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Sample records for adrenergic blockade clinical

  1. Adrenergic blockade in diabetic and uninephrectomized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Jørgensen, P E

    1999-01-01

    The present study reports on the effects of adrenergic blocking agents on the renal growth and on the renal content and urinary excretion of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic or uninephrectomized rats. Diabetic and uninephrectomized rats were allocated to groups...... an increase of 33% in kidney weight when compared to controls. The adrenergic antagonist treated diabetic groups had a significantly lower increase of 15%. Postnephrectomized renal growth was not affected by adrenergic antagonists. The total renal content of EGF was comparable in the saline-treated diabetic...... was not affected by adrenergic blocking agents. These results provide evidence for fundamental differences between diabetes-related renal growth and that observed in compensation to nephrectomy and suggest a connection between adrenergic activity, renal growth, and EGF in diabetes....

  2. Circulatory and metabolic effects of alpha-adrenergic blockade in the hyperinsulinemic ovine fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestreet, B S; Boyle, L D; Papparella, A; Berard, D J

    1996-01-01

    Fetuses of diabetic women exhibit hypoxemia, elevated catecholamine concentrations at birth, and increased incidence of death. Our previous findings suggested that experimental fetal hyperinsulinemia results in a surge in catecholamines with cardiovascular changes supported by increased beta-adrenergic activity. The present experiments were designed to assess the contribution of alpha-adrenergic stimulation to the hemodynamic changes in the hyperinsulinemic ovine fetus. Combined ventricular output, regional organ blood flow, vascular resistance, metabolism, and catecholamine concentrations were measured before and during an infusion of insulin and during continued infusion with alpha-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine) in eight chronically catheterized fetal sheep. Fetal insulin infusion produced hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemia, a surge in epinephrine and norepinephrine concentration, and increases in the combined ventricular output (blood flow to the fetus plus placenta) and regional blood flow to the fetus, heart, stomach, gastrointestinal tract, fat, and carcass. In the hyperinsulinemic state, alpha-adrenergic blockade was associated with additional increases in fetal norepinephrine concentration and no major changes in combined ventricular output or blood flow to the body of the fetus, except for decreased blood flow to the stomach and lungs, and a decrease in stroke volume. Because vasodilation characterizes the hyperinsulinemic state, alpha-adrenergic stimulation contributes less to compensatory cardiovascular changes in the hyperinsulinemic fetus than that which we previously have shown for beta-adrenergic stimulation.

  3. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

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    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, whereas (/sup 3/H)clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H)yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of (/sup 3/H)clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations.

  4. Reversible exacerbation of obstructive sleep apnea by α1-adrenergic blockade with tamsulosin: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repeated involuntary closure of the pharyngeal airspace during sleep. Normal activity of the genioglossus (GG) muscle is important in maintaining airway patency, and inhibition of GG activity can contribute to airway closure. Neurons in the hypoglossal motor nucleus (HMN) regulate GG activity. Adrenergic tone is an important regulator of HMN neuronal excitability. In laboratory models α 1 -adrenergic antagonists inhibit HMN neurons and GG activity, suggesting that α 1 -adrenergic antagonism might adversely affect patients with OSA. To date there has been no report of such a case. The patient was a 67-year old man with a 27-month history of obstructive sleep apnea. Diagnostic polysomnography demonstrated a baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 21.3 and a trough oxygen saturation of 84%. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was initiated. The AHI in year 1 averaged 1.0 ± 0.1 (mean ± SD) and 0.8 ± 0.1 in year 2. Other medical conditions included hypertension controlled with losartan and benign prostatic hypertrophy not well controlled by finasteride monotherapy. The α 1 -adrenergic receptor antagonist tamsulosin 0.4 mg daily was added. Shortly after initiation of tamsulosin, subjective sleep quality deteriorated. Significant surges in obstructive events, apneic episodes, and AHI were also recorded, and nocturnal airway pressure was frequently sustained at the CPAP device maximum of 20 cm H 2 O. Tamsulosin was discontinued. CPAP parameters and sleep quality returned to the pre-tamsulosin baselines within 10 days. These findings suggest that α 1 -adrenergic blockade with tamsulosin may exacerbate sleep-disordered breathing in susceptible patients.

  5. The effect of beta-adrenergic blockade after encoding on memory of an emotional event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stegeren, Anda H; Everaerd, Walter; Gooren, Louis J G

    2002-09-01

    Animal and human studies lend support to the hypothesis that enhanced memory associated with emotional experiences involves activation of the beta-adrenergic system. Evidence for the role of noradrenaline in emotional memory in humans has been gathered from experimental studies where blockade of the beta-adrenergic system with a beta-blocker selectively impaired long-term memory for an emotionally arousing story (a slide show), when the beta-blocker was given before subjects were confronted with the emotional stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test whether effective beta-adrenergic blockade occurring only after the stage of encoding has a similar impairing effect on memory. In a double blind experimental design, 60 healthy adult subjects received randomly one tablet of either propranolol (Inderal, 40 mg) or placebo. Drugs were administered just before the slide show begun and (in view of its pharmacokinetics) propranolol reaches peak levels 1 h after drug intake. Physiological arousal was monitored by heart rate and blood pressure. Half of the beta-blocker and placebo groups watched either a neutral or an arousal version of an 11-slide presentation. Memory performance was tested with a surprise free recall and recognition test 1 week later. Memory performance, specifically for the second phase in which emotional elements were introduced, was better in subjects who viewed the arousal version than subjects who saw the neutral version of the slide show. However, no effect of the beta-blocker condition was found. This experiment does not support a role for noradrenaline in the post-encoding phase and on the later processes of consolidation and retrieval. Although it remains possible that with a different dosage or timing protocol a post-treatment effect of noradrenaline in humans can be found, this experiment could not find support for it.

  6. alpha-adrenergic Blockade Unmasks a Greater Compensatory Vasodilation in Hypoperfused Contracting Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren P. Casey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that acute hypoperfusion in exercising human muscle causes an immediate increase in vascular resistance that is followed by a partial restoration (less than 100% recovery of flow. In the current study we examined the contribution of alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the initial changes in vascular resistance at the onset of hypoperfusion as well as in the recovery of flow over time. Nine healthy male subjects (29 ± 2 performed rhythmic forearm exercise (20% of maximum during hypoperfusion evoked by intra-arterial balloon inflation. Each trial included; baseline, exercise prior to inflation, exercise with inflation, and exercise after deflation (3 min each. Forearm blood flow (FBF; ultrasound, local (brachial artery, and systemic arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer were measured. The trial was repeated during phentolamine infusion (alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml min-1 100 mmHg-1 and resistance (mmHg ml min-1 was calculated from BF (ml min-1 and local MAP (mmHg. Recovery of FBF and FVC (steady state inflation plus exercise value – nadir/ [steady state exercise (control value-nadir] with phentolamine was enhanced compared with the respective control (no drug trial (FBF = 97 ± 5% vs. 81 ± 6%, P < 0.05; FVC = 126 ± 9% vs. 91 ± 5%, P < 0.01. However, the absolute (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.06 ± 0.01 mmHg ml min-1; P = 0.17 and relative (35 ± 5% vs. 31 ± 2%; P = 0.41 increase in vascular resistance at the onset of balloon inflation was not different between the alpha-adrenergic receptor inhibition and control (no drug trials. Therefore, our data indicate that alpha-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction restricts compensatory vasodilation during forearm exercise with hypoperfusion, but is not responsible for the initial increase in vascular resistance at the onset of hypoperfusion.

  7. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on lactate turnover in exercising dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issekutz, B

    1984-12-01

    Dogs with indwelling catheters in the jugular vein and in the carotid artery ran on the treadmill (slope: 15%, speed: 133 m/min). Lactate turnover and glucose turnover were measured using [U-14C]lactate and [3-3H]glucose as tracers, according to the primed constant-rate infusion method. In addition, the participation of plasma glucose in lactate production (Ra-L) was measured with [U-14C]glucose. Propranolol was given either (A) before exercise (250 micrograms/kg, iv) or (B) in form of a primed infusion administered to the dog running at a steady rate. Measurements of plasma propranolol concentration showed that in type A experiments plasma propranolol fell in 45 min below the lower limit of the complete beta-blockade. In the first 15 min of work Ra-L rose rapidly; then it fell below that of the control (exercise) values. During steady exercise, the elevated Ra-L was decreased by propranolol infusion close to resting values. beta-Blockade doubled the response of glucose production, utilization, and metabolic clearance rate to exercise. In exercising dogs approximately 40-50% of Ra-L arises from plasma glucose. This value was increased by the blockade to 85-90%. It is concluded that glycogenolysis in the working muscle has a dual control: 1) an intracellular control operating at the beginning of exercise, and 2) a hormonal control involving epinephrine and the beta-adrenergic receptors.

  8. Glucose uptake during centrally induced stress is insulin independent and enhanced by adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekas, M C; Fisher, S J; El-Bahrani, B; van Delangeryt, M; Vranic, M; Shi, Z Q

    1999-08-01

    Glucose utilization increases markedly in the normal dog during stress induced by the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of carbachol. To determine the extent to which insulin, glucagon, and selective (alpha/beta)-adrenergic activation mediate the increment in glucose metabolic clearance rate (MCR) and glucose production (R(a)), we used five groups of normal mongrel dogs: 1) pancreatic clamp (PC; n = 7) with peripheral somatostatin (0.8 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and intraportal replacement of insulin (1,482 +/- 84 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and glucagon (0.65 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1)) infusions; 2) PC plus combined alpha (phentolamine)- and beta (propranolol)-blockade (7 and 5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1), respectively; alpha+beta; n = 5); 3) PC plus alpha-blockade (alpha; n = 6); 4) PC plus beta-blockade (beta; n = 5); and 5) a carbachol control group without PC (Con; n = 10). During ICV carbachol stress (0-120 min), catecholamines, ACTH, and cortisol increased in all groups. Baseline insulin and glucagon levels were maintained in all groups except Con, where glucagon rose 33%, and alpha, where insulin increased slightly but significantly. Stress increased (P glycogenolysis, and that R(a) is augmented by glucagon and alpha- and beta-catecholamine effects.

  9. Women at Altitude: Effects of Menstrual Cycle Phase and Alpha-Adrenergic Blockade on High Altitude Acclimatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    and venous tone. Alpha 1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin attenuated the rise in SNS activity at 4,300 m and prevented the increase in PNS activity in...Physiol 1991;70(3):1129-36. 4. Zamudio S., S.K. Palmer, T.E. Dahms, et al. Blood volume expansion, preeclampsia , and infant birth weight at high altitude

  10. Portal adrenergic blockade does not inhibit the gluconeogenic effects of circulating catecholamines on the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C A; Sindelar, D K; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1997-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the impact of portal adrenergic blockade on the gluconeogenic effects of epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE). Experiments were performed on 18-hour fasted conscious dogs and consisted of a 100-minute equilibration, a 40-minute basal, and two 90-minute test periods. A pancreatic clamp was used to fix insulin and glucagon levels at basal values. Propranolol (1 microgram/kg.min) and phentolamine (2 micrograms/kg.min) were infused intraportally during both test periods. Portal infusion of alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockers alone (first test period) slightly increased hepatic glucose production from 2.4 +/- 0.4 to 2.8 +/- 0.5 mg/kg.min (nonsignificant [NS]) NE (500 ng/kg.min) and EPI (180 ng/kg.min) were infused peripherally during the second test period. Arterial NE and EPI increased from 186 +/- 63 to 6,725 +/- 913 pg/mL and 76 +/- 25 to 2,674 +/- 344 pg/mL, respectively. Portal NE and EPI increased from 135 +/- 32 to 4,082 +/- 747 pg/mL and 28 +/- 8 to 1,114 +/- 174 pg/mL, respectively. Hepatic glucose production, the maximal gluconeogenic rate, and gluconeogenic efficiency increased from 2.8 +/- 0.5 to 3.8 +/- 0.4 mg/kg.min (P glycogenolysis did not increase during catecholamine infusion. In conclusion, portal delivery of adrenergic blockers selectively inhibits the glycogenolytic effects of EPI and NE on the liver, but allows a marked gluconeogenic response to the catecholamines.

  11. THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE AND CHRONIC STRESS ON ERYTHROCYTE DYNAMIC IN COMBINATION WITH ß–ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS BLOCKADE IN RATS

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    Lucian Hritcu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available : 3 consecutive days propranolol hydrochloride administration (5 mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injections under acute and chronic stress conditions causes changes of peripheral erythrocyte distribution in rats. The effects of acute stress and its combination with ȕ-adrenergic receptor blockade on erythrocyte dynamic were more pregnant beside the effects of chronic stress and its combination with ȕ-adrenergic receptor blockade, respectively. ȕ-adrenergic mechanisms were shown to be involved in regulation of erythrocyte dynamic in acute and chronic stress response.

  12. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sather, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia.

  13. Cardiovascular response to beta-adrenergic blockade or activation in 23 inbred mouse strains.

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    Corinne Berthonneche

    Full Text Available We report the characterisation of 27 cardiovascular-related traits in 23 inbred mouse strains. Mice were phenotyped either in response to chronic administration of a single dose of the beta-adrenergic receptor blocker atenolol or under a low and a high dose of the beta-agonist isoproterenol and compared to baseline condition. The robustness of our data is supported by high trait heritabilities (typically H(2>0.7 and significant correlations of trait values measured in baseline condition with independent multistrain datasets of the Mouse Phenome Database. We then focused on the drug-, dose-, and strain-specific responses to beta-stimulation and beta-blockade of a selection of traits including heart rate, systolic blood pressure, cardiac weight indices, ECG parameters and body weight. Because of the wealth of data accumulated, we applied integrative analyses such as comprehensive bi-clustering to investigate the structure of the response across the different phenotypes, strains and experimental conditions. Information extracted from these analyses is discussed in terms of novelty and biological implications. For example, we observe that traits related to ventricular weight in most strains respond only to the high dose of isoproterenol, while heart rate and atrial weight are already affected by the low dose. Finally, we observe little concordance between strain similarity based on the phenotypes and genotypic relatedness computed from genomic SNP profiles. This indicates that cardiovascular phenotypes are unlikely to segregate according to global phylogeny, but rather be governed by smaller, local differences in the genetic architecture of the various strains.

  14. Disposal of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF99-126) in patients with cirrhosis: effect of beta-adrenergic blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, F; Gerbes, A L; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1993-01-01

    was similar to that of controls (9.4 vs. 10.9 pmol l-1, NS) and was positively correlated to cardiac output (r = 0.49, p 17), hepato-enteric (n = 16), and splanchnic superior...... changes in ANF extraction and a small decrease in azygos and hepato-enteric clearance occurred during beta-adrenergic blockade. Our results show a substantial extraction of ANF in the kidney, in the splanchnic bed drained through superior portosystemic collaterals, and in the hepato-enteric bed. Only...

  15. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on elevated arterial compliance and low systemic vascular resistance in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2001-01-01

    ) of 17.8 mmHg, and responded to beta-blocker treatment with a significant reduction in the HVPG (-16%; P beta-adrenergic blockade (1.27 versus 1.29 ml/mmHg, +2%, ns), whereas...... with beta-blockers, but the effect of this treatment on arterial compliance has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the effects of propranolol on the arterial compliance of patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: Twenty patients with cirrhosis underwent a haemodynamic...... with beta-blockers increases small vessel (arteriolar) vascular tone towards the normal level, but does not affect the elevated compliance of the larger arteries in patients with cirrhosis....

  16. Effect of {beta}{sub 1} adrenergic receptor blockade on myocardial blood flow and vasodilatory capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, M.; Czernin, J.; Sun, K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade reduces cardiac work and may thereby lower myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest. The effect of {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on hyperemic MBF is unknown. To evaluate the effect of selective {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on MBF at rest and during dipyridamole induced hyperemia, 10 healthy volunteers (8 men, 2 women, mean age 24 {+-} 5 yr) were studied using {sup 13}N-ammonia PET (two-compartment model) under control conditions and again during metoprolol (50 mg orally 12 hr and 1 hr before the study). The resting rate pressure product (6628 {+-} 504 versus 5225 {+-} 807) and heart rate (63 {+-} 6-54 {plus_minus} 5 bpm) declined during metoprolol (p < 0.05). Similarly, heart rate and rate pressure product declined from the baseline dipyridamole study to dipyridamole plus metoprolol (p < 0.05). Resting MBF declined in proportion to cardiac work by approximately 20% from 0.61 {+-} 0.09-0.51 {+-} 0.10 ml/g/min (p < 0.05). In contrast, hyperemic MBF increased when metoprolol was added to dipyridamole (1.86 {plus_minus} 0.27 {+-} 0.45 ml/g/min; p<0.05). The decrease in resting MBF together with the increase in hyperemic MBF resulted in a significant increase in the myocardial flow reserve during metoprolol (3.14 {+-} 0.80-4.61 {+-} 0.68; p<0.01). The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade increases coronary vasodilatory capacity and myocardial flow reserve. However, the mechanisms accounting for this finding remain uncertain. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Metabolic consequences of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade for the acutely ischemic dog myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westera, G.; Hollander, W. den; Wall, E.E. van der; Eenige, M.J. van; Scholtalbers, S.; Visser, F.C.; Roos, J.P.

    1984-02-01

    In an experimental study in 50 dogs the myocardial uptake of free fatty acids (FFAs) after beta-blockade was determined using radioiodinated heptadecanoic acid as a metabolic tracer. All 4 beta-blockers used (metoprolol, timolol, propranolol and pindolol) lowered the uptake of FFAs in the normal canine heart. Uptake of FFAs was also diminished after coronary artery occlusion per se, but administration of beta-blockers exerted little additional influence on the uptake of FFAs. This observation was qualitatively parallelled by the uptake of /sup 201/Tl in concomitant experiments. Plasma FFA levels were increased by pindolol (non-selective with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity), not changed by metoprolol (a cardioselective betablocking agent) and lowered by timolol and propranolol (both non-selective compounds). The extent of ischemic tissue, as reflected by uptake of iodoheptadecanoic acid and /sup 201/Tl, was diminished by metoprolol but not by other beta-blockers. Regional distribution of both tracers, as shown in the endo-epicardial uptake ratios, was hardly influenced by beta-blockade, except for a small increase of /sup 201/Tl uptake in non-occluded endocardium. Uptake of /sup 201/Tl as well as of iodoheptadecanoic acid in the ischemic area was increased by metoprolol, timolol and propranolol and decreased by pindolol. We conclude that beta-blocking agents confer different effects on myocardial uptake and metabolism of FFAs which might possibly be related to their different inherent properties.

  18. The effect of α1 -adrenergic blockade on post-exercise brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Hansen, Alex B; Howe, Connor A; Willie, Chris K; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J; Hoiland, Ryan L; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α 1 -adrenergic blockade. Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise. At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α 1 -adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and administration of α 1 -adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow-mediated dilatation. Our data indicate that post-exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high-altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate-intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α 1 -adrenergic pathway. In a double-blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo-controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal-exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi-recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α 1 -adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg  -1 ). These experiments were completed at both sea-level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography

  19. The effect of α1‐adrenergic blockade on post‐exercise brachial artery flow‐mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Joshua C.; Hansen, Alex B.; Howe, Connor A.; Willie, Chris K.; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J.; Hoiland, Ryan L.; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow‐mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate‐intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α1‐adrenergic blockade.Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise.At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate‐intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α1‐adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate‐intensity exercise, and administration of α1‐adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow‐mediated dilatation.Our data indicate that post‐exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high‐altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. Abstract We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate‐intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α1‐adrenergic pathway. In a double‐blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo‐controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal‐exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi‐recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α1‐adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg −1). These experiments were completed at both sea‐level (344 m) and high altitude (3800

  20. Maintained cerebral metabolic ratio during exercise in patients with beta-adrenergic blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gam, Christiane M B; Rasmussen, Peter; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decreased cerebral metabolic ratio (CMR) [molar uptake of O(2) versus molar uptake of (glucose + (1/2) lactate)] during exercise is attenuated by intravenous administration of the non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol. We evaluated to what extent cirrhotic...... patients in oral treatment with propranolol are able to mobilize brain non-oxidative carbohydrate metabolism. METHODS: Incremental cycle ergometry to exhaustion (86 +/- 4.2 W; mean +/- SD) was performed in eight cirrhotic patients instrumented with a catheter in the brachial artery and one retrograde...... and during exercise, respectively. During exercise the glucose a-v diff of 0.46 +/- 0.06 mM remained at a level similar to rest (0.54 +/- 0.03 mM) and at exhaustion the CMR was not significantly changed (5.8 +/- 1.1 versus 6.0 +/- 0.6). In controls, CMR decreased from 5.6 +/- 0.9 at rest to 3.4 +/- 0.7 (P

  1. Effects of local alpha2-adrenergic receptor blockade on adipose tissue lipolysis during prolonged systemic adrenaline infusion in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lene; Enevoldsen, Lotte H; Stallknecht, Bente

    2008-01-01

    During prolonged adrenaline infusion, lipolysis peaks within 30 min and thereafter tends to decline, and we hypothesized that the stimulation of local adipose tissue alpha2-adrenergic receptors accounts for this decline. The lipolytic effect of a prolonged intravenous adrenaline infusion combined....... Regional adipose tissue blood flow was measured by the (133)Xe clearance technique. Regional glycerol output (lipolytic rate) was calculated from these measurements and simultaneous measurements of arterial glycerol concentrations. Adrenaline infusion increased lipolysis in all three depots (data...... circulating adrenaline concentrations, and the decrease in lipolysis in subcutaneous adipose tissue under prolonged adrenaline stimulation is thus not attributed to alpha2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of lipolysis. However, in the preperitoneal adipose tissue depot, alpha2-adrenergic receptor tone plays...

  2. Dwarfism and insulin resistance in male offspring caused by α1-adrenergic antagonism during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Oelkrug

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that maternal α1-adrenergic blockade can constitute an epigenetic cause for dwarfism and insulin resistance. The findings are of immediate clinical relevance as combined α/β-adrenergic blockers are first-line treatment of maternal hypertension.

  3. Human adipose tissue blood flow during prolonged exercise, III. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade, nicotinic acid and glucose infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J

    1981-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured in six male subjects by the 133Xe-washout technique during 3-4 h of exercise at a work load corresponding to an oxygen uptake of about 1.71/min. The measurements were done during control conditions, during blockade of lipolysis by nicotinic...... with the hypothesis that adipose tissue vasodilation during exercise is secondary to metabolic events connected to lipolysis....

  4. Human adipose tissue blood flow during prolonged exercise, III. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade, nicotinic acid and glucose infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J

    1981-01-01

    of work. No increase in lipolysis and no increase in ATBF were found when lipolysis was blocked by nicotinic acid (0.3 g/h). Propranolol treatment (0.15 mg/kg) reduced lipolysis and nearly abolished the increase in ATBF during exercise. Intravenous administration of glucose (about 0.25 g/min) did......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured in six male subjects by the 133Xe-washout technique during 3-4 h of exercise at a work load corresponding to an oxygen uptake of about 1.71/min. The measurements were done during control conditions, during blockade of lipolysis by nicotinic...

  5. The roles of beta-adrenergic receptors in tumorigenesis and the possible use of beta-adrenergic blockers for cancer treatment: possible genetic and cell-signaling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luong KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Khanh vinh quốc Lương, Lan Thi Hoàng NguyễnVietnamese American Medical Research Foundation, Westminster, California, USAAbstract: Cancer is the leading cause of death in the USA, and the incidence of cancer increases dramatically with age. Beta-adrenergic blockers appear to have a beneficial clinical effect in cancer patients. In this paper, we review the evidence of an association between β-adrenergic blockade and cancer. Genetic studies have provided the opportunity to determine which proteins link β-adrenergic blockade to cancer pathology. In particular, this link involves the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the renin–angiotensin system, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Beta-adrenergic blockers also exert anticancer effects through non-genomic factors, including matrix metalloproteinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide synthase. In conclusion, β-adrenergic blockade may play a beneficial role in cancer treatment. Additional investigations that examine β-adrenergic blockers as cancer therapeutics are required to further elucidate this role.Keywords: β-adrenergic blocker, neoplasm, β-adrenergic antagonism, non-genomic factor

  6. Alpha adrenergic receptor blockade increases capillarisation and fractional O2 extraction and lowers blood flow in contracting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Egginton, Stuart; Madsen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that daily treatment with an α-adrenergic receptor blocker induces capillary growth in human skeletal muscle, likely due to increased shear stress. The increase in capillarisation resulted in an increased fractional O2 extraction, a lower blood flow and venous lactate......AIM: To investigate the effect of elevated basal shear stress on angiogenesis in humans, and the role of enhanced skeletal muscle capillarisation on blood flow and O2 extraction. METHODS: Limb haemodynamics and O2 extraction was measured at rest and during one-leg knee-extensor exercise (12 and 24W......) in 10 healthy untrained young men before and after 4 weeks treatment with an α1 receptor-antagonist (Terazosin, 1-2 mg day(-1) ). Corresponding biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis. RESULTS: Resting leg blood flow was increased by 57% 6 hours following Terazosin treatment (P

  7. Effects of long-term adrenergic beta-blockade on left ventricular diastolic filling in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S H; Jensen, S E; Egstrup, K

    1999-01-01

    have same beneficial effects in MI. beta-Adrenergic blocking agents are widely used in MI; however only few reports on changes of LV systolic and diastolic function during long-term treatment after acute MI are available. METHODS: Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography were used to evaluate LV....... RESULTS: Mitral E-wave deceleration time was prolonged in the metoprolol group (baseline vs 12 months: 167 +/- 51 ms to 218 +/- 36 ms; P =. 01) versus the placebo group (baseline vs 12 months: placebo 174 +/- 46 ms to 189 +/- 41 ms), which implies a less restrictive filling of the LV in the metoprolol...... Doppler measurements occurred by 3 months of follow-up, whereas a significant increase in LV ejection fraction was noted after 12 months treatment with metoprolol. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term treatment with the beta-blocking agent metoprolol seems to improve LV diastolic filling after acute MI. Less...

  8. Smoking-associated lung cancer prevention by blockade of the beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated insulin-like growth factor receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hye-Young; Boo, Hye-Jin; Lee, Ho Jin; Jang, Hyun-Ji; Yun, Hye Jeong; Hwang, Su Jung; Smith, John Kendal; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-10-25

    Activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is associated with carcinogenesis, but its contribution to smoking-associated lung carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Here we show that a tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) activation via β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) is crucial for smoking-associated lung carcinogenesis. Treatment with NNK stimulated the IGF-1R signaling pathway in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was suppressed by pharmacological or genomic blockade of β-AR and the downstream signaling including a Gβγ subunit of β-AR and phospholipase C (PLC). Consistently, β-AR agonists led to increased IGF-1R phosphorylation. The increase in IGF2 transcription via β-AR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) was associated with NNK-induced IGF-1R activation. Finally, treatment with β-AR antagonists suppressed the acquisition of transformed phenotypes in lung epithelial cells and lung tumor formation in mice. These results suggest that blocking β-AR-mediated IGF-1R activation can be an effective strategy for lung cancer prevention in smokers.

  9. Regulation of glucose turnover during exercise in pancreatectomized, totally insulin-deficient dogs. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, O; Miles, P; Wasserman, D; Lickley, L; Vranic, M

    1988-01-01

    To examine whether glucose metabolic clearance increases and whether catecholamines influence glucose turnover during exercise in total insulin deficiency, 24-h fasted and insulin-deprived pancreatectomized dogs were studied before and during exercise (60 min; 100 m/min; 10% slope) with (n = 8) and without (n = 8) propranolol infusion (PI, 5 micrograms/kg-min). Exercise with or without PI was accompanied by four and fivefold increments in norepinephrine and epinephrine respectively, while glucagon (extrapancreatic) fell slightly. Basal plasma glucose and FFA concentrations and rates of tracer-determined (3[3H]glucose) hepatic glucose production (Ra) and total glucose clearance (including urinary glucose loss) were 459 +/- 24 mg/dl, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mmol/liter, 7.8 +/- 0.9 mg/kg-min and 1.6 +/- 0.1 ml/kg-min, respectively. When corrected for urinary glucose excretion, basal glucose metabolic clearance rate (MCR) was 0.7 +/- 0.1 mg/kg-min and rose twofold (P less than 0.0001) during exercise. Despite lower lactate (3.3 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.6 +/- 1.3 mmol/liter; P less than 0.005) and FFA levels (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/liter; P less than 0.0001) with PI, PI failed to influence MCR during exercise. Ra rose by 3.7 +/- 1.7 mg/kg-min during exercise (P less than 0.02) while with PI the increase was only 1.9 +/- 0.7 mg/kg-min (P less than 0.002). Glucose levels remained unchanged during exercise alone but fell slightly with PI (P less than 0.0001). Therefore, in total insulin deficiency, MCR increases marginally with exercise (13% of normal); the beta adrenergic effects of catecholamines that stimulate both FFA mobilization and muscle glycogenolysis do not regulate muscle glucose uptake. The exercise-induced rise in hepatic glucose production does not require an increase in glucagon levels, but is mediated partially by catecholamines. Present and previous data in normal and alloxan-diabetic dogs, suggest that (a) in total insulin deficiency, control of hepatic glucose

  10. Regulation of glucose turnover during exercise in pancreatectomized, totally insulin-deficient dogs. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, O; Miles, P; Wasserman, D; Lickley, L; Vranic, M

    1988-06-01

    To examine whether glucose metabolic clearance increases and whether catecholamines influence glucose turnover during exercise in total insulin deficiency, 24-h fasted and insulin-deprived pancreatectomized dogs were studied before and during exercise (60 min; 100 m/min; 10% slope) with (n = 8) and without (n = 8) propranolol infusion (PI, 5 micrograms/kg-min). Exercise with or without PI was accompanied by four and fivefold increments in norepinephrine and epinephrine respectively, while glucagon (extrapancreatic) fell slightly. Basal plasma glucose and FFA concentrations and rates of tracer-determined (3[3H]glucose) hepatic glucose production (Ra) and total glucose clearance (including urinary glucose loss) were 459 +/- 24 mg/dl, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mmol/liter, 7.8 +/- 0.9 mg/kg-min and 1.6 +/- 0.1 ml/kg-min, respectively. When corrected for urinary glucose excretion, basal glucose metabolic clearance rate (MCR) was 0.7 +/- 0.1 mg/kg-min and rose twofold (P less than 0.0001) during exercise. Despite lower lactate (3.3 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.6 +/- 1.3 mmol/liter; P less than 0.005) and FFA levels (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/liter; P less than 0.0001) with PI, PI failed to influence MCR during exercise. Ra rose by 3.7 +/- 1.7 mg/kg-min during exercise (P less than 0.02) while with PI the increase was only 1.9 +/- 0.7 mg/kg-min (P less than 0.002). Glucose levels remained unchanged during exercise alone but fell slightly with PI (P less than 0.0001). Therefore, in total insulin deficiency, MCR increases marginally with exercise (13% of normal); the beta adrenergic effects of catecholamines that stimulate both FFA mobilization and muscle glycogenolysis do not regulate muscle glucose uptake. The exercise-induced rise in hepatic glucose production does not require an increase in glucagon levels, but is mediated partially by catecholamines. Present and previous data in normal and alloxan-diabetic dogs, suggest that (a) in total insulin deficiency, control of hepatic glucose

  11. The effect of neuromuscular blockade on canine laparoscopic ovariectomy: A double-blinded, prospective clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, B.; van Nimwegen, S.A.; Akkerdaas, L.C.; Murrell, J.C.; Kirpensteijn, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Effect of Neuromuscular Blockade on Canine Laparoscopic Ovariectomy: A Double-Blinded, Prospective Clinical Trial Bart Van Goethem, Diplomate ECVS, Sebastiaan Alexander van Nimwegen, PhD, Ies Akkerdaas, DVM, Joanna Claire Murrell, BVSc., PhD, Diplomate ECVAA, and Jolle Kirpensteijn, PhD,

  12. Acute non-selective beta-adrenergic blockade reduces prolonged frequency-adjusted Q-T interval (QTc) in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Bendtsen, Flemming; Hansen, Erik Feldager

    2004-01-01

    received 80 mg propranolol orally during a haemodynamic investigation with measurements at baseline and 90 min after propranolol ingestion. RESULTS: Beta-blockade reduced cardiac output (-21%, P17%, P...BACKGROUND/AIMS: Earlier studies have shown a prolonged frequency-adjusted Q-T interval (QTc>0.440 s(1/2)) in a substantial fraction of patients with cirrhosis. The effect of beta-blockade on QTc is unknown, and its determination was the aim of the study. METHODS: Seventeen patients with cirrhosis......=0.460 s(1/2) was prolonged compared to 0.410 s(1/2) in age-matched controls (Pbeta-blockade in the cirrhotic patients (from 0.460 to 0.440 s(1/2), P

  13. Acute non-selective beta-adrenergic blockade reduces prolonged frequency-adjusted Q-T interval (QTc) in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Bendtsen, Flemming; Hansen, Erik Feldager

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Earlier studies have shown a prolonged frequency-adjusted Q-T interval (QTc>0.440 s(1/2)) in a substantial fraction of patients with cirrhosis. The effect of beta-blockade on QTc is unknown, and its determination was the aim of the study. METHODS: Seventeen patients with cirrhosis...... received 80 mg propranolol orally during a haemodynamic investigation with measurements at baseline and 90 min after propranolol ingestion. RESULTS: Beta-blockade reduced cardiac output (-21%, P...=0.460 s(1/2) was prolonged compared to 0.410 s(1/2) in age-matched controls (Pbeta-blockade in the cirrhotic patients (from 0.460 to 0.440 s(1/2), P2), ns), and a reduction was seen...

  14. Genetic basis for clinical response to CTLA-4 blockade in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Merghoub, Taha; Yuan, Jianda; Zaretsky, Jesse M; Desrichard, Alexis; Walsh, Logan A; Postow, Michael A; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S; Hollmann, Travis J; Bruggeman, Cameron; Kannan, Kasthuri; Li, Yanyun; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Liu, Cailian; Harbison, Christopher T; Wang, Lisu; Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D; Chan, Timothy A

    2014-12-04

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are effective cancer treatments, but molecular determinants of clinical benefit are unknown. Ipilimumab and tremelimumab are antibodies against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Anti-CTLA-4 treatment prolongs overall survival in patients with melanoma. CTLA-4 blockade activates T cells and enables them to destroy tumor cells. We obtained tumor tissue from patients with melanoma who were treated with ipilimumab or tremelimumab. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on tumors and matched blood samples. Somatic mutations and candidate neoantigens generated from these mutations were characterized. Neoantigen peptides were tested for the ability to activate lymphocytes from ipilimumab-treated patients. Malignant melanoma exomes from 64 patients treated with CTLA-4 blockade were characterized with the use of massively parallel sequencing. A discovery set consisted of 11 patients who derived a long-term clinical benefit and 14 patients who derived a minimal benefit or no benefit. Mutational load was associated with the degree of clinical benefit (P=0.01) but alone was not sufficient to predict benefit. Using genomewide somatic neoepitope analysis and patient-specific HLA typing, we identified candidate tumor neoantigens for each patient. We elucidated a neoantigen landscape that is specifically present in tumors with a strong response to CTLA-4 blockade. We validated this signature in a second set of 39 patients with melanoma who were treated with anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Predicted neoantigens activated T cells from the patients treated with ipilimumab. These findings define a genetic basis for benefit from CTLA-4 blockade in melanoma and provide a rationale for examining exomes of patients for whom anti-CTLA-4 agents are being considered. (Funded by the Frederick Adler Fund and others.).

  15. Bill restricts abortion blockades. Clinic violence is target of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-17

    On November 16, 1993, the US Senate voted approval, by 69 to 30 members, to impose stiff penalties on those obstructing access to abortion clinics. The penalties include up to 1 year in jail and a $100,000 fine for first violent offenses. Obstruction without violence would lead to a fine of $10,000 and 6 months in jail. The legislation was deemed necessary after the murder of a doctor in Florida and the wounding of another doctor in Kansas. Democratic Senator Edward Kennedy said that those who do not obstruct access have nothing to fear. Support came not only from abortion rights advocates, but from those against lawlessness in the pro-life movement. Maryland's Democratic Senators Mikulski and Sarbanes and California's Democratic Senator Barbara Boxes supported the bill, as well as Attorney General Janet Reno and President Clinton. House Speaker Thomas S. Foley announced that the House would consider its version of the bill on November 18, 1993. The original version was changed to reduce fines for nonviolent offenders from $100,000 to $10,000. Opponents argued that the legislation treated peaceful protesters as felons, and was directed in a singular=sided way with no regard to civil disobedience by animal rights activists, antinuclear protesters, and AIDS activists. North Carolina Republican Senator Jesse Helms thought that the Supreme Court would find the bill unconstitutional. Other arguments were that civil disobedience should be allowed for anti-abortion protesters, as it was allowed for civil rights protesters such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Senator Kennedy pointed out the Dr. King was trying to secure a constitutional right, unlike anti-abortion protesters who were trying to deny a constitutional right.

  16. Transversus abdominis plane blockade in laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen Ridley; Draganic, Brian; Pockney, Peter; Holz, Phillip; Holmes, Ryan; Mcmanus, Brendan; Carroll, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    Adequate postoperative analgesia is essential for recovery following colorectal surgery. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been found to be beneficial in improving pain following a variety of abdominal operations. The objective of this study was to determine if TAP blocks are useful in improving postoperative recovery following laparoscopic colorectal surgery. A prospective double-blind randomized clinical trial, involving 226 consecutive patients having laparoscopic colorectal surgery, was performed by a university colorectal surgical department. Patients were randomized to either TAP blockade using ultrasound guidance, or control, with the primary outcome being postoperative pain, as measured by analgesic consumption. Secondary outcomes assessed were pain visual analogue score (VAS), respiratory function, time to return of gut function, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and patient satisfaction. A total of 142 patients were followed up to trial completion (74 controls, 68 interventions). Patients were well matched with regard to demographics. No complications occurred as a result of the intervention of TAP blockade. There was no difference between groups with regards to analgesic consumption (161 mEq morphine control vs 175 mEq morphine TAP; p = 0.596). There was no difference between the two groups with regards to the secondary outcomes of daily VAS, respiratory outcome, time to return of gut function, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and patient satisfaction. We conclude that TAP blockade appears to be a safe intervention but confers no specific advantage following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

  17. β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in aging heart and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola eFerrara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elderly healthy individuals have a reduced exercise tolerance and a decreased left ventricle inotropic reserve related to increased vascular afterload, arterial-ventricular load mismatching, physical deconditioning and impaired autonomic regulation (the so called β-adrenergic desensitization. Adrenergic responsiveness is altered with aging and the age-related changes are limited to the β-adrenergic receptor density reduction and to the β-adrenoceptor-G-protein(s-adenylyl cyclase system abnormalities, while the type and level of abnormalities change with species and tissues. Epidemiological studies have shown an high incidence and prevalence of heart failure in the elderly and a great body of evidence correlate the changes of β-adrenergic system with heart failure pathogenesis. In particular it is well known that: a levels of cathecolamines are directly correlated with mortality and functional status in heart failure, b β1-adrenergic receptor subtype is down-regulated in heart failure, c heart failure-dependent cardiac adrenergic responsiveness reduction is related to changes in G proteins activity. In this review we focus on the cardiovascular β-adrenergic changes involvement in the aging process and on similarities and differences between aging heart and heart failure.

  18. Beta-Adrenergic Blockade Decreases the Neuroimmune Changes in Mice Induced by Cohabitation with an Ehrlich Tumor-Bearing Cage Mate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margatho, Rafael O; Massoco, Cristina de O; Calefi, Atilio S; Cruz, Daniel S G; Sandini, Thaisa M; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Florio, Jorge C; Palermo-Neto, João

    2017-01-01

    Cohabitation with Ehrlich tumor-bearing (ETB) mice induced behavioral, neurochemical, hormonal, and immune effects in the conspecifics as a consequence of stress-induced activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) with catecholamine release. In the current study, the nonspecific β-AR blocker d,l-propranolol and the specific β2-AR blocker ICI-118.551 were employed as pharmacological tools to assess the extent to which catecholamines participated in the effects induced by cohabitation with ETB mice. Two experiments were performed, 1 with d,l-propranolol treatment and the other with ICI-118.551. One mouse in the experimental group was called the "companion of the sick partner" (CSP) since it was forced to live in the same cage with 2 (experiment 1) or 1 (experiment 2) cage mate that had been i.p. injected with 5 × 106 Ehrlich tumor cells. The d,l-propranolol treatment, but not the ICI-118.551 treatment, attenuated the effects of cohabitation with 2 ETB mice on both open-field behavior and the hypothalamic levels and turnover rate of norepinephrine. The 2 β-AR blockers were unable to change the serum corticosterone levels and adrenal weights of the CSP mice; however, these drugs abrogated the effects of cohabitation on neutrophil oxidative burst and phagocytosis. Finally, an increase in the 5-HT turnover rate was observed in the olfactory bulb of CSP mice compared to their respective controls, an effect that was not modified by β-AR blockade. These results confirm and strengthen our hypothesis that the SNS is involved in the effects induced by cohabitation with ETB mice and point towards β2-AR participation in the immune effects analyzed. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Beta Adrenergic Signaling: A Targetable Regulator of Angiosarcoma and Hemangiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin B. Dickerson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human angiosarcomas and canine hemangiosarcomas are highly aggressive cancers thought to arise from cells of vascular origin. The pathological features, morphological organization, and clinical behavior of canine hemangiosarcomas are virtually indistinct from those of human angiosarcomas. Overall survival with current standard-of-care approaches remains dismal for both humans and dogs, and each is likely to succumb to their disease within a short duration. While angiosarcomas in humans are extremely rare, limiting their study and treatment options, canine hemangiosarcomas occur frequently. Therefore, studies of these sarcomas in dogs can be used to advance treatment approaches for both patient groups. Emerging data suggest that angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas utilize beta adrenergic signaling to drive their progression by regulating the tumor cell niche and fine-tuning cellular responses within the tumor microenvironment. These discoveries indicate that inhibition of beta adrenergic signaling could serve as an Achilles heel for these tumors and emphasize the need to design therapeutic strategies that target tumor cell and stromal cell constituents. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries and present new hypotheses regarding the roles of beta adrenergic signaling in angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas. Because the use of beta adrenergic receptor antagonists is well established in human and veterinary medicine, beta blockade could provide an immediate adjunct therapy for treatment along with a tangible opportunity to improve upon the outcomes of both humans and dogs with these diseases.

  20. Beta Adrenergic Signaling: A Targetable Regulator of Angiosarcoma and Hemangiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B.; Bryan, Brad A.

    2015-01-01

    Human angiosarcomas and canine hemangiosarcomas are highly aggressive cancers thought to arise from cells of vascular origin. The pathological features, morphological organization, and clinical behavior of canine hemangiosarcomas are virtually indistinct from those of human angiosarcomas. Overall survival with current standard-of-care approaches remains dismal for both humans and dogs, and each is likely to succumb to their disease within a short duration. While angiosarcomas in humans are extremely rare, limiting their study and treatment options, canine hemangiosarcomas occur frequently. Therefore, studies of these sarcomas in dogs can be used to advance treatment approaches for both patient groups. Emerging data suggest that angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas utilize beta adrenergic signaling to drive their progression by regulating the tumor cell niche and fine-tuning cellular responses within the tumor microenvironment. These discoveries indicate that inhibition of beta adrenergic signaling could serve as an Achilles heel for these tumors and emphasize the need to design therapeutic strategies that target tumor cell and stromal cell constituents. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries and present new hypotheses regarding the roles of beta adrenergic signaling in angiosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas. Because the use of beta adrenergic receptor antagonists is well established in human and veterinary medicine, beta blockade could provide an immediate adjunct therapy for treatment along with a tangible opportunity to improve upon the outcomes of both humans and dogs with these diseases. PMID:29061946

  1. Beta adrenergic blockade reduces utilitarian judgement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Terbeck; Guy, Kahane; Sarah, McTavish; Julian, Savulescu; Neil, Levy; Miles, Hewstone; Cowen, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Noradrenergic pathways are involved in mediating the central and peripheral effects of physiological arousal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in moral decision-making. We studied the effects in healthy volunteers of propranolol (a noradrenergic beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) on moral judgement in a set of moral dilemmas pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Propranolol (40 mg orally) significantly reduced heart rate, but had no effect on self-reported mood. Importantly, propranolol made participants more likely to judge harmful actions as morally unacceptable, but only in dilemmas where harms were ‘up close and personal’. In addition, longer response times for such personal dilemmas were only found for the placebo group. Finally, judgments in personal dilemmas by the propranolol group were more decisive. These findings indicate that noradrenergic pathways play a role in responses to moral dilemmas, in line with recent work implicating emotion in moral decision-making. However, contrary to current theorising, these findings also suggest that aversion to harming is not driven by emotional arousal. Our findings are also of significant practical interest given that propranolol is a widely used drug in different settings, and is currently being considered as a potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder in military and rescue service personnel. PMID:23085134

  2. Differential effects of adrenergic antagonists (Carvedilol vs Metoprolol on parasympathetic and sympathetic activity: a comparison of clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Bloom

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN is recognized as a significant health risk, correlating with risk of heart disease, silent myocardial ischemia or sudden cardiac death. Beta-blockers are often prescribed to minimize risk. Objectives In this second of two articles, the effects on parasympathetic and sympathetic activity of the alpha/beta-adrenergic blocker, Carvedilol, are compared with those of the selective beta-adrenergic blocker, Metoprolol. Methods Retrospective, serial autonomic nervous system test data from 147 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients from eight ambulatory clinics were analyzed. Patients were grouped according to whether a beta-blocker was (1 introduced, (2 discontinued or (3 continued without adjustment. Group 3 served as the control. Results Introducing Carvedilol or Metoprolol decreased heart rate and blood pressure, and discontinuing them had the opposite effect. Parasympathetic activity increased with introducing Carvedilol. Sympathetic activity increased more after discontinuing Carvedilol, suggesting better sympathetic suppression. With ongoing treatment, resting parasympathetic activity decreased with Metoprolol but increased with Carvedilol. Conclusion Carvedilol has a more profound effect on sympathovagal balance than Metoprolol. While both suppress sympathetic activity, only Carvedilol increases parasympathetic activity. Increased parasympathetic activity may underlie the lower mortality risk with Carvedilol.

  3. Does renin-angiotensin system blockade have a role in preventing diabetic retinopathy? A clinical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjølie, A K; Dodson, P; Hobbs, F R R

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes management has increasingly focused on the prevention of macrovascular disease, in particular for type 2 diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy, one of the main microvascular complications of diabetes, is also an important public health problem. Much of the care invested in retinopathy relates...... the primary trial end-points were not met, there was a clear trend to less severe retinopathy with RAS blockade. A smaller trial, RASS, reported reduced retinopathy progression in type 1 diabetes from RAS blockade with both the ARB losartan and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril...

  4. [Residual neuromuscular blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Buder, T; Schmartz, D

    2017-06-01

    Even small degrees of residual neuromuscular blockade, i. e. a train-of-four (TOF) ratio >0.6, may lead to clinically relevant consequences for the patient. Especially upper airway integrity and the ability to swallow may still be markedly impaired. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that residual neuromuscular blockade may affect postoperative outcome of patients. The incidence of these small degrees of residual blockade is relatively high and may persist for more than 90 min after a single intubating dose of an intermediately acting neuromuscular blocking agent, such as rocuronium and atracurium. Both neuromuscular monitoring and pharmacological reversal are key elements for the prevention of postoperative residual blockade.

  5. Integrating Immune Checkpoint Blockade with Anti-Neo/Mutated Antigens Reactivity to Increase the Clinical Outcome of Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Parmiani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to immune checkpoints have entered the clinical arena and have been shown to provide a clinical benefit for metastatic melanoma and, possibly, for other tumors as well. In this review paper we summarize this therapeutic activity and underline the functional mechanisms that may be involved. Among them, we discuss the so far neglected role of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs deriving from tumor somatic mutations and summarize the results of recent trials showing the immunogenic strength of such TAAs which can be specifically targeted by T cells activated by immune checkpoint antibodies. Finally we discuss new immunotherapy approaches that involve the combination of self/shared- or neo-TAAs-based vaccines and immune checkpoint blockade antibodies, to increase the clinical response of metastatic melanoma patients.

  6. Glucagon and plasma catecholamines during beta-receptor blockade in exercising man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Holst, Janett; Christensen, N J

    1976-01-01

    Seven men ran at 60% of individual maximal oxygen uptake to exhaustion during beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol (P), during lipolytic blockade with nicotinic acid (N), or without drugs (C). The total work times (83 +/- 9 (P), 122 +/- 8 (N), 166 +/- 10 (C) min, mean and SE) differed...

  7. Glucagon and plasma catecholamines during beta-receptor blockade in exercising man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Holst, Janett; Christensen, N J

    1976-01-01

    Seven men ran at 60% of individual maximal oxygen uptake to exhaustion during beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol (P), during lipolytic blockade with nicotinic acid (N), or without drugs (C). The total work times (83 +/- 9 (P), 122 +/- 8 (N), 166 +/- 10 (C) min, mean and SE) differed signif...

  8. Early Aldosterone Blockade in Acute Myocardial Infarction: The ALBATROSS Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygui, Farzin; Cayla, Guillaume; Roule, Vincent; Roubille, François; Delarche, Nicolas; Silvain, Johanne; Van Belle, Eric; Belle, Loic; Galinier, Michel; Motreff, Pascal; Cornillet, Luc; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Furber, Alain; Goldstein, Patrick; Ecollan, Patrick; Legallois, Damien; Lebon, Alain; Rousseau, Hélène; Machecourt, Jacques; Zannad, Faiez; Vicaut, Eric; Montalescot, Gilles

    2016-04-26

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA) improve outcome in the setting of post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF). The study sought to assess the benefit of an early MRA regimen in acute MI irrespective of the presence of HF or left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We randomized 1,603 patients to receive an MRA regimen with a single intravenous bolus of potassium canrenoate (200 mg) followed by oral spironolactone (25 mg once daily) for 6 months in addition to standard therapy or standard therapy alone. The primary outcome of the study was the composite of death, resuscitated cardiac arrest, significant ventricular arrhythmia, indication for implantable defibrillator, or new or worsening HF at 6-month follow-up. Key secondary/safety outcomes included death and other individual components of the primary outcome and rates of hyperkalemia at 6 months. The primary outcome occurred in 95 (11.8%) and 98 (12.2%) patients in the treatment and control groups, respectively (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.28). Death occurred in 11 (1.4%) and 17 (2.1%) patients in the treatment and control groups, respectively (HR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.30 to 1.38). In a non-pre-specified exploratory analysis, the odds of death were reduced in the treatment group (3 [0.5%] vs. 15 [2.4%]; HR: 0.20; 95% CI: 0.06 to 0.70) in the subgroup of ST-segment elevation MI (n = 1,229), but not in non-ST-segment elevation MI (p for interaction = 0.01). Hyperkalemia >5.5 mmol/l(-1) occurred in 3% and 0.2% of patients in the treatment and standard therapy groups, respectively (p < 0.0001). The study failed to show the benefit of early MRA use in addition to standard therapy in patients admitted for MI. (Aldosterone Lethal effects Blockade in Acute myocardial infarction Treated with or without Reperfusion to improve Outcome and Survival at Six months follow-up; NCT01059136). Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Postoperative analgesia for hemorrhoidectomy with bilateral pudendal blockade on an ambulatory patient: a controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Reducing postoperative pain in hemorrhoidectomy is still a challenge. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted to compare bilateral pudendal blockade with peripheral nerve stimulator to relieve postoperative pain with the method commonly used. METHOD: 200 patients scheduled for hemorrhoidectomy were randomly divided into Control Group and Pudendal Group. Bilateral pudendal block was performed with levobupivacaine enantiomeric excess (S75:R25 after location with a peripheral nerve stimulator. The parameters evaluated were pain intensity, duration of analgesia, rescue analgesia, complications, patient satisfaction and pain at first defecation. Data were recorded at 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours after the surgery. RESULTS: Bilateral pudendal nerves with mean 23.4±4.4 hours provided better relief of postoperative pain (pJUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A dor pós-operatória em hemorroidectomia ainda é um problema desafiador. Este estudo prospectivo, aleatório, duplamente encoberto, foi realizado para comparar o bloqueio bilateral do pudendo com estimulador de nervos periféricos para alívio da dor pós-operatória ao método habitualmente utilizado. MÉTODO: 200 pacientes escalados para hemorroidectomia foram aleatoriamente separados em Grupo Controle e Grupo Pudendo. O bloqueio bilateral do Grupo Pudendo foi realizado com levobupivacaína em excesso enantiomérico (S75:R25 após localização com estimulador de nervo periférico. Os parâmetros avaliados foram: intensidade da dor, duração da analgesia, resgate de analgésico, complicações, satisfação dos pacientes e dor à primeira defecação. Os dados foram anotados as 6, 12, 18 e 24 horas após a cirurgia. RESULTADO: O bloqueio bilateral dos pudendos, com média de 23,4±4,4 horas proporcionou um melhor alívio da dor pós-operatória (p<0,001, reduzindo a necessidade de analgésicos e com analgesia residual maior de 24 horas em 41% dos pacientes

  10. Effect of Buprenorphine Weekly Depot (CAM2038) and Hydromorphone Blockade in Individuals With Opioid Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon L; Comer, Sandra D; Lofwall, Michelle R; Vince, Bradley; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Kelsh, Debra; Coe, Marion A; Jones, Jermaine D; Nuzzo, Paul A; Tiberg, Fredrik; Sheldon, Behshad; Kim, Sonnie

    2017-09-01

    Buprenorphine is an efficacious, widely used treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD). Daily oral transmucosal formulations can be associated with misuse, diversion, and nonadherence; these limitations may be obviated by a sustained release formulation. To evaluate the ability of a novel, weekly, subcutaneous buprenorphine depot formulation, CAM2038, to block euphorigenic opioid effects and suppress opioid withdrawal in non-treatment-seeking individuals with OUD. This multisite, double-blind, randomized within-patient study was conducted at 3 controlled inpatient research facilities. It involved 47 adults with DSM-V moderate-to-severe OUD. The study was conducted from October 12, 2015 (first patient enrolled), to April 21, 2016 (last patient visit). A total of five 3-day test sessions evaluated the response to hydromorphone (0, 6, and 18 mg intramuscular in random order; 1 dose/session/day). After the first 3-day session (ie, qualification phase), participants were randomized to either CAM2038 weekly at 24 mg (n = 22) or 32 mg (n = 25); the assigned CAM2038 dose was given twice, 1 week apart (day 0 and 7). Four sets of sessions were conducted after randomization (days 1-3, 4-6, 8-10, and 11-13). The primary end point was maximum rating on the visual analog scale for drug liking. Secondary end points included other visual analog scale (eg, high and desire to use), opioid withdrawal scales, and physiological and pharmacokinetic outcomes. A total of 46 of 47 randomized participants (mean [SD] age, 35.5 [9] years; 76% male [n = 35]) completed the study. Both weekly CAM2038 doses produced immediate and sustained blockade of hydromorphone effects (liking maximum effect, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.813; P withdrawal (Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.617; P opioid blockade and withdrawal suppression. The results support the use of this depot formulation for treatment initiation and stabilization of patients with OUD, with

  11. Combined AKT and MEK Pathway Blockade in Pre-Clinical Models of Enzalutamide-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toren, Paul; Kim, Soojin; Johnson, Fraser; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in patient outcomes using newer androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibitors, treatment resistance in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to remain a clinical problem. Co-targeting alternate resistance pathways are of significant interest to treat CRPC and delay the onset of resistance. Both the AKT and MEK signaling pathways become activated as prostate cancer develops resistance to AR-targeted therapies. This pre-clinical study explores co-targeting these pathways in AR-positive prostate cancer models. Using various in vitro models of prostate cancer disease states including androgen dependent (LNCaP), CRPC (V16D and 22RV1) and ENZ-resistant prostate cancer (MR49C and MR49F), we evaluate the relevance of targeting both AKT and MEK pathways. Our data reveal that AKT inhibition induces apoptosis and inhibits cell growth in PTEN null cell lines independently of their sensitivity to hormone therapy; however, AKT inhibition had no effect on the PTEN positive 22RV1 cell line. Interestingly, we found that MEK inhibition had greater effect on 22RV1 cells compared to LNCaP, V16D or ENZ-resistant cells MR49C and MR49F cells. In vitro, combination AKT and MEK blockade had evidence of synergy observed in some cell lines and assays, but this was not consistent across all results. In vivo, the combination of AKT and MEK inhibition resulted in more consistent tumor growth inhibition of MR49F xenografts and longer disease specific survival compared to AKT inhibitor monotherapy. As in our in vitro study, 22RV1 xenografts were more resistant to AKT inhibition while they were more sensitive to MEK inhibition. Our results suggest that targeting AKT and MEK in combination may be a valuable strategy in prostate cancer when both pathways are activated and further support the importance of characterizing the dominant oncogenic pathway in each patient's tumor in order to select optimal therapy.

  12. Effects of sodium restriction and hydrochlorothiazide on RAAS blockade efficacy in diabetic nephropathy : a randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakernaak, Arjan J.; Krikken, Jan A.; Binnenmars, S. Heleen; Visser, Folkert W.; Hemmelder, Marc H.; Woittiez, Arend-Jan; Groen, Henk; Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Navis, Gerjan

    Background Reduction of dietary sodium intake or diuretic treatment increases renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade efficacy in non-diabetic nephropathy. We aimed to investigate the effect of sodium restriction and the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide, separately and in combination, added

  13. Alpha and beta adrenergic effects on metabolism in contracting, perfused muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Galbo, H

    1982-01-01

    was obtained by epinephrine in a physiological concentration (2.4 X 10(-8) M) and alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade by 10(-5) M phentolamine and propranolol, respectively. Epinephrine enhanced net glycogenolysis during contractions most markedly in slow-twitch red fibers. In these fibers the effect...... was mediated by alpha- as well as by beta-adrenergic stimulation, the latter involving production of cAMP, phosphorylase activation and synthase inactivation. In contrast, in fast-twitch fibers only beta-adrenergic mechanisms were involved in the glycogenolytic effect of epinephrine. Moreover, inactivation...

  14. Clinical Usefulness of Chlormadinone Acetate as an Alternative Antiandrogen Therapy for Prostate Cancer Relapse after Combined Androgen Blockade Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    江原, 英俊; 加藤, 成一; 中根, 慶太; 加藤, 卓; 高田, 俊彦; 小島, 圭太郎; 亀井, 信吾; 萩原, 徳康; 柚原, 一哉; 高橋, 義人; 藤本, 佳則; 藤広, 茂; 蟹本, 雄右; 出口, 隆

    2009-01-01

    We prospectively studied the usefulness of chlormadinone acetate (CMA) as an alternative therapy for prostate cancer relapse after combined androgen blockade (CAB) therapy. Sixteen patients with relapsed prostate cancer after treatment with CAB, including surgical or medical castration and nonsteroidal antiandrogens, 80 mg bicalutamide daily or 375 mg flutamide daily, were enrolled. After discontinuing the antiandrogen for evaluating the patient for the antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome, we ad...

  15. CD28 family of receptors on T cells in chronic HBV infection: Expression characteristics, clinical significance and correlations with PD-1 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zong-Sheng; Hao, You-Hua; Zhang, E-Juan; Xu, Chun-Li; Zhou, Yun; Zheng, Xin; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the overall clinical expression characteristics of the cluster of differentiation (CD)28 family receptors [CD28, inducible T-cell co-stimulator, programmed cell death protein 1 (PD‑1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 and B‑ and T-lymphocyte attenuator] on T cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), analyze the correlations among these receptors and the clinical parameters, and to investigate the effects of PD‑1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles, T‑cell function and other biological effects. The expression characteristics of the CD28 family of receptors, the effects of PD‑1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles and the levels of interferon (IFN)‑γ were investigated in the T cells of patients with CHB. In addition, the transcription factor, T‑box 21 (T‑bet) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA‑3) mRNA expression levels were investigated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with CHB. The expression levels of the CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB demonstrated distinct characteristics , for example levels of PD‑1 and CTLA‑4 on CD4 T cells and ICOS, PD‑1, and BTLA on CD8 T cells were increased in cells from patients with CHB compared with those from the healthy individuals. A significant positive correlation was demonstrated among the serum HBV DNA titers and the levels of PD‑1 on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of PD‑1 corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. A significant positive correlation was observed between the serum HBV DNA titers and the expression levels of BTLA on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of BTLA corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. PD‑1 blockade altered the expression profiles of CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB, partly enhanced T cell function and increased the ratio of T‑bet/GATA‑3 mRNA in PBMCs. Thus, CD28 family receptors

  16. Targeting of Beta Adrenergic Receptors Results in Therapeutic Efficacy against Models of Hemangioendothelioma and Angiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Jessica M.; Amaya, Clarissa; Rains, Steven; Diaz, Dolores; Pham, Robert; Battiste, James; Modiano, Jaime F.; Kokta, Victor; Boucheron, Laura E.; Mitchell, Dianne C.; Bryan, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of the beta-adrenergic receptors has recently shown remarkable efficacy in the treatment of benign vascular tumors such as infantile hemangiomas. As infantile hemangiomas are reported to express high levels of beta adrenergic receptors, we examined the expression of these receptors on more aggressive vascular tumors such as hemangioendotheliomas and angiosarcomas, revealing beta 1, 2, and 3 receptors were indeed present and therefore aggressive vascular tumors may similarly show increased susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of beta blockade. Using a panel of hemangioendothelioma and angiosarcoma cell lines, we demonstrate that beta adrenergic inhibition blocks cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Beta blockade is selective for vascular tumor cells over normal endothelial cells and synergistically effective when combined with standard chemotherapeutic or cytotoxic agents. We demonstrate that inhibition of beta adrenergic signaling induces large scale changes in the global gene expression patterns of vascular tumors, including alterations in the expression of established cell cycle and apoptotic regulators. Using in vivo tumor models we demonstrate that beta blockade shows remarkable efficacy as a single agent in reducing the growth of angiosarcoma tumors. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the selective cytotoxicity and tumor suppressive ability of beta adrenergic inhibition on malignant vascular tumors and have laid the groundwork for a promising treatment of angiosarcomas in humans. PMID:23555867

  17. Expanding role of beta-blockade in the management of chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, J Herbert; Rodgers, Jo E

    2003-04-01

    Although recent advances have been made in the treatment of heart failure, this disease continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality. Among the negative effects associated with progression of heart failure are decline in myocardial reserve, decreased exercise tolerance, decreased contractile function, and altered cardiac gene expression. Guidelines recommend neurohormonal antagonists for treatment and stress the importance of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and beta-blockade in reversing the cardiac remodeling process. beta-Blockade slows or reverses the adverse effects resulting from chronic adrenergic stimulation. Traditionally, beta-blockers were reserved for mild-to-moderate heart failure, based on evidence from large, randomized clinical trials showing their positive effects on myocardial function and clinical outcomes. More recently, clinical data reveal that the agents can be expanded to patients with severe heart failure and those with left ventricular systolic dysfunction after myocardial infarction. Individual beta-blocking agents vary in their pharmacology and dosing requirements. These variations may influence treatment decisions and affect clinical measurements of left ventricular function and ventricular remodeling.

  18. Alterations in DNA Damage Response and Repair Genes as Potential Marker of Clinical Benefit From PD-1/PD-L1 Blockade in Advanced Urothelial Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Min Yuen; Seier, Kenneth; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Regazzi, Ashley M; Kania, Brooke E; Moran, Meredith M; Cipolla, Catharine K; Bluth, Mark J; Chaim, Joshua; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Snyder, Alexandra; Carlo, Maria I; Solit, David B; Berger, Michael F; Funt, Samuel; Wolchok, Jedd D; Iyer, Gopa; Bajorin, Dean F; Callahan, Margaret K; Rosenberg, Jonathan E

    2018-02-28

    Purpose Alterations in DNA damage response and repair (DDR) genes are associated with increased mutation load and improved clinical outcomes in platinum-treated metastatic urothelial carcinoma. We examined the relationship between DDR alterations and response to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. Methods Detailed demographic, treatment response, and long-term outcome data were collected on patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma treated with atezolizumab or nivolumab who had targeted exon sequencing performed on pre-immunotherapy tumor specimens. Presence of DDR alterations was correlated with best objective response per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and progression-free and overall survival. Results Sixty patients with urothelial cancer enrolled in prospective trials of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies met inclusion criteria. Any DDR and known or likely deleterious DDR mutations were identified in 28 (47%) and 15 (25%) patients, respectively. The presence of any DDR alteration was associated with a higher response rate (67.9% v 18.8%; P DDR alterations (80%) compared with DDR alterations of unknown significance (54%) and in those whose tumors were wild-type for DDR genes (19%; P DDR alterations also were associated with longer progression-free and overall survival. Conclusion DDR alterations are independently associated with response to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma. These observations warrant additional study, including prospective validation and exploration of the interaction between tumor DDR alteration and other tumor/host biomarkers of immunotherapy response.

  19. Effects of sodium restriction and hydrochlorothiazide on RAAS blockade efficacy in diabetic nephropathy: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Krikken, Jan A; Binnenmars, S Heleen; Visser, Folkert W; Hemmelder, Marc H; Woittiez, Arend-Jan; Groen, Henk; Laverman, Gozewijn D; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-05-01

    Reduction of dietary sodium intake or diuretic treatment increases renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade efficacy in non-diabetic nephropathy. We aimed to investigate the effect of sodium restriction and the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide, separately and in combination, added to RAAS blockade on residual albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. In this multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover randomised trial, we included patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Main entry criteria were microalbuminaria or macroalbuminuria, and creatinine clearance of 30 mL/min or higher with less than 6 mL/min decline in the previous year. We tested the separate and combined effects of sodium restriction (dietary counselling in the outpatient setting) and hydrochlorothiazide (50 mg daily), added to standardised maximal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (lisinopril 40 mg daily), on albuminuria (primary endpoint). Patients were given hydrochlorothiazide (50 mg per day) or placebo during four treatment periods of 6 weeks. Both treatments were combined with regular sodium diet or sodium restriction (target sodium intake 50 mmol Na(+) per day). The 6-week treatment periods were done consecutively in a random order. Patients were randomised in blocks of two patients. The trial was analysed by intention to treat. The trial is registered with TrialRegister.nl, number 2366. Of 89 eligible patients, 45 were included in the study. Both sodium restriction and hydrochlorothiazide significantly reduced albuminuria, irrespective of treatment sequence. Residual geometric mean albuminuria with baseline treatment was 711 mg per day (95% CI 485-1043); it was significantly reduced by sodium restriction (393 mg per day [258-599], p=0·0002), by hydrochlorothiazide (434 mg per day [306-618], p=0·0003), and to the greatest extent by their combination (306 mg per day [203-461], ppatients (4%) during baseline treatment, five (11%) during

  20. adrenergic receptor with preeclampsia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... expenditure and lipolysis. The mechanisms underlying lipolytic resistance to catecholamines in obesity are not clear and may include desensitization of ADRB2 function. (Yamada et al., 1999). Many studies have reported on the relationship between obesity and genetic variants in β-2 adrenergic receptors ...

  1. Adrenergic receptors are a fallible index of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Liggett, S B; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    by measuring these in a group of subjects with well-documented adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity, patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Mononuclear leukocyte beta 2-adrenergic receptor densities (and binding affinities), measured with 125I-labelled pindolol, and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP...... to diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Regardless of the mechanism of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity in such patients, these data provide further evidence that measurements of cellular adrenergic receptors (and adenylate cyclase) in vitro are a fallible index of sensitivity to catecholamines in vivo....

  2. Adrenergic receptors and gastric secretion in dogs. Is a "tonic balance" relationship between vagal and beta 2-adrenergic activity a possibility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Hovendal, C; Bech, K

    1984-01-01

    The relative influence of adrenergic receptors on gastric acid secretion in the dog stomach with different vagal activity or "tone" is almost unknown. beta-adrenoceptors seem to be most important for the direct effect of adrenergic stimulation on acid secretion. In this study the effects...... of vagotomy and beta 2-adrenoceptor activity were studied in conscious gastric fistula dogs. Pentagastrin stimulated acid output was increased slightly in non-vagotomized dogs and to its prevagotomy level in vagotomized dogs after propranolol infusion. Practolol showed no such effect. Histamine stimulated...... acid secretion was not influenced significantly by beta-blockade. Similar dose-response curves were found for non-vagotomized dogs with high beta 2-adrenergic tone and dogs with low vagal tone (vagotomy) after pentagastrin and histamine stimulated acid secretion. This study indicates...

  3. The influence of adrenergic stimulation on sex differences in left ventricular twist mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alexandra M; Shave, Rob E; Cheyne, William S; Eves, Neil D

    2017-06-15

    Sex differences in left ventricular (LV) mechanics occur during acute physiological challenges; however, it is unknown whether sex differences in LV mechanics are fundamentally regulated by differences in adrenergic control. Using two-dimensional echocardiography and speckle tracking analysis, this study compared LV mechanics in males and females matched for LV length during post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) and β 1 -adrenergic receptor blockade. Our data demonstrate that while basal rotation was increased in males, LV twist was not significantly different between the sexes during PEI. In contrast, during β 1 -adrenergic receptor blockade, LV apical rotation, twist and untwisting velocity were reduced in males compared to females. Significant relationships were observed between LV twist and LV internal diameter and sphericity index in females, but not males. These findings suggest that LV twist mechanics may be more sensitive to alterations in adrenergic stimulation in males, but more highly influenced by ventricular structure and geometry in females. Sex differences in left ventricular (LV) mechanics exist at rest and during acute physiological stress. Differences in cardiac autonomic and adrenergic control may contribute to sex differences in LV mechanics and LV haemodynamics. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate sex differences in LV mechanics with altered adrenergic stimulation achieved through post-handgrip-exercise ischaemia (PEI) and β 1 -adrenergic receptor (AR) blockade. Twenty males (23 ± 5 years) and 20 females (22 ± 3 years) were specifically matched for LV length (males: 8.5 ± 0.5 cm, females: 8.2 ± 0.6 cm, P = 0.163), and two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography was used to assess LV structure and function at baseline, during PEI and following administration of 5 mg bisoprolol (β 1 -AR antagonist). During PEI, LV end-diastolic volume and stroke volume were increased in both groups (P mechanics are reduced in males

  4. Adrenergic receptors are a fallible index of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Liggett, S B; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    In view of evidence that neither interindividual nor induced intra-individual variations of adrenergic receptor status are related to metabolic or haemodynamic sensitivity to adrenaline in vivo, we took an alternative approach to assessment of the relevance of adrenergic receptor measurement...... densities (and binding affinities), measured with 3H-labelled yohimbine, and adrenaline-induced suppression of cyclic AMP contents did not differ among the three groups. Thus, in contrast to idiopathic autonomic failure, there is no generalized increase in adrenergic receptors in autonomic failure due...

  5. Synovial tissue rank ligand expression and radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: observations from a proof-of-concept randomized clinical trial of cytokine blockade.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rooney, Terence

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate synovial tissue receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) as biomarkers of disease activity, progressive joint damage, and therapeutic response, during cytokine blockade in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active RA entered a randomized open-label 12-month study of anakinra 100 mg\\/day, administered as monotherapy or in combination with pegsunercept 800 mug\\/kg twice weekly. Arthroscopic synovial tissue biopsies were obtained at baseline, at 4 weeks and at the final time point. Following immunohistochemical staining, RANKL and OPG expression was quantified using digital image analysis. Radiographic damage was evaluated using the van der Heijde modification of the Sharp scoring system. Twenty-two patients were randomized. Baseline expression of RANKL, but not OPG, correlated significantly with baseline CRP levels (r = 0.61, P < 0.01). While a significant reduction in OPG expression following treatment was observed in clinical responders at the final time point (P < 0.05 vs. baseline), RANKL levels did not change, and the RANKL:OPG ratio remained unaltered, even at the highest levels of clinical response. When potential predictors of radiographic outcome were evaluated, baseline RANKL expression correlated with erosive progression at 1 year (r = 0.71, P < 0.01). Distinct, though related, pathophysiologic processes mediate joint inflammation and destruction in RA. Elevated synovial tissue RANKL expression is associated with progressive joint erosion, and may be independent of the clinical response to targeted therapy. The potential therapeutic importance of modulating RANKL in RA is highlighted, if radiographic arrest is to be achieved.

  6. Effects of sugammadex on incidence of postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brueckmann, B; Sasaki, N; Grobara, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate whether reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex reduced the incidence of residual blockade and facilitated operating room discharge readiness. METHODS: Adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery received rocuronium, followed...... by randomized allocation to sugammadex (2 or 4 mg kg(-1)) or usual care (neostigmine/glycopyrrolate, dosing per usual care practice) for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Timing of reversal agent administration was based on the providers' clinical judgement. Primary endpoint was the presence of residual...... neuromuscular blockade at PACU admission, defined as a train-of-four (TOF) ratio

  7. Coulomb Blockade Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dao; Wu, Jian; Gordon, Reuven

    2017-04-12

    Tunnel resistance can be modulated with bias via the Coulomb blockade effect, which gives a highly nonlinear response current. Here we investigate the optical response of a metal-insulator-nanoparticle-insulator-metal structure and show switching of a plasmonic gap from insulator to conductor via Coulomb blockade. By introducing a sufficiently large charging energy in the tunnelling gap, the Coulomb blockade allows for a conductor (tunneling) to insulator (capacitor) transition. The tunnelling electrons can be delocalized over the nanocapacitor again when a high energy penalty is added with bias. We demonstrate that this has a huge impact on the plasmonic resonance of a 0.51 nm tunneling gap with ∼70% change in normalized optical loss. Because this structure has a tiny capacitance, there is potential to harness the effect for high-speed switching.

  8. Evaluation of spinal anesthesia blockade time with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, with or without sufentanil, in chronic opioid users: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mostafa; Yekta, Reza Atef; Azimaraghi, Omid; Barzin, Gilda; Movafegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The primary outcome of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding sufentanil to hyperbaric bupivacaine on duration of sensory blockade of spinal anesthesia in chronic opioid users in comparison with non-addicts. Sixty patients scheduled for orthopedic surgery under spinal anesthesia were allocated into four groups: group 1 (no history of opium use who received intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine along with 1mL saline as placebo); group 2 (no history of opium use who received intrathecal bupivacaine along with 1mL sufentanil [5μg]); group 3 (positive history of opium use who received intrathecal bupivacaine along with 1mL saline as placebo) and group 4 (positive history of opium use who received intrathecal bupivacaine along with 1mL sufentanil [5μg]). The onset time and duration of sensory and motor blockade were measured. The duration of sensory blockade in group 3 was 120±23.1min which was significantly less than other groups (G1=148±28.7, G2=144±26.4, G4=139±24.7, p=0.007). The duration of motor blockade in group 3 was 145±30.0min which was significantly less than other groups (G1=164±36.0, G2=174±26.8, G4=174±24.9, p=0.03). Addition of 5μg intrathecal sufentanil to hyperbaric bupivacaine in chronic opioid users lengthened the sensory and motor duration of blockade to be equivalent to blockade measured in non-addicts. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Dietary Sodium Restriction in Kidney Transplant Recipients Treated With Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Laura V.; Dobrowolski, Linn C.; van den Bosch, Jacqueline J. O. N.; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Krediet, C. T. Paul; Bemelman, Frederike J.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease receiving renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, dietary sodium restriction is an often-used treatment strategy to reduce blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria. Whether these effects extend to kidney transplant recipients is unknown. We therefore

  10. Effects of Dietary Sodium Restriction in Kidney Transplant Recipients Treated With Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Laura V; Dobrowolski, Linn C; van den Bosch, Jacqueline J O N; Riphagen, Ineke J; Krediet, C T Paul; Bemelman, Frederike J; Bakker, Stephan J L; Navis, Gerjan

    BACKGROUND: In patients with chronic kidney disease receiving renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, dietary sodium restriction is an often-used treatment strategy to reduce blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria. Whether these effects extend to kidney transplant recipients is unknown.

  11. Effects of Dietary Sodium Restriction in Kidney Transplant Recipients Treated With Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Laura V; Dobrowolski, Linn C; van den Bosch, Jacqueline J O N; Riphagen, Ineke J; Krediet, C T Paul; Bemelman, Frederike J; Bakker, Stephan J L; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-06-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease receiving renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, dietary sodium restriction is an often-used treatment strategy to reduce blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria. Whether these effects extend to kidney transplant recipients is unknown. We therefore studied the effects of dietary sodium restriction on BP and urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in kidney transplant recipients receiving RAAS blockade. Two-center randomized crossover trial. Stable outpatient kidney transplant recipients with creatinine clearance > 30mL/min, BP ≥120/80mmHg, receiving stable RAAS blockade therapy. 6-week regular-sodium diet (target, 150mmol/24 h) and a 6-week low-sodium diet (target, 50mmol/24 h). Main outcome parameters were systolic and diastolic BP, UAE, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the end of each diet period. Dietary adherence was assessed by 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. We randomly assigned 23 kidney transplant recipients, of whom 22 (mean age, 58±8 [SD] years; 50% men; mean eGFR, 51±21mL/min/1.73m(2)) completed the study. One patient withdrew from the study because of concerns regarding orthostatic hypotension on the low-sodium diet. Sodium excretion decreased from 164±50mmol/24 h during the regular-sodium diet to 87±55mmol/24 h during the low-sodium diet (mean difference, -77 [95% CI, -110 to -44] mmol/24 h; Padherence to sodium diet was achieved in 86% of patients. In stable kidney transplant recipients receiving RAAS blockade, dietary sodium restriction effectively reduces BP without affecting eGFR. Dietary sodium restriction is relevant to BP management in kidney transplant recipients receiving RAAS blockade. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Contribution of systemic and somatic factors to clinical response and resistance to PD-L1 blockade in urothelial cancer: An exploratory multi-omic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Snyder

    2017-05-01

    improved PFS (n = 29, log-rank p = 0.048 and OS (n = 29, log-rank p = 0.011. Patients with DCB also demonstrated more substantial expansion of tumor-associated TCR clones in the peripheral blood 3 weeks after starting treatment (n = 22, Mann-Whitney p = 0.022. The combination of high pretreatment peripheral blood TCR clonality with elevated PD-L1 IC staining in tumor tissue was strongly associated with poor clinical outcomes (n = 10, hazard ratio (HR (mean = 89.88, HR (median = 23.41, 95% CI [2.43, 506.94], p(HR > 1 = 0.0014. Marked variations in mutation loads were seen with different somatic variant calling methodologies, which, in turn, impacted associations with clinical outcomes. Missense mutation load, predicted neoantigen load, and expressed neoantigen load did not demonstrate significant association with DCB (n = 25, Mann-Whitney p = 0.22, n = 25, Mann-Whitney p = 0.55, and n = 25, Mann-Whitney p = 0.29, respectively. Instead, we found evidence of time-varying effects of somatic mutation load on PFS in this cohort (n = 25, p = 0.044. A limitation of our study is its small sample size (n = 29, a subset of the patients treated on IMvigor 210 (NCT02108652. Given the number of exploratory analyses performed, we intend for these results to be hypothesis-generating.These results demonstrate the complex nature of immune response to checkpoint blockade and the compelling need for greater interrogation and data integration of both host and tumor factors. Incorporating these variables in prospective studies will facilitate identification and treatment of resistant patients.

  13. Contribution of systemic and somatic factors to clinical response and resistance to PD-L1 blockade in urothelial cancer: An exploratory multi-omic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Alexandra; Nathanson, Tavi; Funt, Samuel A; Ahuja, Arun; Buros Novik, Jacqueline; Hellmann, Matthew D; Chang, Eliza; Aksoy, Bulent Arman; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Yusko, Erik; Vignali, Marissa; Benzeno, Sharon; Boyd, Mariel; Moran, Meredith; Iyer, Gopa; Robins, Harlan S; Mardis, Elaine R; Merghoub, Taha; Hammerbacher, Jeff; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Bajorin, Dean F

    2017-05-01

    improved PFS (n = 29, log-rank p = 0.048) and OS (n = 29, log-rank p = 0.011). Patients with DCB also demonstrated more substantial expansion of tumor-associated TCR clones in the peripheral blood 3 weeks after starting treatment (n = 22, Mann-Whitney p = 0.022). The combination of high pretreatment peripheral blood TCR clonality with elevated PD-L1 IC staining in tumor tissue was strongly associated with poor clinical outcomes (n = 10, hazard ratio (HR) (mean) = 89.88, HR (median) = 23.41, 95% CI [2.43, 506.94], p(HR > 1) = 0.0014). Marked variations in mutation loads were seen with different somatic variant calling methodologies, which, in turn, impacted associations with clinical outcomes. Missense mutation load, predicted neoantigen load, and expressed neoantigen load did not demonstrate significant association with DCB (n = 25, Mann-Whitney p = 0.22, n = 25, Mann-Whitney p = 0.55, and n = 25, Mann-Whitney p = 0.29, respectively). Instead, we found evidence of time-varying effects of somatic mutation load on PFS in this cohort (n = 25, p = 0.044). A limitation of our study is its small sample size (n = 29), a subset of the patients treated on IMvigor 210 (NCT02108652). Given the number of exploratory analyses performed, we intend for these results to be hypothesis-generating. These results demonstrate the complex nature of immune response to checkpoint blockade and the compelling need for greater interrogation and data integration of both host and tumor factors. Incorporating these variables in prospective studies will facilitate identification and treatment of resistant patients.

  14. Adrenergic urticaria: review of the literature and proposed mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Sara R; Mandrell, Joshua; Eilers, David

    2014-04-01

    Adrenergic urticaria is a rare type of stress-induced physical urticaria characterized by transient outbreaks of red papules surrounded by halos of hypopigmented, vasoconstricted skin. First described in 1985, there are 10 reported cases of adrenergic urticaria in the English-language medical literature. Episodes are caused by various triggers, including emotional upset, coffee, and chocolate, during which serum catecholamines and IgE are elevated, whereas histamine and serotonin levels remain within normal limits. The precise mechanisms leading to the pathogenesis of adrenergic urticaria have yet to be elucidated. Diagnosis can be made by intradermal injection of epinephrine or norepinephrine, which reproduces the characteristic rash, or by clinical observation. Trigger avoidance and oral propranolol are currently the best known treatments for adrenergic urticaria. Nonspecific therapies, including tranquilizers and antihistamines, may also ease symptoms. This article explores the pathophysiology of adrenergic urticaria and proposes a mechanism by which propranolol treats the condition. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-01-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors

  16. Radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades: a snapshot in 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Tae Yool [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Ah [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Immune checkpoint blockades including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1), and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have been emerged as a promising anticancer therapy. Several immune checkpoint blockades have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and have shown notable success in clinical trials for patients with advanced melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy is a promising combination partner of immune checkpoint blockades due to its potent pro-immune effect. This review will cover the current issue and the future perspectives for combined with radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades based upon the available preclinical and clinical data.

  17. Involvement of β-adrenergic receptor of nucleus tractus solitarius in changing of baroreflex sensitivity by estrogen in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Pourshanazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arterial baroreflex (ABR is an important factor in preventing of blood pressure fluctuations that determined by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS. Estrogen is an ovarian hormone that has influence on ABR. The mechanism of this effect of estrogen unknown and may be mediated by β-adrenergic receptor of nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS, an important area in regulation of baroreflex. Therefore, in this study changing of BRS by estrogen after blockade β-adrenergic receptor of NTS in ovariectomized rats (Ovx and Ovx treated with estrogen (Est was examined. Materials and Methods: After ovariectomy, all female rats divided to Ovx and Ovx + Est groups and two series of experiments were performed. In the first experiment, phenylephrine was [intravenously, IV] injected in both the Ovx and Ovx + Est groups, and mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR, and BRS were evaluated (n = 8 for each group. In the second experiment, each of Ovx and Ovx + Est groups divided into saline and propranolol (pro groups, saline and pro stereotaxically were microinjected into NTS, respectively. Further, phenylephrine (IV was injected in all groups and BRS was evaluated. Results: BRS significantly increased in estrogen-treated groups (Ovx + Est compared to Ovx groups (P < 0.01. The blockade β-adrenergic receptor of NTS by pro did not significantly changed BRS in both Ovx and Ovx + Est groups. Conclusion: We concluded that there aren′t any intraction between estrogen and β-adrenergic receptor of NTS in BRS.

  18. Beta Adrenergic Regulation of Intrapulmonary Arteriovenous Anastomoses in Intact Rat and Isolated Rat Lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L. Bates

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVA allow large diameter particles of venous origin to bypass the pulmonary capillary bed and embolize the systemic arterial circulation. IPAVA have been routinely observed in healthy humans with exercise, hypoxia, and catecholamine infusion, but the mechanism by which they are recruited is not well-defined. We hypothesized that beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation recruits IPAVA and that receptor blockade would limit hypoxia-induced IPAVA recruitment. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the transpulmonary passage of microspheres in intact rats and isolated rats lung infused with the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol. We also evaluated IPAVA recruitment in intact rats with hypoxia and the beta-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol. We found that IPAVA are recruited in the intact rat by isoproterenol and their recruitment by hypoxia can be minimized by propranolol, suggesting a role for the adrenergic system in the recruitment of IPAVA by hypoxia. IPAVA recruitment is completely abolished by ventilation with 100% oxygen. Isoproterenol also recruits IPAVA in isolated rat lungs. The fact that isoproterenol can recruit IPAVA in isolated lungs, without increased pulmonary flow, suggests that elevated cardiac output is not required for IPAVA recruitment.

  19. Neuromuscular blockade in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida João Fernando Lourenço de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs have been widely used to control patients who need to be immobilized for some kind of medical intervention, such as an invasive procedure or synchronism with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this monograph is to review the pharmacology of the NMBAs, to compare the main differences between the neuromuscular junction in neonates, infants, toddlers and adults, and moreover to discuss their indications in critically ill pediatric patients. Continuous improvement of knowledge about NMBAs pharmacology, adverse effects, and the many other remaining unanswered questions about neuromuscular junction and neuromuscular blockade in children is essential for the correct use of these drugs. Therefore, the indication of these agents in pediatrics is determined with extreme judiciousness. Computorized (Medline 1990-2000 and active search of articles were the mechanisms used in this review.

  20. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system mediates hypophagic and anxiety-like effects of CB₁ receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gómez, Edgar; Quarta, Carmelo; Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Cardinal, Pierre; Binder, Elke; Cannich, Astrid; Delamarre, Anna; Häring, Martin; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Vega, David; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Bartsch, Dusan; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Chaouloff, Francis; Pagotto, Uberto; Guzman, Manuel; Cota, Daniela; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2013-03-19

    Complex interactions between periphery and the brain regulate food intake in mammals. Cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor antagonists are potent hypophagic agents, but the sites where this acute action is exerted and the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. To dissect the mechanisms underlying the hypophagic effect of CB1 receptor blockade, we combined the acute injection of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant with the use of conditional CB1-knockout mice, as well as with pharmacological modulation of different central and peripheral circuits. Fasting/refeeding experiments revealed that CB1 receptor signaling in many specific brain neurons is dispensable for the acute hypophagic effects of rimonabant. CB1 receptor antagonist-induced hypophagia was fully abolished by peripheral blockade of β-adrenergic transmission, suggesting that this effect is mediated by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Consistently, we found that rimonabant increases gastrointestinal metabolism via increased peripheral β-adrenergic receptor signaling in peripheral organs, including the gastrointestinal tract. Blockade of both visceral afferents and glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarii abolished rimonabant-induced hypophagia. Importantly, these mechanisms were specifically triggered by lipid-deprivation, revealing a nutrient-specific component acutely regulated by CB1 receptor blockade. Finally, peripheral blockade of sympathetic neurotransmission also blunted central effects of CB1 receptor blockade, such as fear responses and anxiety-like behaviors. These data demonstrate that, independently of their site of origin, important effects of CB1 receptor blockade are expressed via activation of peripheral sympathetic activity. Thus, CB1 receptors modulate bidirectional circuits between the periphery and the brain to regulate feeding and other behaviors.

  1. Does calcium channel blockade and beta-adrenergic blockade affect platelet function and fibrinolysis to a varying degree?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornitz, Gitte Gleerup; Mehlsen, J; Winther, K

    1995-01-01

    The effects of isradipine and atenolol on platelet function and fibrinolytic activity were studied in 10 male patients with mild untreated hypertension. After a 2-week placebo run-in period, the volunteers were randomized to either isradipine 2.5 mg twice daily or atenolol 100 mg daily for a 6......-month period. Those initially receiving isradipine then received atenolol and vice versa. After each therapy regimen, blood was drawn at rest and 1 h after exercise during a maximum exercise test. Platelet activity in vivo was estimated as release of B-TG and PF-4. Fibrinolytic activity was estimated...

  2. Association of the pattern of use of perioperative β-blockade and postoperative mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Arthur W; Au, Selwyn; Cason, Brian A

    2010-10-01

    The 1996 atenolol study provided evidence that perioperative β-adrenergic receptor blockade (β-blockade) reduced postsurgical mortality. In 1998, the indications for perioperative β-blockade were codified as the Perioperative Cardiac Risk Reduction protocol and implemented at the San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, California. The present study analyzed the association of the pattern of use of perioperative β-blockade with perioperative mortality since introduction of the Perioperative Cardiac Risk Reduction protocol. Epidemiologic analysis of the operations undertaken since 1996 at the San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center was performed. The pattern of use of perioperative β-blockade was divided into four groups: None, Addition, Withdrawal, and Continuous. Logistic regression, survival analysis, and propensity analysis were performed. A total of 38,779 operations were performed between 1996 and 2008. In patients meeting Perioperative Cardiac Risk Reduction indications for perioperative β-blockade, Addition is associated with a reduction in 30-day (odds ratio [OR], 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33 to 0.83; P = 0.006) and 1-yr mortality (OR, 0.64; 95%, CI 0.51 to 0.79; P < 0.0001). Continuous is associated with a reduction in 30-day (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.98; P = 0.04) and 1-yr mortality (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.0; P = 0.05). Withdrawal is associated with an increase in 30-day (OR 3.93, 95% CI, 2.57 to 6.01; P less than 0.0001) and 1-yr mortality (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.49 to 2.58; P < 0.0001). Perioperative β-blockade administered according to the Perioperative Cardiac Risk Reduction protocol is associated with a reduction in 30-day and 1-yr mortality. Perioperative withdrawal of β-blockers is associated with increased mortality.

  3. Checkpoint Blockade in Lung Cancer and Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievense, Lysanne A; Sterman, Daniel H; Cornelissen, Robin; Aerts, Joachim G

    2017-08-01

    In the last decade, immunotherapy has emerged as a new treatment modality in cancer. The most success has been achieved with the class of checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs), antibodies that unleash the antitumor immune response. After the success in melanoma, numerous clinical trials are being conducted investigating CPIs in lung cancer and mesothelioma. The programmed death protein (PD) 1-PD ligand 1/2 pathway and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 are currently the most studied immunotherapeutic targets in these malignancies. In non-small cell lung cancer, anti-PD-1 antibodies have become part of the approved treatment arsenal. In small cell lung cancer and mesothelioma, the efficacy of checkpoint inhibition has not yet been proven. In this Concise Clinical Review, an overview of the landmark clinical trials investigating checkpoint blockade in lung cancer and mesothelioma is provided. Because response rates are around 20% in the majority of clinical trials, there is much room for improvement. Predictive biomarkers are therefore essential to fully develop the potential of CPIs. To increase efficacy, multiple clinical trials investigating the combination of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 inhibitors and PD-1/PD ligand 1 blockade in lung cancer and mesothelioma are being conducted. Given the potential benefit of immunotherapy, implementation of current and new knowledge in trial designs and interpretation of results is essential for moving forward.

  4. Targeting cardiac beta-adrenergic signaling via GRK2 inhibition for heart failure therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eCannavo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac cells, like those of the other tissues, undergo regulation through membrane-bound proteins known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. β-adrenergic receptors (βARs are key GPCRs expressed on cardiomyocytes and their role is crucial in cardiac physiology since they regulate inotropic and chronotropic responses of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS. In compromised conditions such as heart failure (HF chronic βAR hyperstimulation occurs via SNS activation resulting in receptor dysregulation and down-regulation and consequently there is a marked reduction of myocardial inotropic reserve and continued loss of pump function. Data has accumulated over the last two decades that a primary culprit in initiating and maintain βAR dysfunction in the injured and stressed heart is GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2, which was originally known as βARK1 (for βAR kinase. GRK2 is up-regulated in the failing heart due to chronic SNS activity and targeting this kinase has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in HF. Indeed, its inhibition or genetic deletion in several disparate animal models of HF including a pre-clinical pig model has shown that GRK2 targeting improves functional and morphological parameters of the failing heart. Moreover, non-βAR properties of GRK2 appear to also contribute to its pathological effects and thus, its inhibition will likely complement existing therapies such as βAR blockade. This review will explore recent research regarding GRK2 inhibition, in particular it will focus on the GRK2 inhibitor peptide known as βARKct, which represents new hope in the treatment against HF progression. 

  5. Beta-Adrenergic gene therapy for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Walter J

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy using in vivo recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer is an effective technique that offers great potential to improve existing drug treatments for the complex cardiovascular diseases of heart failure and vascular smooth muscle intimal hyperplasia. Cardiac-specific adenovirus-mediated transfer of the carboxyl-terminus of the β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARKct, acting as a Gβγ-β-adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK1 inhibitor, improves basal and agonist-induced cardiac performance in both normal and failing rabbit hearts. In addition, βARKct adenovirus infection of vascular smooth muscle is capable of significantly diminishing neointimal proliferation after angioplasty. Therefore, further investigation is warranted to determine whether inhibition of βARK1 activity and sequestration of Gβγ via an adenovirus that encodes the βARKct transgene might be a useful clinical tool for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies.

  6. Receptor-mediated enhancement of beta adrenergic drug activity by ascorbate in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick F Dillon

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Previous in vitro research demonstrated that ascorbate enhances potency and duration of activity of agonists binding to alpha 1 adrenergic and histamine receptors. OBJECTIVES: Extending this work to beta 2 adrenergic systems in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Ultraviolet spectroscopy was used to study ascorbate binding to adrenergic receptor preparations and peptides. Force transduction studies on acetylcholine-contracted trachealis preparations from pigs and guinea pigs measured the effect of ascorbate on relaxation due to submaximal doses of beta adrenergic agonists. The effect of inhaled albuterol with and without ascorbate was tested on horses with heaves and sheep with carbachol-induced bronchoconstriction. MEASUREMENTS: Binding constants for ascorbate binding to beta adrenergic receptor were derived from concentration-dependent spectral shifts. Dose- dependence curves were obtained for the relaxation of pre-contracted trachealis preparations due to beta agonists in the presence and absence of varied ascorbate. Tachyphylaxis and fade were also measured. Dose response curves were determined for the effect of albuterol plus-and-minus ascorbate on airway resistance in horses and sheep. MAIN RESULTS: Ascorbate binds to the beta 2 adrenergic receptor at physiological concentrations. The receptor recycles dehydroascorbate. Physiological and supra-physiological concentrations of ascorbate enhance submaximal epinephrine and isoproterenol relaxation of trachealis, producing a 3-10-fold increase in sensitivity, preventing tachyphylaxis, and reversing fade. In vivo, ascorbate improves albuterol's effect on heaves and produces a 10-fold enhancement of albuterol activity in "asthmatic" sheep. CONCLUSIONS: Ascorbate enhances beta-adrenergic activity via a novel receptor-mediated mechanism; increases potency and duration of beta adrenergic agonists effective in asthma and COPD; prevents tachyphylaxis; and reverses fade. These novel effects are

  7. Evidence for β-adrenergic modulation of sweating during incremental exercise in habitually trained males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Shitara, Yosuke; Fujii, Naoto; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Kondo, Narihiko

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the β-adrenergic contribution to sweating during incremental exercise in habitually trained males. Nine habitually trained and 11 untrained males performed incremental cycling until exhaustion (20 W/min). Bilateral forearm sweat rates (ventilated capsule) were measured at two skin sites that were transdermally administered via iontophoresis with either 1% propranolol (Propranolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) or saline (Control). The sweat rate was evaluated as a function of both relative (percentage of maximum workload) and absolute exercise intensities. The sweat rate at the Propranolol site was lower than the control during exercise at 80 (0.57 ± 0.21 and 0.45 ± 0.19 mg·cm -2 ·min -1 for Control and Propranolol, respectively) and 90% (0.74 ± 0.22 and 0.65 ± 0.17 mg·cm -2 ·min -1 , respectively) of maximum workload in trained males (all P 0.05). At the same absolute intensity, higher sweat rates on the control site were observed in trained males relative to the untrained during exercise at 160 (0.23 ± 0.20 and 0.04 ± 0.05 mg·cm -2 ·min -1 for trained and untrained, respectively) and 180 W (0.40 ± 0.20 and 0.13 ± 0.13 mg·cm -2 ·min -1 , respectively) (all P 0.05). We show that the β-adrenergic mechanism does modulate sweating during exercise at a submaximal high relative intensity in habitually trained males. The β-adrenergic mechanism may in part contribute to the greater sweat production in habitually trained males than in untrained counterparts during exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We demonstrated for the first time that the β-adrenergic mechanism does modulate sweating (i.e., β-adrenergic sweating) during exercise using a localized β-adrenoceptor blockade in humans in vivo. β-Adrenergic sweating was evident in habitually trained individuals during exercise at a submaximal high relative intensity (80-90% maximal work). This observation advances

  8. Serotonergic and adrenergic drug interactions associated with linezolid: a critical review and practical management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Tasha D; Lau, Tim Ty; Ensom, Mary Hh

    2013-04-01

    To describe the evidence for serotonergic and adrenergic drug interactions with linezolid and discuss clinical management strategies. A literature search of PubMed (1947-November 2012), MEDLINE (1946-November 2012), EMBASE (1974-November 2012), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-November 2012) was conducted using the terms linezolid, drug interaction, serotonin syndrome, serotonin toxicity, sympathomimetic, serotonergic agents, and adrenergic agents. Citations of retrieved articles were also reviewed. English-language articles describing coadministration of serotonergic or adrenergic agents with linezolid to humans were included. Studies published only in abstract form were excluded. One prospective study, 6 retrospective studies, and 24 case reports were identified describing a serotonergic or adrenergic drug interaction. Incidence of serotonin syndrome in patients on linezolid and serotonergic agents ranged between 0.24% and 4%. Serotonergic agents determined to have probable (according to the Horn Drug Interaction Probability Scale) linezolid interactions in case reports included meperidine, citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, duloxetine, and venlafaxine. Serotonergic agent dose and duration of coadministration with linezolid did not appear to influence the occurrence of serotonin syndrome. Adrenergic medication coadministration was associated with a possible drug interaction as determined by the Horn Drug Interaction Probability Scale but did not appear to result in clinically significant drug interactions with linezolid. Linezolid-associated serotonergic drug interactions occur more commonly than adrenergic interactions. Serotonergic interactions considered probable according to the Horn Drug Interaction Probability Scale do not appear to correlate with drug dosage; time of onset ranges from serotonergic agent cannot be avoided, clinicians should be aware of the symptoms and management of serotonergic toxicity; close

  9. Decreasing adrenergic or sympathetic hyperactivity after severe traumatic brain injury using propranolol and clonidine (DASH After TBI Study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Mayur B

    2012-09-01

    the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and Quality of Life after Brain Injury scale. Safety parameters evaluated will include cardiac complications. Discussion The DASH After TBI Study is the first randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial powered to determine feasibility and investigate safety and outcomes associated with adrenergic blockade in patients with severe TBI. If the study results in positive trends, this could provide pilot evidence for a larger multicenter randomized clinical trial. If there is no effect of therapy, this trial would still provide a robust prospective description of sympathetic hyperactivity after TBI. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01322048

  10. Stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hidetaka; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a chronic disorder that is characterized by craving for tobacco products, withdrawal upon smoking cessation, and relapse after periods of abstinence. Previous studies demonstrated that systemic administration of α2-adrenergic receptor agonists attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking in rats. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) in stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Rats self-administered nicotine for 14-16 days and then nicotine seeking was extinguished by substituting saline for nicotine. The effect of the intra-CeA infusion of the α2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and dexmedetomidine, the nonselective β1/β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol, and the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin on stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking was investigated. In all the experiments, exposure to footshocks reinstated extinguished nicotine seeking. The administration of clonidine or dexmedetomidine into the CeA attenuated stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. The administration of propranolol or prazosin into the CeA did not affect stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Furthermore, intra-CeA administration of clonidine or dexmedetomidine did not affect operant responding for food pellets. This suggests that the effects of clonidine and dexmedetomidine on stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking were not mediated by motor impairments or sedation. Taken together, these findings indicate that stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors, but not blockade of α1 or β-adrenergic receptors, in the CeA attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. These findings suggest that α2-adrenergic receptor agonists may at least partly attenuate stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking by stimulating α2-adrenergic receptors in the CeA. Copyright © 2010

  11. Propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, attenuates the decrease in trabecular bone mass in high calorie diet fed growing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Hwang, Hyo Rin; Park, Hyun-Jung; Kwon, Arang; Qadir, Abdul S; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of high calorie and low calorie diets on skeletal integrity, and whether β-adrenergic blockade (BB) attenuates bone loss induced by dietary calorie alteration. Male 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either an ad-lib fed control diet (CON), a high calorie diet (HIGH), or a low calorie diet (LOW) group. In each diet group, mice were treated with either vehicle (VEH) or propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist. Over 12-weeks, β-blockade mitigated body weight and fat mass increases induced by the high calorie diet. Femoral trabecular bone mineral density and the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes in bone marrow cells were reduced in HIGHVEH and LOWVEH mice, and BB significantly attenuated this decline only in HIGH mice. In summary, the magnitude of bone loss induced by low calorie diet was greater than that caused by high calorie diet in growing mice, and β-blockade mitigated high calorie diet-induced bone loss.

  12. Redistribution of Cerebral Blood Flow during Severe Hypovolemia and Reperfusion in a Sheep Model: Critical Role of α1-Adrenergic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffner, René; Bischoff, Sabine Juliane; Lehmann, Thomas; Rakers, Florian; Rupprecht, Sven; Reiche, Juliane; Matziolis, Georg; Schubert, Harald; Schwab, Matthias; Huber, Otmar; Schmidt, Martin

    2017-05-11

    Maintenance of brain circulation during shock is sufficient to prevent subcortical injury but the cerebral cortex is not spared. This suggests area-specific regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) during hemorrhage. Cortical and subcortical CBF were continuously measured during blood loss (≤50%) and subsequent reperfusion using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood gases, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), heart rate and renal blood flow were also monitored. Urapidil was used for α1A-adrenergic receptor blockade in dosages, which did not modify the MABP-response to blood loss. Western blot and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions were used to determine adrenergic receptor expression in brain arterioles. During hypovolemia subcortical CBF was maintained at 81 ± 6% of baseline, whereas cortical CBF decreased to 40 ± 4% ( p < 0.001). Reperfusion led to peak CBFs of about 70% above baseline in both brain regions. α1A-Adrenergic blockade massively reduced subcortical CBF during hemorrhage and reperfusion, and prevented hyperperfusion during reperfusion in the cortex. α1A-mRNA expression was significantly higher in the cortex, whereas α1D-mRNA expression was higher in the subcortex ( p < 0.001). α1-Adrenergic receptors are critical for perfusion redistribution: activity of the α1A-receptor subtype is a prerequisite for redistribution of CBF, whereas the α1D-receptor subtype may determine the magnitude of redistribution responses.

  13. Redistribution of Cerebral Blood Flow during Severe Hypovolemia and Reperfusion in a Sheep Model: Critical Role of α1-Adrenergic Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Schiffner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maintenance of brain circulation during shock is sufficient to prevent subcortical injury but the cerebral cortex is not spared. This suggests area-specific regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF during hemorrhage. Methods: Cortical and subcortical CBF were continuously measured during blood loss (≤50% and subsequent reperfusion using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood gases, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP, heart rate and renal blood flow were also monitored. Urapidil was used for α1A-adrenergic receptor blockade in dosages, which did not modify the MABP-response to blood loss. Western blot and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions were used to determine adrenergic receptor expression in brain arterioles. Results: During hypovolemia subcortical CBF was maintained at 81 ± 6% of baseline, whereas cortical CBF decreased to 40 ± 4% (p < 0.001. Reperfusion led to peak CBFs of about 70% above baseline in both brain regions. α1A-Adrenergic blockade massively reduced subcortical CBF during hemorrhage and reperfusion, and prevented hyperperfusion during reperfusion in the cortex. α1A-mRNA expression was significantly higher in the cortex, whereas α1D-mRNA expression was higher in the subcortex (p < 0.001. Conclusions: α1-Adrenergic receptors are critical for perfusion redistribution: activity of the α1A-receptor subtype is a prerequisite for redistribution of CBF, whereas the α1D-receptor subtype may determine the magnitude of redistribution responses.

  14. Influence of beta blockade on gastric acid secretion and changes in gastric mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy in dogs and man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P; Bech, K; Bekker, C

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was, in paired experiments in dogs, to examine the effect of beta-receptor blockade on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy (PCV). The secretory response to pentagastrin was reduced after vagotomy. beta-Adrenergic block......The aim of the present study was, in paired experiments in dogs, to examine the effect of beta-receptor blockade on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy (PCV). The secretory response to pentagastrin was reduced after vagotomy. beta...

  15. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  16. Is deep neuromuscular blockade beneficial in laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. V.; Staehr-Rye, A K; Claudius, C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deep neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic surgery may provide some clinical benefit. We present the 'Pro-' argument in this paired position paper. METHODS: We reviewed recent evidence from a basic database of references which we agreed on with the 'Con-' side, and present...... this in narrative form. We have shared our analysis and text with the authors of the 'Con-' side of these paired position papers during the preparation of the manuscripts. RESULTS: There are a few low risk of bias studies indicating that use of deep neuromuscular blockade improve surgical conditions and improve...... patient outcomes such as post-operative pain in laparoscopic surgery. CONCLUSION: Our interpretation of recent findings is that there is reason to believe that there may be some patient benefit of deep neuromuscular blockade in this context, and more detailed study is needed....

  17. Why not treat human cancer with interleukin-1 blockade?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinarello, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical successes of targeting angiogenesis provide a basis for trials of interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade and particularly anti-IL-1beta as an add-on therapy in human metastatic disease. In animal studies for over 20 years, IL-1 has been demonstrated to increase adherence of tumor cells to the

  18. blockade therapy in patient with left ventricular systolic dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of tolerability of β- blockade therapy in patient with left ventricular systolic dysfunction heart failure. SMI Mohammed. Abstract. Back ground: Little data exist to demonstrate the tolerability of β-blocker therapy in an unselected community heart failure population already treated with the clinical trial or higher dose ...

  19. Predictors of responses to immune checkpoint blockade in advanced melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquelot, N; Roberti, M P; Enot, D P

    2017-01-01

    stage III MMel patients after adjuvant ipilimumab + nivolumab (but not nivolumab alone). These biomarkers should be validated in prospective trials in MMel.The clinical management of metastatic melanoma requires predictors of the response to checkpoint blockade. Here, the authors use immunological...

  20. Ventricular electrical instability in the conscious dog: effects of psychologic stress and beta adrenergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, R J; Lawler, J E; Lown, B

    1976-11-04

    The effect of psychologic stress on cardiac vulnerability was examined in 10 conscious dogs. The repetitive extrasystole threshold was employed as a measure of susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation. Instrumental aversive conditioning constituted a stressful environment. The repetitive extrasystole threshold decreased by nearly 50 percent during 3 days in which the animals were exposed to the stressful environment. When Tolamolol hydrochloride, a cardioselective beta adrenoceptor blocking agent, was administered before a stress session, the repetitive extrasystole threshold was unaltered from the control value. Thus, stress-evoked changes in cardiac vulnerability are mediated through the sympathetic nervous system.

  1. The Effect of Beta Adrenergic Blockade on Ratings of Perceived Exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    completion of this manuscript. I wish to express my gratitude to the following people for their ideas, technical assistance, and moral support. Jack H...by Borg (75). RPE have been described as a "gestalt" of sensations derived from both central ( respiratory and cardiovascular) and peripheral or local...decrease in baseline levels of HR. Various studies (82, 86-106) have found RPE to be related to blood lactate (80, 86-92), kinesthetic cues (93, ,.,. .4

  2. Neurohumoral activation in heart failure: the role of adrenergic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C. Brum

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a common endpoint for many forms of cardiovascular disease and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The development of end-stage HF often involves an initial insult to the myocardium that reduces cardiac output and leads to a compensatory increase in sympathetic nervous system activity. Acutely, the sympathetic hyperactivity through the activation of beta-adrenergic receptors increases heart rate and cardiac contractility, which compensate for decreased cardiac output. However, chronic exposure of the heart to elevated levels of catecholamines released from sympathetic nerve terminals and the adrenal gland may lead to further pathologic changes in the heart, resulting in continued elevation of sympathetic tone and a progressive deterioration in cardiac function. On a molecular level, altered beta-adrenergic receptor signaling plays a pivotal role in the genesis and progression of HF. beta-adrenergic receptor number and function are decreased, and downstream mechanisms are altered. In this review we will present an overview of the normal beta-adrenergic receptor pathway in the heart and the consequences of sustained adrenergic activation in HF. The myopathic potential of individual components of the adrenergic signaling will be discussed through the results of research performed in genetic modified animals. Finally, we will discuss the potential clinical impact of beta-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms for better understanding the progression of HF.A insuficiência cardíaca (IC é a via final comum da maioria das doenças cardiovasculares e uma das maiores causas de morbi-mortalidade. O desenvolvimento do estágio final da IC freqüentemente envolve um insulto inicial do miocárdio, reduzindo o débito cardíaco e levando ao aumento compensatório da atividade do sistema nervoso simpático (SNS. Existem evidências de que apesar da exposição aguda ser benéfica, exposições crônicas a elevadas concentra

  3. Uncoupling of the baroreflex by N(N)-cholinergic blockade in dissecting the components of cardiovascular regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Black, B. K.; Costa, F.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Systemic administration of adrenergic agonists and nitric oxide donors is used extensively to determine cardiovascular receptor sensitivity. Conclusions regarding receptor sensitivity in the presence of the baroreflex may be misleading. In 8 normal volunteers, we determined the heart rate and blood pressure changes after incremental bolus doses of isoproterenol, phenylephrine, and sodium nitroprusside before and during neuronal nicotinic cholinergic (N(N)-cholinergic) blockade with trimethaphan. Results are given as median (25th/75th percentile). With trimethaphan, the baroreflex slope (as determined by bolus doses of nitroprusside and phenylephrine) decreased from 24 (22/26) to 0.00 (0.00/0.09) ms/mm Hg (Pbaroreflex can be completely interrupted with N(N)-cholinergic blockade. Estimation of adrenoreceptor sensitivity and sensitivity to nitric oxide donors by systemic administration of agonists is severely confounded by baroreflexes. Uncoupling of the baroreflex by N(N)-cholinergic blockade may be a useful method to obtain an integrated measure of adrenergic receptor sensitivity and sensitivity to nitric oxide donors in humans. This approach would permit the comparison of normal and abnormal physiological states without the "noise" of baroreflex buffering.

  4. The effects of N-methyl D-aspartate and B-adrenergic receptor antagonists on the reconsolidation of reward memory: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ravi K; Freeman, Tom P; Kamboj, Sunjeev K

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacological memory reconsolidation blockade provides a potential mechanism for ameliorating the maladaptive reward memories underlying relapse in addiction. Two of the most promising classes of drug that interfere with reconsolidation and have translational potential for human use are N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and B-Adrenergic receptor (B-AR) antagonists. We used meta-analysis and meta-regression to assess the effects of these drugs on the reconsolidation of reward memory in preclinical models of addiction. Pharmacokinetic, mnemonic and methodological factors were assessed for their moderating impact on effect sizes. An analysis of 52 independent effect sizes (NMDAR=30, B-AR=22) found robust effects of both classes of drug on memory reconsolidation, but a far greater overall effect of NMDAR antagonism than B-AR antagonism. Significant moderating effects of drug dose, relapse process and primary reinforcer were found. The findings suggest that reward memory reconsolidation can be robustly targeted by NMDAR antagonists and to a lesser extent, by B-AR antagonists. Implications for future clinical work are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coulomb blockade induced by magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors found that a Coulomb blockade can be induced by magnetic field. The authors illustrated this effect on the example of a ring consisting of two and many Josephson junctions. For the ring with two junctions we present an exact solution. The transition into Coulomb blockade state on a ring transforms into a linear array of Josephson junctions, although in latter case the effect of magnetic field disappears. In the state of Coulomb blockade the magnetization may be both diamagnetic and paramagnetic. The Coulomb blockade may also be removed by external magnetic field

  6. Renin-angiotensin system blockade therapy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Tomoki; Saito, Shigeru; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Shishido, Koki; Tanaka, Yutaka; Yamabe, Tsuyoshi; Shirai, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Araki, Motoharu; Naganuma, Toru; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masanori; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2018-04-01

    The persistence of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is associated with poor clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for aortic stenosis. However, the optimal medical therapy after TAVI remains unknown. We investigated the effect of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade therapy on LV hypertrophy and mortality in patients undergoing TAVI. Between October 2013 and April 2016, 1215 patients undergoing TAVI were prospectively enrolled in the Optimized CathEter vAlvular iNtervention (OCEAN)-TAVI registry. This cohort was stratified according to the postoperative usage of RAS blockade therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs). Patients with at least two prescriptions dispensed 180 days apart after TAVI and at least a 6-month follow-up constituted the RAS blockade group (n=371), while those not prescribed any ACE inhibitors or ARBs after TAVI were included in the no RAS blockade group (n=189). At 6 months postoperatively, the RAS blockade group had significantly greater LV mass index regression than the no RAS blockade group (-9±24% vs -2±25%, p=0.024). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly lower cumulative 2-year mortality in the RAS blockade than that in the no RAS blockade group (7.5% vs 12.5%; log-rank test, p=0.031). After adjusting for confounding factors, RAS blockade therapy was associated with significantly lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.45; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.91; p=0.025). Postoperative RAS blockade therapy is associated with greater LV mass index regression and reduced all-cause mortality. These data need to be confirmed by a prospective randomised controlled outcome trial. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Atorvastatin reduces β-Adrenergic dysfunction in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillion, Aude; Feldman, Sarah; Na, Na; Biais, Matthieu; Carpentier, Wassila; Birenbaum, Aurélie; Cagnard, Nicolas; Loyer, Xavier; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Hatem, Stéphane; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2017-01-01

    In the diabetic heart the β-adrenergic response is altered partly by down-regulation of the β1-adrenoceptor, reducing its positive inotropic effect and up-regulation of the β3-adrenoceptor, increasing its negative inotropic effect. Statins have clinical benefits on morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients which are attributed to their "pleiotropic" effects. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of statin treatment on β-adrenergic dysfunction in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes. β-adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (echocardiography) and ex vivo (left ventricular papillary muscles) in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, who were pre-treated or not by oral atorvastatin over 15 days (50 mg.kg-1.day-1). Micro-array analysis and immunoblotting were performed in left ventricular homogenates. Data are presented as mean percentage of baseline ± SD. Atorvastatin restored the impaired positive inotropic effect of β-adrenergic stimulation in diabetic hearts compared with healthy hearts both in vivo and ex vivo but did not suppress the diastolic dysfunction of diabetes. Atorvastatin changed the RNA expression of 9 genes in the β-adrenergic pathway and corrected the protein expression of β1-adrenoceptor and β1/β3-adrenoceptor ratio, and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4). Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition abolished the beneficial effects of atorvastatin on the β-adrenoceptor response. Atorvastatin restored the positive inotropic effect of the β-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy. This effect is mediated by multiple modifications in expression of proteins in the β-adrenergic signaling pathway, particularly through the NOS pathway.

  8. Atorvastatin reduces β-Adrenergic dysfunction in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Carillion

    Full Text Available In the diabetic heart the β-adrenergic response is altered partly by down-regulation of the β1-adrenoceptor, reducing its positive inotropic effect and up-regulation of the β3-adrenoceptor, increasing its negative inotropic effect. Statins have clinical benefits on morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients which are attributed to their "pleiotropic" effects. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of statin treatment on β-adrenergic dysfunction in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes.β-adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (echocardiography and ex vivo (left ventricular papillary muscles in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, who were pre-treated or not by oral atorvastatin over 15 days (50 mg.kg-1.day-1. Micro-array analysis and immunoblotting were performed in left ventricular homogenates. Data are presented as mean percentage of baseline ± SD.Atorvastatin restored the impaired positive inotropic effect of β-adrenergic stimulation in diabetic hearts compared with healthy hearts both in vivo and ex vivo but did not suppress the diastolic dysfunction of diabetes. Atorvastatin changed the RNA expression of 9 genes in the β-adrenergic pathway and corrected the protein expression of β1-adrenoceptor and β1/β3-adrenoceptor ratio, and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibition abolished the beneficial effects of atorvastatin on the β-adrenoceptor response.Atorvastatin restored the positive inotropic effect of the β-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy. This effect is mediated by multiple modifications in expression of proteins in the β-adrenergic signaling pathway, particularly through the NOS pathway.

  9. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  10. Adrenergic innervation of the rat hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palkovits, M.; Mezey, E.; Záborszky, L.; Feminger, A.; Versteeg, D.H.G.; Wijnen, H.J.L.M.; Jong, Wybren de; Fekete, M.I.K.; Herman, J.P.; Kanyicska, B.

    The adrenergic innervation of the hypothalamus was studied by measuring hypothalamic adrenaline levels following surgical transection of the lower brain stem or electrolytic lesion of the medullary adrenaline-containing cell groups. The adrenaline levels in some hypothalamic nuclei and in the median

  11. α-2 adrenergic receptor: a radiohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnerstall, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    α-2 adrenergic agents have been shown to influence blood pressure, heart rate and other physiological and behavioral functions through interactions with adrenergic pathways within the central nervous system. Pharmacologically relevant α-1 adrenergic receptors were biochemically characterized and radiohistochemically analyzed in intact tissue sections of the rat and human central nervous system. The anatomical distribution of the α-2 receptors, labeled with the agonist [ 3 H]para-aminoclonidine, verified the concept that α-2 receptors are closely associated with adrenergic nerve terminals and that α-2 agents can influence autonomic and endocrine function through an action in the central nervous system. Since α-2 agonists can influence sympathetic outflow, α-2 binding sites were closely analyzed in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracic spinal cord. The transport of putative presynaptic α-2 binding sites in the rat sciatic nerve was analyzed by light microscopic radiohistochemical techniques. Finally, in intact tissue section of the rat central nervous system, the biochemical characteristics of [ 3 H]rauwolscine binding were analyzed. Data were also shown which indicates that the synthetic α-2 antagonist [ 3 H]RX781094 also binds to α-2 receptors with high-affinity. Further, the distribution of [ 3 H]RX781094 binding sites in the rat central nervous system was identical to the distribution seen when using [ 3 H]para-aminoclonidine

  12. Mechanism of adrenergic stimulation of hepatic ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, K; Harano, Y; Nakano, T; Suzuki, M; Kashiwagi, A; Shigeta, Y

    1983-11-01

    The effects of alpha- and beta-adrenergic stimulation on ketogenesis were examined in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes in order to determine which alpha- or beta-adrenergic stimulation is involved in the enhancement of ketogenesis. In the presence of 0.3 mmol/L (U-14C)-palmitate, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and phenylephrine at 500 ng/mL increased ketogenesis by 25% (16.0 +/- 0.17 v 12.8 +/- 0.13 nmol/mg protein per hour), 20% (15.3 +/- 0.28) and 20% (15.4 +/- 0.36), respectively. However, isoproterenol even at 1 microgram/mL did not stimulate ketogenesis. Phentolamine (5 micrograms/mL) almost completely abolished the effect of epinephrine on ketogenesis (13.7 +/- 0.30 v 16.0 +/- 0.17) but propranolol did not inhibit the stimulation by epinephrine (15.6 +/- 0.38 v 16.0 +/- 0.17). Trifluoperazine (10 mumol/L), presumably an inhibitor of calcium-dependent protein kinase, abolished the effect of epinephrine (13.6 +/- 0.22 v 16.0 +/- 0.17). These results indicate that catecholamines increase ketogenesis predominantly through the alpha-adrenergic system independent of cyclic AMP, and calcium-dependent protein kinase is thought to be involved in the activation of ketogenesis. On the other hand, glucagon stimulated ketogenesis with an increase of cyclic AMP, which was not inhibited by alpha- and beta-adrenergic antagonists. Alpha-adrenergic stimulation increased hepatic glycogenolysis much more at much lower concentrations when compared with ketogenesis. Stimulation of ketogenesis by catecholamines seemed to be less sensitive and responsive compared with hepatic glycogenolysis.

  13. Combined blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor and programmed death 1 pathways in advanced kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, David J; McDermott, David F

    2017-06-01

    Targeted and immune-based therapies have improved outcomes in advanced kidney cancer, yet novel strategies are needed to extend the duration of these benefits and expand them to more patients. Combined inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the programmed death 1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways with therapeutic agents already in clinical use may offer such a strategy. Here, we describe the development and clinical evaluation of VEGF inhibitors and, separately, PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. We present preclinical evidence of interaction between these pathways and the rationale for combined blockade. Beyond well-known effects on pathologic angiogenesis, VEGF blockade also may decrease immune tolerance and enhance PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. We conclude with the results of several early trials of combined VEGF and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade, which demonstrate encouraging antitumor activity, and we pose questions for future study.

  14. α-adrenergic blockers for the treatment of lower-urinary-tract symptoms and dysfunction in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Katie; Hilas, Olga

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of α-adrenergic blockers in the treatment of female lower-urinary-tract symptoms and dysfunction. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974 to January 2014), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to January 2014), and MEDLINE (1946 to January 2014) to identify clinical trials evaluating the effects of α-adrenergic blockers in the treatment of women with lower-urinary-tract dysfunction. Bibliographies from relevant research articles were also reviewed for inclusion. All original research articles available in the English language were identified from the data sources. Primary literature evaluating outcomes related to urinary dysfunction and associated symptoms in women were included in this review. Articles describing the use of α-adrenergic blockers in other medical conditions or in men were excluded. A total of 15 clinical studies were identified and evaluated. Many studies showed an improvement in female lower-urinary-tract symptoms and dysfunction using α-adrenergic blockers. Most studies also reported adverse drug events of α-adrenergic blockers such as dizziness and hypotension. However, limitations of the studies conducted to date include small sample sizes, inconsistent study designs, and short duration of therapy. The role of α-adrenergic blockers in the treatment of urinary dysfunction and associated symptoms in women remains unclear. The majority of evidence suggests that these agents may have a place in therapy for female lower-urinary-tract symptoms and/or bladder outlet obstruction; however, data are conflicting. Clinicians should be aware of the potential clinical benefits but also recognize the potential adverse drug effects of α-adrenergic blockers.

  15. Neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic ventral herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Roar; Madsen, Matias V; Asadzadeh, Sami

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic herniotomy is the preferred technique for some ventral hernias. Several factors may influence the surgical conditions, one being the depth of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) applied. We hypothesised that deep neuromuscular blockade defined as a post-tetanic count below eight...

  16. Neuromuscular blockade during laparoscopic ventral herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Roar; Madsen, Matias V; Asadzadeh, Sami

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic herniotomy is the preferred technique for some ventral hernias. Several factors may influence the surgical conditions, one being the depth of neuromuscular blockade (NMB) applied. We hypothesised that deep neuromuscular blockade defined as a post-tetanic count below eig...

  17. Ghrelin potentiates cardiac reactivity to stress by modulating sympathetic control and beta-adrenergic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo-Silva, Gabriel; Turones, Larissa Córdova; da Cruz, Kellen Rosa; Gomes, Karina Pereira; Mendonça, Michelle Mendanha; Nunes, Allancer; de Jesus, Itamar Guedes; Colugnati, Diego Basile; Pansani, Aline Priscila; Pobbe, Roger Luis Henschel; Santos, Robson; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky; Guatimosim, Silvia; de Castro, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Ferreira, Reginaldo Nassar; Xavier, Carlos Henrique

    2018-03-01

    Prior evidence indicates that ghrelin is involved in the integration of cardiovascular functions and behavioral responses. Ghrelin actions are mediated by the growth hormone secretagogue receptor subtype 1a (GHS-R1a), which is expressed in peripheral tissues and central areas involved in the control of cardiovascular responses to stress. In the present study, we assessed the role of ghrelin - GHS-R1a axis in the cardiovascular reactivity to acute emotional stress in rats. Ghrelin potentiated the tachycardia evoked by restraint and air jet stresses, which was reverted by GHS-R1a blockade. Evaluation of the autonomic balance revealed that the sympathetic branch modulates the ghrelin-evoked positive chronotropy. In isolated hearts, the perfusion with ghrelin potentiated the contractile responses caused by stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor, without altering the amplitude of the responses evoked by acetylcholine. Experiments in isolated cardiomyocytes revealed that ghrelin amplified the increases in calcium transient changes evoked by isoproterenol. Taken together, our results indicate that the Ghrelin-GHS-R1a axis potentiates the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia by modulating the autonomic nervous system and peripheral mechanisms, strongly relying on the activation of cardiac calcium transient and beta-adrenergic receptors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Checkpoint blockade in combination with cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-12-16

    Checkpoint blockade, prevention of inhibitory signaling that limits activation or function of tumor antigen-specific T cells responses, is revolutionizing the treatment of many poor prognosis malignancies. Indeed monoclonal antibodies that modulate signaling through the inhibitory molecules CTLA-4 and PD-1 are now clinically available; however, many tumors, demonstrate minimal response suggesting the need for combinations with other therapeutic strategies. Because an inadequate frequency of activated tumor antigen-specific T cells in the tumor environment, the so-called non-inflamed phenotype, is observed in some malignancies, other rationale partners are modalities that lead to enhanced T cell activation (vaccines, cytokines, toll-like receptor agonists, and other anticancer therapies such as chemo-, radio- or targeted therapies that lead to release of antigen from tumors). This review will focus on preclinical and clinical data supporting the use of cancer vaccines with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies. Preliminary preclinical data demonstrate enhanced antitumor activity although the results in human studies are less clear. Broader combinations of multiple immune modulators are now under study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Huan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease. Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use of monotherapy, without applying any language restrictions. Keywords for the searches included "diabetic nephropathy," "chronic kidney disease," "chronic renal insufficiency," "diabetes mellitus," "dual therapy," "combined therapy," "dual blockade," "renin-angiotensin system," "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor," "angiotensin-receptor blocker," "aldosterone blockade," "selective aldosterone blockade," "renin inhibitor," "direct renin inhibitor," "mineralocorticoid receptor blocker," etc. Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed. We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin II receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension. However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety. In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons. Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility. Further trials are warranted to study the combination therapy as an

  20. Involvement of norepinephrine activity in the regulation of α1 adrenergic receptors in the medial preoptic nucleus of estradiol-treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sortino, M.A.; Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    To establish whether the diurnal decrease in the density of α1 receptors observed in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of estrogen (E 2 )-treated rats is related to the concomitant diurnal increase in norepinephrine (NE) turnover rates, we quantitiated the density of [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 receptors after blockade of NE turnover with alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (αMPT). A series of preliminary studies was performed to rule out an interference of this drug with [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 adrenergic receptors in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of brain slices with αMPT produced a dose-dependent inhibition of [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 adrenergic receptors with an IC 50 of approximately 6 mM. Scatchard analysis demonstrated that αMPT exhibited a simple competitive interaction with [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding sites as shown by an increase in the apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of the ligand and no change in the number of α1 receptors (B/sub max/). In contrast, preincubation of brain slices with αMPT and prior in vivo administration of αMPT did not affect [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding to α1 adrenergic receptors. The density of α1 adrenergic receptors in MPN was quantitated autoradiographically. Blockade of NE turnover with αMPT only partially prevented the reduction in α1 receptor density observed in the E 2 -treated rats, suggesting that the decrease in the level of [ 3 H]-Prazosin binding sites cannot be completely ascribed to increased NE turnover rates

  1. Coronary responses to cold air inhalation following afferent and efferent blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhaohui; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia and angina pectoris are commonly experienced during exertion in a cold environment. In the current study we tested the hypotheses that oropharyngeal afferent blockade (i.e., local anesthesia of the upper airway with lidocaine) as well as systemic β-adrenergic receptor blockade (i.e., intravenous propranolol) would improve the balance between myocardial oxygen supply and demand in response to the combined stimulus of cold air inhalation (−15 to −30°C) and isometric handgrip exercise (Cold + Grip). Young healthy subjects underwent Cold + Grip following lidocaine, propranolol, and control (no drug). Heart rate, blood pressure, and coronary blood flow velocity (CBV, from Doppler echocardiography) were continuously measured. Rate-pressure product (RPP) was calculated, and changes from baseline were compared between treatments. The change in RPP at the end of Cold + Grip was not different between lidocaine (2,441 ± 376) and control conditions (3,159 ± 626); CBV responses were also not different between treatments. With propranolol, heart rate (8 ± 1 vs. 14 ± 3 beats/min) and RPP responses to Cold + Grip were significantly attenuated. However, at peak exercise propranolol also resulted in a smaller ΔCBV (1.4 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 1.4 cm/s, P = 0.035), such that the relationship between coronary flow and cardiac metabolism was impaired under propranolol (0.43 ± 0.37 vs. 2.1 ± 0.63 arbitrary units). These data suggest that cold air breathing and isometric exercise significantly influence efferent control of coronary blood flow. Additionally, β-adrenergic vasodilation may play a significant role in coronary regulation during exercise. PMID:24816257

  2. Deep Neuromuscular Blockade Improves Laparoscopic Surgical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Herring, W Joseph; Blobner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic cholecys...

  3. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β2-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β2-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β2-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β2-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  4. Atomic Fock State Preparation Using Rydberg Blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, Matthew; Gill, Alexander; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G.

    2013-01-01

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected $\\sqrt{N}$ Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi $\\pi$ pulses to produce ${\\cal N}=1,2$ atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48% respectively. The ${\\cal N}=2$ ...

  5. Deep Neuromuscular Blockade Improves Laparoscopic Surgical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Herring, W Joseph; Blobner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic cholecys......INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic...

  6. The effect of neuromuscular blockade on oxygen consumption in sedated and mechanically ventilated pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemson, J.; Driessen, J.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of intense neuromuscular blockade (NMB) on oxygen consumption (VO(2)) in deeply sedated and mechanically ventilated children on the first day after complex congenital cardiac surgery. DESIGN: Prospective clinical interventional study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive

  7. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    in the rat. Spinal microdialysis was used to measure in vivo changes of acetylcholine after administration of the ligands, with or without nicotinic receptor blockade. In addition, in vitro binding properties of the ligands on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors were investigated. It was found that clonidine...... and rilmenidine increased, while yohimbine decreased spinal acetylcholine release. Efaroxan affected acetylcholine release differently depending on concentration. Nicotinic receptor blockade attenuated the effect of all ligands. All ligands showed poor binding affinity for muscarinic receptors. On the other hand......, all ligands possessed affinity for nicotinic receptors. Clonidine and yohimbine binding was best fit to a one site binding curve and rilmenidine and efaroxan to a two site binding curve. The present study demonstrates that the tested alpha2-adrenergic receptor ligands affect intraspinal acetylcholine...

  8. The role of adrenergic receptors in nicotine-induced hyperglycemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of adrenergic receptors in nicotine-induced hyperglycaemia has not been well studied in amphibians. Thus, this study investigates the effects of alpha and beta adrenergic receptor blockers in nicotine-induced hyperglycaemia in the common African toad Bufo regularis. Toads fasted for 24 h were anaesthetized with ...

  9. [Sleep disturbances in Smith-Magenis syndrome: treatment with melatonin and beta-adrenergic antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Thillo, A; Devriendt, K; Willekens, D

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome is a generic disorder, characterised by physical, neurological and behavioural features and caused by a 17p11.2 deletion. Patients with this syndrome typically display an inversion of the sleep-wake cycle. In this article we describe clinical developments in a two-year-old girl with Smith-Magenis syndrome whose sleep problems were successfully treated with melatonin and beta-adrenergic blockers. We also mention relevant data obtained in our literature search.

  10. Combined androgen blockade in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer--an overview. The Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1997-01-01

    The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed.......The value of combined androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer is still controversial. In this review by the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group, the literature addressing the concept and its clinical use is critically reviewed....

  11. Why CCR2 and CCR5 blockade failed and why CCR1 blockade might still be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lebre, M.C.; Vergunst, C.E.; Choi, I.Y.K.; Aarrass, S.; Oliveira, A.S.F.; Wyant, T.; Horuk, R.; Reedquist, K.A.; Tak, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to provide more insight into the question as to why blockade of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 may have failed in clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, using an in vitro monocyte migration system model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monocytes from healthy donors (HD; n = 8) or from RA patients (for CCR2 and CCR5 antibody n = 8; for CCR1 blockade n = 13) were isolated from peripheral blood and pre-incubated with different concentrations of either ...

  12. Evaluation of epidural blockade as therapy for patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Carlos Sanfelice Nunes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Sciatic pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation is a complex condition that is often highly limiting. The causes of pain in disc herniation are multifactorial. Two physiopathological mechanisms are involved in discogenic pain: mechanical deformation of nerve roots and a biochemical inflammatory component resulting from contact between the intervertebral disc and neural tissue, by way of the nucleus pulposus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of epidural blockade as therapy for bulging lumbar disc herniation. METHODS: A clinical study was conducted based on a retrospective and prospective survey. The blockade consisted of interlaminar puncture and bolus drug delivery. The number of procedures varied according to the clinical response, as determined through weekly evaluations and then 30, 90, and 180 days after the final session. A total of 124 patients who received one to five blockades were evaluated. RESULTS: The success rate (defining success as a reduction in sciatic pain of at least 80% was 75.8%. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated the therapeutic action of epidural blockade over the short term, i.e. in cases of acute pain, thus showing that intense and excruciating sciatic pain can be relieved through this technique. Because of the multifactorial genesis of sciatica and the difficulties encountered by healthcare professionals in treating this condition, epidural blockade can become part of therapeutic arsenal available. This procedure is situated between conservative treatment with an eminently clinical focus and surgical approaches.

  13. Adrenergic regulation of innate immunity: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eScanzano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system has a major role in the brain-immune cross-talk, but few information exist on the sympathoadrenergic regulation of innate immune system.The aim of this review is to summarize available knowledge regarding the sympathetic modulation of the innate immune response, providing a rational background for the possible repurposing of adrenergic drugs as immunomodulating agents.The cells of immune system express adrenoceptors (AR, which represent the target for noradrenaline and adrenaline. In human neutrophils, adrenaline and noradrenaline inhibit migration, CD11b/CD18 expression, and oxidative metabolism, possibly through β-AR, although the role of α1- and α2-AR requires further investigation. Natural Killer express β-AR, which are usually inhibitory. Monocytes express β-AR and their activation is usually antiinflammatory. On murine Dentritic cells (DC, β-AR mediate sympathetic influence on DC-T cells interactions. In human DC β2-AR may affect Th1/2 differentiation of CD4+ T cells. In microglia and in astrocytes, β2-AR dysregulation may contribute to neuroinflammation in autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease.In conclusion, extensive evidence supports a critical role for adrenergic mechanisms in the regulation of innate immunity, in peripheral tissues as well as in the CNS. Sympathoadrenergic pathways in the innate immune system may represent novel antiinflammatory and immunomodulating targets with significant therapeutic potential.

  14. Phosphoinositide metabolism and adrenergic receptors in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; de Vellis, J.

    1986-03-01

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide (PI) breakdown functions as a signal generating system. Diacylglycerol, one breakdown product of phosphotidylinositol-4,5-diphosphate hydrolysis, can stimulate protein kinase C, whereas inositol triphosphate, the other product, has been proposed to be a second messenger for Ca/sup + +/ mobilization. Using purified astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brain, the effects of adrenergic agonists and antagonists at 10/sup -5/ M were measured on PI breakdown. Astrocytes grown in culture were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, and basal (/sup 3/H) inositol phosphate (IP/sub 1/) accumulation was measured in the presence of Li/sup +/. Epinephrine > norepinephrine (NE) were the most active stimulants of IP/sub 1/ production. The ..cap alpha../sub 1/ adrenoreceptor blockers, phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine, added alone had no effect on IP/sub 1/ production was reduced below basal levels. Propranolol partially blocked the effects of NE. Clonidine and isoproterenol, separately added, reduced IP/sub 1/ below basal levels and when added together diminished IP/sub 1/ accumulation even further. The role of adrenergic stimulation in the production of c-AMP.

  15. Management of acute asthma in childhood. A randomized evaluation of beta-adrenergic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, A L; Lipton, J M; Warburton, D; Johnson, L B; Twarog, F J

    1980-05-01

    We examined the efficacy of several beta-adrenergic agents commonly used to treat asthma and evaluated the optimum route of administration. Two hundred and sixty-nine persons aged 5 to 21 years who came to the emergency ward while suffering from acute asthma were treated with either (1) inhalation isoetharine hydrochloride or (2) subcutaneous epinephrine or terbutaline sulfate. Patients were evaluated using clinical scores and pulmonary function tests and were monitored for adverse side effects. Regardless of mode of therapy, the acute attack was either treated successfully, terminated in hospital admission, or required further therapy within 24 hours in a comparable number of patients. Adverse side effects were more common with terbutaline sulfate than with either epinephrine or isoetharine in the doses used. Thus, inhalation of beta-adrenergic agents is as effective as subcutaneous administration in the treatment of acute asthma in childhood.

  16. An Oral Selective Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Youn Beak, PhD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs play adaptive and protective roles in the heart. Dabuzalgron is an oral selective α1A-AR agonist that was well tolerated in multiple clinical trials of treatment for urinary incontinence, but has never been used to treat heart disease in humans or animal models. In this study, the authors administered dabuzalgron to mice treated with doxorubicin (DOX, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent with dose-limiting cardiotoxicity that can lead to heart failure (HF. Dabuzalgron protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, likely by preserving mitochondrial function. These results suggest that activating cardiac α1A-ARs with dabuzalgron, a well-tolerated oral agent, might represent a novel approach to treating HF. Key Words: alpha adrenergic receptors, anthracyclines, cardioprotection, catecholamines, heart failure

  17. Precipitated withdrawal during maintenance opioid blockade with extended release naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Marc

    2008-08-01

    Background There has been increasing interest in the use of extended release injectable naltrexone for the treatment of opioid dependence. Case description We report a case of precipitated withdrawal in a 17-year-old adolescent female receiving extended release naltrexone (Vivitrol) for opioid dependence, following her third serial monthly dose of the medication, several days after using oxycodone with mild intoxication. Conclusions This case suggests that, in some circumstances, the opioid blockade may be overcome when naltrexone levels drop towards the end of the dosing interval, producing vulnerability to subsequent naltrexone-induced withdrawal. This may provide cautionary guidance for clinical management and dosing strategies.

  18. Greater occipital nerve blockade in cervicogenic headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VINCENT MAURICE B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervicocogenic headache (CeH is a relatively common disorder. Although no ideal treatment is available so far, blockades in different structures and nerves may be temporarily effective. We studied the effects of 1-2 mL 0.5% bupivacaine injection at the ipsilateral greater occipital nerve (GON in 41 CeH patients. The pain is significantly reduced both immediately and as long as 7 days after the blockade. The improvement is less marked during the first two days, a phenomenon we called "tilde pattern". GON blockades may reduce the pool of exaggerated sensory input and antagonize a putative "wind-up-like effect" which may explain the headache improvement.

  19. Atomic Fock State Preparation Using Rydberg Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Matthew; Gill, Alexander; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G.

    2014-01-01

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected √N Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with an essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi π pulses to produce N =1, 2 atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48%, respectively. The N=2 Fock state shows the collective Rabi frequency enhancement without corruption from atom number fluctuations.

  20. Arotinolol is a weak partial agonist on beta 3-adrenergic receptors in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Golozoubova, V; Cannon, B; Nedergaard, J

    2001-07-01

    Arotinolol, a clinically used alpha/beta-adrenergic blocker, has been demonstrated to be an anti-obesity agent. The anti-obesity effect of arotinolol was suggested to be the result of direct activation of thermogenesis in brown-fat cells. We tested the ability of arotinolol to stimulate thermogenesis (oxygen consumption) in isolated brown-fat cells and in intact animals. Arotinolol stimulated thermogenesis in brown-fat cells isolated from mouse and hamster. A relatively low sensitivity to the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol (pK(B) approximately 6) indicated that arotinolol interacted with the beta3-adrenergic receptor. On the beta3-receptor, arotinolol was a very weak (EC50 approximately 20 microM) and only partial (approximately 50%) agonist, but arotinolol also demonstrated the properties of being a beta3-receptor antagonist with a pK(B) of 5.7. In intact animals, only the antagonistic action of arotinolol could be observed. Because arotinolol is only a very weak and partial agonist on the beta3-receptors, direct stimulation of thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue is unlikely to be sufficient to cause significant weight loss. It may be necessary to invoke additional pathways to explain the anti-obesity effects of chronic treatment with arotinolol.

  1. Analgesic efficacy of the ultrasound-guided blockade of the transversus abdominis plane - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ripollés

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transverse abdominal plan blockade is a block of abdominal wall that has diffused rapidly in the clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesia for abdominal surgery. The performance of the ultrasound-guided technique has allowed the lowering of potential complications, as well as new approaches that were carried out according to the descriptions, and the prospective studies would make it possible to utilize the transverse abdominal plan blockade in different surgical interventions; however, the results obtained in randomized clinical trials are inconsistent.OBJECTIVES: To prepare a systematic review aiming to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockade for different surgical interventions, as well as the indications according to the approaches and their influences.METHODS: Two research approaches, one manual, and the other in Pubmed returned 28 randomized clinical trials where intervention with ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockades was performed to compare the analgesic efficacy in contrast to another technique in adults, published between 2007 and October 2013, in English or Spanish, with Jadad score > 1, according to the inclusion criteria for this review. The authors analyzed independently all the randomized clinical trials.CONCLUSIONS: The transverse abdominal plan blockades have been shown to be an effective technique in colorectal surgery, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, appendectomy, donor nephrectomy, retropubic prostatectomy, and bariatric surgery. However, the data found in randomized clinical trial are not conclusive, and as a result, it is necessary to develop new and well designed randomized clinical trial, with enough statistical power to compare different approaches, drugs, doses, and volumes for the same intervention, aiming to answer the current questions and their effects in the habitual clinical practice.

  2. Analgesic efficacy of the ultrasound-guided blockade of the transversus abdominis plane - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés, Javier; Mezquita, Sandra Marmaña; Abad, Alfredo; Calvo, José

    2015-01-01

    The transverse abdominal plan blockade is a block of abdominal wall that has diffused rapidly in the clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesia for abdominal surgery. The performance of the ultrasound-guided technique has allowed the lowering of potential complications, as well as new approaches that were carried out according to the descriptions, and the prospective studies would make it possible to utilize the transverse abdominal plan blockade in different surgical interventions; however, the results obtained in randomized clinical trials are inconsistent. To prepare a systematic review aiming to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockade for different surgical interventions, as well as the indications according to the approaches and their influences. Two research approaches, one manual, and the other in Pubmed returned 28 randomized clinical trials where intervention with ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockades was performed to compare the analgesic efficacy in contrast to another technique in adults, published between 2007 and October 2013, in English or Spanish, with Jadad score>1, according to the inclusion criteria for this review. The authors analyzed independently all the randomized clinical trials. The transverse abdominal plan blockades have been shown to be an effective technique in colorectal surgery, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, appendectomy, donor nephrectomy, retropubic prostatectomy, and bariatric surgery. However, the data found in randomized clinical trial are not conclusive, and as a result, it is necessary to develop new and well designed randomized clinical trial, with enough statistical power to compare different approaches, drugs, doses, and volumes for the same intervention, aiming to answer the current questions and their effects in the habitual clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda

  3. Profile of sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular blockade in the elderly: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Michele; Bertoncello, Francesco; Ieppariello, Giovanna

    2018-01-01

    The number of elderly patients is increasing worldwide. This will have a significant impact on the practice of anesthesia in future decades. Anesthesiologists must provide care for an increasing number of elderly patients, who have an elevated risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Complications related to postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade, such as muscle weakness, airway obstruction, hypoxemia, atelectasis, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure, are more frequent in older than in younger patients. Therefore, neuromuscular blockade in the elderly should be carefully monitored and completely reversed before awakening patients at the end of anesthesia. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are traditionally used for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Although the risk of residual neuromuscular blockade is reduced by reversal with neostigmine, it continues to complicate the postoperative course. Sugammadex represents an innovative approach to reversal of neuromuscular blockade induced by aminosteroid neuromuscular-blocking agents, particularly rocuronium, with useful applications in clinical practice. However, aging is associated with certain changes in the pharmacokinetics of sugammadex, and to date there has been no thorough evaluation of the use of sugammadex in elderly patients. The aim of this review was to perform an analysis of the use of sugammadex in older adults based on the current literature. Major issues surrounding the physiologic and pharmacologic effects of aging in elderly patients and how these may impact the routine use of sugammadex in elderly patients are discussed.

  4. Adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells: correlation in rat thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Daniela

    2002-10-21

    The interactions between adrenergic nerve fibres and mast cells (MCs) were studied in the thymus of adult and old rats by morphological methods and by quantitative analysis of images (QAIs). The whole thymus was drawn in adult (12 months old) rats: normal, sympathectomized or electrostimulated. Thymuses from the above-mentioned animals were weighed, measured and dissected. Thymic slices were stained with eosin orange for detection of microanatomical details and with Bodian's method for identification of the whole nerve fibres. Thymic MCs were stained with Astrablau. Histofluorescence microscopy was used for staining of adrenergic nerve fibres. Finally, all morphological results were submitted to the QAIs and statistical analysis of data. Our results suggest that after surgical sympathectomy, the greater part of adrenergic nerve fibres disappear while related MCs appear to show less evident fluorescence and few granules. On the contrary, electrostimulation of the cervical superior ganglion induced an increase in the fluorescence of adrenergic nerve fibres and of related MCs.

  5. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  6. Amiloride interacts with renal α- and β-adrenergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, M.J.; Mullen, M.D.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques to assess whether amiloride and certain analogues of amiloride (ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil) can bind to adrenergic receptors in the kidney. They found that amiloride could compete for [ 3 H]rauwolscine (α 2 -adrenergic receptors), [ 3 H]prazosin (α 1 -adrenergic receptors), and [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol (β-adrenergic receptors) binding in rat renal cortical membranes with inhibitor constants of 13.6 /plus minus/ 5.7, 24.4 /plus minus/ 7.4, and 8.36 /plus minus/ 13.5 μM, respectively. Ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil were from 2- to 25-fold more potent than amiloride in competing for radioligand binding sites in studies with these membranes. In addition, amiloride and the two analogues competed for [ 3 H]prazosin sites on intact Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and amiloride blocked epinephrine-stimulated prostaglandin E 2 production in these cells. They conclude that amiloride competes for binding to several classes of renal adrenergic receptors with a rank order of potency of α 2 > α 1 > β. Binding to, and antagonism of, adrenergic receptors occurs at concentrations of amiloride that are lower than previously observed nonspecific interactions of this agent

  7. Beta-adrenergic antagonism modulates functional connectivity in the default mode network of individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, John P; Ferguson, Bradley J; Zamzow, Rachel M; Rohowetz, Landon J; Johnson, Jeffrey D; Christ, Shawn E; Beversdorf, David Q

    2017-10-01

    The beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol benefits some social and communication domains affected in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and these benefits appear to be associated with increased functional connectivity (FC) in the brain during task performance. FC is implicated in ASD, with the majority of studies suggesting long distance hypo-connectivity combined with regionally specific local hyper-connectivity. The objective in the current investigation was to examine the effect of propranolol on FC at rest and determine whether ASD-specific effects exist. Participants with and without ASD attended three sessions in which propranolol, nadolol (a beta-adrenergic antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier), or placebo were administered. Resting-state fMRI data were acquired, and graph theory techniques were utilized to assess additional aspects of FC. Compared to placebo, propranolol administration was associated with decreased FC in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex subnetwork of the default mode network and increased FC in the medial temporal lobe subnetwork, regardless of diagnosis. These effects were not seen with nadolol suggesting that the alterations in FC following propranolol administration were not exclusively due to peripheral cardiovascular effects. Thus, beta-adrenergic antagonism can up- or down- regulate FC, depending on the network, and alter coordinated functional activation in the brain. These changes in information processing, as demonstrated by FC, may mediate some of the clinical and behavioral effects of beta-adrenergic antagonism previously reported in patients with ASD.

  8. Adrenergic influence on gastric mucosal blood flow in gastric fistula dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P; Bech, K; Gottrup, F

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of alpha-, beta- and dopaminergic receptors on gastric mucosal blood flow during "high", "normal", and "low" vagal conditions obtained by stimulation with bethanechol and pentagastrin and by parietal cell vagotomy respectively. During pentagastri...... increasing effect on mucosal blood flow. One may conclude that blood flow and acid secretion are not unconditionally linked and that at least two different mechanisms are involved in blood flow changes in the stomach.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...... and bethanechol stimulation, a linear relationship between gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow was observed. During pentagastrin stimulation, dopamine (40 micrograms/kg/min) did not change the blood flow values while a decrease in acid secretion was found. During bethanechol stimulation dopamine (10...... micrograms/kg/min) induced an increase in mucosal blood flow and a similar increase in acid secretion. If the dopamine infusion was preceded by alpha-receptor blockade, a pronounced increase in mucosal blood flow was observed without a similar increase in acid secretion. beta-adrenergic stimulation...

  9. Norepinephrine regulates cocaine-primed reinstatement via α1-adrenergic receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karl T; Schroeder, Jason P; Foster, Stephanie L; Squires, Katherine; Smith, Brilee M; Pitts, Elizabeth G; Epstein, Michael P; Weinshenker, David

    2017-06-01

    Drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats is thought to reflect relapse-like behavior and is mediated by the integration of signals from mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic projections and corticostriatal glutamatergic innervation. Cocaine-primed reinstatement can also be attenuated by systemic administration of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibitors, which prevent norepinephrine (NE) synthesis, or by α1-adrenergic receptor (α1AR) antagonists, indicating functional modulation by the noradrenergic system. In the present study, we sought to further discern the role of NE in cocaine-seeking behavior by determining whether α1AR activation can induce reinstatement on its own or is sufficient to permit cocaine-primed reinstatement in the absence of all other AR signaling, and identifying the neuroanatomical substrate within the mesocorticolimbic reward system harboring the critical α1ARs. We found that while intracerebroventricular infusion of the α1AR agonist phenylephrine did not induce reinstatement on its own, it did overcome the blockade of cocaine-primed reinstatement by the DBH inhibitor nepicastat. Furthermore, administration of the α1AR antagonist terazosin in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell, attenuated cocaine-primed reinstatement. Combined, these data indicate that α1AR activation in the mPFC is required for cocaine-primed reinstatement, and suggest that α1AR antagonists merit further investigation as pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adrenergic Stimulation Mediates Visceral Hypersensitivity to Colorectal Distension following Heterotypic Chronic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, John H.; Xu, Guang-Yin; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic stress exacerbates or causes relapse of symptoms such as abdominal pain and cramping in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether chronic stress increases plasma norepinephrine and sensitizes colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by increasing the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the colon wall. Methods Heterotypic chronic stress (HeCS) was induced in male Wistar rats and neurologic and molecular responses were analyzed. Tissues were analyzed for NGF expression. Results HeCS significantly increased the visceromoter response to colorectal distension; expression of NGF increased in colonic muscularis externa and mucosa/submucosa. Rheobase decreased, resting membrane potential was depolarized, and electrogenesis of action potentials increased in colon-specific thoracolumbar DRG neurons. Luminal administration of resiniferatoxin in distal colon, systemic administration of anti-NGF antibody, or inhibition of the NGF receptor TrkA by k252A or antisense oligonucleotides in thoracolumbar DRG blocked the chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. Blockade of α1/α2- and β1/β2-adrenergic receptors prevented the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity and increased expression of NGF in the colon wall. HeCS did not induce any inflammatory response in the colon wall. Conclusion The peripheral stress mediator norepinephrine induces visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension in response to HeCS by increasing the expression of NGF in the colon wall, which sensitizes primary afferents in the absence of an inflammatory response. PMID:19800336

  11. Neuromuscular blockade in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz-Rudnicki, Michał

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the presented review is to highlight the clinical problem of postoperative residual curarization (PORC) following general anaesthesia in the elderly. Possible complications of PORC are described along with age-induced changes in pharmacokinetics of long and intermediate-acting neuromuscular blocking agents. This is intended to facilitate the selection and to promote appropriate intraoperative use of muscle relaxants in patients over the age of 65 years.

  12. The Combination of Marketed Antagonists of α1b-Adrenergic and 5-HT2A Receptors Inhibits Behavioral Sensitization and Preference to Alcohol in Mice: A Promising Approach for the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovero, Fabrice; David, Sabrina; Bernard, Philippe; Puech, Alain; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-dependence is a chronic disease with a dramatic and expensive social impact. Previous studies have indicated that the blockade of two monoaminergic receptors, α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A, could inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to drugs of abuse, a hallmark of drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in rodents. Here, in order to develop a potential therapeutic treatment of alcohol dependence in humans, we have blocked these two monoaminergic receptors by a combination of antagonists already approved by Health Agencies. We show that the association of ifenprodil (1 mg/kg) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) (α1-adrenergic and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists marketed as Vadilex ® and Periactine ® in France, respectively) blocks behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in C57Bl6 mice and to alcohol in DBA2 mice. Moreover, this combination of antagonists inhibits alcohol intake in mice habituated to alcohol (10% v/v) and reverses their alcohol preference. Finally, in order to verify that the effect of ifenprodil was not due to its anti-NMDA receptors property, we have shown that a combination of prazosin (0.5 mg/kg, an α1b-adrenergic antagonist, Mini-Press ® in France) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) could also reverse alcohol preference. Altogether these findings strongly suggest that combined prazosin and cyproheptadine could be efficient as a therapy to treat alcoholism in humans. Finally, because α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade also inhibits behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants, opioids and tobacco, it cannot be excluded that this combination will exhibit some efficacy in the treatment of addiction to other abused drugs.

  13. The Combination of Marketed Antagonists of α1b-Adrenergic and 5-HT2A Receptors Inhibits Behavioral Sensitization and Preference to Alcohol in Mice: A Promising Approach for the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Trovero

    Full Text Available Alcohol-dependence is a chronic disease with a dramatic and expensive social impact. Previous studies have indicated that the blockade of two monoaminergic receptors, α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A, could inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to drugs of abuse, a hallmark of drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in rodents. Here, in order to develop a potential therapeutic treatment of alcohol dependence in humans, we have blocked these two monoaminergic receptors by a combination of antagonists already approved by Health Agencies. We show that the association of ifenprodil (1 mg/kg and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg (α1-adrenergic and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists marketed as Vadilex ® and Periactine ® in France, respectively blocks behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in C57Bl6 mice and to alcohol in DBA2 mice. Moreover, this combination of antagonists inhibits alcohol intake in mice habituated to alcohol (10% v/v and reverses their alcohol preference. Finally, in order to verify that the effect of ifenprodil was not due to its anti-NMDA receptors property, we have shown that a combination of prazosin (0.5 mg/kg, an α1b-adrenergic antagonist, Mini-Press ® in France and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg could also reverse alcohol preference. Altogether these findings strongly suggest that combined prazosin and cyproheptadine could be efficient as a therapy to treat alcoholism in humans. Finally, because α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade also inhibits behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants, opioids and tobacco, it cannot be excluded that this combination will exhibit some efficacy in the treatment of addiction to other abused drugs.

  14. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on elevated arterial compliance and low systemic vascular resistance in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2001-01-01

    investigation with determination of splanchnic and systemic haemodynamics. Arterial compliance was determined as the ratio of the stroke volume to the pulse pressure and compared to normal values. RESULTS: All the patients had significant portal hypertension, with a mean hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG......) of 17.8 mmHg, and responded to beta-blocker treatment with a significant reduction in the HVPG (-16%; P elevated (1.27 versus controls 1.01 ml/mmHg; P ... with beta-blockers increases small vessel (arteriolar) vascular tone towards the normal level, but does not affect the elevated compliance of the larger arteries in patients with cirrhosis....

  15. Effect of beta-adrenergic blockade on elevated arterial compliance and low systemic vascular resistance in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2001-01-01

    investigation with determination of splanchnic and systemic haemodynamics. Arterial compliance was determined as the ratio of the stroke volume to the pulse pressure and compared to normal values. RESULTS: All the patients had significant portal hypertension, with a mean hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG......BACKGROUND: Patients with cirrhosis exhibit a characteristic hyperdynamic circulation with increased cardiac output and heart rate and reduced systemic vascular resistance. The compliance of the arterial tree has recently been reported to be increased in these patients, who are often treated...... systemic vascular resistance increased substantially (1083 versus 1378 dyn x s x cm-5, +27%; P arterial blood pressure (-6%; P

  16. Hemodynamic response to exercise after beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol in patients with mitral valve obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummung, G R; Carr, W

    1966-09-03

    Propranolol (P) .13 mg./kg. was given to seven patients with mitral valve obstruction the changes in resting and exercise hemodynamics were followed by means of combined right and left heart catheterization. Changes were variable. At rest there was a decrease in heart rate of 10 beats/min. with no consistent change in stroke volume, cardiac output, left ventricular systolic (LVS) or left atrial (LA) pressure after P. Mean left ventricular end-diastolic (LVED) pressure was increased 3 mm., mean pulmonary artery (PA) pressure was increased 4 mm., and mean mitral valve gradient was reduced 3 mm. Hg by P. During exercise, mean LVS pressure was decreased 31 mm., mean LVED pressure increased 3 mm., mean LA pressure decreased 3 mm., and mean mitral valve gradient was reduced 5 mm. Hg after P. Mean exercise PA pressure was unchanged, cardiac output was reduced 0.9 1./min., and mean heart rate was reduced 37 beats/min., while stroke volume increased 3 ml./beat after P. Exercise pulmonary vascular resistance was increased from 6.1 to 8.2 units by P. Despite a slower heart rate, the diastolic filling period was not increased. P has no place in the treatment of the majority of patients with mitral stenosis because it further reduces cardiac performance below normal.

  17. The Effects of β-Adrenergic Blockade on the Degrading Effects of Eye Movements on Negative Autobiographical Memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Littel, Marianne; Kenemans, J. Leon; Baas, Johanna M.P.; Logemann, H. N.Alexander; Rijken, Nellie; Remijn, Malou; Hassink, Rutger J.; Engelhard, Iris M.; van den Hout, Marcel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. During EMDR, patients make horizontal eye movements (EMs) while simultaneously recalling a traumatic memory, which renders the memory less vivid and emotional when it is later

  18. The Effects of β-Adrenergic Blockade on the Degrading Effects of Eye Movements on Negative Autobiographical Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littel, Marianne; Kenemans, J Leon; Baas, Johanna M P; Logemann, H N Alexander; Rijken, Nellie; Remijn, Malou; Hassink, Rutger J; Engelhard, Iris M; van den Hout, Marcel A

    2017-10-15

    Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. During EMDR, patients make horizontal eye movements (EMs) while simultaneously recalling a traumatic memory, which renders the memory less vivid and emotional when it is later recalled again. Recalling highly emotional autobiographical memories enhances noradrenergic neurotransmission. Noradrenaline (NA) strengthens memory (re)consolidation. However, memories become less vivid after recall+EMs. Therefore, NA might either play no significant role or serve to strengthen memories that are degraded by EMs. The present study was designed to test the latter hypothesis. We predicted that blocking NA would abolish the memory degrading effects of EMs. Fifty-six healthy participants selected three negative autobiographical memories. One was then recalled while making EMs, one was recalled without EMs, and one was not recalled. Vividness and emotionality of the memories as well as heart rate and skin conductance level during memory retrieval were measured before, directly after, and 24 hours after the EM task. Before the task, participants received a placebo or the noradrenergic β-receptor blocker propranolol (40 mg). There were no effects of EMs on memory emotionality or psychophysiological measures in the propranolol and placebo groups. However, in the placebo group, but not in the propranolol group, memory vividness significantly decreased from pretest to posttest and follow-up after recall+EMs relative to the control conditions. Blocking NA abolished the effects of EMs on the vividness of emotional memories, indicating that NA is crucial for EMDR effectiveness and possibly strengthens the reconsolidation of the degraded memory. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade on endurance and short-time performance in respect to individual muscle fiber composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, P; Rössner, S; Karlsson, J

    1981-02-01

    Nine physically active males were studied three times with four different exercise tests after administration of placebo, 0.1 g atenolol, or 0.08 g propranolol in random order. The test modals were: bicycle ergometer exercise at 50% of VO2max, peak torque during knee extension, the Wingate muscle power test, and 2000 m track running. Muscle fiber composition had previously been determined. In subjects with a high percentage of slow-twitch fibers the beta-blockers caused a more marked impairment in the exercising muscles. This effect was more pronounced with the unselective beta-blocker propranolol than with atenolol. One interpretation of our findings is that peripheral sympathetic beta 2-receptors in skeletal muscles may contribute to regulating muscle metabolism.

  20. Regulation of glucose turnover during exercise in pancreatectomized, totally insulin-deficient dogs. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade.

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorkman, O; Miles, P; Wasserman, D; Lickley, L; Vranic, M

    1988-01-01

    To examine whether glucose metabolic clearance increases and whether catecholamines influence glucose turnover during exercise in total insulin deficiency, 24-h fasted and insulin-deprived pancreatectomized dogs were studied before and during exercise (60 min; 100 m/min; 10% slope) with (n = 8) and without (n = 8) propranolol infusion (PI, 5 micrograms/kg-min). Exercise with or without PI was accompanied by four and fivefold increments in norepinephrine and epinephrine respectively, while glu...

  1. Women at Altitude: Effects of Menstrual Cycle Phase and Alpha-Adrenergic Blockade on High Altitude Acclimatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, vA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction...Palmer SK, Dahms TE, et al. Blood volume expansion, preeclampsia , and infant birth weight at high altitude. J Appl Physiol 1993;74:1566- 73. Contract...is Ms. Virginia Miller at DSN 343-7327 or by email at virginia.miller@det.amedd.army.mil. FOR THE COMMANDER: PHYL IM. RINEHART Deputy Chief of, Staff for Information Management

  2. Efficient Multiparticle Entanglement via Asymmetric Rydberg Blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Mølmer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    We present an efficient method for producing N particle entangled states using Rydberg blockade interactions. Optical excitation of Rydberg states that interact weakly, yet have a strong coupling to a second control state is used to achieve state dependent qubit rotations in small ensembles. On t....... On the basis of quantitative calculations, we predict that an entangled quantum superposition state of eight atoms can be produced with a fidelity of 84% in cold Rb atoms.......We present an efficient method for producing N particle entangled states using Rydberg blockade interactions. Optical excitation of Rydberg states that interact weakly, yet have a strong coupling to a second control state is used to achieve state dependent qubit rotations in small ensembles...

  3. Adrenergic Metabolic and Hemodynamic Effects of Octopamine in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelar Bracht

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fruit extracts of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange are traditionally used as weight-loss products and as appetite suppressants. A component of these extracts is octopamine, which is an adrenergic agent. Weight-loss and adrenergic actions are always related to metabolic changes and this work was designed to investigate a possible action of octopamine on liver metabolism. The isolated perfused rat liver was used to measure catabolic and anabolic pathways and hemodynamics. Octopamine increased glycogenolysis, glycolysis, oxygen uptake, gluconeogenesis and the portal perfusion pressure. Octopamine also accelerated the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids (octanoate and oleate, as revealed by the increase in 14CO2 production derived from 14C labeled precursors. The changes in glycogenolysis, oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure were almost completely abolished by α1-adrenergic antagonists. The same changes were partly sensitive to the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. It can be concluded that octopamine accelerates both catabolic and anabolic processes in the liver via adrenergic stimulation. Acceleration of oxygen uptake under substrate-free perfusion conditions also means acceleration of the oxidation of endogenous fatty acids, which are derived from lipolysis. All these effects are compatible with an overall stimulating effect of octopamine on metabolism, which is compatible with its reported weight-loss effects in experimental animals.

  4. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena J Steinle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jena J SteinleDepartments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Neurobiology, Hamilton Eye Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USAAbstract: Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease.Keywords: NGF, β-adrenergic receptor agents, α-adrenergic receptor agents, retina, cornea, glaucoma

  5. Adrenergic Signaling: A Targetable Checkpoint Limiting Development of the Antitumor Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Guanxi; Chen, Minhui; Bucsek, Mark J; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Hylander, Bonnie L

    2018-01-01

    An immune response must be tightly controlled so that it will be commensurate with the level of response needed to protect the organism without damaging normal tissue. The roles of cytokines and chemokines in orchestrating these processes are well known, but although stress has long been thought to also affect immune responses, the underlying mechanisms were not as well understood. Recently, the role of nerves and, specifically, the sympathetic nervous system, in regulating immune responses is being revealed. Generally, an acute stress response is beneficial but chronic stress is detrimental because it suppresses the activities of effector immune cells while increasing the activities of immunosuppressive cells. In this review, we first discuss the underlying biology of adrenergic signaling in cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. We then focus on the effects of chronic adrenergic stress in promoting tumor growth, giving examples of effects on tumor cells and immune cells, explaining the methods commonly used to induce stress in preclinical mouse models. We highlight how this relates to our observations that mandated housing conditions impose baseline chronic stress on mouse models, which is sufficient to cause chronic immunosuppression. This problem is not commonly recognized, but it has been shown to impact conclusions of several studies of mouse physiology and mouse models of disease. Moreover, the fact that preclinical mouse models are chronically immunosuppressed has critical ramifications for analysis of any experiments with an immune component. Our group has found that reducing adrenergic stress by housing mice at thermoneutrality or treating mice housed at cooler temperatures with β-blockers reverses immunosuppression and significantly improves responses to checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy. These observations are clinically relevant because there are numerous retrospective epidemiological studies concluding that cancer patients who were

  6. Autoradiographic quantification of adrenergic receptors in rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calianos, T. II; Muntz, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic nervous system is active in kidney function, and the kidney has large numbers of adrenergic receptor subtypes. Because of the cellular complexity of the kidney, it is difficult to obtain direct assessments of adrenergic receptor binding characteristics over specific tissue compartments. Qualitative autoradiography allows the localization of adrenergic receptors over tissue types in the kidney, but quantitative autoradiography allows direct comparison of adrenergic receptor number over different cellular compartments. The purpose of this study was to obtain direct assessments of alpha 1, alpha 2, and beta adrenergic receptor numbers over different tissue compartments of the kidney using quantitative autoradiography. Sections of Sprague-Dawley rat kidney were incubated in several concentrations of 3H-dihydroalprenolol to label beta receptors, 3H-prazosin to label alpha 1 receptors and 3H-rauwolscine to label the alpha 2 receptors. Sections of rat heart incubated in 3H-dihydroalprenolol were included as standards. The sections were then prepared for receptor autoradiography. After processing, the grains were then quantified on an image analysis system, and binding curves constructed from the specific binding. In some animals, the proximal tubules were stained to localize the proximal convoluted tubules. Significant Scatchard analyses were obtained in the glomeruli with dihydroalprenolol (5.18 X 10(9) receptors/mm3) and with rauwolscine (2.48 X 10(9) receptors/mm3). Significant Scatchard analyses were obtained in the cortex with rauwolscine (9.47 X 10(9) receptors/mm3) and with prazosin (3.9 X 10(9)). In addition, specific binding was seen with rauwolscine and prazosin to the kidney arterioles

  7. Dexmedetomidine for Refractory Adrenergic Crisis in Familial Dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Ryan C.; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Spalink, Christy L.; Altshuler, Diana; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Fridman, David; Papadopoulos, John; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adrenergic crises are a cardinal feature of familial dysautonomia (FD). Traditionally, adrenergic crisis have been treated with the sympatholytic agent clonidine or with benzodiazepines, which can cause excessive sedation and respiratory depression. Dexmedetomidine is an α2A-adrenergic agonist with greater selectivity and shorter half-life than clonidine. We aimed to evaluate the preliminary effectiveness and safety of intravenous dexmedetomidine in the treatment of refractory adrenergic crisis in patients with FD. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients with genetically confirmed FD who received intravenous dexmedetomidine for refractory adrenergic crises. The primary outcome was preliminary effectiveness of dexmedetomidine defined as change in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) 1-hour after the initiation of dexmedetomidine. Secondary outcomes included incidence of adverse events related to dexmedetomidine, hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, and hemodynamic parameters 12-hours after dexmedetomidine cessation. Results Nine patients over 14 admissions were included in the final analysis. At 1-hour after the initiation of dexmedetomidine, systolic BP decreased from 160±7 to 122±7 mmHg (p=0.0005), diastolic BP decreased from 103±6 to 65±8 (p=0.0003), and HR decreased from 112±4 to 100±5 bpm (p=0.0047). The median total adverse events during dexmedetomidine infusion was 1 per admission. Median hospital length of stay was 9 days (IQR, 3 – 11 days) and median ICU length of stay was 7 days (IQR, 3 – 11 days). Conclusions Intravenous dexmedetomidine is safe in patients with FD and appears to be effective to treat refractory adrenergic crisis. Dexmedetomidine may be considered in FD patients who do not respond to conventional clonidine and benzodiazepine pharmacotherapy. PMID:27752785

  8. Reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in laparoscopic bariatric surgery: In support of dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaoui, Rachid; Cabaret, Aurélie; Alami, Youssef; Zogheib, Elie; Popov, Ivan; Lorne, Emmanuel; Dupont, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    Sugammadex is the first molecule able to antagonize steroidal muscle relaxants with few adverse effects. Doses are adjusted to body weight and the level of neuromuscular blockade. Sleeve gastrectomy is becoming a very popular form of bariatric surgery. It requires deep muscle relaxation followed by complete and rapid reversal to decrease postoperative and especially post-anaesthetic morbidity. Sugammadex is therefore particularly indicated in this setting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the deep neuromuscular blockade reversal time after administration of various doses of sugammadex (based on real weight or at lower doses). Secondary endpoints were the interval between the sugammadex injection and extubation and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room. We then investigated any complications observed in the recovery room. This pilot, prospective, observational, clinical practice evaluation study was conducted in the Amiens University Hospital. Neuromuscular blockade was induced by rocuronium. At the end of the operation, deep neuromuscular blockade was reversed by sugammadex at the dose of 4mg/kg. Sixty-four patients were included: 31 patients received sugammadex at a dosage based on their real weight (RW) and 33 patients received a lower dose (based on ideal weight [IW]). For identical rocuronium doses calculated based on IBW, sugammadex doses were significantly lower in the IW group: 349 (± 65) mg versus 508 (± 75) mg (Pneuromuscular blockade reversal took 115 (± 69) s in the IW group versus 87 (± 40) s in the RW group, but with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.08). The intervals between injection of sugammadex and extubation (P=0.07) and transfer from the operating room to the recovery room (P=0.68) were also non-significantly longer in the IW group. The mean dose of sugammadex used by anaesthetists in the IW group was 4mg/kg of ideal weight increased by 35% to 50% (n=20; 351±34mg). No sugammadex adverse

  9. Race and sex differences in cardiovascular α-adrenergic and β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in men and women with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Andrew; Hill, LaBarron K; Blumenthal, James A; Johnson, Kristy S; Hinderliter, Alan L

    2017-05-01

    Hypertension is associated with unfavorable changes in adrenergic receptor responsiveness, but the relationship of race and sex to adrenergic receptor responsiveness in the development of cardiovascular disease is unclear. This study examined α-adrenergic and ß-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in African-American and white men and women with untreated high blood pressure (BP) (HBP) and with normal BP. The study sample comprised 161 African-American and white men and women in the age range 25-45 years. Isoproterenol, a nonselective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist, was administered intravenously to determine the bolus dose required to increase heart rate by 25 bpm, an index of β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. Similarly, phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, was administered to determine the bolus dose required to increase BP by 25 mmHg, an index of vascular α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. HBP (P < 0.01), male sex (P = 0.04), and higher BMI (P < 0.01) were all associated with reduced β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness, with a similar trend observed for African-American race (P = 0.07). Conversely, α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness was increased in association with HBP (P < 0.01), female sex (P < 0.01), and African-American race (P < 0.01). In the early stages of hypertension, cardiovascular β-adrenergic receptors demonstrate blunted responsiveness, whereas conversely α1-adrenergic receptors exhibit increased responsiveness. This pattern of receptor changes is especially evident in men and African-Americans, is exacerbated by obesity, and may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease.

  10. Long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist in pediatric asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemi Yoshihara

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (LABA, a class of agents for the long-term management of childhood bronchial asthma, are recommended for use in combination with steroid inhalation for the treatment of the morning dip in severe childhood asthma. In the present review, salmeterol (SM, a LABA inhalant with a long-acting bronchodilator effect, was compared with the recently introduced tulobuterol patch (TBP in terms of safety and efficacy, based on their respective clinical effects on childhood asthma. From a clinical perspective, both drugs had a preventive effect by suppressing the morning dip and exercise-induced asthma when used concomitantly with an inhaled corticosteroid, and both agents were associated with a lower incidence of adverse effects on the cardiovascular system than oral β2-adrenergic receptor agonists. Based on these findings, both SM and TBP are concluded to be highly efficacious and safe bronchodilator agents that are appropriate for the long-term management of childhood asthma.

  11. Use of ß-adrenergic agonists in hybrid catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) is a potent ß-adrenergic agonist that has been used in some species of fish to improve growth performance and dress out characteristics. While this metabolic modifier has been shown to have positive effects on growth of fish, little research has focused on the mechani...

  12. Adrenergic Component of Nicotine Antinociception in Rats | Ibironke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been widely established that nicotine , the active pharmacological agent in tobacco has antinociceptive effects , but the mechanism of this activity is yet to be fully investigated . The present study examined the effects of two adrenergic receptor antagonists , propranolol and prazosin .on nicotine antinociception using ...

  13. Astrocytic beta(2)-adrenergic receptors : From physiology to pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laureys, Guy; Clinckers, Ralph; Gerlo, Sarah; Spooren, Anneleen; Wilczak, Nadine; Kooijman, Ron; Smolders, Ilse; Michotte, Yvette; De Keyser, Jacques

    Evidence accumulates for a key role of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptors in the many homeostatic and neuroprotective functions of astrocytes, including glycogen metabolism, regulation of immune responses, release of neurotrophic factors, and the astrogliosis that occurs in response to neuronal

  14. Effects of β2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms on asthma severity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Several polymorphisms of the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) gene have been identified. There is mounting evidence that these polymorphisms are associated with significant variability in response to bronchodilator therapy and thus in severity and duration of asthmatic symptoms. Objectives: to assess the ...

  15. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D' Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. (Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville (United States))

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  16. Adrenergic signaling in heart failure and cardiovascular aging

    OpenAIRE

    Santulli, Gaetano; Iaccarino, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Both cardiovascular disease and aging are associated with changes in the sympathetic nervous system. Indeed, mounting evidence indicates that adrenergic receptors are functionally involved in numerous processes underlying both aging and cardiovascular disorders, in particular heart failure. This article will review the pathophysiological role of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure and cardiovascular aging.

  17. Adrenergic signaling in heart failure and cardiovascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, Gaetano; Iaccarino, Guido

    2016-11-01

    Both cardiovascular disease and aging are associated with changes in the sympathetic nervous system. Indeed, mounting evidence indicates that adrenergic receptors are functionally involved in numerous processes underlying both aging and cardiovascular disorders, in particular heart failure. This article will review the pathophysiological role of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure and cardiovascular aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antilocalization of Coulomb Blockade in a Ge-Si Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higginbotham, Andrew P.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Larsen, Thorvald Wadum

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of Coulomb blockade peak heights as a function of magnetic field is investigated experimentally in a Ge-Si nanowire quantum dot. Strong spin-orbit coupling in this hole-gas system leads to antilocalization of Coulomb blockade peaks, consistent with theory. In particular, the peak...

  19. The impact of acute preoperative beta-blockade on perioperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the impact of acute preoperative β-blockade on the incidence of perioperative cardiovascular morbidity and all- ... Our findings suggest that acute preoperative β-blockade is associated with an increased risk of perioperative cardiac ..... Shammash JB, Trost JC, Gold JM, Berlin JA, Golden MA, Kimmel SE.

  20. Costimulatory signal blockade in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub, M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Stadlbauer, T H

    1999-01-01

    Blockade of the CD28-B7 or CD40L-CD40 T cell costimulatory signals prevents induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the effect of simultaneous blockade of these signals in EAE is unknown. We show that administration of either MR1 (to block CD40L) or CTLA4Ig (to block...

  1. Found in Translation: International initiatives pursuing interleukin-1 blockade for treatment of acute Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jane C.; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Kuijpers, Taco; Shimizu, Chisato; Tremoulet, Adriana; Arditi, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The decision to move forward with three clinical trials of IL-1 blockade for treatment of acute Kawasaki disease is a case study in translational science. These trials were born on the one hand from transcriptome studies of host response during the acute disease coupled with animal model investigations of key immune signaling pathways and, on the other hand, out of clinical desperation to intervene in patients with severe inflammation in the setting of acute Kawasaki disease. The convergence of laboratory science and clinical observations led to the clinical trials described here and serves as a model for how such observations can be translated into new therapies. PMID:27792871

  2. Aerobic glycolysis during brain activation: adrenergic regulation and influence of norepinephrine on astrocytic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic glycolysis occurs during brain activation and is characterized by preferential up-regulation of glucose utilization compared with oxygen consumption even though oxygen level and delivery are adequate. Aerobic glycolysis is a widespread phenomenon that underlies energetics of diverse brain activities, such as alerting, sensory processing, cognition, memory, and pathophysiological conditions, but specific cellular functions fulfilled by aerobic glycolysis are poorly understood. Evaluation of evidence derived from different disciplines reveals that aerobic glycolysis is a complex, regulated phenomenon that is prevented by propranolol, a non-specific β-adrenoceptor antagonist. The metabolic pathways that contribute to excess utilization of glucose compared with oxygen include glycolysis, the pentose phosphate shunt pathway, the malate-aspartate shuttle, and astrocytic glycogen turnover. Increased lactate production by unidentified cells, and lactate dispersal from activated cells and lactate release from the brain, both facilitated by astrocytes, are major factors underlying aerobic glycolysis in subjects with low blood lactate levels. Astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling with local oxidation is minor. Blockade of aerobic glycolysis by propranolol implicates adrenergic regulatory processes including adrenal release of epinephrine, signaling to brain via the vagus nerve, and increased norepinephrine release from the locus coeruleus. Norepinephrine has a powerful influence on astrocytic metabolism and glycogen turnover that can stimulate carbohydrate utilization more than oxygen consumption, whereas β-receptor blockade 're-balances' the stoichiometry of oxygen-glucose or -carbohydrate metabolism by suppressing glucose and glycogen utilization more than oxygen consumption. This conceptual framework may be helpful for design of future studies to elucidate functional roles of preferential non-oxidative glucose utilization and glycogen turnover during brain

  3. Pelvic osteotomy under general anaesthesia combined with caudal blockade in children

    OpenAIRE

    Novotny, Milan; Rejholec, Milan

    1987-01-01

    Combined anaesthesia (Local plus General) has been used at the 1 st Clinic of Orthopaedics since 1986. A trial is described involving 21 children and comparing them with a control group of 14 cases having only inhalation anaesthesia. Caudal blockade with Bupivacaine is the local anaesthesia used to decrease stress during pelvic osteotomies. The use of combined anaesthesia provides smoothness and stability with absence of side effects and the doses of anaesthetic and post- operative analgesic ...

  4. The Beta Adrenergic Receptor Blocker Propranolol Counteracts Retinal Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Oxygen Induced Retinopathy: Restoring the Balance between Apoptosis and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Cammalleri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In a mouse model of oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR, beta adrenergic receptor (BAR blockade has been shown to recover hypoxia-associated retinal damages. Although the adrenergic signaling is an important regulator of apoptotic and autophagic processes, the role of BARs in retinal cell death remains to be elucidated. The present study was aimed at investigating whether ameliorative effects of BAR blockers may occur through their coordinated action on apoptosis and autophagy. To this aim, retinas from control and OIR mice untreated or treated with propranolol, a non-selective BAR1/2 blocker, were characterized in terms of expression and localization of apoptosis and autophagy markers. The effects of propranolol on autophagy signaling were also evaluated and specific autophagy modulators were used to get functional information on the autophagic effects of BAR antagonism. Finally, propranolol effects on neurodegenerative processes were associated to an electrophysiological investigation of retinal function by recording electroretinogram (ERG. We found that retinas of OIR mice are characterized by increased apoptosis and decreased autophagy, while propranolol reduces apoptosis and stimulates autophagy. In particular, propranolol triggers autophagosome formation in bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells that are committed to die by apoptosis in response to hypoxia. Also our data argue that propranolol, through the inhibition of the Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, activates autophagy which decreases retinal cell death. At the functional level, propranolol recovers dysfunctional ERG by recovering the amplitude of a- and b-waves, and oscillatory potentials, thus indicating an efficient restoring of retinal transduction. Overall, our results demonstrate that BAR1/2 are key regulators of retinal apoptosis/autophagy, and that BAR1/2 blockade leads to autophagy-mediated neuroprotection. Reinstating the balance between apoptotic and autophagic

  5. The adrenergic alpha2 receptor and sexual incentive motivation in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitamaa, Timo; Haapalinna, Antti; Agmo, Anders

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of the present series of experiments was to determine whether drugs acting at the alpha2-adrenoceptor modify unconditioned sexual incentive motivation in the male rat. To that end a highly specific agonist, dexmedetomidine, a corresponding antagonist, atipamezole, and a less specific antagonist, yohimbine, were administered to groups of sexually inexperienced male rats. The subjects were tested in a large rectangular arena, where a sexually receptive female and an intact male were employed as incentives. The incentive animals were confined behind a wire mesh in opposite corners of the arena. The animals could see, hear and smell each other, but no sexual interaction was possible. Approach to the incentives constituted the measure of incentive motivation. In addition, the test provided data on ambulatory activity and general arousal. Dexmedetomidine, at a dose of 8 microg/kg, produced a slight reduction of sexual incentive motivation. Ambulatory activity and general arousal were also inhibited. Atipamezole, in doses of 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg enhanced the positive incentive properties of the receptive female. A high dose of 1mg/kg did not have any significant effect. Ambulatory activity was slightly reduced by the two larger doses of atipamezole. Yohimbine had a slight stimulatory effect on sexual incentive motivation at a dose (4 mg/kg) that also reduced ambulatory activity and general arousal. It is concluded that blockade of the adrenergic alpha2 receptor stimulates sexual incentive motivation in the male rat whereas stimulation of it has the opposite effect. At present it is not clear if these drug effects are caused by pre- or postsynaptic actions of the drugs, and the importance of secondary changes in other neurotransmitter systems remains unknown.

  6. Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein mediates the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of melatonin release in photoreceptive chick pineal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, B.L.; Takahashi, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The avian pineal gland is a photoreceptive organ that has been shown to contain postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors that inhibit melatonin synthesis and/or release upon receptor activation. Physiological response and [32P]ADP ribosylation experiments were performed to investigate whether pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) were involved in the transduction of the alpha 2-adrenergic signal. For physiological response studies, the effects of pertussis toxin on melatonin release in dissociated cell cultures exposed to norepinephrine were assessed. Pertussis toxin blocked alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin-induced blockade appeared to be noncompetitive. One and 10 ng/ml doses of pertussis toxin partially blocked and a 100 ng/ml dose completely blocked norepinephrine-induced inhibition. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP ribosylation of G-proteins in chick pineal cell membranes was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Membranes were prepared from cells that had been pretreated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. In the absence of pertussis toxin pretreatment, two major proteins of 40K and 41K mol wt (Mr) were labeled by [32P]NAD. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of pineal cells abolished [32P] radiolabeling of the 40K Mr G-protein in a dose-dependent manner. The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of both cAMP efflux and melatonin release, as assessed by RIA of medium samples collected before membrane preparation, was also blocked in a dose-dependent manner by pertussis toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive 40K Mr G-protein labeled by [32P]NAD may be functionally associated with alpha 2-adrenergic signal transduction in chick pineal cells

  7. Does perioperative tactile evaluation of the train-of-four response influence the frequency of postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T; Viby-Mogensen, J; Bang, U

    1990-01-01

    The authors conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the usefulness of perioperative manual evaluation of the response to train-of-four (TOF) nerve stimulation. A total of 80 patients were divided into four groups of 20 each. For two groups (one given vecuronium and one...... pancuronium), the anesthetists assessed the degree of neuromuscular blockade during operation and during recovery from neuromuscular blockade by manual evaluation of the response to TOF nerve stimulation. In the other two groups, one of which received vecuronium and the other pancuronium, the anesthetists...

  8. PD-1 Blockade in Tumors with Mismatch-Repair Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dung T; Uram, Jennifer N; Wang, Hao; Bartlett, Bjarne R; Kemberling, Holly; Eyring, Aleksandra D; Skora, Andrew D; Luber, Brandon S; Azad, Nilofer S; Laheru, Dan; Biedrzycki, Barbara; Donehower, Ross C; Zaheer, Atif; Fisher, George A; Crocenzi, Todd S; Lee, James J; Duffy, Steven M; Goldberg, Richard M; de la Chapelle, Albert; Koshiji, Minori; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Huebner, Thomas; Hruban, Ralph H; Wood, Laura D; Cuka, Nathan; Pardoll, Drew M; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Zhou, Shibin; Cornish, Toby C; Taube, Janis M; Anders, Robert A; Eshleman, James R; Vogelstein, Bert; Diaz, Luis A

    2015-06-25

    Somatic mutations have the potential to encode "non-self" immunogenic antigens. We hypothesized that tumors with a large number of somatic mutations due to mismatch-repair defects may be susceptible to immune checkpoint blockade. We conducted a phase 2 study to evaluate the clinical activity of pembrolizumab, an anti-programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, in 41 patients with progressive metastatic carcinoma with or without mismatch-repair deficiency. Pembrolizumab was administered intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 14 days in patients with mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers, patients with mismatch repair-proficient colorectal cancers, and patients with mismatch repair-deficient cancers that were not colorectal. The coprimary end points were the immune-related objective response rate and the 20-week immune-related progression-free survival rate. The immune-related objective response rate and immune-related progression-free survival rate were 40% (4 of 10 patients) and 78% (7 of 9 patients), respectively, for mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers and 0% (0 of 18 patients) and 11% (2 of 18 patients) for mismatch repair-proficient colorectal cancers. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were not reached in the cohort with mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancer but were 2.2 and 5.0 months, respectively, in the cohort with mismatch repair-proficient colorectal cancer (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.10 [Pmismatch repair-deficient noncolorectal cancer had responses similar to those of patients with mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancer (immune-related objective response rate, 71% [5 of 7 patients]; immune-related progression-free survival rate, 67% [4 of 6 patients]). Whole-exome sequencing revealed a mean of 1782 somatic mutations per tumor in mismatch repair-deficient tumors, as compared with 73 in mismatch repair-proficient tumors (P=0.007), and high somatic

  9. The immune microenvironment of HPV-negative oral squamous cell carcinoma from never-smokers and never-drinkers patients suggests higher clinical benefit of IDO1 and PD1/PD-L1 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, J-P; Bertolus, C; Michallet, M-C; Deneuve, S; Incitti, R; Bendriss-Vermare, N; Albaret, M-A; Ortiz-Cuaran, S; Thomas, E; Colombe, A; Py, C; Gadot, N; Michot, J-P; Fayette, J; Viari, A; Van den Eynde, B; Goudot, P; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, M; Puisieux, A; Caux, C; Zrounba, P; Lantuejoul, S; Saintigny, P

    2017-08-01

    Never-smokers and never-drinkers patients (NSND) suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are epidemiologically different from smokers drinkers (SD). We therefore hypothesized that they harbored distinct targetable molecular alterations. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (discovery set), Gene Expression Omnibus and Centre Léon Bérard (CLB) (three validation sets) with available gene expression profiles of HPV-negative OSCC from NSND and SD were mined. Protein expression profiles and genomic alterations were also analyzed from TCGA, and a functional pathway enrichment analysis was carried out. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from 44 OSCC including 20 NSND and 24 SD treated at CLB were retrospectively collected to perform targeted-sequencing of 2559 transcripts (HTG EdgeSeq system), and CD3, CD4, CD8, IDO1, and PD-L1 expression analyses by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Enrichment of a six-gene interferon-γ signature of clinical response to pembrozulimab (PD-1 inhibitor) was evaluated in each sample from all cohorts, using the single sample gene set enrichment analysis method. A total of 854 genes and 29 proteins were found to be differentially expressed between NSND and SD in TCGA. Functional pathway analysis highlighted an overall enrichment for immune-related pathways in OSCC from NSND, especially involving T-cell activation. Interferon-γ response and PD1 signaling were strongly enriched in NSND. IDO1 and PD-L1 were overexpressed and the score of response to pembrolizumab was higher in NSND than in SD, although the mutational load was lower in NSND. IHC analyses in the CLB cohort evidenced IDO1 and PD-L1 overexpression in tumor cells that was associated with a higher rate of tumor-infiltrating T-cells in NSND compared with SD. The main biological and actionable difference between OSCC from NSND and SD lies in the immune microenvironment, suggesting a higher clinical benefit of PD-L1 and IDO1 inhibition in OSCC from NSND. © The Author

  10. Pauli Spin Blockade and the Ultrasmall Magnetic Field Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Danon, Jeroen

    2013-08-06

    Based on the spin-blockade model for organic magnetoresistance, we present an analytic expression for the polaron-bipolaron transition rate, taking into account the effective nuclear fields on the two sites. We reveal the physics behind the qualitatively different magnetoconductance line shapes observed in experiment, as well as the ultrasmall magnetic field effect (USFE). Since our findings agree in detail with recent experiments, they also indirectly provide support for the spin-blockade interpretation of organic magnetoresistance. In addition, we predict the existence of a similar USFE in semiconductor double quantum dots tuned to the spin-blockade regime.

  11. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L; Brentville, Victoria A; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M; Durrant, Lindy G

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10-40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses.

  12. Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Modulates Basal and β-Adrenergic-Stimulated Contractility by Rapid and Reversible Redox-Dependent S-Nitrosylation of the Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Z Vielma

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation of several Ca2+ regulating proteins in response to β-adrenergic stimulation was recently described in the heart; however the specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS isoform and signaling pathways responsible for this modification have not been elucidated. NOS-1 activity increases inotropism, therefore, we tested whether β-adrenergic stimulation induces NOS-1-dependent S-nitrosylation of total proteins, the ryanodine receptor (RyR2, SERCA2 and the L-Type Ca2+ channel (LTCC. In the isolated rat heart, isoproterenol (10 nM, 3-min increased S-nitrosylation of total cardiac proteins (+46±14% and RyR2 (+146±77%, without affecting S-nitrosylation of SERCA2 and LTCC. Selective NOS-1 blockade with S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC and Nω-propyl-l-arginine decreased basal contractility and relaxation (-25-30% and basal S-nitrosylation of total proteins (-25-60%, RyR2, SERCA2 and LTCC (-60-75%. NOS-1 inhibition reduced (-25-40% the inotropic response and protein S-nitrosylation induced by isoproterenol, particularly that of RyR2 (-85±7%. Tempol, a superoxide scavenger, mimicked the effects of NOS-1 inhibition on inotropism and protein S-nitrosylation; whereas selective NOS-3 inhibitor L-N5-(1-Iminoethylornithine had no effect. Inhibition of NOS-1 did not affect phospholamban phosphorylation, but reduced its oligomerization. Attenuation of contractility was abolished by PKA blockade and unaffected by guanylate cyclase inhibition. Additionally, in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, NOS-1 inhibition or removal reduced the Ca2+-transient amplitude and sarcomere shortening induced by isoproterenol or by direct PKA activation. We conclude that 1 normal cardiac performance requires basal NOS-1 activity and S-nitrosylation of the calcium-cycling machinery; 2 β-adrenergic stimulation induces rapid and reversible NOS-1 dependent, PKA and ROS-dependent, S-nitrosylation of RyR2 and other proteins, accounting for about one third of its inotropic effect.

  13. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casie Lindsly

    Full Text Available Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs. We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  14. Alpha-adrenergic receptors in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattigan, S; Appleby, G J; Edwards, S J

    1986-01-01

    from sarcolemma of soleus muscle (phentolamine greater than phenylephrine greater than idazoxan greater than yohimbine) suggested that the receptors were alpha 1. Binding sites for dihydroalprenolol (beta antagonist) were also more concentrated on red than white muscle and outnumbered prazosin sites...... by approx. 10:1. Binding sites for idazoxan (alpha 2 antagonist) were undetectable. Contamination of sarcolemma-enriched preparations by endothelial tissue indicated by the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme did not correlate with prazosin binding. It is concluded that post-synaptic alpha 1...... adrenergic receptors are present on the sarcolemma of slow oxidative red fibres of rat skeletal muscle. The presence provides the mechanistic basis for apparent alpha-adrenergic effects to increase glucose and oxygen uptake in perfused rat hindquarter....

  15. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors are colocalized and coregulated with whisker barrels in rat somatosensory cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, P.; Kaufmann, D.; Hand, P.J.; Wolfe, B.B. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Autoradiography has been used to visualize independently the subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat somatosensory cortex. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors, but not beta 1-adrenergic receptors colocalize with whisker barrels in this tissue. Thus, each whisker sends a specific multisynaptic pathway to the somatosensory cortex that can be histochemically visualized and only one subtype of beta-adrenergic receptor is specifically associated with this cortical representation. Additionally, neonatal lesion of any or all of the whisker follicles results in loss of the corresponding barrel(s) as shown by histochemical markers. This loss is paralleled by a similar loss in the organization of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the somatosensory cortex. Other results indicate that these beta 2-adrenergic receptors are not involved in moment-to-moment signal transmission in this pathway and, additionally, are not involved in a gross way in the development of whisker-barrel array.

  16. Adrenergic control of swimbladder deflation in the zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbarton, Tristan C; Stoyek, Matthew; Croll, Roger P; Smith, Frank M

    2010-07-15

    Many teleosts actively regulate buoyancy by adjusting gas volume in the swimbladder. In physostomous fishes such as the zebrafish, a connection is maintained between the swimbladder and the oesophagus via the pneumatic duct for the inflation and deflation of this organ. Here we investigated the role of adrenergic stimulation of swimbladder wall musculature in deflation of the swimbladder. Noradrenaline (NA), the sympathetic neurotransmitter (dosage 10(-6) to 10(-5) mol l(-1)), doubled the force of smooth muscle contraction in isolated tissue rings from the anterior chamber, caused a doubling of pressure in this chamber in situ, and evoked gas expulsion through the pneumatic duct, deflating the swimbladder to approximately 85% of the pre-NA volume. These effects were mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, representing a novel role for these receptors in vertebrates. No effects of adrenergic stimulation were detected in the posterior chamber. In a detailed examination of the musculature and innervation of the swimbladder to determine the anatomical substrate for these functional results, we found that the anterior chamber contained an extensive ventral band of smooth muscle with fibres organized into putative motor units, richly innervated by tyrosine hydroxylase-positive axons. Additionally, a novel arrangement of folds in the lumenal connective tissue in the wall of the anterior chamber was described that may permit small changes in muscle length to cause large changes in effective wall distensibility and hence chamber volume. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that deflation of the zebrafish swimbladder occurs primarily by beta-adrenergically mediated contraction of smooth muscle in the anterior chamber and is under the control of the sympathetic limb of the autonomic nervous system.

  17. Calcineurin mediates alpha-adrenergic stimulation of Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity in renal tubule cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Aperia, A; Ibarra, F; Svensson, L B; Klee, C; Greengard, P

    1992-01-01

    The alpha-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline increased Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity of single proximal convoluted tubules dissected from rat kidney. Activation of the enzyme by oxymetazoline was prevented by either the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin or the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine and was mimicked by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of oxymetazoline on Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity was prevented by a specific peptide inhibitor of calcineurin, as well as by FK 506, an immun...

  18. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE ANALGESIC CHARACTERS AND HEMODYNAMIC CHANGES OF 2% LIGNOCAINE ALONE AND 2% LIGNOCAINE WITH CLONIDINE IN EPIDURAL BLOCKADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pain is as old as mankind and so is the quest for its control. It is defined as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage”. 1 Pain relief is a growing concern to anaesthesiologist, since no single analgesia is free from side effect, so it is a challenge to provide pain relief without much side effect like sedation, respiratory depression or problem like nausea & vomiting. Regional anaesthesia techniques generously offer adequate pain control for early mobilization and compliance with physiotherapy, they also provide additional benefits of decreased surgical stress response 2 improved myocardial stability, 3,4 rapid recovery of bowel function 5,6 and reduced risk of thromboembolic events like deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. 7 As a result it is also associated with reduction in postoperative morbidity and mortality. 8 Epidural anaesthesia has become increasingly popular in recent years for surgeries of lower abdomen, pelvis and lower limbs as it offer excellent operating conditions and is relatively safe for patients. It offers benefits in the form of greater hemodynamic stability and provision of postoperative analgesia via an epidural catheter. Clonidine is a partial α - 2 adrenergic agonist which, when administered by epidural route, has analgesic properties and potentiates the effect of local anesthetics . 9 Clonidine has analgesic effect at spinal level mediated by alpha - 2 adrenergic receptor situated in the postsynaptic dorsal horn of spinalcord. 10 It works by blocking the conductance of C & A fibres, increases the potassium ion in isolated neurons in - vitro and intensifies conductance block of local anaesthetics. 11 The aim of our study was to compare the quality and duration of analgesia, to assess the hemodynamic effects and to assess the incidence of side effects (sedation, post - operative nausea and vomiting when 2% lignocaine was used alone and

  19. Residual Neuromuscular Blockade in the Critical Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawicki, Nicole; Gessner, Patty

    2018-01-01

    Residual neuromuscular blockade is a widespread challenge for providers in the acute care setting that, if left unrecognized or untreated, places patients at higher risk for morbidity and mortality. The condition is estimated to occur in 26% to 88% of patients undergoing general anesthesia. The role of the advanced practice nurse in the acute care setting is to facilitate a safe recovery process by identifying early signs of deterioration and supporting the patient until full muscular strength has returned. This article discusses the prevalence of residual neuromuscular blockade and associated complications and patient risk factors. A review is included of the current uses for neuromuscular blockade, pathophysiology of the neuromuscular junction, pharmacologic characteristics of neuromuscular blocking agents (including drug-drug interactions), monitoring modalities, and effectiveness of reversal agents. Treatment recommendations pertinent to residual neuromuscular blockade are outlined. ©2018 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Opioid Receptors Blockade Modulates Apoptosis in a Rat Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of endogenous opioids in the apoptosis process in a rat model of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Materials and Methods: Cirrhosis was ... Conclusion: Apoptosis occurs during cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and endogenous opioid receptors blockade using naltrexone ..... Further research would define the responsible pathways.

  1. Heat Coulomb blockade of one ballistic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivre, E.; Anthore, A.; Parmentier, F. D.; Cavanna, A.; Gennser, U.; Ouerghi, A.; Jin, Y.; Pierre, F.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum mechanics and Coulomb interaction dictate the behaviour of small circuits. The thermal implications cover fundamental topics from quantum control of heat to quantum thermodynamics, with prospects of novel thermal machines and an ineluctably growing influence on nanocircuit engineering. Experimentally, the rare observations thus far include the universal thermal conductance quantum and heat interferometry. However, evidence for many-body thermal effects paving the way to markedly different heat and electrical behaviours in quantum circuits remains wanting. Here we report on the observation of the Coulomb blockade of electronic heat flow from a small metallic circuit node, beyond the widespread Wiedemann-Franz law paradigm. We demonstrate this thermal many-body phenomenon for perfect (ballistic) conduction channels to the node, where it amounts to the universal suppression of precisely one quantum of conductance for the transport of heat, but none for electricity. The inter-channel correlations that give rise to such selective heat current reduction emerge from local charge conservation, in the floating node over the full thermal frequency range (<~temperature × kB/h). This observation establishes the different nature of the quantum laws for thermal transport in nanocircuits.

  2. Transport Through a Coulomb Blockaded Majorana Nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazunov, Alex; Egger, Reinhold; Yeyati, Alfredo Levy; Hützen, Roland; Braunecker, Bernd

    In one-dimensional (1D) quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman field, a superconducting substrate can induce zero-energy Majorana bound states located near the ends of the wire. We study electronic properties when such a wire is contacted by normal metallic or superconducting electrodes. A special attention is devoted to Coulomb blockade effects. We analyze the "Majorana single-charge transistor" (MSCT), i.e., a floating Majorana wire contacted by normal metallic source and drain contacts, where charging effects are important. We describe Coulomb oscillations in this system and predict that Majorana fermions could be unambiguously detected by the emergence of sideband peaks in the nonlinear differential conductance. We also study a superconducting variant of the MSCT setup with s-wave superconducting (instead of normal-conducting) leads. In the noninteracting case, we derive the exact current-phase relation (CPR) and find π-periodic behavior with negative critical current for weak tunnel couplings. Charging effects then cause the anomalous CPR I(\\varphi ) = Ic\\cos \\varphi, where the parity-sensitive critical current I c provides a signature for Majorana states.

  3. PD-1 blockade with nivolumab in relapsed/refractory primary central nervous system and testicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lakshmi; Iwamoto, Fabio M; LaCasce, Ann; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Roemer, Margaretha G M; Chapuy, Bjoern; Armand, Philippe; Rodig, Scott J; Shipp, Margaret A

    2017-06-08

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma (PCNSL) and primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) are rare extranodal large B-cell lymphomas with similar genetic signatures. There are no standard-of-care treatment options for patients with relapsed and refractory PCNSL and PTL, and the overall prognosis is poor. PCNSLs and PTLs exhibit frequent 9p24.1 copy-number alterations and infrequent translocations of 9p24.1 and associated increased expression of the programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. The activity of PD-1 blockade in other lymphomas with 9p24.1 alterations prompted us to test the efficacy of the anti-PD1 antibody, nivolumab, in 4 patients with relapsed/refractory PCNSL and 1 patient with CNS relapse of PTL. All 5 patients had clinical and radiographic responses to PD-1 blockade, and 3 patients remain progression-free at 13 + to 17 + months. Our data suggest that nivolumab is active in relapsed/refractory PCNSL and PTL and support further investigation of PD-1 blockade in these diseases. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. The inotropic actions of N-acetylprocainamide: blockade and reversal by propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertora, J J; King, L W; Donkor, K A

    1986-12-01

    The inotropic actions of N-acetylprocainamide (NAPA) were studied in chloralose-urethane anesthetized dogs. Myocardial contractile force was measured with a Walton-Brodie strain gauge sutured to the right ventricle. A low-dose NAPA infusion (12 mg/kg i.v.) increased myocardial force by a maximum of 11.6 +/- 2.4% (mean +/- SEM), whereas a high dose of NAPA (60 mg/kg i.v.) increased myocardial force by 33.3 +/- 2.6% at the peak of the effect. The high-dose NAPA infusion also caused significant reductions in heart rate and blood pressure, while the low-dose NAPA infusion lacked significant chronotropic or hypotensive actions. Pretreatment with propranolol (0.5 mg/kg i.v. loading, followed by a 10 micrograms/kg/min infusion) did not block the positive inotropic actions of NAPA 12 mg/kg, but these actions were blocked in dogs pretreated with both propranolol and atropine (1 mg/kg). On the other hand, pretreatment with propranolol blocked and reversed the inotropic actions of NAPA 60 mg/kg, and potentiated its negative chronotropic effects. Thus, the positive inotropic actions of NAPA are indirect and more than one mechanism is involved; a component due to direct action related to the lengthening of cardiac repolarization is not discounted. At low doses, the increase in myocardial force seems related to NAPA's vagolytic properties, whereas at high doses the positive inotropic actions appear to be catecholamine-mediated. Furthermore, a negative inotropic action of high-dose NAPA is apparent after beta-adrenergic receptor blockade.

  5. Recommendations on the use of deep neuromuscular blockade by anaesthesiologists and surgeons. AQUILES (Anestesia QUIrúrgica para Lograr Eficiencia y Seguridad) Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando-Oyonarte, C L; Moreno-Sanz, C; Vila-Caral, P; Ruiz de Adana-Belbel, J C; Vázquez-Alonso, E; Ramírez-Rodríguez, J M; Veiga-Ruiz, G; Guasch-Arévalo, E; Lora-Tamayo D'Ocón, J I

    2017-02-01

    Neuromuscular blockade enables airway management, ventilation and surgical procedures. However there is no national consensus on its routine clinical use. The objective was to establish the degree of agreement among anaesthesiologists and general surgeons on the clinical use of neuromuscular blockade in order to make recommendations to improve its use during surgical procedures. Multidisciplinary consensus study in Spain. Anaesthesiologists experts in neuromuscular blockade management (n=65) and general surgeons (n=36) were included. Delphi methodology was selected. A survey with 17 final questions developed by a dedicated scientific committee was designed. The experts answered the successive questions in two waves. The survey included questions on: type of surgery, type of patient, benefits/harm during and after surgery, impact of objective neuromuscular monitoring and use of reversal drugs, viability of a multidisciplinary and efficient approach to the whole surgical procedure, focussing on the level of neuromuscular blockade. Five recommendations were agreed: 1) deep neuromuscular blockade is very appropriate for abdominal surgery (degree of agreement 94.1%), 2) and in obese patients (76.2%); 3) deep neuromuscular blockade maintenance until end of surgery might be beneficial in terms of clinical aspects, such as as immobility or better surgical access (86.1 to 72.3%); 4) quantitative monitoring and reversal drugs availability is recommended (89.1%); finally 5) anaesthesiologists/surgeons joint protocols are recommended. Collaboration among anaesthesiologists and surgeons has enabled some general recommendations to be established on deep neuromuscular blockade use during abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Bloqueio "3 em 1" por via anterior: bloqueio parcial, completo ou superdimensionado? Correlação entre anatomia, clínica e radio imagens Bloqueo "3 en 1" por vía anterior: bloqueo parcial, completo o superdimensionado? Correlación entre anatomía, clínica y radio imágenes Anterior "3-in-1" blockade: partial, total or overdimensioned block? Correlation between anatomy, clinic and radio images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Otto Geier

    2004-08-01

    participación eventual del nervio genitofemoral (bloqueo "2,5 en 1", uno de los ramos del nervio femoral. Todavía, cuando fueron utilizados catéteres cortos (G2, se obteve bloqueo "3 en 1" en apenas un paciente, al paso que con catéteres largos (G3 introducidos en el sentido cefálico até 18 cm en el espacio subfascial ilíaco, tres bloqueos "3 en 1" superdimensionados fueron registrados, por el envolvimiento adicional de los nervios fibular común en dos pacientes y el nervio tibial en un paciente. CONCLUSIONES: A pesar de la pequeña muestra, con inyección única (G1, siempre se obtuvo un bloqueo "2 en 1" ó "2,5 en 1", sin la participación del nervio obturador. Con catéter corto (G2, el bloqueo "3 en 1" fue clasificado como completo en 6,6% de los casos (un paciente. Mas, con catéter largo (G3, el resultado tiende a ser más previsible en relación a los otros grupos, especialmente cuando el catéter alcanza el espacio paravertebral lombosacral, resultando en un bloqueo "3 en 1" completo en 20% de los casos (tres pacientes o, raramente, en un bloqueo "3 en 1" superdimensionado en 13,2% de los casos (dos pacientes.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Classic anterior 3-in-1 blockade has been questioned as to the anesthetic involvement of its three participant nerves: femoral, lateral cutaneous of thigh and obturator. This study aimed at evaluating the outcome of anterior 3-in-1 blockade through: single injection (G1, short catheters (G2 and long catheters (G3. 3-in-1 blockades identified as total or overdimensioned were additionally investigated by radio images. METHODS: The identification of iliac subfascial space in 3-in-1 blockades with single injection or catheters has been made by loss of resistance to air. In several painful events, anesthetic volume has varied 30 to 40 mL and cranial catheters introduction was up to 18 cm in the iliac subfascial space. When clinical research would point to the involvement of the obturator nerve or other nerve additional to 3-in-1

  7. On the role of renal alpha-adrenergic receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Jäger, S.; Casto, R.; Rettig, R.; Graf, C.; Printz, M.; Insel, P. A.; Philipp, T.; Brodde, O. E.

    1992-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a genetically determined increase in renal alpha-adrenergic receptor density might be a pathophysiologically important factor in the spontaneously hypertensive rat model of genetic hypertension. In a first study, we compared renal alpha 1 and alpha 2-adrenergic receptor

  8. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  9. [H-3]dihydroalprenolol binding to beta adrenergic receptors in multiple sclerosis brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, E; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    By using immunocytochemistry we previously reported the absence of beta(2) adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in multiple sclerosis (MS) white matter. Here, we measured beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptor concentrations in postmortem brain sections of six MS patients and six controls by using

  10. Adrenergic effects on renal secretion of epidermal growth factor in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1985-01-01

    Urinary epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been demonstrated recently to originate from the kidneys. The present study was undertaken to investigate the adrenergic and cholinergic influence on secretion of renal EGF. beta-Adrenergic agonists increased the level of urinary EGF, while propranolol......, a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, decreased basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated total output of urinary EGF. Acetylcholine and the anticholinergic agent atropine had no effect on the output of EGF in urine. Also chemical sympathectomy induced by 6-hydroxydopamine reduced the urinary output of EGF. None...... of the experimental groups had a median serum concentration above the detection limit of the assay. The present study shows that secretion of renal EGF is under the influence of the sympathetic nervous system and release of EGF is stimulated by activation of beta-adrenergic receptors in the kidneys....

  11. Effect of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists on nicotine-induced tail-tremor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemaru, K; Gomita, Y; Furuno, K; Araki, Y

    1993-09-01

    The effects of various beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists on nicotine-induced tail-tremor were investigated in rats. Atenolol (5 and 10 mg/kg, IP), arotinolol (5 and 10 mg/kg, IP), and carteolol (5 and 10 mg/kg, IP), hydrophilic beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, did not affect the tail-tremor induced by nicotine given at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg SC. However, propranolol (5-20 mg/kg, IP) and pindolol (5-20 mg/kg, IP), nonselective and lipophilic beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, did suppress the tail-tremor dose dependently. In contrast, metoprolol (5-20 mg/kg, IP), lipophilic and beta 1-selective adrenergic receptor antagonists, did not show such an effect. These results suggest that nicotine-induced tail-tremors may be mediated through central beta 2-adrenergic receptors as an appearance and developmental mechanism.

  12. Oral beta 2-selective adrenergic bronchodilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, V; Daniotti, S; Schiassi, M; Dottorini, M; Tantucci, C

    1986-01-01

    Oral beta 2-agonists (carbuterol, pirbuterol, procaterol, bitolterol, clenbuterol) are drugs widely used as bronchodilators. The efficacy and selectivity of bronchodilators drugs depend on their intrinsic pharmacological properties and on the route of administration. The characteristics of the oral route are easy usage, precise dosage and assured effects. Consequently, disadvantages (delayed onset of action, more frequent side-effects) and the indications, (patients with severe chronic airways obstruction, nocturnal asthmatic attacks, and children and elderly subjects) are clearly evident. The most recent beta 2-agonists have an efficient and prolonged bronchodilating action with well-known side-effects. In order to control drug efficiency in a large population and identify type and degree of adverse reactions, a post-marketing surveillance study was programmed for clenbuterol. The results available confirms that long-term treatment with oral clenbuterol is an effective and safe therapeutical approach. During long-term treatment, tachyphylaxis (a diminished responsiveness) develops. This complex biological phenomenon can be studied, in several ways i.e. functional response of target-organ, appropriate biochemical-metabolical indices, and functional evaluation of the cellular beta-receptors in vitro. Also in the light of evaluation of serum levels of cyclic nucleotides (cyclic adenosine and guanosine monophosphates) it appears that the clinical importance of tachyphylaxis is mild and that chronic therapy with beta 2-agonists is safe and effective when used in selected patients.

  13. Adrenergic Agonists Bind to Adrenergic-Receptor-Like Regions of the Mu Opioid Receptor, Enhancing Morphine and Methionine-Enkephalin Binding: A New Approach to “Biased Opioids”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Root-Bernstein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence demonstrates functional interactions between the adrenergic and opioid systems in a diversity of tissues and organs. While some effects are due to receptor and second messenger cross-talk, recent research has revealed an extracellular, allosteric opioid binding site on adrenergic receptors that enhances adrenergic activity and its duration. The present research addresses whether opioid receptors may have an equivalent extracellular, allosteric adrenergic binding site that has similar enhancing effects on opioid binding. Comparison of adrenergic and opioid receptor sequences revealed that these receptors share very significant regions of similarity, particularly in some of the extracellular and transmembrane regions associated with adrenergic binding in the adrenergic receptors. Five of these shared regions from the mu opioid receptor (muOPR were synthesized as peptides and tested for binding to adrenergic, opioid and control compounds using ultraviolet spectroscopy. Adrenergic compounds bound to several of these muOPR peptides with low micromolar affinity while acetylcholine, histamine and various adrenergic antagonists did not. Similar studies were then conducted with purified, intact muOPR with similar results. Combinations of epinephrine with methionine enkephalin or morphine increased the binding of both by about half a log unit. These results suggest that muOPR may be allosterically enhanced by adrenergic agonists.

  14. Blood flow distribution with adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.H.; Davis, D.L.; Sutton, E.T.

    1989-03-01

    Superficial fibular nerve stimulation (SFNS) causes increased pre- and post-capillary resistances as well as increased capillary permeability in the dog hind paw. These responses indicate possible adrenergic and histaminergic interactions. The distribution of blood flow between capillaries and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) may depend on the relative effects of these neural inputs. Right hind paws of anesthetized heparinized dogs were vascularly and neurally isolated and perfused with controlled pressure. Blood flow distribution was calculated from the venous recovery of 85Sr-labeled microspheres (15 microns). The mean transit times of 131I-albumin and 85Sr-labeled microspheres were calculated. The effects of adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists with and without SFNS were determined. Phentolamine blocked the entire response to SFNS. Prazosin attenuated increases in total and AVA resistance. Yohimbine prevented increased total resistance, attenuated the AVA resistance increase, and revealed a decrease in capillary circuit resistance. Pyrilamine attenuated total resistance increase while SFNS increased capillary and AVA resistances. Metiamide had no effect on blood flow distribution with SFNS. The increase in AVA resistance with SFNS apparently resulted from a combination of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptor stimulation but not histaminergic effects.

  15. Blood flow distribution with adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.H.; Davis, D.L.; Sutton, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Superficial fibular nerve stimulation (SFNS) causes increased pre- and post-capillary resistances as well as increased capillary permeability in the dog hind paw. These responses indicate possible adrenergic and histaminergic interactions. The distribution of blood flow between capillaries and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) may depend on the relative effects of these neural inputs. Right hind paws of anesthetized heparinized dogs were vascularly and neurally isolated and perfused with controlled pressure. Blood flow distribution was calculated from the venous recovery of 85Sr-labeled microspheres (15 microns). The mean transit times of 131I-albumin and 85Sr-labeled microspheres were calculated. The effects of adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists with and without SFNS were determined. Phentolamine blocked the entire response to SFNS. Prazosin attenuated increases in total and AVA resistance. Yohimbine prevented increased total resistance, attenuated the AVA resistance increase, and revealed a decrease in capillary circuit resistance. Pyrilamine attenuated total resistance increase while SFNS increased capillary and AVA resistances. Metiamide had no effect on blood flow distribution with SFNS. The increase in AVA resistance with SFNS apparently resulted from a combination of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptor stimulation but not histaminergic effects

  16. Rapid clearance of iodine-131 MIBG from the heart and liver of patients with adrenergic dysfunction and pheochromocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajo, M.; Shimabukuro, K.; Miyaji, N.; Shimada, J.; Shirono, K.; Sakata, H.; Yoshimura, H.; Yonekura, R.; Shinohara, S.

    1985-01-01

    Iodine-131 MIBG, a radiolabeled adrenergic neuron-blocking agent, decreased rapidly from the heart and liver of patients with adrenergic dysfunction and pheochromocytoma when compared with eight controls. However, there was no significant difference in the rate of [ 131 I]MIBG decrease in these organs between controls and patients in the intervals subsequent to 4 hr. These findings suggest that adrenergic neuronal uptake of [ 131 I]MIBG in these organs is smaller in the patients than in the controls. Measurements of time-activity relationships of radioiodinated MIBG may be useful for assessment of adrenergic function of these organs and thus of generalized disorders of adrenergic innervation

  17. Quantum fluctuations and the single-junction Coulomb blockade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girvin, S.M. (Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (USA)); Glazman, L.I. (Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials, U.S.S.R. Academy of Science, Moscow District (U.S.S.R.)); Jonson, M. (Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN (USA)); Penn, D.R.; Stiles, M.D. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

    1990-06-25

    We investigate the effect of quantum fluctuations on the Coulomb blockade in a single tunnel junction coupled to its environment by a transmission line of arbitrary impedance {ital Z}({omega}). The quantized oscillation modes of the transmission line are suddenly displaced when an electron tunnels through the junction. For small {ital Z} (relative to the quantum of resitance), a weak power-law zero-bias anomaly occurs associated with the infrared-divergent shakeup of low-frequency transmission-line modes. For large {ital Z}, the full blockade is recovered. Comparison with recent experiments is made.

  18. Combination approaches with immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Swart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, immune checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate anti-tumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune checkpoint blockade, aimed at increasing response-rates to the single treatments.

  19. Neural Blockade for Persistent Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    involved in neuropathic pain syndromes or to be used as a treatment in its own right. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence for neural blockade as a potential diagnostic tool or treatment for persistent pain after breast cancer surgery. In this systematic review, we found only 7 studies (n......Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery is predominantly a neuropathic pain syndrome affecting 25% to 60% of patients and related to injury of the intercostobrachial nerve, intercostal nerves, and other nerves in the region. Neural blockade can be useful for the identification of nerves...

  20. Regression of cardiac hypertrophy in the SHR by combined renin-angiotensin system blockade and dietary sodium restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Abro

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Altered operation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS and dietary sodium intake have been identified as independent risk factors for cardiac hypertrophy. The way in which sodium intake and the operation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system interact in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the cardiac effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS blockade in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, using co-treatment with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor with different sodium intakes. Our experiments with SHR show that, at high levels of sodium intake (4.0%, aggressive RAS blockade treatment with candesartan (3 mg/kg and perindopril (6 mg/kg does not result in regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In contrast, RAS blockade coupled with reduced sodium diet (0.2% significantly regresses cardiac hypertrophy, impairs animal growth and is associated with elevated plasma renin and dramatically suppressed plasma angiotensinogen levels. Histological analyses indicate that the differential effect of reduced sodium on heart growth during RAS blockade is not associated with any change in myocardial interstitial collagen, but reflects modification of cellular geometry. Dimensional measurements of enzymatically-isolated ventricular myocytes show that, in the RAS blocked, reduced sodium group, myocyte length and width were decreased by about 16—19% compared with myocytes from the high sodium treatment group. Our findings highlight the importance of `titrating' sodium intake with combined RAS blockade in the clinical setting to optimise therapeutic benefit.

  1. Dual HER2 blockade in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Advani P

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pooja Advani,1 Lauren Cornell,2 Saranya Chumsri,1 Alvaro Moreno-Aspitia1 1Division of Hematology and Oncology, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 is a tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor that is overexpressed on the surface of 15%–20% of breast tumors and has been associated with poor prognosis. Consistently improved pathologic response and survival rates have been demonstrated with use of trastuzumab in combination with standard chemotherapy in both early and advanced breast cancer. However, resistance to trastuzumab may pose a major problem in the effective treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Dual HER2 blockade, using agents that work in a complimentary fashion to trastuzumab, has more recently been explored to evade resistance in both the preoperative (neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. Increased effectiveness of dual anti-HER2 agents over single blockade has been recently reported in clinical studies. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and taxane is currently approved in the metastatic and neoadjuvant treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Various biomarkers have also been investigated to identify subsets of patients with HER2-positive tumors who would likely respond best to these targeted therapy combinations. In this article, available trial data regarding efficacy and toxicity of treatment with combination HER2 agents in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant setting have been reviewed, and relevant correlative biomarker data from these trials have been discussed. Keywords: HER2, dual blockade, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, breast cancer, trastuzumab

  2. Comparison of paravertebral blockade techniques with and without ultrasound guidance in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Michela; Blanco-Murcia, Javier; Villaescusa, Alejandra; De Gaspar, Ignacio; de Segura, Ignacio A Gómez

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of an ultrasound-guided paravertebral nerve blockade technique (UGPNB) with distal and proximal paravertebral nerve blockade techniques without ultrasound guidance (DPNB and PPNB, respectively) in calves. ANIMALS 4 calf cadavers and 7 healthy calves. PROCEDURES A suitable acoustic window was identified to facilitate access to the T13, L1, and L2 spinal nerves in cadavers and live calves. In cadavers, nerves were injected with dye under ultrasound guidance. In calves, the UGPNB, DPNB, and PPNB were performed in random order at 10-day intervals by injection of an anesthetic solution containing 2% lidocaine hydrochloride. Nociceptive withdrawal responses were assessed to determine the effects of the blockades. RESULTS In cadavers, nerve staining success rates (ie, ≥ 2-cm-long dye path) achieved with ultrasound guidance were 88% (T13 [ventral branch]), 75% (T13 and L1 [dorsal branches] and L1 and L2 [ventral branches]), and 38% (L2 [dorsal branch]). The nerves were each identified as a hyperechoic band in a longitudinal plane. In calves, the UGPNB, DPNB, and PPNB reduced the withdrawal response to the noxious stimulus, mainly in the dorsal-cranial, dorsal-caudal, and ventral-cranial areas of the flank. Overall, the UGPNB resulted in a better nociceptive cumulative score, administering only one half of the local anaesthetic dose, compared with findings for the DPNB and PPNB. However, time to perform the UGPNB was longer. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The UGPNB evaluated may be an improved alternative to the DPNB and PPNB for provision of anesthesia for flank surgery in calves. However, effectiveness of the UGPNB should be evaluated in a clinical setting and in adult cattle.

  3. Current status and perspectives in translational biomarker research for PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Ma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Modulating immune inhibitory pathways has been a major recent breakthrough in cancer treatment. Checkpoint blockade antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4 and programed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1 have demonstrated acceptable toxicity, promising clinical responses, durable disease control, and improved survival in some patients with advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and other tumor types. About 20 % of advanced NSCLC patients and 30 % of advanced melanoma patients experience tumor responses from checkpoint blockade monotherapy, with better clinical responses seen with the combination of anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Given the power of these new therapies, it is important to understand the complex and dynamic nature of host immune responses and the regulation of additional molecules in the tumor microenvironment and normal organs in response to the checkpoint blockade therapies. In this era of precision oncology, there remains a largely unmet need to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy, to optimize the monitoring assays for tumor-specific immune responses, to develop strategies to improve clinical efficacy, and to identify biomarkers so that immune-related adverse events can be avoided. At this time, PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC staining using 22C3 antibody is the only FDA-approved companion diagnostic for patients with NSCLC-treated pembrolizumab, but more are expected to come to market. We here summarize the current knowledge, clinical efficacy, potential immune biomarkers, and associated assays for immune checkpoint blockade therapies in advanced solid tumors.

  4. Acute adrenergic stress inhibits proliferation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells via p38/MAPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraml, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Robert; Kotzbeck, Petra; Grillari, Johannes; Schauenstein, Konrad

    2009-03-01

    Acute adrenergic stress is a cause of hematopoietic failure that accompanies severe injury. Although the communication between neuronal and immune system is well documented and catecholamines are known as important regulators of homeostasis, the molecular mechanisms of hematopoietic failure are not well understood. To study the influence of adrenergic stress on hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), which recently have been found to express adrenergic receptors, Lin(-),Sca(+), cells were isolated and treated with alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists in vitro. Indeed, this stimulation resulted in significantly decreased colony formation capacity using granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming unit assays. This decline was dependent on the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of the p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, since the addition of antioxidants or a p38 inhibitor restored CFU formation. DNA damage by adrenergically induced ROS, however, does not seem to account for the reduction of colonies. Thus, catecholamine/p38/MAPK is identified as a key signal transduction pathway in HPCs besides those dependent on Wnt, Notch, and sonic hedgehog. Furthermore, a well-known target of p38 signaling, p16 is transcriptionally activated after adrenergic stimulation, suggesting that cell cycle arrest might importantly contribute to hematopoietic failure and immune dysfunctions after severe injury. Since increased levels of catecholamines are also observed in other conditions, such as during aging which is linked with decline of immune functions, adrenergic stress might as well contribute to the lowered immune defence in the elderly.

  5. Comparative effect of calcium and of the adrenergic system on calcitonin secretion in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, N M; Williams, G A; Hargis, G K; Bowser, E N; Kawahara, W; Jackson, B L; Henderson, W J; Kukreja, S C

    1978-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of adrenergic agents on immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) secretion in normal man, and compared the time course and magnitude of these adrenergic effects with those caused by modifying calcium (Ca) ion concentration. Ca infusion (15 mg Ca++/kg iv in 4 h) significantly increased plasma iCT within 1 h, reaching 140 +/- 8% of baseline at 4 h. EDTA (50 mg/kg iv in 2 h) significantly decreased plasma iCT within 15 min, with nadir value of 53 +/- 4.9% of baseline at 2 h. The beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, significantly increased plasma iCT with 5 min, reaching 136 +/- 5.9% of baseline at 30 min. The alpha-adrenergic antagonist, phentolamine, significantly increased iCT within 15 min, reaching 132 +/- 8.6% of baseline at 45 min. The beta-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol, significantly suppressed iCT with 15 min, reaching 51.8 +/-6.3% of baseline at 2 h. Therefore, 1) the adrenergic system (without induced change in serum Ca) can modify CT secretion to as great a degree as can change in Ca ion concentration induced by standard Ca and EDTA infusion tests and 2) even basal secretion of CT can be modified by adrenergic influences. These data strongly suggest 1) that the adrenergic system is an effective modifier of CT secretion and 2) that the adrenergic system, as well as Ca ion concentration, may play an improtant physiological role in control of CT secretion in man.

  6. Effect of epidural blockade and oxygen therapy on changes in subcutaneous oxygen tension after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, U; Erichsen, C J

    1994-01-01

    The effect of oxygen therapy (37% by face mask) and epidural local anesthetic blockade (9 ml 0.5% bupivacaine at Th9-11 level) on wound oxygenation was evaluated in eight otherwise healthy patients undergoing elective colorectal resection. The patients were monitored continuously for subcutaneous...... without epidural blockade and 15 (10-20) min with blockade (P surgery....

  7. Ultrasound-guided neural blockade in Proteus syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anatomy, a young patient with Proteus syndrome requiring forearm surgery successfully received a supraclavicular block, using an ultrasound-guided technique for needle placement. We recommend that practitioners experienced in ultrasound- guided neural blockade perform regional anaesthesia in selected patients with ...

  8. Topological matter with collective encoding and Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We propose to use a permutation symmetric sample of multilevel atoms to simulate the properties of topologically ordered states. The Rydberg blockade interaction is used to prepare states of the sample which are equivalent to resonating valence bond states, Laughlin states, and string...

  9. Acute peri-operative beta-blockade in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    This paper considers the effect of physiochemical and/or pharmacokinetic properties on the cardioprotective efficacy of acute peri-operative beta-blockade, indications for peri- operative beta-blockers and economic viability in South. Africa. 1. Is there a preferable peri-operative beta-blocker based on physiochemical and ...

  10. Effect of Dual Blockade of Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Effect of Dual Blockade of Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone. System on Proteinuria in Patients with Diabetic. Nephropathy and Advanced Azotemia. Hatice Odabas1, İlyas Capoglu2, Ramazan Cetinkaya3, Ali Riza Odabas3,. Abdullah Uyanik3 and Mustafa Keles3*. 1Department of Internal Medicine, ...

  11. Effect of Dual Blockade of Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the dual effect of angiotensin blockade by irbesartan and enalapril on proteinuria in diabetic patients with azotemia. Methods: Patients with diabetes of > 5 years duration, proteinuria at a nephrotic level and serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL were enrolled in the study. Forty-five enrolled patients were ...

  12. CARDIOVASCULAR ENDOCRINOLOGY Dual RAAS blockade has dual effects on outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; de Zeeuw, Dick

    Makani and colleagues report that dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is associated with harm despite previous studies showing that this approach decreases blood pressure and albuminuria. Do these results imply that we should abandon surrogate markers? Or should we become more

  13. Effective dermatomal blockade after subcostal transversus abdominis plane block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Anja Ulrike; Torup, Henrik; Hansen, Egon G

    2012-01-01

    . Sensory assessment of a TAP block may guide the decision on the extent of the block. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the dermatomal extent of sensory blockade after injection of 20 ml 0.5% ropivacaine bilaterally into the TAP can be assessed using cold and pinprick sensation....

  14. Entanglement of two ground state neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Browaeys, Antoine; Evellin, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in trapping and manipulation of internal states of single neutral rubidium atoms in optical tweezers. We demonstrate the creation of an entangled state between two ground state atoms trapped in separate tweezers using the effect of Rydberg blockade. The quality...... of the entanglement is measured using global rotations of the internal states of both atoms....

  15. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  16. PD-1 Blockade Expands Intratumoral Memory T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated, and single-cell infiltrates were analyzed by multi...

  17. Coulomb blockade due to quantum phase slips illustrated with devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hriscu, A.M.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    2011-01-01

    To illustrate the emergence of Coulomb blockade from coherent quantum phase-slip processes in thin superconducting wires, we propose and theoretically investigate two elementary setups, or devices. The setups are derived from the Cooper-pair box and Cooper-pair transistor, so we refer to them as the

  18. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockade in patients with advanced diabetic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Bermejo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS blockade has been shown to slow the progression of diabetic kidney disease. Our objectives were: to study the percentage of patients with diabetic kidney disease treated with RAAS blockade, to determine its renal function, safety profile and assess whether its administration is associated with increased progression of CKD after 3 years of follow-up. Materials and methods: Retrospective study. 197 diabetic kidney disease patients were included and divided into three groups according to the treatment: patients who had never received RAAS blockade (non-RAAS blockade, patients who at some point had received RAAS blockade (inconstant-RAAS blockade and patients who received RAAS blockade (constant-RAAS blockade. Clinical characteristics and analytical variables such as renal function, electrolytes, glycosylated hemoglobin and glomerular filtration rate according to CKD-EPI and MDRD formulas were assessed. We also studied their clinical course (baseline, 1 and 3 years follow-up in terms of treatment group, survival, risk factors and renal prognosis. Results: Non-RAAS blockade patients had worse renal function and older age (p < 0.05 at baseline compared to RAAS blockade patients. Patients who received RAAS blockade were not found to have greater toxicity or chronic kidney disease progression and no differences in renal prognosis were identified. Mortality was higher in non-RAAS blockade patients, older patients and patients with worse renal function (p < 0.05. In the multivariate analysis, older age and worse renal function were risk factors for mortality. Conclusions: Treatment with RAAS blockade is more common in diabetic kidney disease patients with eGFR ≥ 30 ml/min/1.73 m2. In our study, there were no differences in the evolution of renal function

  19. Combinatorial pharmacogenetic interactions of bucindolol and β1, α2C adrenergic receptor polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Christopher M; Fiuzat, Mona; Carson, Peter E; Anand, Inder S; Plehn, Jonathan F; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Silver, Marc A; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Miller, Alan B; White, Michel; Walsh, Ryan; Nelson, Penny; Medway, Allen; Davis, Gordon; Robertson, Alastair D; Port, J David; Carr, James; Murphy, Guinevere A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Abraham, William T; Liggett, Stephen B; Bristow, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics involves complex interactions of gene products affecting pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, but there is little information on the interaction of multiple genetic modifiers of drug response. Bucindolol is a β-blocker/sympatholytic agent whose efficacy is modulated by polymorphisms in the primary target (β(1) adrenergic receptor [AR] Arg389 Gly on cardiac myocytes) and a secondary target modifier (α(2C) AR Ins [wild-type (Wt)] 322-325 deletion [Del] on cardiac adrenergic neurons). The major allele homozygotes and minor allele carriers of each polymorphism are respectively associated with efficacy enhancement and loss, creating the possibility for genotype combination interactions that can be measured by clinical trial methodology. In a 1,040 patient substudy of a bucindolol vs. placebo heart failure clinical trial, we tested the hypothesis that combinations of β(1)389 and α(2C)322-325 polymorphisms are additive for both efficacy enhancement and loss. Additionally, norepinephrine (NE) affinity for β(1)389 AR variants was measured in human explanted left ventricles. The combination of β(1)389 Arg+α(2C)322-325 Wt major allele homozygotes (47% of the trial population) was non-additive for efficacy enhancement across six clinical endpoints, with an average efficacy increase of 1.70-fold vs. 2.32-fold in β(1)389 Arg homozygotes+α(2C)322-325 Del minor allele carriers. In contrast, the minor allele carrier combination (13% subset) exhibited additive efficacy loss. These disparate effects are likely due to the higher proportion (42% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.009) of high-affinity NE binding sites in β(1)389 Arg vs. Gly ARs, which converts α(2C)Del minor allele-associated NE lowering from a therapeutic liability to a benefit. On combination, the two sets of AR polymorphisms 1) influenced bucindolol efficacy seemingly unpredictably but consistent with their pharmacologic interactions, and 2) identified subpopulations with enhanced (β(1)389 Arg

  20. Combinatorial pharmacogenetic interactions of bucindolol and β1, α2C adrenergic receptor polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M O'Connor

    Full Text Available Pharmacogenetics involves complex interactions of gene products affecting pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, but there is little information on the interaction of multiple genetic modifiers of drug response. Bucindolol is a β-blocker/sympatholytic agent whose efficacy is modulated by polymorphisms in the primary target (β(1 adrenergic receptor [AR] Arg389 Gly on cardiac myocytes and a secondary target modifier (α(2C AR Ins [wild-type (Wt] 322-325 deletion [Del] on cardiac adrenergic neurons. The major allele homozygotes and minor allele carriers of each polymorphism are respectively associated with efficacy enhancement and loss, creating the possibility for genotype combination interactions that can be measured by clinical trial methodology.In a 1,040 patient substudy of a bucindolol vs. placebo heart failure clinical trial, we tested the hypothesis that combinations of β(1389 and α(2C322-325 polymorphisms are additive for both efficacy enhancement and loss. Additionally, norepinephrine (NE affinity for β(1389 AR variants was measured in human explanted left ventricles.The combination of β(1389 Arg+α(2C322-325 Wt major allele homozygotes (47% of the trial population was non-additive for efficacy enhancement across six clinical endpoints, with an average efficacy increase of 1.70-fold vs. 2.32-fold in β(1389 Arg homozygotes+α(2C322-325 Del minor allele carriers. In contrast, the minor allele carrier combination (13% subset exhibited additive efficacy loss. These disparate effects are likely due to the higher proportion (42% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.009 of high-affinity NE binding sites in β(1389 Arg vs. Gly ARs, which converts α(2CDel minor allele-associated NE lowering from a therapeutic liability to a benefit.On combination, the two sets of AR polymorphisms 1 influenced bucindolol efficacy seemingly unpredictably but consistent with their pharmacologic interactions, and 2 identified subpopulations with enhanced (β(1389 Arg

  1. β(3) adrenergic stimulation of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump by reversal of an inhibitory oxidative modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundgaard, Henning; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Hamilton, Elisha J; Huang, Yifei; Chia, Karin K M; Hunyor, Stephen N; Figtree, Gemma A; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2010-12-21

    inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) current contributes to negative inotropy of β(3) adrenergic receptor (β(3) AR) activation, but effects on other determinants of excitation-contraction coupling are not known. Of these, the Na(+)-K(+) pump is of particular interest because of adverse effects attributed to high cardiac myocyte Na(+) levels and upregulation of the β(3) AR in heart failure. we voltage clamped rabbit ventricular myocytes and identified electrogenic Na(+)-K(+) pump current (I(p)) as the shift in holding current induced by ouabain. The synthetic β(3) AR agonists BRL37344 and CL316,243 and the natural agonist norepinephrine increased I(p). Pump stimulation was insensitive to the β(1)/β(2) AR antagonist nadolol and the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 but sensitive to the β(3) AR antagonist L-748,337. Blockade of nitric oxide synthase abolished pump stimulation and an increase in fluorescence of myocytes loaded with a nitric oxide-sensitive dye. Exposure of myocytes to β(3) AR agonists decreased β(1) Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit glutathionylation, an oxidative modification that causes pump inhibition. The in vivo relevance of this was indicated by an increase in myocardial β(1) pump subunit glutathionylation with elimination of β(3) AR-mediated signaling in β(3) AR(-/-) mice. The in vivo effect of BRL37344 on contractility of the nonfailing and failing heart in sheep was consistent with a beneficial effect of Na(+)-K(+) pump stimulation in heart failure. the β(3) AR mediates decreased β(1) subunit glutathionylation and Na(+)-K(+) pump stimulation in the heart. Upregulation of the receptor in heart failure may be a beneficial mechanism that facilitates the export of excess Na(+).

  2. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) and β-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, α7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol (β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE 2 and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE 2 induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not α-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis

  3. On Disruption of Fear Memory by Reconsolidation Blockade: Evidence from Cannabidiol Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Cristina A J; Gazarini, Lucas; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Guimarães, Francisco S; Bertoglio, Leandro J

    2012-01-01

    The search for reconsolidation blockers may uncover clinically relevant drugs for disrupting memories of significant stressful life experiences, such as those underlying the posttraumatic stress disorder. Considering the safety of systemically administered cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychotomimetic component of Cannabis sativa, to animals and humans, the present study sought to investigate whether and how this phytocannabinoid (3–30 mg/kg intraperitoneally; i.p.) could mitigate an established memory, by blockade of its reconsolidation, evaluated in a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm in rats. We report that CBD is able to disrupt 1- and 7-days-old memories when administered immediately, but not 6 h, after their retrieval for 3 min, with the dose of 10 mg/kg being the most effective. This effect persists in either case for at least 1 week, but is prevented when memory reactivation was omitted, or when the cannabinoid type-1 receptors were antagonized selectively with AM251 (1.0 mg/kg). Pretreatment with the serotonin type-1A receptor antagonist WAY100635, however, failed to block CBD effects. These results highlight that recent and older fear memories are equally vulnerable to disruption induced by CBD through reconsolidation blockade, with a consequent long-lasting relief in contextual fear-induced freezing. Importantly, this CBD effect is dependent on memory reactivation, restricted to time window of <6 h, and is possibly dependent on cannabinoid type-1 receptor-mediated signaling mechanisms. We also observed that the fear memories disrupted by CBD treatment do not show reinstatement or spontaneous recovery over 22 days. These findings support the view that reconsolidation blockade, rather than facilitated extinction, accounts for the aforementioned CBD results in our experimental conditions. PMID:22549120

  4. Role of the alpha-adrenergic blocking effect in the acute hypotensive effect of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs with alpha-blocking activities in conscious SHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, H; Nakazawa, M; Takeda, K; Imai, S

    1985-12-01

    Acute hypotensive effects and the mechanisms of three beta-adrenergic blocking drugs with alpha-blocking activity were studied in comparison with those of prazosin, propranolol and hydralazine in the conscious spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Prazosin lowered the blood pressure dose-dependently and inhibited the pressor response to phenylephrine. Three beta-adrenergic blocking drugs with alpha-blocking activity, labetalol (30 mg/kg), arotinolol (100 mg/kg) and nipradilol (100 mg/kg) also lowered the blood pressure to the same extent as prazosin (0.3 mg/kg), but the inhibition of the pressor response to phenylephrine produced by them was disproportionately slight. Propranolol (100 mg/kg) did not lower the blood pressure. These results suggest that the acute hypotensive effects of three beta-adrenergic blocking drugs with alpha-blocking activity were attributable only partially to the alpha-adrenergic blocking effect; a mechanism or mechanisms other than the alpha-adrenergic blocking effect must be invoked to explain the acute hypotensive effect produced by lower doses of these drugs in the conscious SHR.

  5. Development of a radioreceptor assay for β2 adrenergic agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbo, V.; Vandenbroeck, M.; Maghuin-Rogister, G.

    1994-01-01

    Several β 2 adrenergic agonists are illegally used as growth promoters in meat production. We have developed and evaluated a radioreceptor assay for the multianalyte detection of these compounds. The method is based on a competition for binding with receptors (plasma membranes prepared from bovine teat muscles) between a radioactive tracer ( 3 H-dihydroalprenolol) and β 2 agonist residues present in the samples. The method has been validated for three β 2 agonists (clenbuterol, mabuterol and cimaterol) in bovine urine samples. The detection limit (mean of ''blank'' values + 3 SEM) in urine was 2.4 ppb clenbuterol. Using this procedure, samples containing at least 5 ppb of clenbuterol, mabuterol or cimaterol could be identified as positive for the presence of β 2 agonists. (orig.) [de

  6. EEG differences between the opioid and adrenergic psyhoneuroendocrine rat types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristea, A; Moldovan, M; Munteanu, A M

    2000-01-01

    (BEA) of the "O" and "A" rat types during restrained wakefulness and anesthesia with Ether and chloral hydrate (CHL). The differentiation of the psyhoneuroendocrine rat types was made using the level of painful sensitivity. 13 hypersensitive "A" and 14 hyposensitive "O" rats were selected from a 91......Our work is based on the hypothesis of the existence of an opioid psychoneuroendocrine type named "O" type (Cristea, 1993), opposed to the well known adrenergic "A" type described by Roseman and Friedman in 1980. In the present study we tested the differences between the background EEG activity...... adult (140 g) male Wistar population using the distribution of the tail retraction time (TRT) during a tail-flick test. The epidural EEG activity, was quantified within the 1-30 Hz band by six numerical parameters: root mean square (RMS), mean spectral frequency (MSF), spectral edge frequency at 95...

  7. Potential antisecretory antidiarrheals. 1. Alpha 2-adrenergic aromatic aminoguanidine hydrazones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzele, B S; Moormann, A E; Gullikson, G W; Albin, D; Bianchi, R G; Palicharla, P; Sanguinetti, E L; Walters, D E

    1988-01-01

    Guanabenz, a centrally acting antihypertensive agent, has been shown to have intestinal antisecretory properties. A series of aromatic aminoguanidine hydrazones was made in an effort to separate the antisecretory and cardiovascular activities. Benzaldehyde, naphthaldehyde, and tetralone derivatives were synthesized. The compounds were evaluated in the cholera toxin treated ligated jejunum of the rat and in the Ussing chamber using a rabbit ileum preparation. A number of compounds, including members of each structural class, were active upon subcutaneous administration in the rat. Active compounds were determined to be alpha 2-adrenergic agonists by yohimbine reversals of their Ussing chamber activities. The compound displaying the best separation of activities was the aminoguanidine hydrazone of 2,6-dimethyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (20).

  8. Systemic administration of guanfacine improves food-motivated impulsive choice behavior primarily via direct stimulation of postsynaptic α2A-adrenergic receptors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitomi, Kouhei; Yano, Koji; Kobayashi, Mika; Jino, Kohei; Kano, Takuya; Horiguchi, Naotaka; Shinohara, Shunji; Hasegawa, Minoru

    2018-06-01

    Impulsive choice behavior, which can be assessed using the delay discounting task, is a characteristic of various psychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Guanfacine is a selective α 2A -adrenergic receptor agonist that is clinically effective in treating ADHD. However, there is no clear evidence that systemic guanfacine administration reduces impulsive choice behavior in the delay discounting task in rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of systemic guanfacine administration on food-motivated impulsive choice behavior in rats and the neuronal mechanism underlying this effect. Repeated administration of either guanfacine, methylphenidate, or atomoxetine significantly enhanced impulse control, increasing the number of times the rats chose a large but delayed reward in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of guanfacine was significantly blocked by pretreatment with an α 2A -adrenergic receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effect of guanfacine remained unaffected in rats pretreated with a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin, consistent with a post-synaptic action. In contrast, the effect of atomoxetine on impulsive choice behavior was attenuated by pretreatment with the noradrenergic neurotoxin. These results provide the first evidence that systemically administered guanfacine reduces impulsive choice behavior in rats and that direct stimulation of postsynaptic, rather than presynaptic, α 2A -adrenergic receptors is involved in this effect. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between alpha-2a-adrenergic receptor gene and ADHD inattentive type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Marcelo; Denardin, Daniel; Silva, Tatiana Laufer; Pianca, Thiago; Roman, Tatiana; Hutz, Mara Helena; Faraone, Stephen V; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2006-11-15

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that an MspI polymorphism at the adrenergic alpha2A receptor gene (ADRA2A) is associated with severity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) inattentive symptoms in clinical samples composed mainly of subjects with ADHD, combined type. This study aimed to investigate the association between this ADRA2A polymorphism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-inattentive type (ADHD-I) in a nonreferred sample. In a case-control study, we assessed a sample of 100 children and adolescents with ADHD-I and 100 non-ADHD controls. Cases and controls were matched by gender and age and were screened by using teacher reports in a revised version of the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham rating scale at 12 schools. Psychiatric diagnoses were derived through structured diagnostic interviews. Homozygous subjects for the G allele at the ADRA2A had significantly higher odds ratio (OR) for ADHD-I than did those with other genotypes (CC + CG genotypes), even after adjusting for potential confounders (p = .02; OR = 3.78; 95% confidence interval = 1.23-11.62). In family-based analyses, no significant associations were detected. Our results suggest that the ADRA2A may be associated with ADHD-I, replicating previous findings from clinical samples that have suggested the importance of this gene for the dimension of inattention. In addition, these results support the role of the noradrenergic system in ADHD.

  10. Adrenergic effects on secretion of amylase from the rat salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1988-01-01

    . The result of infusion of alpha- and beta-adrenergic antagonists as well as noradrenaline and isoproterenol showed that secretion of salivary amylase is predominantly mediated by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors, especially of the beta 1-subtype. Investigation of the isoenzyme pattern in saliva......The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adrenergic agents on secretion of amylase from the salivary glands in vivo. Saliva was collected from the distal oesophagus in conscious rats. Adrenaline increased the concentration of amylase in saliva and serum significantly......, pancreatic juice and serum demonstrated that the major component in serum is salivary amylase. This study has shown that beta-adrenergic agents stimulate secretion of amylase from the salivary glands in rats. Though the secretion is mainly exocrine small amounts of amylase is found in serum, which seems...

  11. β2-adrenergic receptor Thr164Ile polymorphism, obesity, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette; Dahl, Morten; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The β(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) influences regulation of energy balance by stimulating catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipose tissue. The rare functional ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism could therefore influence risk of obesity and subsequently diabetes.......The β(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) influences regulation of energy balance by stimulating catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipose tissue. The rare functional ADRB2rs1800888(Thr164Ile) polymorphism could therefore influence risk of obesity and subsequently diabetes....

  12. Demonstration of beta1-adrenergic receptors in human placenta by (-)I125 Iodocyanopindolol binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, A.; Cocci, F.; Niedermeyer, H.P.; Matteucci, E.; Vitali, C.; Ciarimboli, G.; Bombardieri, S.

    1989-01-01

    The highly specific β-adrenergic radioligand (-) 125 I Iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) was used to characterize the β-adrenergic receptor subtype present in human placenta. Binding of ICYP to membranes from human placenta was saturable with time and ligand concentration, of high affinity, and demonstrated appropriate stereoselectivity and agonist rank order of potency for binding to a β-adrenergic receptor. From saturation binding curves, the K D and B max values for ICYP binding were 233±51 pM and 690±139 fmol/mg of proteins, respectively.Analysis of inhibition of ICYP binding by β 1 - and β 2 -selective adrenergic antagonists via Hofstee analysis resulted in linear plots, indicating the existence of a homogeneous population of β-adrenergic receptors. From the resulting K I -values for the β 1 -selective drugs practolol (4.0±0.9 μM) and metoprolol (0.19±0.07 μM) and for the β 2 -selective drug ICI 118,551 (0.30)±0.06 μM) it is concluded that the β-adrenergic receptor in human placenta is of the β 1 -subtype. This is further supported by the fact that (-)-noradrenaline and (-)-adrenaline were equipotent in inhibiting ICYP binding

  13. Blockade of NMDA receptors prevents analgesic tolerance to repeated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingne, Priyanka M.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2008-01-01

    Repeated daily application transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) results in tolerance, at spinal opioid receptors, to the anti-hyperalgesia produced by TENS. Since N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists prevent analgesic tolerance to opioid agonists we hypothesized that blockade of NMDA receptors will prevent tolerance to TENS. In rats with knee joint inflammation, TENS was applied for 20 minute daily at high frequency (100 Hz), low frequency (4 Hz), or sham TENS. Rats were treated with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg-0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily before TENS. Paw withdrawal thresholds were tested before and after inflammation, and before and after TENS treatment for 4 days. On day 1 TENS reversed the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold induced by joint inflammation. On day 4 TENS had no effect on the decreased withdrawal threshold in the group treated with vehicle demonstrating development of tolerance. However, in the group treated with 0.1 mg/kg MK-801, TENS significantly reversed the mechanical withdrawal thresholds on day 4 demonstrating that tolerance did not develop. Vehicle treated animals developed cross-tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. Treatment with MK-801 reversed this cross-tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. In summary, blockade of NMDA receptors prevents analgesic tolerance to daily TENS by preventing tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. Perspective Tolerance observed to the clinical treatment of TENS could be prevented by administration of pharmaceutical agents with NMDA receptors activity such as ketamine or dextromethorphan. PMID:18061543

  14. Pancreatic Digestive Enzyme Blockade in the Intestine Increases Survival After Experimental Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLano, Frank A.; Hoyt, David B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2015-01-01

    Shock, sepsis, and multiorgan failure are associated with inflammation, morbidity, and high mortality. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests that pancreatic enzymes in the intestinal lumen autodigest the intestine and generate systemic inflammation. Blocking these enzymes in the intestine reduces inflammation and multiorgan dysfunction. We investigated whether enzymatic blockade also reduces mortality after shock. Three rat shock models were used here: hemorrhagic shock, peritonitis shock induced by placement of cecal material into the peritoneum, and endotoxin shock. One hour after initiation of hemorrhagic, peritonitis, or endotoxin shock, animals were administered one of three different pancreatic enzyme inhibitors—6-amidino-2-naphtyl p-guanidinobenzoate di-methanesulfate, tranexamic acid, or aprotinin—into the lumen of the small intestine. In all forms of shock, blockade of digestive proteases with protease inhibitor attenuated entry of digestive enzymes into the wall of the intestine and subsequent autodigestion and morphological damage to the intestine, lung, and heart. Animals treated with protease inhibitors also survived in larger numbers than untreated controls over a period of 12 weeks. Surviving animals recovered completely and returned to normal weight within 14 days after shock. The results suggest that the active and concentrated digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine play a central role in shock and multi-organ failure, which can be treated with protease inhibitors that are currently available for use in the clinic. PMID:23345609

  15. Graft-versus-host disease is enhanced by selective CD73 blockade in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Wang

    Full Text Available CD73 functions as an ecto-5'-nucleotidase to produce extracellular adenosine that has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity. We here demonstrate that CD73 helps control graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in mouse models. Survival of wild-type (WT recipients of either allogeneic donor naïve CD73 knock-out (KO or WT T cells was similar suggesting that donor naïve T cell CD73 did not contribute to GVHD. By contrast, donor CD73 KO CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells (Treg had significantly impaired ability to mitigate GVHD mortality compared to WT Treg, suggesting that CD73 on Treg is critical for GVHD protection. However, compared to donor CD73, recipient CD73 is more effective in limiting GVHD. Pharmacological blockade of A2A receptor exacerbated GVHD in WT recipients, but not in CD73 KO recipients, suggesting that A2 receptor signaling is primarily implicated in CD73-mediated GVHD protection. Moreover, pharmacological blockade of CD73 enzymatic activity induced stronger alloreactive T cell activity, worsened GVHD and enhanced the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect. These findings suggest that both donor and recipient CD73 protects against GVHD but also limits GVL effects. Thus, either enhancing or blocking CD73 activity has great potential clinical application in allogeneic bone marrow transplants.

  16. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade on hippocampal-dependent memory in adults with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenstein, Lisa S; Sheridan, Margaret; Garg, Rajesh; Adler, Gail K

    2015-06-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for paired-associate learning. Obesity is associated with increased mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activity in peripheral and possibly central tissues, decreased hippocampal size in humans, and impaired hippocampal learning in rodents. The MR is expressed in hippocampal neurons, and MR blockade improves hippocampal learning in obese animals. The goal of the study was to determine whether MR blockade would modulate paired-associate learning in men and women with obesity. Men and women ages 20-61 years with BMI between 30-45 kg/m(2) were randomly assigned to placebo (n = 11; 7 women) or 50 mg spironolactone daily (n = 12; 7 women) for six weeks. At baseline and post-treatment, subjects underwent a clinical and hormonal evaluation. They also underwent a computerized task that assesses paired-associate learning and has been shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging to activate the hippocampus. In an ANCOVA model that adjusted for baseline paired-associate learning, age, and race, spironolactone treatment was associated with a significant (P = 0.043) improvement in hippocampal memory as compared to placebo treatment. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that blocking MR with chronic, low-dose spironolactone treatment improves paired-associate learning in individuals with obesity, suggesting that MR activation contributes to hippocampal memory modulation in humans. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  17. The adrenergic retulation of the cardiovascular system in the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, G.L.J.; Jensen, Nini Skovgaard; Abe, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates adrenergic regulation of the systemic and pulmonary circulations of the anaesthetised South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus. Haemodynamic measurements were made following bolus injections of adrenaline and adrenergic antagonists administered through a systemic...... arterial catheter. Adrenaline caused a marked systemic vasoconstriction that was abolished by phentolamine, indicating this response was mediated through α-adrenergic receptors. Injection of phentolamine gave rise to a pronounced vasodilatation (systemic conductance (Gsys) more than doubled), while...... injection of propranolol caused a systemic vasoconstriction, pointing to a potent α-adrenergic, and a weaker β-adrenergic tone in the systemic vasculature of Crotalus. Overall, the pulmonary vasculature was far less responsive to adrenergic stimulation than the systemic circulation. Adrenaline caused...

  18. Perioperative Beta Blockade - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha K. Zachariah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuation of antihypertensives preoperatively and their influence on intraoperative hemodynamics is a big concern among anesthesiologists. The Peri Operative Ischaemia Study Evaluation (POISE trial showed a significant reduction of myocardial infarction, need for coronary revascularization and the incidence of atrial fibrillation with metoprolol started 2-4 hours prior to surgery but a significant increase in total mortality and clinically significant hypotension and bradycardia. This is a case report of intraoperative severe bradycardia in a young patient on recently started beta blocker.

  19. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  20. Association of adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms with adolescent obesity in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Lee, Yun-Shien; Pei, Jen-Sheng

    2012-02-01

    Polymorphisms of β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) and β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) have been reported to be associated with obesity in adults and adolescents, although study results have been controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of polymorphisms of ADRB2 (Arg16Gly, Gln27Glu) and ADRB3 (Trp64Arg) with adolescent obesity in Taiwan. A total of 559 adolescent volunteers with equal numbers female and male were enrolled. Participants were divided into two groups: obese (body mass index [BMI]≥ 95th percentile) and normal weight (BMI 15th-85th percentile). Genomic DNA was extracted from buccal mucosa cells and genotyped in TaqMan assays. Genotype results and clinical subject characteristics were analyzed. Among the three ADRB polymorphisms, only Arg16Gly polymorphism was found to be significantly correlated with adolescent obesity, especially in girls. Girls with genotype Gly/Gly had a lower probability of obesity than those with genotypes Arg/Gly or Arg/Arg (P= 0.006; Arg/Gly: odds ratio [OR], 2.57, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 1.22-5.41; Arg/Arg: OR, 3.03, 95%CI: 1.50-6.12). Girls with genotype Gly/Gly had lower BMI than those with genotype Arg/Arg (P= 0.049). Obese adolescents with genotype Gly/Gly had a lower probability of hypertension than those with genotype Arg/Gly or Arg/Arg (P= 0.005). Arg16Gly polymorphism of ADRB2 was significantly associated with obesity in female adolescents, and those with the Gly/Gly genotype were associated with a lower possibility of obesity and lower BMI. This polymorphism was also associated with a lower probability of hypertension in obese adolescents. The other two polymorphisms of ADRB (Gln27Glu and Trp64Arg) were not associated with adolescent obesity in Taiwan. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Berry-phase blockade in single-molecule magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    We formulate the problem of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM) in the Coulomb blockade regime taking into account topological interference effects for the tunneling of the large spin of a SMM. The interference originates from spin Berry phases associated with different tunneling paths. We show that in the case of incoherent spin states it is essential to place the SMM between oppositely spin-polarized source and drain leads in order to detect the spin tunneling in the s...

  2. A mean field approach to Coulomb blockade for a disordered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CB is the energy price paid in adding an electron to a QD. Classically, this price is ≈e2/C, where e is the electron charge and C is the capacitance of the QD. In many-body quantum mechanics, this price is given a name, namely Hubbard U. The Coulomb blockade is the model led by an effective Hubbard U which in the.

  3. Mismatch Repair Deficiency and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Valerie; Murphy, Adrian; Le, Dung T; Diaz, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    : More than 1.6 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2016, resulting in more than 500,000 deaths. Although chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment in advanced cancers, immunotherapy development, particularly with PD-1 inhibitors, has changed the face of treatment for a number of tumor types. One example is the subset of tumors characterized by mismatch repair deficiency and microsatellite instability that are highly sensitive to PD-1 blockade. Hereditary forms of cancer have been noted for more than a century, but the molecular changes underlying mismatch repair-deficient tumors and subsequent microsatellite unstable tumors was not known until the early 1990s. In this review article, we discuss the history and pathophysiology of mismatch repair, the process of testing for mismatch repair deficiency and microsatellite instability, and the role of immunotherapy in this subset of cancers. Mismatch repair deficiency has contributed to our understanding of carcinogenesis for the past 2 decades and now identifies a subgroup of traditionally chemotherapy-insensitive solid tumors as sensitive to PD-1 blockade. This article seeks to educate oncologists regarding the nature of mismatch repair deficiency, its impact in multiple tumor types, and its implications for predicting the responsiveness of solid tumors to immune checkpoint blockade. ©AlphaMed Press.

  4. Blockade of Death Ligand TRAIL Inhibits Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Takaomi; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Gondai, Tatsuro; Yagita, Hideo; Yokoyama, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI). Many investigators have reported that cell death via apoptosis significantly contributed to the pathophysiology of renal IRI. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, and induces apoptosis and inflammation. However, the role of TRAIL in renal IRI is unclear. Here, we investigated whether TRAIL contributes to renal IRI and whether TRAIL blockade could attenuate renal IRI. AKI was induced by unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 60 min in male FVB/N mice. We found that the expression of TRAIL and its receptors were highly upregulated in renal tubular cells in renal IRI. Neutralizing anti-TRAIL antibody or its control IgG was given 24 hr before ischemia and a half-dose booster injection was administered into the peritoneal cavity immediately after reperfusion. We found that TRAIL blockade inhibited tubular apoptosis and reduced the accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages. Furthermore, TRAIL blockade attenuated renal fibrosis and atrophy after IRI. In conclusion, our study suggests that TRAIL is a critical pathogenic factor in renal IRI, and that TRAIL could be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of renal IRI

  5. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor and of combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade on cardiac performance and vascular resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Hilsted, J

    1992-01-01

    1. Cardiac performance and vascular resistance was studied in seven healthy men by radionuclide cardiography and venous plethysmography before and after alpha-adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine and after combined alpha-adrenoceptor, beta-adrenoceptor (propranolol) and parasympathetic (atropine......) blockade. 2. During alpha-adrenoceptor blockade heart rate and cardiac output increased considerably and left ventricular ejection fraction increased because of increased contractility. Systemic vascular resistance fell both during alpha-adrenoceptor blockade alone and during combined blockade...

  6. β-Adrenergic blockade does not impair the skin blood flow sensitivity to local heating in burned and nonburned skin under neutral and hot environments in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Eric; McEntire, Serina J; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Suman, Oscar E

    2017-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that propranolol, a drug given to burn patients to reduce hypermetabolism/cardiac stress, may inhibit heat dissipation by changing the sensitivity of skin blood flow (SkBF) to local heating under neutral and hot conditions. In a randomized double-blind study, a placebo was given to eight burned children, while propranolol was given to 13 burned children with similar characteristics (mean±SD: 11.9±3 years, 147±20 cm, 45±23 kg, 56±12% Total body surface area burned). Nonburned children (n=13, 11.4±3 years, 152±15 cm, 52±13 kg) served as healthy controls. A progressive local heating protocol characterized SkBF responses in burned and unburned skin and nonburned control skin under the two environmental conditions (23 and 34°C) via laser Doppler flowmetry. Resting SkBF was greater in burned and unburned skin compared to the nonburned control (main effect: skin, Pheating between groups. Additionally, dose-response curves for the sensitivity of SkBF to local heating were not different among burned or unburned skin, and nonburned control skin (EC 50 , P>.05) under either condition. Therapeutic propranolol does not negatively affect SkBF under neutral or hot environmental conditions and further compromise temperature regulation in burned children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pharmacological Blockade of I-Ks Destabilizes Spiral-Wave Reentry Under beta-Adrenergic Stimulation in Favor of Its Early Termination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, Sara; Honjo, Haruo; Takemoto, Yoshio; Takanari, Hiroki; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yusuke; Opthof, Tobias; Sakuma, Ichiro; Inada, Shin; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ashihara, Takashi; Kodama, Itsuo; Kamiya, Kaichiro

    2012-01-01

    We tested a hypothesis that an enhancement of I-Ks may play a pivotal role in ventricular proarrhythmia under high sympathetic activity. A 2-dimensional ventricular muscle layer was prepared in rabbit hearts, and action potential signals were analyzed by optical mapping. During constant stimulation,

  8. Browning of Subcutaneous White Adipose Tissue in Humans after Severe Adrenergic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidossis, Labros S; Porter, Craig; Saraf, Manish K; Børsheim, Elisabet; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S; Chao, Tony; Ali, Arham; Chondronikola, Maria; Mlcak, Ronald; Finnerty, Celeste C; Hawkins, Hal K; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy; Herndon, David N

    2015-08-04

    Since the presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT) was confirmed in adult humans, BAT has become a therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. We examined whether human subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) can adopt a BAT-like phenotype using a clinical model of prolonged and severe adrenergic stress. sWAT samples were collected from severely burned and healthy individuals. A subset of burn victims were prospectively followed during their acute hospitalization. Browning of sWAT was determined by the presence of multilocular adipocytes, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), and increased mitochondrial density and respiratory capacity. Multilocular UCP1-positive adipocytes were found in sWAT samples from burn patients. UCP1 mRNA, mitochondrial density, and leak respiratory capacity in sWAT increased after burn trauma. Our data demonstrate that human sWAT can transform from an energy-storing to an energy-dissipating tissue, which opens new research avenues in our quest to prevent and treat obesity and its metabolic complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiplanar wrist joint proprioception: The effect of anesthetic blockade of the posterior interosseous nerve or skin envelope surrounding the joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kenneth F; Meyer, Vanessa M; Smith, Laurel B; Lustik, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Contribution of the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) and surrounding skin envelope to wrist proprioception is a topic of debate and the primary focus of this research. We performed a double-blinded, placebo control study in which subjects underwent baseline multiplanar testing of wrist proprioception. They were randomized to receive either anesthetic blockade of the PIN within the fourth dorsal compartment, or circumferential topical anesthetic blockade of skin surrounding the wrist. Corresponding opposite wrists underwent placebo intervention with saline injection or inert ultrasound gel. Subjects repeated proprioceptive testing. Eighty subjects, 45 male and 35 female, mean age 33 years (range, 19-64 years), completed testing. The percentage of measurements falling outside a ±18° range did not differ between pre-treatment and post-treatment PIN blockade or for circumferential skin anesthesia. Wrist proprioception appears to be a multifactorial phenomenon. Surgeons may sacrifice the PIN without concern for effect on joint proprioception. Level I. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. All rights reserved.

  10. Blocking C5aR signaling promotes the anti-tumor efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Haoran; Han, Xiao; Zhu, Ying; Yang, Fei; Li, Yongsheng; Li, Qijing; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy has achieved great success in the clinic; however, only a small fraction of cancer patient benefit from PD-1/PD-L1 blockade therapy, and overcoming resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade has thus become a primary priority. In this study, we demonstrated that administration of PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies resulted in the activation of the complement system and massive generation of C5a. Generation of C5a did not change the accumulation of MDSCs in either the tumor or spleen but enhanced their inhibitory potential. In addition, blockade of C5a-C5aR signaling in combination with PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies greatly enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies. Overall, these data indicate an immunosuppressive role of C5a in the context of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade therapy and provide a strong incentive to clinically explore combination therapies using a C5a antagonist.

  11. Exercício físico, receptores β-adrenérgicos e resposta vascular Physical exercise, β-adrenergic receptors, and vascular response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Sérgio Silva

    2010-06-01

    mediated by β-adrenergic receptors. Thus, the effects of exercise on the vascular β-adrenergic sensitivity should be more deeply investigated. Furthermore, the physiopathology of the vascular system is an open field for the discovery of new compounds and advances in the clinical practice.

  12. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of [125I]cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species

  13. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a “double-edged sword” for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:26751469

  14. Adrenergic signaling in teleost fish liver, a challenging path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Elena; Moon, Thomas W

    2016-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors or adrenoceptors (ARs) belong to the huge family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have been well characterized in mammals primarily because of their importance as therapeutic drug targets. ARs are found across vertebrates and this review examines the path to identify and characterize these receptors in fish with emphasis on hepatic metabolism. The absence of reliable and specific pharmacological agents led investigators to define the fish hepatic AR system as relying solely on a β2-AR, cAMP-dependent signaling transduction pathway. The use of calcium-radiometric imaging, purified membranes for ligand-binding studies, and perifused rather than static cultured fish hepatocytes, unequivocally demonstrated that both α1- and β2-AR signaling systems existed in the fish liver consistent with studies in mammals. Additionally, the use of molecular tools and phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated the existence of multiple AR-types and -subtypes in hepatic and other tissues of a number of fish species. This review also examines the use of β-blockers as pharmaceuticals and how these drugs that are now in the aquatic environment may be impacting aquatic species including fish and some invertebrates. Clearly there is a large conservation of structure and function within the AR system of vertebrates but there remain a number of key questions that need to be addressed before a clear understanding of these systems can be resolved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of Noninvasive Stellate Ganglion Blockade Performed Using Physical Agent Modalities in Patients with Sympathetic Hyperactivity-Associated Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chun-De; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chen, Hung-Chou; Rau, Chi-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Background Stellate ganglion blockade (SGB) is mainly used to relieve symptoms of neuropathic pain in conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome and has several potential complications. Noninvasive SGB performed using physical agent modalities (PAMs), such as light irradiation and electrical stimulation, can be clinically used as an alternative to conventional invasive SGB. However, its application protocols vary and its clinical efficacy remains controversial. This study investigated ...

  16. PTH regulates β2-adrenergic receptor expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Shuichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Notomi, Takuya; Aryal, Smriti; Nakamaoto, Testuya; Izu, Yayoi; Kawasaki, Makiri; Yamada, Takayuki; Shirakawa, Jumpei; Kaneko, Kazuo; Ezura, Yoichi; Noda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    As the aged population is soaring, prevalence of osteoporosis is increasing. However, the molecular basis underlying the regulation of bone mass is still incompletely understood. Sympathetic tone acts via beta2 adrenergic receptors in bone and regulates the mass of bone which is the target organ of parathyroid hormone (PTH). However, whether beta2 adrenergic receptor is regulated by PTH in bone cells is not known. We therefore investigated the effects of PTH on beta2 adrenergic receptor gene expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. PTH treatment immediately suppressed the expression levels of beta2 adrenergic receptor mRNA. This PTH effect was dose-dependent starting as low as 1 nM. PTH action on beta2 adrenergic receptor gene expression was inhibited by a transcriptional inhibitor, DRB, but not by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide suggesting direct transcription control. Knockdown of beta2 adrenergic receptor promoted PTH-induced expression of c-fos, an immediate early response gene. With respect to molecular basis for this phenomenon, knockdown of beta2 adrenergic receptor enhanced PTH-induced transcriptional activity of cyclic AMP response element-luciferase construct in osteoblasts. Knockdown of beta2 adrenergic receptors also enhanced forskolin-induced luciferase expression, revealing that adenylate cyclase activity is influenced by beta2 adrenergic receptor. As for phosphorylation of transcription factor, knockdown of beta2 adrenergic receptor enhanced PTH-induced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). These data reveal that beta2 adrenergic receptor is one of the targets of PTH and acts as a suppressor of PTH action in osteoblasts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Blockade of leukotriene production by a single oral dose of MK-0591 in active ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillingsø, Jens; Kjeldsen, J; Laursen, L S

    1995-01-01

    -ethyl)thio)-5(quinolin+ ++-2ylmethyl-oxy)-1H-indol-2yl)-2,2-dimethyl-propanoate) exerts its effect by binding to the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, thereby inhibiting the translocation and activation of 5-lipoxygenase. METHODS: Concentrations of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in rectal...... that a single oral 250 mg dose of MK-0591 results in nearly complete blockade of systemic leukotriene production and LTB4 formation in the target tissue of inflammation (the rectum). Controlled multiple-dose trials to assess the clinical efficacy of this novel 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor seem......BACKGROUND: 5-Lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid metabolism are thought to play a central role in the secondary amplification of the inflammatory response in a number of human inflammatory diseases, such as ulcerative colitis. MK-0591 (3-(1((4-chlorophenyl)methyl)-3((1,1-dimethyl...

  18. Effects of adductor-canal-blockade on pain and ambulation after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenstrup, M T; Jæger, P; Lund, J

    2012-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with intense post-operative pain. Besides providing optimal analgesia, reduction in side effects and enhanced mobilization are important in this elderly population. The adductor-canal-blockade is theoretically an almost pure sensory blockade. We...... hypothesized that the adductor-canal-blockade may reduce morphine consumption (primary endpoint), improve pain relief, enhance early ambulation ability, and reduce side effects (secondary endpoints) after TKA compared with placebo....

  19. α- and β-adrenergic receptors in proximal tubules of rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Fortin, T.L.; Kelvie, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Proximal tubules were isolated from the rat kidney by collagenase digestion of the cortical tissue followed by Percoll gradient centrifugation. Microscopic and hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity studies proved the purity of the preparation. [ 3 H]Prazosin, [ 3 H]rauwolscine, and [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol were used to identify and quantitate respectively the α 1 -, α 2 - and β-adrenergic receptors. Proximal tubular (F 4 ) particulate fraction was compared against other cortical nephron segment (F 1 ,F 2 ) fractions and the total collagenase-digested cortex particulate suspension (F t ). Proximal tubules were enriched in α 1 - and α 2 -adrenergic receptors compared with. The fractions enriched in glomeruli and distal tubular segments had relatively low concentrations of α 1 - and α 2 -adrenergic receptors. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities in the different fractions corroborated well with the pattern suggested by the [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol binding studies. The results suggest that whole-cortex preparation radioligand binding studies may reflect proximal tubular α 1 - and α 2 -adrenergic receptor changes quite well. They may, however, miss or give erroneous impressions about β-adrenergic receptor changes occurring in different cortical nephron segments

  20. Impact of the Tamsulosin in Alpha Adrenergic Receptor of Airways at Patients with Increased Bronchial Reactibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Lirim; Ilazi, Ali; Dauti, Arta; Islami, Pellumb; Kastrati, Bashkim; Islami, Hilmi

    2015-08-01

    In this work, effect of tamsulosin as antagonist of alpha1A and alpha1B adrenergic receptor and effect of agonists of beta2 adrenergic receptor-salbutamol in patients with increased bronchial reactibility was studied. Parameters of the lung function are determined with Body plethysmography six (6) hours after administration of tamsulosin. Raw and ITGV were registered and specific resistance (SRaw) was calculated as well. Tamsulosin was administered in per os manner as a preparation in the shape of the capsules with a brand name of "Prolosin", produced by Niche Generics Limited, Hitchin, Herts. After six (6) hours of administration of tamsulosin, results gained indicate that blockage of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor (0.8 mg per os) has not changed significantly (p > 0.1) the bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial tree in comparison to the check-up that has inhaled salbutamol agonist of adrenergic beta2 receptor (2 inh. x 0.2 mg), (p tamsulosin. This suggests that even after six hours of administration of tamsulosin, and determining of lung function parameters, the activity of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor in the smooth bronchial musculature has not changed in patients with increased bronchial reactibility.

  1. Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Mechanisms in Asthma: The New Long-Acting Beta-Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Townley

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to review β-adrenergic receptors and mechanisms in the immediate and late bronchial reaction in asthma and the new long-acting β-agonist. This will be discussed in light of the controversy of the potential adverse effect of regular use of long-acting β-agonists. We studied the effect of formoterol on the late asthmatic response (LAR and airway inflammation in guinea-pigs. Formoterol suppressed the LAR, antigen-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, although isoproterenol failed to inhibit these parameters. β-Adrenergic hyporesponsiveness, and cholinergic and a- adrenergic hyperresponsiveness have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. A decrease in β-adrenoreceptor function can result either from exogenously administered β-agonist or from exposure to allergens resulting in a late bronchial reaction. There is increasing evidence that eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes which are of primary importance in the late bronchial reaction are also modulated by β2- adrenoreceptors. In functional studies of guinea-pig or human isolated trachea and lung parenchyma, PAF and certain cytokines significantly reduced the potency of isoproterenol to reverse methacholine- or histamine-induced contraction. The effect of glucocorticoids on pulmonary β-adrenergic receptors and responses suggests an important role for glucocorticoids to increase β-adrenergic receptors and responsiveness.

  2. Preliminary evidence for a role of the adrenergic nervous system in generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobin; Norton, Joanna; Carrière, Isabelle; Ritchie, Karen; Chaudieu, Isabelle; Ryan, Joanne; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2017-02-15

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common chronic condition that is understudied compared to other psychiatric disorders. An altered adrenergic function has been reported in GAD, however direct evidence for genetic susceptibility is missing. This study evaluated the associations of gene variants in adrenergic receptors (ADRs) with GAD, with the involvement of stressful events. Data were obtained from 844 French community-dwelling elderly aged 65 or over. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatry Interview, according to DSM-IV criteria. Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved with adrenergic function were genotyped; adrenergic receptors alpha(1A) (ADRA1A), alpha(2A) (ADRA2A), and beta2 (ADRB2) and transcription factor TCF7L2. Questionnaires evaluated recent stressful life events as well as early environment during childhood and adolescence. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses four SNPs were significantly associated with GAD. A 4-fold modified risk was found with ADRA1A rs17426222 and rs573514, and ADRB2 rs1042713 which remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Certain variants may moderate the effect of adverse life events on the risk of GAD. Replication in larger samples is needed due to the small case number. This is the first study showing that ADR variants are susceptibility factors for GAD, further highlighting the critical role of the adrenergic nervous system in this disorder.

  3. Oscillations-free PID control of anesthetic drug delivery in neuromuscular blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Alexander; Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T; Rosén, Olov; Silva, Margarida M

    2016-07-25

    The PID-control of drug delivery or the neuromuscular blockade (NMB) in closed-loop anesthesia is considered. The NMB system dynamics portrayed by a Wiener model can exhibit sustained nonlinear oscillations under realistic PID gains and for physiologically feasible values of the model parameters. Such oscillations, also repeatedly observed in clinical trials, lead to under- and over-dosing of the administered drug and undermine patient safety. This paper proposes a tuning policy for the proportional PID gain that via bifurcation analysis ensures oscillations-free performance of the control loop. Online estimates of the Wiener model parameters are needed for the controller implementation and monitoring of the closed-loop proximity to oscillation. The nonlinear dynamics of the PID-controlled NMB system are studied by bifurcation analysis. A database of patient models estimated under PID-controlled neuromuscular blockade during general anesthesia is utilized, along with the corresponding clinical measurements. The performance of three recursive algorithms is compared in the application at hand: an extended Kalman filter, a conventional particle filter (PF), and a PF making use of an orthonormal basis to estimate the probability density function from the particle set. It is shown that with a time-varying proportional PID gain, the type of equilibria of the closed-loop system remains the same as in the case of constant controller gains. The recovery time and frequency of oscillations are also evaluated in simulation over the database of patient models. Nonlinear identification techniques based on model linearization yield biased parameter estimates and thus introduce superfluous uncertainty. The bias and variance of the estimated models are related to the computational complexity of the identification algorithms, highlighting the superiority of the PFs in this safety-critical application. The study demonstrates feasibility of the proposed oscillation-free control

  4. Classifying and predicting endurance outcomes of α2-adrenergic agonist intervention in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Geoffrey L; Duffell, Lynsey D; Mirbagheri, Mehdi M

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic condition that can lead to both functional and neuromuscular impairments. Spasticity in the muscles surrounding the ankle joint caused by hypertonia is often reported as a complication. We investigated whether a pharmacological intervention using Tizanidine, an anti-spastic medication acting as an α2-adrenergic agonist, could lead to improvements in walking endurance. We placed subjects on a 4-week program and measured the change in clinical measures of walking speed, endurance, and mobility. We used growth mixture modeling (GMM) to class subjects into groups based on recovery patterns. Two classes of recovery were found by GMM: high and low functioning. Radom coefficient regression (RCR) was then used to identify significant changes over time. Statistically significant improvements in walking endurance were shown for the high functioning group. However, a small number of subjects in the high functioning group showed improvement greater than the smallest real difference (SRD), which indicates a clinical significance as well. We also investigated the extent to which these recovery patterns can be predicted using baseline measures. Baseline walking endurance was found to be a robust predictor of recovery in walking endurance. Subjects that began the intervention with already higher endurance showed a greater chance of improvement in endurance over time. This information could potentially be used as a fast and reliable assessment tool for clinicians to predict which patient can benefit the most from this intervention prior to prescribing the medication, and thus optimizing cost and resources. Our findings demonstrate that these techniques can be used to characterize and predict the progress of changes to functional impairments due to various types of intervention.

  5. Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Treatment: A Double-Edged Sword Cross-Targeting the Host as an “Innocent Bystander”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Gelao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Targeted immune checkpoint blockade augments anti-tumor immunity and induces durable responses in patients with melanoma and other solid tumors. It also induces specific “immune-related adverse events” (irAEs. IrAEs mainly include gastrointestinal, dermatological, hepatic and endocrinological toxicities. Off-target effects that arise appear to account for much of the toxicity of the immune checkpoint blockade. These unique “innocent bystander” effects are likely a direct result of breaking immune tolerance upon immune check point blockade and require specific treatment guidelines that include symptomatic therapies or systemic corticosteroids. What do we need going forward to limit immune checkpoint blockade-induced toxicity? Most importantly, we need a better understanding of the roles played by these agents in normal tissues, so that we can begin to predict potentially problematic side effects on the basis of their selectivity profile. Second, we need to focus on the predictive factors of the response and toxicity of the host rather than serially focusing on individual agents. Third, rigorous biomarker-driven clinical trials are needed to further elucidate the mechanisms of both the benefit and toxicity. We will summarize the double-edged sword effect of immunotherapeutics in cancer treatment.

  6. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptors in the Insular Cortex are Differentially Involved in Aversive vs. Incidental Context Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Maria Isabel; Sabath, Elizabeth; Nunez-Jaramillo, Luis; Puron-Sierra, Liliana

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine the effects of [beta]-adrenergic antagonism in the IC before or after inhibitory avoidance (IA) training or context pre-exposure in a latent inhibition protocol. Pretraining intra-IC infusion of the [beta]-adrenergic antagonist propranolol disrupted subsequent IA retention and impaired latent inhibition…

  7. Berry-Phase Blockade in Single-Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2007-06-01

    We formulate the problem of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet (SMM) in the Coulomb blockade regime taking into account topological interference effects for the tunneling of the large spin of a SMM. The interference originates from spin Berry phases associated with different tunneling paths. We show that, in the case of incoherent spin states, it is essential to place the SMM between oppositely spin-polarized source and drain leads in order to detect the spin tunneling in the stationary current, which exhibits topological zeros as a function of the transverse magnetic field.

  8. Beta-adrenergic agonists as additive in beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Vedovatto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The agonists receptor beta-adrenergic (β-AA are present in virtually all types of mammalian cells and are stimulated by catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine produced by the organism itself. The β-AA agonists are synthetic substances with similar structure to these amines. When provided in the diet they alter the body composition of animals, affecting the distribution of nutrients toward to protein deposition, and decreasing lipogenesis. Although the mechanisms of action are not fully understood, these may cause morphological and physiological changes such as increased blood flow decrease in plasma insulin, decreased lipogenesis, and muscle hypertrophy mainly in type II fibers. We also observed changes in motility and secretions grastointestinal tract, beyond the direct influence on the rumen bacteria, altering the digestibility of the diet. The β-AA agonists released in some countries for use in beef cattle are ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride. According to literature data, the inclusion of these additives in the diet of feedlot cattle has been associated with an increase infeed efficiency with the increase in daily weight gain and with equal or lower feed intake. Carcass characteristics improvement was verified in carcass weight, and increased loin eye area, but with the possibility to decrease the subcutaneous fat thickness and marbling. Reviews in sensory panel of meat from animals consuming β-AA agonists showed decreased tenderness and juiciness. Thus β-AA improve performance and carcass characteristics, but more studies are needed to confirm whether they have negative influence on the organoleptic characteristics of the meat.

  9. Regulation of Clock Genes by Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Takao

    2018-01-01

    The clock system has been identified as one of the major mechanisms controlling cellular functions. Circadian clock gene oscillations also actively participate in the functions of various cell types including bone-related cells. Previous studies demonstrated that clock genes were expressed in bone tissue and also that their expression exhibited circadian rhythmicity. Recent findings have shown that sympathetic tone plays a central role in biological oscillations in bone. Adrenergic receptor (AR) signaling regulates the expression of clock genes in cancellous bone. Furthermore, α 1 -AR signaling in osteoblasts is known to negatively regulate the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-4 (Bmp4) by up-regulating nuclear factor IL-3 (Nfil3)/e4 promoter-binding protein 4 (E4BP4). The ablation of α 1B -AR signaling also increases the expression of the Bmp4 gene in bone. The findings of transient overexpression and siRNA experiments have supported the involvement of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPδ, Cebpd) in Nfil3 and Bmp4 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. These findings suggest that the effects of Cebpd are due to the circadian regulation of Bmp4 expression, at least in part, by the up-regulated expression of the clock gene Nfil3 in response to α 1B -AR signaling in osteoblasts. Therefore, AR signaling appears to modulate cellular functionality through the expression of clock genes that are circadian rhythm regulators in osteoblasts. The expression of clock genes regulated by the sympathetic nervous system and clock-controlled genes that affect bone metabolism are described herein.

  10. Nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase modulate β-adrenergic cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; McNeely, Brendan D; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-02-15

    β-Adrenergic receptor agonists such as isoproterenol induce cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating in humans, but the mechanisms underpinning this response remain unresolved. Using intradermal microdialysis, we evaluated the roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in β-adrenergic cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating elicited by administration of isoproterenol. We show that while NOS contributes to β-adrenergic cutaneous vasodilatation, COX restricts cutaneous vasodilatation. We also show that combined inhibition of NOS and COX augments β-adrenergic sweating These new findings advance our basic knowledge regarding the physiological control of cutaneous blood flow and sweating, and provide important and new information to better understand the physiological significance of β-adrenergic receptors in the skin. β-Adrenergic receptor agonists such as isoproterenol can induce cutaneous vasodilatation and sweating in humans, but the mechanisms underpinning this response remain unresolved. We evaluated the hypotheses that (1) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) contributes to β-adrenergic cutaneous vasodilatation, whereas cyclooxygenase (COX) limits the vasodilatation, and (2) COX contributes to β-adrenergic sweating. In 10 young males (25 ± 5 years), cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate were evaluated at four intradermal forearm skin sites infused with (1) lactated Ringer solution (control), (2) 10 mm N ω -nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA), a non-specific NOS inhibitor, (3) 10 mm ketorolac, a non-specific COX inhibitor, or (4) a combination of l-NNA and ketorolac. All sites were co-administered with a high dose of isoproterenol (100 μm) for 3 min to maximally induce β-adrenergic sweating (β-adrenergic sweating is significantly blunted by subsequent activations). Approximately 60 min after the washout period, three incremental doses of isoproterenol were co-administered (1, 10 and 100 μm each for 25 min). Increases in CVC induced

  11. Effect of age on upregulation of the cardiac adrenergic beta receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumer, N.; Houck, W.T.; Roberts, J.

    1990-01-01

    Radioligand binding studies were performed to determine whether upregulation of postjunctional beta receptors occurs in sympathectomized hearts of aged animals. Fischer 344 rats 6, 12, and 24 months of age (n = 10) were used in these experiments. To produce sympathectomy, rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA; 2 x 50 mg/kg iv) on days 1 and 8; the animals were decapitated on day 15. The depletion of norepinephrine in the heart was about 86% in each age group. 125I-Iodopindolol (IPIN), a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist, was employed to determine the affinity and total number of beta adrenergic receptors in the ventricles of the rat heart. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly elevated by 37%, 48%, and 50% in hearts from sympathectomized 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. These results indicate that beta receptor mechanisms in older hearts can respond to procedures that cause upregulation of the beta adrenergic receptors

  12. Calcineurin mediates alpha-adrenergic stimulation of Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity in renal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aperia, A; Ibarra, F; Svensson, L B; Klee, C; Greengard, P

    1992-01-01

    The alpha-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline increased Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity of single proximal convoluted tubules dissected from rat kidney. Activation of the enzyme by oxymetazoline was prevented by either the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin or the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine and was mimicked by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of oxymetazoline on Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity was prevented by a specific peptide inhibitor of calcineurin, as well as by FK 506, an immunosuppressant agent known to inhibit calcineurin; these results indicate that the action of oxymetazoline is mediated via activation of calcineurin (a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase). Activation of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase by either oxymetazoline or A23187 was associated with a greater than 2-fold increase in its affinity for Na+. The results provide a biochemical mechanism by which norepinephrine, released from renal nerve terminals, stimulates Na+ retention. PMID:1380157

  13. Structure-guided development of dual β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Dietmar; Stanek, Markus; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Aiming to discover dual-acting β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor ligands, a structure-guided approach for the evolution of GPCR agonists that address multiple targets was elaborated. Starting from GPCR crystal structures, we describe the design, synthesis and biological investigation of a defined set of compounds leading to the identification of the benzoxazinone (R)-3, which shows agonist properties at the adrenergic β2 receptor and substantial G protein-promoted activation at the D2 receptor. This directed approach yielded molecular probes with tuned dual activity. The congener desOH-3 devoid of the benzylic hydroxyl function was shown to be a β2 adrenergic antagonist/D2 receptor agonist with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The compounds may serve as a promising starting point for the investigation and treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CT-guided injection for ganglion impar blockade: a radiological approach to the management of coccydynia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datir, A., E-mail: apdatir@gmail.co [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Connell, D. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in needle placement for ganglion impar blocks, and to determine the efficacy of CT-guided ganglion impar blocks in the management of coccydynia. Materials and methods: The results of ganglion impar blockade in eight patients with coccydynia secondary to trauma or unknown cause were reviewed. The diagnosis of coccydynia was based on clinical history, location of pain, and response to previous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The eight patients were treated with CT-guided ganglion impar blocks to manage their coccyx pain after conservative procedures, including oral medication and cushions, failed to provide relief. All patients were subjected to ganglion impar blocks under a thin-section CT-guided technique for needle placement, using a mixture of bupivacaine and triamcinolone. The patients were followed-up for a period of 6-months. Results: Eight patients were treated in this study with a total of 11 injections. A technical success of 100% was achieved in all cases with accurate needle placement without any complications and all the patients tolerated the procedure well. Out of eight, three patients (37%) had complete relief of pain on the follow-up intervals up to 6 months. Three out of eight patients (37%), had partial relief of symptoms and a second repeat injection was given at the 3 month interval of the follow-up period. At the end of the 6-month follow-up period, six out of eight patients (75%) experienced symptomatic relief (four complete relief and two partial relief) without any additional resort to conventional pain management. Twenty-five percent (two out of eight) did not have any symptomatic improvement. The mean visual analogue score (VAS) pre-procedure was 8 (range 6-10) and had decreased to 2 (range 0-5) in six out of eight patients. Conclusion: CT can be used as an imaging method to identify the ganglion and guide the needle in ganglion impar blockade. The advantages of CT

  15. Distinctive left-sided distribution of adrenergic-derived cells in the adult mouse heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley Osuala

    Full Text Available Adrenaline and noradrenaline are produced within the heart from neuronal and non-neuronal sources. These adrenergic hormones have profound effects on cardiovascular development and function, yet relatively little information is available about the specific tissue distribution of adrenergic cells within the adult heart. The purpose of the present study was to define the anatomical localization of cells derived from an adrenergic lineage within the adult heart. To accomplish this, we performed genetic fate-mapping experiments where mice with the cre-recombinase (Cre gene inserted into the phenylethanolamine-n-methyltransferase (Pnmt locus were cross-mated with homozygous Rosa26 reporter (R26R mice. Because Pnmt serves as a marker gene for adrenergic cells, offspring from these matings express the β-galactosidase (βGAL reporter gene in cells of an adrenergic lineage. βGAL expression was found throughout the adult mouse heart, but was predominantly (89% located in the left atrium (LA and ventricle (LV (p<0.001 compared to RA and RV, where many of these cells appeared to have cardiomyocyte-like morphological and structural characteristics. The staining pattern in the LA was diffuse, but the LV free wall displayed intermittent non-random staining that extended from the apex to the base of the heart, including heavy staining of the anterior papillary muscle along its perimeter. Three-dimensional computer-aided reconstruction of XGAL+ staining revealed distribution throughout the LA and LV, with specific finger-like projections apparent near the mid and apical regions of the LV free wall. These data indicate that adrenergic-derived cells display distinctive left-sided distribution patterns in the adult mouse heart.

  16. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States))

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  17. Psychological stress promotes neutrophil infiltration in colon tissue through adrenergic signaling in DSS-induced colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Que; Chen, Hongyu; Liu, Yanjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Guo, Liang; Liu, Dan; Cheng, Xiang; Zhao, Min; Wang, Xiaomeng; Xie, Shuai; Qi, Siyong; Yin, Zhaoyang; Gao, Jiangping; Chen, Xintian; Wang, Jiangong; Guo, Ning; Ma, Yuanfang; Shi, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition. Psychological stress has been postulated to affect the clinical symptoms and recurrence of IBD. The exact molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that psychological stress promotes neutrophil infiltration into colon tissues in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model. The psychological stress resulted in abnormal expression of the proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, and IL-22) and neutrophil chemokines (CXCL1 and CXCL2) and overactivation of the STAT3 inflammatory signaling pathway. Under chronic unpredictable stress, the adrenergic nervous system was markedly activated, as the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, in bone marrow and colonic epithelium was enhanced, especially in the myenteric ganglia. The β-AR agonist isoproterenol mimicked the effects of psychological stress on neutrophilia, neutrophil infiltration, and colonic damage in DSS-induced colitis. The β1-AR/β2-AR inhibitor propranolol reduced the numbers of the neutrophils in the circulation, suppressed neutrophil infiltration into colonic tissues, and attenuated the colonic tissue damage promoted by chronic stress. Propranolol also abolished stress-induced upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil chemokines. Our data reveal a close linkage between the β1-AR/β2-AR activation and neutrophil trafficking and also suggest the critical roles of adrenergic nervous system in exacerbation of inflammation and damage of colonic tissues in experimental colitis. The current study provides a new insight into the mechanisms underlying the association of psychological stress with excessive inflammatory response and pathophysiological consequences in IBD. The findings also suggest a potential application of neuroprotective agents to prevent relapsing immune activation in the treatment of IBD

  18. Role of β-adrenergic modulation in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Mechanisms underlying cardioprotection

    OpenAIRE

    García-Prieto Cuesta, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica. Fecha de lectura: 18-12-2017 The β-adrenergic system plays an important role in the regulation of heart function. The early intravenous administration of ß1-adrenergic receptor (ADRB1)-antagonist, metoprolol, in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reduces the extent of infarct size. The prevailing view has been that metoprolol act...

  19. β-Adrenergic response is counteracted by extremely-low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields in beating cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchione, Marisa; Pellegrini, Manuela; Fassina, Lorenzo; Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Di Siena, Sara; Gimmelli, Roberto; Ambrosino, Paolo; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Isidori, Andrea M; Lenzi, Andrea; Naro, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Proper β-adrenergic signaling is indispensable for modulating heart frequency. Studies on extremely-low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (ELF-PEMF) effects in the heart beat function are contradictory and no definitive conclusions were obtained so far. To investigate the interplay between ELF-PEMF exposure and β-adrenergic signaling, cultures of primary murine neonatal cardiomyocytes and of sinoatrial node were exposed to ELF-PEMF and short and long-term effects were evaluated. The ELF-PEMF generated a variable magnetic induction field of 0-6mT at a frequency of 75Hz. Exposure to 3mT ELF-PEMF induced a decrease of contraction rate, Ca(2+) transients, contraction force, and energy consumption both under basal conditions and after β-adrenergic stimulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes. ELF-PEMF exposure inhibited β-adrenergic response in sinoatrial node (SAN) region. ELF-PEMF specifically modulated β2 adrenergic receptor response and the exposure did not modify the increase of contraction rate after adenylate cyclase stimulation by forskolin. In HEK293T cells transfected with β1 or β2 adrenergic receptors, ELF-PEMF exposure induced a rapid and selective internalization of β2 adrenergic receptor. The β-adrenergic signaling, was reduced trough Gi protein by ELF-PEMF exposure since the phosphorylation level of phospholamban and the PI3K pathway were impaired after isoproterenol stimulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes. Long term effects of ELF-PEMF exposure were assessed in cultures of isolated cardiomyocytes. ELF-PEMF counteracts cell size increase, the generation of binucleated of cardiomyocytes and prevents the up-regulation of hypertrophic markers after β-adrenergic stimulation, indicating an inhibition of cell growth and maturation. These data show that short and long term exposure to ELF-PEMF induces a reduction of cardiac β-adrenergic response at molecular, functional and adaptative levels. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one...... conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperaemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade...

  1. Quantitative assessment of differential sensory blockade after lumbar epidural lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, B; Wallace, M S; Irving, G

    1997-05-01

    A cutaneous current perception threshold (CPT) sensory testing device measures both large and small diameter sensory nerve fiber function and may be useful in evaluating differential neural blockade. Eight subjects received both lumbar epidural saline and lumbar epidural lidocaine. Five milliliters of normal saline was administered and the CPTs were measured. After the saline, 10 mL of 2% plain lidocaine was administered. CPTs, and sensation to touch, pinprick, and cold were subsequently measured. Saline had no effect on any measurements. Lidocaine caused an increase in all CPTs at the umbilicus and the knee reaching a statistical significance at 5 Hz for the umbilicus only. The great toe showed a slight increase of the 5 Hz stimulus and no increase of the 2000 or 250 Hz stimulus. There was a significant decrease in touch, pinprick, and cold sensation at the umbilicus and knee and a significant decrease in the cold sensation at the great toe. There was no effect on any measurements made at the mastoid. Epidural lidocaine resulted in a differential neural blockade as measured by a CPT monitor but not with crude sensory measurements.

  2. Interleukin-6 blockade Improves Autonomic Dysfunction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Syngle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system (ANS involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is well recognised and contributes to arrhythmia and sudden death. However, there is no study documented the therapeutic efficacy on autonomic neuropathy (AN in RA. This is the first reported observation of improvement in AN with interleukin-6 (IL-6 blockade with tocilizumab in RA. We report a case of 61-year old female with seropositive RA with severe disease activity, investigated for autonomic neuropathy. A battery of non invasive tests was used for accurate assessment of AN function based on assessment of peripheral sympathetic autonomic function and cardiovascular reflex tests. Tocilizumab 8mg/kg intravenous infusion at weeks 0, 4 and 8 was added to her treatment regimen. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests at baseline showed marked abnormalities of parasympathetic cardiovascular reflexes. After the first dose of tocilizumab there was a rapid improvement with normalization of parasympathetic autonomic activity with subsequent doses. IL-6 blockade with tocilizumab seems to have the potential to improve the vagus nerve mediated parasympathetic neuropathy and hence has the potential to restore cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  3. Localized CD47 blockade enhances immunotherapy for murine melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jessica R; Blomberg, Olga S; Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Ali, Lestat; Schmidt, Florian I; Pishesha, Novalia; Espinosa, Camilo; Dougan, Stephanie K; Garcia, K Christopher; Ploegh, Hidde L; Dougan, Michael

    2017-09-19

    CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand broadly expressed on normal and malignant tissues that delivers an inhibitory signal through the receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Inhibitors of the CD47-SIRPα interaction improve antitumor antibody responses by enhancing antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) in xenograft models. Endogenous expression of CD47 on a variety of cell types, including erythrocytes, creates a formidable antigen sink that may limit the efficacy of CD47-targeting therapies. We generated a nanobody, A4, that blocks the CD47-SIRPα interaction. A4 synergizes with anti-PD-L1, but not anti-CTLA4, therapy in the syngeneic B16F10 melanoma model. Neither increased dosing nor half-life extension by fusion of A4 to IgG2a Fc (A4Fc) overcame the issue of an antigen sink or, in the case of A4Fc, systemic toxicity. Generation of a B16F10 cell line that secretes the A4 nanobody showed that an enhanced response to several immune therapies requires near-complete blockade of CD47 in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, strategies to localize CD47 blockade to tumors may be particularly valuable for immune therapy.

  4. Immunomodulation by gadolinium chloride-induced Kupffer cell phagocytosis blockade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, G.; Husztik, E.; Kiss, I.; Szakacs, J.; Olah, J.

    1998-01-01

    Gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ), a rare earth metal salt, depresses macrophage activity, and is commonly used to study the physiology of the reticuloendothelial system. In the present work, the effect of GdCl 3 -induced Kupffer cell blockade on the humoral immune response in mice to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was investigated. Kupffer cell phagocytosis blockade was found to increase both the primary and secondary immune responses to SRBC. The primary immune response was significantly augmented in animals injected intravenously with GdCl 3 2, 3 or 4 days before injection of the cellular antigen, but GdCl 3 injected 7 days before the antigen did not modify the immune response. Increased secondary humoral immune responses were also observed. When GdCl 3 was injected 2 days before the second dose of antigen, the numbers of both IgM and IgG-producing plaque forming cells were augmented. GdCl 3 injected 2 days before the first dose of SRBC did not modify the humoral immune response. Earlier studies with 51 Cr-labelled foreign red blood cells suggested that the augmentation of the humoral immune response in GdCl 3 -pretreated mice is a consequence of the spillover of the antigen from the liver into the spleen and other extrahepatic reticuloendothelial organs. (orig.)

  5. Rationale for an early aldosterone blockade in acute myocardial infarction and design of the ALBATROSS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygui, Farzin; Vicaut, Eric; Ecollan, Patrick; Machecourt, Jacques; Van Belle, Eric; Zannad, Faiez; Montalescot, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    Aldosterone is at its highest levels at presentation for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). High aldosterone levels are predictive of poor outcome regardless of heart failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have delayed partial and temporary effects on aldosterone levels. We hypothesize that aldosterone receptor blockade, early after AMI onset on top of standard therapy, may improve clinical outcome. ALBATROSS is a nationwide, multicenter, open-labeled, randomized trial designed to assess the superiority of aldosterone blockade by a 200-mg intravenous bolus of potassium canrenoate followed by a daily 25-mg dose of spirinolactone for 6 months, on top of standard therapy compared to standard therapy alone among 1,600 patients admitted for ST-segment elevation or high risk non-ST-segment elevation acute AMI -TIMI score ≥3-within 72 hours after symptom onset regardless of heart failure and treatment strategy. The primary efficacy end point of the study is the 6-month rate of the composite of death, resuscitated cardiac arrest, significant ventricular arrhythmia, class IA American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology indication for implantable cardioverter device, and new or worsening heart failure. Secondary end points include each of the components of the primary end point, different combinations of such components, the primary end point assessed at hospital discharge and 30-day follow-up, and rates of acute renal failure. Safety end points include rates of hyperkalemia and premature drug discontinuation. ALBATROSS will assess the cardiovascular benefit of a low-cost aldosterone receptor blocker on top of standard therapy in all-coming AMI patients. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving the efficacy of RAAS blockade in patients with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; de Borst, Martin H.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Navis, Gerjan J.

    I Reduction of blood pressure and proteinuria by blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has been the cornerstone of renoprotective intervention for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for many years. Despite the proven efficacy of RAAS blockade, however, the reduction in

  7. Effects of axillary blockade on regional cerebral blood flow during dynamic hand contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, D B; Friberg, L; Payne, G

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured at orbitomeatal (OM) plane +5.0 and +9.0 cm in 10 subjects at rest and during dynamic hand contractions before and after axillary blockade. Handgrip strength was significantly reduced, and rating of perceived exertion increased after blockade. During...

  8. Epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine and ropivacaine : effects of age on the pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, Mischa J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Epidural neural blockade results from processes after the administration of a local anaesthetic in the epidural space until the uptake in neural tissue. The pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics after epidural anaesthesia may be influenced by several factors, with age as the most

  9. Carvedilol and adrenergic agonists suppress the lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in RAW 264.7 macrophages via the adrenergic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pekarová, Michaela; Králová, Jana; Kubala, Lukáš; Číž, Milan; Papežíková, Ivana; Mačičková, T.; Pečivová, J.; Nosál, R.; Lojek, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2009), s. 143-150 ISSN 0867-5910 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507; GA ČR(CZ) GA524/08/1753 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : carvedilol * adrenergic agonists * nitric oxide Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.489, year: 2009

  10. Autoantibodies against β1-Adrenergic Receptors: Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy and Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelucci, Antonio; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Sticchi, Elena; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Fatini, Cinzia; Benagiano, Marisa; Niccolai, Elena; Grassi, Alessia; Attanà, Paola; Nesti, Martina; Grifoni, Gino; Padeletti, Luigi; Abbate, Rosanna; Prisco, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) nonresponse remains a major clinical problem. Autoantibodies specific for the β1-adrenergic (β1-AAbs) and muscarinic (M2-AAbs) receptors are found in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) of various etiologies. We retrospectively analyzed 73 HF patients (median age 67 years, 84% males, New York Heart Association II-IV, in sinus rhythm, left ventricular ejection fraction 15% in left ventricular end-systolic volume at 6 months follow-up). Renal function (RF) parameters (creatinine [Cr], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR Modified Diet in Renal Disease], cystatin C [Cys-C], and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL]) were also evaluated. A significantly higher percentage of patients positive for β1-AAbs (OD sample/OD reference ratio >2.1) in nonresponders than in responder patients was observed (57% vs 27%, P = 0.004). No influence of M2-AAbs on CRT-D response was demonstrated. β1-AAbs were predictive of a poor CRT-D response (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval (CI)] 3.64 [1.49-8.88], P = 0.005), also after adjustment for RF parameters (OR [95% CI] 4.95 [1.51-16.26], P = 0.008) observed to influence CRT-D response (Cr P = 0.03, BUN P = 0.009, Cys-C P = 0.02). The positive rates of β1-AABs in patients with abnormal blood level of Cr, eGFR, Cys-C, and NGAL were significantly higher than those with normal levels (P = 0.03, P = 0.02, P = 0.001, P = 0.007, respectively). Our study suggests that (1) the evaluation of β1-AAb is useful to identify responders to CRT-D; (2) the presence of β1-AAbs is in relationship with elevated renal function parameters. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Progenitor cells are mobilized by acute psychological stress but not beta-adrenergic receptor agonist infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Natalie E; Burns, Victoria E; Wallace, Graham R; Edwards, Kate M; Drayson, Mark; Redwine, Laura S; Hong, Suzi; Bui, Jack C; Fischer, Johannes C; Mills, Paul J; Bosch, Jos A

    2015-10-01

    Stimuli that activate the sympathetic nervous system, such as acute psychological stress, rapidly invoke a robust mobilization of lymphocytes into the circulation. Experimental animal studies suggest that bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (PCs) also mobilize in response to sympathetic stimulation. Here we tested the effects of acute psychological stress and brief pharmacological β-adrenergic (βAR) stimulation on peripheral PC numbers in humans. In two studies, we investigated PC mobilization in response to an acute speech task (n=26) and βAR-agonist (isoproterenol) infusion (n=20). A subset of 8 participants also underwent the infusion protocol with concomitant administration of the βAR-antagonist propranolol. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate lymphocyte subsets, total progenitor cells, total haematopoietic stem cells (HSC), early HSC (multi-lineage potential), late HSC (lineage committed), and endothelial PCs (EPCs). Both psychological stress and βAR-agonist infusion caused the expected mobilization of total monocytes and lymphocytes and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Psychological stress also induced a modest, but significant, increase in total PCs, HSCs, and EPC numbers in peripheral blood. However, infusion of a βAR-agonist did not result in a significant change in circulating PCs. PCs are rapidly mobilized by psychological stress via mechanisms independent of βAR-stimulation, although the findings do not exclude βAR-stimulation as a possible cofactor. Considering the clinical and physiological relevance, further research into the mechanisms involved in stress-induced PC mobilization seems warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Croft Thomas

    Full Text Available The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse.

  13. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  14. Oleoylethanolamide enhances β-adrenergic-mediated thermogenesis and white-to-brown adipocyte phenotype in epididymal white adipose tissue in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Suárez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available β-adrenergic receptor activation promotes brown adipose tissue (BAT β-oxidation and thermogenesis by burning fatty acids during uncoupling respiration. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA can inhibit feeding and stimulate lipolysis by activating peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα in white adipose tissue (WAT. Here we explore whether PPARα activation potentiates the effect of β3-adrenergic stimulation on energy balance mediated by the respective agonists OEA and CL316243. The effect of this pharmacological association on feeding, thermogenesis, β-oxidation, and lipid and cholesterol metabolism in epididymal (eWAT was monitored. CL316243 (1 mg/kg and OEA (5 mg/kg co-administration over 6 days enhanced the reduction of both food intake and body weight gain, increased the energy expenditure and reduced the respiratory quotient (VCO2/VO2. This negative energy balance agreed with decreased fat mass and increased BAT weight and temperature, as well as with lowered plasma levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, nonessential fatty acids (NEFAs, and the adipokines leptin and TNF-α. Regarding eWAT, CL316243 and OEA treatment elevated levels of the thermogenic factors PPARα and UCP1, reduced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, and promoted brown-like features in the white adipocytes: the mitochondrial (Cox4i1, Cox4i2 and BAT (Fgf21, Prdm16 genes were overexpressed in eWAT. The enhancement of the fatty-acid β-oxidation factors Cpt1b and Acox1 in eWAT was accompanied by an upregulation of de novo lipogenesis and reduced expression of the unsaturated-fatty-acid-synthesis enzyme gene, Scd1. We propose that the combination of β-adrenergic and PPARα receptor agonists promotes therapeutic adipocyte remodelling in eWAT, and therefore has a potential clinical utility in the treatment of obesity.

  15. Deep neuromuscular blockade leads to a larger intraabdominal volume during laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekaer, Astrid Listov; Halvor Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2013-01-01

    for measuring the intra-abdominal space available to the surgeon during laproscopy, in order to examine whether the relaxation produced by deep neuromuscular blockade can increase the working surgical space sufficiently to permit a reduction in the CO2 insufflation pressure. Using the laproscopic grasper......, the distance from the promontory to the skin is measured at two different insufflation pressures: 8 mm Hg and 12 mm Hg. After the initial measurements, a neuromuscular blocking agent (rocuronium) is administered to the patient and the intra-abdominal volume is measured again. Pilot data collected from 15...... patients shows that the intra-abdominal space at 8 mm Hg with blockade is comparable to the intra-abdominal space measured at 12 mm Hg without blockade. The impact of neuromuscular blockade was not correlated with patient height, weight, BMI, and age. Thus, using neuromuscular blockade to maintain a steady...

  16. A randomised trial of a pre-synaptic stimulator of DA2-dopaminergic and alpha2-adrenergic receptors on morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Carlsen, Jan E

    2008-01-01

    Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed as a mul.......i.d. of nolomirole was not beneficial (or harmful) in patients with heart failure. (c) 2007 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1......Background: By pre-synaptic stimulation of DA(2)-dopaminergic and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors, nolomirole inhibits norepinephrine secretion from sympathetic nerve endings. We performed a clinical study with nolomirole in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: The study was designed...... as a multicentre, double blind, parallel group trial of 5 mg b.i.d. of nolomirole (n=501) versus placebo (n=499) in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, recently in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV. The primary endpoint was time to all cause death or hospitalisation for HF...

  17. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate (HR) response to exercise but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate but not combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exerci...

  18. Role of adrenergic receptors in the caffeine-induced increase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of alpha and beta adrenergic receptor blockers on caffeine-induced increase in canine hindlimb glucose uptake. The study was carried out on fasted male anaesthetized dogs divided into five groups (5dogs per group). Each dog was given a bolus injection of normal ...

  19. role of adrenergic receptors in the caffeine-induced increase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    Summary: The present study was designed to investigate the effects of alpha and beta adrenergic receptor blockers on caffeine-induced increase in canine hindlimb glucose uptake. The study was carried out on fasted male anaesthetized dogs divided into five groups (5dogs per group). Each dog was given a bolus ...

  20. Adrenergic regulation of the innate immune response in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chadzinska, M.K.; Tertil, E.; Kepka, M.; Hermsen, G.J.; Scheer, M.H.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Catecholamines exert their physiological actions through a and ß adrenergic receptors (ARs). As ARs are not exclusively expressed on neuroendocrine cells, but also on leukocytes, they may facilitate neuroendocrine modulation of immune responses. We sequenced the ß2a-AR in common carp, and studied

  1. Regulation of cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors by captopril. Implications for congestive heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maisel, A. S.; Phillips, C.; Michel, M. C.; Ziegler, M. G.; Carter, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of the renin-angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system in patients with congestive heart failure is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can resensitize the beta-adrenergic receptor system. Guinea pigs were given

  2. Molecular and chemical comparison of beta/sub 2/ and beta/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorr, R.G.L.; Gotlib, L.; Varrichio, A.; Strohsacker, M.; Minnich, M.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor proteins of 55,000M/sub r/ and 45,000M/sub r/ have been purified from rabbit lung, guinea pig lung, bovine lung and turkey red blood cell plasma membranes by affinity chromatography, size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography and preparative SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Each purified receptor was characterized with agonists and selective antagonists in ligand binding competition experiments with (/sup 125/I) cyanopindolol as being of the ..beta../sub 1/ or ..beta../sub 2/ adrenergic receptor subclass. Purified rabbit lung, guinea pig lung and bovine lung were all found to be of the ..beta../sub 2/ receptor subclass. Purified turkey RBC receptor was of the ..beta../sub 1/ subclass. When compared by molecular weight, each of the receptor proteins was found to comigrate on SDS polyacylamide gels with its counterpart from the additional tissues. When the proteins were compared by amino acid composition similar results were obtained for each of the receptors. These results suggest significant levels of sequence homology between the avian ..beta../sub 1/ adrenergic receptor and the mammalian ..beta../sub 2/ adrenergic receptor preparations.

  3. Preserved alpha-adrenergic tone in the leg vascular bed of spinal cord-injured individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, H.M.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Smits, P.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Supraspinal sympathetic control of leg vascular tone is lost in spinal cord-injured individuals, but this does not result in a reduced leg vascular tone: Leg vascular resistance is even increased. The aim of this study was to assess the alpha-adrenergic contribution to the increased

  4. β3-Adrenergic receptor gene polymorphism and type 2 diabetes in a Caucasian population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeveren van-Dybicz, A.M.; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Bon, M.A.M.; van den Bergh, F.A.J.T.M.; Vermes, I.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-AR) is suspected to play a key role in the regulation of energy balance by increasing lipolysis and thermogenesis. A mutation in the β3-AR gene (Trp64Arg) has been associated with the capacity of weight gain and with early onset of noninsulin dependent diabetes

  5. In utero Exposure to beta-2-Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Drugs and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidaya, Nicole B.; Lee, Brian K.; Burstyn, Igor

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between use of β-2-adrenergic receptor (B2AR) agonist drugs during pregnancy and risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). METHODS: A case-control study was conducted by using Denmark’s health and population registers. Among...

  6. Substrate utilization and thermogenic responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation in obese subjects with NIDDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, E E; Saris, W H; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    OBJECTIVE: This study intended to investigate disturbances in beta-adrenergically-mediated substrate utilization and thermogenesis in obese subjects with mild non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). DESIGN: Following a baseline period of 30 min, the beta-agonist isoproterenol (ISO) was

  7. β-Adrenergic regulation of the cardiac Na+-K+ ATPase mediated by oxidative signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Bundgaard, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Activation of β-adrenergic receptors (ARs) elicits responses arising from protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of target proteins that regulate Ca(2+)-dependent excitation-contraction coupling. Some important targets for β-AR- and PKA-dependent pathways, including the sarcolemmal Na...

  8. Adrenergic effects on renal secretion of epidermal growth factor in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1985-01-01

    of the experimental groups had a median serum concentration above the detection limit of the assay. The present study shows that secretion of renal EGF is under the influence of the sympathetic nervous system and release of EGF is stimulated by activation of beta-adrenergic receptors in the kidneys....

  9. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in chicken pineal gland using (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bylund, D.B.; Rudeen, P.K.; Petterborg, L.J.; Ray-Prenger, C.

    1988-07-01

    The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of avian pineal N-acetyltransferase activity appears to be mediated by alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. In this study, alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the chicken pineal gland were directly identified by radioligand binding. Membrane preparations of pineal glands from chickens from 1 to 6 weeks of age were examined using (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, to characterize the binding sites. The results indicate no ontological change in either the affinity (KD) or density of receptor binding sites (Bmax) during the time span examined. The binding was saturable and of high affinity with a mean KD of 0.27 +/- 0.01 nM and a mean Bmax of 242 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein. Further characterization of these binding sites indicated that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor is of the alpha 2A subtype, since prazosin and ARC-239 bound with low affinities and oxymetazoline bound with high affinity.

  10. Beta-Adrenergic signaling in rat heart is similarly affected by continuous and intermittent normobaric hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hahnová, K.; Kašparová, D.; Žurmanová, J.; Neckář, Jan; Kolář, František; Novotný, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2016), s. 165-173 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat myocardium * chronic hypoxia * beta-adrenergic receptors * adenylyl cyclase Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.170, year: 2016

  11. Myocardial adrenergic nerve activity in valvular diseases assessed by iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Yoshihiro; Fukuyama, Takaya

    1997-01-01

    Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging was used to assess myocardial adrenergic nerve activity in patients with heart failure. MIBG planar images were obtained in 94 patients. The uptake of MIBG, calculated as the heart-to-mediastinum activity ratio in the immediate image (15 min), showed a significant decrease only in patients with severe heart failure due to cardiomyopathy, but was not changed in those with valvular diseases. Storage and release of MIBG, calculated as the percentage myocardial MIBG washout from 15 min to 4 hours after isotope injection, was substantially accelerated in both patients with cardiomyopathy and valvular diseases in proportion to the severity of heart failure. These data suggest that, in severe heart failure associated with cardiomyopathy, norepinephrine uptake is reduced. Also, myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is accelerated in proportion to the severity of heart failure independent of the underlying cause. MIBG images were analyzed in 20 patients with mitral stenosis with the same methods to clarify whether myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is different in patients with heart failure without left ventricular volume or pressure overload. Myocardial uptake of MIBG did not show any significant difference. The percentage myocardial MIBG washout was increased in patients with severe heart failure. The closest correlation was between myocardial washout and cardiac output. In heart failure due to mitral stenosis, myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is intensified. Decrease in cardiac output associated with mitral stenosis acts as a potent stimulus for this intensification. (author)

  12. Beta-adrenergic signaling promotes tumor angiogenesis and prostate cancer progression through HDAC2-mediated suppression of thrombospondin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsurkar, M; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; Li, X; Zheng, D; Li, W

    2017-03-01

    Chronic behavioral stress and beta-adrenergic signaling have been shown to promote cancer progression, whose underlying mechanisms are largely unclear, especially the involvement of epigenetic regulation. Histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2), an epigenetic regulator, is critical for stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy. It is unknown whether it is necessary for beta-adrenergic signaling-promoted cancer progression. Using xenograft models, we showed that chronic behavioral stress and beta-adrenergic signaling promote angiogenesis and prostate cancer progression. HDAC2 was induced by beta-adrenergic signaling in vitro and in mouse xenografts. We next uncovered that HDAC2 is a direct target of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) that is activated by beta-adrenergic signaling. Notably, HDAC2 is necessary for beta-adrenergic signaling to induce angiogenesis. We further demonstrated that, upon CREB activation, HDAC2 represses thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), a potent angiogenesis inhibitor, through epigenetic regulation. Together, these data establish a novel pathway that HDAC2 and TSP1 act downstream of CREB activation in beta-adrenergic signaling to promote cancer progression.

  13. β-Adrenergic Receptor Mediation of Stress-Induced Reinstatement of Extinguished Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference in Mice: Roles for β1 and β2 Adrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranjkovic, Oliver; Hang, Shona; Baker, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Stress can trigger the relapse of drug use in recovering cocaine addicts and reinstatement in rodent models through mechanisms that may involve norepinephrine release and β-adrenergic receptor activation. The present study examined the role of β-adrenergic receptor subtypes in the stressor-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-induced (15 mg/kg i.p.) conditioned place preference in mice. Forced swim (6 min at 22°C) stress or activation of central noradrenergic neurotransmission by administration of the selective α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist 2-[(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-1H-isoindole (BRL-44,408) (10 mg/kg i.p.) induced reinstatement in wild-type, but not β- adrenergic receptor-deficient Adrb1/Adrb2 double-knockout, mice. In contrast, cocaine administration (15 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reinstatement in both wild-type and β-adrenergic receptor knockout mice. Stress-induced reinstatement probably involved β2 adrenergic receptors. The β2 adrenergic receptor antagonist -(isopropylamino)-1-[(7-methyl-4-indanyl)oxy]butan-2-ol (ICI-118,551) (1 or 2 mg/kg i.p.) blocked reinstatement by forced swim or BRL-44,408, whereas administration of the nonselective β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (2 or 4 mg/kg i.p.) or the β2 adrenergic receptor-selective agonist clenbuterol (2 or 4 mg/kg i.p.) induced reinstatement. Forced swim-induced, but not BRL-44,408-induced, reinstatement was also blocked by a high (20 mg/kg) but not low (10 mg/kg) dose of the β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist betaxolol, and isoproterenol-induced reinstatement was blocked by pretreatment with either ICI-118,551 or betaxolol, suggesting a potential cooperative role for β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors in stress-induced reinstatement. Overall, these findings suggest that targeting β-adrenergic receptors may represent a promising pharmacotherapeutic strategy for preventing drug relapse, particularly in cocaine addicts whose drug use is stress

  14. Oncogenic pathways that affect antitumor immune response and immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianda; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2018-01-01

    Mechanistic insights of cancer immunology have led to the development of immune checkpoint blockade therapy (ICBT), which has elicited a remarkable clinical response in some cancer patients. Increasing evidence suggests that activation of oncogenic pathways, such as RAS/RAF/MAPK and PI3K signaling, impairs the antitumor immune response. Such oncogenic signaling, in turn, activates many inhibitory factors, including expression of immune checkpoint genes-allowing active infiltration of immunosuppressive cells into the tumor environment and inducing resistance against T-cell killing. In preclinical tumor models, effective targeting of oncogenic pathways has enhanced the response to ICBT. Ongoing clinical trials are now evaluating combination therapy (i.e., the use of oncogenic pathway inhibitors in combination with ICBT). However, more translational and clinical research is needed, to optimize ICBT doses and sequence, minimize toxicity, and assess the impact on study participants of certain genetic backgrounds. Also, it is crucial to understand whether wild-type tumors with elevated oncogenic signaling will respond to combination therapy. Insights gained through current and future translational studies will provide the scientific premise and rationale to target 1 or more oncogenic pathways in ICBT-resistant tumors, thus enabling more human patients to benefit from combination therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coulomb blockade in turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S C; Kang, D S; Kim, D C; Choi, C K; Ryu, J Y

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the analytic solutions to the electrostatic problem of the multi-grated-small-junction systems, the stable domain for the Coulomb blockade of turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions at zero temperature has been analyzed as a function of the number of tunnel junction, the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance, and the asymmetric factor. Our results show that domains form various shaped regions according to the asymmetric factor and their size depends on the number of junction and the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance. In particular, it is shown that electrons can be transferred in positive and/or negative bias voltage depending on the asymmetric factor when an appropriate gate cycle is applied. Thus, the asymmetric factor plays an important role in determining the turnstile operation.

  16. Neuromuscular blockade for improvement of surgical conditions during laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Scheppan, Susanne; Kissmeyer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During laparotomy, surgeons frequently experience difficult surgical conditions if the patient's abdominal wall or diaphragm is tense. This issue is particularly pertinent while closing the fascia and placing the intestines into the abdominal cavity. Establishment of a deep neuromus......INTRODUCTION: During laparotomy, surgeons frequently experience difficult surgical conditions if the patient's abdominal wall or diaphragm is tense. This issue is particularly pertinent while closing the fascia and placing the intestines into the abdominal cavity. Establishment of a deep...... neuromuscular blockade (NMB), defined as a post-tetanic-count (PTC) of 0-1, paralyses the abdominal wall muscles and the diaphragm. We hypothesised that deep NMB (PTC 0-1) would improve surgical conditions during upper laparotomy as compared to standard NMB with bolus administration. METHODS...

  17. Ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors for Coulomb blockade devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotkhov, Sergey V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication and low-temperature characterization of ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors made of a thin film of weakly oxidized titanium. Nearly linear voltage–current characteristics were measured at temperatures down to T ∼ 20 mK for films with sheet resistivities as high as ∼7 kΩ, i.e. about an order of magnitude higher than our previous findings for weakly oxidized Cr. Our analysis indicates that such an improvement can help to create an advantageous high-impedance environment for different Coulomb blockade devices. Further properties of the Ti film addressed in this work show the promise of low-noise behavior of the resistors when applied in different realizations of the quantum standard of current. (paper)

  18. Chirality blockade of Andreev reflection in a magnetic Weyl semimetal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenzi, N.; Breitkreiz, M.; Baireuther, P.; O'Brien, T. E.; Tworzydło, J.; Adagideli, I.; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2017-07-01

    A Weyl semimetal with broken time-reversal symmetry has a minimum of two species of Weyl fermions, distinguished by their opposite chirality, in a pair of Weyl cones at opposite momenta ±K that are displaced in the direction of the magnetization. Andreev reflection at the interface between a Weyl semimetal in the normal state (N) and a superconductor (S) that pairs ±K must involve a switch of chirality, otherwise it is blocked. We show that this "chirality blockade" suppresses the superconducting proximity effect when the magnetization lies in the plane of the NS interface. A Zeeman field at the interface can provide the necessary chirality switch and activate Andreev reflection.

  19. Abdominal compartment syndrome successfully treated with neuromuscular blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris T Chiles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48 year old male admitted to the intensive care unit after a cardiac arrest complicated by a stroke intra-operatively during automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. He post-operatively developed a rigid abdomen, elevated peak and plateau pressures, hypoxia and renal insufficiency. He was diagnosed with abdominal compartment syndrome with an intra-abdominal compartment pressure of 40mmHg. The patient was administered 10 mg of intravenous cisatracuriumbesylate in preparation for bedside surgical abdominal decompression. Cisatracurium eliminated the patients need for surgical intervention by reducing his abdominal compartment pressures to normal and improving his hypoxia and renal function. This case illustrates that neuromuscular blockade should be attempted in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome prior to surgical intervention.

  20. Ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors for Coulomb blockade devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkhov, Sergey V.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication and low-temperature characterization of ultra-high-ohmic microstripline resistors made of a thin film of weakly oxidized titanium. Nearly linear voltage-current characteristics were measured at temperatures down to T ˜ 20 mK for films with sheet resistivities as high as ˜7 kΩ, i.e. about an order of magnitude higher than our previous findings for weakly oxidized Cr. Our analysis indicates that such an improvement can help to create an advantageous high-impedance environment for different Coulomb blockade devices. Further properties of the Ti film addressed in this work show the promise of low-noise behavior of the resistors when applied in different realizations of the quantum standard of current.

  1. Coulomb blockade transport across lateral (Ga,Mn)As nanoconstrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapps, Markus; Geissler, Stefan; Lermer, Teresa; Sadowski, Janusz; Wegscheider, Werner; Weiss, Dieter

    2010-09-01

    We report on magnetotransport measurements of nanoconstricted (Ga,Mn)As devices showing very large resistance changes that can be controlled by both an electric and a magnetic field. Based on the bias voltage and temperature dependent measurements down to the millikelvin range we compare the models currently used to describe transport through (Ga,Mn)As nanoconstrictions. We provide an explanation for the observed spin-valve like behavior during a magnetic field sweep by means of the magnetization configurations in the device. Furthermore, we prove that Coulomb blockade plays a decisive role for the transport mechanism and show that modeling the constriction as a granular metal describes the temperature and bias dependence of the conductance correctly and allows to estimate the number of participating islands located in the constriction.

  2. Investigation of uncertainty components in Coulomb blockade thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.; Manninen, A. [MIKES Centre for Metrology and Accreditation, Tekniikantie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Meschke, M.; Savin, A.; Pekola, J. P. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto University, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Gunnarsson, D.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Penttilä, J. S.; Roschier, L. [Aivon Oy, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-09-11

    Coulomb blockade thermometry (CBT) has proven to be a feasible method for primary thermometry in every day laboratory use at cryogenic temperatures from ca. 10 mK to a few tens of kelvins. The operation of CBT is based on single electron charging effects in normal metal tunnel junctions. In this paper, we discuss the typical error sources and uncertainty components that limit the present absolute accuracy of the CBT measurements to the level of about 1 % in the optimum temperature range. Identifying the influence of different uncertainty sources is a good starting point for improving the measurement accuracy to the level that would allow the CBT to be more widely used in high-precision low temperature metrological applications and for realizing thermodynamic temperature in accordance to the upcoming new definition of kelvin.

  3. Investigation of uncertainty components in Coulomb blockade thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.; Manninen, A.; Meschke, M.; Savin, A.; Pekola, J. P.; Gunnarsson, D.; Prunnila, M.; Penttilä, J. S.; Roschier, L.

    2013-01-01

    Coulomb blockade thermometry (CBT) has proven to be a feasible method for primary thermometry in every day laboratory use at cryogenic temperatures from ca. 10 mK to a few tens of kelvins. The operation of CBT is based on single electron charging effects in normal metal tunnel junctions. In this paper, we discuss the typical error sources and uncertainty components that limit the present absolute accuracy of the CBT measurements to the level of about 1 % in the optimum temperature range. Identifying the influence of different uncertainty sources is a good starting point for improving the measurement accuracy to the level that would allow the CBT to be more widely used in high-precision low temperature metrological applications and for realizing thermodynamic temperature in accordance to the upcoming new definition of kelvin

  4. Effect of on-chip filter on Coulomb blockade thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roschier, L; Penttilä, J S; Gunnarsson, D; Prunnila, M; Meschke, M; Savin, A

    2012-01-01

    Coulomb Blockade Thermometer (CBT) is a primary thermometer based on electric conductance of normal tunnel junction arrays. One limitation for CBT use at the lowest temperatures has been due to environmental noise heating. To improve on this limitation, we have done measurements on CBT sensors fabricated with different on-chip filtering structures in a dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 10 mK. The CBT sensors were produced with a wafer scale tunnel junction process. We present how the different on-chip filtering schemes affect the limiting saturation temperatures and show that CBT sensors with proper on-chip filtering work at temperatures below 20 mK and are tolerant to noisy environment.

  5. Synergistic effect of CTLA-4 blockade and cancer chemotherapy in the induction of anti-tumor immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Joost Lesterhuis

    Full Text Available Several chemotherapeutics exert immunomodulatory effects. One of these is the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine, which is widely used in patients with lung cancer, ovarian cancer, breast cancer, mesothelioma and several other types of cancer, but with limited efficacy. We hypothesized that the immunopotentiating effects of this drug are partly restrained by the inhibitory T cell molecule CTLA-4 and thus could be augmented by combining it with a blocking antibody against CTLA-4, which on its own has recently shown beneficial clinical effects in the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. Here we show, using two non-immunogenic murine tumor models, that treatment with gemcitabine chemotherapy in combination with CTLA-4 blockade results in the induction of a potent anti-tumor immune response. Depletion experiments demonstrated that both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells are required for optimal therapeutic effect. Mice treated with the combination exhibited tumor regression and long-term protective immunity. In addition, we show that the efficacy of the combination is moderated by the timing of administration of the two agents. Our results show that immune checkpoint blockade and cytotoxic chemotherapy can have a synergistic effect in the treatment of cancer. These results provide a basis to pursue combination therapies with anti-CTLA-4 and immunopotentiating chemotherapy and have important implications for future studies in cancer patients. Since both drugs are approved for use in patients our data can be immediately translated into clinical trials.

  6. Adrenergic receptor systems and unscheduled DNA synthesis in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadile, A G; Lamberti-D'Mello, C; Cerbone, A; Amoroso, S; Annunziato, L; Menna, T; Buono, C; Giuditta, A

    1995-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out in the albino rat to investigate the role of brain adrenergic systems in DNA remodeling. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraventricular microinjection of an adrenergic drug or vehicle followed 2 h later by the intraventricular injection of 50 microCi of [3H-methyl]thymidine. The rats were sacrificed 0.5 h after the injection of the radioactive tracer. The rate of DNA synthesis was determined by measuring the amount of radioactive precursor incorporated into the DNA extracted from homogenates of several brain areas. In Experiment 1, at time 0 rats received the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (5 micrograms), the beta antagonist propranolol (10 micrograms), the alpha agonist phenylephrine (1 microgram), the beta agonist isoproterenol (12.5 micrograms), or the vehicle. The latter decreased UBDS in neocortex, and increased it in the septum, neostriatum, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and rest of the brain. The alpha and beta agonists and antagonists induced several significant effects, depending on the brain region. In Experiment 2, rats were bilaterally lesioned in the dorsal noradrenergic bundle (DNB) by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine or were sham lesioned. One week later, at time 0 they were given the alpha agonist phenylephrine (1 microgram), the beta agonist isoproterenol (12.5 micrograms), or the vehicle. The DNB-lesioned rats showed a higher UBDS in the hippocampus, neocortex, and hypothalamus, which was reversed by the alpha or the beta agonist. The results suggest an influence of the DNB, probably as a tonic inhibitor of UBDS in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus which, in turn, are likely to be mediated by beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptors. In addition, a phasic inhibitory effect seems to be mediated by beta and alpha receptors in the neocortex, and by beta receptors in the cerebellum. A modulatory role of central adrenergic systems on unscheduled brain DNA synthesis may be inferred from these findings.

  7. Loss of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors during simulated extracorporeal circulation: prevention with prostaglandin E1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachtogel, Y.T.; Musial, J.; Jenkin, B.; Niewiarowski, S.; Edmunds, L.H. Jr.; Colman, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass prolongs bleeding time and increases postoperative blood loss. During in vitro recirculation in an extracorporeal circuit containing a membrane oxygenator and primed with fresh heparinized human blood, the authors previously observed thrombocytopenia, impaired platelet aggregation, and depletion of granular contents, all of which were prevented with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). To investigate these changes further, they studied the number and affinity of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by measuring the binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine. Before recirculation, they found 235 alpha 2-adrenergic receptors per platelet, a Kd of 3.37 nmol/L, complete aggregation with 1.04 mumol/L epinephrine, and a platelet count of 281,000 microliters/sup -1/. After 2 minutes of recirculation, 9.44 mumol/L epinephrine was required to produce complete aggregation, and the platelet count was 104,000 microliters-1 (44% of control). After 2 hours of recirculation, the platelet count had increased to 123,000 microliters/sup -1/. However, epinephrine did not induce platelet aggregation even at 100 mumol/L. Moreover, alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites were not detectable, and affinity for yohimbine could not be calculated. Two minutes after PGE1 0.3 mumol/L was added to the circuit, platelet numbers, response to epinephrine, alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites per platelet, and affinity for yohimbine were not significantly different from control values. At 2 hours, the number of alpha 2-adrenergic sites was not significantly changed from control, but the affinity of yohimbine for platelets was significantly decreased 2.5-fold.

  8. Loss of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors during simulated extracorporeal circulation: prevention with prostaglandin E1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtogel, Y.T.; Musial, J.; Jenkin, B.; Niewiarowski, S.; Edmunds, L.H. Jr.; Colman, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass prolongs bleeding time and increases postoperative blood loss. During in vitro recirculation in an extracorporeal circuit containing a membrane oxygenator and primed with fresh heparinized human blood, the authors previously observed thrombocytopenia, impaired platelet aggregation, and depletion of granular contents, all of which were prevented with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). To investigate these changes further, they studied the number and affinity of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by measuring the binding of 3 H-yohimbine. Before recirculation, they found 235 alpha 2-adrenergic receptors per platelet, a Kd of 3.37 nmol/L, complete aggregation with 1.04 mumol/L epinephrine, and a platelet count of 281,000 microliters -1 . After 2 minutes of recirculation, 9.44 mumol/L epinephrine was required to produce complete aggregation, and the platelet count was 104,000 microliters-1 (44% of control). After 2 hours of recirculation, the platelet count had increased to 123,000 microliters -1 . However, epinephrine did not induce platelet aggregation even at 100 mumol/L. Moreover, alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites were not detectable, and affinity for yohimbine could not be calculated. Two minutes after PGE1 0.3 mumol/L was added to the circuit, platelet numbers, response to epinephrine, alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites per platelet, and affinity for yohimbine were not significantly different from control values. At 2 hours, the number of alpha 2-adrenergic sites was not significantly changed from control, but the affinity of yohimbine for platelets was significantly decreased 2.5-fold

  9. Astrocytic β2 Adrenergic Receptor Gene Deletion Affects Memory in Aged Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Joanna Jensen

    Full Text Available In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that the astrocytic adrenergic signalling enhances glycogenolysis which provides energy to be transported to nearby cells and in the form of lactate. This energy source is important for motor and cognitive functioning. While it is suspected that the β2-adrenergic receptor on astrocytes might contribute to this energy balance, it has not yet been shown conclusively in vivo. Inducible astrocyte specific β2-adrenergic receptor knock-out mice were generated by crossing homozygous β2-adrenergic receptor floxed mice (Adrb2flox and mice with heterozygous tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase-expression driven by the astrocyte specific L-glutamate/L-aspartate transporter promoter (GLAST-CreERT2. Assessments using the modified SHIRPA (SmithKline/Harwell/Imperial College/Royal Hospital/Phenotype Assessment test battery, swimming ability test, and accelerating rotarod test, performed at 1, 2 and 4 weeks, 6 and 12 months after tamoxifen (or vehicle administration did not reveal any differences in physical health or motor functions between the knock-out mice and controls. However deficits were found in the cognitive ability of aged, but not young adult mice, reflected in impaired learning in the Morris Water Maze. Similarly, long-term potentiation (LTP was impaired in hippocampal brain slices of aged knock-out mice maintained in low glucose media. Using microdialysis in cerebellar white matter we found no significant differences in extracellular lactate or glucose between the young adult knock-out mice and controls, although trends were detected. Our results suggest that β2-adrenergic receptor expression on astrocytes in mice may be important for maintaining cognitive health at advanced age, but is dispensable for motor function.

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II and Programmed Death Ligand 1 Expression Predict Outcome After Programmed Death 1 Blockade in Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Margaretha G M; Redd, Robert A; Cader, Fathima Zumla; Pak, Christine J; Abdelrahman, Sara; Ouyang, Jing; Sasse, Stephanie; Younes, Anas; Fanale, Michelle; Santoro, Armando; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Timmerman, John; Collins, Graham P; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Cohen, Jonathon B; De Boer, Jan Paul; Kuruvilla, John; Savage, Kerry J; Trneny, Marek; Ansell, Stephen; Kato, Kazunobu; Farsaci, Benedetto; Sumbul, Anne; Armand, Philippe; Neuberg, Donna S; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Ligon, Azra H; Rodig, Scott J; Shipp, Margaret A

    2018-02-02

    Purpose Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells evade antitumor immunity by multiple means, including gains of 9p24.1/ CD274(PD-L1)/ PDCD1LG2(PD-L2) and perturbed antigen presentation. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) receptor blockade is active in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) despite reported deficiencies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression on HRS cells. Herein, we assess bases of sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL who were treated with nivolumab (anti-PD-1) in the CheckMate 205 trial. Methods HRS cells from archival tumor biopsies were evaluated for 9p24.1 alterations by fluorescence in situ hybridization and for expression of PD ligand 1 (PD-L1) and the antigen presentation pathway components-β2-microglobulin, MHC class I, and MHC class II-by immunohistochemistry. These parameters were correlated with clinical responses and progression-free survival (PFS) after PD-1 blockade. Results Patients with higher-level 9p24.1 copy gain and increased PD-L1 expression on HRS cells had superior PFS. HRS cell expression of β2-microglobulin/MHC class I was not predictive for complete remission or PFS after nivolumab therapy. In contrast, HRS cell expression of MHC class II was predictive for complete remission. In patients with a > 12-month interval between myeloablative autologous stem-cell transplantation and nivolumab therapy, HRS cell expression of MHC class II was associated with prolonged PFS. Conclusion Genetically driven PD-L1 expression and MHC class II positivity on HRS cells are potential predictors of favorable outcome after PD-1 blockade. In cHL, clinical responses to nivolumab were not dependent on HRS cell expression of MHC class I.

  11. P2X7 receptor blockade protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice by decreasing the activities of inflammasome components, oxidative stress and caspase-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Fahuan; Cao, Xuejiao [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Zhai, Zhifang [Department of Dermatology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Gang Huang [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 430038 (China); Du, Xiang; Wang, Yiqin; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian; Zhao, Jinghong [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Hou, Weiping, E-mail: hwp0518@aliyun.com [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Nephrotoxicity is a common complication of cisplatin chemotherapy and thus limits the use of cisplatin in clinic. The purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays important roles in inflammation and apoptosis in some inflammatory diseases; however, its roles in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we first assessed the expression of P2X7R in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice, and then we investigated the changes of renal function, histological injury, inflammatory response, and apoptosis in renal tissues after P2X7R blockade in vivo using an antagonist A-438079. Moreover, we measured the changes of nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRP3) inflammasome components, oxidative stress, and proapoptotic genes in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity after treatment with A-438079. We found that the expression of P2X7R was significantly upregulated in the renal tubular epithelial cells in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity compared with that of the normal control group. Furthermore, pretreatment with A-438079 markedly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury while lightening the histological damage, inflammatory response and apoptosis in renal tissue, and improved the renal function. These effects were associated with the significantly reduced levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components, oxidative stress, p53 and caspase-3 in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In conclusions, our studies suggest that the upregulated activity of P2X7R might play important roles in the development of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, and P2X7R blockade might become an effective therapeutic strategy for this disease. - Highlights: • The P2X7R expression was markedly upregulated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. • P2X7R blockade significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury. • P2X7R blockade reduced activities of NLRP3 inflammasome components in renal tissue. • P2X7R blockade

  12. P2X7 receptor blockade protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice by decreasing the activities of inflammasome components, oxidative stress and caspase-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Fahuan; Cao, Xuejiao; Zhai, Zhifang; Gang Huang; Du, Xiang; Wang, Yiqin; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian; Zhao, Jinghong; Hou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a common complication of cisplatin chemotherapy and thus limits the use of cisplatin in clinic. The purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays important roles in inflammation and apoptosis in some inflammatory diseases; however, its roles in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we first assessed the expression of P2X7R in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice, and then we investigated the changes of renal function, histological injury, inflammatory response, and apoptosis in renal tissues after P2X7R blockade in vivo using an antagonist A-438079. Moreover, we measured the changes of nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRP3) inflammasome components, oxidative stress, and proapoptotic genes in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity after treatment with A-438079. We found that the expression of P2X7R was significantly upregulated in the renal tubular epithelial cells in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity compared with that of the normal control group. Furthermore, pretreatment with A-438079 markedly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury while lightening the histological damage, inflammatory response and apoptosis in renal tissue, and improved the renal function. These effects were associated with the significantly reduced levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components, oxidative stress, p53 and caspase-3 in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In conclusions, our studies suggest that the upregulated activity of P2X7R might play important roles in the development of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, and P2X7R blockade might become an effective therapeutic strategy for this disease. - Highlights: • The P2X7R expression was markedly upregulated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. • P2X7R blockade significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury. • P2X7R blockade reduced activities of NLRP3 inflammasome components in renal tissue. • P2X7R blockade

  13. Long-term Benefit of PD-L1 Blockade in Lung Cancer Associated with JAK3 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allen, Eliezer M; Golay, Hadrien G; Liu, Yan; Koyama, Shohei; Wong, Karrie; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Giannakis, Marios; Harden, Maegan; Rojas-Rudilla, Vanesa; Chevalier, Aaron; Thai, Tran; Lydon, Christine; Mach, Stacy; Avila, Ada G; Wong, Joshua A; Rabin, Alexandra R; Helmkamp, Joshua; Sholl, Lynette; Carter, Scott L; Oxnard, Geoffrey; Janne, Pasi; Getz, Gad; Lindeman, Neal; Hammerman, Peter S; Garraway, Levi A; Hodi, F Stephen; Rodig, Scott J; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Barbie, David A

    2015-08-01

    PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade occasionally results in durable clinical responses in advanced metastatic cancers. However, mechanism-based predictors of response to this immunotherapy remain incompletely characterized. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling on a tumor and germline sample from a patient with refractory lung adenocarcinoma who achieved marked long-term clinical benefit from anti-PD-L1 therapy. We discovered activating somatic and germline amino acid variants in JAK3 that promoted PD-L1 induction in lung cancer cells and in the tumor immune microenvironment. These findings suggest that genomic alterations that deregulate cytokine receptor signal transduction could contribute to PD-L1 activation and engagement of the PD-1 immune checkpoint in lung cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Cadmium effects on ros production and DNA damage via adrenergic receptors stimulation: role of Na+/H+ exchanger and PKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailianis, Stefanos; Piperakis, Styllianos M; Kaloyianni, Martha

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the events that are involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage after adrenergic receptors stimulation by cadmium, in relation to cAMP, protein kinase C (PKC) and Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE). Cadmium (50 microM) caused increased levels of ROS with a concomitant increase in DNA damage in digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis. Either the use of EIPA, a NHE blocker, or calphostin C, the inhibitor of PKC, reduced cadmium effects. Cells treated with alpha1-, alpha2-, beta- and beta1- adrenergic antagonists together with cadmium reversed cadmium alone effects, while the respective adrenergic agonists, phenylephrine and isoprenaline, mimic cadmium effects. Moreover, cadmium caused an increase in the levels of cAMP in digestive gland cells that were reversed after NHE and PKC inhibition as well as in the presence of each type of adrenergic antagonist. The different sensitivity of alpha1-, alpha2-, beta-, beta1- adrenergic receptors on ROS, cAMP production and DNA damage possibly leads to the induction of two signaling pathways that may be interacting or to the presence of a compensatory pathway that acts in concert with the alpha- and beta- adrenergic receptors. In these signaling pathways PKC and NHE play significant role.

  15. Myths and facts in neuromuscular pharmacology - New developments in reversing neuromuscular blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, H.; Hollmann, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacologic reversal of neuromuscular blockade is a topic nor very well acknowledged and controversially discussed. Reasons for this are numerous and include missing perception of the potential complications of residual neuromuscular paralysis including an increased morbidity and mortality, as

  16. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan, E-mail: brogi-221179@yahoo.in; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla-171005 (India); Chand, Shyam [University Institute of Information Technology, H.P. University Shimla-171005 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ε + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect.

  17. Effects of dual renin-angiotensin system blockade on proteinuria in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kidney diseases manifesting as proteinuria or elevated creatinine are increasingly prevalent complications of HIV infection. We report the effects of dual renin-angiotensin system blockade on proteinuria in a hypertensive black African HIV-infected patient.

  18. Blockade of Metallothioneins 1 and 2 Increases Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summermatter, Serge; Bouzan, Anais; Pierrel, Eliane; Melly, Stefan; Stauffer, Daniela; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Nolin, Erin; Dornelas, Christina; Fryer, Christy; Leighton-Davies, Juliet; Glass, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metallothioneins are proteins that are involved in intracellular zinc storage and transport. Their expression levels have been reported to be elevated in several settings of skeletal muscle atrophy. We therefore investigated the effect of metallothionein blockade on skeletal muscle anabolism in vitro and in vivo. We found that concomitant abrogation of metallothioneins 1 and 2 results in activation of the Akt pathway and increases in myotube size, in type IIb fiber hypertrophy, and ultimately in muscle strength. Importantly, the beneficial effects of metallothionein blockade on muscle mass and function was also observed in the setting of glucocorticoid addition, which is a strong atrophy-inducing stimulus. Given the blockade of atrophy and the preservation of strength in atrophy-inducing settings, these results suggest that blockade of metallothioneins 1 and 2 constitutes a promising approach for the treatment of conditions which result in muscle atrophy. PMID:27956698

  19. Class III antiarrhythmic agents in cardiac failure: lessons from clinical trials with a focus on the Grupo de Estudio de la Sobrevida en la Insuficiencia Cardiaca en Argentina (GESICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, H C

    1999-11-04

    The results of previous clinical trials, in a variety of clinical settings, showed that class I agents may consistently increase mortality in sharp contrast to the effects of beta blockers. Attention has therefore shifted to class III compounds for potential beneficial effects on long-term mortality among patients with underlying cardiac disease. Clinical trials with d-sotalol, the dextro isomer (devoid of beta blockade) of sotalol, showed increased mortality in patients with low ejection fraction after myocardial infarction and in those with heart failure; whereas in the case of dofetilide, the impact on mortality was neutral. Because of the complex effects of its actions as an alpha-adrenergic blocker and a class III agent, the impact on mortality of amiodarone in patients with heart failure is of particular interest. A meta-analysis of 13 clinical trials revealed significant reductions in all-cause and cardiac mortality among patients with heart failure or previous myocardial infarction. Among these were 5 controlled clinical trials that investigated the effects of amiodarone on mortality among patients with heart failure. None of these trials was large relative to the beta-blocker trials in the postinfarction patients. However, the larger 2 of the 5 amiodarone trials produced discordant effects on mortality, neutral in one and significantly positive in the other. Some of the differences may be accounted for by the differences in eligibility criteria and baseline characteristics. Future trials that may be undertaken to resolve the discrepancies may need to allow for the newer findings on the effects of concomitant beta blockers, implantable devices, and possibly, spironolactone. All these modalities of treatment have been shown in controlled clinical trials to augment survival in patients with impaired ventricular function or manifest heart failure. Additional trials, some of which are currently in progress, compare amiodarone with implantable devices and other

  20. Conformational Occlusion of Blockade Antibody Epitopes, a Novel Mechanism of GII.4 Human Norovirus Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindesmith, Lisa C; Mallory, Michael L; Debbink, Kari; Donaldson, Eric F; Brewer-Jensen, Paul D; Swann, Excel W; Sheahan, Timothy P; Graham, Rachel L; Beltramello, Martina; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S

    2018-01-01

    Extensive antigenic diversity within the GII.4 genotype of human norovirus is a major driver of pandemic emergence and a significant obstacle to development of cross-protective immunity after natural infection and vaccination. However, human and mouse monoclonal antibody studies indicate that, although rare, antibodies to conserved GII.4 blockade epitopes are generated. The mechanisms by which these epitopes evade immune surveillance are uncertain. Here, we developed a new approach for identifying conserved GII.4 norovirus epitopes. Utilizing a unique set of virus-like particles (VLPs) representing the in vivo -evolved sequence diversity within an immunocompromised person, we identify key residues within epitope F, a conserved GII.4 blockade antibody epitope. The residues critical for antibody binding are proximal to evolving blockade epitope E. Like epitope F, antibody blockade of epitope E was temperature sensitive, indicating that particle conformation regulates antibody access not only to the conserved GII.4 blockade epitope F but also to the evolving epitope E. These data highlight novel GII.4 mechanisms to protect blockade antibody epitopes, map essential residues of a GII.4 conserved epitope, and expand our understanding of how viral particle dynamics may drive antigenicity and antibody-mediated protection by effectively shielding blockade epitopes. Our data support the notion that GII.4 particle breathing may well represent a major mechanism of humoral immune evasion supporting cyclic pandemic virus persistence and spread in human populations. IMPORTANCE In this study, we use norovirus virus-like particles to identify key residues of a conserved GII.4 blockade antibody epitope. Further, we identify an additional GII.4 blockade antibody epitope to be occluded, with antibody access governed by temperature and particle dynamics. These findings provide additional support for particle conformation-based presentation of binding residues mediated by a particle

  1. Zeeman splitting spin filter in a single quantum dot electron transport with Coulomb blockade effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Wenxi

    2014-01-01

    Electron spin filter induced by Zeeman splitting in a few-electron quantum dot coupled to two normal electrodes is studied considering Coulomb blockade effect. Based on the Anderson model and Liouville-von Neumann equation, equation of motion of the system is derived and analytical solutions are achieved. Transport windows for perfectly polarized current, partially polarized current and non-polarized current induced by the Zeeman splitting energy and Coulomb blockade potential are exploited. ...

  2. Scintigraphic assessment of cardiac adrenergic innervation in patients with essential hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Hamada, M.; Shigematsu, Y.; Sumimoto, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Hiwada, K. (2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Ehime University School of Medicine (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    To assess the regional cardiac adrenergic innervation in patients with essential hypertension (EHT), simultaneous iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123I)MIBG) and thallium-201 (201Tl) myocardial imagings were performed in five patients with EHT, seven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and seven normal subjects. Short axial images at rest were divided into five segments: anterior, septal, posterior, lateral, and apical segments. Percent regional uptake (%RU) of 201Tl except the septal segment in patients with EHT showed no significant difference. However, the %RU of (123I)MIBG at posterior, lateral, and apical segments was significantly lower than that at anterior and septal segments in EHT. This intraimage heterogeneity of (123I)MIBG was also observed in HCM. These results suggest that there is a difference in regional adrenergic innervation of the left ventricle with myocardial hypertrophy.

  3. Historical Overview of the Effect of -Adrenergic Agonists on Beef Cattle Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Johnson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal muscle hypertrophy of beef cattle is the result of enhanced myofibrillar protein synthesis and reduced protein turnover. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy has been studied in cattle fed β-adrenergic agonists (β-AA, which are receptor-mediated enhancers of protein synthesis and inhibitors of protein degradation. Feeding β-AA to beef cattle increases longissimus muscle cross-sectional area 6% to 40% compared to non-treated cattle. The β-AA have been reported to improve live animal performance, including average daily gain, feed efficiency, hot carcass weight, and dressing percentage. Treatment with β-AA increased mRNA concentration of the β2 or β1-adrenergic receptor and myosin heavy chain IIX in bovine skeletal muscle tissue. This review will examine the effects of skeletal muscle and adipose development with β-AA, and will interpret how the use of β-AA affects performance, body composition, and growth in beef cattle.

  4. The effects of ketotifen on beta-adrenergic activity in asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, R I; Burge, P S; Stableforth, D E; Skinner, C

    1988-01-01

    In order to examine a possible mechanism of action of ketotifen in asthma, a double-blind study was undertaken to determine whether ketotifen showed any effects on the beta-adrenergic system in asthmatic patients. The effects of ketotifen 1 mg b.i.d. for one month on the changes in spirometry, plasma potassium and serum glucose nebulized salbutamol was compared with placebo. In addition the degree of inhibition caused by local salbutamol on the wheal volume due to intradermal prostaglandin E and bradykinin, was compared following ketotifen and placebo. Nebulized salbutamol produced consistent improvements in spirometry and changes in potassium and glucose levels. Local salbutamol significantly decreased the wheal volume induced by intradermal prostaglandin E and bradykinin. However, none of these salbutamol-induced effects were altered following ketotifen or placebo. Ketotifen, in the doses used, has no demonstrable effect on the beta-adrenergic system in asthmatic patients.

  5. Significance of adrenergic receptors for the development of nevus flammeus and nevus anemicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raff, M. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Hautklinik)

    1981-01-01

    Examination of patients with nevus flammeus or nevus anemicus showed disturbed sensibility in the area of the nevus in the majority of cases. Histologically and with special technique of histochemistry and fluorescence microscopy there was no evidence for neurogenic lesions. However, signs of vegetative disfunction were present: hyperhidrosis and absent reactivity of vasculature in the nevus area to vasoconstrictive and vasodilatatory stimuli. Based on these findings a disturbed regulation of vascular intramural adrenergic receptors seemed possible and really could be demonstrated by means of autoradiography. In both types of nevi only one of the adrenergic receptors could be marked with specific antagonists. Therefore, the persistent vascular dilatation and constriction can be accounted for by the absence of one of these receptors. This abnormal distribution of receptors could be due to a developmental defect influenced by the ''nerve growth factor''.

  6. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and [Arg8]vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in [ 3 H]prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and [ 3 H] [Arg8]vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis

  7. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    crystallization, we engineered a beta2AR fusion protein in which T4 lysozyme (T4L) replaces most of the third intracellular loop of the GPCR ("beta2AR-T4L") and showed that this protein retains near-native pharmacologic properties. Analysis of adrenergic receptor ligand-binding mutants within the context......The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) is a well-studied prototype for heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to diffusible hormones and neurotransmitters. To overcome the structural flexibility of the beta2AR and to facilitate its...... a conformational pathway from the ligand-binding pocket to regions that interact with G proteins....

  8. Coulomb blockade and transfer of electrons one by one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, Hugues

    1991-01-01

    Zero point fluctuations of the charge on the capacitance of a tunnel junction connected to a bias circuit are in almost all experimental situations larger than the electron charge. As a consequence, the effects of charge granularity are hidden, but in circuits with 'islands', which are electrodes connected to the rest of the circuit only through tunnel junctions and capacitors. The island charge being quantized, its fluctuations are blocked. If the island capacitance is sufficiently small, no electron can enter the island because of the increase of electrostatic energy that would occur. We have observed this effect, called 'Coulomb blockade', in the 'single electron box', where an island is formed between a tunnel junction and a capacitor. A bias voltage source coupled to the island through the capacitor allows to control the number of electrons. We have designed and operated two devices with nano-scale tunnel junctions based on this principle, the 'turnstile' and the 'pump', through which the current is controlled electron by electron. In our experiments, the precision of the transfer is of the order of one percent. It should be a million time better in versions of these devices with more junctions. One could then use them for a new measurement of the fine structure constant alpha. (author) [fr

  9. Mefloquine gap junction blockade and risk of pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Remington Lee

    2012-09-01

    Obstetric use of the antimalarial drug mefloquine has historically been discouraged during the first trimester and immediately before conception owing to concerns of potential fetal harm. With the rise of resistance to the antimalarial drug sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), mefloquine is now being considered as a replacement for SP for universal antenatal administration to women from malaria-endemic regions. Recent recommendations have also suggested that mefloquine may be used cautiously among pregnant travelers who cannot otherwise avoid visiting these areas. Mefloquine has been demonstrated to cause blockade of gap junction protein alpha 1 (GJA1) gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), and recent evidence suggests that GJA1 GJIC is critical to successful embryonic implantation and early placental development. During routine use, mefloquine accumulates in organ and peripheral tissue, crosses the blood-placental barrier, and may plausibly accumulate in developing decidua and trophoblast at concentrations sufficient to interfere with GJA1 GJIC and, thus, cause deleterious effects on fetal outcomes. This conclusion is supported by epidemiological evidence that demonstrates use of the drug during early development is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and stillbirth. Confirmatory studies are pending, but the available experimental and epidemiological evidence support renewed adherence, where feasible, to existing mefloquine package insert guidance that women avoid the drug during the periconceptional period.

  10. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Ahn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  11. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Brian J. [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Okada, Hideho, E-mail: okadah@upmc.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  12. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Brian J.; Pollack, Ian F.; Okada, Hideho

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas

  13. A meta-analysis of the effects of β-adrenergic blockers in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Shen, Chengwu; Zhai, Shujun; Liu, Yukun; Yue, Wen-Wei; Han, Li

    2016-10-01

    Adrenergic β-blockers are drugs that bind to, but do not activate β-adrenergic receptors. Instead they block the actions of β-adrenergic agonists and are used for the treatment of various diseases such as cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, hypertension, headache, migraines, stress, anxiety, prostate cancer, and heart failure. Several meta-analysis studies have shown that β-blockers improve the heart function and reduce the risks of cardiovascular events, rate of mortality, and sudden death through chronic heart failure (CHF) of patients. The present study identified results from recent meta-analyses of β-adrenergic blockers and their usefulness in CHF. Databases including Medline/Embase/Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PubMed were searched for the periods May, 1985 to March, 2011 and June, 2013 to August, 2015, and a number of studies identified. Results of those studies showed that use of β-blockers was associated with decreased sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. However, contradictory results have also been reported. The present meta-analysis aimed to determine the efficacy of β-blockers on mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure. The results showed that mortality was significantly reduced by β-blocker treatment prior to the surgery of heart failure patients. The results from the meta-analysis studies showed that β-blocker treatment in heart failure patients correlated with a significant decrease in long-term mortality, even in patients that meet one or more exclusion criteria of the MERIT-HF study. In summary, the findings of the current meta-analysis revealed beneficial effects different β-blockers have on patients with heart failure or related heart disease.

  14. Probenecid inhibits α-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in the human leg vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann; Kiehn, Oliver Thistrup

    2018-01-01

    Coordination of vascular smooth muscle cell tone in resistance arteries plays an essential role in the regulation of peripheral resistance and overall blood pressure. Recent observations in animals have provided evidence for a coupling between adrenoceptors and Panx1 (pannexin-1) channels....... Probenecid treatment increased (Parterial infusion of tyramine (α1- and α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation) by ≈15%, whereas the response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine was unchanged. Inhibition...

  15. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  16. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  17. The effect of dietary energy and the inclusion of a β-adrenergic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marnel

    2013-10-26

    Oct 26, 2013 ... The effect of dietary energy and the inclusion of a β-adrenergic agonist in the diet on the meat quality of feedlot lambs. T.S. Brand. 1,2#. , M.P. Genis. 2. , L.C. Hoffman. 2 ... increases in meat prices and the change in consumer preference towards leaner meat have resulted in more lamb producers opting to ...

  18. The QseC Adrenergic Signaling Cascade in Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC)

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, David T.; Clarke, Marcie B.; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Rasko, David A.; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The ability to respond to stress is at the core of an organism's survival. The hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine play a central role in stress responses in mammals, which require the synchronized interaction of the whole neuroendocrine system. Mammalian adrenergic receptors are G-coupled protein receptors (GPCRs); bacteria, however, sense these hormones through histidine sensor kinases (HKs). HKs autophosphorylate in response to signals and transfer this phosphate to response regulators...

  19. Osmotic versus adrenergic control of ion transport by ionocytes of Fundulus heteroclitus in the cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Janet C; Mercer, Evan W; Gerber, Lucie; Robertson, George N; Marshall, William S

    2017-01-01

    In eurythermic vertebrates, acclimation to the cold may produce changes in physiological control systems. We hypothesize that relatively direct osmosensitive control will operate better than adrenergic receptor mediated control of ion transport in cold vs. warm conditions. Fish were acclimated to full strength seawater (SW) at 21°C and 5°C for four weeks, gill samples and blood were taken and opercular epithelia mounted in Ussing style chambers. Short-circuit current (I sc ) at 21°C and 5°C (measured at acclimation temperature), was significantly inhibited by the α 2 -adrenergic agonist clonidine but the ED 50 dose was significantly higher in cold conditions (93.8±16.4nM) than in warm epithelia (47.8±8.1nM) and the maximum inhibition was significantly lower in cold (-66.1±2.2%) vs. warm conditions (-85.6±1.3%), indicating lower sensitivity in the cold. β-Adrenergic responses were unchanged. Hypotonic inhibition of I sc , was higher in warm acclimated (-95%), compared to cold acclimated fish (-75%), while hypertonic stimulations were the same, indicating equal responsiveness to hyperosmotic stimuli. Plasma osmolality was significantly elevated in cold acclimated fish and, by TEM, gill ionocytes from cold acclimated fish had significantly shorter mitochondria. These data are consistent with a shift in these eurythermic animals from complex adrenergic control to relatively simple biomechanical osmotic control of ion secretion in the cold. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Protein kinase A regulates AKAP250 (gravin) scaffold binding to the β2-adrenergic receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Wang, Hsien-yu; Malbon, Craig C.

    2003-01-01

    A-kinase-anchoring protein 250 (AKAP250; gravin) acts as a scaffold that binds protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C and protein phosphatases, associating reversibly with the β2-adrenergic receptor. The receptor-binding domain of the scaffold and the regulation of the receptor–scaffold association was revealed through mutagenesis and biochemical analyses. The AKAP domain found in other members of this superfamily is essential for the scaffold–receptor interactions. Gravin constructs lackin...

  1. Arrhythmogenic remodeling of β2 versus β1 adrenergic signaling in the human failing heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Di; Holzem, Katherine; Kang, Chaoyi; Xiao, Mengqian; Hwang, Hye Jin; Ewald, Gregory A; Yamada, Kathryn A; Efimov, Igor R

    2015-04-01

    Arrhythmia is the major cause of death in patients with heart failure, for which β-adrenergic receptor blockers are a mainstay therapy. But the role of β-adrenergic signaling in electrophysiology and arrhythmias has never been studied in human ventricles. We used optical imaging of action potentials and [Ca(2+)]i transients to compare the β1- and β2-adrenergic responses in left ventricular wedge preparations of human donor and failing hearts. β1-Stimulation significantly increased conduction velocity, shortened action potential duration, and [Ca(2+)]i transients duration (CaD) in donor but not in failing hearts, because of desensitization of β1-adrenergic receptor in heart failure. In contrast, β2-stimulation increased conduction velocity in both donor and failing hearts but shortened action potential duration only in failing hearts. β2-Stimulation also affected transmural heterogeneity in action potential duration but not in [Ca(2+)]i transients duration. Both β1- and β2-stimulation augmented the vulnerability and frequency of ectopic activity and enhanced substrates for ventricular tachycardia in failing, but not in donor, hearts. Both β1- and β2-stimulation enhanced Purkinje fiber automaticity, whereas only β2-stimulation promoted Ca-mediated premature ventricular contractions in heart failure. During end-stage heart failure, β2-stimulation creates arrhythmogenic substrates via conduction velocity regulation and transmurally heterogeneous repolarization. β2-Stimulation is, therefore, more arrhythmogenic than β1-stimulation. In particular, β2-stimulation increases the transmural difference between [Ca(2+)]i transients duration and action potential duration, which facilitates the formation of delayed afterdepolarizations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Effects of adrenergic drugs on aqueous humour dynamics in the normal human eye. I. Salbutamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakes, R L; Siah, P B

    1984-06-01

    The immediate effects of topical salbutamol, a beta 2 adrenergic agonist, on the aqueous humour dynamics of 22 normal subjects was studied by fluorophotometry and tonography. Significant lowering of intraocular pressure was accompanied by a significant increase in both aqueous flow rate and tonographic facility of outflow. Uveoscleral outflow was calculated and found to be significantly increased by salbutamol. This appeared to be the predominant acute pressure lowering effect of beta receptor stimulation in the normal human eye.

  3. Effects of adrenergic drugs on aqueous humour dynamics in the normal human eye. I. Salbutamol.

    OpenAIRE

    Coakes, R. L.; Siah, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    The immediate effects of topical salbutamol, a beta 2 adrenergic agonist, on the aqueous humour dynamics of 22 normal subjects was studied by fluorophotometry and tonography. Significant lowering of intraocular pressure was accompanied by a significant increase in both aqueous flow rate and tonographic facility of outflow. Uveoscleral outflow was calculated and found to be significantly increased by salbutamol. This appeared to be the predominant acute pressure lowering effect of beta recepto...

  4. Association between renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and future osteoporotic fracture risk in hypertensive population: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-I; Yeh, Jong-Shiuan; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Lin, Fen-Yen; Shih, Chun-Ming; Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Kao, Yung-Ta; Fang, Yu-Ann; Tsai, Lung-Wen; Liu, Wen-Chi; Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi; Kuo, Yi-Jie; Huang, Chun-Yao

    2017-11-01

    Tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activation in sites of osteoporosis had been demonstrated in animal studies; however, the possibility of RAAS blockade to prevent future osteoporotic fracture had rarely been verified in clinical studies. We Used the Taiwan Longitudinal Health insurance database 2000 to 2008, the cohort study comprised patients age over 40 with a recorded new diagnosis of hypertension between January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2008, in addition, patients who had diagnosis of osteoporosis before the date of cohort enter were excluded. After the definite diagnosis of hypertension, each patient was followed until osteoporotic fracture happened or the end of 2008. The occurrence of osteoporotic fracture was evaluated in patients who either were or without taking RAAS blockade agents. Cox proportional hazard regressions were used to evaluate the osteoporotic fracture incidence after adjusting for known confounding factors. In total, 57,132 hypertensive patients comprised the study cohort. Our study results showed that the incidence of osteoporosis fracture in the whole cohort was significantly higher in the RAAS blockade non-user group than the user group. This phenomenon was observed in both sex and all age categories. Sensitivity analysis further showed the concordant lower osteoporosis fracture risk in patients with various RAAS blockers usage durations; the risk of osteoporosis fracture was the lowest in those drug use >365 days when compared with the non-user cohort. In conclusion, our study result demonstrated the lower future osteoporotic fracture risk in hypertensive subjects who received long term RAAS blocker treatment.

  5. Anti-hypertensive effects of probenecid via inhibition of the α-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Baek; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Probenecid has long been used in the treatment of gout. Its anti-gout mechanisms consist of uric acid reuptake inhibition and the consequent facilitation of uric acid excretion. In the present study, we investigated whether probenecid could exert an anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The noninvasive indirect tail cuff method was employed to measure blood pressure and heart rate. The administration of probenecid (50 mg/kg, ip) induced a significant systolic blood pressure (SBP) decrease, from 167 mmHg to 141 mmHg, within 120 min. In contrast, probenecid had little effect on normotensive control Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). The anti-hypertensive effects of probenecid are almost as potent as those of atenolol. In a further exploration of the anti-hypertensive mechanisms of probenecid, its effects on phenylephrine-induced blood vessel contraction were tested. Our results suggest that probenecid significantly inhibited the contractions of rat aorta. This effect was also observed with endothelium-removed rat aorta, suggesting that probenecid can directly interact with the α-adrenergic receptor. Moreover, probenecid inhibited the α-adrenergic-receptor-mediated activation of ERK I/II in MC3TC-E1 cells. Therefore, our results indicate that probenecid might alleviate high blood pressure in SHR via inhibition of the α-adrenergic receptor and ERK I/II.

  6. Effects of central imidazolinergic and alpha2-adrenergic activation on water intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-adrenergic ligands that bind to imidazoline receptors (I-R, a selective ligand that binds to alpha2-adrenoceptors (alpha2-AR and mixed ligands that bind to both receptors were tested for their action on water intake behavior of 24-h water-deprived rats. All drugs were injected into the third cerebral ventricle. Except for agmatine (80 nmol, mixed ligands binding to I-R/alpha2-AR such as guanabenz (40 nmol and UK 14304 (20 nmol inhibited water intake by 65% and up to 95%, respectively. The selective non-imidazoline alpha2-AR agonist, alpha-methylnoradrenaline, produced inhibition of water intake similar to that obtained with guanabenz, but at higher doses (80 nmol. The non-adrenergic I-R ligands histamine (160 nmol, mixed histaminergic and imidazoline ligand and imidazole-4-acetic acid (80 nmol, imidazoline ligand did not alter water intake. The results show that selective, non-imidazoline alpha2-AR activation suppresses water intake, and suggest that the action on imidazoline sites by non-adrenergic ligands is not sufficient to inhibit water intake.

  7. Beta(2) adrenergic receptors mediate important electrophysiological effects in human ventricular myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, M D; Rowland, E; Brown, M J; Grace, A A

    2001-07-01

    To define the effects of beta(2) adrenergic receptor stimulation on ventricular repolarisation in vivo. Prospective study. Tertiary referral centre. 85 patients with coronary artery disease and 22 normal controls. Intravenous and intracoronary salbutamol (a beta(2) adrenergic receptor selective agonist; 10-30 microg/min and 1-10 microg/min), and intravenous isoprenaline (a mixed beta(1)/beta(2) adrenergic receptor agonist; 1-5 microg/min), infused during fixed atrial pacing. QT intervals, QT dispersion, monophasic action potential duration. In patients with coronary artery disease, salbutamol decreased QT(onset) and QT(peak) but increased QT(end) duration; QT(onset)-QT(peak) and QT(peak)-QT(end) intervals increased, resulting in T wave prolongation (mean (SEM): 201 (2) ms to 233 (2) ms; p salbutamol (controls), and 70 (1) ms baseline v 108 (3) ms salbutamol (coronary artery disease); p action potential duration at 90% repolarisation shortened during intracoronary infusion of salbutamol, from 278 (4.1) ms to 257 (3.8) ms (p mechanism whereby catecholamines acting through this receptor subtype may trigger ventricular arrhythmias.

  8. Alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation triggers Achilles tenocyte hypercellularity: Comparison between two model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Fong, G; Alfredson, H; Scott, A; Danielson, P

    2013-12-01

    The histopathology of tendons with painful tendinopathy is often tendinosis, a fibrosis-like condition of unclear pathogenesis characterized by tissue changes including hypercellularity. The primary tendon cells (tenocytes) have been shown to express adrenoreceptors (mainly alpha-2A) as well as markers of catecholamine production, particularly in tendinosis. It is known that adrenergic stimulation can induce proliferation in other cells. The present study investigated the effects of an exogenously administered alpha-2 adrenergic agonist in an established in vivo Achilles tendinosis model (rabbit) and also in an in vitro human tendon cell culture model. The catecholamine producing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase and the alpha-2A-adrenoreceptor (α2A AR) were expressed by tenocytes, and alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation had a proliferative effect on these cells, in both models. The proliferation was inhibited by administration of an α2A AR antagonist, and the in vitro model further showed that the proliferative alpha-2A effect was mediated via a mitogenic cell signaling pathway involving phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2. The results indicate that catecholamines produced by tenocytes in tendinosis might contribute to the proliferative nature of the pathology through stimulation of the α2A AR, pointing to a novel target for future therapies. The study furthermore shows that animal models are not necessarily required for all aspects of this research. © 2013 The Authors. Scand J Med Sci Sports published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Adrenergic mechanism responsible for pathological alteration in gastric mucosal blood flow in rats with ulcer bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Pavlov, A. N.; Semyachkin-Glushkovskiy, I. A.; Gekalyuk, A. S.; Ulanova, M. V.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The adrenergic system plays an important role in regulation of central and peripheral circulation in normal state and during hemorrhage. Because the impaired gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) is the major cause of gastroduodenal lesions, including ulcer bleeding (UB), we studied the adrenergic mechanism responsible for regulation of GMBF in rats with a model of stress-induced UB (SUB) using the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). First, we examined the effect of adrenaline on GMBF in rats under normal state and during UB. In all healthy animals the submucosal adrenaline injection caused a decrease in local GMBF. During UB the submucosal injection of adrenaline was accompanied by less pronounced GMBF suppression in 30,3% rats with SUB vs. healthy ones. In 69,7% rats with SUB we observed the increase in local GMBF after submucosal injection of adrenaline. Second, we studied the sensitivity of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors and the activity of two factors which are involved in β2-adrenomediated vasorelaxation-KATP -channels and NO. The effects of submucosal injection of isoproterenol, ICI118551 and glybenclamide on GMBF as well as NO levels in gastric tissue were significantly elevated in rats with SUB vs. healthy rats. Thus, our results indicate that high activation of gastric β2-adrenoreceptors associated with the increased vascular KATP -channels activity and elevated NO production is the important adrenergic mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of UB.

  10. Food restriction modulates β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat liver during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase activities were studied in rat liver during postmaturational aging of male Fischer 344 rats fed ad libitum or restricted to 60% of the ad libitum intake. Catecholamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased by 200-300% between 6 and 24-27 mo of age in ad libitum-fed rats, whereas in food-restricted rats catecholamine response increased by only 58-84% between 6 and 30 mo. In ad libitum-fed rats, glucagon-stimulated enzyme activity also increased by 40% between 6 and 12 mo and in restricted rats a similar age-related increase was delayed until 18 mo. β-Adrenergic receptor density increased by 50% between 6 and 24 mo in livers from ad libitum-fed but not food-restricted rats and showed a highly significant correlation with maximal isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity over the postmaturational life span. Age-related increases in unstimulated (basal) adenylate cyclase activity and nonreceptor-mediated enzyme activation were retarded by food restriction. The results demonstrate that food restriction diminishes a marked age-related increase in β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity of rat liver. Alterations of adrenergic-responsive adenylate cyclase with age and the modulatory effects of food restriction appear to be mediated by changes in both receptor and nonreceptor components of adenylate cyclase

  11. Effects of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on the neuromuscular blockade of vecuronium bromide in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ying; Zhang Hong; Sun Li

    2013-01-01

    The effects of intraoperative magnetic resonance (iMR) imaging on the neuromuscular blockade of vecuronium bromide were investigated in neurosurgery. Fifty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I-II scheduled for craniotomy operation were divided into two groups (n=25 each) with no difference in demographic data: the iMR imaging group and control group. Train-of-four (TOF) stimulation through an accelerometer was used to monitor onset, maintenance, and recovery of muscle relaxation caused by vecuronium. Vecuronium bromide was intravenously injected after anesthesia induction. The dosage of vecuronium bromide in the iMR imaging group was larger than in the control group, but not significantly. Duration of vecuronium bromide administration and operation time were significantly longer in the iMR imaging group than in the control group. Time from drug discontinuation to operation termination, and to return to neurosurgery intensive care unit were not different. Time taken by first twitch (T 1 ) in response to TOF stimulation to recover by 25%, and muscle relaxant recovery index were significantly greater in the control group than in the iMR imaging group. The body temperature of the patients increased gradually in the iMR imaging group but decreased in the control group. iMR imaging can prolong the operation time, increase the body temperature of the patient, and remarkably shorten the clinical action time and muscle relaxation recovery index of vecuronium. (author)

  12. Cytosolic Accumulation of L-Proline Disrupts GABA-Ergic Transmission through GAD Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg W. Crabtree

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH, which degrades L-proline, resides within the schizophrenia-linked 22q11.2 deletion suggesting a role in disease. Supporting this, elevated L-proline levels have been shown to increase risk for psychotic disorders. Despite the strength of data linking PRODH and L-proline to neuropsychiatric diseases, targets of disease-relevant concentrations of L-proline have not been convincingly described. Here, we show that Prodh-deficient mice with elevated CNS L-proline display specific deficits in high-frequency GABA-ergic transmission and gamma-band oscillations. We find that L-proline is a GABA-mimetic and can act at multiple GABA-ergic targets. However, at disease-relevant concentrations, GABA-mimesis is limited to competitive blockade of glutamate decarboxylase leading to reduced GABA production. Significantly, deficits in GABA-ergic transmission are reversed by enhancing net GABA production with the clinically relevant compound vigabatrin. These findings indicate that accumulation of a neuroactive metabolite can lead to molecular and synaptic dysfunction and help to understand mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disease.

  13. Noradrenaline transporter blockade increases fronto-parietal functional connectivity relevant for working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernaus, Dennis; Casales Santa, Marta Ma; Offermann, Jan Stefan; Van Amelsvoort, Thérèse

    2017-04-01

    Experimental animal work has demonstrated that dopamine and noradrenaline play an essential role in modulating prefrontal cortex-mediated networks underlying working memory performance. Studies of functional connectivity have been instrumental in extending such notions to humans but, so far, have almost exclusively focussed on pharmacological agents with a predominant dopaminergic mechanism of action. Here, we investigate the effect of a single dose of atomoxetine 60mg, a noradrenaline transporter inhibitor, on working memory performance and associated functional connectivity during an n-back task in 19 healthy male volunteers. Atomoxetine increased functional connectivity between right anterior insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, posterior parietal cortex and precuneus during the high-working memory load condition of the n-back task. Increased atomoxetine-induced insula-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity during this condition correlated with decreased reaction time variability and was furthermore predicted by working memory capacity. These results show for the first time that noradrenaline transporter blockade-induced increases in cortical catecholamines accentuate fronto-parietal working memory-related network integrity. The observation of significant inter-subject variability in response to atomoxetine has implications for inverted-U frameworks of dopamine and noradrenaline function, which could be useful to predict drug effects in clinical disorders with variable treatment response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of Costimulation Blockade in Solid Organ and Islet Xenotransplantation

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    Kannan P. Samy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pig-to-human xenotransplantation offers a potential bridge to the growing disparity between patients with end-stage organ failure and graft availability. Early studies attempting to overcome cross-species barriers demonstrated robust humoral immune responses to discordant xenoantigens. Recent advances have led to highly efficient and targeted genomic editing, drastically altering the playing field towards rapid production of less immunogenic porcine tissues and even the discussion of human xenotransplantation trials. However, as these humoral immune barriers to cross-species transplantation are overcome with advanced transgenics, cellular immunity to these novel xenografts remains an outstanding issue. Therefore, understanding and optimizing immunomodulation will be paramount for successful clinical xenotransplantation. Costimulation blockade agents have been introduced in xenotransplantation research in 2000 with anti-CD154mAb. Most recently, prolonged survival has been achieved in solid organ (kidney xenograft survival > 400 days with anti-CD154mAb, heart xenograft survival > 900 days, and liver xenograft survival 29 days with anti-CD40mAb and islet xenotransplantation (>600 days with anti-CD154mAb with the use of these potent experimental agents. As the development of novel genetic modifications and costimulation blocking agents converges, we review their impact thus far on preclinical xenotransplantation and the potential for future application.

  15. Biologic effects of platelet-derived growth factor receptor α blockade in uterine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Ju-Won; Huang, Jie; Hu, Wei; Yang, XiaoYun; Jennings, Nicholas B; Sehgal, Vasudha; Sohn, Bo Hwa; Han, Hee Dong; Lee, Sun Joo; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Zand, Behrouz; Dalton, Heather J; Previs, Rebecca A; Davis, Ashley N; Matsuo, Koji; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ram, Prahlad; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2014-05-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) expression is frequently observed in many kinds of cancer and is a candidate for therapeutic targeting. This preclinical study evaluated the biologic significance of PDGFRα and PDGFRα blockade (using a fully humanized monoclonal antibody, 3G3) in uterine cancer. Expression of PDGFRα was examined in uterine cancer clinical samples and cell lines, and biologic effects of PDGFRα inhibition were evaluated using in vitro (cell viability, apoptosis, and invasion) and in vivo (orthotopic) models of uterine cancer. PDGFRα was highly expressed and activated in uterine cancer samples and cell lines. Treatment with 3G3 resulted in substantial inhibition of PDGFRα phosphorylation and of downstream signaling molecules AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Cell viability and invasive potential of uterine cancer cells were also inhibited by 3G3 treatment. In orthotopic mouse models of uterine cancer, 3G3 monotherapy had significant antitumor effects in the PDGFRα-positive models (Hec-1A, Ishikawa, Spec-2) but not in the PDGFRα-negative model (OVCA432). Greater therapeutic effects were observed for 3G3 in combination with chemotherapy than for either drug alone in the PDGFRα-positive models. The antitumor effects of therapy were related to increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation and angiogenesis. These findings identify PDGFRα as an attractive target for therapeutic development in uterine cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Effect of β-blockade on lung function, exercise performance and dynamic hyperinflation in people with arterial vascular disease with and without COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Angela; Parry, Matthew; West, Malcolm A; Asher, Rebecca; Jack, Sandy; Duffy, Nick; Torella, Francesco; Walker, Paul P

    2017-01-01

    β Blockers are important treatment for ischaemic heart disease and heart failure; however, there has long been concern about their use in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to fear of symptomatic worsening of breathlessness. Despite growing evidence of safety and efficacy, they remain underused. We examined the effect of β-blockade on lung function, exercise performance and dynamic hyperinflation in a group of vascular surgical patients, a high proportion of who were expected to have COPD. People undergoing routine abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surveillance were sequentially recruited from vascular surgery clinic. They completed plethysmographically measured lung function and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing with dynamic measurement of inspiratory capacity while taking and not taking β blocker. 48 participants completed tests while taking and not taking β blockers with 38 completing all assessments successfully. 15 participants (39%) were found to have, predominantly mild and undiagnosed, COPD. People with COPD had airflow obstruction, increased airway resistance (Raw) and specific conductance (sGaw), static hyperinflation and dynamically hyperinflated during exercise. In the whole group, β-blockade led to a small fall in FEV1 (0.1 L/2.8% predicted) but did not affect Raw, sGaw, static or dynamic hyperinflation. No difference in response to β-blockade was seen in those with and without COPD. In people with AAA, β-blockade has little effect on lung function and dynamic hyperinflation in those with and without COPD. In this population, the prevalence of COPD is high and consideration should be given to case finding with spirometry. NCT02106286.

  17. Effect of Stimulation of Neurotransmitter Systems on Heart Rate Variability and β-Adrenergic Responsiveness of Erythrocytes in Outbred Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur'yanova, E V; Tryasuchev, A V; Stupin, V O; Teplyi, D L

    2017-05-01

    We studied heart rate variability and β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes and changes in these parameters in response to single administration of β-adrenoblocker propranolol (2 mg/kg) in outbred male rats against the background of activation of the noradrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems achieved by 4-fold injections maprotiline (10 mg/kg), 5-hydroxytryptophan (50 mg/kg) combined with fluoxetine (3 mg/kg), and L-DOPA (20 mg/kg) with amantadine (20 mg/kg), respectively. Stimulation of the noradrenergic system moderately enhanced the heart rhythm rigidity and β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes. In addition, it markedly augmented the moderating effect of subsequently administered propranolol on LF and VLF components in the heart rate variability and reversed the effect of propranolol on β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes. Stimulation of the serotonergic system dramatically decreased all components in the heart rate variability and pronouncedly enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes. Subsequent injection of propranolol slightly restored all components in the heart rate variability and decreased β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes to the control level. Stimulation of the dopaminergic system made the heart rate more rigid due to decrease of all components in the heart rate variability; in addition, it slightly but significantly enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes. Subsequent injection of propranolol produced no significant effects on all components in the heart rate variability and on β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes. Stimulation of noradrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems produced unidirectional and consorted effects on heart rate variability and β-adrenergic responsiveness of erythrocytes, although the magnitudes of these effects were different. Probably, the changes in the heart rate variability in rats with stimulated

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor in Israelis with severe asthma compared to non-asthmatic Israelis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachor, Joshua; Chana, Ziv; Varsano, Shabtai; Erlich, Tamar; Goldman, Elizabeth; Dror, Yigal; Yakovy, Ilana; Navon, Ruth

    2003-11-01

    It has been argued that arginine replacement in locus 16 (Arg16) of beta 2 adrenergic receptor with glycin (Gly16) increases asthma severity, while glutamin replacement in locus 27 (Gln27) with glutamic acid (Glu27) decreases it. In addition, ethnic dependency of these polymorphisms has been described, but few studies investigated its relation to asthma severity in a non-anglosaxic population. To investigate non-anglosaxic ethnic influences on beta 2AR polymorphisms and its correlations to asthma severity. Sixty-six Israeli Jewish and Arab asthmatics who had near-fatal asthma and/or severe nocturnal asthma and/or steroid-dependency were investigated for genetic polymorphisms of beta 2AR and compared to matched controls. The Jewish patients included both Ashkenazi (of European origin) and non-Ashkenazi (originating from the Middle East or North Africa). The results were compared with those of ethnically matched 113 non-asthmatic Israelis and non-asthmatic Anglo-Saxons described in the literature. We found no significant genetic differences between the asthmatics and their controls or between the various ethnic groups of our population. However, the prevalence of Glu27 was significantly lower in non-asthmatic Israelis compared to non-asthmatic Anglo-Saxons. The genetic distribution of beta 2AR polymorphisms in severe Israeli asthmatics is not different from that of non-asthmatic Israelis and therefore its clinical impact on asthma is probably minimal.

  19. [Analgesic efficacy of the ultrasound-guided blockade of the transversus abdominis plane - a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés, Javier; Marmaña Mezquita, Sandra; Abad, Alfredo; Calvo, José

    2015-01-01

    The transverse abdominal plan blockade (TAP) is a block of abdominal wall that has diffused rapidly in the clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesia for abdominal surgery. The performance of the ultrasound-guided technique has allowed the lowering of potential complications, as well as new approaches that according to the descriptions carried out and the prospective studies would make it possible to utilize the TAP in different surgical interventions; however, the results obtained in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are inconsistent. To prepare a systematic review aiming to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided TAP for different surgical interventions, as well as the indications according to the approaches and their influences. Two research approaches, one manual, and the other in Pubmed returned 28 RCT where an intervention with ultrasound-guided TAP were performed to compare the analgesic efficacy in contrast to another technique in adults, published between 2007 and October 2013, in English or Spanish, with Jadad score > 1, according to the inclusion criteria for this review. The authors analyzed independently all the RCT. The TAP have been shown to be an effective technique in colorectal surgery, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, appendectomy, donor nephrectomy, retropubic prostatectomy, and bariatric surgery. However, the data found in RCT are not conclusive, and as a result, it is necessary to develop new and well designed RCT, with enough statistical power to compare different approaches, drugs, doses, and volumes for the same intervention, aiming to answer the current questions and their effects in the habitual clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Adrenergic and muscarinergic receptors: classification, pathophysiological relevance and drug target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The rapid development of receptor pharmacology has not only proved to be of great fundamental value, but has also acquired clinical relevance. Major advances have been made in fundamental issues such as the analysis of receptor structures by means of cloning techniques; the elucidation of signal

  1. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  2. Potential diagnostic value of regional myocardial adrenergic imaging using {sup 123}I-MIBG SPECT to identify patients with Lewy body diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebasnier, Adrien; Peyronnet, Damien; Bouvard, Gerard [University Hospital Center of Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Lamotte, Guillaume; Defer, Gilles [University Hospital Center of Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Manrique, Alain [University Hospital Center of Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Cyceron PET Centre, Caen (France); Normandie Universite, Caen (France); Agostini, Denis [University Hospital Center of Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Normandie Universite, Caen (France)

    2015-01-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential diagnostic value of regional myocardial adrenergic {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging to identify patients with Lewy body diseases (LBD+). Sixty-four consecutive patients who underwent cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG SPECT to differentiate LBD+, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), from patients without LBD (LBD-) were retrospectively reviewed. A neurologist expert in memory disorders determined the final clinical diagnosis by using international clinical diagnostic criteria. Planar [heart to mediastinum ratio (HMR)] and {sup 123}I-MIBG SPECT[innervation defect score (IDS)] using the 17-segment left ventricular model (five-point scale) were obtained 4 h after the injection of {sup 123}I-MIBG on a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal HMR and IDS cut-off values to discriminate LBD+ from LBD-. Of the 64 patients, 45 (70 %) were diagnosed LBD+ (DLB, n = 27; PD, n = 18) and 19 were diagnosed LBD- (5 other dementias, 14 other parkinsonisms). The HMR and IDS of LBD+ were significantly different from those of LBD- (1.30 ± 0.21 vs 1.65 ± 0.26, p < 0.001; 39 ± 28 vs 8 ± 16, p = 0.001). The optimal HMR and IDS cut-off values to discriminate LBD+ (n = 45) from LBD- (n = 19) were 1.47 and 6/68, providing a sensitivity and specificity of 82.2 and 84.2 % and 86.7 and 73.7 %, respectively. Regional myocardial adrenergic {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging SPECT has a potential diagnostic value to identify LBD+. (orig.)

  3. Why do hypertensive patients of African ancestry respond better to calcium blockers and diuretics than to ACE inhibitors and β-adrenergic blockers? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians are encouraged to take an individualized approach when treating hypertension in patients of African ancestry, but little is known about why the individual patient may respond well to calcium blockers and diuretics, but generally has an attenuated response to drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system and to β-adrenergic blockers. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the factors associated with the differential drug response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drug therapy. Methods Using the methodology of the systematic reviews narrative synthesis approach, we sought for published or unpublished studies that could explain the differential clinical efficacy of antihypertensive drugs in patients of African ancestry. PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, African Index Medicus and the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency databases were searched without language restriction from their inception through June 2012. Results We retrieved 3,763 papers, and included 72 reports that mainly considered the 4 major classes of antihypertensive drugs, calcium blockers, diuretics, drugs that interfere with the renin-angiotensin system and β-adrenergic blockers. Pharmacokinetics, plasma renin and genetic polymorphisms did not well predict the response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drugs. An emerging view that low nitric oxide and high creatine kinase may explain individual responses to antihypertensive drugs unites previous observations, but currently clinical data are very limited. Conclusion Available data are inconclusive regarding why patients of African ancestry display the typical response to antihypertensive drugs. In lieu of biochemical or pharmacogenomic parameters, self-defined African ancestry seems the best available predictor of individual responses to antihypertensive drugs. PMID:23721258

  4. Norepinephrine-Induced Adrenergic Activation Strikingly Increased the Atrial Fibrillation Duration through β1- and α1-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Signaling in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Suita

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmias among old people. It causes serious long-term health problems affecting the quality of life. It has been suggested that the autonomic nervous system is involved in the onset and maintenance of AF in human. However, investigation of its pathogenesis and potential treatment has been hampered by the lack of suitable AF models in experimental animals.Our aim was to establish a long-lasting AF model in mice. We also investigated the role of adrenergic receptor (AR subtypes, which may be involved in the onset and duration of AF.Trans-esophageal atrial burst pacing in mice could induce AF, as previously shown, but with only a short duration (29.0 ± 8.1 sec. We found that adrenergic activation by intraperitoneal norepinephrine (NE injection strikingly increased the AF duration. It increased the duration to more than 10 minutes, i.e., by more than 20-fold (656.2 ± 104.8 sec; P<0.001. In this model, a prior injection of a specific β1-AR blocker metoprolol and an α1-AR blocker prazosin both significantly attenuated NE-induced elongation of AF. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these receptors' effects on AF, we assessed the SR Ca(2+ leak, a major trigger of AF, and consequent spontaneous SR Ca(2+ release (SCR in atrial myocytes. Consistent with the results of our in-vivo experiments, both metoprolol and prazosin significantly inhibited the NE-induced SR Ca(2+ leak and SCR. These findings suggest that both β1-AR and α1-AR may play important roles in the development of AF.We have established a long-lasting AF model in mice induced by adrenergic activation, which will be valuable in future AF study using experimental animals, such as transgenic mice. We also revealed the important role of β1- and α1-AR-mediated signaling in the development of AF through in-vivo and in-vitro experiments.

  5. CTLA4 blockade increases Th17 cells in patients with metastatic melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comin-Anduix Begonya

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Th17 cells are CD4+ cells that produce interleukin 17 (IL-17 and are potent inducers of tissue inflammation and autoimmunity. We studied the levels of this T cell subset in peripheral blood of patients treated with the anti-CTLA4 antibody tremelimumab since its major dose limiting toxicities are inflammatory and autoimmune in nature. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were collected before and after receiving tremelimumab within two clinical trials, one with tremelimumab alone (21 patients and another together with autologous dendritic cells (DC pulsed with the melanoma epitope MART-126–35 (6 patients. Cytokines were quantified directly in plasma from patients and after in vitro stimulation of PBMC. We also quantified IL-17 cytokine-producing cells by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS. Results There were no significant changes in 13 assayed cytokines, including IL-17, when analyzing plasma samples obtained from patients before and after administration of tremelimumab. However, when PBMC were activated in vitro, IL-17 cytokine in cell culture supernatant and Th17 cells, detected as IL-17-producing CD4 cells by ICS, significantly increased in post-dosing samples. There were no differences in the levels of Th17 cells between patients with or without an objective tumor response, but samples from patients with inflammatory and autoimmune toxicities during the first cycle of therapy had a significant increase in Th17 cells. Conclusion The anti-CTLA4 blocking antibody tremelimumab increases Th17 cells in peripheral blood of patients with metastatic melanoma. The relation between increases in Th17 cells and severe autoimmune toxicity after CTLA4 blockade may provide insights into the pathogenesis of anti-CTLA4-induced toxicities. Trial Registration Clinical trial registration numbers: NCT0090896 and NCT00471887

  6. Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces cardiovascular events in nonheart failure, stable patients with prior coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young; Lim, Sungmin; Lee, Kwan Yong; Park, Ha-Wook; Byeon, Jaeho; Hwang, Byung-Hee; Kim, Jin Jin; Oh, Yong-Seog; Youn, Ho-Joong; Jung, Wook Sung; Seung, Ki-Bae; Chang, Kiyuk

    2018-02-27

    The effects of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade on the clinical outcome in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) are conflicting. We evaluated the long-term effects of RAS blockers (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker) on the clinical outcomes in patients with SCAD without heart failure (HF) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent using a large-scale, multicenter, prospective cohort registry. A total of 5722 patients with SCAD were enrolled and divided into two groups according to the use of RAS blockers after PCI: RAS blocker group included 4070 patients and no RAS blocker group included 1652 patients. Exclusion criteria were left ventricular ejection fraction less than 50% and the history of HF or myocardial infarction. A major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke. During a median follow-up of 29.7 months, RAS blockers were associated with a significant reduction in the risk of MACE [adjusted hazard ratio (HR): 0.781; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.626-0.975; P=0.015] and all-cause death (adjusted HR: 0.788; 95% CI: 0.627-0.990; P=0.041) but did not affect the risk of coronary revascularization. In the propensity score matched cohort, overall findings were consistent (MACE: adjusted HR: 0.679; 95% CI: 0.514-0.897; P=0.006; all-cause death: adjusted HR: 0.723; 95% CI: 0.548-0.954; P=0.022), and the benefit of RAS blockade was maintained in all predefined subgroups. This study demonstrated that RAS blockers were effective preventive therapies for reducing long-term cardiovascular events in patients with SCAD without HF who underwent PCI.

  7. Importance of Alpha-adrenergic Receptor Subtypes in Regulating of Airways Tonus at Patients with Bronchial Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Pellumb; Ilazi, Ali; Jakupi, Arianit; Bexheti, Sadi; Islami, Hilmi

    2014-06-01

    In this work, effect of Tamsulosin hydrochloride as antagonist of alpha1A and alpha1B- adrenergic receptor and effect of Salbutamol as agonist of beta2- adrenergic receptor in patients with bronchial asthma and increased bronchial reactibility was studied. Parameters of the lung function are determined by Body plethysmography. Raw and ITGV were registered and specific resistance (SRaw) was also calculated. Tamsulosin was administered in per os way as a preparation in the form of the capsules with a brand name of "Prolosin", producer: Niche Generics Limited, Hitchin, Herts. Results gained from this research show that blockage of alpha1A and alpha1B- adrenergic receptor with Tamsulosin hydrochloride (0.4 mg and 0.8 mg in per os way) has not changed significantly (p > 0.1) the bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial tree in comparison to the inhalation of Salbutamol as agonist of beta2- adrenergic receptor (2 inh. x 0.2 mg), (p mechanism which causes reaction in patients with increased bronchial reactibility, in comparison to agonists of beta2 - adrenergic receptor which emphasizes their significant action in the reduction of specific resistance of airways.

  8. NGF blockade at early times during bone cancer development attenuates bone destruction and increases limb use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Gwen; Thompson, Michelle L; Majuta, Lisa; Fealk, Michelle N; Chartier, Stephane; Longo, Geraldine; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    Studies in animals and humans show that blockade of nerve growth factor (NGF) attenuates both malignant and nonmalignant skeletal pain. While reduction of pain is important, a largely unanswered question is what other benefits NGF blockade might confer in patients with bone cancer. Using a mouse graft model of bone sarcoma, we demonstrate that early treatment with an NGF antibody reduced tumor-induced bone destruction, delayed time to bone fracture, and increased the use of the tumor-bearing limb. Consistent with animal studies in osteoarthritis and head and neck cancer, early blockade of NGF reduced weight loss in mice with bone sarcoma. In terms of the extent and time course of pain relief, NGF blockade also reduced pain 40% to 70%, depending on the metric assessed. Importantly, this analgesic effect was maintained even in animals with late-stage disease. Our results suggest that NGF blockade immediately upon detection of tumor metastasis to bone may help preserve the integrity and use, delay the time to tumor-induced bone fracture, and maintain body weight. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Increased Atrial β-Adrenergic Receptors and GRK-2 Gene Expression Can Play a Fundamental Role in Heart Failure After Repair of Congenital Heart Disease with Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcela Silva; Carmona, Fabio; Vicente, Walter V A; Manso, Paulo H; Mata, Karina M; Celes, Mara Rúbia; Campos, Erica C; Ramos, Simone G

    2017-04-01

    Surgeries to correct congenital heart diseases are increasing in Brazil and worldwide. However, even with the advances in surgical techniques and perfusion, some cases, especially the more complex ones, can develop heart failure and death. A retrospective study of patients who underwent surgery for correction of congenital heart diseases with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a university tertiary-care hospital that died, showed infarction in different stages of evolution and scattered microcalcifications in the myocardium, even without coronary obstruction. CPB is a process routinely used during cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease. However, CPB has been related to increased endogenous catecholamines that can lead to major injuries in cardiomyocytes. The mechanisms involved are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alterations induced in the β-adrenergic receptors and GRK-2 present in atrial cardiomyocytes of infants with congenital heart disease undergoing surgical repair with CPB and correlate the alterations with functional and biochemical markers of ischemia/myocardial injury. The study consisted of right atrial biopsies of infants undergoing surgical correction in HC-FMRPUSP. Thirty-three cases were selected. Atrial biopsies were obtained at the beginning of CPB (group G1) and at the end of CPB (group G2). Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis were conducted to evaluate the expression of β 1 , β 2 -adrenergic receptors, and GRK-2 in atrial myocardium. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and biochemical analysis (N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), lactate, and cardiac troponin I). We observed an increase in serum lactate, NT-proBNP, and troponin I at the end of CPB indicating tissue hypoxia/ischemia. Even without major clinical consequences in cardiac function, these alterations were followed by a significant increase in gene expression of β 1 and β 2

  10. Efficacy and safety of sugammadex versus neostigmine in reversing neuromuscular blockade in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristovska, Ana-Marija; Duch, Patricia; Allingstrup, Mikkel; Afshari, Arash

    2017-08-14

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as neostigmine, have traditionally been used for reversal of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents. However, these drugs have significant limitations, such as indirect mechanisms of reversal, limited and unpredictable efficacy, and undesirable autonomic responses. Sugammadex is a selective relaxant-binding agent specifically developed for rapid reversal of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium. Its potential clinical benefits include fast and predictable reversal of any degree of block, increased patient safety, reduced incidence of residual block on recovery, and more efficient use of healthcare resources. The main objective of this review was to compare the efficacy and safety of sugammadex versus neostigmine in reversing neuromuscular blockade caused by non-depolarizing neuromuscular agents in adults. We searched the following databases on 2 May 2016: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE (WebSPIRS Ovid SP), Embase (WebSPIRS Ovid SP), and the clinical trials registries www.controlled-trials.com, clinicaltrials.gov, and www.centerwatch.com. We re-ran the search on 10 May 2017. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) irrespective of publication status, date of publication, blinding status, outcomes published, or language. We included adults, classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I to IV, who received non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents for an elective in-patient or day-case surgical procedure. We included all trials comparing sugammadex versus neostigmine that reported recovery times or adverse events. We included any dose of sugammadex and neostigmine and any time point of study drug administration. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts to identify trials for eligibility, examined articles for eligibility, abstracted data, assessed the articles, and excluded obviously irrelevant reports. We resolved

  11. Prostaglandin (PG) E3 synthesis elicted by adrenergic stimuli in guinea-pig trachea (GPT) is mediated primarily by B2 adrenergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadel, G.L.; Malik, K.U.; Lew, D.B. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The purpose of this study was to examine arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and to characterize the type of adrenergic receptor (AR) involved in the production of the major metabolite of this fatty acid. ({sup 14}C)AA was incubated with GPT-rings and the radiolabelled products were extracted and separated by TLC method. The medium was also assayed for radiolabelled immunoreactive PG's (iPG's) and leukotrienes (LT) B4 and C4 by RIA or Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) after exposure to various AR agonists. ({sup 14}C)AA was incorporated into GPT-rings and metabolized mainly into iPGE2 and smaller amounts into PGF2{alpha}. Trace amounts of PGD2 and 6-keto-PGF1{alpha} but not LTB4 or LTC4 were detected by RIA and/or EIA. Incubation of GPT rings for 15 minutes with isoproterenol and salbutamol resulted in a significant increase of PGE2 synthesis (optimum conc: 10{sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}7}M respectively). In contrast, dobutamine, norepinephrine, phenylnephrine and xylazine (up to 10{sup {minus}6}M) did not significantly increase PGE2 production. Isoproterenol-induced iPGE2 production was inhibited by a selective {beta}2 antagonist, butoxamine (70%: 10{sup {minus}7}M, 91%: 10{sup {minus}6}M) and somewhat reduced by {beta}1 antagonists practolol and metoprolol (30-64%:10{sup {minus}6}M). These data suggest that isoproterenol induced iPGE2 synthesis is primarily mediated via activation of {beta}2 adrenergic receptor.

  12. Regulation of β-adrenergic control of heart rate by GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) and tetrahydrobiopterin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlam, David; Herring, Neil; Douglas, Gillian; De Bono, Joseph P.; Li, Dan; Danson, Edward J.; Tatham, Amy; Lu, Cheih-Ju; Jennings, Katie A.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Casadei, Barbara; Paterson, David J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Clinical markers of cardiac autonomic function, such as heart rate and response to exercise, are important predictors of cardiovascular risk. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for enzymes with roles in cardiac autonomic function, including tyrosine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase. Synthesis of BH4 is regulated by GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), encoded by GCH1. Recent clinical studies report associations between GCH1 variants and increased heart rate, but the mechanistic importance of GCH1 and BH4 in autonomic function remains unclear. We investigate the effect of BH4 deficiency on the autonomic regulation of heart rate in the hph-1 mouse model of BH4 deficiency. Methods and results In the hph-1 mouse, reduced cardiac GCH1 expression, GTPCH enzymatic activity, and BH4 were associated with increased resting heart rate; blood pressure was not different. Exercise training decreased resting heart rate, but hph-1 mice retained a relative tachycardia. Vagal nerve stimulation in vitro induced bradycardia equally in hph-1 and wild-type mice both before and after exercise training. Direct atrial responses to carbamylcholine were equal. In contrast, propranolol treatment normalized the resting tachycardia in vivo. Stellate ganglion stimulation and isoproterenol but not forskolin application in vitro induced a greater tachycardic response in hph-1 mice. β1-adrenoceptor protein was increased as was the cAMP response to isoproterenol stimulation. Conclusion Reduced GCH1 expression and BH4 deficiency cause tachycardia through enhanced β-adrenergic sensitivity, with no effect on vagal function. GCH1 expression and BH4 are novel determinants of cardiac autonomic regulation that may have important roles in cardiovascular pathophysiology. PMID:22241166

  13. Síndrome de Tako-Tsubo em decorrência de bloqueio neuromuscular residual: relato de caso Síndrome de Tako-Tsubo como consecuencia de bloqueo neuromuscular residual: relato de caso Tako-Tsubo syndrome secondary to residual neuromuscular blockade: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guilherme Cunha Cruvinel

    2008-12-01

    residual neuromuscular blockade. In the post-anesthetic care unit the patient developed somnolence, tachycardia, hypertension, and severe respiratory acidosis. After reintubation the patient evolved for cardiac arrest with electrical activity without a pulse, which was reverted with the administration of adrenaline and external cardiac massage. In the postoperative period the patient presented elevation of the ST segment, increased troponin, and left ventricular medial-apical akinesia with an estimated ejection fraction of 30%. Cardiac catheterization showed absence of significant atheromatous lesions in the coronary vessels, and severe disruption of the systolic function with inferior and antero-septo-apical akinesia and compensatory basal hypercontractility. The patient had complete functional recovery with the treatment instituted. CONCLUSIONS: Residual neuromuscular blockade associated with diaphragmatic paralysis and possible pulmonary atelectasis leading to respiratory failure, hypercapnia, and adrenergic discharge triggered the Tako-Tsubo syndrome with severe clinical repercussion.

  14. Beta-adrenergic control of plasma glucose and free fatty acid levels in the air-breathing African catfish Clarias gariepinus Burchell 1822

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heeswijk, JCF; Vianen, GJ; van den Thillart, GEEJM; Zaagsma, J

    In several water-breathing fish species, P-adrenergic receptor stimulation by noradrenaline leads to a decrease in plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels, as opposed to an increase in air-breathing mammals. We hypothesised that this change in adrenergic control is related to the mode of breathing.

  15. Dexmedetomidine: An Adjuvant Making Large Inroads into Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The introduction of newer more selective α-2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine has made a revolution in the field of anesthesia owing to its varied application. The aim of the current review is to highlight the various clinical and pharmacological aspects of dexmedetomidine in daily routine practice of anesthesiology and ...

  16. Dexmedetomidine: An Adjuvant Making Large Inroads into Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Punjab, India. E‑mail: sukhminder_bajwa2001@ yahoo.com. Introduction. The continued quest for a novel sedating agent for intensive care and need for drugs to blunt the stress response to the surgical stimulus has led to the increasing use of α‑2 adrenergic agonists in these clinical settings. These drugs have a favorable ...

  17. Functional response of white rats isolated heart to the stimulation of adrenergic receptors after gamma-irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonenko, A.N.; Lobanok, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    It was investigated the effects of acute gamma-irradiation on bio mechanical activity of rats heart isolated by Langendorf's method in early and delayed terms after exposure to gamma-rays. Intra ventricle pressure and the rate of its growth, volumetric rate of coronal flow, frequency of heart contraction were registered. Stimulation of alpha-adrenergic receptors was conducted by means of specific agonist mesatone and stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors was made by means of isoprenaline. The study has shown that acute irradiation of rats caused the decrease of both contractile ability and relaxation of myocardium in a 10 days after exposure. In delayed period bio mechanical activity of isolated heart was restored. Functional response of heart to the stimulation of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors was decreased in all terms of investigation

  18. Renal content and output of epidermal growth factor in long-term adrenergic agonist-treated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates the renal and urinary levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rats under long-term treatment with alpha- or beta-adrenergic agonists. Urine samples were obtained on days 7, 14 and 21, and renal tissue samples on day 21. EGF was quantified by ELISA and tissue sections were...... material in the distal tubules. Concomitantly, reduced levels of EGF and EGF mRNA were observed, and also the urinary levels of EGF were reduced. Together, these observations indicate alpha-adrenergic treatment to affect the distal tubules. Treatment with the beta-adrenergic agonist did not change...... fractional kidney weight, but initially the urinary excretion of EGF was reduced. The data add further evidence to the suggestion that activity of the sympathetic nervous system influences renal homeostasis of EGF, either directly or indirectly through renal histopathological changes....

  19. Interaction between Antagonist of Cannabinoid Receptor and Antagonist of Adrenergic Receptor on Anxiety in Male Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Komaki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety is among the most common and treatable mental disorders. Adrenergic and cannabinoid systems have an important role in the neurobiology of anxiety. The elevated plus-maze (EPM has broadly been used to investigate anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds. The present study investigated the effects of intraperitoneal (IP injection of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist (AM251 in the presence of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist (Prazosin on rat behavior in the EPM. Methods: In this study, the data were obtained from male Wistar rat, which weighing 200- 250 g. Animal behavior in EPM were videotaped and saved in computer for 10 min after IP injection of saline, AM251 (0.3 mg/kg, Prazosin (0.3 mg/kg and AM251 + Prazosin, subsequently scored for conventional indices of anxiety. During the test period, the number of open and closed arms entries, the percentage of entries into the open arms of the EPM, and the spent time in open and closed arms were recorded. Diazepam was considered as a positive control drug with anxiolytic effect (0.3, 0.6, 1.2 mg/kg. Results: Diazepam increased the number of open arm entries and the percentage of spent time on the open arms. IP injection of AM251 before EPM trial decreased open arms exploration and open arm entry. Whereas, Prazosin increased open arms exploration and open arm entry. This study showed that both substances in simultaneous injection have conflicting effects on the responses of each of these two compounds in a single injection. Discussion: Injection of CB1 receptor antagonist may have an anxiogenic profile in rat, whereas adrenergic antagonist has an anxiolytic effect. Further investigations are essential for better understanding of anxiolytic and anxiogenic properties and neurobiological mechanisms of action and probable interactions of the two systems.

  20. Alpha-adrenergic stimulation of corticotropin secretion by a specific central mechanism in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Damluji, S; Perry, L; Tomlin, S; Bouloux, P; Grossman, A; Rees, L H; Besser, G M

    1987-01-01

    In a double-blind study in normal subjects, methoxamine, a highly selective agonist at alpha-1-adrenoceptors, significantly increased circulating ACTH and cortisol. The stimulant effect of methoxamine on cortisol secretion was dose dependent in the range 3.5-7 micrograms/kg/min, was abolished by concomitant administration of the strong alpha-1-adrenergic (and weak H1) antagonist thymoxamine but unaffected by the antihistamine, chlorpheniramine. In order to test whether the action of methoxamine on ACTH secretion was exerted centrally or peripherally, the effects of norepinephrine (NE), an alpha-1-agonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, were studied. Doses of NE (1-12 micrograms/min) that increased systolic blood pressure by amounts similar to the changes produced by methoxamine, did not result in any rise in plasma cortisol in normal subjects. The effect of methoxamine, which is more lipid soluble than NE, on plasma ACTH and cortisol, appears to be exerted on the CNS and not at the pituitary or via nonspecific peripheral mechanisms. In addition to its water solubility, NE differs from methoxamine in its beta-1-, beta-2- and alpha-2-agonist actions. However, prenalterol (2 mg) and salbutamol (250 micrograms), respectively beta-1- and beta-2-adrenergic agonist drugs, had no effect on the secretion of ACTH or cortisol and the alpha-2-antagonist yohimbine in an effective dose did not unmask a stimulant effect of intravenous NE on plasma cortisol. At high infusion rates, NE significantly inhibited cortisol secretion. Stimulation of central alpha-1-adrenergic mechanisms results in secretion of ACTH in man, presumably by increased release of a corticotropin-releasing factor.

  1. The role of basolateral amygdala adrenergic receptors in hippocampus dependent spatial memory in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafaei A.L.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: There are extensive evidences indicating that the noradrenergic system of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA is involved in memory processes. The present study investigated the role of the BLA adrenergic receptors (ARs in hippocampus dependent spatial memory in place avoidance task in male rat. Material and Methods: Long Evans rats (n=150 were trained to avoid footshock in a 60° segment while foraging for scattered food on a circular (80-cm diameter arena. The rats were injected bilaterally in the BLA specific ARS (Adrenergic receptors agonist norepinephrine (NE, 0.5 and 1 µg/µl and specific β-ARs antagonist propranolol (PRO, 0.5 and 1 µg/µl before acquisition, after training or before retrieval of the place avoidance task. Control rats received vehicle at the same volume. The learning in a single 30-min session was assessed 24h later by a 30-min extinction trial in which the time to first entrance and the number of entrances to the shocked area measured the avoidance memory. Results: Acquisition and consolidation were enhanced and impaired significantly by NE and PRO when the drugs were injected 10 min before or immediately after training, respectively. In contrast, neither NE nor PRO influenced animal performances when injected before retention testing. Conclusion: Findings of this study indicates that adrenergic system of the BLA plays an important role in regulation of memory storage and show further evidences for the opinion that the BLA plays an important role in integrating hormonal and neurotransmitter influences on memory storage.

  2. The slow afterhyperpolarization: a target of β1-adrenergic signaling in hippocampus-dependent memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ouyang, Ming; Ganellin, C Robin; Thomas, Steven A

    2013-03-13

    In rodents, adrenergic signaling by norepinephrine (NE) in the hippocampus is required for the retrieval of intermediate-term memory. NE promotes retrieval via the stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors, the production of cAMP, and the activation of both protein kinase A (PKA) and the exchange protein activated by cAMP. However, a final effector for this signaling pathway has not been identified. Among the many targets of adrenergic signaling in the hippocampus, the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) is an appealing candidate because its reduction by β1 signaling enhances excitatory neurotransmission. Here we report that reducing the sAHP is critical for the facilitation of retrieval by NE. Direct blockers of the sAHP, as well as blockers of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium influx that activates the sAHP, rescue retrieval in mutant mice lacking either NE or the β1 receptor. Complementary to this, a facilitator of L-type calcium influx impairs retrieval in wild-type mice. In addition, we examined the role of NE in the learning-related reduction of the sAHP observed ex vivo in hippocampal slices. We find that this reduction in the sAHP depends on the induction of persistent PKA activity specifically in conditioned slices. Interestingly, this persistent PKA activity is induced by NE/β1 signaling during slice preparation rather than during learning. These observations suggest that the reduction in the sAHP may not be present autonomously in vivo, but is likely induced by neuromodulatory input, which is consistent with the idea that NE is required in vivo for reduction of the sAHP during memory retrieval.

  3. Sepsis causes presynaptic histamine H3 and alpha2-adrenergic dysfunction in canine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zao-Qin; Bose, Deepak; Jacobs, Han; Light, R Bruce; Mink, Steven N

    2002-11-01

    Histamine H3 receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors are presynaptic receptors that modulate norepinephrine (NE) release from sympathetic nerves innervating the cardiovascular system. We previously showed that cardiac H3 receptors are activated in sepsis, and that this activation leads to a decrease in the adrenergic response (AR) [J. Appl. Physiol. 85 (1998) 1693-1701] H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors appear to be coupled to GTP binding regulatory proteins (G) that modulate transmitter release by reducing calcium current into the nerve terminals through neuronal calcium channels. There may also be interaction between H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors on AR that may occur either at the receptor or a more downstream level. In the present study, we examined the effect of septic plasma on AR in a canine ventricular preparation in which field stimulation was used to produce AR. We determined whether there was interaction between H(3)-receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors and tested whether H3 activation would attenuate the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects of clonidine and yohimbine, respectively. We also determined whether the mechanism by which septic plasma decreases the adrenergic response involves inactivation of an inhibitory G protein and used pertussis toxin (PTX) to assess this effect. We found that septic plasma attenuated AR produced by field stimulation, and that this decrease was mediated by a PTX sensitive inhibitory G protein. H3 activation also attenuated the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects on adrenergic activation as compared with nonseptic plasma. We conclude that presynaptic sympathetic dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  4. Enhanced adenylate cyclase activity of turkey erythrocytes following treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J R; Nambi, P; Sibley, D R; Lefkowitz, R J

    1984-12-15

    The turkey erythrocyte contains a beta 1-adrenergic receptor-linked adenylate cyclase system. We have examined the effects of pretreatment with receptor antagonists on adenylate cyclase activity and the individual components in the pathway of enzyme activation in this system. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is increased by 30% (P less than 0.01) over control in membranes derived from cells preincubated with the antagonist propranolol. The effect is stereospecific and dose-related with a EC50 of 100 nM for the (-) isomer. The time course of effect is rapid being complete by 90 min. Non-receptor mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by manganese ion, forskolin and NaF is similarly enhanced following propranolol pretreatment. Sensitization of adenylate cyclase activity also occurs following pretreatment with a number of antagonists but is not seen after preincubation with pindolol or practolol. Quantitation of beta-adrenergic receptor (R) density using [125I]cyanopindolol indicates no difference between membranes derived from control and antagonist pretreated cells. Coupling of R with the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (N) as assessed by high affinity agonist binding is unchanged following pretreatment. The efficacy of 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate Gpp(NH)p in producing a shift of agonist binding curves associated with destabilization of high affinity H-R-N complexes, is also the same (EC50 = 0.2 microM) in membranes from control and antagonist treated cells. The isoproterenol stimulated rate of release of [3H]GDP from membranes preloaded with [3H]GTP as an index of formation of an active form of the N protein is similarly unaffected by antagonist preincubation. We conclude that the mechanism of the observed sensitization of turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase by beta-adrenergic antagonists is receptor mediated and likely involves facilitation of N interaction with the catalytic subunit of the enzyme.

  5. Effect of TIM-3 Blockade on the Immunophenotype and Cytokine Profile of Murine Uterine NK Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Tripathi

    Full Text Available NK cells are the most abundant lymphocyte population in the feto-maternal interface during gestation. The uterine NK cells (uNK are transient, have a unique immunophenotype and produce a number of cytokines. These cytokines play an important role in establishment and maintenance of vascular remodeling and tolerance associated with successful pregnancy. The uNK cells also express TIM-3 during gestation and blockade of TIM-3 expression results in fetal loss in mice. In this study we determined the effect of TIM-3 blockade on uNK cells. Specifically we observed surface receptor phenotype and cytokine production by uNK cells following TIM-3 blockade. Our results show that TIM-3 plays a role in regulating the uNK cells and contributes to the maintenance of tolerance at the feto-maternal interface.

  6. Ultrasound guided intercostobrachial nerve blockade in patients with persistent pain after breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Duriaud, Helle M; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) affects 25 - 60% of breast cancer survivors and damage to the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) has been implicated as the cause of this predominantly neuropathic pain. Local anesthetic blockade of the ICBN could provide clues...... determined the sonoanatomy of the ICBN and part 2 examined effects of the ultrasound-guided ICBN blockade in patients with PPBCS. SETTING: Section for Surgical Pathophysiology at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. METHODS: Part 1: Sixteen unoperated, pain free breast cancer patients underwent systematic...... to pathophysiological mechanisms as well as aiding diagnosis and treatment of PPBCS but has never been attempted. OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of ICBN blockade and assess its effects on pain and sensory function in patients with PPBCS. STUDY DESIGN: This prospective pilot study was performed in 2 parts: Part 1...

  7. The effect of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on the alpha-adrenoceptor blockade produced by phenoxybenzamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, A; Sharma, P L

    1977-05-01

    The effect of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on the irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor blockade produced by phenoxybenzamine was studied in dogs. The pressor effects of adrenaline were revived after the inhibition by the alpha-receptor block by (+/-) propranolol, (-) INPEA, (+/-) MJ 1999 and (+/-) butoxamine. The enantiomers (+) propranolol and (+) INPEA were ineffective in this regard. (+/-) Practolol also did not revive the pressor effect of the amines. The alpha-receptor mediated effect of the amines, in the nictitating membrana-receptor blockade. It is concluded that (1) blockade of the peripheral (beta-2) receptors is essential for the revival of the pressor effects, (2) local anesthetic effect of the beta-antagonists is not involved. Further work using a series of doses of agonists and antagonists of alpha-and beta-receptors is indicated to clarify the nature of this drug-interaction.

  8. Ultrasound Guided Intercostobrachial Nerve Blockade in Patients with Persistent Pain after Breast Cancer Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Duriaud, Helle M; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    to pathophysiological mechanisms as well as aiding diagnosis and treatment of PPBCS but has never been attempted. OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of ICBN blockade and assess its effects on pain and sensory function in patients with PPBCS. STUDY DESIGN: This prospective pilot study was performed in 2 parts: Part 1......BACKGROUND: Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) affects 25 - 60% of breast cancer survivors and damage to the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) has been implicated as the cause of this predominantly neuropathic pain. Local anesthetic blockade of the ICBN could provide clues...... determined the sonoanatomy of the ICBN and part 2 examined effects of the ultrasound-guided ICBN blockade in patients with PPBCS. SETTING: Section for Surgical Pathophysiology at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. METHODS: Part 1: Sixteen unoperated, pain free breast cancer patients underwent systematic...

  9. Current hot spot in the spin-valley blockade in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2013-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of the spin-valley blockade transport effect in a double quantum dot defined in a straight carbon nanotube. We find that intervalley scattering due to short-range impurities completely lifts the spin-valley blockade and induces a large leakage current in a certain confined range of the external magnetic field vector. This current hot spot emerges due to different effective magnetic fields acting on the spin-valley qubit states of the two quantum dots. Our predictions are compared to a recent measurement [F. Pei , Nat. Nanotech.1748-338710.1038/nnano.2012.160 7, 630 (2012)]. We discuss the implications for blockade-based schemes for qubit initialization/readout and motion sensing of nanotube-based mechanical resonators.

  10. Ventricular action potential adaptation to regular exercise: role of β-adrenergic and KATP channel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinrui; Fitts, Robert H

    2017-08-01

    Regular exercise training is known to affect the action potential duration (APD) and improve heart function, but involvement of β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) subtypes and/or the ATP-sensitive K + (K ATP ) channel is unknown. To address this, female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to voluntary wheel-running or control groups; they were anesthetized after 6-8 wk of training, and myocytes were isolated. Exercise training significantly increased APD of apex and base myocytes at 1 Hz and decreased APD at 10 Hz. Ca 2+ transient durations reflected the changes in APD, while Ca 2+ transient amplitudes were unaffected by wheel running. The nonselective β-AR agonist isoproterenol shortened the myocyte APD, an effect reduced by wheel running. The isoproterenol-induced shortening of APD was largely reversed by the selective β 1 -AR blocker atenolol, but not the β 2 -AR blocker ICI 118,551, providing evidence that wheel running reduced the sensitivity of the β 1 -AR. At 10 Hz, the K ATP channel inhibitor glibenclamide prolonged the myocyte APD more in exercise-trained than control rats, implicating a role for this channel in the exercise-induced APD shortening at 10 Hz. A novel finding of this work was the dual importance of altered β 1 -AR responsiveness and K ATP channel function in the training-induced regulation of APD. Of physiological importance to the beating heart, the reduced response to adrenergic agonists would enhance cardiac contractility at resting rates, where sympathetic drive is low, by prolonging APD and Ca 2+ influx; during exercise, an increase in K ATP channel activity would shorten APD and, thus, protect the heart against Ca 2+ overload or inadequate filling. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our data demonstrated that regular exercise prolonged the action potential and Ca 2+ transient durations in myocytes isolated from apex and base regions at 1-Hz and shortened both at 10-Hz stimulation. Novel findings were that wheel running shifted the β-adrenergic

  11. Exercise training modulates functional sympatholysis and alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in hypertensive and normotensive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Gliemann Hybholt, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension is linked to an increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity and reduced tissue perfusion. We investigated the role of exercise training on functional sympatholysis and postjunctional α-adrenergic responsiveness in individuals with essential hypertension. Leg haemodynamics...... were measured before and after 8 weeks of aerobic training (3-4 times/week) in 8 hypertensive (47 ± 2 years) and 8 normotensive untrained individuals (46 ± 1 years) during arterial tyramine infusion, arterial ATP infusion and/or one-legged knee extensions. Before training, exercise hypaeremia and leg...... vascular conductance (LVC) were lower in the hypertensive individuals (P Training lowered blood pressure in the hypertensive individuals (P

  12. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong

    2011-01-01

    -occupied receptor. The β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β(2)AR and nucleotide-free Gs...... of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling...

  13. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in β-Adrenergic Signaling in Cardiomyocytes from Mice with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Llano-Diez

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is associated with prolonged stress and hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and afflicted subjects are prone to develop cardiovascular disease. Under normal conditions, the cardiomyocyte response to acute β-adrenergic stimulation partly depends on increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here we investigated the interplay between beta-adrenergic signaling, ROS and cardiac contractility using freshly isolated cardiomyocytes and whole hearts from two mouse models with the metabolic syndrome (high-fat diet and ob/ob mice. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes of mice with the metabolic syndrome would experience excessive ROS levels that trigger cellular dysfunctions. Fluorescent dyes and confocal microscopy were used to assess mitochondrial ROS production, cellular Ca2+ handling and contractile function in freshly isolated adult cardiomyocytes. Immunofluorescence, western blot and enzyme assay were used to study protein biochemistry. Unexpectedly, our results point towards decreased cardiac ROS signaling in a stable, chronic phase of the metabolic syndrome because: β-adrenergic-induced increases in the amplitude of intracellular Ca2+ signals were insensitive to antioxidant treatment; mitochondrial ROS production showed decreased basal rate and smaller response to β-adrenergic stimulation. Moreover, control hearts and hearts with the metabolic syndrome showed similar basal levels of ROS-mediated protein modification, but only control hearts showed increases after β-adrenergic stimulation. In conclusion, in contrast to the situation in control hearts, the cardiomyocyte response to acute β-adrenergic stimulation does not involve increased mitochondrial ROS production in a stable, chronic phase of the metabolic syndrome. This can be seen as a beneficial adaptation to prevent excessive ROS levels.

  14. Resting sympathetic nerve activity is related to age, sex and arterial pressure but not to α2-adrenergic receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Azhar; West, Robert M; Galloway, Stacey L; Drinkhill, Mark J; Mary, David A S G; Greenwood, John P; Ball, Stephen G

    2010-10-01

    Sympathetic nerve hyperactivity has been associated with hypertension and heart failure and their cardiovascular complications. The α2-adrenergic receptors have been proposed to play a prominent role in the control of sympathetic neural output, and their malfunction to constitute a potential central mechanism for sympathetic hyperactivity of essential hypertension. Reports on the relationship between variant alleles of α2-adrenergic receptor subtypes and sympathetic drive or its effects, however, have not been consistent. Therefore, this study was planned to test the hypothesis that variant alleles of subtypes of α2-adrenergic receptors are associated with raised muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in man. One hundred and seventy-two individuals, with a wide range of arterial pressure, were prospectively examined. Resting MSNA was quantified from multiunit bursts and from single units, and α2-adrenergic receptor subtypes were genotyped from DNA extracted from leucocytes and quantified by spectrophotometry. No significant relationships between variant alleles of any of the α2A, α2B or α2C subtypes and raised muscle sympathetic activity were found. In contrast, MSNA showed a marked significant curvilinear relationship with age and systolic pressure; sex had a small but statistically significant effect. The α2-adrenergic receptor variants had a similar frequency when hypertensive and normotensive individuals were compared. Variant alleles of three α2-adrenergic receptor subtypes were not related to resting muscle sympathetic nerve hyperactivity, indicating that their functional differences shown in vitro are not reflected in sympathetic activity in man. Age had a marked effect likely influencing arterial pressure through sympathetic activity.

  15. Endothelin-A receptor blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental renovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Silvia; Hall, John E; Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-07-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent renal vasoconstrictor with mitogenic properties, is upregulated by ischemia and has been shown to induce renal injury via the ET-A receptor. The potential role of ET-A blockade in chronic renovascular disease (RVD) has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. We hypothesized that chronic ET-A receptor blockade would preserve renal hemodynamics and slow the progression of injury of the stenotic kidney in experimental RVD. Renal artery stenosis, a major cause of chronic RVD, was induced in 14 pigs and observed for 6 wk. In half of the pigs, chronic ET-A blockade was initiated (RVD+ET-A, 0.75 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) at the onset of RVD. Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and perfusion were quantified in vivo after 6 wk using multidetector computer tomography. Renal microvascular density was quantified ex vivo using three-dimensional microcomputer tomography, and growth factors, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis were determined in renal tissue. The degree of stenosis and increase in blood pressure were similar in RVD and RVD+ET-A pigs. Renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density were decreased in the stenotic kidney but preserved by ET-A blockade, accompanied by increased renal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and downstream mediators such as phosphorilated-Akt, angiopoietins, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. ET-A blockade also reduced renal apoptosis, inflammation, and glomerulosclerosis. This study shows that ET-A blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental RVD and preserves renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density in the stenotic kidney. These results support a role for ET-1/ET-A as a potential therapeutic target in chronic RVD.

  16. Intralipid Therapy for Inadvertent Peripheral Nervous System Blockade Resulting from Local Anesthetic Overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although local anesthetics have an acceptable safety profile, significant morbidity and mortality have been associated with their use. Inadvertent intravascular injection of local anesthetics and/or the use of excessive doses have been the most frequent causes of local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST. Furthermore, excessive doses of local anesthetics injected locally into the tissues may lead to inadvertent peripheral nerve infiltration and blockade. Successful treatment of LAST with intralipid has been reported. We describe a case of local anesthetic overdose that resulted in LAST and in unintentional blockade of peripheral nerves of the lower extremity; both effects completely resolved with administration of intralipid.

  17. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of the nonlocal conductance in normalmetal/superconductor hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolenda, Stefan; Wolf, Michael J.; Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In normalmetal/superconductor hybrid structures nonlocal conductance is determined by crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) and elastic cotunneling (EC). This was investigated recently both experimentally and theoretically. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of EC and CAR was predicted theoretically. Here we report on experimental investigations of these effects. We found signatures of dynamical Coulomb blockade in local and nonlocal conductance in the normal state. In the superconducting state, we find s-shaped nonlocal differential conductance curves as a function of bias applied on both contacts. These curves were observed for bias voltages both below and above the gap. We compare our results to theory.

  18. The effect of RAAS blockade on markers of renal tubular damage in diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine; Rossing, Kasper; Hess, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) affects both the glomerulus and tubules. We aimed to investigate the effect of irbesartan on the tubular markers: urinary (u) neutrophil gelatinase associated protein (NGAL), Kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM1) and liver-fatty acid-binding p......Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) affects both the glomerulus and tubules. We aimed to investigate the effect of irbesartan on the tubular markers: urinary (u) neutrophil gelatinase associated protein (NGAL), Kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM1) and liver-fatty acid...

  19. Effect of axillary blockade on regional cerebral blood flow during static handgrip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, D B; Friberg, L; Mitchell, J H

    1991-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined at rest and during static handgrip before and after regional blockade with lidocaine. A fast rotating single photon emission computer tomograph system with 133Xe inhalation was used at orbitomeatal plane (OM) +2.5 and +6.5 cm in eight subjects. M...... static handgrip, there was no increase in rCBF after partial sensory and motor blockade. Thus bilateral activation occurs in the premotor and motor sensory cortex during static handgrip, and this activation requires neural feedback from the contracting muscles....

  20. Influence of pudendal nerve blockade on stress relaxation in the female urethra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thind, P; Bagi, P; Mieszczak, C

    1996-01-01

    dilatation, P alpha and P beta are pressure decay, and tau alpha and tau beta are time constants. The time constants have previously proved independent of the way the dilatation is performed. The urethral stress relaxation obtained in 10 healthy women before and after pudendal nerve blockade was analysed...... by the mathematical model and the pressure parameters and time constants determined. The fast time constant, tau beta, was reduced by the nerve blockade, whereas tau alpha was unaffected, however, both P alpha and P beta were reduced. No single stress relaxation parameter can therefore be related to the muscle...

  1. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Chakrabarti

    Full Text Available Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a cells (Id2-kd N2a failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy.

  2. Nilotinib Enhances Tumor Angiogenesis and Counteracts VEGFR2 Blockade in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Xenograft Model with Desmoplastic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zafarnia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-targeted therapies predominantly affect nascent, immature tumor vessels. Since platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR blockade inhibits vessel maturation and thus increases the amount of immature tumor vessels, we evaluated whether the combined PDGFR inhibition by nilotinib and VEGFR2 blockade by DC101 has synergistic therapy effects in a desmoplastic breast cancer xenograft model. In this context, besides immunohistological evaluation, molecular ultrasound imaging with BR55, the clinically used VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles, was applied to monitor VEGFR2-positive vessels noninvasively and to assess the therapy effects on tumor angiogenesis. DC101 treatment alone inhibited tumor angiogenesis, resulting in lower tumor growth and in significantly lower vessel density than in the control group after 14 days of therapy. In contrast, nilotinib inhibited vessel maturation but enhanced VEGFR2 expression, leading to markedly increased tumor volumes and a significantly higher vessel density. The combination of both drugs led to an almost similar tumor growth as in the DC101 treatment group, but VEGFR2 expression and microvessel density were higher and comparable to the controls. Further analyses revealed significantly higher levels of tumor cell–derived VEGF in nilotinib-treated tumors. In line with this, nilotinib, especially in low doses, induced an upregulation of VEGF and IL-6 mRNA in the tumor cells in vitro, thus providing an explanation for the enhanced angiogenesis observed in nilotinib-treated tumors in vivo. These findings suggest that nilotinib inhibits vessel maturation but counteracts the effects of antiangiogenic co-therapy by enhancing VEGF expression by the tumor cells and stimulating tumor angiogenesis.

  3. Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists for the prevention of shivering following general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sharon R; Nicholson, Amanda; Smith, Andrew F; Alderson, Phil

    2015-08-10

    Shivering after general anaesthesia is common. It is unpleasant but can also have adverse physiological effects. Alpha-2 (α-2) adrenergic agonist receptors, which can lead to reduced sympathetic activity and central regulation of vasoconstrictor tone, are a group of drugs that have been used to try to prevent postoperative shivering. To assess the following: the effects of α-2 agonists on the prevention of shivering and subsequent complications after general anaesthesia in people undergoing surgery; the effects of α-2 agonists on the risk of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia; and whether any adverse effects are associated with these interventions. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and EMBASE on 13 June 2014. Our search terms were relevant to the review question and limited to studies that assessed shivering or hypothermia. We also carried out searches of clinical trials registers, and forward and backward citation tracking. We considered all randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized studies, and cluster-randomized studies with adult participants undergoing surgery with general anaesthesia in which an α-2 agonist was compared with another α-2 agonist or a placebo for the prevention of shivering. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data, consulting a third review author in the case of disagreements. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures, including an assessment of risk of bias and use of GRADEpro software to interpret findings. We included 20 studies with 1401 surgical participants comparing an α-2 agonist against a control. Thirteen studies compared clonidine with a control, whilst seven compared dexmedetomidine with a control. The doses, methods, and time of administration varied between studies: three studies gave the drug orally or as an intravenous bolus preoperatively and nine intraoperatively; one study gave the drug as an infusion starting

  4. Glucose-induced thermogenesis in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. The effect of acute beta-adrenergic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Tuxen, C

    1994-01-01

    -induced thermogenesis in the 120 min following the glucose load was significantly reduced by beta-adrenergic inhibition with approximately 50% from 63.9 +/- 5.8 kJ 120 min-1 (mean +/- SE) to 27.8 +/- 9.8 kJ 120 min-1 (P ...-induced forearm oxygen uptake in the period 60-120 min following the glucose load was significantly reduced after beta-adrenergic inhibition from 103 +/- 28 mumol 100 g-1 60 min-1 to 29 +/- 29 mumol 100 g-1 60 min-1 (P

  5. Systemic beta-Adrenergic Stimulation of Thermogenesis Is Not Accompanied by Brown Adipose Tissue Activity in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Vosselman, M. J.; van der Lans, A. A. J. J.; Brans, B.; Wierts, R.; van Baak, M. A.; Schrauwen, P.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is currently considered as a target to combat obesity and diabetes in humans. BAT is densely innervated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and can be stimulated by ?-adrenergic agonists, at least in animals. However, the exact role of the ?-adrenergic part of the SNS in BAT activation in humans is not known yet. In this study, we measured BAT activity by 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in 10 le...

  6. Stimulation of postsynapse adrenergic α2A receptor improves attention/cognition performance in an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2014-08-15

    A 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test using spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) pups has been used as an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the roles of noradrenergic systems, which are involved in the pathophysiology of ADHD, have not been investigated in this model. In the present study, the effects of adrenergic α2 receptor stimulation, which has been an effective treatment for ADHD, on attention/cognition performance were investigated in this model. Moreover, neuronal mechanisms mediated through adrenergic α2 receptors were investigated. We evaluated the effects of both clonidine, a non-selective adrenergic α2 receptor agonist, and guanfacine, a selective adrenergic α2A receptor agonist, using a 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test with SHR pups. Juvenile SHR exhibited a shorter transfer latency, compared with juvenile Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Both clonidine and guanfacine significantly prolonged the transfer latency of juvenile SHR. The effects of clonidine and guanfacine were significantly blocked by pretreatment with an adrenergic α2A receptor antagonist. In contrast, the effect of clonidine was not attenuated by pretreatment with an adrenergic α2B receptor antagonist, or an adrenergic α2C receptor antagonist, while it was attenuated by a non-selective adrenergic α2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effects of neither clonidine nor guanfacine were blocked by pretreatment with a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin. These results suggest that the stimulation of the adrenergic α2A receptor improves the attention/cognition performance of juvenile SHR in the 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test and that postsynaptic, rather than presynaptic, adrenergic α2A receptor is involved in this effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Beta-adrenergic receptors support attention to extinction learning that occurs in the absence, but not the presence, of a context change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Emma André

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The noradrenergic (NA-system is an important regulator of cognitive function. It contributes to extinction learning(EL, and in disorders where EL is impaired NA-dysfunction has been postulated. We explored whether NA acting on beta-adrenergic-receptors (β-AR, regulates EL that depends on context, but is not fear-associated. We assessed behaviour in an ‘AAA’ or ‘ABA’ paradigm: rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze(context-A to learn that a reward is consistently found in the goal arm, despite low reward probability. This was followed on day 4 by EL(unrewarded, whereby in the ABA-paradigm, EL was reinforced by a context change (B, and in the AAA-paradigm, no context change occurred. On day 5, re-exposure to the A-context (unrewarded occurred. Typically, in control ‘AAA’ animals EL occurred on day 4 that progressed further on day 5. In control ‘ABA’ animals, EL also occurred on day 4, followed by renewal of the previously learned (A behavior on day 5, that was followed (in day 5 by extinction of this behavior, as the animals realised that no food reward would be given.Treatment with the β-AR-antagonist, propranolol, prior to EL on day 4, impaired EL in the AAA-paradigm. In the ‘ABA’ paradigm, antagonist treatment on day 4, had no effect on extinction that was reinforced by a context change (B. Furthermore, β-AR-antagonism prior to renewal testing (on day 5 in the ABA-paradigm, resulted in normal renewal behavior, although subsequent extinction of responses during day 5 was prevented by the antagonist. Thus, under both treatment conditions, β-AR-antagonism prevented extinction of the behavior learned in the ‘A’ context.β-AR-blockade during an overt context change did not prevent EL, whereas β-AR were required for EL in an unchanging context. These data suggest that β-AR may support EL by reinforcing attention towards relevant changes in the previously learned experience, and that this process supports extinction

  8. Targeting beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptors differentially shifts Th1, Th2, and inflammatory cytokine profiles in immune organs to attenuate adjuvant arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne eLorton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system (SNS regulates host defense responses and restores homeostasis. SNS-immune regulation is altered in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and rodent models of RA, characterized by nerve remodeling in immune organs and defective adrenergic receptor (AR signaling to immune cell targets that typically promotes or suppresses inflammation via α- and β2-AR activation, respectively, and indirectly drives humoral immunity by blocking Th1 cytokine secretion. Here, we investigate how β2-AR stimulation and/or α-AR blockade at disease onset affects disease pathology and cytokine profiles in relevant immune organs from male Lewis rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA. Rats challenged to induce AA were treated with terbutaline (TERB, a β2-AR agonist (600 μg/kg/day and/or phentolamine (PHEN, an α-AR antagonist (5.0 mg/kg/day or vehicle from disease onset through severe disease. We report that in spleen, mesenteric (MLN and draining lymph node (DLN cells, TERB reduces proliferation, an effect independent of IL-2. TERB also fails to shift Th cytokines from a Th1 to Th2 profile in spleen and MLN (no effect on IFN-γ and DLN (greater IFN-γ cells. In splenocytes, TERB, PHEN and co-treatment (PT promotes an anti-inflammatory profile (greater IL-10 and lowers TNF-α (PT only. In DLN cells, drug treatments do not affect inflammatory profiles, except PT, which raised IL-10. In MLN cells, TERB or PHEN lowers MLN cell secretion of TNF-α or IL-10, respectively. Collectively, our findings indicate disrupted β2-AR, but not α-AR signaling in AA. Aberrant β2-AR signaling consequently derails the sympathetic regulation of lymphocyte expansion, Th cell differentiation, and inflammation in the spleen, DLNs and MLNs that is required for immune system homeostasis. Importantly, this study provides potential mechanisms through which reestablished balance between α- and β2-AR function in the immune system ameliorates inflammation and joint

  9. Quantitative three-phase bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of intravenous regional blockade treatment in patients with stage-I reflex sympathetic dystrophy of upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Emel; Möhür, Haydar; Arslan, Nuri; Entok, Emre; Tan, Kenan; Ozgüven, Mehmet Ali

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the role of quantitative three phase bone scintigraphy (QTPBS) in the evaluation of efficacy of intravenous regional blockade treatment in patients having reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) of the upper extremity. Twenty-six patients with stage-I RSD were focused on in this study. Patients were treated with physical therapy and intravenous (I.V.) regional blockade therapy consisting of dexamethasone and lidocaine. All patients were clinically evaluated before and 1 month after the completion of the therapy protocol. QTPBS was applied to patients before therapy and 1 month after the therapy. As a control group, 11 healthy subjects also underwent QTPBS. Perfusion, hyperemic and fixation indices were calculated from three-phase bone scintigraphy. All patients showed statistically significant clinical improvement after the therapy (p < 0.01). Pre-treatment, perfusion (1.67 +/- 0.63), hyperemic (1.44 +/- 0.48) and fixation (1.69 +/- 0.48) indices of patients were higher than those of healthy subjects (PI: 0.95 +/- 0.05, HI: 0.94 +/- 0.06, FI: 1.01 +/- 0.2) (p < 0.01) and all indices significantly decreased after the treatment (PI: 1.33 +/- 0.46, HI: 1.18 +/- 0.23, FI: 1.42 +/- 0.26) (p < 0.01). I.V. regional blockade therapy combined with corticosteroids is a simple, safe and effective method for the treatment of patients with stage-I RSD in the upper extremity. QTPBS is a valuable and objective method to evaluate the response to therapy and may be useful for staging of patients and predicting the response to therapy.

  10. Effect of selective blockade of oxygen consumption, glucose transport, and Ca2+ influx on thyroxine action in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of selective blockade of cellular glucose transporters, Ca2+ influx, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption on thyroxine (T4)-stimulated oxygen consumption and glucose uptake was examined in human mononuclear blood cells. Blockade of glucose transporters by cytochalasin B (1 x 10(-5) mol...

  11. [Improvement of approach to performance of lumbar sympathetic blockade in patients with tissue ischemia of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, V M; Fesenko, U A; Kutsyn, V M

    2014-06-01

    New access for performance of sympathic blockade in region of aortal bifurcation, was elaborated, basing on calculations, conducted on 30 spiral computeric tomograms of lumbar and sacral parts of vertebral column. Application of the method permits to escape such complications, as a renal and the main vessels damage, the sympathetic nerves blockade, do not demand roentgenological control.

  12. Effect of adductor-canal-blockade on established, severe post-operative pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, P; Grevstad, Ulrik; Henningsen, Maja

    2012-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, we investigated the effect of the predominantly sensory adductor-canal-blockade on established pain in the early post-operative period after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesised that the adductor-canal-blockade would reduce pain during flexion of the knee...

  13. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jue Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. ► Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. ► This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and according to our data doxazosin might be useful for application in the field of bone

  14. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  15. Determination of beta-adrenergic receptor blocking pharmaceuticals in united states wastewater effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggett, D.B.; Khan, I.A.; Foran, C.M.; Schlenk, D

    2003-02-01

    This is the first report of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist pharmaceuticals in United States wastewater effluent. - Beta adrenergic receptor antagonists ({beta}-Blockers) are frequently prescribed medications in the United States and have been identified in European municipal wastewater effluent, however no studies to date have investigated these compounds in United States wastewater effluent. Municipal wastewater effluent was collected from treatment facilities in Mississippi, Texas, and New York to investigate the occurrence of metoprolol, nadolol, and propranolol. Propranolol was identified in all wastewater samples analyzed (n=34) at concentrations {<=}1.9 {mu}g/l. Metoprolol and nadolol were identified in {>=}71% of the samples with concentrations of metoprolol {<=}1.2 {mu}g/l and nadolol {<=}0.36 {mu}g/l. Time course studies at both Mississippi plants and the Texas plant indicate that concentrations of propranolol, metoprolol, and nadolol remain relatively constant at each sampling period. This study indicates that {beta}-Blockers are present in United States wastewater effluent in the ng/l to {mu}g/l range.

  16. Effect of adrenergic receptor ligands on metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake and storage in neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babich, J.W. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Graham, W. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fischman, A.J. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The effects of adrenergic receptor ligands on uptake and storage of the radiopharmaceutical [{sup 125}I]metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) were studied in the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH. For uptake studies, cells were with varying concentrations of {alpha}-agonist (clonidine, methoxamine, and xylazine), {alpha}-antagonist (phentolamine, tolazoline, phenoxybenzamine, yohimbine, and prazosin), {beta}-antagonist (propranolol, atenolol), {beta}-agonist (isoprenaline and salbutamol), mixed {alpha}/{beta} antagonist (labetalol), or the neuronal blocking agent guanethidine, prior to the addition of [{sup 125}I]MIBG (0.1 {mu}M). The incubation was continued for 2 h and specific cell-associated radioactivity was measured. For the storage studies, cells were incubated with [{sup 125}I]MIBG for 2 h, followed by replacement with fresh medium with or without drug (MIBG, clonidine, or yohimbine). Cell-associated radioactivity was measured at various times over the next 20 h. Propanolol reduced [{sup 125}I]MIBG uptake by approximately 30% (P<0.01) at all concentrations tested, most likely due to nonspecific membrane changes. In conclusion, the results of this study establish that selected adrenergic ligands can significantly influence the pattern of uptake and storage of MIBG in cultured neuroblastoma cells, most likely through inhibition of uptake or through noncompetitive inhibition. The potential inplications of these findings justify further study. (orig./VHE). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. In Vitro Examination of Degenerative Evolution of Adrenergic Nerve Endings in Pulmonary Inflamatory Processes in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmi Islami

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological aspect of tracheal preparations and pulmonary tissue was studied in vitro. The material was obtained from autopsy of newborns that died from different causes. Examinations were made in different gestational periods (immature 23-29 weeks; premature 30-37 weeks; mature >38 weeks. Material for examination was obtained up to 6 hours after death. Pulmonary and tracheal tissue was incubated for fixation in buffered formalin (10%. Special histochemical and histoenzymatic methods were used for coloring of pulmonary and tracheal tissue and the activity of ATP-ase and dopaoxidase was monitored. Cut out models were made in series of 7μ, 10 μ and 20 μ. In peripheral axons of tracheobronchial pathways, degenerative alterations of adrenergic nerve endings in lung inflammatory processes were documented. These morphologic neuronal changes were described: Walerians degeneration, neuro-axonal degeneration and segment demyelinisation. These changes are well seen with argentafine coloring (Sevier-Munger modification for nerve endings and with dopaoxidase reaction. In mature newborns that died from respiratory distress syndrome, we found different forms of metabolic and toxic degenerative damage in peripheral axons, such as: segment demyelinisation, neurotubular fragmentation, Schwan cell proliferation, fragmentation and bulging out of axonal neurotubules and neurofilaments. In tracheo-bronchial tissue, chromafine granules are homogenously distributed on Lamina propria layer and through glandular structures. This gives as a contradiction, according to some authors, that adrenergic nerve fibers for muscle tissue are absent and that adrenaline and noradrenalin diffuse in muscle tissue from interstice.

  18. Mass spectrometric determination of the predominant adrenergic protoalkaloids in bitter orange (Citrus aurantium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Putzbach, Karsten; Sharpless, Katherine E; Sander, Lane C

    2007-11-28

    The predominant adrenergic protoalkaloid found in the peel and fruit of bitter orange, Citrus aurantium, is synephrine. Synephrine is reputed to have thermogenic properties and is used as a dietary supplement to enhance energy and promote weight loss. However, there exists some concern that the consumption of dietary supplements containing synephrine or similar protoalkaloids may contribute to adverse cardiovascular events. This study developed and validated a positive-ion mode liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for the quantitative determination of the major (synephrine) and minor (tyramine, N-methyltyramine, octopamine, and hordenine) adrenergic protoalkaloids in a suite of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) bitter orange Standard Reference Materials (SRMs): SRM 3258 Bitter Orange Fruit, SRM 3259 Bitter Orange Extract, and SRM 3260 Bitter Orange Solid Oral Dosage Form. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all protoalkaloids is approximately 1 pg on-column, except for octopamine (20 pg on-column). Additionally, the method has a linear dynamic range of > or =3 orders of magnitude for all of the protoalkaloids. Individual, as well as "total", protoalkaloid levels (milligrams per kilogram) in the NIST SRMs were determined and compared to the levels measured by an independent liquid chromatography/fluorescence detection (LC/FD) method. Satisfactory concordance between the LC/MS/MS and LC/FD protoalkaloid measurements was demonstrated. LC/MS/MS analysis of the protoalkaloids in the SRMs resulted in mean measurement imprecision levels of < or =10% coefficient of variation (% CV).

  19. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  20. Conversion of agonist site to metal-ion chelator site in the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, C E; Thirstrup, K; Holst, Birgitte

    1999-01-01

    Previously metal-ion sites have been used as structural and functional probes in seven transmembrane receptors (7TM), but as yet all the engineered sites have been inactivating. Based on presumed agonist interaction points in transmembrane III (TM-III) and -VII of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor,...... as generic, pharmacologic tools to switch 7TM receptors with engineered metal-ion sites on or off at will.......Previously metal-ion sites have been used as structural and functional probes in seven transmembrane receptors (7TM), but as yet all the engineered sites have been inactivating. Based on presumed agonist interaction points in transmembrane III (TM-III) and -VII of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor......, in this paper we construct an activating metal-ion site between the amine-binding Asp-113 in TM-III-or a His residue introduced at this position-and a Cys residue substituted for Asn-312 in TM-VII. No increase in constitutive activity was observed in the mutant receptors. Signal transduction was activated...

  1. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors gate rapid orientation-specific reduction in visual discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario; Frey, Sebastian; Köhr, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged imbalance in sensory experience leads to dramatic readjustments in cortical representation. Neuromodulatory systems play a critical role in habilitating experience-induced plasticity and regulate memory processes in vivo. Here, we show that a brief period of intense patterned visual stimulation combined with systemic activation of alpha-1 adrenergic neuromodulator receptors (α(1)-ARs) leads to a rapid, reversible, and NMDAR-dependent depression of AMPAR-mediated transmission from ascending inputs to layer II/III pyramidal cells in the visual cortex of young and adult mice. The magnitude of this form of α(1)-AR long-term depression (LTD), measured ex vivo with miniature EPSC recordings, is graded by the number of orientations used during visual experience. Moreover, behavioral tests of visual function following the induction of α(1)-AR LTD reveal that discrimination accuracy of sinusoidal drifting gratings is selectively reduced at high spatial frequencies in a reversible, orientation-specific, and NMDAR-dependent manner. Thus, α(1)-ARs enable rapid cortical synaptic depression which correlates with an orientation-specific decrease in visual discrimination. These findings contribute to our understanding of how adrenergic receptors interact with neuronal networks in response to changes in active sensory experience to produce adaptive behavior.

  2. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Urayama

    Full Text Available The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  3. Adrenergic receptor effects and antihypertensive actions of beta-adrenoceptor-blocking agents with ancillary properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, S; Nakahara, H; Nakazawa, M; Takeda, K

    1988-01-01

    The acute antihypertensive effects and possible underlying mechanisms of 3 beta-adrenergic-blocking drugs with alpha-blocking activity, i.e. labetalol, drugs with alpha-blocking activity, i.e. labetalol, nipradilol and arotinolol, were studied in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and compared with the effects of prazosin, propranolol and hydralazine. Prazosin produced a dose-dependent antihypertensive effect which paralleled inhibition of the pressor response to phenylephrine. Labetalol (30 mg/kg), nipradilol (30 and 100 mg/kg) and arotinolol (30 and 100 mg/kg) also produced a fall in blood pressure. However, inhibition of the pressor response to phenylephrine was not seen in association with the antihypertensive effect after the lower dose of nipradilol and arotinolol. Propranolol (100 mg/kg) did not lower blood pressure. These results suggest that a mechanism(s) other than an alpha-adrenergic-blocking effect plays a role in the acute antihypertensive effects produced by the lower dose of nipradilol and arotinolol.

  4. Astrocytic β2-adrenergic receptors mediate hippocampal long-term memory consolidation

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Virginia

    2016-07-12

    Emotionally relevant experiences form strong and long-lasting memories by critically engaging the stress hormone/neurotransmitter noradrenaline, which mediates and modulates the consolidation of these memories. Noradrenaline acts through adrenergic receptors (ARs), of which β2- Adrenergic receptors (βARs) are of particular importance. The differential anatomical and cellular distribution of βAR subtypes in the brain suggests that they play distinct roles in memory processing, although much about their specific contributions and mechanisms of action remains to be understood. Here we show that astrocytic rather than neuronal β2ARs in the hippocampus play a key role in the consolidation of a fear-based contextual memory. These hippocampal β2ARs, but not β1ARs, are coupled to the training-dependent release of lactate from astrocytes, which is necessary for long- Term memory formation and for underlying molecular changes. This key metabolic role of astrocytic β2ARs may represent a novel target mechanism for stress-related psychopathologies and neurodegeneration.

  5. Identification of a probable new adrenergic agonist by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatto, Gianpiero; Culeddu, Nicola; Testa, Cecilia; Neri, Bruno; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Barbosa, Jorge; Cruz, Clara

    2007-01-01

    In animal production, it is consolidated the synthesis and the illegal use of growth promoters of new generation, able to skip routine screening and confirmatory analysis. In this work it is reported the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and the mass spectrometry identification of a probable new adrenergic drug found in a feed premix. The substance was selectively purified on alpha 1 acid glycoprotein affinity columns; then its structure was first achieved by recording the 13 C NMR spectrum that gave the total number of carbons of the molecule, successively sorted by DEPT experiments into quaternary, CH, CH 2 , and CH 3 groups. However, the complete assignments of all resonances were derived from the bi-dimensional analysis and the crucial indications from the 1 H- 13 C reverse experiments. Further characterisation was performed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation both in positive and negative ion mode, matching the molecular ion and the fragmentation pattern with those of most recently described new adrenergic agonists. After the loss of a ter-butylic group, the structure shows an internal symmetry along with the presence of Chlorine clusters. The proposed formula of the compound, the 8,8'-diamino-9,9'-dichloro-1-terbutyl-1,1',4,4-tetrahydro-5H,5'H-2,2'-bi -1-benzazepine-5,5'-dione, partially resembles that of Zilpaterol for the presence of a heterocyclic ring; Further work is in progress to characterise the structure-activity relationship

  6. Relaxing action of adrenergic β2-agonists on guinea-pig skinned tracheal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Nemoto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Although adrenergic β2-agonist-induced smooth muscle relaxation has been attributed to increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP, a relaxation response has been observed at low β2-agonist concentrations that do not cause increased cAMP To elucidate the mechanism of tracheal muscle relaxation induced by low concentrations of β2-agonists, we used a guinea-pig skinned tracheal smooth muscle preparation to examine the effects on the contractile protein system. The isotonic contraction of β-escin-treated skinned tracheal muscle from guinea-pig was measured. When the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was maintained at 1 μmol/L in the presence of guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP; 100 μmol/L, neither isoproterenol (10nmol/L nor salbutamol (60 nmol/L affected Ca2+ sensitivity, but a significant decrease in Ca2+ sensitivity was observed in the presence of okadaic acid (1 μmol/L. The decrease in Ca2+ sensitivity was a slow response and was blocked by pretreatment with propranolol (1 μmol/L. Forskolin (1 μmol/L did not affect Ca2+ sensitivity. These results suggest that adrenergic b 2-agonists may activate protein phosphatase through an unknown pathway involving the β2-receptor, which enhances dephosphorylation of the myosin light chain and/or thin filament proteins, resulting in relaxation of the tracheal smooth muscle.

  7. Development of a radioreceptor assay for {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbo, V. [Lab. d`analyse des denrees alimentaires d`origine animale, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire de l`Universite, Liege (Belgium); Vandenbroeck, M. [Lab. d`analyse des denrees alimentaires d`origine animale, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire de l`Universite, Liege (Belgium); Maghuin-Rogister, G. [Lab. d`analyse des denrees alimentaires d`origine animale, Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire de l`Universite, Liege (Belgium)

    1994-05-01

    Several {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic agonists are illegally used as growth promoters in meat production. We have developed and evaluated a radioreceptor assay for the multianalyte detection of these compounds. The method is based on a competition for binding with receptors (plasma membranes prepared from bovine teat muscles) between a radioactive tracer ({sup 3}H-dihydroalprenolol) and {beta}{sub 2} agonist residues present in the samples. The method has been validated for three {beta}{sub 2} agonists (clenbuterol, mabuterol and cimaterol) in bovine urine samples. The detection limit (mean of ``blank`` values + 3 SEM) in urine was 2.4 ppb clenbuterol. Using this procedure, samples containing at least 5 ppb of clenbuterol, mabuterol or cimaterol could be identified as positive for the presence of {beta}{sub 2} agonists. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mehrere {beta}{sub 2} adrenerge Agonisten werden illegal als Wachstumsfoerderer in der Fleischproduktion eingesetzt. Wir entwickelten und testeten einen RRA (``Radioreceptor Assay``) zur Mehrfachrueckstandsanalyse dieser Zusammensetzungen. Die Methode basiert auf einer Kompetition eines radioaktiven Markers ({sup 3}H-dihydroalpenolol) mit den Rueckstaenden der {beta}{sub 2} Agonisten der Proben um Bindungsstellen der Rezeptoren (Plasmamembranen, welche aus Muskelzellen von Rinderzitzen gewonnen wurden). Die Methode wurde fuer 3 {beta}{sub 2} Agonisten (Clenbuterol, Mabuterol und Cimaterol) in Harnproben anerkannt. Die Nachweisgrenze (Durchschnitt der Leerwerte + 3 Standardabweichungen) bei Harnproben liegt bei 2,4 ppb fuer Clenbuterol. Diese Methode ermoeglicht, Konzentrationen von mindestens 5 ppb an Clenbuterol, Mabuterol und Cimaterol im Probenmaterial nachzuweisen. (orig.)

  8. β2 adrenergic agonist, clenbuterol, enhances working memory performance in aging animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Brian P.; Colgan, Leslie A.; Nou, Eric; Arnsten, Amy F.T.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies using a mixed β1 and β2 adrenergic antagonist, propanolol, have indicated that β adrenoceptors have little effect on the cognitive functioning of the prefrontal cortex. However, recent studies have suggested that endogenous stimulation of β1 adrenoceptors impairs working memory in both rats and monkeys. Since propanolol has no effect on cognition, we hypothesized that activation of β2 adrenoceptors might improve performance in a working memory task. We tested this hypothesis by observing the effects of the β2 agonist, clenbuterol, on spatial working memory performance. Clenbuterol was either infused directly into the prefrontal cortex (rats) or administered systemically (monkeys). Results demonstrated that clenbuterol improved performance in many young and aged rats and monkeys who performed poorly under control conditions. Actions at β2 adrenoceptors were confirmed by challenging the clenbuterol response with the β2 adrenergic antagonist, ICI 118,551. The effects of clenbuterol were not universal and depended on the cognitive status of the animal: the drug moderately improved only a subset of animals with working memory impairment. PMID:17363115

  9. Berberine-induced pigment dispersion in Bufo melanostictus melanophores by stimulation of beta-2 adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sharique A; Naaz, Ishrat; Choudhary, Ram Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Reduced production of melanin by decreased or the absence of melanocytes leads to various hypopigmentation disorders, and the development of melanogenetic agents for photoprotection and hypopigmentation disorders is one of the top priority areas of research. Hence, the present study was carried out to elucidate the ability of berberine, a principal active ingredient present in the roots of the herb Berberis vulgaris to stimulate pigment dispersion in the isolated skin melanophores of the toad Bufo melanostictus. In the present study, mean melanophore size index of the isolated skin melanophores of B. melanostictus was assayed after treating with various concentrations of berberine. A marked melanin dispersion response leading to skin darkening was observed in the isolated melanophores of toad in response to berberine, which was found to be mediated through beta-2 adrenergic receptors. The physiologically significant dose-related melanin dispersion effects of berberine per se were found to be completely abolished by propranolol, which is a specific beta-2 adrenergic receptor blocker. These per se melanin dispersal effects were also found to be markedly potentiated by isoprenaline, which is a specific beta-adrenoceptor agonist. The results indicate that berberine causes a tremendous, dose-dependent, physiologically significant pigment dispersing in the isolated skin melanophores of B. melanostictus.

  10. Beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, autonomic balance and serotonergic activity in practitioners of Transcendental Meditation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the acute autonomic effects of the Transcendental Meditation Program (TM) and resolve the conflict arising from discrepant neurochemical and psychophysiological data. Three experimental investigations were performed. The first examined beta 2 -adrenergic receptors (AR's) on peripheral blood lymphocytes, via [I 125 ]iodocyanopindolol binding, in 10 male mediating and 10 age matched non-meditating control subjects, to test the hypothesis that the long-term practice of TM and the TM Sidhi Program (TMSP) reduces end organ sensitivity to adrenergic agonists. The second investigated respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indirect measure of cardiac Parasympathetic Nervous System tone), and skin resistance (a measure of Sympathetic Nervous System tone) during periods of spontaneous respiratory apneusis, a phenomenon occurring during TM that is known to mark the subjective experience of transcending. The third was within subject investigation of the acute effects of the TMSP on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) activity. Platelet 5-HT was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, plasma prolactin (PL) and lutenizing hormone (LH) by radioimmunoassay, tryptophan by spectrofluorimetry, and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, a modulator of 5-HT uptake) by radial immunodiffusion assay

  11. Beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, autonomic balance and serotonergic activity in practitioners of Transcendental Meditation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the acute autonomic effects of the Transcendental Meditation Program (TM) and resolve the conflict arising from discrepant neurochemical and psychophysiological data. Three experimental investigations were performed. The first examined beta{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors (AR's) on peripheral blood lymphocytes, via (I{sup 125})iodocyanopindolol binding, in 10 male mediating and 10 age matched non-meditating control subjects, to test the hypothesis that the long-term practice of TM and the TM Sidhi Program (TMSP) reduces end organ sensitivity to adrenergic agonists. The second investigated respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indirect measure of cardiac Parasympathetic Nervous System tone), and skin resistance (a measure of Sympathetic Nervous System tone) during periods of spontaneous respiratory apneusis, a phenomenon occurring during TM that is known to mark the subjective experience of transcending. The third was within subject investigation of the acute effects of the TMSP on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) activity. Platelet 5-HT was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, plasma prolactin (PL) and lutenizing hormone (LH) by radioimmunoassay, tryptophan by spectrofluorimetry, and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, a modulator of 5-HT uptake) by radial immunodiffusion assay.

  12. Increased mortality in groups of cattle administered the β-adrenergic agonists ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy H Loneragan

    Full Text Available The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved two β-adrenergic agonists (βAA for in-feed administration to cattle fed in confinement for human consumption. Anecdotal reports have generated concern that administration of βAA might be associated with an increased incidence of cattle deaths. Our objectives, therefore, were to a quantify the association between βAA administration and mortality in feedlot cattle, and b explore those variables that may confound or modify this association. Three datasets were acquired for analysis: one included information from randomized and controlled clinical trials of the βAA ractopamine hydrochloride, while the other two were observational data on zilpaterol hydrochloride administration to large numbers of cattle housed, fed, and cared for using routine commercial production practices in the U.S. Various population and time at-risk models were developed to explore potential βAA relationships with mortality, as well as the extent of confounding and effect modification. Measures of effect were relatively consistent across datasets and models in that the cumulative risk and incidence rate of death was 75 to 90% greater in animals administered the βAA compared to contemporaneous controls. During the exposure period, 40 to 50% of deaths among groups administered the βAA were attributed to administration of the drug. None of the available covariates meaningfully confounded the relationship between βAA and increased mortality. Only month of slaughter, presumably a proxy for climate, consistently modified the effect in that the biological association was generally greatest during the warmer months of the year. While death is a rare event in feedlot cattle, the data reported herein provide compelling evidence that mortality is nevertheless increased in response to administration of FDA-approved βAA and represents a heretofore unquantified adverse drug event.

  13. Increased Mortality in Groups of Cattle Administered the β-Adrenergic Agonists Ractopamine Hydrochloride and Zilpaterol Hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loneragan, Guy H.; Thomson, Daniel U.; Scott, H. Morgan

    2014-01-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two β-adrenergic agonists (βAA) for in-feed administration to cattle fed in confinement for human consumption. Anecdotal reports have generated concern that administration of βAA might be associated with an increased incidence of cattle deaths. Our objectives, therefore, were to a) quantify the association between βAA administration and mortality in feedlot cattle, and b) explore those variables that may confound or modify this association. Three datasets were acquired for analysis: one included information from randomized and controlled clinical trials of the βAA ractopamine hydrochloride, while the other two were observational data on zilpaterol hydrochloride administration to large numbers of cattle housed, fed, and cared for using routine commercial production practices in the U.S. Various population and time at-risk models were developed to explore potential βAA relationships with mortality, as well as the extent of confounding and effect modification. Measures of effect were relatively consistent across datasets and models in that the cumulative risk and incidence rate of death was 75 to 90% greater in animals administered the βAA compared to contemporaneous controls. During the exposure period, 40 to 50% of deaths among groups administered the βAA were attributed to administration of the drug. None of the available covariates meaningfully confounded the relationship between βAA and increased mortality. Only month of slaughter, presumably a proxy for climate, consistently modified the effect in that the biological association was generally greatest during the warmer months of the year. While death is a rare event in feedlot cattle, the data reported herein provide compelling evidence that mortality is nevertheless increased in response to administration of FDA-approved βAA and represents a heretofore unquantified adverse drug event. PMID:24621596

  14. Beta2-adrenergic receptor gene haplotypes and bronchodilator response in Egyptian patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohammad H; Sobhy, Khaled E; Sabry, Irene M; El Serafi, Ahmed T; Toraih, Eman A

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-factorial disorder caused by environmental determinants and genetic risk factors. Understanding the genetic predisposition of COPD is essential to develop personalized treatment regimens. Beta 2 -adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) gene polymorphisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of obstructive pulmonary diseases. This study was conducted to assess the genetic association between Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu polymorphisms and COPD in the Egyptian patients, and to analyze their impact on the clinical outcome and therapeutic response. The study population included 115 participants (61 COPD patients and 54 healthy controls) were genotyped for the Arg16Gly (rs1042713) and Gln27Glu (rs1042714) polymorphisms. Pulmonary function test was done and repeated in patients after salbutamol inhalation. The Gly 16 and Gln 27 alleles represented 57% and 70% of the whole study population, and only 3 haplotypes were detected; Arg 16 /Gln 27 , Gly 16 /Gln 27 , and Gly 16 /Glu 27 . Genotypes and haplotypes homozygous for Arg 16 and Gln 27 were more likely to develop COPD (p<0.05). However, individuals carrying Glu 27 allele conferred protection against COPD development (p=0.002). Furthermore, Arg 16 genotypes and haplotypes were significantly associated with higher grades of dyspnea, more COPD symptoms and frequent exacerbations. In contrast, patients carrying Glu 27 allele had better bronchial airway responsiveness to β 2 -agonists. Our findings suggested that the ADRB2 gene polymorphisms may have vital role in COPD risk, severity, and bronchodilator response among Egyptian population. Larger epidemiological studies are needed for results validation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Fascia iliaca compartment blockade for acute pain control in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Kristensen, Billy B; Bundgaard, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Hip fracture patients are in severe pain upon arrival at the emergency department. Pain treatment is traditionally based on systemic opioids. No study has examined the effect of fascia iliaca compartment blockade (FICB) in acute hip fracture pain management within a double-blind, randomized setup....

  16. Is lumbosacral plexus blockade effective and safe for surgical anesthesia in total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    had lumbosacral plexus blockade (lumbar plexus block, sacral plexus block and fascia transversalis plane block) with ropivacaine. Group 2 had continuous spinal anesthesia with repeated bupivacaine-doses. Group 3 had single-dose spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine. Hemodynamic data were recorded during...

  17. A new approach to anesthesia management in myasthenia gravis: reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de; Egmond, J. van; Driessen, J.J.; Booij, L.H.D.J.

    2010-01-01

    A neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB) in patients with myasthenia gravis usually dissipates either spontaneously or by administration of neostigmine. We administered sugammadex to a patient with myasthenia gravis to reverse a rocuronium-induced profound NMB. NMBDs

  18. Photon routing in cavity QED: Beyond the fundamental limit of photon blockade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Dayan, Barak [Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Parkins, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2011-09-15

    The most simple and seemingly straightforward application of the photon blockade effect, in which the transport of one photon prevents the transport of others, would be to separate two incoming indistinguishable photons to different output ports. We show that time-energy uncertainty relations inherently prevent this ideal situation when the blockade is implemented by a two-level system. The fundamental nature of this limit is revealed in the fact that photon blockade in the strong coupling regime of cavity QED, resulting from the nonlinearity of the Jaynes-Cummings energy level structure, exhibits efficiency and temporal behavior identical to those of photon blockade in the bad cavity regime, where the underlying nonlinearity is that of the atom itself. We demonstrate that this limit can be exceeded, yet not avoided, by exploiting time-energy entanglement between the incident photons. Finally, we show how this limit can be circumvented completely by using a three-level atom coupled to a single-sided cavity, enabling an ideal and robust photon routing mechanism.

  19. Differential effects of B7-1 blockade in the rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallon, L; Chandraker, A; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    1997-01-01

    Blocking the CD28-B7 T cell costimulatory activation pathway protects animals from developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In the mouse EAE model, selective blockade of B7-1 by specific mAbs has been shown to protect animals from EAE. In the Lewis rat model, we have shown that...

  20. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rojas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study.

  1. Reversal of prolonged rocuronium neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex in an obstetric patient with transverse myelitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weekes, G

    2010-07-01

    A 38-year-old wheelchair-bound primigravida with transverse myelitis presented at 38 weeks of gestation for elective caesarean section. Transverse myelitis, which is characterised by bilateral inflammation of the spinal cord and myelin destruction, is associated with myopathy, autonomic dysreflexia and pulmonary aspiration. Regional anaesthesia was contraindicated in this case as the patient had undergone two previous lumbar spinal fusion procedures. Rocuronium 1.2 mg\\/kg was used to facilitate rapid intubating conditions. The caesarean section proceeded uneventfully, but even after administration of neostigmine the patient exhibited prolonged neuromuscular blockade. After 3 h and 15 min sugammadex was obtained to reverse neuromuscular blockade; the drug was not stocked in our hospital. Sugammadex 4 mg\\/kg resulted in complete reversal of blockade after 2 min. We believe that myopathy associated with transverse myelitis led to the prolonged duration of action of rocuronium. Sugammadex is a relatively new drug with few reported side effects. In this case it was used to reverse neuromuscular blockade and prevented prolonged postoperative ventilatory support.

  2. Reversal of prolonged rocuronium neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex in an obstetric patient with transverse myelitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weekes, G

    2012-02-01

    A 38-year-old wheelchair-bound primigravida with transverse myelitis presented at 38 weeks of gestation for elective caesarean section. Transverse myelitis, which is characterised by bilateral inflammation of the spinal cord and myelin destruction, is associated with myopathy, autonomic dysreflexia and pulmonary aspiration. Regional anaesthesia was contraindicated in this case as the patient had undergone two previous lumbar spinal fusion procedures. Rocuronium 1.2 mg\\/kg was used to facilitate rapid intubating conditions. The caesarean section proceeded uneventfully, but even after administration of neostigmine the patient exhibited prolonged neuromuscular blockade. After 3 h and 15 min sugammadex was obtained to reverse neuromuscular blockade; the drug was not stocked in our hospital. Sugammadex 4 mg\\/kg resulted in complete reversal of blockade after 2 min. We believe that myopathy associated with transverse myelitis led to the prolonged duration of action of rocuronium. Sugammadex is a relatively new drug with few reported side effects. In this case it was used to reverse neuromuscular blockade and prevented prolonged postoperative ventilatory support.

  3. Blockade of KCa3.1 Attenuates Left Ventricular Remodeling after Experimental Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hui Ju

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: After myocardial infarction (MI, cardiac fibrosis greatly contributes to left ventricular remodeling and heart failure. The intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium Channel (KCa3.1 has been recently proposed as an attractive target of fibrosis. The present study aimed to detect the effects of KCa3.1 blockade on ventricular remodeling following MI and its potential mechanisms. Methods: Myocardial expression of KCa3.1 was initially measured in a mouse MI model by Western blot and real time-polymerase chain reaction. Then after treatment with TRAM-34, a highly selective KCa3.1 blocker, heart function and fibrosis were evaluated by echocardiography, histology and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the role of KCa3.1 in neonatal mouse cardiac fibroblasts (CFs stimulated by angiotensin II (Ang II was tested. Results: Myocardium expressed high level of KCa3.1 after MI. Pharmacological blockade of KCa3.1 channel improved heart function and reduced ventricular dilation and fibrosis. Besides, a lower prevalence of myofibroblasts was found in TRAM-34 treatment group. In vitro studies KCa3.1 was up regulated in CFs induced by Ang II and suppressed by its blocker.KCa3.1 pharmacological blockade attenuated CFs proliferation, differentiation and profibrogenic genes expression and may regulating through AKT and ERK1/2 pathways. Conclusion: Blockade of KCa3.1 is able to attenuate ventricular remodeling after MI through inhibiting the pro-fibrotic effects of CFs.

  4. Postoperative shoulder pain after laparoscopic hysterectomy with deep neuromuscular blockade and low-pressure pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Istre, Olav; Staehr-Rye, Anne K

    2016-01-01

    indicate that the use of deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) improves surgical conditions during a low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) and deep NMB (posttetanic count 0 to 1) compared with standard...

  5. Renal and cardiac function during alpha1-beta-blockade in congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, M; Davidsen, U; Stokholm, K H

    2002-01-01

    The kidney and the neurohormonal systems are essential in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure (CHF) and the physiologic response. Routine treatment of moderate to severe CHF consists of diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and beta-blockade. The need for control...

  6. Renal and cardiac function during alpha1-beta-blockade in congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, M; Davidsen, U; Stokholm, K H

    2002-01-01

    of renal function during initiation of ACE-inhibition in patients with CHF is well known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether supplementation by a combined alpha1-beta-blockade to diuretics and ACE-inhibition might improve cardiac function without reducing renal function....

  7. Epigenetic stability of exhausted T cells limits durability of reinvigoration by PD-1 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauken, Kristen E; Sammons, Morgan A; Odorizzi, Pamela M; Manne, Sasikanth; Godec, Jernej; Khan, Omar; Drake, Adam M; Chen, Zeyu; Sen, Debattama R; Kurachi, Makoto; Barnitz, R Anthony; Bartman, Caroline; Bengsch, Bertram; Huang, Alexander C; Schenkel, Jason M; Vahedi, Golnaz; Haining, W Nicholas; Berger, Shelley L; Wherry, E John

    2016-12-02

    Blocking Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) can reinvigorate exhausted CD8 T cells (T EX ) and improve control of chronic infections and cancer. However, whether blocking PD-1 can reprogram T EX into durable memory T cells (T MEM ) is unclear. We found that reinvigoration of T EX in mice by PD-L1 blockade caused minimal memory development. After blockade, reinvigorated T EX became reexhausted if antigen concentration remained high and failed to become T MEM upon antigen clearance. T EX acquired an epigenetic profile distinct from that of effector T cells (T EFF ) and T MEM cells that was minimally remodeled after PD-L1 blockade. This finding suggests that T EX are a distinct lineage of CD8 T cells. Nevertheless, PD-1 pathway blockade resulted in transcriptional rewiring and reengagement of effector circuitry in the T EX epigenetic landscape. These data indicate that epigenetic fate inflexibility may limit current immunotherapies. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Chronic blockade of angiotensin II action prevents glomerulosclerosis, but induces graft vasculopathy in experimental kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit-van Oosten, A; Navis, G; Stegeman, CA; Joles, JA; Klok, PA; Kuipers, F; Tiebosch, ATMG; van Goor, H

    Long-term renin-angiotensin system blockade is beneficial in a variety of renal diseases, This study examines the long-term (34 weeks) effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril and the angiotensin II receptor type I blocker L158,809 in the Fisher to Lewis rat model of chronic

  9. Single-photon blockade in a hybrid cavity-optomechanical system via third-order nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bijita; Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2018-04-01

    Photon statistics in a weakly driven optomechanical cavity, with Kerr-type nonlinearity, are analyzed both analytically and numerically. The single-photon blockade effect is demonstrated via calculations of the zero-time-delay second-order correlation function g (2)(0). The analytical results obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation are in complete conformity with the results obtained through numerical solution of the quantum master equation. A systematic study on the parameter regime for observing photon blockade in the weak coupling regime is reported. The parameter regime where the photon blockade is not realizable due to the combined effect of nonlinearities owing to the optomechanical coupling and the Kerr-effect is demonstrated. The experimental feasibility with state-of-the-art device parameters is discussed and it is observed that photon blockade could be generated at the telecommunication wavelength. An elaborate analysis of the thermal effects on photon antibunching is presented. The system is found to be robust against pure dephasing-induced decoherences and thermal phonon number fluctuations.

  10. Split-dose atropine versus glycopyrrolate with neostigmine for reversal of gallamine-induced neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, J; Jarnvig, I; Jørgensen, L N

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a split-dose of atropine sulphate versus a single dose of glycopyrrolate given with neostigmine for the reversal of gallamine-induced neuromuscular blockade were studied in 55 patients undergoing gynaecological surgery. The patients were randomized to receive either a single dose...

  11. Parasympathetic blockade attenuates augmented pancreatic polypeptide but not insulin secretion in Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Stefan, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    of pancreatic polypeptide (PP), an islet hormone considered a surrogate marker of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) drive to the pancreas. To test if hyperinsulinemia in Pima Indians is due to increased vagal input to the beta-cell, we examined the effect of PNS blockade in 17 Caucasian (aged 35 +/- 8 years...

  12. Predictors of Pain Relieving Response to Sympathetic Blockade in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijs, F.; Geurts, J.; van Kleef, M.; Faber, C.G.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Kessels, A.G.; van Zundert, J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Sympathetic blockade with local anesthetics is used frequently in the management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1(CRPS-1), with variable degrees of success in pain relief. The current study investigated which signs or symptoms of CRPS-1 could be predictive of outcome. The

  13. Optimized surgical space during low-pressure laparoscopy with deep neuromuscular blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr-Rye, Anne K; Rasmussen, Lars S; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) can be performed using low intra-abdominal pressure (<12 mmHg), but surgical conditions may not be optimal. The present study aimed at comparing surgical space conditions using either deep, continuous muscle relaxation or moderate blockade during low-pressure (8 ...

  14. Peripheral cannabinoid 1 receptor blockade activates brown adipose tissue and diminishes dyslipidemia and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, M.R.; Kooijman, S.; Dam, A.D. van; Pelgrom, L.R.; Berbée, J.F.P.; Visseren, C.A.R.; Aggele, R.C. van; Hoek, A.M. van den; Sips, H.C.M.; Lombès, M.; Havekes, L.M.; Tamsma, J.T.; Guigas, B.; Meijer, O.C.; Jukema, J.W.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is an important player in energy metabolism by regulating appetite, lipolysis, and energy expenditure. Chronic blockade of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) leads to long-term maintenance of weight loss and reduction of dyslipidemia in experimental and human obesity. The

  15. Selective structure-based virtual screening for full and partial agonists of the beta2 adrenergic receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, C.; Rognan, Didier

    2008-01-01

    The recently solved high-resolution X-ray structure of the beta2 adrenergic receptor has been challenged for its ability to discriminate inverse agonists/antagonists from partial/full agonists. Whereas the X-ray structure of the ground state receptor was unsuitable to distinguish true ligands with

  16. Thyroid hormone and adrenergic signaling interact to control pineal expression of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (Drd4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jong-So; Bailey, Michael J; Weller, Joan L

    2009-01-01

    is circadian in nature and under photoneural control. Whereas most rhythmically expressed genes in the pineal are controlled by adrenergic/cAMP signaling, Drd4 expression also requires thyroid hormone. This advance raises the questions of whether Drd4 expression is regulated by this mechanism in other systems...... and whether thyroid hormone controls expression of other genes in the pineal gland....

  17. ß2 -adrenergic receptor Thr164IIe polymorphism, blood pressure and ischaemic heart disease in 66¿750 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M; Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A

    2012-01-01

    The ß(2) -adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) is located on smooth muscle cells and is an important regulator of smooth muscle tone. The Thr164Ile polymorphism (rs1800888) in the ADRB2 gene is rare but has profound functional consequences on receptor function and could cause lifelong elevated smooth musc...

  18. Disappearance of beta(2)-adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in canine distemper encephalitis : possible implications for the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Wilczak, N; Zurbriggen, A

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that astrocytes in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) lack beta (2)-adrenergic receptors. This abnormality might explain why astrocytes in active MS plaques aberrantly express major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules, which play an important role

  19. Staying awake: a genetic region that hinders α2 adrenergic receptor agonist-induced loss of consciousness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelegen, C.; Gent, T.C.; Ferretti, V.; Zhang, Z.; Yustos, R.; Lan, F.; Yang, Q.; Overington, D.W.U.; Vyssotsky, A.L.; van Lith, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/091342422; Wisden, W.; Franks, N.P.

    2014-01-01

    How external stimuli prevent the onset of sleep has been little studied. This is usually considered to be a non-specific type of phenomenon. However, the hypnotic drug dexmedetomidine, an agonist at a2 adrenergic receptors, has unusual properties that make it useful for investigating this question.

  20. Alpha-Amylase Activity in Blood Increases after Pharmacological, But Not Psychological, Activation of the Adrenergic System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs M Nater

    Full Text Available Alpha-amylase in both blood and saliva has been used as a diagnostic parameter. While studies examining alpha-amylase activity in saliva have shown that it is sensitive to physiological and psychological challenge of the adrenergic system, no challenge studies have attempted to elucidate the role of the adrenergic system in alpha-amylase activity in blood. We set out to examine the impact of psychological and pharmacological challenge on alpha-amylase in blood in two separate studies.In study 1, healthy subjects were examined in a placebo-controlled, double-blind paradigm using yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenergic antagonist. In study 2, subjects were examined in a standardized rest-controlled psychosocial stress protocol. Alpha-amylase activity in blood was repeatedly measured in both studies.Results of study 1 showed that alpha-amylase in blood is subject to stronger increases after injection of yohimbine compared to placebo. In study 2, results showed that there was no significant effect of psychological stress compared to rest.Alpha-amylase in blood increases after pharmacological activation of the adrenergic pathways suggesting that sympathetic receptors are responsible for these changes. Psychological stress, however, does not seem to have an impact on alpha-amylase in blood. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying activity changes in alpha-amylase in blood in healthy individuals.