability of carbon capture techniques by integrating with CO2 utilization to produce industrially important chemicals like ammonia and urea are analyzed. From the reader's perspective, for different classes of materials, each section has been summarized in the form of tables or figures to get a quick glance of the developments.

  6. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Shinohara

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA, composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules.

  7. Synthesis of amino-silane modified magnetic silica adsorbents and application for adsorption of flavonoids from Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic separation technology was applied in the separation of flavonoids from the licorice root in this work. Licorice flavonoids (LF) displayed a remarkable array of biological and pharmacological activities. The magnetic adsorbents with functional -NH2 groups were synthesized by immobilization of amino-silane on the surface of the magnetic silica supports, which were prepared by co-precipitation method. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of the magnetic adsorbents for the separation of LF have been evaluated. The purity of an enriched extract with this method was 16.7% while the crude extract only had about 6.8% purity. Therefore, it can be concluded that these kinds of magnetic adsorbents have selectivity to the flavonoids to some extent. The affinity selectivity of the adsorbents is based on the formation of hydrogen bonding between the -NH2 on the magnetic adsorbents and -OH,-CO on the flavonoids.

  8. Synthesis of amino-silane modified magnetic silica adsorbents and application for adsorption of flavonoids from Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bo; XING JianMin; LANG YuQi; LIU HuiZhou

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic separation technology was applied in the separation of flavonoids from the licorice root in this work.Licorice flavonoids (LF) displayed a remarkable array of biological and pharmacological ac-tivities.The magnetic adsorbents with functional --NH2 groups were synthesized by immobilization of amino-silane on the surface of the magnetic silica supports, which were prepared by co-precipitation method.The adsorption and desorption characteristics of the magnetic adsorbents for the separation of LF have been evaluated.The purity of an enriched extract with this method was 16.7% while the crude extract only had about 6.8% purity.Therefore, it can be concluded that these kinds of magnetic adsorbents have selectivity to the flavonoids to some extent.The affinity selectivity of the adsorbents is based on the formation of hydrogen bonding between the --NH2 on the magnetic adsorbents and --OH, -CO on the flavonoids.

  9. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  10. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  11. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Chris [ORNL; Yatsandra, Oyola [ORNL; Mayes, Richard [ORNL; none,; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Li-Jung, Kuo [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL; Sadananda, Das [ORNL

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  12. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of phenosafranine adsorbed onto micro and mesoporous materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Easwaramoorthi; K Ananthanarayanan; B Sreedhar; P Natarajan

    2009-09-01

    The phenosafranine adsorbed onto the micro and mesoporous materials prepared by ion exchange method and interaction of the dye with host materials were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of the host matrix on the binding energy of N 1s orbital. Core level N 1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals the interaction between the dye and the solid surface through the hydrogen bonding between the hydrogen atoms of primary amino groups in dye molecule and the oxygen atom of surface hydroxyl groups. The strength of the hydrogen bonding depends on the nature of the solid surface. In the dye adsorbed onto the micro and mesoporous materials the interaction between adsorbed phenosafranine and the surfaces of the porous materials are found to modify the optical spectra and the excited state dynamics of the confined phenosafranine molecules. The change in photophysical properties of phenosafranine adsorbed on to the host materials on dehydration at elevated temperatures is attributed to the modification of host surface during dehydration process.

  13. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function.

  14. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

    2012-08-30

    The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

  15. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  16. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  17. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ally, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  18. Hydrogen purification by periodic adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barg, Christian; Secchi, Argimiro R.; Trierweiler, Jorge O. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: cbarg@enq.ufrgs.br; arge@enq.ufrgs.br; jorge@enq.ufrgs.br

    2000-07-01

    The periodic adsorption processes have been widely used for industrial applications, mainly because it spends less energy than the usual gas separation processes, like the cryogenic distillation. The largest commercial application of periodic adsorption processes is the pressure swing adsorption (PSA) applied to hydrogen purification. Although its wide use in the chemical and petrochemical industry, there are no reports in the open literature about complete modeling studies of a complex commercial unit, with multiple adsorbents and multiple beds and several feed components. This study has as objective the modeling, optimization and dynamical analysis of an industrial PSA unit for hydrogen purification. (author)

  19. Interaction of gas phase atomic hydrogen with Pt(111): Direct evidence for the formation of bulk hydrogen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG ZhiQuan; HUANG WeiXin; BAO XinHe

    2007-01-01

    Employing hot tungsten filament to thermal dissociate molecular hydrogen, we generated gas phase atomic hydrogen under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions and investigated its interaction with Pt(111) surface. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) results demonstrate that adsorption of molecular hydrogen on Pt(111) forms surface Had species whereas adsorption of atomic hydrogen forms not only surface Had species but also bulk Had species. Bulk Had species is more thermal-unstable than surface Had species on Pt(111), suggesting that bulk Had species is more energetic. This kind of weakly- adsorbed bulk Had species might be the active hydrogen species in the Pt-catalyzed hydrogenation reactions.

  20. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  1. The Dynamics and Structures of Adsorbed Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Ellenson, W. D.; McTague, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews neutron scattering work performed on films of simple gas atoms and molecules adsorbed primarily on graphite surfaces. Exfoliated graphite substrates such as Grafoil were first used in this kind of measurements about five years ago and new results have been reported at an increasing pace...... of molecules such as NH3 or the internal modes of adsorbed molecules such as C4H10. Neutron scattering measurements where substrates other than graphite products are used as the adsorbents will not be reviewed here. However, the power of the technique will be demonstrated in an example of H2 physisorbed...

  2. QuestAir hydrogen separation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, B. [QuestAir Technologies Inc., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    QuestAir's gas purification products employ a process known as pressure swing adsorption (PSA). PSA is based on the adsorption of gases onto special materials known as adsorbents. These adsorbents remove all contaminants from an impure feed stream to produce a purified product gas. Once the adsorbents are near saturation, the impurities are purged, regenerating the adsorbents for the next PSA cycle. QuestAir's patented technology has reduced the duration of the PSA cycle by up to 10 times, allowing for a similar reduction in the size of system components such as pressure vessels, piping and structural supports. Our simple, compact and reliable technology is a significant improvement over conventional PSA hydrogen purification systems, and it also has significant advantages over other gas purification technologies such as membranes and cryogenic plants.

  3. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  4. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  5. Neutron powder diffraction of metal-organic frameworks for hydrogen storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Craig M Brown; Yun Liu; Dan A Neumann

    2008-10-01

    We review recent structural studies that we have undertaken aimed at elucidating the fundamental properties of metal-organic framework materials and their interactions with hydrogen. We have shown that exposing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers can greatly enhance the hydrogen binding energy and that they result in a significant increase of the surface packing density of adsorbed hydrogen molecules on materials' surface. We will review some of the structural aspects of these materials, especially the adsorbed hydrogen molecule surface packing density in one type of metal-organic framework, MOF-74, which can be packed even denser than that in solid hydrogen.

  6. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    CERN Document Server

    Gwyn, W

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  7. Chitin Adsorbents for Toxic Metals: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Anastopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment is still a critical issue all over the world. Among examined methods for the decontamination of wastewaters, adsorption is a promising, cheap, environmentally friendly and efficient procedure. There are various types of adsorbents that have been used to remove different pollutants such as agricultural waste, compost, nanomaterials, algae, etc., Chitin (poly-β-(1,4-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and it has attracted scientific attention as an inexpensive adsorbent for toxic metals. This review article provides information about the use of chitin as an adsorbent. A list of chitin adsorbents with maximum adsorption capacity and the best isotherm and kinetic fitting models are provided. Moreover, thermodynamic studies, regeneration studies, the mechanism of adsorption and the experimental conditions are also discussed in depth.

  8. Chitin Adsorbents for Toxic Metals: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Bhatnagar, Amit; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N; Kyzas, George Z

    2017-01-07

    Wastewater treatment is still a critical issue all over the world. Among examined methods for the decontamination of wastewaters, adsorption is a promising, cheap, environmentally friendly and efficient procedure. There are various types of adsorbents that have been used to remove different pollutants such as agricultural waste, compost, nanomaterials, algae, etc., Chitin (poly-β-(1,4)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and it has attracted scientific attention as an inexpensive adsorbent for toxic metals. This review article provides information about the use of chitin as an adsorbent. A list of chitin adsorbents with maximum adsorption capacity and the best isotherm and kinetic fitting models are provided. Moreover, thermodynamic studies, regeneration studies, the mechanism of adsorption and the experimental conditions are also discussed in depth.

  9. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; De Brito Mota, F; De Castilho, Caio M C [Grupo de Fisica de Superfcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao/Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Mascarenhas, Artur J S, E-mail: caio@ufba.br [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia em Energia e Ambiente-INCT-E and A, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-280 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2010-12-03

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the {Gamma} point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  10. Dissolved Air Flotation of arsenic adsorbent particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Santander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The removal of arsenic from synthetic effluent was studied using the adsorbent particle flotation technique (APF and dissolved air flotation (DAF. A sample of an iron mineral was used as adsorbent particles of arsenic, ferric chloride as coagulant, cationic polyacrylamide (NALCO 9808 as flocculants, and sodium oleate as collector. Adsorption studies to determine the pH influence, contact time, and adsorbent particles concentration on the adsorption of arsenic were carried out along with flotation studies to determine the removal efficiency of adsorbents particles. The results achieved indicate that the adsorption kinetic of arsenic is very rapid and that in range of pH’s from 2 to 7 the adsorption percentages remain constant. The equilibrium conditions were achieved in 60 minutes and about 95% of arsenic was adsorbed when used an adsorbent concentration of 2 g/L and pH 6.3. The maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent particles was 4.96 mg/g. The mean free energy of adsorption (E was found to be 2.63 kJ/mol, which suggests physisorption. The results of the flotation studies demonstrated that when synthetic effluents with 8.9 mg/L of arsenic were treated under the following experimental conditions; 2 g/L of adsorbent particles, 120 mg/L of Fe(III, 2 mg/L of Nalco 9808, 20 mg/L of sodium oleate, and 40% of recycle ratio in the DAF, it was possible to reach 98% of arsenic removal and 6.3 NTU of residual turbidity in clarified synthetic effluent.

  11. Behavior of macromolecules in adsorbed layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A model for describing the behavior of macromolecules in adsorbed layers is developed by introducing a concept of distribution density of layer thickness U based on stochastic process and probabilistic statistics. The molecular behavior of layers adsorbed on clay particle surfaces is discussed; the random distribution and its statistics of the layer thickness are given by incorporating experimental results with an ionic polyelectrolyte with the molecular weight of 1.08×106 and chain charged density of 0.254.

  12. ADSORBENTS USED IN THE CLEARANCE OF ENDOTOXIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Mei; LIU Tao; Hou Guanghui; YUAN Zhi

    2003-01-01

    A series of modified poly (methyl methacrylate, PMMA) resins were prepared and compared their adsorption abilities to endotoxin. The results showed that adsorbents, which were grafted with tertiary amine and long spacing arms, had the best adsorption capacities and good blood compatibility, It is hopeful to be used as adsorbent in hemoperfusion for clinical clearance of endotoxin. The influence of original concentration of endotoxin on adsorption and the adsorption mechanism were also investigated.

  13. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahzadeh-Ghom Sara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices.

  14. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  15. Heterogeneous radiolysis of HCN adsorbed on a solid surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin-Garcia, M.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F. [Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Negron-Mendoza, A., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.m [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-21

    Hydrogen cyanide is a key molecule for chemical evolution studies because, when it is exposed to different sources of energy, it forms various compounds of biological importance. To understand the role of minerals in chemical evolution, a series of experiments was performed. First, the adsorption capacity of HCN on different surface minerals was studied; the results show that HCN is readily adsorbed onto the solids proposed (zeolite, serpentine, dolomite, and sodium montmorillonite), in particular zeolite and montmorillonite. Second, the radiolysis of HCN adsorbed on olivine (as an example of a mineral surface) was also followed; it was found that the rate of HCN decomposition by gamma irradiation is enhanced in the presence of the solid. The third series of studies show that organic material was produced in high abundance from HCN at high radiation doses. The radiolytic products included gases (CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}, and CO) and oligomeric materials that release carboxylic acids (succinic, malonic, citric, and tricarballylic acids) and amino acids upon acid hydrolysis. These experiments suggest that minerals could have participated actively in chemical evolution processes.

  16. Cellulose: A review as natural, modified and activated carbon adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhas; Gupta, V K; Carrott, P J M; Singh, Randhir; Chaudhary, Monika; Kushwaha, Sarita

    2016-09-01

    Cellulose is a biodegradable, renewable, non-meltable polymer which is insoluble in most solvents due to hydrogen bonding and crystallinity. Natural cellulose shows lower adsorption capacity as compared to modified cellulose and its capacity can be enhanced by modification usually by chemicals. This review focuses on the utilization of cellulose as an adsorbent in natural/modified form or as a precursor for activated carbon (AC) for adsorbing substances from water. The literature revealed that cellulose can be a promising precursor for production of activated carbon with appreciable surface area (∼1300m(2)g(-1)) and total pore volume (∼0.6cm(3)g(-1)) and the surface area and pore volume varies with the cellulose content. Finally, the purpose of review is to report a few controversies and unresolved questions concerning the preparation/properties of ACs from cellulose and to make aware to readers that there is still considerable scope for future development, characterization and utilization of ACs from cellulose.

  17. Hydrogen Adsorption on Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾梦秋; A.M.Meretskyi

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogen adsorption on Pt-Rh alloys in sulfuric acid aqueous solutions was studied by the method of cathode pulses. Hydrogen adsorption on the electrode with all ratio of alloy components (ωRh = 0-100%) is well described by the Temkin logarithmic isotherm. The surface coverage by adsorbed hydrogen at the same potential is decreased with increasing content of rhodium in the system. A linear dependence of adsorption peak potential on the alloy compositions in the case of weakly bonded adsorbed hydrogen is established. Hydrogen adsorption heat as a function of surface coverage for Pt-Rh-electrodes was obtained. The shape of the current-potential curve and position of the weakly bonded hydrogen adsorption on the potential scale are all related to alloy compositions, thus can serve as the basis for the determination surface composition of allovs.

  18. Chemical and physical solutions for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Ulrich; Felderhoff, Michael; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier in future energy systems. However, storage of hydrogen is a substantial challenge, especially for applications in vehicles with fuel cells that use proton-exchange membranes (PEMs). Different methods for hydrogen storage are discussed, including high-pressure and cryogenic-liquid storage, adsorptive storage on high-surface-area adsorbents, chemical storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides, and storage in boranes. For the latter chemical solutions, reversible options and hydrolytic release of hydrogen with off-board regeneration are both possible. Reforming of liquid hydrogen-containing compounds is also a possible means of hydrogen generation. The advantages and disadvantages of the different systems are compared.

  19. Hydrogenation of PAH cations : A first step towards H2 formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, L.; Reitsma, G.; Cazaux, S.; Schlathölter, Thomas; Hoekstra, R.; Spaans, M.; Gonzalez Magana, Olmo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the universe. A large fraction of H-2 forms by association of hydrogen atoms adsorbed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), where formation rates depend crucially on the H sticking probability. We have experimentally studied PAH hydrogenation

  20. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  1. Competitive and cooperative adsorption behaviors of phenol and aniline onto nonpolar macroreticular adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-ming; CHEN Jin-long; PAN Bing-cai; ZHANG Quan-xing

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of phenol and aniline on nonpolar macroreticular adsorbents( NDA100 and Amberlite XAD4) were investigated in single or binary batch system at 293K and 313K respectively in this study. The results indicated that the adsorption isotherms of phenol and aniline on both adsorbents in both systems fitted well Langmuir equation, which indicated a favourable and exothermic process. At the lower equilibrium concentrations, the individual amount adsorbed of phenol or aniline or macroreticular adsorbents in single-component systems was higher than those in binary-component systems because of the competition between phenol and aniline towards the adsorption sites. It is noteworthy, on the contrast, that at higher concentrations, the total uptake amounts of phenol and aniline in binary-component systems were obviously larger than that in single-component systems, and a large excess was noted on the adsorbent surface at saturation, which is presumably due to the cooperative effect primarily arisen from the hydrogen bonding or weak acidbase interaction between phenol and aniline.

  2. Crystalline structures of alkylamide monolayers adsorbed on the surface of graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhinde, Tej; Clarke, Stuart M; Phillips, Tamsin K; Arnold, Thomas; Parker, Julia E

    2010-06-01

    Synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction have been used to determine the two-dimensional crystalline structures of alkylamides adsorbed on graphite at submonolayer coverage. The calculated structures show that the plane of the carbon backbone of the amide molecules is parallel to the graphite substrate. The molecules form hydrogen-bonded dimers, and adjacent dimers form additional hydrogen bonds yielding extended chains. By presenting data from a number of members of the homologous series, we have identified that these chains pack in different arrangements depending on the number of carbons in the amide molecule. The amide monolayers are found to be very stable relative to other closely related alkyl species, a feature which is attributed to the extensive hydrogen bonding present in these systems. The characteristics of the hydrogen bonds have been determined and are found to be in close agreement with those present in the bulk materials.

  3. Promotion of CO oxidation on PdO(101) by adsorbed H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Juhee; Pan, Li; Mehar, Vikram; Zhang, Feng; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of adsorbed H2O on the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) using temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that water inhibits CO adsorption on PdO(101) by site blocking, but also provides a more facile pathway for CO oxidation compared with the bare oxide surface. In the presence of adsorbed H2O, the oxidation of CO on PdO(101) produces a CO2 TPRS peak that is centered at a temperature 50 K lower than the main CO2 TPRS peak arising from CO oxidation on clean PdO(101) ( 330 vs. 380 K). RAIRS shows that CO continues to adsorb on atop-Pd sites of PdO(101) when H2O is co-adsorbed, and provides no evidence of other reactive intermediates. DFT calculations predict that the CO oxidation mechanism follows the same steps for CO adsorbed on PdO(101) with and without co-adsorbed H2O, wherein an atop-CO species recombines with an oxygen atom from the oxide surface lattice. According to DFT, hydrogen bonding interactions with adsorbed H2O species stabilize the carboxyl-like transition structure and intermediate that result from the initial recombination of CO and O on the PdO(101) surface. This stabilization lowers the energy barrier for CO oxidation on PdO(101) by 10 kJ/mol, in good agreement with our experimental estimate.

  4. A vibrational and TDS study of sulfur adsorbates on Cu(100): Evidence for CH 3S species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, B. A.; Nyberg, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrational (EELS) and TDS data for methyl mercaptan (CH 3SH), dimethyl sulfide (CH 3) 2S and dimethyl disulfide (CH 3S) 2 are analyzed to determine the nature of the adsorption states on Cu(100). Dimethyl sulfide is reversibly adsorbed on Cu(100); no dissociation (CS bond breaking) was found. By contrast, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl disulfide dissociate below 300 K to form adsorbed CH 3S (methyl mercaptide) species. Depending on the coverage, two orientations of methyl mercaptide are found: linear and bent. The two different orientations can be distinguished via the surface dipole selection rule by different intensities of the methyl rocking and deformation vibrations. By contrast with the methoxy species, which on Cu(100) decomposes to formaldehyde, no H 2C=S is liberated during decomposition of CH 3S. The mercaptide is stable to ˜ 350 K, but decomposes at higher temperatures to form adsorbed sulfur and recombinant methane, hydrogen and ethane. The methane appears to be formed by methyl-hydrogen recombination when the C-S bond scission occurs. TDS results show that sulfur released from the decomposition poisons the surface toward further adsorption. In addition, the selectivity toward methane versus ethane can be altered by pre-titrating the adsorbed hydrogen with oxygen, thereby changing the relative methyl-hydrogen and methyl-methyl recombination probabilities.

  5. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  6. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  7. Nanoporous metal organic framework materials for hydrogen storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Xiao; Qingchun Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen is expected to play an important role in future transportation as a promising alternative clean energy source to carbon-based fuels.One of the key challenges to commercialize hydrogen energy is to develop appropriate onboard hydrogen storage systems,capable of charging and discharging large quantities of hydrogen with fast enough kinetics to meet commercial requirements.Metal organic framework (MOF) is a new type of inorganic and organic hybrid nanoporous particulate materials.Its diverse networks can enhance hydrogen storage through tuning the structure and property of MOFs.The MOF materials so far developed adsorb hydrogen through weak disperston interactions,which allow significant quantity of hydrogen to be stored at cryogenic temperatures with fast kinetics.Novel MOFs are being developed to strengthen the interactions between hydrogen and MOFs in order to store hydrogen under ambient conditions.This review surveys the development of such candidate materials,their performance and future research needs.

  8. Adsorbent Selection by Functional Group Interaction Screening for Peptide Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijntje, Renze; Bosch, Hans; Haan, de Andre B.; Bussman, Paul

    2005-01-01

    In order to selectively adsorb small peptides from complex aqueous feeds, selective adsorbents are required. The goal is to first find adsorbents with capacity for triglycine, as triglycine contains all groups common to small peptides. Selectivity studies will follow. Adsorbent selection was based o

  9. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  10. NOx Removal and Effect of Adsorbate-Adsorbate Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Tuhin Suvra

    to obtain more accurate catalytic rates than with the commonly used non-interacting mean field model. I then applied the proposed adsorbate-adsorbate interaction model to three important catalytic reactions, the direct NO decomposition, CO methanation, and steam reforming of methane, and analyzed the effect...

  11. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  12. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  13. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  14. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  15. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  16. Noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 with hydrogen accumulated in a hybrid carbon nanostructure in nanosized membrane reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the creation of nanosized membrane reactors (NMRs) of a new generation with accumulated hydrogen and a regulated volume of reaction zone were continued at the next stage. Hydrogenation was performed in the pores of ceramic membranes with hydrogen preliminarily adsorbed in mono- and multilayered orientated carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs)—a new hybrid carbon nanostructure formed on the inner pore surface. Quantitative determination of hydrogen adsorption in OCNTGs was performed using TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with D av = 50 and 90 nm and showed that hydrogen adsorption was up to ˜1.5% of the mass of OCNTG. The instrumentation and procedure for noncatalytic hydrogenation of decene-1 at 250-350°C using hydrogen accumulated and stored in OCNTG were developed. The conversion of decene-1 into decane was ˜0.2-1.8% at hydrogenation temperatures of 250 and 350°C, respectively. The rate constants and activation energy of hydrogenation were determined. The latter was found to be 94.5 kJ/mol, which is much smaller than the values typical for noncatalytic hydrogenations and very close to the values characteristic for catalytic reactions. The quantitative distribution of the reacting compounds in each pore regarded as a nanosized membrane reactor was determined. The activity of hydrogen adsorbed in a 2D carbon nanostructure was evaluated. Possible mechanisms of noncatalytic hydrogenation were discussed.

  17. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stottler, Gary

    2012-02-08

    General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

  18. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Gun Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    8217s HY80 and HY130 steels were checked for the critical hydrogen concentrations which were determined to be 6 ppm for HY8O steel 8 and 3 ppm for HY130...JOTC FILE COPY AD-A188 972 AD 1 TECHNICAL REPORT ARCCB-TR-87030 HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF GUN STEEL F’ GERALD L. SPFNCER DTIC DEC 1 5 1987 NOVEMBER...PtEtIOC COVERED HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEHENT OF GUN STEEL Final OG EOTNME 6. PERFORMINGORO EOTNME 7. A*JTNOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) Gerald L

  19. Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, E.

    2011-02-13

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon

  20. Aging of the nanosized photochromic WO3 films and the role of adsorbed water in the photochromism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilyuk, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    Here it has been reported on aging of the nanosized WO3 film, which is revealed is continuous reduction of the photochromic sensitivity over time. Water molecules physically adsorbed on the film surface from ambient air form donor-acceptor and hydrogen bonds, changing gradually the adsorption state to chemisorption which prevents an access of organic molecules that serve as hydrogen donors by the photochromism. The mechanism of the process has been investigated and discussed. The role of water in the photochromism has been highlighted. The difference in the efficiency for being of a hydrogen donor in the photochromic process between water and organic molecules is discussed.

  1. FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

    2006-08-28

    The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion America’s technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

  2. Modulated synthesis of Cr-MOF (MIL 101) for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Segakweng, T

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available material-based adsorptive storage, hydrogen gas as an adsorbed species within a suitable porous adsorbent such as metal organic frameworks (MOFs), continue to attract an increasing attention as a long-term solution to meet stringent volumetric targets...

  3. Standard hydrogen monitoring system equipment installation instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-09-27

    This document provides the technical specifications for the equipment fabrication, installation, and sitework construction for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System is designed to remove gases from waste tank vapor space and exhaust headers for continual monitoring and remote sample analysis.

  4. AC microcalorimetry of adsorbates on evaporated metal films: Orientational ordering of H sub 2 multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, R.B.

    1991-11-01

    We have improved and extended a novel ac calorimetric technique for measuring the heat capacity of adsorbates on evaporated metal films. Metallic substrates are of particular interest in current studies of the thermodynamics of adsorbed molecules. The method described in the present work is only calorimetric technique which allows measurements of molecules on simple metallic surfaces. Among other improvements, we have achieved significant progress in the preparation and characterization of the evaporated metal film. We have applied this novel technique to a study of hydrogen multilayers on gold and sapphire substrates. We have shown that samples of normal-hydrogen with a nominal coverage n of approximately 25 monolayers (ML) undergo a bulk-like orientational ordering transition. The transition is suppressed as the coverage is decreased, and no sign of the transition remains above 1.6 K for n {approx} 1 ML. For n {approx lt} 8 ML, the peak in the heat capacity exhibits signs of finite-size effects. At higher coverages, finite-size effects are not observed, and the shape of the peak depends strongly on the substrate. We conclude that the peak is inhomogeneously broadened for n {approx lt} 8 ML. This work represents the first measurements of the heat capacity due to orientational ordering in adsorbed hydrogen. The results of an earlier experiment involving vibrational spectroscopy of adsorbed molecules are included in the Appendix. In this work, we have used infrared emission spectroscopy to study the spectral region in the vicinity of the C=O stretch vibration of bridge-bonded CO on Pt(111).

  5. AC microcalorimetry of adsorbates on evaporated metal films: Orientational ordering of H{sub 2} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, R.B.

    1991-11-01

    We have improved and extended a novel ac calorimetric technique for measuring the heat capacity of adsorbates on evaporated metal films. Metallic substrates are of particular interest in current studies of the thermodynamics of adsorbed molecules. The method described in the present work is only calorimetric technique which allows measurements of molecules on simple metallic surfaces. Among other improvements, we have achieved significant progress in the preparation and characterization of the evaporated metal film. We have applied this novel technique to a study of hydrogen multilayers on gold and sapphire substrates. We have shown that samples of normal-hydrogen with a nominal coverage n of approximately 25 monolayers (ML) undergo a bulk-like orientational ordering transition. The transition is suppressed as the coverage is decreased, and no sign of the transition remains above 1.6 K for n {approx} 1 ML. For n {approx_lt} 8 ML, the peak in the heat capacity exhibits signs of finite-size effects. At higher coverages, finite-size effects are not observed, and the shape of the peak depends strongly on the substrate. We conclude that the peak is inhomogeneously broadened for n {approx_lt} 8 ML. This work represents the first measurements of the heat capacity due to orientational ordering in adsorbed hydrogen. The results of an earlier experiment involving vibrational spectroscopy of adsorbed molecules are included in the Appendix. In this work, we have used infrared emission spectroscopy to study the spectral region in the vicinity of the C=O stretch vibration of bridge-bonded CO on Pt(111).

  6. Poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite: A novel adsorbent for enhanced fulvic acid removal from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wei [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yang, Lei; Zhong, Wenhui; Cui, Jing [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Wei, Zhenggui, E-mail: weizhenggui@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Poorly crystalline HAP was firstly used for FA removal from aqueous solution. • The maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 90.20 mg/g at 318 K. • Adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic have been studied in detail. • Adsorption mechanism involved surface complexation, electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. - Abstract: In this study, poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) was developed as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fulvic acid (FA) from aqueous solution. Surface functionality, crystallinity, and morphology of the synthetic adsorbent were studied by Fourier-transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of various parameters such as crystallinity of adsorbent, contact time, adsorbent dosage, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkaline earth metal ions on FA adsorption were investigated. Results indicated that the nanosized HAP calcined at lower temperature was poorly crystalline (X{sub c} = 0.23) and had better adsorption capacity for FA than those (X{sub c} = 0.52, 0.86) calcined at higher temperature. FA removal was increased with increases of adsorbent dosage, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkali earth metal ions, but decreased as the pH increased. Kinetic studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model better described the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were best described by Sips models, and the estimated maximum adsorption capacity of poorly crystalline HAP was 90.20 mg/g at 318 K, displaying higher efficiency for FA removal than previously reported adsorbents. FT-IR results revealed that FA adsorption over the adsorbent could be attributed to the surface complexation between the oxygen atom of functional groups of FA and calcium ions of HAP. Regeneration studies indicated that HAP could be recyclable for a long

  7. Metallacarboranes: Towards promising hydrogen storage metal organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Sadrzadeh, Arta; Yakobson, Boris

    2011-03-01

    Using first principles calculations we show the high hydrogen storage capacity of metallacarboranes, where the transition metal (TM) atoms bind hydrogen via Kubas interaction. The average binding energy of ~ 0.3 eV/H favorably lies within the reversible adsorption range The Sc and Ti are found to be the optimum metal atoms maximizing the number of stored H2 molecules. Depending upon the structure, metallacarboranes can adsorb up to 8 wt% of hydrogen, which exceeds DOE goal for 2015. Being integral part of the cage, TMs do not suffer from the aggregation problem. Furthermore, the presence of carbon atom in the cages permits linking the metallacarboranes to form metal organic frameworks (MOF), thus able to adsorb hydrogen via Kubas interaction, in addition to van der Waals physisorption. A. K. Singh, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Metallacarboranes: Toward Promising Hydrogen Storage Metal Organic Frameworks, JACS 132,14126 (2010).

  8. Hydrogen storage in Li-doped metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himsl, D.; Hartmann, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Erlangen Catalysis Resource Center

    2010-12-30

    Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks have been considered as potential materials for solid state hydrogen storage in recent times. In this context their properties like high permanent porosity, large surface area and the ease of chemical modification due their modular assembly are highly attractive. Unfortunately these materials suffer from low physisorption interaction energies with hydrogen and consequently the need for low adsorption temperatures (77 K) to achieve sufficient hydrogen loadings. One possible approach to overcome the outlined problem is the introduction of unsaturated metal sites within the interior MOF surface to strengthen the adsorbate-adsorbent interaction. We established the functionalization with lithiumalkoxide groups via a post-synthetic transformation of pendant hydroxyl groups with a suitable lithium base. Our results show a significant increase of the isosteric heat of adsorption for hydrogen within the lithium-containing material, thus showing that our approach is a promising strategy to make hydrogen storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks more efficient. (orig.)

  9. Modelling Hydrogen Reduction and Hydrodeoxygenation of Oxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Cheah, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations, we have studied the reduction of nickel oxide and biomass derived oxygenates (catechol, guaiacol, etc.) in hydrogen. Both the kinetic barrier and thermodynamic favorability are calculated with respect to the modeled reaction pathways. In early-stage reduction of the NiO(100) surface by hydrogen, the pull-off of the surface oxygen atom and simultaneous activation of the nearby Ni atoms coordinately dissociate the hydrogen molecules so that a water molecule can be formed, leaving an oxygen vacancy on the surface. In hydrogen reaction with oxygenates catalyzed by transition metals, hydrogenation of the aromatic carbon ring normally dominates. However, selective deoxygenation is of particular interest for practical application such as biofuel conversion. Our modeling shows that doping of the transition metal catalysts can change the orientation of oxygenates adsorbed on metal surfaces. The correlation between the selectivity of reaction and the orientation of adsorption are discussed.

  10. Effect of Adsorbent Diameter on the Performance of Adsorption Refrigeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宏宇; 何兆红; 袁浩然; 小林敬幸; 赵丹丹; 窪田光宏; 郭华芳

    2014-01-01

    Adsorbents are important components in adsorption refrigeration. The diameter of an adsorbent can af-fect the heat and mass transfer of an adsorber. The effect of particle diameter on effective thermal conductivity was investigated. The heat transfer coefficient of the refrigerant and the void rate of the adsorbent layer can also affect the effective thermal conductivity of adsorbents. The performance of mass transfer in the adsorber is better when pressure drop decreases. Pressure drop decreases with increasing permeability. The permeability of the adsorbent layer can be improved with increasing adsorbent diameter. The effect of adsorbent diameter on refrigeration output power was experimentally studied. Output power initially increases and then decreases with increasing diameter under different cycle time conditions. Output power increases with decreasing cycle time under similar diameters.

  11. Hydrogenation of PAH cations: a first step towards H2 formation

    CERN Document Server

    Boschman, L; Cazaux, S; Schlathoelter, T; Hoekstra, R; Spaans, M; Gonzalez-Magana, O

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the universe. A large fraction of H2 forms by association of hydrogen atoms adsorbed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), where formation rates depend crucially on the H sticking probability. We have experimentally studied PAH hydrogenation by exposing coronene cations, confined in a radiofrequency ion trap, to gas phase atomic hydrogen. A systematic increase of the number of H atoms adsorbed on the coronene with the time of exposure is observed. Odd coronene hydrogenation states dominate the mass spectrum up to 11 H atoms attached. This indicates the presence of a barrier preventing H attachment to these molecular systems. For the second and fourth hydrogenation, barrier heights of 72 +- 6 meV and 40 +- 10 meV, respectively are found which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for the hydrogenation of neutral PAHs. Our experiments however prove that the barrier does not vanish for higher hydrogenation states. These results imply that PAH ...

  12. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  13. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  14. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize the management of the Technical Network (TN), to ease the understanding and purpose of devices connected to the TN, and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive email notifications from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database. Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  15. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimise the management of the Technical Network (TN), to facilitate understanding of the purpose of devices connected to the TN and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive e-mails from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database at "network-cern-ch". Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  16. Heparin interaction with protein-adsorbed surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winterton, Lynn C.; Andrade, Joseph D.; Feijen, Jan; Kim, Sung Wan

    1986-01-01

    Albumin and fibrinogen show no binding affinity to varied molecular weights of heparin at physiological pH. Human plasma fibronectin was shown to bind heparins in both the solution and adsorbed states. Fibronectin was shown to have six active binding sites for heparins which may be sterically blocke

  17. Linear Sweep Voltammetry of Adsorbed Neutral Red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    E. Creager, G. T. Marks, D. A. Aikens and H. H. Richtol Prepared for Publication in Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry Rensselaer Polytechnic... Electroanalytical Chemistry It. KEY WORDS (Continue oun reverse side It necessary mid Ideneliy by block ntaibor) Neutral Red, cyclic voltammetry, adsorbed dye 20

  18. Radon emanation from radium specific adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdula'aly, Abdulrahman I; Maghrawy, Hamed B

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies were undertaken to quantify the total activity of radon that is eluted following no-flow periods from several Ra-226 adsorbents loaded to near exhaustion. The adsorbents studied included two types of barium sulphate impregnated alumina (ABA-8000 and F-1) and Dowex MSC-1 resin treated by either barium hydroxide or barium chloride. In parallel, radium loaded plain activated aluminas and Dowex MSC-1 resin were similarly investigated. The results revealed that radon was quantitatively eluted during the first few bed volumes of column operation after no-flow periods. Although similar radon elution profiles were obtained, the position of the radon peak was found to vary and depended on the adsorbent type. Radon levels up to 24 and 14 kBq dm(-3) were measured after a rest period of 72h from radium exhausted Dowex MSC-1 treated with barium chloride and F-1 impregnated alumina with barium sulphate, respectively. The eluted radon values measured experimentally were compared to those calculated theoretically from accumulated radium quantities for the different media. For plain adsorbents, an agreement better than 10% was obtained. For treated resin-types a consistency within 30% but for impregnated alumina-types high discrepancy between respective values were obtained.

  19. Adsorption Mechanisms of Mesoporous Adsorbents in Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-jian; LEE Kangtaek

    2004-01-01

    Sieve effect, complexation, ionic exchange, electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interaction, and molecular recognition based on molecular imprinting are comprehensively discussed.

  20. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  1. Nitric oxide adsorbed on zeolites: EPR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiro, Hidenori; Lund, Anders; Shiotani, Masaru

    2004-05-01

    CW-EPR studies of NO adsorbed on sodium ion-exchanged zeolites were focused on the geometrical structure of NO monoradical and (NO)2 biradical formed on zeolites. The EPR spectrum of NO monoradical adsorbed on zeolite can be characterized by the three different g-tensor components and the resolved y-component hyperfine coupling with the 14N nucleus. Among the g-tensor components, the value of g(zz) is very sensitive to the local environment of zeolite and becomes a measure of the electrostatic field in zeolite. The temperature dependence of the g-tensor demonstrated the presence of two states of the Na-NO adduct, in rigid and rotational states. The EPR spectra of NO adsorbed on alkaline metal ion-exchanged zeolite and their temperature dependency are essentially the same as that on sodium ion-exchanged zeolite. On the other hand, for NO adsorbed on copper ion-exchanged zeolite it is known that the magnetic interaction between NO molecule and paramagnetic copper ion are observable in the spectra recorded at low temperature. The signals assigned to (NO)2 biradical were detected for EPR spectrum of NO adsorbed on Na-LTA. CW-EPR spectra as well as their theoretical calculation suggested that the two NO molecules are aligned along their N-O bond axes. A new procedure for automatical EPR simulation is described which makes it possible to analyze EPR spectrum easily. In the last part of this paper, some instances when other nitrogen oxides were used as a probe molecule to characterize the zeolite structure, chemical properties of zeolites, and dynamics of small molecules were described on the basis of selected literature data reported recently.

  2. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  3. Hydrogen intercalation under graphene on Ir(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grånäs, Elin; Gerber, Timm; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Schulte, Karina; Andersen, Jesper N.; Michely, Thomas; Knudsen, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Using high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy we study the intercalation of hydrogen under graphene/Ir(111). The hydrogen intercalated graphene is characterized by a component in C 1s that is shifted -0.10 to -0.18 eV with respect to pristine graphene and a component in Ir 4f at 60.54 eV. The position of this Ir 4f component is identical to that of the Ir(111) surface layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed, indicating that the atomic hydrogen adsorption site on bare Ir(111) and beneath graphene is the same. Based on co-existence of fully- and non-intercalated graphene, and the inability to intercalate a closed graphene film covering the entire Ir(111) surface, we conclude that hydrogen dissociatively adsorbs at bare Ir(111) patches, and subsequently diffuses rapidly under graphene. A likely entry point for the intercalating hydrogen atoms is identified to be where graphene crosses an underlying Ir(111) step.

  4. A theoretical study of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions on Ru(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1998-01-01

    Using density functional theory we study the effect of pre-adsorbed atoms on the dissociation of N(2) and the adsorption of N, N(2), and CO on Ru(0001). We have done calculations for pre-adsorbed Na, Cs, and S, and find that alkali atoms adsorbed close to a dissociating N(2) molecule will lower...... the barrier for dissociation, whereas S will increase it. The interaction with alkali atoms is mainly of an electrostatic nature. The poisoning by S is due to two kinds of repulsive interactions: a Pauli repulsion and a reduced covalent bond strength between the adsorbate and the surface d-electrons. In order...... to investigate these different interactions in more detail, we look at three different species (N atoms, and terminally bonded N(2) and CO) and use them as probes to study their interaction with two modifier atoms (Na and S). The two modifier atoms have very different properties, which allows us to decouple...

  5. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoxime-based Adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-18

    Amidoxime-based polymer fibers are considered one of the most promising materials for sequestering uranium from seawater. The high-surface-area polymer fibers containing amidoxime and carboxylate groups synthesized by Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL-AF1) show very high uranium adsorption capacities known in the literature. Effective elution of uranium and repeated use of the adsorbent are important factors affecting the cost of producing uranium from seawater using this material. Traditional acid leaching of uranium followed by KOH conditioning of the fiber causes chemical changes and physical damage to the ORNL-AF1 adsorbent. Two alkaline solution leaching methods were developed by this project, one uses a highly concentrated (3 M) potassium bicarbonate solution at pH 8.3 and 40 °C; the other uses a mixture of sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide at pH 10.4. Both elution methods do not require KOH conditioning prior to reusing the fiber adsorbent. The conditions of eluting uranium from the amidoxime-based adsorbent using these alkaline solutions are confirmed by thermodynamic calculations. The bicarbonate elution method is selective for uranium recovery compared to other elution methods and causes no chemical change to the fiber material based on FTIR spectroscopy

  6. Hydrogenated Microstructure and Its Hydrogenation Properties: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdus Salam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between microstructure and hydrogenation properties of the mixed metals has been investigated via different spectroscopic techniques and the density functional theory (DFT. FESEM and TEM analyses demonstrated the nano-grains of Mg2NiH4 and MgH2 on the hydrogenated microstructure of the adsorbents that were confirmed by using XPS analysis technique. SAED pattern of hydrogenated metals attributed the polycrystalline nature of mixed metals and ensured the hydrogenation to Mg2NiH4 and MgH2 compounds. Flower-like rough surface of mixed metals showed high hydrogenation capacity. The density functional theory (DFT predicted hydrogenation properties; enthalpy and entropy changes of hydrogenated microstructure of MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 are −62.90 kJ/mol, −158 J/mol·K and −52.78 kJ/mol, −166 J/mol·K, respectively. The investigation corresponds to the hydrogen adsorption feasibility, reversible range hydrogenation thermodynamics, and hydrogen desorption energy of 54.72 kJ/mol. DFT predicted IR band for MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 attributed hydrogen saturation on metal surfaces.

  7. Investigation on Adsorption State of Surface Adsorbate on Silicon Wafer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    An adsorption kinetics model for adsorbate on the specularly polished silicon wafer was suggested. The mathematical model of preferential adsorption and the mechanism controlling the adsorption state of adsorbate were discussed.

  8. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  9. Development of Hydrogen Education Programs for Government Officials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Shannon [South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Alliance, Columbia, SC (United States); Keller, Russ [Advanced Technology International, Cedarburg, WI (United States)

    2016-03-08

    1. Subcontractor/Technical Subject Matter Expert (Tasks 1-3) 2. Technical lead for LFG cleanup and hydrogen production systems Support for Feasibility Study 3. Technical Lead for Feasibility Study Coordination of site preparation activities for all project equipment 4. Host site

  10. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  11. Preparation of Graphene Oxide-Based Hydrogels as Efficient Dye Adsorbents for Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haiying; Jiao, Tifeng; Zhang, Qingrui; Guo, Wenfeng; Peng, Qiuming; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets exhibit superior adsorption capacity for removing organic dye pollutants from an aqueous environment. In this paper, the facile preparation of GO/polyethylenimine (PEI) hydrogels as efficient dye adsorbents has been reported. The GO/PEI hydrogels were achieved through both hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between amine-rich PEI and GO sheets. For both methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (RhB), the as-prepared hydrogels exhibit removal rates within about 4 h in accordance with the pseudo-second-order model. The dye adsorption capacity of the hydrogel is mainly attributed to the GO sheets, whereas the PEI was incorporated to facilitate the gelation process of GO sheets. More importantly, the dye-adsorbed hydrogels can be conveniently separated from an aqueous environment, suggesting potential large-scale applications of the GO-based hydrogels for organic dye removal and wastewater treatment.

  12. Zeolites as alcohol adsorbents from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekova Blagica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential usage of zeolites as adsorbents for the removal of organic molecules from water was investigated in a series of experiments with aqueous solutions of lower alcohols. This could represent a simple solution to the problem of cleaning up industrial wastewater as well as recovering valuable chemicals at relatively low costs. Adsorption isotherms of the Langmuir type were applied, and calculations showed that the amount of propanol adsorbed on silicalite corresponded to approximately 70% of the pore volume. The adsorption process is simple, and recovery of the more concentrated products is easily done by heat treatment and/or at lowered pressures. Adsorption experiments with aqueous acetone showed that silicalite had approximately the same adsorption capacity for acetone as for n-propanol. Heats of adsorption were determined calorimetrically.

  13. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  14. Fluorescence of dyes adsorbed on highly organized nanostructured gold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Stefano A.; Mourran, Ahmed; Spatz, Joachim P.; Veggel, van Frank C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Möller, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that fluorescent dyes can be adsorbed selectively on gold nanoparticles which are immobilized on a glass substrate and that the fluorescence originating from the adsorbed dyes exhibits significantly less quenching when compared to dyes adsorbed on bulk gold. Self-assembled monolayers of

  15. New nanosized catalytic membrane reactors for hydrogenation with stored hydrogen: Prerequisites and the experimental basis for their creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. P.; Tsodikov, M. V.; Parenago, O. P.; Teplyakov, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    The prerequisites and prospects for creating a new generation of nanosized membrane reactors are considered. For the first time, hydrogenation reactions take place in ceramic membrane pores with hydrogen adsorbed beforehand in mono- and multilayered oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs) formed on the internal pore surface. It is shown for Trumem microfiltration membranes with D avg ˜130 nm that oxidation reactions of CO on a Cu0.03Ti0.97O2 ± δ catalyst and the oxidative conversion of methane into synthesis gas and light hydrocarbons on La + Ce/MgO are considerably enhanced when they occur in membranes. Regularities of hydrogen adsorption, storage, and desorption in nanosized membrane reactors are investigated through OCNTG formation in Trumem ultrafiltration membrane pores with D avg = 50 and 90 nm and their saturation with hydrogen at a pressure of 10-13 MPa. It is shown that the amount of adsorbed hydrogen reaches 14.0% of OCNTG mass. Using thermogravimetric analysis in combination with mass-spectrometric analysis, hydrogen adsorption in OCNTG is first determined and its desorption is found to proceed at atmospheric pressure at a temperature of ˜175°C. It is shown that adsorbed hydrogen affects the transport properties of the membranes, reducing their efficiency with respect to liquids by 4-26 times. This is indirect confirmation of its high activity, due apparently the dissociative mechanism of adsorption.

  16. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  17. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  18. Green Adsorbents for Wastewaters: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Z. Kyzas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious environmental problems is the existence of hazardous and toxic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. The major hindrance is the simultaneous existence of many/different types of pollutants as (i dyes; (ii heavy metals; (iii phenols; (iv pesticides and (v pharmaceuticals. Adsorption is considered to be one of the most promising techniques for wastewater treatment over the last decades. The economic crisis of the 2000s led researchers to turn their interest in adsorbent materials with lower cost. In this review article, a new term will be introduced, which is called “green adsorption”. Under this term, it is meant the low-cost materials originated from: (i agricultural sources and by-products (fruits, vegetables, foods; (ii agricultural residues and wastes; (iii low-cost sources from which most complex adsorbents will be produced (i.e., activated carbons after pyrolysis of agricultural sources. These “green adsorbents” are expected to be inferior (regarding their adsorption capacity to the super-adsorbents of previous literature (complex materials as modified chitosans, activated carbons, structurally-complex inorganic composite materials etc., but their cost-potential makes them competitive. This review is a critical approach to green adsorption, discussing many different (maybe in some occasions doubtful topics such as: (i adsorption capacity; (ii kinetic modeling (given the ultimate target to scale up the batch experimental data to fixed-bed column calculations for designing/optimizing commercial processes and (iii critical techno-economical data of green adsorption processes in order to scale-up experiments (from lab to industry with economic analysis and perspectives of the use of green adsorbents.

  19. Behavior of macromolecules in adsorbed layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟伯中[1; 姚恒申[2; 罗平亚[3

    2000-01-01

    A model for describing the behavior ot macromoiecuies in aosoroea layers is developed by introducing a concept of distribution density of layer thickness U based on stochastic process and probabilistic statistics. The molecular behavior of layers adsorbed on clay particle surfaces is discussed; the random distribution and its statistics of the layer thickness are given by incorporating experimental results with an ionic polyelectrolyte with the molecular weight of 1.08×106and chain charged density of 0.254.

  20. MOLECULAR IMPRINTED POLYMERS--Novel Polymer Adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Haitao; XU Mancai; SHI Zuoqing; HE Binglin

    2001-01-01

    Molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) are novel functional polymer materials and known as specific adsorbents for the template molecules. These novel functional polymers have promised potential applications in racemic resolution, sensor, chromatography, adsorptive separation and other fields. This review exhibits the approach for preparing MIPs, the features of MIPs obtained by different routes and the characteristics of adsorptive separations with MIPs. The molecular recognition mechanism and the idea of the present possibilities and limitations of molecular imprinting polymerization are discussed as well.

  1. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-02-28

    total hydrogen uptake at 77 K and 100 bar amounts to 7.8 wt.% comparable to the total uptake reported of MOF-177 (10 wt.%), which is a benchmark material for high pressure and low temperature H{sub 2} adsorption. Covalent organic frameworks are new class of nanoporous materials constructed solely from light elements (C, H, B, and O). The number of adsorption sites as well as the strength of adsorption are essential prerequisites for hydrogen storage in porous materials because they determine the storage capacity and the operational conditions. Currently, to the best of our knowledge, no experimental data are available on the position of preferential H{sub 2} adsorption sites in COFs. Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to determine the position of preferential hydrogen sites in COFs. Our results demonstrate that H{sub 2} molecule adsorbed at low temperature in seven different adsorption sites in COFs. The calculated adsorption energies are about 3 kJ/mol, comparable to that found for MOF systems. The gravimetric uptake for COF-108 reached 4.17 wt.% at room temperature and 100 bar, which makes this class of materials promising for hydrogen storage applications. (orig.)

  2. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  3. Remediation of AMD using industrial waste adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nuur Hani Bte; Yaacob, Wan Zuhairi Wan

    2016-11-01

    The study investigates the characteristic of industrial waste as adsorbents and its potential as heavy metals absorbents in AMD samples. The AMD sample was collected from active mine pond and the pH was measured in situ. The metal contents were analyzed by ICP-MS. The AMD water was very acidic (pH< 3.5), and the average heavy metals content in AMD were high especially in Fe (822.029 mg/l). Fly ash was found to be the most effective absorbent material containing high percentage of CaO (57.24%) and SiO2 (13.88%), followed by ladle furnace slag containing of high amount of CaO (51.52%) and Al2O3 (21.23%), while biomass ash consists of SiO2 (43.07%) and CaO (12.97%). Tank analysis display a huge changes due to pH value change from acidity to nearly neutral phases. After 50 days, fly ash remediation successfully increase the AMD pH values from pH 2.57-7.09, while slag change from acidity to nearly alkaline phase from pH 2.60-7.3 and biomass has change to pH 2.54-6.8. Fly ash has successfully remove Fe, Mn, Cu, and Ni. Meanwhile, slag sample displays as an effective adsorbent to adsorb more Pb and Cd in acid mine drainage.

  4. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The actors of the building industry have access to a range of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), and are constantly presented with new software and new communications platforms. Through case studies, and inspired by sociotechnical approaches to the study of emerging technologies......, this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references...... to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role...

  5. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    , this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references......The actors of the building industry have access to a range of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), and are constantly presented with new software and new communications platforms. Through case studies, and inspired by sociotechnical approaches to the study of emerging technologies...... to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role...

  6. Trilinear analysis of thin-layer chromatography retention of 35 model compounds chromatographed on nine adsorbents with 20 pure solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komsta, Łukasz; Skibiński, Robert; Bezpalko, Natalia; Mielniczek, Aleksandra; Stępkowska, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    The RF value dataset of 35 model compounds, chromatographed with 20 pure solvents as the mobile phase each on nine adsorbents: RP2, RP8, RP18, alumina, cellulose, CN, DIOL, NH2 , and silica, was subjected to trilinear analysis with parallel factor analysis. The two-factor optimal model explained 87% of total information in this complex dataset. The first obtained score (trend) represents two features: the presence of hydrogen bonding and heteroatoms of solute and the mean elution force of the solvent. The second trend represents molecule size, aromaticity, and number of carbons, interconnected with presence of chlorine in mobile phase. The correlation between the scores and molecular descriptors were checked to interpret these trends quantitatively. The scores of adsorbents were slightly intercorrelated, showing NH2 , alumina, and cellulose as outliers from main adsorbents cloud. The obtained results suggest that molecular size and aromaticity, connected with chlorine atoms in mobile phase, is the second source of retention variability.

  7. Surface Hydrogen and Subsurface Hydrogen: Their Roles in Bulk Absorption and Surface Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    Hydrogen adsorbed on metal surfaces possibly penetrates into “subsurface” sites, which might further diffuse into bulk. When temperature is raised, on the other hand, such absorbed hydrogen diffuses back to the surface via the subsurface site eventually desorbing from the surface. The kinetics of these absorption and desorption are ideally expressed by the potential energy surfaces of hydrogen near the surfaces. This article describes how the potential of hydrogen is described, and how the surface and subsurface sites influence the kinetics of absorption and desorption for Pd and Ni as examples. As well as these phenomena, the subsurface sites could serve to promote particular hydrogenation reactions occurring at surfaces. The mechanism of subsurface chemistry is discussed.

  8. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  9. Ab initio study of adsorption of molecular hydrogen on microporous metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Sébastien; Côté, Michel

    2004-03-01

    In the ongoing search for promising compounds for hydrogen storage, novel porous metal-organic frameworks (MOF) have been discovered recently [1]. Well defined binding sites were deduced from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy of the rotational transitions of the adsorbed molecular hydrogen. In light of this discovery we performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on this class of microporous MOF to compare different adsorption sites. Different approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials were accessed for a set of relevant properties such as binding energy, energetically favored configuration and distance between the adsorbents and adsorbates. In particular, theoretical rotational spectra of the adsorbed H2 were obtained that could be compared to the experimental INS spectra. [1] Rosi et al., Science Vol. 300, 1127 (2003)

  10. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 6 Report Promoting a Southeast Hydrogen Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this project task was to establish a technical consortium to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. The goal was to partner with fuel cell manufacturers, hydrogen fuel infrastructure providers, electric utilities, energy service companies, research institutions, and user groups to improve education and awareness of hydrogen technologies in an area that is lagging behind other parts of the country in terms of vehicle and infrastructure demonstrations and deployments. This report documents that effort.

  11. Hydrogenation of chalcones using hydrogen permeating through a Pd and palladized Pd electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, M., E-mail: mcgutier@unse.edu.a [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina); Nazareno, M.A. [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina); Sosa, V. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Agencia postal 4, Casilla 61, 5000, Cordoba (Argentina); Lopez de Mishima, B.A., E-mail: bmishima@unse.edu.a [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina); Mishima, H.T. [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina)

    2010-08-01

    The hydrogenation of benzalacetone and benzalacetophenone was carried out using atomic hydrogen permeating through a palladium membrane. A two-compartment cell separated by a Pd sheet or a palladized Pd (Pd/Pd black) sheet electrode was employed. The reduction products were identified by (GC) gas chromatography, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy. The carbon-carbon double bond was hydrogenated and the benzylacetone and benzylacetophenone were obtained as products using palladium catalyst. The current efficiency for hydrogenation reaction increases when the current density for water electrolysis decreases and depends on the initial chalcone concentration. It is over 90% at the concentration of 10 mmol L{sup -1}. The hydrogen absorption and diffusion into and through a palladium membrane electrode has been studied by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method. The impedance results would indicate that the hydrogen permeated through the membrane is consumed by the chalcone during the hydrogenation process keeping as the permeable boundary condition in the outer side of the Pd membrane the hydrogen activity almost zero. The hydrogen entering the metal through an adsorbed state and the rate of hydrogen absorption is diffusion-controlled.

  12. Hydrogen for IC Engines: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayaka S, Syed farees khaleel rahman H.K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen provides a pathway for energy diversity. It can store the energy from diverse domestic resources (including clean coal, nuclear, and intermittently available renewables for use in mobile applications and more. Vehicles operating on hydrogen can dramatically reduce our nation’s dependence on oil and significantly reduce tailpipe emissions. Hydrogen offers a potential means to store and deliver energy from abundant, domestically available resources—while reducing our nation’s carbon footprint. This paper describes the use of Hydrogen as a fuel in IC engines and the technical aspects that accompany this idea.

  13. Hydrogen storage technology materials and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klebanoff, Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Zero-carbon, hydrogen-based power technology offers the most promising long-term solution for a secure and sustainable energy infrastructure. With contributions from the world's leading technical experts in the field, Hydrogen Storage Technology: Materials and Applications presents a broad yet unified account of the various materials science, physics, and engineering aspects involved in storing hydrogen gas so that it can be used to provide power. The book helps you understand advanced hydrogen storage materials and how to build systems around them. Accessible to nonscientists, the first chapt

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Eckert, Juergen; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Vodak, David T.; Kim, Jaheon; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2003-05-01

    Metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5) of composition Zn4O(BDC)3 (BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) with a cubic three-dimensional extended porous structure adsorbed hydrogen up to 4.5 weight percent (17.2 hydrogen molecules per formula unit) at 78 kelvin and 1.0 weight percent at room temperature and pressure of 20 bar. Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of the rotational transitions of the adsorbed hydrogen molecules indicates the presence of two well-defined binding sites (termed I and II), which we associate with hydrogen binding to zinc and the BDC linker, respectively. Preliminary studies on topologically similar isoreticular metal-organic framework-6 and -8 (IRMOF-6 and -8) having cyclobutylbenzene and naphthalene linkers, respectively, gave approximately double and quadruple (2.0 weight percent) the uptake found for MOF-5 at room temperature and 10 bar.

  15. Siloxanes removal from biogas by high surface area adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislon, P; Galli, S; Monteleone, G

    2013-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds, as their burning has damaging effects on turbines and engines; organic silicon compounds in the form of siloxanes can be found in biogas produced from urban wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product, such as cosmetics, detergents and paints. Siloxanes removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Mona, 2009; Ajhar et al., 2010 May; Schweigkofler and Niessner, 2001); aim of the present work is to find a single practical and economic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both the hydrogen sulphide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleone et al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing the most volatile siloxane (hexamethyldisiloxane or L2) in a nitrogen stream, typically 100-200 ppm L2 over N2, through an activated carbon powder bed; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best activated carbon shows an adsorption capacity of 0.1g L2 per gram of carbon. The next thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests. The capacity results depend on L2 concentration. A regenerative carbon process is then carried out by heating the carbon bed up to 200 °C and flushing out the adsorbed L2 samples in a nitrogen stream in a three step heating procedure up to 200 °C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cycling the samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  17. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience Since the closure of the detector in February, the technical operation of CMS has been quite smooth and reliable. Some minor interventions in UXC were required to cure failures of power supplies, fans, readout boards and rack cooling connections, but all these failures were repaired in scheduled technical stops or parasitically during access dedicated to fixing LHC technical problems. The only occasion when CMS had to request an access between fills was to search for the source of an alarm from the leak-detection cables mounted in the DT racks. After a few minutes of diagnostic search, a leaking air-purge was found. Replacement was complete within 2 hours. This incident demonstrated once more the value of these leak detection cables; the system will be further extended (during the end of year technical stop) to cover more racks in UXC and the floor beneath the detector. The magnet has also been operating reliably and reacted correctly to the 14s power cut on 29 May (see below). In or...

  18. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  19. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  20. Interplay of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions in self-assembled molecular surface nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnadt, Joachim; Xu, Wei; Vang, Ronnie Thorbjørn

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid (NDCA) molecules on the Ag(110), Cu(110), and Ag(111) surfaces at room temperature has been studied by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Further supporting results were obtained using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and soft X......-edge crossing is not observed when the molecules are adsorbed on the isotropic Ag(111) or more reactive Cu(110) surfaces. On Ag(111), similar 1-D assemblies are formed to those on Ag(110), but they are oriented along the step edges. On Cu(110), the carboxylic groups of NDCA are deprotonated and form covalent...

  1. Hydrogen and Storage Initiatives at the NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Miguel; Woods, Stephen S.

    2006-01-01

    NASA WSTF Hydrogen Activities: a) Aerospace Test; b) System Certification & Verification; c) Component, System, & Facility Hazard Assessment; d) Safety Training Technical Transfer: a) Development of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Practices; b) Support of National Hydrogen Infrastructure Development.

  2. Codes and Standards Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Codes and Standards Tech Team (CSTT) mission is to enable and facilitate the appropriate research, development, & demonstration (RD&D) for the development of safe, performance-based defensible technical codes and standards that support the technology readiness and are appropriate for widespread consumer use of fuel cells and hydrogen-based technologies with commercialization by 2020. Therefore, it is important that the necessary codes and standards be in place no later than 2015.

  3. Technical and systems evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skolnik, E.G.; DiPietro, J.P. [Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-08-01

    During FY 1998 Energetics performed a variety of technology-based evaluations for the Hydrogen Program. Three evaluations are summarized below: hydrogen bromine-based electricity storage, carbon-based hydrogen storage, and hydrogen-fueled buses.

  4. The Uranium from Seawater Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Overview of Marine Testing, Adsorbent Characterization, Adsorbent Durability, Adsorbent Toxicity, and Deployment Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Chris J.; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, R. Shane; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D’Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 ± 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 ± 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage

  5. Interactions between interfacial water and CO adsorbed on Pt and Pt-Ru alloy surfaces under electrochemical conditions: Density-functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Juan A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Ishikawa, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yishikawa@uprrp.ed [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico)

    2010-12-30

    The structural and electronic properties of interfacial water and adsorbed CO on platinum and platinum/ruthenium alloy have been studied via density-functional theory calculations to gain insight into the water-adsorbate interaction under electrochemical conditions. The computational simulations reveal a new interpretation for the interaction of adsorbed CO and water at the electrochemical interfaces. The new interaction model rationalizes the observed quantitative relationship between infrared intensities for adsorbed bridging CO and water molecules that impart a high-frequency O-H stretch, ca. 3630-3660 cm{sup -1} on pure Pt and 3600-3620 cm{sup -1} on PtRu alloy. The theoretical modeling indicates that the observed feature common to both pure Pt and PtRu alloy surfaces is due to interfacial water molecules firmly hydrogen-bonded to bridging CO.

  6. Polymeric adsorbents with peptide pendants as artificial receptors for β-Mactam antibiotics by mimicking the binding sites of β-lactamases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建标; 谢志东; 王永健; 王亦农; 范云鸽; 何炳林

    1997-01-01

    A scries of polymeric adsorbents with peptide pendants were designed as the artificial receptors of β-laetarn antibiotics by mimicking the structures of binding site in β-lactamases.Crosslinked poly(N,N-dimethyl acry-lamide) gel as a carrier was prepared by suspension copolyrnerization of N,N-dimethyl acrylamide and N,N-bisacryl-diaminoethane and then functionalized with ethylenediamine after partial hydrolysis.Using solid-phase peptide synthesis with symmetrical anhydride of protected amino acid step by step,various peptide pendants were respectively anchored onto the functionalized carrier.The adsorption properties of these peptide-containing adsorbents for β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin and cefotaxime were then studied.The results showed that only those adsorbents in which peptide chains contained more than one lysine residues could obviously adsorb both β-lactams and that static interaction as well as hydrogen bond played an important role during the adsorption

  7. MOLECULAR IMPRINTED POLYMERS—Novel Polymer Adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIHaitao; XUMancai; 等

    2001-01-01

    Molecular imprinted polymers(MIPs) are novel functional polymer materials and known as specific adsorbents for the template molecules,These novel functional polymers have promised potential applications in racemic resolution,sensor,chromatography,adsorptive separation and other fields.This review exhibits the approach for preparing MIPs,the features of MIPs obtained by different routes and the characteristics of adsorptive separations with MIPs.The molecular recognition mechanism and the idea of the present possibilities and limitations of molecular imprinting polymerization are discussed as well.

  8. Adsorbate Azimuthal Orientation from Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, B. G.; Power, J. R.; Cole, R. J.; Perry, C. C.; Chen, Q.; Haq, S.; Bertrams, Th.; Richardson, N. V.; Weightman, P.

    1998-05-01

    We have determined the azimuthal orientation of an adsorbate on a metal surface from an intramolecular-transition-derived feature in reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS). Adsorption of 9-anthracene carboxylic acid onto p\\(2×1\\)O/Cu110 led to an ordered structure with a strong (2%), derivativelike feature at 4.5 eV. Fresnel theory predicts the measured intensity, functional behavior, and sense of the RAS signal for the molecule aligned along [110]. IR measurements confirm that the molecular plane is perpendicular to the surface and STM measurements support the azimuthal orientation. We reassign the sense of the clean Cu(110) surface RA spectrum.

  9. Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Separation Coefficient of Absorbed Hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvera, I. F.; Nielsen, Mourits

    1976-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering and measurement of the ortho-para separation coefficient have been used to study the low lying rotational states of molecular hydrogen adsorbed on activated alumina. The observations are consistent with a picture in which the orientational motion of the molecules...

  10. Magnetic adsorbent constructed from the loading of amino functionalized Fe3O4 on coordination complex modified polyoxometalates nanoparticle and its tetracycline adsorption removal property study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jinzhao; Mei, Mingliang; Xu, Xinxin

    2016-06-01

    A magnetic polyoxometalates based adsorbent has been synthesized successfully through the loading of amino functionalized Fe3O4 (NH2-Fe3O4) on nanoparticle of a coordination complex modified polyoxometalates (CC/POMNP). FTIR illustrate there exist intense hydrogen bonds between NH2-Fe3O4 and CC/POMNP, which keep the stability of this adsorbent. At room temperature, this adsorbent exhibits ferromagnetic character with saturation magnetization of 8.19 emu g-1, which provides prerequisite for fast magnetic separation. Water treatment experiment illustrates this POM based magnetic adsorbent exhibits high adsorption capacity on tetracycline. The adsorption process can be described well with Temkin model, which illustrates the interaction between adsorbent and tetracycline plays the dominated role in tetracycline removal. The rapid, high efficient tetracycline adsorption ability suggests this POM based magnetic adsorbent exhibits promising prospect in medical and agriculture waste water purification. A magnetic polyoxometalates based adsorbent, which exhibits excellent tetracycline adsorption removal property has been synthesized through the loading of NH2-Fe3O4 on coordination complex modified polyoxometalates

  11. SISGR - Hydrogen Caged in Carbon-Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Badding, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Crespi, Vinent [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen trapped in a carbon cage, captured through repulsive interactions, is a novel concept in hydrogen storage. Trapping hydrogen via repulsive interactions borrows an idea from macroscale hydrogen storage (i.e. compressed gas storage tanks) and reapplies these concepts on the nanoscale in specially designed molecular containers. Under extreme conditions of pressure, hydrogen solubility in carbon materials is expected to increase and carbon is expected to restructure to minimize volume via a mixed sp2/sp3 hydrogenated state. Thermodynamics dictate that pre-formed C-H structures will rearrange with increased pressure, yet the final carbon-hydrogen interactions may be dependent upon the mechanism by which hydrogen is introduced. Gas “trapping” is meant to denote gas present in a solid in a high density, adsorbed-like state, when the external pressure is much less than that necessary to provide a comparable fluid density. Trapping thus denotes a kinetically metastable state rather than thermodynamic equilibrium. This project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize select hydrocarbons in the presence of gases, in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap gases via repulsive interactions. Aromatic, polyaromatic, and hydroaromatic molecules expected to undergo cyclo-addition reactions were polymerized at high (~GPa) pressures to form extended hydrogenated amorphous carbon networks. Notably, aromatics with a pre-existing internal free volume (such as Triptycene) appeared to retain an internal porosity upon application of pressure. However, a high photoluminescence background after polymerization precluded in situ identification of trapped gases. No spectroscopic evidence was found after depressurization that would be indicative of pockets of trapped gases in a localized high-pressure environment. Control studies suggested this measurement may be insensitive to gases at low pressure. Similarly, no spectral fingerprint was found for gas-imbued spherical

  12. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  13. Electronic properties of hydrogen- and oxygen-terminated diamond surfaces exposed to the air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Feng-Bin; Wang Jia-Dao; Chen Da-Rong; Yan Da-Yun

    2009-01-01

    The electronic properties of hydrogen- and oxygen-terminated diamond surfaces exposed to the air are investigated by scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The results indicate that for the hydrogen-terminated diamond surface a shallow acceptor above the valence-band-maximum (VBM) appears in the band gap. However, the oxygen-terminated diamond film exhibits a high resistivity with a wide band gap. Based on the density-functional-theory, the densities of states, corresponding to molecular adsorbate in hydrogenated and oxygenated diamond (100) surfaces, are studied. The results show that the shallow acceptor in the band gap for the hydrogen-terminated diamond film can be attributed to the interaction between the surface C-H bonding orbitals and the adsorbate molecules, while for the oxygen-terminated diamond film, the interaction between the surface C-O bonding orbitals and the adsorbate molecules can induce occupied states in the valence-band.

  14. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

    In this report we will review the main achievements of the Technical Stop and the progress of several centrally-managed projects to support CMS operation and maintenance and prepare the way for upgrades. Overview of the extended Technical Stop  The principal objectives of the extended Technical Stop affecting the detector itself were the installation of the TOTEM T1 telescopes on both ends, the readjustment of the alignment link-disk in YE-2, the replacement of the light-guide sleeves for all PMs of both HFs, and some repairs on TOTEM T2 and CASTOR. The most significant tasks were, however, concentrated on the supporting infrastructure. A detailed line-by-line leak search was performed in the C6F14 cooling system of the Tracker, followed by the installation of variable-frequency drives on the pump motors of the SS1 and SS2 tracker cooling plants to reduce pressure transients during start-up. In the electrical system, larger harmonic filters were installed in ...

  15. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  16. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on honeycomb adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Takaaki; Munakata, Kenzo; Takeishi, Toshiharu; Hara, Keisuke; Wada, Kouhei; Katekari, Kenichi; Inoue, Keita; Shinozaki, Yohei; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Masahiro; Uda, Tatsuhiko

    2011-10-01

    Recovery of tritium released into working areas in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue of safety. A large volume of air from tritium fuel cycle or vacuum vessel should be processed by air cleanup system (ACS). In ACS, tritium gas is oxidized by catalysts, and then tritiated water vapor is collected by adsorbents. This method can remove tritium effectively, whereas high throughput of air causes high-pressure drop in catalyst and adsorbent beds. In this study, the applicability of honeycomb-type adsorbents, which offers a useful advantage in terms of their low-pressure drop, to ACS was examined, in comparison with conventional pebble-type adsorbent. Honeycomb-type adsorbent causes far less pressure drop than pebble-type adsorbent beds. Adsorption capacity of water vapor on a honeycomb-type adsorbent is slightly lower than that on a pebble-type adsorbent, while adsorption rate of water vapor on honeycomb-type adsorbent is much higher than that of pebble-type adsorbent.

  17. (3) Development of composite adsorbents for high decontamination and their selective adsorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Hitoshi; Yamagishi, Isao

    In an action for the convergence of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, the completion of Step 2 was declared in last December, 2011. As for the circulating cooling system supporting the cold shutdown of nuclear reactor, the temporary treatment equipment operation maintains stability. On the other hand, the establishment of permanent equipments, safety storage, treatment and disposal for the secondary solid wastes are urgent subjects. This special issue deals with the development of highly functional composite adsorbents and the evaluation of selective adsorption properties. The technical issues for the stable treatment and disposal of solid wastes are further discussed.

  18. Low concentration CO2 capture using physical adsorbents: Are Metal-Organic Frameworks becoming the new benchmark materials?

    KAUST Repository

    Belmabkhout, Youssef

    2016-03-30

    The capture and separation of traces and concentrated CO2 from important commodities such as CH4, H2, O2 and N2, is becoming important in many areas related to energy security and environmental sustainability. While trace CO2 concentration removal applications have been modestly studied for decades, the spike in interest in the capture of concentrated CO2 was motivated by the need for new energy vectors to replace highly concentrated carbon fuels and the necessity to reduce emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. CO2 capture from various gas streams, at different concentrations, using physical adsorbents, such as activated carbon, zeolites, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), is attractive. However, the adsorbents must be designed with consideration of many parameters including CO2 affinity, kinetics, energetics, stability, capture mechanism, in addition to cost. Here, we perform a systematic analysis regarding the key technical parameters that are required for the best CO2 capture performance using physical adsorbents. We also experimentally demonstrate a suitable material model of Metal Organic Framework as advanced adsorbents with unprecedented properties for CO2 capture in a wide range of CO2 concentration. These recently developed class of MOF adsorbents represent a breakthrough finding in the removal of traces CO2 using physical adsorption. This platform shows colossal tuning potential for more efficient separation agents.

  19. MSW to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasternak, A.D.; Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B.; Wallman, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Richter, G.N.; Wolfenbarger, J.K. [Texaco Inc., Montebello, CA (United States). Montebello Research Lab.

    1994-04-19

    LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the preparation and conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen by gasification and purification. The laboratory focus will be on pretreatment of MSW waste in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. Initial pretreatment approaches include (1) hydrothermal processing at saturated conditions around 300 C with or without chemical/pH modification and (2) mild dry pyrolysis with subsequent incorporation into an appropriate slurry. Initial experiments will be performed with newspaper, a major constituent of MSW, prior to actual work with progressively more representative MSW samples. Overall system modeling with special attention to energy efficiency and waste water handling of the pretreatment process will provide overall guidance to critical scale-up parameters. Incorporation of additional feed stock elements (e.g., heavy oil) will be evaluated subject to the heating value, viscosity, and economics of the MSW optimal slurry for hydrogen production. Ultimate scale-up of the optimized process will provide sufficient material for demonstration in the Texaco pilot facility; additional long term objectives include more detailed economic analysis of the process as a function of technical parameters and development of a measure/control system to ensure slagging ash for variable MSW feed stocks. Details of the overall project plan and initial experimental and modeling results are presented.

  20. Inorganic-organic phase arrangement as a factor affecting gas-phase desulfurization on catalytic carbonaceous adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Adil; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2005-08-15

    Dried sewage sludge was physically mixed with waste paper (paper-to-sludge ratios from 25% to 75%). To increase the catalytic activity, from 1% to 6% calcium hydroxide was added to the mixtures. Then the precursors were carbonized at 950 degrees C. The performance of materials as H2S adsorbents was tested using a home-developed dynamic breakthrough test. The samples, before and after the adsorption process, were characterized by adsorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, thermal analysis, XRF, and SEM. Differences in the performance were linked to the surface properties. Itwas found that mixing paper with sludge increases the amount of H2S adsorbed/oxidized in comparison with that adsorbed/oxidized by the adsorbents obtained from pure precursors (sludge or waste paper) and the capacity is comparable to those of the best activated carbons existing on the market. Although both sewage sludge and waste paper provide the catalytic centers for hydrogen sulfide oxidation, the dispersion of the catalyst and its location within accessible pores is an important factor. The presence of cellulose in the precursor mixture leads to the formation of a light macroporous char whose particles physically separate the inorganic catalytic phase of the sewage sludge origin, decreasing the density of the adsorbent and thus providing more space for storage of oxidation products. This, along with calcium, contributes to a significant increase in the capacity of the materials as hydrogen sulfide adsorbents. On their surface about 30 wt % H2S can be adsorbed, mainly as elemental sulfur or sulfates. The results demonstrate the importance of the composition and arrangement of inorganic/ organic phases for the removal of hydrogen sulfide. The interesting finding is that although some microporosity is necessary to increase the storage area for oxidation products, the carbonaceous phase does not need to be highly microporous. It is important that it provides space for deposition of sulfur

  1. New Fiber Materials with Sorption Capacity at 5.0 g-U/kg Adsorbent under Marine Testing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Tomonori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Das, Sadananda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayes, Richard T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Janke, Christopher James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strivens, Jonathan E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schlafer, Nicholas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, G. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flicker Byers, M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Schneider, Eric [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has focused on assuring that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States for a long term. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. Extraction of the uranium resource in seawater can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to make the seawater uranium recovery technology a cost competitive, viable technology. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed several novel adsorbents, which enhanced the uranium capacity 4-5 times from the state-of-the art Japanese adsorbents. Uranium exists uniformly at a concentration of ~3.3 ppb in seawater. Because of the vast volume of the oceans, the total estimated amount of uranium in seawater is approximately 1000 times larger than its amount in terrestrial resources. However, due to the low concentration, a significant challenge remains for making the extraction of uranium from seawater a commercially viable alternative technology. The biggest challenge for this technology to overcome to efficiently reduce the extraction cost is to develop adsorbents with increased uranium adsorption capacity. Two major approaches were investigated for synthesizing novel adsorbents with enhanced uranium adsorption capacity. One method utilized conventional radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) to synthesize adsorbents on high-surface area trunk fibers and the other method utilized a chemical grafting technique, atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Both approaches have shown promising uranium extraction

  2. Equilibrium molecular theory of two-dimensional adsorbate drops on surfaces of heterogeneous adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-08-01

    A molecular statistical theory for calculating the linear tension of small multicomponent droplets in two-dimensional adsorption systems is developed. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuous distributions of molecules (at short distances inside cells) in their translational and vibrational motions. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (the Mie type potential) in several coordination spheres are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that distinctions in the sizes of mixture components are slight and comparable to the sizes of adsorbent adsorption centers. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small droplets on the heterogeneous surface of an adsorbent are obtained, allowing calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-fluid interface, including linear tension. Problems in refining the molecular theory are discussed: describing the properties of small droplets using a coordination model of their structure, considering the effect an adsorbate has on the state of a near-surface adsorbent region, and the surface heterogeneity factor in the conditions for the formation of droplets.

  3. An NMR study of adsorbed helium films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Anthony Joseph

    The properties of sub-monolayer Helium-3 films adsorbed on two totally different but planar substrates, Mylar† film and exfoliated graphite have been studied using NMR. The nuclear magnetic relaxation times T1 and T 2 have been measured as functions of fractional monolayer completion, temperature, substrate plane orientation and Larmor frequency using a specially designed and constructed NMR spectrometer system. The results obtained with a Mylar film substrate are consistent3with the formation of patches of solid 3He at regions of preferential adsorption on the substrate. Measurements of T2 m very low coverage 3He films on exfoliated graphite also indicate that the adsorbate forms areas of relatively high density solid, in agreement with the thermodynamic analysis of Elgin and Goodstein. Finally, detailed measurements of T2 as a function of all of the above parameters at low areal densities will help us to characterise the relaxation processes for the fluid phase of 33He on exfoliated graphite. †Mylar is the tradename of poly(ethelene-terephthalate) film, marketed by Du Pont.

  4. TRMM project contamination control using molecular adsorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straka, S.; Chen, P.; Thomson, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Bettini, R.; Triolo, J.; Carosso, N. [Swales and Associates, Inc., 5050 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a spacecraft under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and is scheduled for launch in August 1997. The spacecraft design includes the use of numerous optical instruments and the thermal control surfaces. In addition to the inherent contamination sensitivities of the optical and thermal systems, TRMM has had the added challenge of designing systems to function at a relatively low altitude (350 km), with solar exposure. Under these conditions, high atomic oxygen densities and potentially high levels of backscattered contamination (self-contamination), as well as UV photopolymerization effects, all pose major threats to sensitive TRMM elements. In considering the various contamination control paths to follow, the TRMM project management has opted for pursuing a relatively new, but very promising technology for the TRMM spacecraft in order to lower the on-orbit contamination levels. TRMM will be incorporating Molecular Adsorbers as part of the basic spacecraft design. This paper will summarize the TRMM requirements, describe the Molecular Adsorbers being fabricated for the mission, and discuss the expected benefits of this method of on-orbit contamination control. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  6. Dye sequestration using agricultural wastes as adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Adesina Adegoke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Color is a visible pollutant and the presence of even minute amounts of coloring substance makes it undesirable due to its appearance. The removal of color from dye-bearing effluents is a major problem due to the difficulty in treating such wastewaters by conventional treatment methods. The most commonly used methods for color removal are biological oxidation and chemical precipitation. However, these processes are effective and economic only in the case where the solute concentrations are relatively high. Most industries use dyes and pigments to color their products. The presence of dyes in effluents is a major concern due to its adverse effect on various forms of life. The discharge of dyes in the environment is a matter of concern for both toxicological and esthetical reasons. It is evident from a literature survey of about 283 recently published papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for dye removal and the optimal equilibrium time of various dyes with different charcoal adsorbents from agricultural residues is between 4 and 5 h. Maximum adsorptions of acidic dyes were obtained from the solutions with pH 8–10. The challenges and future prospects are discussed to provide a better framework for a safer and cleaner environment.

  7. Effects of structure and surface properties on carbon nanotubes' hydrogen storage characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption experiments were carried out in special stainless steel vessels at room temperature (298K) and under 10 MPa using self-synthesized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In the experiments, carbon nanotubes synthesized by the seeded catalyst method were pretreated by being soaked in chemical reagents or annealed at high temperature before they were used to adsorb hydrogen, but their capacity for hydrogen storage was still poor. Carbon nanotubes synthesized by the floating catalyst method were found to be able to adsorb more hydrogen. They have a hydrogen storage capacity of over 4% after they were annealed at high temperatures, which suggested that they could be used as a promising material for hydrogen storage.``

  8. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  9. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  10. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  11. Polyaniline as a material for hydrogen storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Nour F; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2013-07-12

    The main challenge of commercialization of the hydrogen economy is the lack of convenient and safe hydrogen storage materials, which can adsorb and release a significant amount of hydrogen at ambient conditions. Finding and designing suitable cost-effective materials are vital requirements to overcome the drawbacks of investigated materials. Because of its outstanding electronic, thermal, and chemical properties, the electrically conducting polyaniline (PANI) has a high potential in hydrogen storage applications. In this review, the progress in the use of different structures of conducting PANI, its nanocomposites as well as activated porous materials based on PANI as hydrogen storage materials is presented and discussed. The effect of the unique electronic properties based on the π-electron system in the backbone of these materials in view of the hydrogen uptake and the relevant mechanisms are highlighted.

  12. High-Resolution and Time-Resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Bonding and Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lee James

    1988-12-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of the quantized vibrations of atoms and molecules adsorbed on single crystal surfaces has emerged as one of the most powerful probes of the structure, adsorption sites and reaction paths of adsorbates. This thesis explores EELS as a probe of the structure of adsorbed hydrogen on Pt(111) and Rh(100), and the structure of both CO and H coadsorbed on Rh(100). It also describes aspects of the development of a custom time-resolved EEL (TREEL) spectrometer and the application of the spectrometer to the study of the kinetics of the decomposition of methanol (CH_3 OH) and formaldehyde (H_2CO) on Ni(110) and Rh(100). In studies of H/Pt(111) and H/Rh(100) it was determined that the extended nature of the single crystal surface complicates quantitative analysis of the vibrational spectra. The nearest-neighbor central force constant model, commonly used to estimate bonding geometries, is qualitatively incorrect for both surfaces. The study of H/Rh(100) also established that local models of the potential anharmonicity are of limited utility due to the different dispersion of the fundamental and overtone losses. Adsorbate-adsorbate interactions can significantly affect adsorbate structure and reactivity. For the system of CO adsorbed on H precovered Rh(100), a strong CO-H repulsion results in a series of ordered H and CO lattices, each associated with a distinct H desorption behavior. One of the structures consists of bridge bound H and CO, each species binding to a site different from that preferred when adsorbed alone. Time-resolved EELS studies of the decomposition of methanol on Ni(110) and Rh(100) found the reaction follows the same pathway: a metastable methoxy species is formed, by cleavage of the OH bond, which subsequently decomposes to CO and H. The removal of the first methoxy hydrogen is the rate limiting step in the decomposition. The high reactivity of the 'CH_2O' product of the methoxy CH bond scission is supported by the

  13. Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

    2007-07-31

    IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

  14. Role of Adsorbed Water on Charge Carrier Dynamics in Photoexcited TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Overall photocatalytic water splitting is one of the most sought after processes for sustainable solar-to-chemical energy conversion. The efficiency of this process strongly depends on charge carrier recombination and interaction with surface adsorbates at different time scales. Here, we investigated how hydration of TiO2 P25 affects dynamics of photogenerated electrons at the millisecond to minute time scale characteristic for chemical reactions. We used rapid scan diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The decay of photogenerated electron absorption was substantially slower in the presence of associated water. For hydrated samples, the charge carrier recombination rates followed an Arrhenius-type behavior in the temperature range of 273–423 K; these became temperature-independent when the material was dehydrated at temperatures above 423 K or cooled below 273 K. A DFT+U analysis revealed that hydrogen bonding with adsorbed water stabilizes surface-trapped holes at anatase TiO2(101) facet and lowers the barriers for hole migration. Hence, hole mobility should be higher in the hydrated material than in the dehydrated system. This demonstrates that adsorbed associated water can efficiently stabilize photogenerated charge carriers in nanocrystalline TiO2 and suppress their recombination at the time scale up to minutes.

  15. A regenerable oxide-based H2S adsorbent with nanofibrous morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mayank; Yeom, Junghoon; Lineberry, Quentin; Jain, Prashant K; Shannon, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen sulphide is found in raw fuels such as natural gas and coal/biomass-derived syngas. It is poisonous to catalysts and corrosive to metals and therefore needs to be removed. This is often achieved using metal oxides as reactive adsorbents, but metal oxides perform poorly when subjected to repeated cycles of sulphidation and re-oxidation as a result of complex structural and chemical changes. Here, we show that Zn-Ti-O-based adsorbents with nanofibrous morphology can sustain their initial reactivity and sulphur removal capacity over multiple regeneration cycles. These nanostructured sorbents offer rapid reaction rates that overcome the gas-transport limitations of conventional pellet-based sorbents and allow all of the material to be used efficiently. Regeneration can be carried out at the same temperature as the sulphidation step because of the higher reactivity, which prevents sorbent deterioration and reduces energy use. The efficient regeneration of the adsorbent is also aided by structural features such as the growth of hierarchical nanostructures and preferential stabilization of a wurtzite phase in the sulphidation product.

  16. Adsorption characteristics of bio-adsorbent on chromium(III) in industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhufeng; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Jiayou; Yuan, Lixia; Zhu, Lianwen

    2015-01-01

    The removal of chromium(III) (Cr(III)) from industrial wastewater by various low-cost methods has been widely investigated. In this paper, a type of bio-adsorbent was prepared using rice straw modified by fermentation and simple chemical treatment. The aim is to detect the adsorption mechanism and characteristics on Cr(III) ions. The analysis shows that the bio-adsorbent possesses four modified characteristics for Cr(III) adsorption. The first one is the acquired physical adsorption involving concave and convex structures. The second one is the effects of the hydrogen bonding surface hydroxyl groups and the metal chromium ion with complexation. The third one is mainly caused by hydrophilic active groups that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl groups during microbial degradation to combine with ions. The final one is the bio-adsorbent had high adsorption for low concentration of Cr(III) ions. The highest removal of around 97.45% was obtained at pH 5.0, bio-adsorption dosage of 0.5 g L(-1), and initial Cr(III) concentration of 20 mg L(-1). The adsorption process followed the pseudo second-order model (R(2) > 0.99), while the isotherms were fitted to the Freundlich equation (68.1926 mg g(-1)), mainly by chemical adsorption. This study demonstrates the potential of using this biosorbent to remove Cr(III) from both synthetic and industrial wastewater.

  17. Vibrational Shift of Adsorbed Carbon Dioxide Within a Metal-Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, S.; Pierce, C.; Schloss, J.; Thompson, B.; Rowsell, J.

    2012-06-01

    There is much interest in a class of materials known as Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs). While practical applications center on hydrogen storage and carbon sequestration, these highly porous, crystalline materials also provide an excellent opportunity for performing matrix isolation experiments. In this talk we will present data on MOF-74, a honey-comb structure consisting of metal-oxide units linked by aromatic rings. Infrared spectra show that for a series of different metal cations, Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ the vibrational modes of adsorbed CO2 are all red shifted relative to the gas phase values. In contrast the ν3 mode of CO2 adsorbed within the Mg version of MOF-74 is unique in showing a blue shift. It is accompanied by broader sidebands associated with librational or center of mass motion of the adsorbed CO2. Spectra obtained below 100 K show the emergence of a second ν3 band indicating a further distortion of the CO2 molecule. These results will be discussed in terms of the interaction mechanisms of the different metal cations and in particular the fact that the Mg version of MOF-74 has a very strong affinity for CO2 with a binding enenergy of 47 kJ/mol, more than 5 kJ/mol greater than any other MOF.

  18. Hydrogen for automotive applications and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, U. [Adam Opel GmbH, Ruesselsheim (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    The energy storage system is of decisive importance for all types of electric vehicles, in contrast to the case of vehicles powered by a conventional fossil fuel or bio-fuel based internal combustion engine. Two major alternatives exist and need to be discussed: on the one hand, there is the possibility of electrical energy storage using batteries, whilst on the other hand there is the storage of energy in chemical form as hydrogen and the application of a fuel cell as energy converter. Considering the latter concept, hydrogen is a promising energy carrier in future energy systems. However, storage of hydrogen is a substantial challenge, especially for applications in vehicles with fuel cells that use proton-exchange membranes (PEMs). Different methods for hydrogen storage are discussed, including high-pressure and cryogenic-liquid storage, adsorptive storage on high-surface-area adsorbents, chemical storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides, and storage in boranes. For the latter chemical solutions, reversible options and hydrolytic release of hydrogen with off-board regeneration are both possible. Reforming of liquid hydrogen-containing compounds is also a possible means of hydrogen generation. The advantages and disadvantages of the different systems are compared. (orig.)

  19. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  20. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  1. Formic Acid as a Hydrogen Energy Carrier

    KAUST Repository

    Eppinger, Jorg

    2016-12-15

    The high volumetric capacity (S3 g H-2/L) and its low toxicity and flammability under ambient conditions make formic acid a promising hydrogen energy carrier. Particularly, in the past decade, significant advancements have been achieved in catalyst development for selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. This Perspective highlights the advantages of this approach with discussions focused on potential applications in the transportation sector together with analysis of technical requirements, limitations, and costs.

  2. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, A. S. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mazumder, M. K. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Karabacak, T. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kannarpady, Ganesh [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Sharma, R. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  3. DESORPTION OF VOCs FROM POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS UNDER MICROWAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)from polymeric adsorbents by microwave was investigated experimentally. Two kinds of organic compounds, benzene and toluene,were separately used as adsorbates in this work. Results showed that the application of microwave to regenerate the polymeric adsorbents not only can get higher regeneration efficiency in comparison with the use of heat regeneration, but also make the temperatures of the fixed beds much lower than that when using the heat regeneratton The weaker the polarity of a polymeric adsorbent, the easier its regeneration was.

  4. Nanostructure and hydrogen spillover of bridged metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Cheng-Si; Yu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Pin-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Jeng, U-Ser; Tzeng, Yi-Ren; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Wu, Hsiu-Chu

    2009-02-04

    The metal-organic frameworks (MOF) with low and medium specific surface areas (SSA) were shown to be able to adsorb hydrogen via bridged spillover at room temperature (RT) up to an amount of full coverage of hydrogen in the MOF. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering was employed to investigate the key relationship between the structures and storage properties of the involved materials. It was found that the tunable imperfect lattice defects and the 3D pore network in the MOF crystal are the most critical structures for RT hydrogen uptake rather than the known micropores in the crystal, SSA, and Pt catalyst structure.

  5. Theoretical Insight of Physical Adsorption for a Single-Component Adsorbent + Adsorbate System: I. Thermodynamic Property Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2009-02-17

    Thermodynamic property surfaces for a single-component adsorbent + adsorbate system are derived and developed from the viewpoint of classical thermodynamics, thermodynamic requirements of chemical equilibrium, Gibbs law, and Maxwell relations. They enable us to compute the entropy and enthalpy of the adsorbed phase, the isosteric heat of adsorption, specific heat capacity, and the adsorbed phase volume thoroughly. These equations are very simple and easy to handle for calculating the energetic performances of any adsorption system. We have shown here that the derived thermodynamic formulations fill up the information gap with respect to the state of adsorbed phase to dispel the confusion as to what is the actual state of the adsorbed phase. We have also discussed and established the temperature-entropy diagrams of (i) CaCl 2-in-silica gel + water system for cooling applications, and (ii) activated carbon (Maxsorb III) + methane system for gas storage. © Copyright 2009 American Chemical Society.

  6. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

      Operational experience 2011 CMS is approaching the end of a very successful year of operation. Proton- proton running ended in the late afternoon of 30th October with a stunning 5.73 fb–1 delivered by LHC, of which CMS recorded 5.22 fb–1. During heavy-ion operation, which continues until 7th December, both the accelerator and the CMS detector have also performed very well. Despite the encouraging overall reliability of technical operation, several infrastructure failures which occurred since the last Bulletin are worthy of mention, with one leading for the first time to significant data-loss. On 10th July, a CERN-wide power failure brought down essentially all services including the magnet, due to an MCS setting being left in “manual” after the recent technical stop, but there was no significant damage and the detector was operational before the LHC, despite a slow and tortuous recovery (one of several indications this year that there is room for improve...

  7. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Summary of progress since last CMS week. Ten years of construction work have been completed. CMS is closed, in very close to the ideal low luminosity configuration, and performed well in the first tests with LHC beam. Behind this encouraging news is the story of a summer of intense commitment by many teams (from the collaboration and 3 CERN departments) working together, against the clock and despite many minor setbacks, to ensure that the experiment was ready to play a leading role in the excitement of September 10. Following beampipe bakeout and refill with pure neon, a magnificent effort by the ECAL group and the pt 5 technical crew made it possible to install and commission all 4 ECAL endcap Dees before the end of August. In the shadow of this activity, the barrel and forward pixel trackers and part of the beam monitoring were installed within the vac tank. The pt 5 technical teams then succeeded in safely removing the 20t installation tables and their support blocks from beneath the already installed ...

  8. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2013-01-01

    For the reporting period, the CMS common systems and infrastructure worked well, without failures that caused significant data losses. One more disconnection of the magnet cold box occurred in the shadow of interruptions in data taking, caused by a series of technical faults. The recognition during 2012 that re-connection can only safely be done at around 2 T implies a minimum magnet recovery time of 12 hours and raises serious concerns about the number of ramping cycles of the magnet these incidents cause. This has triggered studies of how to make the cryo-system of the magnet more robust against failures. The proton-proton run ended just before the end-of-year CERN closure, during which CASTOR was installed on the negative end of CMS and both ZDC calorimeters were installed in TAN absorbers the LHC tunnel, in preparation for the heavy-ion run. The installation of CASTOR was an excellent “engineering test” of procedures for working in an activated environment. Despite some technical pr...

  9. Hydrogen-induced mitigation of O on Ru(1010): a density-functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovkin, I N

    2009-07-21

    The reaction of hydrogen with oxygen adsorbed on an Ru(1010) surface has been studied by density-functional calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In agreement with experiment, it has been found that molecular hydrogen does not react with adsorbed O. In contrast, the hydrogenation of oxygen by an atomic H beam occurs spontaneously and results in the formation of adsorbed OH molecules. Subsequent impinging H-atoms can either initiate the formation of water, which readily desorbs at room temperature thus removing the O from the surface, or lead to formation and desorption of H2. It is the latter channel that hinders, at 300 K, a complete removal of O from Ru capping layers on Si/Mo mirrors for extreme ultraviolet radiation. The estimated height of the barrier for the Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction between adsorbed H and OH, 0.92 eV, and related position of the H2O peak in model desorption spectra (approximately 320 K) are consistent with recent experiments. The H2 desorption peak appears at higher temperature, approximately 350 K, so that in the range from 320 to 330 K adsorbed hydrogen atoms will react predominantly with OH. Hence, the present simulations predict that an efficient removal of the chemisorbed O from Ru capping layers can be achieved by heating the surface to 320-330 K in a molecular hydrogen atmosphere.

  10. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-11-01

    This report offers examples of real-world applications and technical progress of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, including policies adopted by countries to increase technology development and commercialization.

  11. Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team (FPITT) supports the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (the Partnership) in the identification and evaluation of implementation scenarios for fuel cell technology pathways, including hydrogen and fuel cell electric vehicles in the transportation sector, both during a transition period and in the long term.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Capture Adsorbents: Chemistry and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2016-12-21

    Excess carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions and their inevitable consequences continue to stimulate hard debate and awareness in both academic and public spaces, despite the widespread lack of understanding on what really is needed to capture and store the unwanted CO2 . Of the entire carbon capture and storage (CCS) operation, capture is the most costly process, consisting of nearly 70 % of the price tag. In this tutorial review, CO2 capture science and technology based on adsorbents are described and evaluated in the context of chemistry and methods, after briefly introducing the current status of CO2 emissions. An effective sorbent design is suggested, whereby six checkpoints are expected to be met: cost, capacity, selectivity, stability, recyclability, and fast kinetics.

  13. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  14. The condensation of water on adsorbed viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José María; Tatti, Francesco; Chuvilin, Andrey; Mam, Keriya; Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Bittner, Alexander M

    2013-11-26

    The wetting and dewetting behavior of biological nanostructures and to a greater degree single molecules is not well-known even though their contact with water is the basis for all biology. Here, we show that environmental electron microscopy (EM) can be applied as a means of imaging the condensation of water onto viruses. We captured the formation of submicrometer water droplets and filaments on single viral particles by environmental EM and by environmental transmission EM. The condensate structures are compatible with capillary condensation between adsorbed virus particles and with known droplet shapes on patterned surfaces. Our results confirm that such droplets exist down to evaporation cycle as expected from their stability in air and water. Moreover we developed procedures that overcome problems of beam damage and of resolving structures with a low atomic number.

  15. Protein purification using magnetic adsorbent particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franzreb, M; Siemann-Herzberg, M.; Hobley, Timothy John

    2006-01-01

    separations are fast, gentle, scaleable, easily automated, can achieve separations that would be impossible or impractical to achieve by other techniques, and have demonstrated credibility in a wide range of disciplines, including minerals processing, wastewater treatment, molecular biology, cell sorting...... and clinical diagnostics. However, despite the highly attractive qualities of magnetic methods on a process scale, with the exception of wastewater treatment, few attempts to scale up magnetic operations in biotechnology have been reported thus far. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current state...... of other suspended solids. Thus, it becomes possible to magnetically separate selected target species directly out of crude biological process liquors (e.g. fermentation broths, cell disruptates, plasma, milk, whey and plant extracts) simply by binding them on magnetic adsorbents before application...

  16. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  17. Changes in solvent exposure reveal the kinetics and equilibria of adsorbed protein unfolding in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitcher, R W; O'Connell, J P; Fernandez, E J

    2010-08-27

    Hydrogen exchange has been a useful technique for studying the conformational state of proteins, both in bulk solution and at interfaces, for several decades. Here, we propose a physically based model of simultaneous protein adsorption, unfolding and hydrogen exchange in HIC. An accompanying experimental protocol, utilizing mass spectrometry to quantify deuterium labeling, enables the determination of both the equilibrium partitioning between conformational states and pseudo-first order rate constants for folding and unfolding of adsorbed protein. Unlike chromatographic techniques, which rely on the interpretation of bulk phase behavior, this methodology utilizes the measurement of a molecular property (solvent exposure) and provides insight into the nature of the unfolded conformation in the adsorbed phase. Three model proteins of varying conformational stability, alpha-chymotrypsinogen A, beta-lactoglobulin B, and holo alpha-lactalbumin, are studied on Sepharose HIC resins possessing assorted ligand chemistries and densities. alpha-Chymotrypsinogen, conformationally the most stable protein in the set, exhibits no change in solvent exposure at all the conditions studied, even when isocratic pulse-response chromatography suggests nearly irreversible adsorption. Apparent unfolding energies of adsorbed beta-lactoglobulin B and holo alpha-lactalbumin range from -4 to 3 kJ/mol and are dependent on resin properties and salt concentration. Characteristic pseudo-first order rate constants for surface-induced unfolding are 0.2-0.9 min(-1). While poor protein recovery in HIC is often associated with irreversible unfolding, this study documents that non-eluting behavior can occur when surface unfolding is reversible or does not occur at all. Further, this hydrogen exchange technique can be used to assess the conformation of adsorbed protein under conditions where the protein is non-eluting and chromatographic methods are not applicable.

  18. Understanding Trends in Catalytic Activity: The Effect of Adsorbate-Adsorbate Interactions for CO Oxidation Over Transition Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabow, Lars; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2010-01-01

    Using high temperature CO oxidation as the example, trends in the reactivity of transition metals are discussed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Volcano type relations between the catalytic rate and adsorption energies of important intermediates are introduced...... and the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on the trends is discussed. We find that adsorbate-adsorbate interactions significantly increase the activity of strong binding metals (left side of the volcano) but the interactions do not change the relative activity of different metals and have a very small...... influence on the position of the top of the volcano, that is, on which metal is the best catalyst....

  19. ADSORPTION OF TANNIN FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION ONTO MACROPOROUS CROSSLINKED POLY(N—VINYL—ACETAMIDE)VIA HYDROGEN BONDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMancai; XUMingcheng; 等

    2000-01-01

    A Strongly hydrophilic hydrogen-bonding adsorbent-macroporous crosslinked Poly(Nvinyl-acetamide),which contain both hydrogen bond acceptor and donator,was synthesized.Adsorption mechanism and dynamic adsorption of tannin from aqueous solution onto the adsorbent were investigated.Most of the differntial adsorption heats for various adsorption capacities calculated from the adsorption isotherms according to Clapeyron-Clausius equation lay in the range of hydrogen bond energy(8-50J/mol).Adsorption properties of the adsorbent were studied in detail.These results revealed a hydrogen bonding mechanism of the adsorption of tannin from aqueous solution onto the adsorbent.The result of the dynamic adsorption of tanning with the initial concentration under 600mg/L showed that the adsorption rate of tannin exceeded 90% when the flow rate was 3BV/h and the effluent volume reached 100BV.Therefore,the developed hydrogen-bonding adsorbent-macroporous crosslinked poly(N-vinyl-acetamide)-is an excellent adsorbent to remove tannin from extract of natural products,and has great value in application.

  20. Symmetry-Driven Band Gap Engineering in Hydrogen Functionalized Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Holm; Čabo, Antonija Grubišić; Balog, Richard; Kyhl, Line; Groves, Michael N; Cassidy, Andrew Martin; Bruix, Albert; Bianchi, Marco; Dendzik, Maciej; Arman, Mohammad Alif; Lammich, Lutz; Pascual, José Ignacio; Knudsen, Jan; Hammer, Bjørk; Hofmann, Philip; Hornekaer, Liv

    2016-12-27

    Band gap engineering in hydrogen functionalized graphene is demonstrated by changing the symmetry of the functionalization structures. Small differences in hydrogen adsorbate binding energies on graphene on Ir(111) allow tailoring of highly periodic functionalization structures favoring one distinct region of the moiré supercell. Scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that a highly periodic hydrogen functionalized graphene sheet can thus be prepared by controlling the sample temperature (Ts) during hydrogen functionalization. At deposition temperatures of Ts = 645 K and above, hydrogen adsorbs exclusively on the HCP regions of the graphene/Ir(111) moiré structure. This finding is rationalized in terms of a slight preference for hydrogen clusters in the HCP regions over the FCC regions, as found by density functional theory calculations. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the preferential functionalization of just one region of the moiré supercell results in a band gap opening with very limited associated band broadening. Thus, hydrogenation at elevated sample temperatures provides a pathway to efficient band gap engineering in graphene via the selective functionalization of specific regions of the moiré structure.

  1. National Agenda for Hydrogen Codes and Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, C.

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of hydrogen codes and standards with an emphasis on the national effort supported and managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the help and cooperation of standards and model code development organizations, industry, and other interested parties, DOE has established a coordinated national agenda for hydrogen and fuel cell codes and standards. With the adoption of the Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap and with its implementation through the Codes and Standards Technical Team, DOE helps strengthen the scientific basis for requirements incorporated in codes and standards that, in turn, will facilitate international market receptivity for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  2. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  3. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2010-01-01

    Overview Once again, the bulk of this article reviews the intense activity of a recently completed shutdown, which, although quite unforeseeable until a few weeks before it started, proved by its success that our often advertised capability to conduct major maintenance within a two month period is real. Although safely completed, on-time to remarkable precision, the activity was not without incident, and highlighted our dependence on many experienced, specialist teams and their precise choreography. Even after the yoke was safely closed, magnet re-commissioning and beampipe pumpdown showed new and thought-provoking behaviour. The struggle to maintain adequate technical resources will be a pre-occupation over the coming months, in parallel with the start of truly sustained operation, for which various procedures are still being put in place. Planning for future shutdowns must now become a high priority, with many working groups and task forces already in existence to prepare infrastructure improvements and to...

  4. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    10 March 2010 DYNEOS 10:00 – 12:00 - Main Building, Room B, 61-1-009 Dyneos AG is active in the fields of photonics, laser and high-precision positioning. Our highly qualified engineer team has more than 30 years of experience in electro-optical solutions sales. The engineers are supported by a technical and administrative team. We are focused on the Swiss market and represent six suppliers (Coherent, PI Physik Instrumente, SIOS, Nanonics Imaging, APE, Ekspla) in order to give a qualified sales and service support to our customers. Our products are dedicated to the research field as well as to industry. In addition to standard catalog products, we offer custom designs to fulfill the specific needs of OEM customers or specific applications.

  5. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  6. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  7. Multiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Peter [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Gillespie, Andrew [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Stalla, David [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dohnke, Elmar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-02-20

    The purpose of the project “Multiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage” is the development of materials that store hydrogen (H2) by adsorption in quantities and at conditions that outperform current compressed-gas H2 storage systems for electric power generation from hydrogen fuel cells (HFCs). Prominent areas of interest for HFCs are light-duty vehicles (“hydrogen cars”) and replacement of batteries with HFC systems in a wide spectrum of applications, ranging from forklifts to unmanned areal vehicles to portable power sources. State-of-the-art compressed H2 tanks operate at pressures between 350 and 700 bar at ambient temperature and store 3-4 percent of H2 by weight (wt%) and less than 25 grams of H2 per liter (g/L) of tank volume. Thus, the purpose of the project is to engineer adsorbents that achieve storage capacities better than compressed H2 at pressures less than 350 bar. Adsorption holds H2 molecules as a high-density film on the surface of a solid at low pressure, by virtue of attractive surface-gas interactions. At a given pressure, the density of the adsorbed film is the higher the stronger the binding of the molecules to the surface is (high binding energies). Thus, critical for high storage capacities are high surface areas, high binding energies, and low void fractions (high void fractions, such as in interstitial space between adsorbent particles, “waste” storage volume by holding hydrogen as non-adsorbed gas). Coexistence of high surface area and low void fraction makes the ideal adsorbent a nanoporous monolith, with pores wide enough to hold high-density hydrogen films, narrow enough to minimize storage as non-adsorbed gas, and thin walls between pores to minimize the volume occupied by solid instead of hydrogen. A monolith can be machined to fit into a rectangular tank (low pressure, conformable tank), cylindrical tank

  8. Selective sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate on molecularly imprinted polymer adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shubo DENG; Danmeng SHUAI; Qiang YU; Jun HUANG; Gang YU

    2009-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), as a potential persistent organic pollutant, has been widely detected in water environments, and has become a great concern in recent years. PFOS is very stable and difficult to decompose using conventional techniques. Sorption may be an attractive method to remove it from water. In this study, the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) adsorbents were prepared through the polymerization of 4-vinylpyridine under different preparation conditions in order to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from water. The MIP adsorbents using perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as the template had good imprinting effects and could selectively remove PFOS from aqueous solution. The sorption behaviors including sorption kinetics,isotherms, and effect of pH, salt, and competitive anions were investigated. Experimental results showed that the sorption of PFOS On the MIP adsorbents was very fast, pH-dependent, and highly selective. The achieved fast sorption equilibrium within 1 h was attributed to the surface sorption on the fine adsorbents. The sorption isotherms showed that the sorption selectivity of PFOS on the MIP adsorbents decreased at high PFOS concentrations, which may be due to the double-layer sorption and the formation of PFOS micelles on the sorbent surface. The sorption of PFOS on the MIP adsorbents was mainly dominated by the electrostatic interaction between the protonated vinylpyridine on the adsorbent surface and the anionic PFOS. The prepared MIP adsorbents can potentially be applied in water and wastewater treatment for selective removal of PFOS.

  9. Lead Removal from Water by Low Cost Adsorbents: A Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zahra, Naseem

    2012-01-01

    ..., industrial wastes and low cost synthetic oxides as adsorbents for the removal of poisonous lead from water. Keywords: Adsorption; Adsorbents; Lead; Water; Toxic. Introduction Lead and its toxicity Lead has environmental importance due to its well known toxicity [1] and intensive use in industries such as storage-battery manufacture, printing, pigment ...

  10. Single bank NOx adsorber for heavy duty diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genderen, M. van; Aken, M.G. van

    2003-01-01

    In a NOx adsorber programme the feasibility for applying this technology to heavy duty diesel engines was investigated. After modelling and simulations for realising best λ < 1 engine conditions a platform was build which was used to obtain good NOx adsorber regeneration settings in a number of stea

  11. Friction and diffusion dynamics of adsorbates at surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusco, C.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical study of the motion of adsorbates (e. g. atoms, molecules or clusters) on solid surfaces is presented, with a focus on surface diffusion and atomic-scale friction. These two phenomena are inextricably linked, because when an atomic or molecular adsorbate diffuses, or is pulled, it unav

  12. Adsorbent Carbon Fabrics : New Generation Armour for Toxic Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gurudatt

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon in the form of a regular fabric obtained using viscose rayon precursor is a new generation adsorbent material having superior sorptional properties and is finding varied defence applications. Carbonisation and activation mechanisms and properties and applications of adsorbent carbort fibres made from viscose rayon precursor are reviewed in this paper.

  13. Mixed-matrix membrane adsorbers for protein separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avramescu, Maria-Elena; Borneman, Zandrie; Wessling, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The separation of two similarly sized proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine hemoglobin (Hb) was carried out using a new type of ion-exchange mixed-matrix adsorber membranes. The adsorber membranes were prepared by incorporation of various types of Lewatit ion-exchange resins into an ethyle

  14. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  15. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  16. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

  17. Nano-sized Adsorbate Structure Formation in Anisotropic Multilayer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vasyl O.; Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Yanovsky, Vladimir V.

    2017-05-01

    In this article, we study dynamics of adsorbate island formation in a model plasma-condensate system numerically. We derive the generalized reaction-diffusion model for adsorptive multilayer system by taking into account anisotropy in transfer of adatoms between neighbor layers induced by electric field. It will be found that with an increase in the electric field strength, a structural transformation from nano-holes inside adsorbate matrix toward separated nano-sized adsorbate islands on a substrate is realized. Dynamics of adsorbate island sizes and corresponding distributions are analyzed in detail. This study provides an insight into details of self-organization of adatoms into nano-sized adsorbate islands in anisotropic multilayer plasma-condensate systems.

  18. Adsorption of Fluoride Ion by Inorganic Cerium Based Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Zhongzhi(焦中志); Chen Zhonglin; Yang Min; Zhang Yu; Li Guibai

    2004-01-01

    Excess of fluoride in drinking water is harmful to human health, the concentration of F- ions must be maintained in the range of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L. An inorganic cerium based adsorbent (CTA) is developed on the basis of research of adsorption of fluoride on cerium oxide hydrate. Some adsorption of fluoride by CTA adsorbent experiments were carried out, and results showed that CTA adsorbent has a quick adsorption speed and a large adsorption capacity. Adsorption follows Freundlich isotherm, and low pH value helps fluoride removal. Some physical-chemical characteristics of CTA adsorbent were experimented, fluoride removal mechanism was explored, and results showed that hydroxyl group of CTA adsorbent played an important role in the fluoride removal.

  19. The solar-hydrogen economy: an analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Warren D.

    2007-09-01

    The 20th Century was the age of the Petroleum Economy while the 21st Century is certainly the age of the Solar-Hydrogen Economy. The global Solar-Hydrogen Economy that is now emerging follows a different logic. Under this new economic paradigm, new machines and methods are once again being developed while companies are restructuring. The Petroleum Economy will be briefly explored in relation to oil consumption, Hubbert's curve, and oil reserves with emphasis on the "oil crash". Concerns and criticisms about the Hydrogen Economy will be addressed by debunking some of the "hydrogen myths". There are three major driving factors for the establishment of the Solar-Hydrogen Economy, i.e. the environment, the economy with the coming "oil crash", and national security. The New Energy decentralization pathway has developed many progressive features, e.g., reducing the dependence on oil, reducing the air pollution and CO II. The technical and economic aspects of the various Solar-Hydrogen energy options and combinations will be analyzed. A proposed 24-hour/day 200 MWe solar-hydrogen power plant for the U.S. with selected energy options will be discussed. There are fast emerging Solar Hydrogen energy infrastructures in the U.S., Europe, Japan and China. Some of the major infrastructure projects in the transportation and energy sectors will be discussed. The current and projected growth in the Solar-Hydrogen Economy through 2045 will be given.

  20. Maximizing Light Utilization Efficiency and Hydrogen Production in Microalgal Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Anastasios [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    The project addressed the following technical barrier from the Biological Hydrogen Production section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Low Sunlight Utilization Efficiency in Photobiological Hydrogen Production is due to a Large Photosystem Chlorophyll Antenna Size in Photosynthetic Microorganisms (Barrier AN: Light Utilization Efficiency).

  1. Solar Hydrogen Fuel Cell Projects at Brooklyn Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, Alex; Farah, Shadia; Farley, Daithi; Ghani, Naureen; Kuo, Emmy; Aponte, Cecielo; Abrescia, Leo; Kwan, Laiyee; Khan, Ussamah; Khizner, Felix; Yam, Anthony; Sakeeb, Khan; Grey, Daniel; Anika, Zarin; Issa, Fouad; Boussayoud, Chayama; Abdeldayem, Mahmoud; Zhang, Alvin; Chen, Kelin; Chan, Kameron Chuen; Roytman, Viktor; Yee, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the projects on solar hydrogen powered vehicles using water as fuel conducted by teams at Brooklyn Technical High School. Their investigations into the pure and applied chemical thermodynamics of hydrogen fuel cells and bio-inspired devices have been consolidated in a new and emerging sub-discipline that they define as solar…

  2. Hycom Pre - Feasibility study. Final report[Hydrogen communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacobazzi, A.; Mario, F di [ENEA, (Italy); Hasenauer, U. [Fraunhofer IS, (Germany); Joergensen, B.H.; Bromand Noergaard, P. [Risoe National Lab., (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    The Quick-start Programme of the European Union Initiative for Growth identifies the hydrogen economy as one of the key areas for investment in the medium term (2004-2015). In this context the HyCOM (Hydrogen Communities) programme has been initiated. The main goal of this programme is the creation of a limited number of strategically sited stand-alone hydrogen communities producing hydrogen from various primary sources (mostly renewables) and using it for heat and electricity production and as fuel for vehicles. This report looks at the establishment of such hydrogen communities, analysing the main technical, economic, social, and environmental aspects as well as financial and regulatory barriers associated with the creation and operation of hydrogen communities. It also proposes a number of concepts for Hydrogen Communities and criteria with which a Hydrogen Community should be evaluated. The study is not in any way intended to be prescriptive. (ln)

  3. Bio-regeneration of π-complexation desulfurization adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Wangliang; XING; Jianmin; XIONG; Xiaochao; SHAN; Guob

    2005-01-01

    The coupling of adsorption desulfurization and biodesulfurization is a new approach to produce clean fuels. Sulfur compounds are firstly adsorbed on adsorbents, and then the adsorbents are regenerated by microbial conversion. π-Complexation adsorbent, Cu(Ⅰ)-Y, was obtained by ion exchanging Y-type zeolite with Cu2+ and then by auto-reduction in helium at 450℃ for 3 h. Dibenzothiophene (DBT) was used as a model compound. The effects of cell concentration, volume of oil phase, the ratio of aqueous phase to adsorbent on DBT desorption by a bacterium were studied. The amounts of DBT desorbed and 2-HBP produced can be apparently increased with addition of n-octane. BDS activity can be improved by increasing cell concentration and the ratio of water-to-adsorbent. 89% of DBT desorbed from the adsorbents can be converted to 2-HBP within 6 h and almost 100% within 24 h, when the volume ratio of oil-to-water was 1/5 mL/mL, the cell concentration was 60 g·L-1, and the ratio of adsorbent-to-oil was 0.03 g·mL-1. The amount of 2-HBP produced was strongly dependent on the volume ratio of oil-to- water, cell concentration and amount of adsorbent. Adsorption capacity of the regenerated adsorbent is 95% that of the fresh one after being desorbed with Pseudomonas delafieldii R-8, washed with n-octane, dried at 100℃ for 24 h and auto-reduced in He.

  4. Application of carbon foam for heavy metal removal from industrial plating wastewater and toxicity evaluation of the adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Song, Mi-Kyung; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2016-06-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains various types of toxic substances, such as heavy metals, solvents, and cleaning agents. Carbon foam was used as an adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from real industrial plating wastewater. Its sorption capacity was compared with those of a commercial ion-exchange resin (BC258) and a heavy metal adsorbent (CupriSorb™) in a batch system. The experimental carbon foam has a considerably higher sorption capacity for Cr and Cu than commercial adsorbents for acid/alkali wastewater and cyanide wastewater. Additionally, cytotoxicity test showed that the newly developed adsorbent has low cytotoxic effects on three kinds of human cells. In a pilot plant, the carbon foam had higher sorption capacity for Cr (73.64 g kg(-1)) than for Cu (14.86 g kg(-1)) and Ni (7.74 g kg(-1)) during 350 h of operation time. Oxidation pretreatments using UV/hydrogen peroxide enhance heavy metal removal from plating wastewater containing cyanide compounds.

  5. Unusual hydrogen peroxide decomposition on stoichiometric insulating oxide ultrathin films

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Zhenjun

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide dissociation on MgO(001) films deposited on Mo(001) surface is investigated by employing periodic density-functional theory methods. The pristine MgO(001) surface showing chemical inertness prefers the weak adsorbing molecular configuration and is extremely difficult to react with hydrogen peroxide. As far as we know, energetically favorable decomposition state of hydrogen peroxide has never been obtained on MgO(001) surface. In this work the hydrogen peroxide is successfully dissociated on perfect stoichiometric MgO(001) films by depositing on transition metal substrate, without any activation barrier. The spontaneous dissociation of hydrogen peroxide on metal supported oxide films is rationalized by characterizing the geometric structures and electronic structures.

  6. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Das, Sadananda [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T. [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Kuo, Li-Jung [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela D.; Li, Qixiu; Badding, John V.; Fonseca, Dania; Gutierrez, Humerto; Sakti, Apurba; Adu, Kofi; Schimmel, Michael

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  8. Description of the cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. A.; Riffle, G. K.; Merdich, Jeff A.

    1993-06-01

    The cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility being developed for the USAF Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is described along with the test capabilities, technical approach, and technical status. Particular attention is given to the hydrogen test facility control and data acquisition and the hot hydrogen gas generator (HHGG). The hydrogen test facility will be be ready for operation in conjunction with cryogenic test capability by late 1994.

  9. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    2013-01-01

      Since the last report, much visible progress has been made, as the LS1 programme approaches the halfway point. From early October, technical and safety shift-crew have been present around the clock, allowing detectors to stay switched on overnight, ensuring that safety systems are operational and instructions for non-expert shift-crew are clear. LS1 progress Throughout the summer, whilst the solenoid vacuum tank and YB0 surfaces were accessible, an extensive installation programme took place to prepare for Tracker colder operation and the PLT installation, in 2014, the Phase 1 Pixel Tracker installation, in 2016–’17, and the HCAL Phase 1 upgrade completion, ending in LS2. This included pipework for N2 or dry air to flush the Tracker bulkhead region, many sensors to monitor temperature and dew point in the Tracker and its service channels, heating wires outside the Tracker cooling bundles, supports for the new vacuum-jacketed, concentric, CO2 Pixel cooling lines, the PLT cool...

  10. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2012-01-01

      UXC + detectors As explained in detail in the November 2011 bulletin, the bellows unit at −18.5 m from the CMS interaction point was identified as a prime candidate for the regularly occurring pressure spikes which occasionally led to sustained severe background conditions in 2011, affecting dead time and data quality. Similar regions in LHC with vacuum instabilities were observed to be close to bellows, which radiography showed to have distorted RF-fingers — on removal, they proved to have been severely overheated. The plans for the Year-End Technical Stop were adapted to prioritise radiography of the bellows at 16 m to 18 m either end of CMS. Excellent work by the beam pipe, survey and heavy mechanical teams allowed the X-rays to be taken as planned on 20th December, showing that the bellow at −18.5m had an obvious non-conformity. The RF-fingers were found inside the end of the opposing flared pipe instead of outside. In addition, the overlap between fingers and...

  11. Nanostructured polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Di-Jia [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States; Yu, Luping [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a new class of hydrogen storage adsorbent, nanostructured porous organic polymers (POPs), through collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago. POPs have excellent thermal stability and tolerance to gas contaminants such as moisture. They also have low skeleton density and high intrinsic porosity via covalent bonds, capable of maintaining specific surface area (SSA) during high pressure pelletizing for better volumetric density. Furthermore, they can be produced at a commercial scale with the existing industrial infrastructure. The team’s approach focused on improving hydrogen uptake capacity and the heat of adsorption by enhancing SSA, porosity control, and framework-adsorbate interactions through rational design and synthesis at the molecular level. The design principles aim at improving the following attributes of the polymers: (a) high SSA to provide sufficient interface with H2; (b) narrow pore diameter to enhance van der Waals interactions in the confined space; and (c) “metallic” features, either through π- conjugation or metal doping, to promote electronic orbital interactions with hydrogen.

  12. Magnetic adsorbent constructed from the loading of amino functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on coordination complex modified polyoxometalates nanoparticle and its tetracycline adsorption removal property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Jinzhao; Mei, Mingliang; Xu, Xinxin, E-mail: xuxx@mail.neu.edu.cn

    2016-06-15

    A magnetic polyoxometalates based adsorbent has been synthesized successfully through the loading of amino functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (NH{sub 2}-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) on nanoparticle of a coordination complex modified polyoxometalates (CC/POMNP). FTIR illustrate there exist intense hydrogen bonds between NH{sub 2}-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CC/POMNP, which keep the stability of this adsorbent. At room temperature, this adsorbent exhibits ferromagnetic character with saturation magnetization of 8.19 emu g{sup −1}, which provides prerequisite for fast magnetic separation. Water treatment experiment illustrates this POM based magnetic adsorbent exhibits high adsorption capacity on tetracycline. The adsorption process can be described well with Temkin model, which illustrates the interaction between adsorbent and tetracycline plays the dominated role in tetracycline removal. The rapid, high efficient tetracycline adsorption ability suggests this POM based magnetic adsorbent exhibits promising prospect in medical and agriculture waste water purification. A magnetic polyoxometalates based adsorbent, which exhibits excellent tetracycline adsorption removal property has been synthesized through the loading of NH{sub 2}-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on coordination complex modified polyoxometalates - Graphical abstract: A magnetic polyoxometalates based adsorbent, which exhibits excellent tetracycline adsorption removal property has been synthesized through the loading of NH{sub 2}-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on coordination complex modified polyoxometalate. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A POM based magnetic adsorbent was fabricated through the loading of NH{sub 2}-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on POM nanoparticle. • This adsorbent possesses excellent tetracycline adsorption property. • Saturation magnetization value of this adsorbent is 8.19 emug−1, which is enough for magnetic separation.

  13. Interaction of gas phase atomic hydrogen with Pt(111):Direct evidence for the formation of bulk hydrogen species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Employing hot tungsten filament to thermal dissociate molecular hydrogen,we generated gas phase atomic hydrogen under ultra-high vacuum(UHV)conditions and investigated its interaction with Pt(111) surface.Thermal desorption spectroscopy(TDS)results demonstrate that adsorption of molecular hy- drogen on Pt(111)forms surface Had species whereas adsorption of atomic hydrogen forms not only surface Had species but also bulk Had species.Bulk Had species is more thermal-unstable than surface Had species on Pt(111),suggesting that bulk Had species is more energetic.This kind of weakly- adsorbed bulk Had species might be the active hydrogen species in the Pt-catalyzed hydrogenation reactions.

  14. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  15. Metal-organic frameworks: A new hydrogen storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghi, Omar

    2004-03-01

    Metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5) of composition Zn4O(BDC)3 (BDC = 1,4-benzenedi-carboxylate) with a cubic 3-D extended porous structure was found to be capable of adsorbing hydrogen up to 4.5 weight percent (17.2 hydrogen molecules per formula unit) at 78 K. At room temperature and pressures up to 20 bar this material has a hydrogen storage capacity which increases linearly as a function of the applied pressure up to 1.0 percent by weight at 20 bar. Inelastic Neutron Scattering spectroscopy of the rotational transitions of the adsorbed hydrogen molecules was performed on hydrogen loaded MOF-5 using doses equivalent to four, eight and twenty-four hydrogen molecules per formula unit at 10 K. The spectra show peaks at 10.3 and 12.3 meV that are sharper than those observed for hydrogen in other porous materials, indicating the presence of two well-defined binding sites (termed I and II), which we associate with hydrogen binding to zinc and the BDC linker, respectively. At the highest dose (twenty-four hydrogen molecules), the peak corresponding to site II splits into four peaks, suggesting that higher capacity for hydrogen may be achieved by the use of larger linkers. Indeed, preliminary studies on isoreticular (of the same topology) metal-organic framework-6 and 8 having cyclobutyl and benzene moieties respectively fused to the benzene of MOF-5 gave approximately double and quadruple (2.0 weight percent) the uptake found for MOF-5 at room temperature and 10 bar.

  16. Hydrogen: the future of the car; Hydrogene: l'avenir de la voiture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuzit, P

    2007-07-01

    With the end of the petroleum resources, the hydrogen offers interesting perspectives in the context of a sustainable development. The authors analyze the challenges of the hydrogen vehicle: the substitution fuels, the technical interior design, the cost of this evolution, the impacts on the world energy map and the part played by the France and the automobile sector in this evolution. (A.L.B.)

  17. Adsorption and hydrogenation of simple alkenes at Pt-group metal electrodes studied by DEMS: influence of the crystal orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ulrich; Schmiemann, Udo; Dülberg, Andreas; Baltruschat, Helmut

    1995-07-01

    The adsorption of ethene and cyclohexene on mono-and polycrystalline Pt and on polycrystalline Pd electrodes was studied using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). Both molecules are partially hydrated to an oxygen containing species upon adsorption on Pt. In the case of ethene, this species dissociated to methane and adsorbed CO at negative potentials. Another part of the adsorbed ethene can be cathodically desorbed as ethane and butane. The ratio of the various species formed strongly depends on crystal orientation and adsorption potential. Contrary to heterogenous gas phase hydrogenation (and also contrary to some earlier reports on electrochemical hydrogenation), the rate of the Faradaic hydrogenation reaction is also strongly dependent on the crystallographic orientation, being faster on Pt(110) or roughened surfaces. During hydrogenation, H/D exchange occurs to an appreciable degree, suggesting the participation of adsorbed intermediates.

  18. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  19. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  20. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  1. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  2. Classical and quantum studies of the photodissociation of a HX (X=Cl,F) molecule adsorbed on ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woittequand, S; Duflot, D; Monnerville, M; Pouilly, B; Toubin, C; Briquez, S; Meyer, H-D

    2007-10-28

    The photodissociation dynamics of a HX (X = Cl,F) molecule adsorbed on a hexagonal ice surface at T = 0 K is studied using time-dependent quantum wave packets and quasiclassical trajectories. The relevant potential energy surfaces are calculated using high-level ab initio methods. We present here two dimensional calculations for the dynamics of the hydrogen photofragment for both HCl and HF molecules. The purpose of this paper is to compare the photodissociation dynamics of the two molecules which are adsorbed on the ice surface with different equilibrium geometries. The total photodissociation cross section and the angular distribution are calculated. The comparison with classical trajectory calculations provides evidence for typical quantum effects and reveals rainbow structures.

  3. Quantum dynamics of adsorbed H2 in the microporous framework MOF-5 analyzed using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, S. A.; Allen, K.; Landerman, P.; Hopkins, J.; Matters, J.; Myers, R.; Rowsell, J. L. C.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy is used to measure the quantum dynamics of molecular hydrogen adsorbed in the microporous material MOF-5. Low-temperature spectra reveal at least three distinct binding sites. The induced redshifts in the vibrational mode frequencies allow the estimation of site-specific binding energies ranging from 2.5 to 4 kJ/mol. Splittings in the rovibrational sidebands are consistent with the existing theories and indicate that H2 is relatively freely rotating even at temperatures as low as 10 K. Ortho to para conversion of the adsorbed H2 is observed to occur over the course of several hours. A translational sideband of 84cm-1 arises from the center-of-mass motion of H2 at the primary adsorption site and indicates that the zero-point energy is a substantial fraction of the binding energy of this site.

  4. Polarity of an MCM-41 adsorbent surface modified with methyl and phenyl groups based on data from gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhareva, D. A.; Gus'kov, V. Yu.; Karpov, S. I.; Kudasheva, F. Kh.; Roessner, F.; Borodina, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    The polarity of an MCM-41 adsorbent surface and organosilylated composites based on it with grafted trimethylsilane and dimethylphenylsilane groups is studied via inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The dispersion and specific components of the value proportional to the Helmholtz adsorption energy are calculated, and a comparative analysis of the surface polarity of MCM-41 and its modified analogs relative to the commercially available C-120 silica gel is performed. The electrostatic and donor-acceptor components of the specific Helmholtz adsorption energy are calculated through linear decomposition of the adsorption energy. It is established that MCM-41 is less polar than C-120. The modification of the initial adsorbent surface leads to a reduction in polarity, due mainly to the weakening of induction and orientation interactions. It is concluded that the surfaces of the modified samples retain the ability to form hydrogen bonds.

  5. STUDY ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF ADSORPTION OF ETHYL BENZOATE AND DIETHYL PHTHALATE BY PHENOLIC RESIN ADSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Wang; Zuo-qing Shi; Rong-fu Shi; Yun-ge Fan; Yi-zhong Yang

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents experimental observations on the adsorption of individual solutes by a simple thermodynamic framework, and the equilibrium adsorption of ethyl benzoate and diethyl phthalate on phenolic resin adsorbent in hexane solutions within the temperature range of 293-313 K. The experimental results show that the Freundlich adsorption law is applicable to the adsorption of ethyl benzoate and diethyl phthalate on the adsorbent, since all the correlative factors R' are larger than 0.99. The negative values of all the isosteric adsorption enthalpies for ethyl benzoate and diethyl phthalate indicate that they undergo exothermic processes, while their magnitudes (19-28 kJ/mol) manifest a hydrogen bonding sorption process. Other thermodynamic properties: the free energy changes and the entropy change associated with the adsorption have been calculated from the Gibbs adsorption equation and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  6. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  7. [Study on LDL adsorbent modified by lauric acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Haixia; Du, Longbing; Fang, Bo; You, Chao

    2010-06-01

    A hydrophobic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) adsorbent was synthesized with lauric acid and chitosan. The condition for adsorption was obtained by investigating the influence of adsorbent amount and adsorption time. The results of adsorption in vitro showed that the average adsorption rates for total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and total protein (TP) were 47.7%, 84.7%, 18.1% and 5.9% respectively. The adsorbent possesses good selectivity in removing LDL-C.

  8. Atom-Specific Identification of Adsorbed Chiral Molecules by Photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. W.; Carbone, M.; Dil, J. H.; Tallarida, M.; Flammini, R.; Casaletto, M. P.; Horn, K.; Piancastelli, M. N.

    2005-09-01

    The study of chiral adsorbed molecules is important for an analysis of enantioselectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Here we show that such molecules can be identified through circular dichroism in core-level photoemission arising from the chiral carbon atoms in stereoisomers of 2,3-butanediol molecules adsorbed on Si(100), using circularly polarized x rays. The asymmetry in the carbon 1s intensity excited by right and left circularly polarized light is readily observed, and changes sign with the helicity of the radiation or handedness of the enantiomers; it is absent in the achiral form of the molecule. This observation demonstrates the possibility of determining molecular chirality in the adsorbed phase.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Impurely Irrigated Soil Adsorbent from Beaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]We aimed to study the preparation methods of impurely irrigated soil adsorbent from beaches,as well as its ability to absorb phenol.[Method]Using hydrochloric acid as activator,we compared the influences of various soil adsorbents on the adsorption of phenol through the desired orthogonal tests where the usage of saw dust,concentration of hydrochloric acid,liquid-solid ratio and carbonization temperature varied.Afterwards,we characterized this soil adsorbent.[Result]The optimal conditions for pre...

  10. The Electrochemical Properties of Thionine Adsorbed Monolayer on Gold Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A gold electrode modified with adsorbed thionine monolayer was investigated with ac impedance and cyclic voltammetry method. It was found therewere some different redox properties for the adsorbed thionine depended on the different potential scanning rate. At the slower potential scanning rate (10 mV@s-1), the dimer of thionine appeared and possessed the catalytic activity for the oxidation of ascorbic acid.The underpotential deposition (UPD) and the bulk deposition of Cu2+ were also employed to investigate the monolayer of adsorbed thionine.

  11. DESORPTION OF VOCs FROM POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS UNDER MICROWAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIXiang; LIZhong; 等

    2001-01-01

    Desorption of volatile organic compounds(VOCs) from polymeric adsorbents by microwave was investigated experimentally.Two kinds of organic compounds.benzene and toluene.were separately used as adsorbates in this work Results showed that the application of microwave to regenerate the polymeric adsorbents not only can get higher regeneration efficiency in comparison with the use of heat regeneration,but also make the temperatures of the fixed beds much lower than that when using the heat regeneration the weaker the polarity of a polymericadsorbent,the easier its regeneration was.

  12. ADSORPTION OF PHENYLACETIC ACID ON MACROPOROUS POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANBingcai; CHENJinlong; 等

    2002-01-01

    Several macroporous polymeric adsorbents(NDA-999,XAD-8,X-5 and XAD-2)were emplyed in the study to adsorb phenylacetic acid from aqueous solution.Effect of salt and ambient temperature on adsorption was studied using NDA-999 adsorbent and the adsorption process conforms to Freundlich′s model reasonably.Adsorption dynamics were conducted in batch experiments in order to make clear the mechanism of adsorption process.It is proved that the squared driving force mass transfer model can be adopted to elucidate the process.The treatment process of industrial wastewater containing high strength of phenylacetic acid was proposed for cleaner production of phenylacetic acid.

  13. ADSORPTION OF PHENYLACETIC ACID ON MACROPOROUS POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Several macroporous polymeric adsorbents (NDA-999, XAD-8, X-5 and XAD-2) wereemployed in the study to adsorb phenylacetic acid from aqueous solution. Effect of salt and ambienttemperature on adsorption was studied using NDA-999 adsorbent and the adsorption processconforms to Freundlich's model reasonably. Adsorption dynamics were conducted in batchexperiments in order to make clear the mechanism of adsorption process. It is proved that thesquared driving force mass transfer model can be adopted to elucidate the process. The treatmentprocess of industrial wastewater containing high strength of phenylacetic acid was proposed forcleaner production of phenylacetic acid.

  14. Multi-criteria evaluation of on-board hydrogen storage technologies using the MACBETH approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montignac, F.; Noirot, I.; Chaudourne, S. [CEA, LITEN, Departement des Technologies de l' Hydrogene, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-05-15

    This paper provides some results obtained from the implementation of the MACBETH multi-criteria evaluation approach for the evaluation and comparison of the technical performance of three hydrogen storage technologies: a type IV 70 MPa hydrogen storage system, a cylindrical steel made liquid hydrogen storage system and a solid storage system. The evaluation is carried out considering a 6 kg hydrogen fuel cell vehicle application. Five technical evaluation criteria are taken into account in the analysis: system volume, system mass, refuelling time, hydrogen loss rate and conformability. The outcomes and added-value of this multi-criteria approach are finally discussed. (author)

  15. Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985-2000 time frame - A review and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, J. A.; Foster, R. W.; Escher, W. J. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive state-of-the-art review of solar/hydrogen technologies has been conducted. From this, solar/hydrogen production systems which could be commercialized by the year 2000 have been characterized technically and economically. Incentives and disincentives for the early commercialization of four solar/hydrogen systems have been explored, conclusions drawn and recommendations made.

  16. Technical and theoretical advances in copper-based catalysts for oxalate hydrogenation%草酸酯加氢铜基催化剂关键技术与理论研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玉军; 赵硕; 王博; 吕静; 马新宾

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of ethylene glycol from syngas via hydrogenation of oxalate is a novel non-oil route to obtain bulk chemicals. Due to the "deficient oil, lean gas, rich coal" energy structure in China, research on the technology bears a realistic and strategic significance. This paper introduces recent research on Cu-based catalyst applied in the hydrogenation of oxalate to EG and presents a discussion on the influences of support and additive on the activity and selectivity of catalyst. An insight was made on the catalyst structure and the formation mechanism of copper valence states, as well as its influences on catalytic performance. The internal diffusion and shaping process of the catalyst have also been discussed and analyzed in this paper. Moreover, the paper introduces the progress in scaling up and engineering of the process. Developing new catalyst with high activity and mechanical strength has been proposed as one important subject for the hydrogenation of oxalate. Furthermore, the application of irregular shape catalyst may tackle the engineering problem of the higher bed resistance of catalyst. Finally, developing thermal stable Cu-based catalyst is suggested to be one of the important aspects of this subject.%合成气经草酸酯加氢制乙二醇工艺是非石油路线合成大宗化学品的新兴路线.在我国贫油、少气、煤炭相对丰富的能源结构条件下,该工艺路线的研究具有重要的现实意义和战略意义.本文着重介绍了草酸酯加氢制乙二醇铜基催化剂的研究进展.系统讨论了催化剂载体、助剂对活性和选择性的影响规律,以及催化剂的结构与价态的形成机制及其对催化性能的影响,并对草酸酯加氢制乙二醇催化剂中的内扩散问题以及催化剂成型进行综述和分析.此外,还对该草酸酯加氢反应放大和工程化进展进行了简单介绍.提出具有较高加氢活性与机械强度的新型催化剂研究是草酸酯加氢催化剂

  17. Revamping of existent chlor-alkali plants for conversion of hydrogen to electricity, hydrogen community germination step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordache, Ioan; Laurentiu, Patularu [National R and D Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies - ICSI, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Delfrate, Alessandro [UHDENORA SpA (Italy); Iordache, Mihaela [National R and D Institute for Industrial Ecology - ECOIND, Rm. Valcea (Romania)

    2010-07-01

    The transition towards hydrogen becoming widespread in future energy systems and may be one of the greatest social and technical challenges facing society. A wide range of stakeholders will need to work together over extended periods of time to make the sustainable hydrogen ''vision'' a reality. Community-based projects are seen as a route to stimulate the start of the transformation, leading to more widespread early adoption of these new technologies. Valcea have premises to develop some local projects in order to become a Hydrogen Community. This ''Community'' fulfills both an economic-technical background and a scientifically potential. (orig.)

  18. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options

  19. A Novel Sandwich-type Dinuclear Complex for High-capacity Hydrogen Storage%A Novel Sandwich-type Dinuclear Complex for High-capacity Hydrogen Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱海燕; 陈元振; 李赛; 曹秀贞; 柳永宁

    2012-01-01

    From density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we predicted that the sandwich-type dinuclear organometallic compounds Cpffi2 and Cp2Sc2 can adsorb up to eight hydrogen molecules respectively, corresponding to a high gravimetric storage capacity of 6.7% and 6.8% (w), respectively. These sandwich-type organometallocenes proposed in this work are favorable for reversible adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at ambient conditions.

  20. Development of sensors for hydrogen safety on fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanoya, S.; Furusaki, K.; Inoue, R.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuno, T.; Ichikawa, D. [NGK Spark Plug Co. Ltd, Aichi (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    When combusted, hydrogen fuel used in fuel cell vehicles (FCV) generates water only. Although this technology can help protect against global warming, the safety of hydrogen fuel must be resolved before widespread use of hydrogen-based FCVs can be realized. Hydrogen gas has a broad flammability range and will ignite when mixed with air in the ranges from 4 to 75 per cent. The primary technical requirement for FCV safety is to detect hydrogen leaks and shut off the hydrogen gas. Hydrogen sensors that detect hydrogen leaks are an important part of the safety issue. This paper presented 2 newly developed hydrogen sensors in which micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology was used to build a micro-heater with very small heat capacity. Both sensors have different detection principles. One is placed above the hydrogen tank and fuel cells. This combustion type sensor uses catalytic combustion of the hydrogen on the micro-heater. It features quick start-up and high accuracy. The other type of hydrogen sensor can be place in a hydrogen gas purging pipe. This thermal conduction-type sensor can detect the change in thermal conductivity of the gas. The catalytic combustion sensor is based on the detection of the voltage difference between the detection heater and reference heater. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 24 figs.

  1. Development of Advanced Small Hydrogen Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, Krishna; Tan, Zhaosheng; Chao, Ben

    2010-09-30

    The main objective of the project is to develop advanced, low cost conversions of small (< 25 hp) gasoline internal combustion engines (ICEs) to run on hydrogen fuel while maintaining the same performance and durability. This final technical report summarizes the results of i) the details of the conversion of several small gasoline ICEs to run on hydrogen, ii) the durability test of a converted hydrogen engine and iii) the demonstration of a prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system. Peak power of the hydrogen engine achieves 60% of the power output of the gasoline counterpart. The efforts to boost the engine power with various options including installing the over-sized turbocharger, retrofit of custom-made pistons with high compression ratio, an advanced ignition system, and various types of fuel injection systems are not realized. A converted Honda GC160 engine with ACS system to run with hydrogen fuel is successful. Total accumulative runtime is 785 hours. A prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system having nominal capacity of 1.2 kg is designed, constructed and demonstrated. It is capable of supporting a wide range of output load of a hydrogen generator.

  2. Dynamics of CO 2 Adsorption on Amine Adsorbents. 2. Insights Into Adsorbent Design

    KAUST Repository

    Bollini, Praveen

    2012-11-21

    Packed bed breakthrough experiments are reported for commercial zeolite 13X and 3-aminopropyl-functionalized SBA-15 silica materials with three different amine loadings. Mass and heat transfer dynamics for all four materials are modeled successfully. Amine adsorbents with open pores are found to exhibit faster mass diffusion rates compared to zeolite 13X. When amine loading is increased by coupling aminopropyl groups, premature breakthrough combined with a long tail is observed. Contrary to conventional physisorbants, finite heat losses to the column wall do not explain the long breakthrough tail. A rate model that accounts for heterogeneity in diffusion was found to accurately capture the breakthrough shape of the high loading material. Batch uptake measurements support the hypothesis that slow diffusion through the polymer phase is what hampers adsorption kinetics in the high amine loading adsorbent. The results emphasize the importance of designing materials that are not overloaded with amine sites, as excessive amine loadings can lead to depressed adsorption kinetics and premature column breakthrough. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. The rules governing hydrogen combustion close to the lower ignition limit in the kinetic region of chain termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, N. M.; Tsvetkov, G. I.; Chernysh, V. I.

    2009-10-01

    The kinetic scheme of hydrogen combustion near the lower self-ignition limit in the kinetic region can be augmented by the reactions of bimolecular nonlinear termination O + OH → H + O2 and heterogeneous propagation of chains with the participation of adsorbed hydrogen atoms Hs. The literature data on the experimental determination of the probability of hydrogen atom trapping by the surface of quartz were analyzed.

  4. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee (HECC) was established over 14 years ago to ensure that the many varied aspects of hydrogen technology research and development within the Department are coordinated. Each year the committee brings together technical representatives within the Department to coordinate activities, share research results and discuss future priorities and directions. An annual report is published summarizing the work in progress. This summary is the fourteenth consecutive report. It provides an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented in the HECC.

  5. Application of a high density adsorbent in expanded bed adsorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... The high density of the adsorbent allowed the EBA to be operated at linear velocity as high as 657 cm/h ... through precipitation and even dialyzed before sample ... In EBA process, upward fluidized stationary phase with.

  6. Sol-Gel Synthesized Adsorbents for Metal Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A series of organo-ceramic adsorbents have been synthesized by a sol-gel processing technique for metal ion extraction. These adsorbents generally have significantly high metal uptake capacities, good physical-chemical stabilities, and well-designed pore geometries compared to other pre-existing metalchelating ceramic-based adsorbents. This work describes the synthesis and evaluation of pyrazole and calix[4]arene crown adsorbents for selective separation of platinum, palladium, and gold and cesium ions,respectively, from solutions. These materials exhibit mesoporous properties with high surface areas and pore volumes. The sol-gel synthesis starting with precursor silanes and titania results in gel particles of desired pore characteristics and high capacity and stability. Characterization studies, such as adsorption isotherms, breakthrough curves for fixed bed operation, and material stability, show promising results for applications to metal sepation.

  7. Structure and properties of carbonaceous adsorbents obtained from furanformolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokonova, Y.B.; Oleinik, M.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.

    1982-12-10

    We have shown previously (1) that a new copolycondensate based on petroleum residues -- fuaranformolite -- is a valuable carbon-containing raw material by the use of which carbonaceous adsorbents have been obtained. The latter can be used as catalysts and catalyst supports and also for the fine purification and separation of gases. The present paper is devoted to the study of the porous structure and sorption characteristics of the adsorbents obtained. High-strength carbonaceous adsorbents obtained from new copolymers of asphaltite -- fuaranformolites may, depending on the degree of burn-off, be used for the adsorption of poorly sorbed gases, of vapors of organic solvents, and of substances from solution. By varying the composition of the copolymer it is possible to direct the formation of the porous structure of the adsorbents in a desired manner.

  8. A NOVEL METAL CHELATE AFFINITY ADSORBENT FOR PROTEIN UPTAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYongjian; BAIShu; 等

    2001-01-01

    In this article,a spherical chitosan gel crosslinked by epichlorohydrin was prepared.It was then loaded with copper ions to produce a metal chelate affinity adsorbent for protein.The uptake of bovine serum albumin(BSA)by the affinity adsorbent was investigated.and the adsorption capacity for BSA as high as 40mg/g-wet beads was observed.The adsorption equilibrium data was well correlated by the Langmuir equation.The adsorption was considerably affected by pH.In additio.The amount of BSA adsorbed onto the beads decreased with the increasing of aqueous phase ionic strength,so adsorbed BAS can be desorbed by adjusting pH orionic strength of the solution.

  9. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  10. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c < 50 μg ml-1) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c ⩾ 50 μg ml-1) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18 cm-1, indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  11. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-05

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  12. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-06-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  13. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-03-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  14. Plant waste materials from restaurants as the adsorbents for dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović Marija D.; Nikolić Ivan R.; Milutinović Milica D.; Dimitrijević-Branković Suzana I.; Šiler-Marinković Slavica S.; Antonović Dušan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper has demonstrated the valorization of inexpensive and readily available restaurant waste containing most consumed food and beverage residues as adsorbents for methylene blue dye. Coffee, tea, lettuce and citrus waste have been utilized without any pre-treatment, thus the adsorption capacities and dye removal efficiency were determined. Coffee waste showed highest adsorbent capacity, followed by tea, lettuce and citrus waste. The dye removal was mo...

  15. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of hydrogen in metals processing and treatment identified, and mechanisms for hydrogen entry into a ferritic surface are discussed. The differences between hydrogen attack of ferritic steels and copper alloys are contrasted, and an unusual case study...

  16. Technical analysis of failure of catalyst support of reformer furnace tube of a hydrogen generation unit%制氢装置转化炉炉管催化剂支托失效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐庆轩; 冯岩

    2012-01-01

    The damages of catalyst support of reformer furnace tubes of No. 1 hydrogen generation unit in SINOPEC Shijiazhuang Refining & Chemical Co. , Ltd. in two maintenances were introduced. The composition analysis of catalyst support, the study on the macroscopic photo, the analysis of damaged surface of catalyst support of Incoloy800H, the metallographic analysis, energy dispersion spectrum (EDS) analysis, and scanning electron microscope analysis of support' s section area as well as study on the anti-caburization performances of Cr25Ni20 and Incoloy800H materials have concluded the following: The damages of catalyst support was caused by surface carburization of catalyst support material under high temperature in the presence of hydrogen, which led to phase changes of material surface structure, material stratification, loosening and bulging of surface material structure, large amount of micro-crackings in grain boundary at surface area and eduction of large amount of carbides. All these will reduce the ductility and plasticity of material. Therefore, it is difficult for the catalyst support to restore its original state after thermal expansion, which explains why there are some bulges on the tube of failed support. The anti-carburization performance is greatly improved after application of Cr25Ni20 steel material.%对两次检修中所发现的中国石油化工股份有限公司石家庄炼化分公司l号制氢装置转化炉炉管催化剂支托出现损坏的情况做了介绍,并对两种批次的催化剂支托进行了成分分析,对使用Incoloy800H材料、损坏严重的催化剂支托表面宏观照片进行了分析,对损伤支托的横截面进行金相、电镜及能谱检验分析.通过对Cr25Ni20和lncoloy800H两种材料的抗渗碳能力的比较,得出了以下结论:催化剂支托损伤的原因是材料在含氢高温环境下发生了表面渗碳现象,直接导致材料表面组织相变、材料分层、表现材料组织疏松和隆起,

  17. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

    2013-08-28

    This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent

  18. 丙酮一步法合成甲基异丁基酮的工业化生产及技术分析%Commercial production and technical analysis of melthyl isobutyl ketone by acetone one -step hydrogenation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴双九; 包宗宏

    2012-01-01

    泰州东联化工有限公司15 kt/a甲基异丁基酮(MIBK)装置采用的是从韩国引进的丙酮一步法生产技术.反应单元使用三相列管式反应器,反应压力为3.0 MPa,反应温度为90 ~110℃,反应器轴向温差为5~10℃.精馏系统采用7塔工艺流程,由丙酮精馏单元、MIBK精制单元、丙酮回收及二异丁基酮纯化3部分组成.3年多运行结果表明,装置的丙酮单耗[m(丙酮)/m(MIBK)]为1.30~1.35 t/t,产品质量全部达到优级品标准.%The methyl isobutyl ketone ( MIBK ) was produced in a 15 kt/a unit of Taizhou United East Petrochemical Co Ltd by the acetone one - step hydrogenation technology introduced from South Korea. The reaction system was a three - phase tube reactor with pressure 3. 0 Mpa, temperature 90 -110℃ and axial temperature difference 5 - 10 ℃. The rectification system consisted of 7 columns, such as acetone rectifying unit, MIBK refining unit, ace-tone recovery and diisobutyl ketone purification unit. The operation results in three years showed that the acetone unit consumption [ m ( acetone) /m ( MIBK )] was 1. 30 - 1. 35 t/t, and the product quality all met the needs of superior grade product standard.

  19. Adsorbates effects in H^- - Na/Cu(111) collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrim, Bogdana; Yu, Song

    2008-03-01

    The (111) faces of Cu, Ag and Au present a band gap that extends just below the vacuum level at the γ gpoint [1]. The effect is to forbid electrons with energies in a certain range to be transferred into the metal along the surface normal. Thus, the presence of a band gap should dramatically influence various experiments in ion-surface collisions involving electron capture or loss. In recent years, this topic received a great interest [2 -- 4]. Adsorbates deposition makes the electron dynamics at such surfaces to be even more complex. We analyze some interesting adsorbates effects: (1) projectile energy levels and widths are strongly perturbed when this approaches close to an adsorbate atom; (2) scattering by adsorbates may be used to laterally confine surface state electrons; (3) adsorbates may enhance the band gap effect; (4) adsorbates tend to couple the surface states to the bulk states. Results for the H^- projectile interacting with a Na/Cu(111) surface are reported. [1] E.V. Chulkov, V.M. Silkin and P.M. Echenique 1999 Surf. Sci. 437, 330. [2] A.G. Borisov, A.K. Kazansky and J.P. Gauyacq 1999 Phys. Rev. B. 59, 10935. [3] H.S. Chakraborty, T. Niederhausen and U. Thumm 2004 Phys. Rev. A. 70, 052903. [4] B. Bahrim, B. Makarenko and J.W. Rabalais 2005 Surface Sci. 594, 62.

  20. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  1. Activity of lactoperoxidase when adsorbed on protein layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberska, Karolina; Svensson, Olof; Shleev, Sergey; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2008-09-15

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is an enzyme, which is used as an antimicrobial agent in a number of applications, e.g., food technology. In the majority of applications LPO is added to a homogeneous product phase or immobilised on product surface. In the latter case, however, the measurements of LPO activity are seldom reported. In this paper we have assessed LPO enzymatic activity on bare and protein modified gold surfaces by means of electrochemistry. It was found that LPO rapidly adsorbs to bare gold surfaces resulting in an amount of LPO adsorbed of 2.9mg/m(2). A lower amount of adsorbed LPO is obtained if the gold surface is exposed to bovine serum albumin, bovine or human mucin prior to LPO adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the adsorbed enzyme is in general preserved at the experimental conditions and varies only moderately when comparing bare gold and gold surface pretreated with the selected proteins. The measurement of LPO specific activity, however, indicate that it is about 1.5 times higher if LPO is adsorbed on gold surfaces containing a small amount of preadsorbed mucin in comparison to the LPO directly adsorbed on bare gold.

  2. Hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choong-Nyeon

    2000-12-01

    This study introduces the hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials and its applicability for practical use. This treatment is somewhat different from normal heat treatment because of the interaction between metal atoms and hydrogen. Since hydrogen can be removed very fast by pumping it out the hydrogen-induced new lattice phase which can not be obtained without hydrogen can be preserved in a meta-stable state. A thermodynamic interpretation of the hydrogen heat treatment established previously was reformulated for graphical and analytical methods and applied to Pd-Pt-H and Pd-Ag-H alloy systems and a fair correlation between the calculation and experimental results was shown. The feasibility of applying the thermodynamic interpretation to intermetallic compounds-hydrogen systems was also discussed.

  3. Non-dissociative activation of chemisorbed dinitrogen on Ni(110) by co-adsorbed lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao, E-mail: tgliu24@gmail.com; Temprano, Israel; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-14

    Weakening the intramolecular N–N bond is essential to promote direct hydrogenation of adsorbed N{sub 2} on catalyst surfaces. The interaction of N{sub 2} with Li on Ni(110) surfaces has been investigated. We show that the N–N bond is significantly weakened with increasing Li coverage, evidenced by large redshifts in N–N stretch frequency of up to 380 cm{sup −1} compared to the gas phase. Some increased thermal stability of the most weakened N{sub 2,ads} states is also observed. We speculate that the various observed redshifts in N–N stretch frequency are associated with an enhanced backfilling of the 2π* antibonding orbital of N{sub 2} due to both the Li-induced surface electrostatic field, and the formation of Li{sub x}(N{sub 2}){sub y} surface complexes.

  4. Dissipation of the excess energy of the adsorbate- thermalization via electron transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Strak, Paweł; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    A new scenario of thermalization process of the adsorbate attached at solid surfaces is proposed. The scenario is based on existence of electric dipole layer in which the electron wavefunctions extend over the positive ions. Thus the strong local electric field exists which drags electron into the solids and repels the positive ions. The electrons are tunneling conveying the energy into the solid interior. The positive ions are retarded in the field, which allows them to loose excess kinetic energy and to be located smoothly into the adsorption sites. In this way the excess energy is not dissipated locally avoiding melting or creation of defects, in accordance with the experiments. The scenario is supported by the ab intio calculation results including density function theory of the slabs representing AlN surface and the Schrodinger equation for time evolution of hydrogen-like atom at the solid surface.

  5. Structure formation in adsorbed overlayers comprising functional cross-shaped molecules: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperski, Adam; Nieckarz, Damian; Szabelski, Paweł

    2015-11-01

    Surface confined self-assembly of functional star-shaped organic molecules is a promising method to create nanoporous networks with tailorable structure and functions. In this work we use the Monte Carlo simulation method to demonstrate how the morphology of these supramolecular assemblies can be tuned by manipulating intrinsic parameters of the building blocks and modified by the presence of co-adsorbed metal atoms. To that purpose we study the 2D self-assembly of planar cruciform molecules modeled as collections of interconnected segments, some of which were activated to represent discrete interaction centers. We consider a few exemplary adsorbed systems in which the molecules with different size, aspect ratio and intramolecular distribution of active centers form superstructures stabilized by short-range segment-segment interactions or by metal-segment interactions. These two situations correspond to supramolecular assemblies sustained by, for example, hydrogen bonding and metal-organic ligand coordination, respectively. The simulated results show that proper encoding of intramolecular interactions into the cruciform building bricks allows for directing the self-assembly towards largely diversified structures ranging from nanoclusters to porous grids. The obtained findings can facilitate designing and optimization of molecular networks comprising cross-shaped units including functionalized porphyrins and phthalocyanines and they can be helpful in preliminary selection of these building blocks.

  6. Investigation of organic, inorganic and synthetic adsorbents for the pretreatment of landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, H; Fernandes, L; Tezel, F H

    2008-05-01

    An investigation into the use of organic, inorganic and synthetic adsorbents for the pretreatment of landfill leachate, generated by the City of Ottawa Trail Road Landfill, was carried out. The purpose of this project was to reduce the concentration of contaminants in order to meet the local Sewer Use By-Laws, prior to transporting the leachate from the generating site to the local municipal sewage treatment plant, and thereby reducing the disposal fees. Peat moss, compost, clinoptilolite, basalt and two types of activated carbon (DSR-A and F400) were investigated to determine the adsorption capacity for contaminants from leachate. Kinetic studies were also performed. The results based on batch adsorption isotherms show that peat moss has the highest adsorption capacity for boron (B) and barium (Ba), compared with the other adsorbents. Also peat moss has good removals of Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN), Total Organic Carbon (TOC), and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), but these are lower than the removals obtained with activated carbon. Because of its relatively low cost and higher adsorption of B and Ba, peat moss was selected as the filter media for the column studies. The treated leachate was tested for B, Ba, TKN, carbonaceous biological oxygen demand (CBOD5) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The breakthrough curves for B and Ba showed the effectiveness of peat moss in removing these contaminants.

  7. Direct electrochemistry and electroanalysis of hemoglobin adsorbed in self-assembled films of gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Qian, Weiping; Tan, Yong; Ding, Shaohua; Zhang, Haiqian

    2007-05-15

    Gold nanoshells (GNSs), consisting of a silica core and a thin gold shell, were self-assembled on the surface of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTES) modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The resulting novel GNSs-coated ITO (GNSs/APTES/ITO) electrode could provide a biocompatible surface for the adsorption of hemoglobin (Hb). The UV-visible (UV-vis) spectra indicated that Hb adsorbed on the GNSs interface retained the native structure. Electrochemical impedance spectra and cyclic voltammetric techniques were employed to evaluate the electrochemical behaviors of Hb, the results demonstrated that GNSs could act as electron tunnels to facilitate electron transfer between Hb and the electrode. Based on the activity of Hb adsorbed on the GNSs/APTES/ITO electrode toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, a mediator-free H(2)O(2) biosensor was constructed, which showed a broad linear range from 5muM to 1mM with a detection limit of 3.4muM (S/N=3). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant was calculated to be 180muM, suggesting a high affinity.

  8. Solar driven technologies for hydrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medojević Milovan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bearing in mind that the production of hydrogen based on renewable energy sources, without doubt, is an important aspect to be taken into account when considering the potential of this gas, where as particularly interesting technologies stand out the ones which are based on the use of solar energy to produce hydrogen. The goal of this paper provides basic technological trajectories, with the possibility of combining, for solar driven hydrogen production, such as: electrochemical, photochemical and thermochemical process. Furthermore, the paper presents an analysis of those technologies from a technical as well as economic point of view. In addition, the paper aims to draw attention to the fact that the generation of hydrogen using renewable energy should be imposed as a logical and proper way to store solar energy in the form of chemical energy.

  9. Gold recovery from low concentrations using nanoporous silica adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledresse, Adil

    The development of high capacity adsorbents with uniform porosity denoted 5%MP-HMS (5% Mercaptopropyl-Hexagonal Mesoporous Structure) to extract gold from noncyanide solutions is presented. The preliminary studies from laboratory simulated noncyanide gold solutions show that the adsorption capacities of these materials are among the highest reported. The high adsorption saturation level of these materials, up to 1.9 mmol/g (37% of the adsorbent weight) from gold chloride solutions (potassium tetrachloroaurate) and 2.9 mmol/g (57% of the adsorbent weight) from gold bromide solutions (potassium tetrabromoaurate) at pH = 2, is a noteworthy feature of these materials. This gold loading from [AuC4]- and [AuBr4 ]- solutions corresponds to a relative Au:S molar ratio of 2.5:1 and 3.8:1, respectively. These rates are significantly higher than the usual 1:1 (Au:S) ratio expected for metal ion binding with the material. The additional gold ions loaded have been spontaneously reduced to metallic gold in the mesoporous material. Experimental studies indicated high maximum adsorptions of gold as high as 99.9% recovery. Another promising attribute of these materials is their favourable adsorption kinetics. The MP-HMS reaches equilibrium (saturation) in less than 1 minute of exposure in gold bromide and less than 10 minutes in gold chloride. The MP-HMS materials adsorption is significantly improved by agitation and the adsorption capacity of Au (III) ions increases with the decrease in pH. The recovery of adsorbed gold and the regeneration of spent adsorbent were investigated for MP-HMS adsorbent. The regenerated adsorbent (MP-HMS) maintained its adsorption capacity even after repeated use and all the gold was successfully recovered from the spent adsorbent. For the fist time, a promising adsorbent system has been found that is capable of effectively concentrating gold thiosulphate complexes, whereas conventional carbon-inpulp (CIP) and carbon-in-leach (CIL) systems fail. The

  10. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, P.W. [Duke Power Company, Huntersville, NC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.

    2011-10-01

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  12. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-10-01

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  13. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Stewart R; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2015-01-09

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000CV/h (2s and 0.3s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12mgBSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21mglysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20mgBSA/mL and 27mglysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000CV/h. For compression loads of 5MPa and 10MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an uncompressed adsorbent, compressions of 1, 5

  14. Octahedral palladium nanoparticles as excellent hosts for electrochemically adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalineeva, Anna; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    We report new results for electrochemical H adsorption on and absorption in octahedral palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with an average tip-to-tip size of 7.8 nm and a narrow size distribution. They reveal a very high H loading of 0.90 that cannot be achieved using bulk Pd materials or larger NPs; this behavior is assigned to a combination of two factors: their small size and face morphology. Temperature-dependent cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies in the range of 296 to 333 K reveal unique features that are attributed to electrochemical H adsorption, H absorption, and H2 generation. The CV features are used to prepare H adsorption and absorption isotherms that are then used in thermodynamic data analysis. Modeling of the experimental results demonstrates that, upon H adsorption and absorption, Pd-NPs develop a core-shell-skin structure, each with its unique H loading. The electrochemical results obtained for octahedral Pd-NPs are compared to analogous data obtained for cubic Pd-NPs with a similar size as well as for larger cubic Pd-NPs and bulk materials under gas-phase conditions. PMID:28168217

  15. Elution by Le Chatelier's principle for maximum recyclability of adsorbents: applied to polyacrylamidoxime adsorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Vukovic, Sinisa; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-28

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents have attracted interest within the last decade due to their high adsorption capacities for uranium and other rare earth metals from seawater. The ocean contains an approximated 4-5 billion tons of uranium and even though amidoxime-based adsorbents have demonstrated the highest uranium adsorption capacities to date, they are still economically impractical because of their limited recyclability. Typically, the adsorbed metals are eluted with a dilute acid solution that not only damages the amidoxime groups (metal adsorption sites), but is also not strong enough to remove the strongly bound vanadium, which decreases the adsorption capacity with each cycle. We resolved this challenge by incorporating Le Chatelier's principle to recycle adsorbents indefinitely. We used a solution with a high concentration of amidoxime-like chelating agents, such as hydroxylamine, to desorb nearly a 100% of adsorbed metals, including vanadium, without damaging the metal adsorption sites and preserving the high adsorption capacity. The method takes advantage of knowing the binding mode between the amidoxime ligand and the metal and mimics it with chelating agents that then in a Le Chatelier's manner removes metals by shifting to a new chemical equilibrium. For this reason the method is applicable to any ligand-metal adsorbent and it will make an impact on other extraction technologies.

  16. Tribology in Gaseous Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawae, Yoshinori; Sugimura, Joich

    Hydrogen is expected as a clean and renewable energy carrier for future environment-friendly society. Many machine elements in hydrogen energy systems should be operating within hydrogen gas and tribological behavior, such as friction and wear, of bearings and seals are affected by the hydrogen environment through some interactions between material surfaces and gaseous hydrogen, i.e., physisorption of hydrogen molecules and following chemisorptions of dissociated atoms on metal surfaces, formation of metal hydride and reduction of metal oxide layer by hydrogen atoms diffused into bulk. Therefore, friction and wear characteristics of tribomaterials in the hydrogen environment should be appropriately understood to establish a design guideline for reliable hydrogen utilizing systems. This paper reviews the current knowledge about the effect of hydrogen on friction and wear of materials, and then describes our recent progress of hydrogen research in the tribology field.

  17. Effect of hydrogenation, low energy ion irradiation and annealing on hydrogen bonding to polycrystalline diamond surface studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, S.; Ternyak, O.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A. [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion, Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Lafosse, A.; Bertin, M.; Azria, R. [Paris-Sud Univ. et CNRS, Lab. des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2007-09-15

    The effects of different processes of hydrogenation, thermal treatment and ion irradiation of hydrogenated polycrystalline diamond surface have been investigated by means of high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS). Analysis of the different contributions in the CH stretching, overtones and combination modes, as well as changes in relative intensities of the diamond CC and CH{sub x} related vibrations allowed us to identify the CH{sub x} adsorbed species on the diamond surface following the different treatments. Ex-situ hydrogenation of diamond surface by means of exposure to H-MW plasma results in a fully hydrogenated well-ordered diamond surface and etching of the amorphous phase located on the grain boundaries present on the sample after CVD-deposition. Annealing this surface to 600 C results in some subtle changes in the HR-EELS, probably associated with decomposition of CH{sub x} (x=2,3) adsorbed species. Ion irradiation on the surface induces partial desorption of hydrogen from the diamond phase and a large amount of amorphous defects, some of them of sp and the most of them of sp{sup 2} character. Annealing to 600-700 C of the irradiated surface leads to hydrogen desorption. In-situ hydrogenation of the irradiated and annealed sample does not restore the diamond structure, and results in hydrogenated amorphous surface, unstable with thermal annealing above 600-700 C. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Metallic glassy Zr70Ni20Pd10 powders for improving the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation behavior of MgH2

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sherif El-Eskandarany

    2016-01-01

    Because of its low density, storage of hydrogen in the gaseous and liquids states possess technical and economic challenges. One practical solution for utilizing hydrogen in vehicles with proton-exchange fuel cells membranes is storing hydrogen in metal hydrides. Magnesium hydride (MgH2) remains the best hydrogen storage material due to its high hydrogen capacity and low cost of production. Due to its high activation energy and poor hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics at moderate temperatur...

  19. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  20. Hydrogen sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, T L

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in 'sour' gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands, pelt processing, certain types of pulp and paper production, and any situation in which organic material decays or inorganic sulphides exist under reducing conditions. H2S dissociates into free sulphide in the circulation. Sulphide binds to many macromolecules, among them cytochrome oxidase. Although this is undoubtedly an important mechanism of toxicity due to H2S, there may be others H2S provides little opportunity for escape at high concentrations because of the olfactory paralysis it causes, the steep exposure-response relationships, and the characteristically sudden loss of consciousness it can cause which is colloquially termed 'knockdown.' Other effects may include mucosal irritation, which is associated at lower concentrations with a keratoconjunctivitis called 'gas eye' and at higher concentrations with risk of pulmonary oedema. Chronic central nervous system sequelae may possibly follow repeated knockdowns: this is controversial and the primary effects of H2S may be confounded by anoxia or head trauma. Treatment is currently empirical, with a combination of nitrite and hyperbaric oxygen preferred. The treatment regimen is not ideal and carries some risk.

  1. Extracting Uranium from Seawater: Promising AF Series Adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Chris J.; Kuo, L. -J.; Gill, G.; Wood, J. R.; Dai, S.

    2016-04-20

    A new family of high-surface-area polyethylene fiber adsorbents named the AF series was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series adsorbents were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/comonomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154-354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44 M KOH at 80 °C followed by screening at ORNL with sodium-based synthetic aqueous solution, spiked with 8 ppm uranium. The uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170 to 200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/comonomer molar ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through column experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning times at 80 °C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1 and 3 h of KOH conditioning at 80 °C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 1 to 3 h at 80 °C resulted in a 22-27% decrease in uranium adsorption capacity in seawater.

  2. First-principles study on hydrogen adsorption on nitrogen doped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Rafique; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we have investigated the adsorption of Hydrogen on Nitrogen doped graphene in detail by means of first-principles calculations. A comprehensive study is performed of the structural, electronic and optical properties of hydrogen atoms adsorbed on dopant atoms sites and on carbon atoms neighboring dopant atoms. The effect of doping has been investigated by varying the concentration of doping atoms from 3.125%(one atom of nitrogen in 32 host atoms) to 6.25% (two nitrogen atoms in 32 host atoms). Similarly the effect of adsorption has been investigated by varying the concentration of hydrogen atoms and also varying the adsorption sites. Band structure, partial density of states (PDOS) and optical properties of pure, nitrogen doped and hydrogen adsorbed graphene sheet were calculated using VASP (Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package). The calculated results for pure graphene sheet were then compared with nitrogen doped graphene and Hydrogen adsorbed graphene sheet. It is found that upon nitrogen doping the Dirac point in the graphene band structure shifts below the Fermi Energy level and energy gap appears at the high symmetric K-point. On the other hand, by adsorption of Hydrogen atom, there is further change in the band structure near the Fermi level and also the energy gap at the high symmetric K-point is increased. There is change in the dielectric function and refractive index of the graphene after H atoms adsorption on N-doped graphene. The overall absorption spectra is decreased in case of nitrogen doping and after adsorption process of Hydrogen atoms. However a significant red shift in absorption towards visible range of radiation is found to occur for hydrogen atoms adsorbed on nitrogen doped graphene sheet. The reflectivity peak of graphene increases in low energy region after H adsorption on N-doped graphene. The results can be used to tune the Fermi Energy level and to tailor the optical properties of graphene sheet in visible region.

  3. Growth and hydrogenation of ultra-thin Mg films on Mo(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Davies, Jonathan Conrad; Vegge, Tejs;

    2005-01-01

    The growth and hydrogenation of ultra-thin magnesium overlayers have been investigated on a Mo(1 1 1) single crystal substrate. For increasing magnesium coverages we observe intermediate stages in the TPD and LEISS profiles, which illustrate the transition from one monolayer to multilayer growth....... are necessary to sustain this purely adsorbed state. Using predissociated hydrogen we show that the hydride formation is self-stabilizing and the hydride only decomposes at a temperature where a considerable desorption of magnesium occurs....

  4. General Motors: Final Report for Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Mei [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Chakraborty, Amlan [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Hou, Peter [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Kaisare, Niklet [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Jorgensen, Scott [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Kumar, Sudarshan [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Li, Changpeng [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Ortmann, Jerome [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Raju, M. [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States); Vadivelu, S. Kumar [General Motors Company, Warren, MI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    As part of the HSECoE team, the GM team built system models and detailed transport models for on-board hydrogen storage systems using metal hydrides and adsorbent materials. Detailed transport models have been developed for both the metal hydride and adsorbent systems with a focus on optimization of heat exchanger designs with the objective of minimizing the heat exchanger mass. We also performed work in collaboration with our partners on storage media structuring and enhancement studies for the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Since the hydrogen storage materials are generally characterized by low density and low thermal conductivity, we conducted experiments to form pellets and add thermal conductivity enhancers to the storage material, and to improve cycling stability and durability of the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Refueling of a MOF-5 pellet with cryogenic hydrogen was studied by developing a detailed two-dimensional axisymmetric COMSOL® model of the process. The effects of pellet permeability, thermal conductivity, and thermal conductivity enhancers were investigated. Our key area of focus has been on designing and building a cryo-adsorption vessel for validation of cryo-adsorption models. The 3-L cryogenic tank was used to study the fast fill and discharge dynamics of a cryo-adsorbent storage system, both experimentally and numerically.

  5. Adsorption behavior and current-voltage characteristics of CdSe nanocrystals on hydrogen-passivated silicon

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy we have studied both the geometric distribution and the conduction properties of organic shell capped CdSe nanocrystals adsorbed on hydrogen-passivated Si(100). At submonolayer concentrations, the nanocrystal distribution on the surface was found to be highly nonhomogeneous, with an aggregation of most of the nanocrystals into islands of monolayer thickness. I-V spectra collected on nanocrystals adsorbed on n- and p-type substrates showed a...

  6. Structural characteristics of oligomeric DNA strands adsorbed onto single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxbury, Daniel; Jagota, Anand; Mittal, Jeetain

    2013-01-10

    The single-stranded DNA to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hybrid continues to attract significant interest as an exemplary biological molecule-nanomaterial conjugate. In addition to their many biomedical uses, such as in vivo sensing and delivery of molecular cargo, DNA-SWCNT hybrids enable the sorting of SWCNTs according to their chirality. Current experimental methods have fallen short of identifying the actual structural ensemble of DNA adsorbed onto SWCNTs that enables and controls several of these phenomena. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been a useful tool for studying the structure of these hybrid molecules. In recent studies, using replica exchange MD (REMD) simulation we have shown that novel secondary structures emerge and that these structures are DNA-sequence and SWCNT-type dependent. Here, we use REMD to investigate in detail the structural characteristics of two DNA-SWCNT recognition pairs: (TAT)(4)-(6,5)-SWCNT, i.e., DNA sequence TATTATTATTAT bound to the (6,5) chirality SWCNT, and (CCG)(2)CC-(8,7)-SWCNT as well as off-recognition pairs (TAT)(4)-(8,7)-SWCNT and (CCG)(2)CC-(6,5)-SWCNT. From a structural clustering analysis, dominant equilibrium structures are identified and show a right-handed self-stitched motif for (TAT)(4)-(6,5) in contrast to a left-handed β-barrel for (CCG)(2)CC-(8,7). Additionally, characteristics such as DNA end-to-end distance, solvent accessible SWCNT surface area, DNA hydrogen bonding between bases, and DNA dihedral distributions have been probed in detail as a function of the number of DNA strands adsorbed onto the nanotube. We find that the DNA structures adsorbed onto a nanotube are also stabilized by significant numbers of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds (intrastrand and interstrand) in addition to π-π stacking between DNA bases and nanotube surface and Watson-Crick pairs. Finally, we provide a summary of DNA structures observed for various DNA-SWCNT hybrids as a preliminary set of motifs that may be

  7. Technical-economic study of the development of a hydrogen-based energy system in Venezuela; Estudio tecnico-economico del desarrollo en Venezuela de un sistema energetico basado en el hidrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posso, F. [ULA-Tachira. San Cristobal (Venezuela)] email: fausto@ula.ve; Contreras, A. [ETSII-UNED (Venezuela)

    2009-09-15

    The feasibility of the development in Venezuela of a hydroelectric/hydrogen energy system (HHES) was studied. The application of this system is intended for rural sectors in the country with no available permanent and safe energy services. The study was conducted by developing and later simulating a mathematical model for each of the components of the energy system: transformation, storage, transport, distribution and final use. Structurally, the models are composed of an energy sub-model and a cost sub-model. The HHES model as a whole is obtained from the connection of the models and the components. The simulation is performed for operating conditions and parameter values that are most favorable for the proposed use, with the same temporal period in all cases. The results indicate that the annual production of H{sub 2} must increase in order to satisfy the growing energy needs of the rural study population. The total annual costs of the HHES decreased during the study period, primarily due to a decrease in the costs of the final use component, which indicates the behavior of total costs. A comparison of the results obtained with those from the literature demonstrate interest in the proposed system given the ideal economic and environmental conditions provided to the zone selected, primarily due to the availability of inexpensive hydroelectric energy in the country. The current feasibility of the development of the HHES is shown, as compared to the option of supplying electric energy to rural population centers via traditional electric installations. [Spanish] Se estudia la viabilidad del desarrollo en Venezuela del Sistema Energetico Hidroelectricidad/Hidrogeno, SEHH, con vista a su aplicacion en sectores rurales del pais que no disponen de servicios permanentes y seguros de energia. El estudio se realiza mediante la elaboracion y posterior simulacion de un modelo matematico para cada uno de los componentes del sistema energetico: transformacion, almacenamiento

  8. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinska, Kris [PI; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    directly address any hydrogen storage technical barriers or targets in terms of numbers. Specifically, hydrogen sorption and desorption tests or kinetics measurements were not part of the project scope. However, the insights gained from these studies could help to answer fundamental questions necessary for considering glass-based materials as hydrogen storage media and could be applied indirectly towards the DOE hydrogen storage technical targets such as system weight and volume, system cost and energy density. Such questions are: Can specific macro-crystals, proven to attract hydrogen when in a macroscopic form (bulk), be nucleated in glass matrices as nanocrystals to create two-phased materials? What are suitable compositions that enable to synthetize glass-based, two-phase materials with nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen via surface or bulk interactions? What are the limits of controlling the microstructure of these materials, especially limits for nanocrystals density and size? Finally, from a technological point of view, the fabrication of glass-derived nanocomposites that we explore is a very simple, fast and inexpensive process that does not require costly or specialized equipment which is an important factor for practical applications.

  9. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  10. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept b

  11. Benzene partial hydrogenation: advances and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Lucas; Dupont, Jairton

    2015-04-07

    The partial hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexene is an economically interesting and technically challenging reaction. Over the last four decades, a lot of work has been dedicated to the development of an exploitable process and several approaches have been investigated. However, environmental constraints often represent a limit to their industrial application, making further research in this field necessary. The goal of this review is to highlight the main findings of the different disciplines involved in understanding the governing principles of this reaction from a sustainable chemistry standpoint. Special emphasis is given to ruthenium-catalyzed liquid phase batch hydrogenation of benzene.

  12. Ti-decorated graphitic-C3N4 monolayer: A promising material for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weibin; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Fuchun; Yang, Woochul

    2016-11-01

    Ti-decorated graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) monolayer as a promising material system for high-capacity hydrogen storage is proposed through density functional theory calculations. The stability and hydrogen adsorption of Ti-decorated g-C3N4 is analyzed by computing the adsorption energy, the charge population, and electronic density of states. The most stable decoration site of Ti atom is the triangular N hole in g-C3N4 with an adsorption energy of -7.58 eV. The large diffusion energy barrier of the adsorbed Ti atom of ∼6.00 eV prohibits the cluster formation of Ti atoms. The electric field induced by electron redistribution of Ti-adsorbed porous g-C3N4 significantly enhanced hydrogen adsorption up to five H2 molecules at each Ti atom with an average adsorption energy of -0.30 eV/H2. The corresponding hydrogen capacity reaches up to 9.70 wt% at 0 K. In addition, the hydrogen capacity is predicted to be 6.30 wt% at 233 K and all adsorbed H2 are released at 393 K according to molecular dynamics simulation. Thus, the Ti-decorated g-C3N4 monolayer is suggested to be a promising material for hydrogen storage suggested by the DOE for commercial applications.

  13. Toward a detailed characterization of oil adsorbates as "solid liquids".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutza, Claudia; Metz, Hendrik; Kutza, Johannes; Syrowatka, Frank; Mäder, Karsten

    2013-05-01

    Solid lipid formulation systems are used to overcome oral bioavailability problems of poorly water-soluble drugs. One promising process is the conversion of a liquid lipid system in a free flowing powder by use of adsorbing excipients. The aim of this study was the detailed characterization of solid-liquid interactions in oil adsorbed to Fujicalin and Neusilin which were manufactured by means of dual asymmetric centrifugation or conventional mortar/pestle blending. The adsorption strength of the excipients was investigated by Benchtop-NMR and ESR spectroscopy revealing the highest adsorption power for the Neusilin products. The adsorbate production methods as well as the storage of the excipients impact their adsorption properties. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) show that dual asymmetric centrifugation leads to a smoothing of the particle surface, whereas the mortar/pestle blending results in an uneven surface and particle destruction. The oil distribution at the particles is inhomogeneous for both production methods. The micropolarity of the adsorbed oil was investigated by ESR spectroscopy and multispectral fluorescence imaging. The adsorbing process on Neusilin leads to an increased micropolarity of the oil component. The release of the oil component in aqueous media could be verified by Benchtop-NMR and multispectral fluorescence imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lipid monolayers and adsorbed polyelectrolytes with different degrees of polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Thomas; Ahrens, Heiko; Lawrenz, Frank; Gröning, Andreas; Nestler, Peter; Günther, Jens-Uwe; Helm, Christiane A

    2014-06-17

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) of different molecular weight M(w) is adsorbed to oppositely charged DODAB monolayers from dilute solutions (0.01 mmol/L). PSS adsorbs flatly in a lamellar manner, as is shown by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction (exception: PSS with M(w) below 7 kDa adsorbs flatly disordered to the liquid expanded phase). The surface coverage and the separation of the PSS chains are independent of PSS M(w). On monolayer compression, the surface charge density increases by a factor of 2, and the separation of the PSS chains decreases by the same factor. Isotherms show that on increase of PSS M(w) the transition pressure of the LE/LC (liquid expanded/liquid condensed) phase transition decreases. When the contour length exceeds the persistence length (21 nm), the transition pressure is low and constant. For low-M(w) PSS (<7 kDa) the LE/LC transition of the lipids and the disordered/ordered transition of adsorbed PSS occur simultaneously, leading to a maximum in the contour length dependence of the transition enthalpy. These findings show that lipid monolayers at the air/water interface are a suitable model substrate with adjustable surface charge density to study the equilibrium conformation of adsorbed polyelectrolytes as well as their interactions with a model membrane.

  15. Interaction of Hydrogen with MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Regli, Laura; Cocina, Donato; Zecchina, Adriano; Arstad, Bjørnar; Bjørgen, Morten; Hafizovic, Jasmina; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-10-06

    Hydrogen storage is among the most demanding challenges in the hydrogen-based energy cycle. One proposed strategy for hydrogen storage is based on physisorption on high surface area solids such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Within this class of materials, MOF-5 has been the first structure studied for hydrogen storage. The IR spectroscopy of adsorbed H2 performed at 15 K and ab initio calculations show that the adsorptive properties of this material are mainly due to dispersive interactions with the internal wall structure and to weak electrostatic forces associated with O13Zn4 clusters. Calculated and measured binding enthalpies are between 2.26 and 3.5 kJ/mol, in agreement with the H2 rotational barriers reported in the literature. A minority of binding sites with higher adsorption enthalpy (7.4 kJ/mol) is also observed. These species are probably associated with OH groups on the external surfaces present as termini of the microcrystals.

  16. Direct observation and modelling of ordered hydrogen adsorption and catalyzed ortho-para conversion on ETS-10 titanosilicate material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Vitillo, Jenny G; Cocina, Donato; Gribov, Evgueni N; Zecchina, Adriano

    2007-06-07

    Hydrogen physisorption on porous high surface materials is investigated for the purpose of hydrogen storage and hydrogen separation, because of its simplicity and intrinsic reversibility. For these purposes, the understanding of the binding of dihydrogen to materials, of the structure of the adsorbed phase and of the ortho-para conversion during thermal and pressure cycles are crucial for the development of new hydrogen adsorbents. We report the direct observation by IR spectroscopic methods of structured hydrogen adsorption on a porous titanosilicate (ETS-10), with resolution of the kinetics of the ortho-para transition, and an interpretation of the structure of the adsorbed phase based on classical atomistic simulations. Distinct infrared signals of o- and p-H2 in different adsorbed states are measured, and the conversion of o- to p-H2 is monitored over a timescale of hours, indicating the presence of a catalyzed reaction. Hydrogen adsorption occurs in three different regimes characterized by well separated IR manifestations: at low pressures ordered 1:1 adducts with Na and K ions exposed in the channels of the material are formed, which gradually convert into ordered 2:1 adducts. Further addition of H2 occurs only through the formation of a disordered condensed phase. The binding enthalpy of the Na+-H2 1:1 adduct is of -8.7+/-0.1 kJ mol(-1), as measured spectroscopically. Modeling of the weak interaction of H2 with the materials requires an accurate force field with a precise description of both dispersion and electrostatics. A novel three body force field for molecular hydrogen is presented, based on the fitting of an accurate PES for the H2-H2 interaction to the experimental dipole polarizability and quadrupole moment. Molecular mechanics simulations of hydrogen adsorption at different coverages confirm the three regimes of adsorption and the structure of the adsorbed phase.

  17. Effect of zinc and cerium addition on property of copper-based adsorbents for phosphine adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁平; 易红宏; 余琼粉; 唐晓龙; 杨丽萍; 叶智青

    2010-01-01

    A series of copper-based activated carbon (AC) adsorbents were prepared in order to investigate the effect of Zn, Ce addition on Cu-based AC adsorbent for phosphine (PH3) adsorption removal from yellow phosphorous tail gas. N2 adsorption isotherm and X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) results suggested that the addition of Zn could increase the adsorbent ultramicropores, decrease the adsorbent supermicropores and the adsorbent average pore diameter. Therefore it enhanced the PH3 adsorption capacity. Appropriate amoun...

  18. Studies on The Adsorption Capacity for Bilirubin of The Adsorbent Chitosan-β-Cyclodextrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The adsorbent crosslinked chitosan-β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was prepared by the reaction of glutaraldehyde with chitosan and β-cyclodextrin. This type of adsorbent has high adsorption capacity for unconjugated bilirubin. The adsorption capacity was related to the β-CD content of the adsorbent; phosphate buffer concentration; temperature; pH value; ionic strength and the adsorbent beads. The results indicated that the chitosan-β-CD was a good adsorbent for unconjugated bilirubin with high capacity.

  19. A Review of Adsorbents Used for Storm Water Runoff Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Agintas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals, petroleum products, sediments and other pollutants get in the environment with insufficiently cleaned storm water runoff. Contaminated storm water runoff is one of the most significant sources for pollution in rivers, lakes and estuaries. Storm water runoff must be treated using not only simple methods but also using adsorption processes. Adsorbents can be natural organic, natural nonorganic and synthetic. Main adsorption characteristic, way of utilization and storm water runoff inflow rate, quantity and pollution need to be investigated when trying to use adsorbents in reasonably way. It is very important to treat storm water properly during the primary mechanical treatment otherwise adsorbents will act as mechanical filters.Article in Lithuanian

  20. Synthesis of silica adsorbent and its selective separation for flavone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqing ZHANG; Yahui ZHANG; Zhen QIN; Zhenrong MA

    2008-01-01

    One kind of built,in silica adsorbent, which has high adsorption selectivity to rutin, was synthesized using molecular imprinting technology by the following steps:synthesis of precursor from the reaction between water soluble rutin (as template molecule) and the functional monomer chloropropyltriethoxysilane, co,hydrolysis of the precursor and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), sol,gel aging process, and removal of template molecules. The results of adsorption experiment show that this adsorbent has a high adsorption capacity for rutin, and good adsorptionselectivity towards rutin even under the interference of a flavone with a similar structure. TEM photos suggest that nanocaves corresponding to rutin were formed inside the adsorbent while FTIR spectra indicate that new bond was generated during the recognition process.