WorldWideScience

Sample records for adolescent school children

  1. School Reintegration for Children and Adolescents with Cancer: The Role of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mekel S.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of advancements in medical expertise and technology, children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer now have opportunities to participate in many typical activities, including school. To some extent, school reintegration reflects positive adjustment to their illness. Nevertheless, children and adolescents with cancer may experience…

  2. DETENTION OF VISUAL PROBLEMS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Isabel Amorim Lino

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The precocious detention of visual problems is a measure of important primary assistance. Thus being,this work had as main objective, to verify the visual level of children and adolescents in Goiânia (Goiás – Brazilpublic school, being used the simplified physical examination of health through Snellen Table. Of the 414evaluated children, 46 (11% had presented visual deficiency and had been directed for oftalmological consultationin the Hospital of the Clinics of the Federal University of Goiás.

  3. Effect of social and environmental determinants on overweight and obesity prevalence among adolescent school children

    OpenAIRE

    Anuradha, R. K.; Sathyavathi, R. B.; T Muneeswara Reddy; R. Hemalatha; Sudhakar, G.; P Geetha; K Kodanda Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overweight and obesity among children and adolescents is a public health concern. Objective: To assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity and its association with social and environmental determinants among the adolescent school children of Tirupati town of Andhra Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: Data was collected by interviewer-administered method from school children aged between 12 to 16 years. The sample consisted of 2258 subjects (1097 boys and 1161 girls). Overw...

  4. The role of anxiety symptoms in school performance in a community sample of children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    D'Arrigo Valentina; Passaniti Eleonora; Scoto Maria Cristina; Ducci Francesca; Mazzone Luigi; Vitiello Benedetto

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Anxiety symptoms are relatively common among children and adolescents and can interfere with functioning. The prevalence of anxiety and the relationship between anxiety and school performance were examined among elementary, middle, and high school students. Methods Samples of elementary (N = 131, age 8–10 years), middle (N = 267, age 11–13 years), and high school (N = 80, age 14–16 years) children were recruited from four public schools in a predominantly middle-class comm...

  5. Individual Differences In The School Performance of 2nd-Grade Children Born to Low-Income Adolescent Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiwattanalunggarn, Kunlakarn Lekskul; Luster, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that contribute to individual differences in the school performance of 2nd-grade children born to adolescent mothers. The sample of this study was 90 low-income adolescent mothers and their children. Data were collected from the adolescent mothers and their first-born children, now in 2nd grade,…

  6. Gender Differences in Food Preferences of School-Aged Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine-Bish, Natalie L.; Scheule, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Background: Schools have the opportunity, through the National School Lunch Program and Local School Wellness Policies, to have a significant impact on healthy eating behaviors. An understanding of children's and adolescents' food preferences in relation to gender and age will facilitate the successful creation of both healthy and financially…

  7. Sleep pattern and practice among adolescents school children in Nigerian secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Maduabuchi, Josephat Chinawa; Obu, Herbert Anayo; Chukwu, Barthlomew Friday; Aronu, Ann Ebele; Manyike, Pius Chukwuka; Chinawa, Awoere Tamunosiki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Some adolescents may have sleep disorder at some point during adolescence. Determining the pattern and practice of sleep among adolescents could be useful to establish a lasting sleep hygiene program among adolescents. The objectives of this study are to describe sleep pattern and practice among adolescent in Nigerian secondary schools. Methods Sleep habits were investigated using a random sampling of adolescents from secondary schools from February to April 2013. A self-administ...

  8. Cross sectional analysis of the association between mode of school transportation and physical fitness in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Kolle, Elin; Steene-Johannessen, Jostein;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the associations between body composition, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness in relation to travel mode to school in children and adolescents.......To investigate the associations between body composition, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness in relation to travel mode to school in children and adolescents....

  9. Music therapy with children and adolescents in mainstream schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine; Wigram, Tony

    2008-01-01

    This article identifies existing research and clinical activity utilising music therapy with mainstream children, and a potential need for music therapy with this client group.  A systematic review was undertaken of music therapy literature relating to work with children in mainstream schools.......  Sixty papers were identified, 12 of which were outcome studies.  Statistical and government data provided a background to the current status and needs of children in the UK.   The review found that emotional and social wellbeing needs of children in the UK have been identified as a priority to be...... addressed by the UK government. However further research, service-planning and reorganisation is required.  There is evidence that music therapy is being used with children in mainstream schools both at home and abroad, and both research and clinical reports suggest that music therapy is an effective...

  10. Influences of Developmental Contexts and Gender Differences on School Performance of Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Eva; da Rosa Piccolo, Luciane; de Paula Couto, Maria Clara Pinheiro; Salles, Jerusa Fumagalli; Helena Koller, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated children and adolescents' school performance over time focusing on two variables that may influence it: developmental context and gender. The sample comprised 627 participants (M[subscript age]?=?11.13, SD?=?1.8), 51% of them female, from grade one to eight, living either with family (n?=?474) or in care institutions…

  11. Patterns and Predictors of Participation in Leisure Activities outside of School in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Egmar; Badia, Marta; Orgaz, Begona M.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the patterns and predictors of participation in leisure activities outside of school of Spanish children and adolescents with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Children and adolescents with CP (n = 199; 113 males and 86 females) participated in this cross-sectional study. Their mean age was 12.11 years (SD = 3.02; range 8-18 years), and…

  12. Sleep Duration, Schedule and Quality among Urban Chinese Children and Adolescents: Associations with Routine After-School Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Hardy, Louise L.; Baur, Louise A; Ding, Ding; Wang, Ling; Shi, Huijing

    2015-01-01

    Background With rapid urbanization accompanied by lifestyle changes, children and adolescents living in metropolitan areas are faced with many time use choices that compete with sleep. This study reports on the sleep hygiene of urban Chinese school students, and investigates the relationship between habitual after-school activities and sleep duration, schedule and quality on a regular school day. Methods Cross-sectional, school-based survey of school children (Grades 4–8) living in Shanghai, ...

  13. Rumination syndrome in children and adolescents: a school survey assessing prevalence and symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajindrajith Shaman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rumination syndrome (RS is a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGD increasingly recognized in children and adolescents. The epidemiology of this condition in school aged children is poorly understood. The main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of rumination and other related associations in a cohort of Sri Lankan children. Methods Children aged 10-16 years were randomly selected from 8 schools in 4 provinces in Sri Lanka. RS was diagnosed using Rome III criteria. Data was collected using a self administered questionnaire distributed in an examination setting. It was translated into Sinhala, the native language and pretested before distribution. Results A total of 2163 children were included in the study (55% boys, mean age 13.4 years, SD 1.8 years. Prevalence of RS was 5.1% (n = 110; boys 5.1% and girls 5.0%. When symptoms were analyzed, 73.6% reported re-swallowing of regurgitated food, while the rest spat it out. In 94.5% regurgitation occurred during the first hour after the meal. Only 8.2% had daily symptoms while 62.7% had symptoms weekly. Abdominal pain, bloating and weight loss were the commonest symptoms associated with RS (19.1%, 17.3% and 11.8% respectively. No significant association was observed between exposure to stressful events and rumination (p > 0.05. Twenty (18.2% with RS fulfilled Rome III criteria for at least one other FGD. School absenteeism was seen in 11.8% of affected children. Conclusion RS was reasonably common in this cohort of school-aged children and adolescents in Sri Lanka. However, symptoms were severe enough to affect schooling only in 12% of affected children. Around one fifth with RS had at least one other overlapping FGD.

  14. The Impact of Education and School-Based Counseling on Children's and Adolescents' Views of Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shawanda W.; Moore, Paula A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if a school-based education and counseling program (Life Skills Training Program) would have an impact on school-aged children/adolescents' views of substance abuse. The study also investigated the degree and direction of change. Participants were 338 elementary or middle-school students in the metro…

  15. Screen Time and Sleep among School-Aged Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, Lauren; Guan, Stanford

    2014-01-01

    We systematically examined and updated the scientific literature on the association between screen time (e.g., television, computers, video games, and mobile devices) and sleep outcomes among school-aged children and adolescents. We reviewed 67 studies published from 1999 to early 2014. We found that screen time is adversely associated with sleep outcomes (primarily shortened duration and delayed timing) in 90% of studies. Some of the results varied by type of screen exposure, age of particip...

  16. Children's and adolescents' snacking : interplay between the individual and the school class

    OpenAIRE

    Giese, Helge; Tãut, Diana; Ollila, Hanna; Baban, Adriana S.; Absetz, Pilvikki; Schupp, Harald T.; Renner, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In schools, perceived norms of classmates facilitate but can also inhibit unhealthy food intake in children and adolescents. However, the role of actual class behaviors and attitudes is less established. Thus, the present study examined classmates' actual eating behavior and food preferences in relation to actual food intake. In addition, it tested whether these normative effects are facilitated by corresponding individual and class food preferences or a positive social self-concep...

  17. Nursing: promoting the health of overweight children and adolescents in the school context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Costa Gonzaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the nursing interventions related to the competencies of health promotion of overweight children and adolescents in the school context, in light of the Galway Consensus through an integrative review. Articles published between 1988 and June, 2013 were found in the databases CINAHL, SCOPUS, MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS and SciELO. A total of 139 publications were obtained from indexed descriptors. Ten articles were selected after reading. The most evident competencies for health promotion were: catalyzing change, needs assessment and impact assessment. The highlights were activities of health education and partnerships with other health professionals and the families of students. It was found that the skills of health promotion developed by nurses can contribute to the adoption of healthy habits by overweight children and adolescents.

  18. Electronic media use and sleep in school-aged children and adolescents: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Neralie; Gradisar, Michael

    2010-09-01

    Electronic media have often been considered to have a negative impact on the sleep of children and adolescents, but there are no comprehensive reviews of research in this area. The present study identified 36 papers that have investigated the relationship between sleep and electronic media in school-aged children and adolescents, including television viewing, use of computers, electronic gaming, and/or the internet, mobile telephones, and music. Many variables have been investigated across these studies, although delayed bedtime and shorter total sleep time have been found to be most consistently related to media use. A model of the mechanisms by which media use may affect sleep is presented and discussed as a vehicle for future research. PMID:20673649

  19. An Overview of International Literature on School Interventions to Promote Mental Health and Well-being in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Fiandra, Teresa Di; Rampazzo, Lorenzo; Contu, Paolo; Preti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Mental disorders are the largest cause of the burden of disease in the world. Most of the burden affecting adult life has its onset during childhood and adolescence. The European Pact for Mental Health and Wellbeing calls for immediate action and investments in the mental health of children and adolescents. Schools may be the ideal location for promoting health and delivering healthcare services, since schools are a location where young people usually spend their daytime and so...

  20. Bullying in Brazilian school children: analysis of the National Adolescent School-based Health Survey (PeNSE 2012

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    Deborah Carvalho Malta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the victimization and bullying practice in Brazilian school children, according to data from the National Adolescent School-based Health Survey and to compare the surveys from 2009 and 2012. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study with univariate and multivariate analyzes of the following variables: to have been treated badly by colleagues, to have been bullied and to have bullied other children. The following independent variables were analyzed: age, sex, race/color, type of school, maternal education. Prevalence rates were compared between the editions of 2009 and 2012 of the survey. RESULTS: Of all the adolescents analyzed, 27.5% have not been treated well by peers at school, with greater frequency among boys (OR = 1.50, at the age of 15 years (OR = 1.29 and 16 (OR = 1.41, public school students (OR = 2.08, black (OR = 1.18 and whose mothers had less education; 7.2% reported having been bullied, with a greater chance in younger students (13 years old, male (OR = 1.26, black (OR = 1.15 and indigenous (OR = 1.16 and whose mothers had less education; 20.8% reported to have bullied other children, with a greater chance for older students, at the age of 14 (OR = 1.08 and 15 years (OR = 1.18, male (OR = 1.87, black (OR = 1.14 and yellow (OR = 1.15, children of mothers with higher education, private school students. There was an increase of bullying in the Brazilian capitals, from 5.4 to 6.8%, between 2009 and 2012. DISCUSSION: The occurrence of bullying reveals that the Brazilian school context is also becoming a space of reproduction of violence, in which it is crucial to act intersectorally and to articulate social protection networks, aiming to face this issue.

  1. The Contribution of Active Journey to School to overall Physical Activity Level of Children and Adolescents: Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Jerina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Daily active journey (AJ to/from school can be an important source of physical activity (PA of children and adolescents, necessary for their overall development and health preservation. Yet, the relation between AJ to/from school and PA of children and adolescents is still not clear. The purpose of this article is to find out whether the AJ to/from school influences the rise of PA. Systematic examination of electronic databases such as MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Science Direct and Springerlink, in May 2012 helped us find relevant articles of which 18 met the criteria for inclusion in our review. Studies include children and adolescents aged 5 to 16 years and quantitatively analyse the relationship between AJ and PA. Fourteen out of eighteen studies report that children and adolescents who practice AJ accumulate more PA compared to those who are driven to/from school. At the same time 8 studies report a positive correlation between AJ to/from school and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA. More longitudinal studies would be necessary to get a deeper insight into the link between AJ and PA. Establishing uniformed criteria for monitoring AJ and PA and monitoring factors that influence the decision for the AJ would contribute to comparability of the results of individual studies and would at the same time make the development of effective intervention programmes for encouraging AJ among children and adolescents possible.

  2. Psychiatric disorders and MND in non-handicapped preterm children - Prevalence and stability from school age into adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoihorst, P. F.; Swaab-Barneveld, H.; van Engeland, H.

    2007-01-01

    In preterm children (N = 66) without major physical and/or mental handicaps the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and minor neurological dysfunction (MND) was assessed at school age (8-10 years). In adolescence (15-17 years) 43 children were reassessed. The study sample was drawn from a cohort of

  3. School-Based Anxiety Treatments for Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Herzig-Anderson, Kathleen; Colognori, Daniela; Fox, Jeremy K.; Stewart, Catherine E; Warner, Carrie Masia

    2012-01-01

    School-based empirically supported treatments for anxiety disorders are a promising avenue for providing necessary intervention to distressed youth who would otherwise never receive treatment. Sustaining such programs in school settings should be viewed as a multiple-stage process, from integration of the program into the institution and maintenance of the intervention to responding to institutional change and ownership of the program by the school.51 Given the scarce resources available to s...

  4. Breakfast glycaemic index and cognitive function in adolescent school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon B; Bandelow, Stephan; Nute, Maria L; Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E

    2012-06-01

    It has been suggested that a low-glycaemic index (GI) breakfast may be beneficial for some elements of cognitive function (e.g. memory and attention), but the effects are not clear, especially in adolescents. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of a low-GI breakfast, a high-GI breakfast and breakfast omission on cognitive function in adolescents. A total of fifty-two adolescents aged 12-14 years were recruited to participate in the study. Participants consumed a low-GI breakfast, a high-GI breakfast or omitted breakfast. A battery of cognitive function tests was completed 30 and 120 min following breakfast consumption and capillary blood samples were taken during the 120 min postprandial period. The findings show that there was a greater improvement in response times following a low-GI breakfast, compared with breakfast omission on the Stroop (P = 0·009) and Flanker (P = 0·041) tasks, and compared with a high-GI breakfast on the Sternberg paradigm (P = 0·013). Furthermore, accuracy on all three tests was better maintained on the low-GI trial compared with the high-GI (Stroop: P = 0·039; Sternberg: P = 0·018; Flanker: P = 0·014) and breakfast omission (Stroop: P breakfast, participants displayed a lower glycaemic response (P breakfast, but there was no difference in the insulinaemic response (P = 0·063) between the high- and low-GI breakfasts. Therefore, we conclude that a low-GI breakfast is most beneficial for adolescents' cognitive function, compared with a high-GI breakfast or breakfast omission. PMID:22017815

  5. Effect of social and environmental determinants on overweight and obesity prevalence among adolescent school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Overweight and obesity among children and adolescents is a public health concern. Objective: To assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity and its association with social and environmental determinants among the adolescent school children of Tirupati town of Andhra Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: Data was collected by interviewer-administered method from school children aged between 12 to 16 years. The sample consisted of 2258 subjects (1097 boys and 1161 girls. Overweight and obesity were defined by body mass index (BMI based on the current method recommended by the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention 2000. Data on social and environmental determinants were collected by using a pre-tested and validated questionnaire. Results: In the present sample, 11.2 percent and 4.8 percent of boys and 10.3 percent and 4.8 percent of girls were overweight and obese. The literacy level of parents, family income and child sleep duration significantly associated with overweight. Parental level of education was a risk factor for overweight (Mother: 1.570; 95% CI: 1.048-2.354. Similarly increase in family income (OR = 1.529; 95% CI: 1.089-2.148 and child sleep duration <7 hrs per day (OR = 2.006; 95% CI: 1.194-3.371 raised children′s association in gaining weight. Conclusion: Our study reinforces the burgeoning prevalence of overweight and obesity among the adolescents. Interventional measures taken should consider family, school and physical environment to check the problem of overweight/obesity.

  6. Prevalence of overweight, obesity and hypertension amongst school children and adolescents in North Karnataka: A cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikumar V Baradol; SV Patil; Anand Ranagol

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Childhood obesity& hypertension are global health problems as they caused increase in morbidity & mortality. Objective: To find out the prevalence of obesity, overweight in school going children and adolescents of north Karnataka. Also to study obesity related morbidities like Prehypertension and Hypertension and associated risk factors for sustained hypertension. Materials and Methods: Total 2800 children in age group from 10-16 years from 3 schools of Urban and rural region of...

  7. Overweight and television and computer habits in Swedish school-age children and adolescents: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Garmy, Pernilla; Clausson, Eva K.; Nyberg, Per; Jakobsson, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents (6–16 years), and relationships between being overweight and sleep, experiencing of fatigue, enjoyment of school, and time spent in watching television and in sitting at the computer. Trained school nurses measured the weight and height of 2891 children aged 6, 7, 10, 14, and 16, and distributed a questionnaire to them regarding television and computer habits, sleep, a...

  8. The Concerns of School Counselors-in-Training about Working with Children and Adolescents with HIV Disease: Training Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Jamie S.; Cobia, Debra C.

    2003-01-01

    Study assessed the knowledge, beliefs, and social comfort of school counselors-in-training, as related to working with children and adolescents who have or are affected by HIV, and these students' concerns and perceptions about their preparedness. Participants reported high levels of general knowledge and positive beliefs; however, they also…

  9. Obesity Prevention and Treatment in School-aged Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults—Where Do We Go from Here?

    OpenAIRE

    Karp, Sharon M.; Gesell, Sabina B.

    2015-01-01

    The rise in the rate of obesity in school-aged children, adolescents, and young adults in the last 30 years is a clear healthcare crisis that needs to be addressed. Despite recent national reports in the United States highlighting positive downward trends in the rate of obesity in younger children, we are still faced with approximately 12.7 million children struggling with obesity. Given the immediate and long-term health consequences of obesity, much time and effort has been expended to addr...

  10. Factors Related to Social Competence in Elementary School among Children of Adolescent Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Laura; Luster, Tom; Vandenbelt, Marcia

    2003-01-01

    This study examined factors related to social competence in first-grade children of low-income, adolescent mothers. Findings indicated that higher social skills and lower levels of problem behaviors related to higher quality parenting, higher academic skills, and residence in neighborhoods with lower poverty rates. Children with higher social…

  11. Moderating effect of the environment in the relationship between mobility and school participation in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheyla R. C. Furtado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The literature demonstrates that the social participation of children with disabilities is influenced by both their functional skills repertoire and environmental factors. However, it is not yet known whether the effect of functional limitations on social participation is minimized or enhanced by the environmental facilitators and barriers. This study aimed to test this hypothesis.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the moderating effect of environmental factors in the relationship between mobility and school participation of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP.METHOD: Participants were 102 elementary school children and adolescents with CP, aged 6 to 17 years, classified as levels I, II, and III according to the Gross Motor Classification System, along with their parents or caregivers and teachers. School participation and parents' perceptions of barriers were evaluated using the School Function Assessment and the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF, respectively.RESULTS: The regression model failed to reveal a moderating effect of environmental factors in the relationship between mobility and school participation. While mobility was a strong predictor of participation, environmental factors demonstrated a weak predictive effect on the latter. The CHIEF subscale school/work showed the factors which were greatest barrier to children's participation, while the subscale attitude/support had the least impact.CONCLUSION: The absence of moderation on the tested relationship suggests that, when investigated under the negative perspective of environmental barriers, the contextual factors do not modify the relationship between mobility and school participation. Factors specific to the school environment might add to the present study's results regarding the effect of school participation in this population.

  12. Patterns in consumption of potentially erosive beverages among adolescent school children in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. Gambon; H.S. Brand; C. Boutkabout; D. Levie; E.C.I. Veerman

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of intake and patterns in consumption of potentially erosive beverages in school children in the Netherlands. METHODS: A cross-sectional, single centre study was performed among 502 school children in Rotterdam, in age varying between 12 and 19 years. Data on consumpt

  13. Screen time and sleep among school-aged children and adolescents: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lauren; Guan, Stanford

    2015-06-01

    We systematically examined and updated the scientific literature on the association between screen time (e.g., television, computers, video games, and mobile devices) and sleep outcomes among school-aged children and adolescents. We reviewed 67 studies published from 1999 to early 2014. We found that screen time is adversely associated with sleep outcomes (primarily shortened duration and delayed timing) in 90% of studies. Some of the results varied by type of screen exposure, age of participant, gender, and day of the week. While the evidence regarding the association between screen time and sleep is consistent, we discuss limitations of the current studies: 1) causal association not confirmed; 2) measurement error (of both screen time exposure and sleep measures); 3) limited data on simultaneous use of multiple screens, characteristics and content of screens used. Youth should be advised to limit or reduce screen time exposure, especially before or during bedtime hours to minimize any harmful effects of screen time on sleep and well-being. Future research should better account for the methodological limitations of the extant studies, and seek to better understand the magnitude and mechanisms of the association. These steps will help the development and implementation of policies or interventions related to screen time among youth. PMID:25193149

  14. A national school-based health lifestyles interventions among Chinese children and adolescents against obesity: rationale, design and methodology of a randomized controlled trial in China

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yajun; Ma, Lu; Ma, Yinghua; Wang, Haijun; Luo, Jiayou; Xin ZHANG; Luo, Chunyan; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Haiping; Pan, Dehong; Zhu, Yanna; Cai, Li; Zou, Zhiyong; Yang, Wenhan; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents has been rapidly rising in Mainland China in recent decades, both in urban and rural areas. There is an urgent need to develop effective interventions to prevent childhood obesity. Limited rigid data regarding children and adolescent overweight prevention in China are available. A national random controlled school-based obesity intervention program was developed in the mainland of China. Methods/Design The study was designed ...

  15. Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders: Strategies for Teachers and School Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Ronald S.; Rickson, Heidi; Standeven, Bill

    2000-01-01

    this article provides an overview of anorexia nervosa and bulimia in children and adolescents, including ages of onset, prevalence, and clinical characteristics. Behavior, cognitive, and affective characteristics are outlined. Strategies are provided for teachers and counselors who are concerned about students who have or may have eating…

  16. Risk Factors for Persistent Fatigue With Significant School Absence in Children and Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Robert J.; van de Putte, Elise M.; Kuis, Wietse; Sinnema, Gerben

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess children and adolescents with severe fatigue who are referred to pediatricians and to examine whether factors can be identified at their first visit that predict worse outcomes at 1 year. METHODS: Ninety-one patients, aged 8 to 18 years completed questionnaires about sleep, soma

  17. Sleep duration, schedule and quality among urban Chinese children and adolescents: associations with routine after-school activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With rapid urbanization accompanied by lifestyle changes, children and adolescents living in metropolitan areas are faced with many time use choices that compete with sleep. This study reports on the sleep hygiene of urban Chinese school students, and investigates the relationship between habitual after-school activities and sleep duration, schedule and quality on a regular school day. METHODS: Cross-sectional, school-based survey of school children (Grades 4-8 living in Shanghai, China, conducted in 2011. Self-reported data were collected on students' sleep duration and timing, sleep quality, habitual after-school activities (i.e. homework, leisure-time physical activity, recreational screen time and school commuting time, and potential correlates. RESULTS: Mean sleep duration of this sample (mean age: 11.5-years; 48.6% girls was 9 hours. Nearly 30% of students reported daytime tiredness. On school nights, girls slept less (p<0.001 and went to bed later (p<0.001, a sex difference that was more pronounced in older students. Age by sex interactions were observed for both sleep duration (p=0.005 and bedtime (p=0.002. Prolonged time spent on homework and mobile phone playing was related to shorter sleep duration and later bedtime. Adjusting for all other factors, with each additional hour of mobile phone playing, the odds of daytime tiredness and having difficulty maintaining sleep increased by 30% and 27% among secondary students, respectively. CONCLUSION: There are sex differences in sleep duration, schedule and quality. Habitual activities had small but significant associations with sleep hygiene outcomes especially among secondary school students. Intervention strategies such as limiting children's use of electronic screen devices after school are implicated.

  18. The impact of parental migration on health status and health behaviours among left behind adolescent school children in China

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    Congdon Nathan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One out of ten of China's population are migrants, moving from rural to urban areas. Many leave their families behind resulting in millions of school children living in their rural home towns without one or both their parents. Little is known about the health status of these left behind children (LBC. This study compares the health status and health-related behaviours of left behind adolescent school children and their counterparts in a rural area in Southern China. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among middle school students in Fuyang Township, Guangdong, China (2007-2008. Information about health behaviours, parental migration and demographic characteristics was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Overweight/obesity and stunting were defined based on measurements of height and weight. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to estimate the differences in health outcomes between LBC and non-LBC. Results 18.1% of the schoolchildren had one or both parents working away from home. Multivariate analysis showed that male LBC were at higher risk of skipping breakfast, higher levels of physical inactivity, internet addiction, having ever smoked tobacco, suicide ideation, and being overweight. LBC girls were more likely to drink excessive amounts of sweetened beverage, to watch more TV, to have ever smoked or currently smoke tobacco, to have ever drunk alcohol and to binge drinking. They were also more likely to be unhappy, to think of planning suicide and consider leaving home. Conclusions Our findings suggest that parental migration is a risk factor for unhealthy behaviours amongst adolescent school children in rural China. Further research is required in addition to the consideration of the implications for policies and programmes to protect LBC.

  19. Treating Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dosages also must be tailored, based upon the child's weight. Children and adolescents are moving through a period of physical and emotional growth and development. Special consideration must be given to potential side ...

  20. Overweight and television and computer habits in Swedish school-age children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmy, Pernilla; Clausson, Eva K; Nyberg, Per; Jakobsson, Ulf

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents (6-16 years), and relationships between being overweight and sleep, experiencing of fatigue, enjoyment of school, and time spent in watching television and in sitting at the computer. Trained school nurses measured the weight and height of 2891 children aged 6, 7, 10, 14, and 16, and distributed a questionnaire to them regarding television and computer habits, sleep, and enjoyment of school. Overweight, obesity included, was present in 16.1% of the study population. Relationships between lifestyle factors and overweight were studied using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Having a bedroom television and spending more than 2 h a day watching television were found to be associated with overweight (OR 1.26 and 1.55 respectively). No association was found between overweight and time spent at the computer, short sleep duration, enjoyment of school, tiredness at school, or difficulties in sleeping and waking up. It is recommended that the school health service discuss with pupils their media habits so as to promote their maintaining a healthy lifestyle. PMID:23796145

  1. Fast foods and physical inactivity are risk factors for obesity and hypertension among adolescent school children in east district of Sikkim, India

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Sumit; Khandelwal, Bidita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity and hypertension among school children have a huge impact on public health. Hence, we estimated the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of childhood obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP) among adolescent schoolchildren (11-19 years) in urban areas of Gangtok, Sikkim, India. Materials and Methods: A population based cross-sectional study was conducted on 979 school children, during November 1, 2009 - April 30, 2010 in Gangtok, East Sikkim India. Anthropometric mea...

  2. Researching health inequalities in adolescents: the development of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) family affluence scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Currie, Candace; Molcho, Michal; Boyce, William;

    2008-01-01

    Scale (FAS), in the context of an international study on adolescent health, the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) Study. The paper reviews the evolution of the measure over the past 10 years and its utility in examining and explaining health related inequalities at national and cross......, psychosomatic symptoms, physical activity and aspects of eating habits at both the individual and country level. FAS has recently been adopted, and in some cases adapted, by other research and policy related studies and this work is also reviewed. Finally, ongoing FAS validation work is described together with...

  3. Role of dietary habits and diet in caries occurrence and severity among urban adolescent school children

    OpenAIRE

    V C Punitha; A Amudhan; P. Sivaprakasam; Rathanaprabu, V.

    2015-01-01

    To identify the role of dietary habits (type of diet, skipping meals, snacking in-between meals and frequency of visits to fast food restaurants) in caries occurrence and severity. To explore the correlation between frequency of intake of selected foods and dental caries. A cross-sectional study was carried out on adolescent children (n = 916) of age 13-19, following a two-stage random sampling technique. Data were collected using a pretested questionnaire. Questionnaire included demographic ...

  4. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder in children and adolescents from public schools in Southern Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Minghelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD in children and adolescents is in the range of 6-68% and can be triggered or aggravated by emotional stress. Aim: The study was to investigate the prevalence of TMD in Portuguese children and adolescents and its association with emotional stress. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised 3,260 students aged 5-19 years. The questionnaire was used to assess the presence of TMD, and was applied in a single moment. Results: TMD was observed in 821 (25.2% students. The most common symptoms of TMD were: if considered tense or nervous (52%, have headaches (36.8%, and habit of clenching or grinding teeth (27.3%. The girls had a 1.36 higher probability of developing TMD than boys (95% CI: 1.14-1.63; p < 0.001; moreover, students from the older age group had a 2.31 higher probability of developing the disorder (95% CI: 1.85-2.89; p < 0.001. Students who considered themselves tense or nervous presented 8.74 higher probability (95% CI: 7.03-10.86; p < 0.001 of developing TMD. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of TMD in children and adolescents in southern Portugal, and revealed a significant association between this dysfunction and the levels of emotional stress. Female students, older students, and those considered tense or nervous have a higher probability of developing TMD.

  5. [Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa in school children and adolescents : Clinical picture and interdisciplinary management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, H; Eich, C; Schriek, K; Ludwikowski, B

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa (EB) represents a clinically heterogeneous group of congenital blistering disorders requiring multiprofessional care. EB is associated with a broad spectrum of potentially severe complications often reaching their full extent during school age and adolescence. This review aims at summarizing cutaneous manifestations of EB as well as extracutaneous complications of this complex disease and their interdisciplinary management. PMID:26943360

  6. Upper arm composition and nutritional status of school children and adolescents in Abeokuta, Southwest Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Idowu Odunayo Senbanjo; Kazeem Adeola Oshikoya; Olisamedua Fidelis Njokanma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Upper arm composition is a reflection of body protein and calorie reserves. However, there is a paucity of data on upper arm composition of children from African countries, including Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the composition of upper arm and nutritional status of school children in Abeokuta, Nigeria and to compare with international reference standards. The sensitivity and specifi city of upper arm muscle area by height (UAMAH) as a nutritional assessment tool was also determined. Methods: Five hundred and seventy children aged 5 to 19 years were selected from seven schools using multistage random sampling. Weight, height, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and triceps skin fold thickness (TSF) were measured. Body mass index, upper arm muscle area (UAMA), upper arm fat area (UAFA), fat percentage and UAMAH were derived. Results: The TSF, UAFA and fat percentage were significantly higher in females than males at each age group. MUAC and UAMA were significantly higher in female children aged 10-14 years, whereas UAMA was significantly higher in male children aged 15-19 years. UAMA and UAFA of the children were lower than those of Americans but similar to those of Zimbabweans, and higher than those of Indians. The sensitivity and specifi city of UAMAH for detecting wasting were 80.8% and 63.9%, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for stunting were 32.2% and 58.2%, respectively. Conclusions: The school children studied have a combination of poor calorie and protein reserve. UAMAH may be a valuable tool for complete evaluation of the nutritional status of school children.

  7. Role of dietary habits and diet in caries occurrence and severity among urban adolescent school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punitha, V C; Amudhan, A; Sivaprakasam, P; Rathanaprabu, V

    2015-04-01

    To identify the role of dietary habits (type of diet, skipping meals, snacking in-between meals and frequency of visits to fast food restaurants) in caries occurrence and severity. To explore the correlation between frequency of intake of selected foods and dental caries. A cross-sectional study was carried out on adolescent children (n = 916) of age 13-19, following a two-stage random sampling technique. Data were collected using a pretested questionnaire. Questionnaire included demographic details, dietary habits of children and food frequency table that listed selected food items. The dependent variable-dental caries was measured using the decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) index. The prevalence of dental caries in this study population was 36.7% (95% confidence interval: 33.58-39.82). The mean DMFT was 1.01 (±1.74). No statistically significant difference found between caries occurrence and type of diet (P = 0.07), skipping meals (P = 0.86), frequency of eating in fast food stalls (0.86) and snacking in between meals (0.08). Mean DMFT values were higher among nonvegetarians and among children who had the habit of snacking in between meals. Frequency of intake of selected food items showed that mean frequency intake of carbonated drinks and confectionery was higher among children who presented with caries when compared to caries-free children (P = 0.000). Significant correlation found between mean DMFT and mean frequency intake of carbonated drinks and confectionery. Odds ratios were calculated for the same for frequency ≥4 times/day for confectionery and ≥4/week for carbonated drinks and results discussed. Frequent intake of carbonated drinks and confectionery is harmful to oral health that eventually reflects on general health. Educating the adolescent children on healthy dietary habits should be put in the forefront. PMID:26015737

  8. Role of dietary habits and diet in caries occurrence and severity among urban adolescent school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V C Punitha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the role of dietary habits (type of diet, skipping meals, snacking in-between meals and frequency of visits to fast food restaurants in caries occurrence and severity. To explore the correlation between frequency of intake of selected foods and dental caries. A cross-sectional study was carried out on adolescent children (n = 916 of age 13-19, following a two-stage random sampling technique. Data were collected using a pretested questionnaire. Questionnaire included demographic details, dietary habits of children and food frequency table that listed selected food items. The dependent variable-dental caries was measured using the decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT index. The prevalence of dental caries in this study population was 36.7% (95% confidence interval: 33.58-39.82. The mean DMFT was 1.01 (±1.74. No statistically significant difference found between caries occurrence and type of diet (P = 0.07, skipping meals (P = 0.86, frequency of eating in fast food stalls (0.86 and snacking in between meals (0.08. Mean DMFT values were higher among nonvegetarians and among children who had the habit of snacking in between meals. Frequency of intake of selected food items showed that mean frequency intake of carbonated drinks and confectionery was higher among children who presented with caries when compared to caries-free children (P = 0.000. Significant correlation found between mean DMFT and mean frequency intake of carbonated drinks and confectionery. Odds ratios were calculated for the same for frequency ≥4 times/day for confectionery and ≥4/week for carbonated drinks and results discussed. Frequent intake of carbonated drinks and confectionery is harmful to oral health that eventually reflects on general health. Educating the adolescent children on healthy dietary habits should be put in the forefront.

  9. BMI, Waist Circumference Reference Values for Chinese School-Aged Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peige; Li, Xue; Gasevic, Danijela; Flores, Ana Borges; Yu, Zengli

    2016-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity has become one of the most serious public health challenges in the 21st century in most developing countries. The percentile curve tool is useful for monitoring and screening obesity at population level, however, in China, no official recommendations on childhood body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) reference percentiles have been made in practice. Aims: to construct the percentile reference values for BMI and WC, and then to calculate the prevalence of overall and abdominal obesity for Chinese children and adolescents. Methods: A total of 5062 anthropometric records for children and adolescents aged from 7 to 18 years (2679 boys and 2383 girls) were included for analysis. The participants were recruited as part of the national representative “China Health and Nutrition Survey” (CHNS). Age, gender, weight, height, and WC were assessed. Smoothed BMI and WC percentile curves and values for the 3rd, 5th, 10th, 15th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th, 95th and 97th percentiles were constructed by using the Lambda-Mu-Sigma (LMS) method. The prevalence estimates of the overall and abdominal obesity were calculated by using the cut-offs from our CHNS study and the previous “Chinese National Survey on Students’ Constitution and Health” (CNSSCH) study, respectively. The difference between prevalence estimates was tested by a McNemar test, and the agreement between these prevalence estimates was calculated by using the Cohen’s kappa coefficient. Results: The prevalence values of overall obesity based on the cut-offs from CHNS and CNSSCH studies were at an almost perfect agreement level in boys (κ = 0.93). However, among girls, the overall obesity prevalence differed between the studies (p children and adolescents aged 7–18 years, which can be adopted in future researches. Large longitudinal study is still needed to reveal the childhood growth pattern and validate the inconsistence between different percentile studies

  10. Depression in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Noel M.

    2005-01-01

    During the past 20 years, depression has been recognized widely in children and adolescents. However, even with what is known today about depression, many children and adolescents remain undiagnosed. Early recognition is imperative to prevent further episodes that may continue into adulthood. Depression in children and adolescents affects social…

  11. [School difficulties in adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenberg, T L; Buffone, M R; Scardia, C; Facente, C

    2002-12-01

    Loss, failure and desertion are those words, which better describe the most frequent difficulties incurred by teenagers, and their relation to the school environment, and indicate, as well, the lack of connection between individual aspirations and school achievements obtained. Despite the likelihood of school difficulties throughout the entire educational career, from the kindergarten to the college, we are able to recognize certain specific "disturbances" which come out during the adolescence, basically relating to the school experiences. School failure, school desertion and school abandonment are, in fact, issues mainly discussed in coincidence with the beginning of the adolescent age and the attending of the high school. The aetiopathogenesis of school discomfort is mostly determined by more than only one factor: psychological, physical, cognitive and environmental aspects, all together, contribute in various ways, to the rise and persisting of the above described problems. Suggesting a univocal characterization of the adolescent with school difficulties, is indeed a hard task, since school failure is not an exclusive feature of only one kind of personality or the expression of only one type of conflict. Once identified the individuals more subject to risk, and the warning signs of actual uneasiness, it is important therefore to intervene timely and in different ways in order to avoid the worsening or the excessive extension of the school difficulties and of their frequent and serious consequences on the teenagers' individual and domestic well-being. Such type of prevention definitely belongs to the Adolescent Medicine, and must be developed on different levels, by involving not only the teenagers, but also their families, the school, and the whole social environment in which the teenagers live and with which they interact. PMID:12388952

  12. PREVALENCE OF OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY IN ADOLESCENT SCHOOL CHILDREN WITH REFERENCE TO BODY MASS INDEX AND LIPID PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: According to World Health Organization estimates, by the year 2020, non-communicable diseases accounts for three quarters of all deaths in the developing world. India is in the midst of rapidly escalating epidemic of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Coronary Heart Disease. Obesity seems to have a central role in this cluster. The key to Obesity prevention is to screen, intervene early, and incorporate physical activity and dietary modifications. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in obese & adolescent school children with reference to BMI and lipid profile, and to compare the Children belonging to High and Low Socioeconomic status. METHODS: An Institution based cross-sectional study conducted in Niloufer Hospital, Hyderabad a tertiary care teaching Hospital for a period of nine months. Affluent and poor socioeconomic status segments of age group of 11-17 years of both genders are taken for the study. 800 children were studied, Inclusion and Exclusion criteria were fallowed, a structured proforma was designed for the study and analysis was done using SPSS windows version 15.0. Mean Values and Standard deviations of the clinical and laboratory data of the children and frequency of cardiovascular risk factors were calculated. RESULTS: out of 800 adolescent School Children studying VI to X Standards of age groups of 11-17 years of both genders, 390 children from HSES were surveyed and 59.74% were males (n=233 and 40.25% were females (n=157 and the prevalence of obesity, Diabetes mellitus, and coronary Heart disease in parents of children of HSES is more in comparison with LSES. Out 65 overweight/obese children evaluated for metabolic Syndrome and presence of cardiovascular risk factors, 25% of them are obese (n=16. 75% of them are overweight (n=49. CONCLUSION: this study showed that clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic Syndrome has its origin in childhood and they are strongly associated with obesity

  13. Height and weight of school children and adolescent girls and boys in Oslo 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundtland, G H; Liestöl, K; Wallöe, L

    1975-07-01

    Height and weight measurements of the school children of Oslo in 1970 (aged 7 to 19 years) are reported. Weights show considerably skewed distributions with long tails towards higher weights. Weight precentiles are calculated by interpolation in the empirical distributions. Percentiles and tables for both sexes, showing height for age, weight for height and weight for age, are presented. A comparison with existing Norwegian data from Sundal, 1956, Bergen shows that the application of statistics based on normal distribution for weight, has introduced considerable error in these percentiles. Oslo children in 1970 are taller by 5-6 cm at age eighteen, than USA (Iowa) standards and 4-5 cm taller compared to Tanner-s English percentiles. Oslo children are also taller than Swedish children, and have reached a stature higher than found in any other comparable study. PMID:1155076

  14. Screening of Adolescents for Eye Diseases in Nigerian High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Adegbehingbe, BO; Oladehinde, MK; Majemgbasan, TO; Onakpoya, HO; Osagiede, EO

    2005-01-01

    The effectiveness of pre-entrance eye screening programmes for school age children is still controversial. A point prevalence study of high school adolescents was conducted to determine the magnitude of undiagnosed eye diseases and offer appropriate treatment where feasible.

  15. Outdoor ultraviolet exposure of children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weekday and weekend outdoor ultraviolet exposure of young people from primary and secondary schools in three geographically distinct regions of England was determined over a 3-month period in summer. Ultraviolet exposure was measured using personal film badges worn by each young person and time spent outdoors, in hourly intervals, assessed using exposure records. In each area a class of 9-10 year-old children from a primary school and a class of 14-15-year-old adolescents from a secondary school took part, giving a total of 180 subjects. We found that primary school children received higher outdoor ultraviolet exposure than young people in secondary schools, and geographical differences in exposure could not be accounted for solely by differences in ambient ultraviolet. There was little difference between the exposure of males and females. Children and adolescents did not behave as homogeneous groups with regard to exposure. (Author)

  16. The work of tutors with children/adolescents with special needs in boarding schools in Northeast Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Roškar, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    As part of school system, boarding schools allow education and training for those children who are attending schools outside their place of residence. Considering the concept of inclusion and integration they also offer this possibility for people with special needs, and it is also one of the tasks of boarding schools that they integrate students with special needs among them. Tutor is an important factor in the educational process in a boarding school. He helps and supports children, he o...

  17. Death among children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001915.htm Death among children and adolescents To use the sharing features on ... injuries) are, by far, the leading cause of death among children and teens. THE TOP THREE CAUSES OF DEATH ...

  18. Preventing Eating and Body Image Problems in Children and Adolescents Using the Health Promoting Schools Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Jennifer; Maloney, Danielle

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Health Promoting Schools Framework and its implementation in schools to prevent eating and body image disorders, examining the efficacy of preventive school-based strategies. The framework encompasses: school curriculum, teaching, and learning; school ethos, environment, and organization; and school-community partnerships and…

  19. The mental health of adolescent school children: a comparison among Japan, Korea, and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houri, Daisuke; Nam, Eun Woo; Choe, Eun Hee; Min, Liu Zhong; Matsumoto, Kenji

    2012-09-01

    This study compared the mental health of adolescents in three countries in northeast Asia: Japan, South Korea, and China. The study sample included a total of 1,399 third graders at junior high schools: 632 from Yonago City and Tottori City in Japan, 377 from Wonju City in Korea, and 390 from Changchun City in China. Mental health was measured by the Ochanomizu University Health Examination, which includes mental health scales composed of somatic symptoms, eating disorders, depression, interpersonal relationships, powerlessness, and impulsiveness; self-resilience; familial relationships; friendships; a feeling of gloom during the previous month; current well-being; and counseling. The results of this study were as follows: first, Japanese students experienced more difficulties in interpersonal relationships and experienced more feelings of powerlessness than Korean and Chinese students. Korean students were vulnerable to somatic symptoms and impulsiveness, whereas Chinese students experienced more depression than Korean and Japanese students. Second, more female students were in the poor mental health group than male students. Third, Japanese female students ranked the lowest of all groups for the Resilience Index scores. Fourth, when in need of counseling, students solicited advice from teachers (classroom teachers, health teachers or club teachers) about their study-related problems, and asked for advice from friends regarding problems or worries about peer and family relations. However, a number of students received no counseling for their troubles. The study concluded that it is necessary to promote a healthy environment for students, with easy access to counseling from mental health care professionals. PMID:24802782

  20. Nutritional knowledge, practice, and dietary habits among school children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Manouchehri Naeeni

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results showed that adolescents failed to meet sufficient nutritional requirements, and they had an imbalanced diet, which was considerably low in several essential nutrients and high in some food materials.

  1. Disguised Distress in Children and Adolescents "Flying under the Radar": Why Psychological Problems Are Underestimated and How Schools Must Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, Gordon L.; Hewitt, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    It is now recognized that there is a very high prevalence of psychological disorders among children and adolescents and relatively few receive psychological treatment. In the current article, we present the argument that levels of distress and dysfunction among young people are substantially underestimated and the prevalence of psychological…

  2. A feasibility study of wearable activity monitors for pre-adolescent school-aged children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding physical activity is key in the fight against childhood obesity. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using certain wearable devices to measure physical activity among children. A qualitative study was conducted with 25 children aged 7 to 10 years to assess ac...

  3. A feasibility study of wearable activity monitors for pre-adolescent school-age children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding physical activity is the key to fighting childhood obesity. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using certian wearable devices to measure physical activity among children. A qualitative study was conducted with 25 children aged 7 to 10 yearsto assess acceptabi...

  4. Sexuality Education for Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuner, Cora C; Mattson, Gerri

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to provide pediatricians updated research on evidence-based sexual and reproductive health education conducted since the original clinical report on the subject was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2001. Sexuality education is defined as teaching about human sexuality, including intimate relationships, human sexual anatomy, sexual reproduction, sexually transmitted infections, sexual activity, sexual orientation, gender identity, abstinence, contraception, and reproductive rights and responsibilities. Developmentally appropriate and evidence-based education about human sexuality and sexual reproduction over time provided by pediatricians, schools, other professionals, and parents is important to help children and adolescents make informed, positive, and safe choices about healthy relationships, responsible sexual activity, and their reproductive health. Sexuality education has been shown to help to prevent and reduce the risks of adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections for children and adolescents with and without chronic health conditions and disabilities in the United States. PMID:27432844

  5. School Climate, Discrimination, and Depressive Symptoms among Asian American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cixin; Atwal, Kavita

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined a multidimensional, developmental, and transactional model for depressive symptoms among Asian American adolescents using longitudinal data from 1,664 Asian American adolescents in the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS). Specifically, the relationships among school climate, acculturation, perceived…

  6. Transgender Children in Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Hellen, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article is intended to provide evidence to suggest that information for teachers regarding transgender children does not represent an adequate picture of transgendered children in schools and that primary schools need to be made more aware of how to deal with transgender children, even if these children do not make themselves known to staff. It will argue that this is probably a contributing factor in transgender children’s underachievement in school. The implications of this research...

  7. What about School? Educational Challenges for Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnan, Barbara M.; Webster, Tracey; Wakefield, Claire E.; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Alvaro, Frank; Lavoipierre, Jenny; Marshall, Glenn M.

    2015-01-01

    Many students treated for cancer experience significant challenges in maintaining their education during and beyond cancer treatment. Late effects of cancer treatment combined with prolonged periods of missed schooling can dramatically impact upon a student's physical, cognitive and social development. This study examined the relationship between…

  8. Obesity in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Cali', Anna M. G.; Caprio, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    Context: Although the prevalence rates of childhood obesity have seemingly been stable over the past few years, far too many children and adolescents are still obese. Childhood obesity, and its associated metabolic complications, is rapidly emerging as one of the greatest global challenges of the 21st century. About 110 million children are now classified as overweight or obese.

  9. Muslim Children's Other School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Leslie C.

    2012-01-01

    Millions of Muslim children around the world participate in Qur'anic schooling. For some, this is their only formal schooling experience; others attend both Qur'anic school and secular school. Qur'anic schooling emphasizes memorization and reproduction (recitation, reading, and transcription) of Qur'anic texts without comprehension of their…

  10. Quality of life, school backpack weight, and nonspecific low back pain in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela B. Macedo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe the degree of disability, anthropometric variables, quality of life (QoL, and school backpack weight in boys and girls aged 11-17 years. The differences in QoL between those who did or did not report low back pain (LBP were also analyzed. METHODS: Eighty-six girls (13.9 ± 1.9 years of age and 63 boys (13.7 ± 1.7 years of age participated. LBP was assessed by questionnaire, and disability using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. QoL was assessed by the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL. Multivariate analyses of variance and covariance were used to assess differences between groups. RESULTS: Girls reported higher disability than boys (p = 0.01, and lower QoL in the domains of physical (p < 0.001 and emotional functioning (p < 0.01, psychosocial health (p = 0.02 and physical health summary score (p < 0.001, and on the total PedsQL score (p < 0.01. School backpack weight was similar in both genders (p = 0.61 and in participants with and without LBP (p = 0.15. After adjustments, participants with LBP reported lower physical functioning (p < 0.01, influencing lower physical health summary score (p < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Girls had higher disability and lower QoL than boys in the domains of physical and emotional functioning, psychosocial health, and physical health summary scores, and on the total PedsQL score; however, similar school backpack weight was reported. Participants with LBP revealed lower physical functioning and physical health summary score, yet had similar school backpack weight to those without LBP.

  11. Psychosomatic problems and countermeasures in Japanese children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka Hidetaka; Terashima Shigenori; Borres Magnus P; Thulesius Olav

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In Japan there are a number of children and adolescents with emotion-related disorders including psychosomatic diseases (orthostatic dysregulation, anorexia nervosa, recurrent pains), behavior problems and school absenteeism. According to our previous report, the Japanese children had significantly higher score of physical symptoms and psychiatric complaints than did the Swedish children, and these were more strongly influenced by school-related stress than by home-related stress. To...

  12. [Trends in subjective health and well-being of children and adolescents in Germany: results of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study 2002 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottova, V; Hillebrandt, D; Ravens-Sieberer, U

    2012-07-01

    The monitoring of health through the analysis of trends provides important information on the long-term development of key outcome parameters for health. Currently, Germany does not have any reliable data on trends in the health situation of young people.The presented results are based on the German trend data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study. Data were analysed for a representative sample of 11-, 13- and 15-year-old school children from 2002 (N=5 650), 2006 (N=7 274) and 2010 (N=5 005). First, a comparison between German and international HBSC trend data was conducted for subjective health, life satisfaction and health complaints in 2002, 2006 and 2010. Next, a logistic regression was calculated to further describe the trends for these outcomes in the German data set.Overall, children and adolescents in Germany report good health. The comparison with the international data further supports this finding. Detailed analyses of trends showed that the health level generally improved between 2002 and 2010 for German children. In particular, better subjective health and lower rates of multiple recurrent health complaints were reported. Irrespective of the survey year, girls and older adolescents reported the highest level of health impairment.Trend analyses contribute towards health politics not only by providing information on the health situation across time, but also by pointing out the long-term effects of measures at the macro level (such as national health programmes, interventions) on children's health. PMID:22836886

  13. Health Related Physical Fitness Among Adolescence School Boys Of Puducherry

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ramajayam; V. Gopinath

    2013-01-01

    Socio economic transformation over the previous decade may have created a less active life style and a decline in fitness among world wise children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to analysis the health related physical fitness among adolescents school boys of Puducherry. The sampling procedure used in this study large distribution of random population. To achieve this purpose the health related physical fitness of different age group 13, 14, 15 and 16 yrs school going boys of Pudu...

  14. Adolescent Marijuana Use and School Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, M. Christopher; French, Michael T.; Dennis, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between adolescent marijuana use and school attendance. Data were pooled from the 1997 and 1998 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse to form a sample of 15 168 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, who had not yet complete high school. The analysis determined the role of marijuana use in adolescent school dropout…

  15. Physical fitness in relation to transport to school in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lawlor, D A; Cooper, A R;

    2008-01-01

    In many Western countries, there are concerns about declining levels of physical activity in school-aged children. Active transport is one way to increase physical activity in children, but few studies have evaluated whether active transport in school-aged children and adolescents has beneficial ......-time sports participation. Our findings suggest that commuter bicycling may be a way to improve health in adolescents....... aerobic power than both walkers and passive travelers (4.6-5.9%). Isometric muscle endurance (10-16%), dynamic muscle endurance in the abdominal muscles (10%) and flexibility (6%) were also higher in cyclists compared with walkers and passive travelers. Mode of travel was not related to leisure...

  16. Blood Pressure Percentiles for School Children

    OpenAIRE

    İsmail Özanli; Sebahat Tülpar; Yunus Yılmaz; Fatih Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of hypertension in childhood and adolescence is gradually increasing. We aimed to in­vestigate the blood pressure (BP) values of children aged 7-18 years. Methods: This study was conducted in a total of 3375 (1777 females, 1598 males) children from 27 schools. Blood pressures of children were measured using sphyg­momanometer appropriate to arm circumference. Results: A positive relationship was found between sys­tolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pr...

  17. Asthma care for children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among young children and adolescents. With high quality health care, most children and adolescents with asthma can live an active and normal life. Yet, many children and adolescents have uncontrolled asthma, with symptoms and exacerbations which may affect their daily life. Adolescence is a sensitive period and asthma may be difficult to treat due to poor adherence to treatment. Little is known about health care professionals’ adhe...

  18. School for beggars' children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eferaro, S; Uloko, S D

    1993-01-01

    The children of blind beggars lead their parents around to beg for alms instead of going to school. 5 years of research however, supported by the Human Development Foundation in Nigeria found that adult beggars want their children to get educated, but did not think it possible. A special school for beggars' children was established by the foundation in 1990 with 30 children aged 6-12 years. The children attend school daily from 2 to 5 P.M. and help their blind parents in the mornings and evenings. Students receive free uniforms, writing materials and books, and are fed free during school hours. This school has attracted the attention of UNICEF which has been offering aid in the form of technical and teaching materials. The program has proved so successful, however, that demand is outpacing the supply of available teachers and teaching space. More room and more teachers are needed. Fund-raisers are being organized to that end. PMID:12318634

  19. Adolescent and School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT) HECAT FAQs Health Education Teacher Training Manual Publications, Journal Articles, and Resources Sexual Risk Behavior Guidelines & Resources Adolescent Health Publications & Resources Additional Protective Factors Resources Journal ...

  20. School, family and adolescent smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yañez, Aina; Leiva, Alfonso; Gorreto, Lucia; Estela, Andreu; Tejera, Elena; Torrent, Maties

    2013-01-01

    The socio-cultural environment is an important factor involved with the onset of smoking during adolescence. Initiation of cigarette smoking occurs almost exclusively during this stage. In this context we aimed to analyze the association of school and family factors with adolescent smoking by a cross-sectional study of 16 secondary schools randomly selected from the Balearic Islands involved 3673 students and 530 teachers. The prevalence of regular smoking (at least one cigarette per week) was 4.8% among first year students, 11.6% among second year students, 14.1% among third year students, 20.9% among fourth year students and 22% among teachers. Among first and second year students, there were independent associations between regular smoking and adolescents' perception of being allowed to smoke at home, belonging to a single parent family, poor relationship with parents, poor academic performance, lack of interest in studies and teachers' perception of smoking in the presence of pupils. Among third and fourth year students, there were independent associations between regular smoking and poor relationship with parents, adolescents' perception of being allowed to smoke at home, poor academic performance, lack of control over student misbehavior and the school attended. The school policies and practices affect student related health behavior regarding smoking, independent of individual and family factors. PMID:23880838

  1. Temporal Trends in Overweight and Obesity, Physical Activity and Screen Time among Czech Adolescents from 2002 to 2014: A National Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Sigmund

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines trends in overweight and obesity, physical activity (PA and screen time (ST among Czech adolescents over a recent 12-year study period. Nationally representative samples consisted of 19,940 adolescents (9760 boys and 10,180 girls aged 10.5–16.5 years from the Czech Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC questionnaire-based surveys conducted in 2002, 2006, 2010 and 2014. Trends in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, meeting the recommendations for moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA (≥60 min per day of MVPA and excessive ST (>2 h per day were estimated using logistic regression. Significant increases (p < 0.001 in the prevalence of overweight/obesity between the years 2002 and 2014 were evident for both adolescent boys (18.3%2002–24.8%2014 and girls (8.3%2002–11.9%2014. Compared to 2002, in 2014 significant decreases (p < 0.001 in meeting MVPA recommendations were observed among boys (32.2%2002–25.6%2014 and girls (23.2%2002–19.2%2014. Moreover, in boys we observed significant increases (p < 0.001 in excessive ST on weekdays (75.1%2002–88.8%2014, as well as on weekends (78.3%2002–91.9%2014 between the years 2002 and 2014. Increases in overweight/obesity with concomitant decreases in PA provide evidence in support of the current and upcoming efforts of government and commercial organizations in implementing interventions aimed at reducing excessive body weight among Czech adolescents.

  2. The referral process characteristics and children /adolescents with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Rovšek, Matej

    2013-01-01

    The research object of the present dissertation is the examination of the referral process characteristics of children and adolescents with intellectual disability into education and schooling curriculas, with a special emphasis on examining the efficacy of the referral process and the connection of different agents with the referral efficacy such as the pre-school curriculas, the socio-economic status, years of schooling, grade retention, academic grades, location of the Referral Process Co...

  3. SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Evrim AKTEPE; Kandil, Sema; Topbas, Murat

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Suicide is a complex phenomenon associated with pyschological, biological and social factors. Suicide has been reported as the second or third most common cause of death in children and adolescents worldwide. Suicidal behaviour in children and adolescents will be discussed in the frame of motivational definition. Method: Published research studies and reviews on children and adolescent suicides have been reviewed. Furthermore, classical papers have been searched to obtain knowledge...

  4. Understanding depression in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ranttila, Junette; Shrestha, Trishna

    2011-01-01

    The contents of this thesis were focused in the context of children and adolescents depression. This topic was chosen to help parents and guardians further understand depression in children and adolescents. By understanding and learning to recognize the presence of depression, the possible negative outcomes that this illness brings can be prevented or lessened. To be able to understand the presence of depression in children and adolescents, varying depressive symptoms experienced by di...

  5. Determinants of obesity in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O I Krasnoperova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the etiological factors contributing to the formation of obesity in children and adolescents. Study included two groups of children. Main group: 101 children with obesity aged 10 to 17 years, body mass index (BMI 31,27±0,51 kg/m 2. Comparison group: of 14 children aged 10 to 17 years, without obesity, BMI 18,54±0,11 kg/m 2. In all children we evaluated perinatal and family history, lifestyle and diet, anthropometric parameters, assessed the progress of sexual development. We found that the manifestation of the disease occurred in the early school years, and in boys significantly earlier than in girls. Mothers of obese children had complications during pregnancy (such as toxaemia, the risk of miscarriage, hypertension, previous medical abortions. The children in the majority of cases were early nursed on milk formula, had violations in feeding regime, and hypokinesia. The disease was shown to run in families.

  6. Children of substance abusers: psychosocial profile of children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Garcia de Grandi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychoactive substance abuse problems in the family have an impact on the development of children and adolescents. This risk conditions can harm mental health and hinder healthy development in psychosocial areas. Objectives: This study investigated the psychosocial profile of children and adolescents assisted in a prevention service center for children of substance abusers in a deprived community located in the outskirts of Sao Paulo. Methods: Exploratory and descriptive study, based on cross-sectional methodology and a convenience sample of 791 children and adolescents assisted at the Intervention and Support Center for Children of Substance Abusers - CUIDA between January 2001 and December 2008. The sample was divided into groups according to discharge status: Active, Therapeutic Discharge (TD, Abandonment, Without Information about the Reason for Leaving and With Information about the Length of Treatment (WIRL, Without Information (WI, and Other Reasons for Leaving (OR. Results: In the Active group, 26% of mothers had completed high-school and 11% belonged to the A/B socioeconomic classes. The TD group showed the highest percentages of wage earning parents (52% living together (64%. In the WIRL group, 17% of the mothers were illiterate or had not completed primary education, and 23% of the fathers were unemployed. In the WI group, 22% lived in houses that had been lent to them. Conclusions: Results indicate the impact of addiction and underprivileged conditions (such as housing status, fathers’ level of education, and socioeconomic status on retention in the service and the importance of health prevention and promotion strategies aimed at this population.

  7. The Impact of Violence on Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Barbara R.; Beauchesne, Michelle A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the effects of violence on today's children and adolescents, focusing on: risk factors for violence (age, gender, and personal characteristics); family violence; violence beyond the family (in the media, in the community, and among peers); effects of exposure to violence related to school functioning, emotional stability, and orientation…

  8. Assessing School Effects on Dental Hygiene and Nutrition Behaviors of Canadian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin

    2007-01-01

    This study examines what school experiences influence dental hygiene and nutrition behaviors of Canadian adolescents from the 1998 Cross-national Survey on Health Behaviors in School-aged Children (HBSC). Multilevel analyses highlight the rare use of dental floss among adolescents. Females are more likely to brush and floss teeth than males.…

  9. ADHD in Danish children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christina Mohr

    The most frequent reason for referral to the child and adolescent psychiatric hospitals in Denmark is the suspicion that a child or an adolescent may have Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this dissertation was to assess how often ADHD has been diagnosed in Denmark, to...... assess the validity of the ADHD diagnoses given to children and adolescents, to describe the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of Danish children and adolescents with ADHD, and to assess their long-term risk for crimes. In the years under investigation, the incidence rates of diagnosed ADHD...... had significantly increased and the majority of ADHD diagnoses given to children and adolescents could be confirmed and were given based on high-quality clinical assessments. Results supported that children and adolescents with ADHD constitute a heterogeneous group that often have comorbid psychiatric...

  10. Common Periodontal Diseases of Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hayat Al-Ghutaimel; Hisham Riba; Salem Al-Kahtani; Saad Al-Duhaimi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2000, studies, experiments, and clinical observations revealed high prevalence of periodontal diseases among children and adolescents. Therefore, this paper was designed to provide an update for dental practitioners on epidemiology, microbiology, pathology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases in children and adolescents. Methods. This paper reviews the current literature concerning periodontal diseases in pediatric dentistry. It includes MEDLINE data...

  11. Poisoning in Korean Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Jae Hyug; Ryoo, Eell

    2013-01-01

    Drug intoxication in children and adolescents is not uncommon in Korea. But the tendency of intoxication is changing with some factors, such as national surveillance system, Naderism and increasing concern among physicians. But the death rate of intoxication among adolescents is increasing in spite of decreasing total death rate of intoxication among children and adolescents. Therefore the physician must be concerned about the basic management of intoxication and figure out the common toxic s...

  12. Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes: the Hvidoere Study Group and the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study.

    OpenAIRE

    Due, Pernille; De Beaufort, Carine; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Mortensen, Henrik Bindesbol; Rasmussen, Mette; Ahluwalia, Naman; Skinner, Timothy; Swift, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) has demonstrated major differences in glycemic control between pediatric diabetes centers which remain largely unexplained. This study investigates whether these differences are partly attributable to healthy eating norms in the background population. METHODS: The study involved adolescents from 18 countries from (i) the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study (HBSC) and (ii) the HSG. There were 94 387 participants from representative HBSC sam...

  13. Children's and adolescents' narratives of guilt: Antecedents and mentalization

    OpenAIRE

    Grazzani, I; Ornaghi, V; Antoniotti, C

    2011-01-01

    In this study, situational antecedents and mentalization of guilt were examined by asking children and adolescents for written narratives. The sample of 240 participants, aged between 9 years and 15 years 6 months, was divided into two groups of 120 children (M = 9 years and 7 months; SD = 0.4) and 120 adolescents (M = 14 years and 7 months; SD = 0.4). Participants displayed typical development, were recruited at schools in Milan city, and came from middle-class backgrounds. There was an equa...

  14. Systemic hypertension and associated factors in school adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Salma B. Galal; Soheir A. Fahmy; Somia Lashine; Nahed Abdel-Fattah; Mohammed Omar Galal

    2011-01-01

    Background: Systemic hypertension is an endemic disease, which causes serious morbidities and mortality in all age groups. Hypertension of adults in Egypt is 26%. It can start in childhood and needs to be assessed in Egyptian children and adolescents.Aim and objectives: This study aims to investigate the prevalence of systemic hypertension in 12-14 year old school children and associated factors. Methods and study design: A cross sectional study was done in some preparatory public and private...

  15. School Lunch Source and Adolescent Dietary Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Hastert, Theresa A.; Babey, Susan H.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction As rates of childhood obesity rise, the nutritional content of lunches eaten at school is more heavily scrutinized. We examined the association between dietary behaviors and the number of days that adolescents bring lunch to school. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data for 2,774 adolescents who responded to the 2005 California Health Interview Survey and reported dietary behaviors for a weekday. Results In bivariate analyses, adolescents who typically brought their lunch from...

  16. Awareness regarding contraception and population control among school going adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnavi, G; Patra, S R

    2009-12-01

    Growing sexuality among adolescents increases their risk of getting reproductive tract infections and pregnancy. This Cross sectional survey was done to assess the knowledge and attitude of higher secondary school children regarding contraception and population control. Majority of students (94.4%) were aware of contraceptives and their easy availability on chemist shop. However very few were aware of name and how to use them and 60% of them considered that condom is an emergency contraceptive. Lack of employment facilities as a consequence of uncontrolled population growth was the main concern of both boys and girls. The two children norm was acceptable to most, with one son and one daughter. All perceived that there is need to be informed about contraceptives. Most of the adolescents are misinformed about contraceptives and their attitude is not favorable as far as responsibility is concerned. There is an unmet need of contraceptive & population control knowledge and attitude among school adolescents and require urgent intervention. PMID:20803909

  17. Perceived School and Neighborhood Safety, Neighborhood Violence and Academic Achievement in Urban School Children

    OpenAIRE

    AJ, Milam; CDM, Furr-Holden; PJ, Leaf

    2010-01-01

    Community and school violence continue to be a major public health problem, especially among urban children and adolescents. Little research has focused on the effect of school safety and neighborhood violence on academic performance. This study examines the effect of the school and neighborhood climate on academic achievement among a population of 3rd-5th grade students in an urban public school system. Community and school safety were assessed using the School Climate Survey, an annual city...

  18. Sex, Drugs, and Catholic Schools: Private Schooling and Non-Market Adolescent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    David Figlio; Jens Ludwig

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of private schooling on adolescent non-market behaviors. We control for differences between private and public school students by making use of the rich set of covariates available with our NELS micro-dataset. We also employ an instrumental-variables strategy that exploits variation across metropolitan areas in the costs that parents face in transporting their children to private schools, which stem from differences in the quality of the local transportation in...

  19. Psychopathology in adolescent children of physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, B A; Leventhal, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The clinical records of 27 adolescent children of physicians who were treated in a psychiatric unit for adolescents were studied. Most of the children had been referred by their physician fathers for evaluation of conduct or mood disorders. These referrals were often the focus of family distress. There appeared to be no typical syndrome presented by physicians' children. Those treating such patients should be especially sensitive to the possibility that parental denial will increase the patie...

  20. Psychosomatic problems and countermeasures in Japanese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Hidetaka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Japan there are a number of children and adolescents with emotion-related disorders including psychosomatic diseases (orthostatic dysregulation, anorexia nervosa, recurrent pains, behavior problems and school absenteeism. According to our previous report, the Japanese children had significantly higher score of physical symptoms and psychiatric complaints than did the Swedish children, and these were more strongly influenced by school-related stress than by home-related stress. To enforce countermeasures for psychosomatic problems in children, the Japanese Society of Psychosomatic Pediatrics (established in 1982 have started several new projects including multi-center psychosomatic researches and society-based activities. In this article, we present an outline of our study on mental health in Japanese children in comparison with Swedish children. Countermeasures including clinical guidelines for child psychosomatic diseases are reviewed and discussed.

  1. Cardiac and Respiratory Responses During Visual Search in Nonretarded Children and Retarded Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porges, Stephen W.; Humphrey, Mary M.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between physiological response patterns and mental competence was investigated by evaluating heart rate and respiratory responses during a sustained visual-search task in 29 nonretarded grade school children and 16 retarded adolescents. (Author)

  2. Perceived School and Neighborhood Safety, Neighborhood Violence and Academic Achievement in Urban School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, A. J.; Furr-Holden, C. D. M.; Leaf, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Community and school violence continue to be a major public health problem, especially among urban children and adolescents. Little research has focused on the effect of school safety and neighborhood violence on academic performance. This study examines the effect of the school and neighborhood climate on academic achievement among a population…

  3. Children, adolescents, and the media: health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C; Jordan, Amy B; Donnerstein, Ed

    2012-06-01

    The media can be a powerful teacher of children and adolescents and have a profound impact on their health. The media are not the leading cause of any major health problem in the United States, but they do contribute to a variety of pediatric and adolescent health problems. Given that children and teens spend >7 hours a day with media, one would think that adult society would recognize its impact on young people's attitudes and behaviors. Too little has been done to protect children and adolescents from harmful media effects and to maximize the powerfully prosocial aspects of modern media. PMID:22643165

  4. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik;

    2015-01-01

    .3%, respectively. High parental education was associated with improved survival after OHCA (OR 3.48, CI 1.27-9.41). Significant crude difference in survival (OR 3.18, CI 1.22-8.34) between high household incomes vs. low household incomes was found. CONCLUSION: OHCA incidences and survival rates varied...... population. METHODS: All OHCA patients in Denmark, ≤21 years of age, were identified from 2001 to 2010. The population was divided into infants (<1 year); pre-school children (1-5 years); school children (6-15 years); and high school adolescents/young adults (16-21 years). Multivariate logistic regression......-school children, school children and high school adolescents were 11.5, 3.5, 1.3 and 5.3 per 100,000 inhabitants. Overall bystander CPR rate was 48.8%, and for age groups: 55.4%, 41.2%, 44.9% and 63.0%, respectively. Overall 30-day survival rate was 8.1%, and for age groups: 1.4%, 4.5%, 16.1% and 9...

  5. Children of perestroika: the changing socioeconomic conditions in Russia and Ukraine and their effect on the psychological well-being of high-school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates how the changing socioeconomic conditions in Russia and Ukraine affect the psychological well-being of high-school adolescents in these countries. Six indexes of psychological well-being, the adolescents' perception of the economic conditions in their families, perceived parental practices (care and autonomy providing), and perceived social support were measured in 1999 and 2007. Macro-level socioeconomic conditions in Russia and Ukraine, as well as the adolescents' perception of the economic conditions in their family, substantially improved from 1999 to 2007. However, the psychological well-being of the adolescents, as well as their perception of parental practices and the social support received from parents, peers, and teachers did not change. Russian adolescents consistently reported higher self-esteem and school competence than their Ukrainian peers, as well as higher parental care and autonomy providing, and higher social support received from peers. At the individual level, perceived parental care and autonomy providing, as well as perceived social support from parents, peers, and teachers were the major contributors to the adolescents' psychological well-being. The obtained results are discussed in light of the conservation of resources and ecological systems theories. PMID:19319455

  6. Bullying Behaviors in Children and Adolescents: “An Ongoing Story”

    OpenAIRE

    Tsitsika, Artemis Kimon; Barlou, Efi; Andrie, Elisabeth; Dimitropoulou, Christine; Tzavela, Eleni C.; Janikian, Mari; Tsolia, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Bullying in school-aged children is a universal problem, which continues to be a serious threat to physical and emotional health of children and adolescents. This article highlights the prevalence, the common characteristics of bullies and victims, as well as the short- and long-term impact of bullying involvement. Key areas highlighted include the efficacy of bullying prevention programs, which can help health care providers to assess and provide interventions to children and adolescents aff...

  7. Laparoscopic Ovarian Surgery in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hong-Bae; Cho, Hye-Yon; Park, Sung-Ho; Park, Sung-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Although laparoscopy is widely used in gynecologic surgery in adults, few studies have been undertaken to examine its use in young and adolescent patients. This study was conducted to investigate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic surgery for the treatment of benign ovarian disease in children and adolescents. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 106 patients (age,

  8. Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steve J; Henschke, Nicholas; Hestbaek, Lise;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have litt...

  9. Parental schooling & children's health.

    OpenAIRE

    Zill, N

    1996-01-01

    Nearly one in every four children in the United States is born to a mother who has not finished high school, and more than one in eight is reared by such a mother during the critical preschool period. Large-scale studies show that the health and welfare of children are linked to the education level of their parents, with parent education often being a stronger predictor of child well-being than family income, single parenthood, or family size. Higher parent education levels make it more likel...

  10. Syncope in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Syncope is an abrupt loss of consciousness and postural tone frequently due to disturbance of the normal autonomic nervous system reflexive mechanisms in regulating peripheral vascular resistance, blood pressure, and heart rate. This leads to a transient decrease in cerebral blood flow. It is a common presenting complaint in children and adolescents. In many cases, there is a characteristic preceding prodrome of dizziness, nausea, diaphoresis, and pallor. Although most cases of syncope are benign in etiology, it frequently causes stress and anxiety in regard to potential cardiovascular disease and possible sudden cardiac death. With careful screening by detailed patient history, comprehensive physical examination, and electrocardiogram (ECG), a significant majority of patients with serious underlying cardiac conditions will be identified. The routine use of echocardiography, ambulatory ECG, tilt-table tests, and exercise stress tests is expensive and frequently of low diagnostic yield. With benign forms of syncope, patient reassurance and education should be the first-line treatment. PMID:26678237

  11. Panic Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a cause for the symptoms, a comprehensive evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist should be obtained. Several types of treatment ... medical school in general (adult) and child and adolescent psychiatry. Facts ... or educational use without written permission, but cannot be included ...

  12. Allergic contact dermatitis in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1999-01-01

    From a clinical point of view, the prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) among children and adolescents seems to be low. However, many children have dermatitis, most often atopic dermatitis. In selected cases, ACD is suspected, and the child is tested. The question remains, whether the...... prevalence of ACD in children really is low or whether the possibility of ACD is not sufficiently considered. During the last decade, reports have appeared on series of children and adolescents with contact allergy and ACD. Few cases have been reported in infants, but the development of contact allergy and...... ACD increases with age. Most studies include selected groups of children and adolescents with suspected ACD. Few studies have examined unselected populations, and most consider only the prevalence of contact allergy without evaluating the clinical relevance, e.g., the prevalence of ACD. Furthermore...

  13. Effects of single-parenthood on school-going adolescents in Gaborone District of Botswana / Portia Gobona Morebodi.

    OpenAIRE

    Morebodi, Portia Gobona

    2005-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the effects of single parenthood on school going adolescents on a group of male and female children schooling in Gaborone District of Botswana. The research questions focused on investigating the effects of. single parenthood on the social interactions of school-going adolescents, effects on their performance in class, the attitude of the community on such adolescents and whether single parenthood affected boys and girls differently. T...

  14. Perceptions of university among Irish children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This study uses both qualitative and quantitative data to inquire into the perceptions that young children and adolescents have about university. The study seeks to understand what influences have affected the construction of these perceptions. The study population are pupils from primary and post-primary schools in the greater Dublin area which span the social and economic divide from middle to working class. The pupils are both males and females who are attending single-sex and co-education...

  15. Adolescents' Interpretations of Social Class Influences on Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantlinger, Ellen

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with low-income and high-income adolescents investigated various aspects of schooling. Low-income adolescents described aggressive behaviors, numerous school circumstances that made them angry, and humiliation and ostracism at school. High-income adolescents felt much more successful at school and entitled to disproportionate school…

  16. Specific Language and Reading Skills in School-Aged Children and Adolescents are Associated with Prematurity after Controlling for IQ

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eliana S.; Yeatman, Jason D.; Luna, Beatriz; FELDMAN, HEIDI M.

    2010-01-01

    Although studies of long-term outcomes of children born preterm consistently show low intelligence quotient (IQ) and visual-motor impairment, studies of their performance in language and reading have found inconsistent results. In this study, we examined which specific language and reading skills were associated with prematurity independent of the effects of gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and IQ. Participants from two study sites (N = 100) included 9–16 year old children born before 36 w...

  17. Hidradenitis Suppurativa in Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Peter Riis; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a burdensome disease and has the potential to affect the life course of patients. It is a rare disease in children, and the recorded literature is correspondingly scarce. This article reviews the therapeutic options for HS in children and adolescents, and highlights...

  18. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Bowen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Bowen1,2, Russell L Rothman2,31Veterans Affairs Quality Scholars Fellowship Program, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Division of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, 3Vanderbilt Eskind Diabetes Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing at a significant rate. Similar to adults, youth with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for developing hypertension, lipid abnormalities, renal disease, and other diabetes-related complications. However, children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes also face many unique management challenges that are different from adults with type 2 diabetes or children with type 1 diabetes. To deliver safe, effective, high-quality, cost-effective health care to adolescents with type 2 diabetes, reorganization and redesign of health care systems are needed. Multidisciplinary health care teams, which allow individuals with specialized training to maximally utilize their skills within an organized diabetes treatment team, may increase efficiency and effectiveness and may improve outcomes in children with type 2 diabetes. This review article provides a brief review of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, provides an overview of multidisciplinary health care teams, and discusses the role of multidisciplinary health care management in youth with type 2 diabetes.Keywords: adolescent, type 2 diabetes, multidisciplinary

  19. Behavioral management of headache in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedda, Noemi; Cerutti, Rita; Verdecchia, Paola; Migliorini, Daniele; Arruda, Marco; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Headache is the most frequent neurological symptom and the most prevalent pain in children and adolescents, and constitutes a serious health problem that may lead to impairment in several areas. Psychosocial factors, social environment, life events, school and family stressors are all closely related to headaches. A multidisciplinary strategy is fundamental in addressing headache in children and adolescents. Applying such a strategy can lead to reductions in frequency and severity of the pain, improving significantly the quality of life of these children.It has been demonstrated that behavioral intervention is highly effective, especially in the treatment of paediatric headache, and can enhance or replace pharmacotherapy, with the advantage of eliminating dangerous side effects and or reducing costs. Behavioral interventions appear to maximize long-term therapeutic benefits and improve compliance with pharmacological treatment, which has proven a significant problem with child and adolescent with headache.The goal of this review is to examine the existing literature on behavioral therapies used to treat headache in children and adolescents, and so provide an up-to-date picture of what behavioral therapy is and what its effectiveness is. PMID:27596923

  20. Management of Hypertension in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua; Bell, Cynthia; Samuel, Joyce; Swinford, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents is becoming a greater problem in the developed world. Although traditionally thought of as usually secondary to renal, vascular, or endocrine causes, primary hypertension is becoming the most common form seen in childhood. This changing epidemiology is related to the recent obesity epidemic. The evaluation of high blood pressure in children is more involved than in adults and is aimed both at identifying secondary causes and to identify other co-morbidities of cardiovascular risk. Treatment of hypertension in childhood and adolescence is aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. While there are a growing number of antihypertensive agents with FDA labeling for children, there remain far fewer options than for adults. This paper reviews the epidemiology, definitions, evaluations, and management of elevated blood pressure in children and adolescents. PMID:26482750

  1. Systemic hypertension and associated factors in school adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma B. Galal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic hypertension is an endemic disease, which causes serious morbidities and mortality in all age groups. Hypertension of adults in Egypt is 26%. It can start in childhood and needs to be assessed in Egyptian children and adolescents.Aim and objectives: This study aims to investigate the prevalence of systemic hypertension in 12-14 year old school children and associated factors. Methods and study design: A cross sectional study was done in some preparatory public and private schools selected from a district of Cairo. The 234 children (167 females, 67males in this study were 12 - 14 year of age. Their weight ranged from 30 – 100 kg Subjects with high blood pressure (BP were identified according to the percentiles of Rosner, et al. Beside characteristics of the sample and blood pressure (BP, associated factors investigated were: - weight and body mass index (BMI, tea / coffee consumption, "added salt before tasting food", sleeping less than 8 hours per day and physical activity. Each student filled out stress and tension level tests. The school health team obtained informed parental consent to include their children in this study. Statistical analysis was done with EPI using chi-square, t-test, odd ratio (OR with 95% confidence limits (Cl and logistic regression with the 5% level for tests. The ethical committee of the faculty approved the study.Results / Finding: The prevalence of systemic hypertension was 10%. Children with high BP (23 were compared to 211 subjects with normotensive BP. High stress and tension score, less sleeping hours / day, adding salt to food and higher BMI were found significantly associated (p<0.05 with high BP. Study limitation: Researchers could assess preparatory schools children. However, primary and secondary school levels are separated in other schools and administrations. We used US standards for hypertension and BMI for children as local standards are not published.Conclusions: One tenth of 12

  2. Subdimensions of Adolescent Belonging in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tanner LeBaron; Ye, Feifei; Chhuon, Vichet

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents' sense of belonging in high school may serve a protective function, linking school-based relationships to positive youth outcomes. To advance the study of sense of belonging, we conducted a mixed method, factor analytic study (Phase 1 focus groups, N = 72; Phase 2 cross-sectional survey, N = 890) to explore the multidimensionality of…

  3. Development of Decision Making in School-Aged Children and Adolescents: Evidence from Heart Rate and Skin Conductance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, Eveline A.; van der Molen, Maurits W.

    2007-01-01

    Age differences in decision making indicate that children fail to anticipate outcomes of their decisions. Using heart rate and skin conductance analyses, we tested whether developmental changes in decision making are associated with (a) a failure to process outcomes of decisions, or (b) a failure to anticipate future outcomes of decisions.…

  4. Creativity Lost: The Importance of Testing Higher-Level Executive Functions in School-Age Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, Dean C.; Lansing, Amy; Houston, Wes S.; Wetter, Spencer; Han, S. Duke; Jacobson, Mark; Holdnack, James; Kramer, Joel

    2007-01-01

    In school settings, students are typically evaluated using group achievement tests, IQ scales, and college entrance exams that focus more on rote-verbal skills (e.g., vocabulary, mathematical facts) than on higher level executive functions (e.g., abstract thinking, problem solving). However, recent neuropsychological findings suggest that…

  5. Association of Relative Backpack Weight with Reported Pain, Pain Sites, Medical Utilization, and Lost School Time in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael J.; White, Gregory L.; Moore, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is debate about a 10% versus 15% of body weight cutoff point for safe weight of school backpacks. Estimation of the cutoff may be affected by use of survey methods and failure to assess pain experienced while wearing a backpack. Previous research also suggests that younger students and females are more at risk for developing…

  6. Tics and psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D; Nolan, Edith E; Sprafkin, Joyce; Schwartz, Joseph

    2002-05-01

    This study examined comorbid psychiatric symptoms in a large, community-based sample of children and adolescents. The study sample comprised a total of 3006 school children: 413 preschool (3 to 5 years; 237 males, 176 females; mean age 4 years 2 months, SD 8 months), 1520 elementary school (5 to 12 years; 787 males, 733 females; mean age 8 years 2 months, SD 1 year 11 months), and 1073 secondary school children (12 to 18 years; 573 males, 500 females; mean age 14 years 4 months, SD 1 year 10 months), all of whom were attending regular education programs. Children were evaluated with a teacher-completed DSM-IV-referenced rating scale. The sample was divided into four groups: attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder with tics (ADHD+tics), ADHD without tics (ADHD), tics without ADHD (T), and a comparison group i.e. neither ADHD nor tics (Non). The percentage of children with tic behaviors varied with age: preschool children (22.3%), elementary school children (7.8%), and adolescents (3.4%). Tic behaviors were more common in males than females, regardless of comorbid ADHD symptoms. For many psychiatric symptoms, screening prevalence rates were highest for the ADHD groups (ADHD+tics>ADHD>T>Non). However, obsessive-compulsive and simple and social phobia symptoms were more common in the groups with tic behavior. Findings for a community-based sample show many similarities with studies of clinically referred samples suggesting that teacher-completed ratings of DSM-IV symptoms may be a useful methodology for investigating the phenomenology of tic disorders. PMID:12033719

  7. Depression screening and mental health outcomes in children and adolescents: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Thombs Brett D; Roseman Michelle; Kloda Lorie A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is an important cause of disability among children and adolescents. Depression screening is one possible method for managing depression, and screening programs have been initiated in some school and medical settings. However, in 2005, the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care and the United Kingdom National Institute of Clinical Excellence did not recommend depression screening among children and adolescents. By contrast, in 2009, the United States Preve...

  8. Total fluid intake of children and adolescents: cross-sectional surveys in 13 countries worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesia, Iris; Guelinckx, Isabelle; De Miguel-Etayo, Pilar M.; González-Gil, Esther M.; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Kavouras, Stavros A.; Gandy, Joan; Martínez, Homero; Bardosono, Saptawati; Abdollahi, Morteza; Nasseri, Esmat; Jarosz, Agnieszka; Ma, Guansheng; Carmuega, Esteban; Thiébaut, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe total fluid intake (TFI) according to socio-demographic characteristics in children and adolescents worldwide. Methods Data of 3611 children (4–9 years) and 8109 adolescents (10–18 years) were retrieved from 13 cross-sectional surveys (47 % males). In three countries, school classes were randomly recruited with stratified cluster sampling design. In the other countries, participants were randomly recruited based on a quota method. TFI (drinking water and beverages of all k...

  9. Psychological aspects of radiotherapy of children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing importance of radiotherapy in tumors of childhood demands the investigation and consideration of the psychological aspects of this afflicting therapy. In this paper the results obtained by questioning and observing 28 childeren of different ages, their parents, attendants and employees of several radiological departments are discussed. As the children's fantasies and the resulting anxieties and reactions are depending on the respective intellectual and emotional developmental stage detailed proposals concerning the preparation and performance of radiation in toddlers, school children and adolescents are presented. (orig.)

  10. Effects of physical conditioning on children and adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Liam; Kemp, Justin G; Roberts, Richard G D

    2005-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, the effects of exertional dyspnoea and the associated fear of an asthma attack usually lead to an avoidance of physical activity amongst asthmatic children. This issue still exists today, particularly in children with severe asthma. This article presents a comprehensive review of published information concerning the effects of training programmes on children and adolescents with asthma. The primary focus of these investigations was to examine the effects of physical conditioning on aerobic fitness, the severity and incidence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and asthma symptoms. The large majority of training studies of asthmatic children and adolescents demonstrate significant increases in aerobic fitness post-training or the achievement of normal levels of aerobic fitness. While there are a few reports of a reduced severity in EIA symptoms post-training, the majority of studies demonstrate no change in the occurrence or degree of EIA. However, a number of these studies have reported some reductions in hospitalisations, wheeze frequency, school absenteeism, doctor consultations and medication usage. It is, therefore, recommended that children and adolescents with asthma should participate in regular physical activity. This may improve asthma management and associated general health benefits, whilst minimising inactivity-related health risks. PMID:15707377

  11. Adolescent-parent relations in Hong Kong: parenting styles, emotional autonomy, and school achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride-Chang, C; Chang, L

    1998-12-01

    This 4-phase study of Hong Kong Chinese adolescent-parent relationships (906 adolescents and 1,091 parents) revealed the following: (a) Adolescents and their parents differ in their perceptions of parenting style. (b) Autonomy is negatively associated with parents' perceived authoritative parenting style and school achievement. (c) Neither parenting style nor measures of parents' beliefs in training their children (R. Chao, 1994) are associated with self-reports of school achievement. However, (d) parents of students from the highest (Band 1) academically oriented schools in Hong Kong rated themselves as higher in authoritativeness and lower in authoritarianism than parents of adolescents from the lowest academically oriented (Band 5) schools. Findings are discussed in relation to posited differences in adolescent-parent relationships in Western and Chinese cultures. PMID:9845973

  12. Treatment of Obesity in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Matson, Kelly L.; Fallon, Renee M.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood and adolescent obesity continues to rise in the United States (US). Immediate health consequences are being observed, and long-term risks are mounting within the pediatric population, secondary to obesity. The hallmark of prevention and treatment of obesity in children and adolescents includes lifestyle modification (i.e., dietary modification, increased physical activity, and behavioral modifications). However, when intensive lifestyle modification is insufficient...

  13. School Adaptation of Roma Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerganov, Encho; Varbanova, Silvia; Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of school adaptation among Roma children who were included in a program for the desegregation of Roma schools in Bulgaria. More specifically, the program requires Roma children to attend mixed classes with Bulgarian students and Roma teacher assistants to work with them. The Bulgarian version of the Questionnaire on…

  14. The relationship between active travel to school and health-related fitness in children and adolescents: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Paul; Boreham Colin A; Lubans David R; Foster Charlie E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Active travel to school (ATS) has been identified as an important source of physical activity for youth. However, the relationship between ATS and health-related fitness (HRF) among youth remains unclear. Methods A systematic search of seven electronic databases (EMBASE, OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and TRIS on line) was conducted in December 2009 and studies published since 1980 were considered for inclusion. Results Twenty seven articles were ident...

  15. Health and School Performance amongst Danish adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus D.; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2009-01-01

    school performance and subsequent educational achievements. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of health measures on school performance at the end of compulsory school (9 years of school). Methods Information from a birth cohort study of adolescents born in 1989 (n = 3058) living in...... depressive symptoms. If parents report health problems for the participant between ages 7 and 14, grades decrease with 0.89 (95% CI 0.44 to 1.32). Conclusions Frequent headache, perceived stress and depressive symptoms contributes to lower grades at the end of compulsory school, thereby indicating that...

  16. The relationship between active travel to school and health-related fitness in children and adolescents: a systematic review

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lubans, David R

    2011-01-26

    Abstract Background Active travel to school (ATS) has been identified as an important source of physical activity for youth. However, the relationship between ATS and health-related fitness (HRF) among youth remains unclear. Methods A systematic search of seven electronic databases (EMBASE, OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and TRIS on line) was conducted in December 2009 and studies published since 1980 were considered for inclusion. Results Twenty seven articles were identified that explored the relationship between ATS and the following aspects of HRF: weight status\\/body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness and flexibility. Forty-eight percent of the studies that examined the relationship between ATS and weight status\\/body composition reported significant associations, this increased to 55% once poor quality studies were removed. Furthermore, the findings from five studies, including one longitudinal study, indicate that ATS is positively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in youth. However, the evidence for the relationships between ATS and muscular fitness or flexibility is equivocal and limited by low study numbers. Conclusions There is some evidence to suggest that ATS is associated with a healthier body composition and level of cardiorespiratory fitness among youth. Strategies to increase ATS are warranted and should be included in whole-of-school approaches to the promotion of physical activity.

  17. The relationship between active travel to school and health-related fitness in children and adolescents: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Paul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active travel to school (ATS has been identified as an important source of physical activity for youth. However, the relationship between ATS and health-related fitness (HRF among youth remains unclear. Methods A systematic search of seven electronic databases (EMBASE, OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and TRIS on line was conducted in December 2009 and studies published since 1980 were considered for inclusion. Results Twenty seven articles were identified that explored the relationship between ATS and the following aspects of HRF: weight status/body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness and flexibility. Forty-eight percent of the studies that examined the relationship between ATS and weight status/body composition reported significant associations, this increased to 55% once poor quality studies were removed. Furthermore, the findings from five studies, including one longitudinal study, indicate that ATS is positively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in youth. However, the evidence for the relationships between ATS and muscular fitness or flexibility is equivocal and limited by low study numbers. Conclusions There is some evidence to suggest that ATS is associated with a healthier body composition and level of cardiorespiratory fitness among youth. Strategies to increase ATS are warranted and should be included in whole-of-school approaches to the promotion of physical activity.

  18. Bullying and associated factors among Brazilian adolescents: analysis of the National Adolescent School-based Health Survey (PeNSE 2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Carvalho Malta; Rogério Ruscitto do Prado; Antônio José Ribeiro Dias; Flavia Carvalho M. Mello; Marta Angelica Iossi Silva; Michelle Ralil da Costa; Waleska Teixeira Caiaffa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of bullying from the victim's perspective in Brazilian school children and to analyze its association with individual and family context variables. METHODS: An analysis of the data on 109,104 adolescents, obtained by the National Adolescent School-based Health Survey, held in schools in 2012, was carried out. An association model between bullying and explanatory variables was tested in different contexts: sociodemographic, risk behaviors, mental heal...

  19. Parental alcohol use and adolescent school adjustment in the general population: Results from the HUNT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Røysamb Espen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigates the relationship between parental drinking and school adjustment in a total population sample of adolescents, with independent reports from mothers, fathers, and adolescents. As a group, children of alcohol abusers have previously been found to exhibit lowered academic achievement. However, few studies address which parts of school adjustment that may be impaired. Both a genetic approach and social strains predict elevated problem scores in these children. Previous research has had limitations such as only recruiting cases from clinics, relying on single responders for all measures, or incomplete control for comorbid psychopathology. The specific effects of maternal and paternal alcohol use are also understudied. Methods In a Norwegian county, 88% of the population aged 13-19 years participated in a health survey (N = 8984. Among other variables, adolescents reported on four dimensions of school adjustment, while mothers and fathers reported their own drinking behaviour. Mental distress and other control variables were adjusted for. Multivariate analysis including generalized estimation equations was applied to investigate associations. Results Compared to children of light drinkers, children of alcohol abusers had moderately elevated attention and conduct problem scores. Maternal alcohol abuse was particularly predictive of such problems. Children of abstainers did significantly better than children of light drinkers. Controlling for adolescent mental distress reduced the association between maternal abuse and attention problems. The associations between parental reported drinking and school adjustment were further reduced when controlling for the children's report of seeing their parents drunk, which itself predicted school adjustment. Controlling for parental mental distress did not reduce the associations. Conclusions Parental alcohol abuse is an independent risk factor for attention and conduct

  20. Racial/ethnic, gender, and BMI differences in athletic identity in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in athletic self-concept, a hypothesized mediator of physical activity and sedentary behavior, by gender, racial/ethnic, and overweight status in elementary and middle school children. Children (Grades 4-5, n=936) and adolescents (Grades 7-8, n=1...

  1. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  2. Nutritional Status and Morbidity among School going Adolescents in Wardha, a Peri-Urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambhare DG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the nutritional status and morbidity among the school going adolescents in peri urban area Wardha. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted in the year 2008. 116 children in the age group of 10 to 19 years studying in high school of peri urban area Wardha were examined. Nutritional status of the adolescents was assessed through weight for age (wasting and height for age (stunting according to WHO criteria. Data was entered and analyzed by using Epi Info 6.04 software package. Chi- square value was used for testing statistical significance. Results: Mean age of the adolescents was 13.16+ 1.99. 48.3% of the adolescents were found to be normal and 51.7% were underweight. Early adolescents were at highest risk of underweight significantly more 73.3% ( p < 0.05 as compared to late adolescents 26.7%. Overall 34.5% of the adolescents were stunted with boys suffering more 72.5% as compared to girls 27.5%. 28.45% of the school going adolescents had anaemia with girls suffering significantly more 38.89% (p < 0.05 as compared to boys 23.75%. 35.34% adolescents had dental caries. 13.79% adolescents were found to be suffering from refractive error. 7.76% adolescents had worm infestation. 6.9% adolescents had skin problems. 2.59% adolescents had tonsillitis and 2.59% had wax in the ear. Conclusion: The study shows the poor health and nutritional status among the adolescents. A periodical and regular health check-up with concerted efforts towards their nutrition along with focused health education will improve the health and nutritional status of these school going adolescents in peri urban area Wardha.

  3. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptability among Parents and Their Adolescent Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    School-aged children were a priority group for receipt of the pandemic (2009) H1N1 influenza vaccine. Both parental and adolescent attitudes likely influence vaccination behaviors. Data were collected from surveys distributed to middle- and high-school students and their parents in two counties in rural Georgia. Multivariable logistic regression…

  4. Menarche in the Severely Disabled Adolescent: School Nurses' Attitudes, Perceptions, and Perceived Teaching Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Alice M.; Opie, Nancy D.

    1986-01-01

    This study examined perceptions of school nurses about their roles as teachers of sex education for children with physical disabilities. Responses to a stimulus story about a female adolescent sent to the school nurse for assistance and instruction on menarche were compared based on variations in the story. (Author/MT)

  5. School Experiences Influence Personal Health and Interpersonal Relationships of Adolescents: The Canadian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin

    2007-01-01

    Canadian data from the 1998 Cross-National Survey on Health Behaviors in School-Aged Children were analyzed to examine the effects of school experiences on personal health (physical health, mental health, self-esteem, helplessness, and body image) and interpersonal relationships (number of close friends and making friends) among adolescents.…

  6. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: An Adolescent Female Student with Severe Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Brady, Jodi

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal pain is a common chief complaint encountered by school nurses. This article explains the etiology of abdominal pain in children and adolescents, describes the office assessment, and delineates life-threatening conditions associated with severe abdominal pain that may prompt the school nurse to transfer the student to a local emergency department. PMID:27470683

  7. Long-Term Intellectual Functioning and School-Related Behavioural Outcomes in Children and Adolescents after Invasive Treatment for Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijkerboer, A. W.; Utens, E. M. W. J.; Bogers, A. J. J. C.; Verhulst, F. C.; Helbing, W. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, long-term intellectual functioning and school-related behavioural outcomes were assessed in a patient sample that underwent invasive treatment for congenital heart disease (ConHD) between 1990 and 1995. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised was used to measure intellectual functioning and the Teacher's Report Form to…

  8. Healthy eating at school to compensate for the activity-related obesigenic lifestyle in children and adolescents: the Quebec experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Angelo; Arguin, Hélène

    2011-03-01

    In this article, we describe the Quebec experience about the determinants of childhood obesity and the search for solutions, which are well adapted to the constraints of the current lifestyle. As expected, it is likely that a decrease in physical fitness and its related sedentariness as well as suboptimal food habits have contributed to the increase in overweight prevalence that was observed between 1980 and 2000. Our research experience suggests that other less suspected activity related factors have also played an important role in the occurrence of the obesity epidemic. This is particularly the case for short sleeping and demanding mental work, which are features of our modern lifestyle. Because there is no foreseeable prospect for a change in sleep and mental work habits, we argue that compensations in other factors may be necessary to prevent weight gain in this new context. We thus developed a concept of food design aiming at the maximization of the satiating properties of a food or a meal course. In this context, we were successful in the design of healthy lunch bags for students of a school located in a low socioeconomic area. Indeed, for a majority of menus, an optimal compromise seemed to be reached between nutrient composition, satiating potential, palatability, and financial accessibility. In summary, the Quebec experience reveals that childhood obesity is a complex problem that partly results from unsuspected environmental factors that deserve creative solutions to at least partly compensate for their effect. PMID:22332048

  9. Hypertension in obese children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2009-01-01

    Obesity, especially upper body fat distribution, has become an increasingly important medical problem in children and adolescents. Outcomes related to childhood obesity include, as in adult population, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, left ventricular hypertrophy, obstructive sleep apnea, orthopedic and socio-psychological problems. Obese children are at approximately 3-fold higher risk for hypertension from non-obese ones. Obesity-hypertension appears to be characterized...

  10. [Confrontation of children and adolescents with pornography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayez, J Y

    2002-11-01

    The author describes the influence of pornography on children, focusing on pornographical material on the web. Most children escape almost uninjured from visualization of pornography. However some are either traumatized, or precipitated in a strict perversion. The consequences on adolescents are similar, though more complex. The hypersexualization of teenagers may become complicated by addiction (so called internet addiction disorder: IAD), isolation, and perversion. Recommendations for the parents are presented. PMID:12503513

  11. School Counselors' Perceptions of Their Training Regarding School-Age Children's Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiano, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    A scarcity of research exists concerning professional school counselors' perceptions of their training regarding recognizing and addressing the mental health issues of children and adolescents in the elementary, middle, and high school setting. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of professional school counselors…

  12. Subthreshold depression in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselhoeft, Rikke; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Heiervang, Einar;

    2013-01-01

    Depressive disorders are disabling conditions striking at all ages. In adults, subthreshold depression (SD) is viewed as being on a continuum with major depressive disorder (MDD). Whether this holds for children and adolescents, is still unclear. We performed the first systematic review of SD in...

  13. Breakfast benefits for children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vingerhoeds, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    This literature review aimed to give some insight in the benefits of breakfast for children and adolescents, with a focus on overweight, food intake and cognition. In addition, we explored the magnitude of skipping breakfast in the Netherlands and factors associated with this behaviour.

  14. CNS Meningiomas in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-01-01

    A clinicopathological analysis of 87 cases of meningioma in children and adolescents age 5 months to 20 years (mean 14 years) is reported from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Children’s National Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington, DC; Uniformed University of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD; and Catholic University of Korea, Seoul.

  15. Understanding sexuality among Indian urban school adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikumar Ramadugu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Adolescence is a very exciting phase of life fraught with many challenges like sexuality. Understanding them is important in helping the adolescents grow up healthily. Aims: To ascertain the attitudes and knowledge about sexuality among school-going adolescents. Settings and Design: Students in two urban schools of an Indian city from class IX to XII were administered a self-reporting questionnaire on matters related to sexuality. Materials and Methods: Requisite ethical clearances were taken as also the consent of the parents and students before administration of the questionnaire. The authors clarified doubts to adolescents. Statistical analysis: Statistical package for social sciences. Results: The incidence of having sexual contact was 30.08% for boys and 17.18% for girls. 6.31% boys and 1.31% girls reported having had experienced sexual intercourse. Friends constituted the main sexual partners for both boys and girls. Sexual abuse had been reported by both girls and boys. These and other findings are discussed in the article. Conclusions: Adolescent school students are involved in sexual activity, but lack adequate knowledge in this regard. Students, teachers, and parents need to understand various aspects of sexuality to be able to help adolescents′ healthy sexual development.

  16. [Synovial sarcoma in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuy, Ludovic; Bernier, Valérie; Ranchère-Vince, Dominique; Mainard, Laurence; Orbach, Daniel; Corradini, Nadège

    2016-02-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a rare high-grade malignant mesenchymal tumor affecting children, adolescents, and young adults. Cytogenetically, more than 90% of SS is characterized by the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2), translocation resulting in two chimeric fusion genes SYT-SSX1 and SYT-SSX2, confirming histological diagnosis. Pediatric SS arises most often in soft tissues of the extremities (66% of cases), and is a localized tumor without spreading to regional lymph nodes (96% of cases) nor to metastatic sites (94% of cases). Although clinical and radiologic presentation, histologic analysis and tumor biology appear similar in pediatric and adolescent SS, outcome seems better in children than in adolescents, respectively 84% vs 60% of 5years overall survival (OS). If complete resection is the gold standard in SS, other therapeutic modalities differ between pediatric and adult populations, considering SS as an intermediate chemosensitive tumor more frequently by pediatric oncologists. Prognostic factors evaluation (tumor size, site of primary and IRS group) is necessary to establish optimal treatment strategies, with multimodal therapeutic approach in children and adolescents. Thus, recent results about the European prospective EpSSG NRSTS 05 study for children and adolescent patients with localized SS showed a 5years OS >90%. Moreover, recent somatic genetic data about SS open the debate on an appropriate strategy based and stratified on tumor genomic. Multinational prospective pediatric, adolescent and young adult study is necessary to improve optimal and appropriate approach in this rare tumor. PMID:26774699

  17. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Fluvoxamine in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labellarte, Michael; Biederman, Joseph; Emslie, Graham; Ferguson, James; Khan, Arifulla; Ruckle, Jon; Sallee, Randy; Riddle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents and to compare pharmacokinetic data from adolescents to adults from a previous study. Method: Fluvoxamine was titrated to a target dose of 100 mg b.i.d. in children (6-11 years) and 150 mg b.i.d. in adolescents (12-17 years) with obsessive-compulsive disorder…

  18. Brief Report: Coping among Austrian Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Petra

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated age and gender effects on coping with common stressors among 494 Austrian children and adolescents (age 8-14 years). Participants were subdivided into subgroups of late children comprising third and fourth graders, early adolescents consisting of fifth and sixth graders, and middle adolescents including seventh graders.…

  19. [Proposal of an index for government measures to deal with domestic violence against children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Suely; Mendes, Corina Helena Figueira; Pinto, Liana Wernersbach

    2015-08-01

    The article discusses the development of the Index for Dealing with Family Violence to assess municipal strategies related to this violation of children's and adolescents' rights. Development of the index involved a preliminary analysis of indicators from previous studies and a technical expert group. Four indicators were selected: the existence of a municipal plan for dealing with violence against children and adolescents; the existence of an inter-sector flow for treating and following up on children and adolescents in situations of family violence; number of guardianship councils in relation to the municipality's population; and the existence of standardized instruments in municipal school, social work, and health systems for reporting situations of violence against children and adolescents. The databank from a previous study was used in an exercise to apply the indicator in four Brazilian state capitals. The indicator can serve as a tool for monitoring and mobilizing efforts to implement measures for dealing with family violence. PMID:26375649

  20. Maternal education, home environments and the development of children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Carneiro; Costas Meghir; Matthias Parey

    2010-01-01

    We study the intergenerational effects of maternal education on children's cognitive achievement, behavioral problems, grade repetition and obesity. We address the endogeneity of maternal schooling by instrumenting it with variation in schooling costs during the mother's adolescence. Using matched data from the female participants of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and their children, we can control for mother's ability and family background factors. Our results show s...

  1. Schooling Ophelia: Hysteria, Memory and Adolescent Femininity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I analyze the theorization of adolescent femininity within three popular cultural texts about girls and schooling written by women and published in the United States during the 1990s. The books, referred to as "Ophelia narratives," include Lyn Mikel Brown and Carol Gilligan's (1992) "Meeting at the Crossroads," Mary Pipher's (1994)…

  2. School-age children development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work, free play, and structured activities. School-age children should participate in family chores such as setting the table and cleaning up. Limit screen time (television and other media) to 2 hours a day.

  3. The Relation between Breakfast Skipping and School Performance in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Ouwehand, Carolijn; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; de Groot, Renate; Krabbendam, Lydia; Jolles, Jelle

    2012-01-01

    Breakfast skipping is common in adolescents, but research on the effects of breakfast skipping on school performance is scarce. This current cross-sectional survey study of 605 adolescents aged 11-18 years investigated whether adolescents who habitually skip breakfast have lower end-of-term grades than adolescents who eat breakfast daily.…

  4. Cancer in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group. Pediatric and Developmental Pathology 2011; 14(3):189-193. [PubMed Abstract] Smith ... factors for acute leukemia in children: A review. Environmental Health Perspectives 2007; 115(1):138-145. [PubMed ...

  5. School mental health services: signpost for out-of-school service utilization in adolescents with mental disorders? : a nationally representative United States cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Tegethoff; Esther Stalujanis; Angelo Belardi; Gunther Meinlschmidt

    2014-01-01

    Background: School mental health services are important contact points for children and adolescents with mental disorders, but their ability to provide comprehensive treatment is limited. The main objective was to estimate in mentally disordered adolescents of a nationally representative United States cohort the role of school mental health services as guide to mental health care in different out-of-school service sectors. Methods: Analyses are based on weighted data (N = 6483) fro...

  6. [Vulnerability to depression in children and adolescents: update and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purper-Ouakil, D; Michel, G; Mouren-Siméoni, M-C

    2002-01-01

    their predictive value for the onset of clinical depressive episodes needs further investigation. Familial and individual vulnerability is likely to heighten the depressogenic impact of life events and psycho-social adversity. Prevention interventions have been developed in the United States for children and adolescents at-risk for depression. In France, clinicians witness growing demands from families with affective illness concerned with risk of parent-child transmission of depressive vulnerability, prevention and early identification of symptoms. To meet this kind of emerging needs and to prevent family dysfunction, a preventive program targets offspring of depressed parents and uses clinician-based family approaches. Family and individual sessions aim a better understanding of illness experience and encourage the parents to identify and foster resilience in their children. Another type of preventive intervention focuses on children and adolescents with subclinical depressive symptoms, eventually associated with behavioral problems ou high level of parental conflict, recruited in school settings. These school-based interventions combine cognitive and social problem-solving techniques. Both familial and school-based preventive interventions have proven applicable and promising in high-risk children and adolescents. Perspectives are more systematic identification of risk groups, including youngsters with past or current non affective symptoms who might benefit from depression prevention, long-term evaluation and cross-cultural applications of prevention programs. PMID:12091784

  7. Loneliness and Ethnic Composition of the School Class: A Nationally Random Sample of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Katrine Rich; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Rubin, Mark; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Lasgaard, Mathias; Walsh, Sophie; Stevens, Gonneke G W J M; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2016-07-01

    Loneliness is a public health concern that increases the risk for several health, behavioral and academic problems among adolescents. Some studies have suggested that adolescents with an ethnic minority background have a higher risk for loneliness than adolescents from the majority population. The increasing numbers of migrant youth around the world mean growing numbers of heterogeneous school environments in many countries. Even though adolescents spend a substantial amount of time at school, there is currently very little non-U.S. research that has examined the importance of the ethnic composition of school classes for loneliness in adolescence. The present research aimed to address this gap by exploring the association between loneliness and three dimensions of the ethnic composition in the school class: (1) membership of ethnic majority in the school class, (2) the size of own ethnic group in the school class, and (3) the ethnic diversity of the school class. We used data from the Danish 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey: a nationally representative sample of 4383 (51.2 % girls) 11-15-year-olds. Multilevel logistic regression analyses revealed that adolescents who did not belong to the ethnic majority in the school class had increased odds for loneliness compared to adolescents that belonged to the ethnic majority. Furthermore, having more same-ethnic classmates lowered the odds for loneliness. We did not find any statistically significant association between the ethnic diversity of the school classes and loneliness. The study adds novel and important findings to how ethnicity in a school class context, as opposed to ethnicity per se, influences adolescents' loneliness. PMID:26861709

  8. SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim AKTEPE

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Suicide is a complex phenomenon associated with pyschological, biological and social factors. Suicide has been reported as the second or third most common cause of death in children and adolescents worldwide. Suicidal behaviour in children and adolescents will be discussed in the frame of motivational definition. Method: Published research studies and reviews on children and adolescent suicides have been reviewed. Furthermore, classical papers have been searched to obtain knowledge about suicide behavior. Results: It is reported that firearms have been the most important effect in adolescent suicide. Both fatal and nonfatal suicidal behaviors have been linked consistently to negative parent-child relationships, depression, substance use, overall number of life stressors, gender and impulsive behaviors. Discussion: Future efforts to investigate suicidal behavior should use new research methodologies that may lead to identification of the interactions between environmental factors and constitutional and biological factors that are associated with risk for suicidal behavior. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(2.000: 88-97

  9. Sharing nature with children and adolescents with moderate, severe or profound intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sterniša, Živa

    2012-01-01

    One of the main and most important principles in educating children and adolescents with moderate, severe or profound intellectual disabilities is integrity. This means that each person tries to develop as a whole, so that they can achieve as much as they can in all areas of functioning. Open-air school is a very good way to achieve this, especially when learning about nature. By carefully planning the open-air school curriculum we allow children and adolescents with moderate, severe or profo...

  10. TO ASSESS NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF ADOLESCENTS (10-12 YEARS) FROM NON GOVERNMENT FUNDED SCHOOLS (PRIVATE) OF AN URBAN INDIAN CITY & KAP OF PARENTS/ TEACHERS REGARDING HEALTHY DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE BEHAVIORS FOR ADOLESCENTS.

    OpenAIRE

    Somila Surabhi; Meenakshi Bakshi Mehan; Sirimavo Nair

    2013-01-01

    To assess nutritional status of adolescents (10-12 years) from non government funded schools (private) of Gujarat, India. Teachers & parents of adolescent children were assessed regarding their knowledge, attitude and practices of healthy dietary & lifestyle behaviours. School canteen services were also critically evaluated. Parent’s willingness, to start a nutrition program in the school was also assessed. A cross sectional study was conducted on adolescents (10-12 years) from two selected p...

  11. Blood Pressure Percentiles for School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Özanli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The prevalence of hypertension in childhood and adolescence is gradually increasing. We aimed to in­vestigate the blood pressure (BP values of children aged 7-18 years. Methods: This study was conducted in a total of 3375 (1777 females, 1598 males children from 27 schools. Blood pressures of children were measured using sphyg­momanometer appropriate to arm circumference. Results: A positive relationship was found between sys­tolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP and the body weight, height, age and body mass index (BMI in male and female children. SBP was high­er in males than females after the age of 13. DBP was higher in males than the females after the age of 14. The mean annual increase of SBP was 2.06 mmHg in males and 1.54 mmHg in females. The mean annual increase of DBP was 1.52 mmHg in males and 1.38 mmHg in fe­males. Conclusion: In this study, we identified the threshold val­ues for blood pressure in children between the age of 7 and 18 years in Erzurum province. It is necessary to com­bine and evaluate data obtained from various regions for the identification of BP percentiles according to the age, gender and height percentiles of Turkish children.

  12. Food insecurity, school absenteeism and educational attainment of adolescents in Jimma zone Southwest Ethiopia: a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Gebremariam Abebe; Lindstrom David; Hadley Craig; Belachew Tefera; Lachat Carl; Kolsteren Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Food insecurity not only affects physical growth and health of children but also their intellectual development, school attendance and academic performance. However, most evidences are based on studies in high income countries. Although food insecurity is common in Ethiopia, to what extent it affects school attendance and educational attainment of adolescents is not explored. We hypothesized that food insecure adolescents would be more likely to be absent from school and h...

  13. Association of sexual maturation with excess body weight and height in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Benedet, Jucemar; da Silva Lopes, Adair; Adami, Fernando; de Fragas Hinnig, Patrícia; Francisco de Assis Guedes de VASCONCELOS

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies addressing the influence of early sexual maturation on the excess of body weight and height of children and adolescents are scarce. The aim of the study was to analyze the association of sexual maturation with excess body weight and height in children and adolescents. Methods This was a cross-sectional study performed in Florianópolis city, Brazil, in 2007, with 2339 school children, aged 8–14 years (1107 males). Selection was based on a probabilistic, cluster-stratified sa...

  14. Determinants of Change in Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Craggs, Christopher; Corder, Kirsten; van Sluijs, Esther M. F.; Simon J Griffin

    2011-01-01

    Context Data are available on correlates of physical activity in children and adolescents, less is known about the determinants of change. This review aims to systematically review the published evidence regarding determinants of change in physical activity in children and adolescents. Evidence acquisition Prospective quantitative studies investigating change in physical activity in children and adolescents aged 4–18 years were identified from seven databases (to November 2010): PubMed, SCOPU...

  15. Primary care management of depression in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, Judy

    2016-06-19

    Depression is the most common mental health disorder in children and adolescents, and primary care is often the first point of contact for children and adolescents with depression. Depression impacts all areas of life, impairing academics and interactions with family and friends. The purpose of this article is to help NPs identify and treat children and adolescents presenting with depression in the primary care setting. PMID:27214067

  16. Night shift working mothers: mutual perceptions with adolescent children

    OpenAIRE

    Sizane, Nongazi Florinah; Van Rensburg, Esme

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the mutual perception of relationships between mothers with day and night shift work and their teenage children. A cross-sectional survey using purposeful sampling was used. Two groups of 35 mothers and their adolescent children completed a Parent-Adolescent Relationship-Questionnaire (Robin, Koepke, Moye & Gerhardstein, 20(19). Data was analysed by means of SAS and SPSS programmes. Findings show that adolescent children of day shift working mothers perceive communicati...

  17. Prevalence of overweight and obesity among preparatory school adolescents in Urban Sharkia Governorate, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed A Talat; Eman El Shahat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become an important public health problem in children and adolescent because of the rapid increase in its prevalence rate and its severe co-morbidities. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of overweight and obesity among preparatory school adolescent in urban Sharkia Governorate, aged from 12 to 15 years and to explore the associated risk factors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out at Sharkia Governorate during academic year 2014–2015 (from Octob...

  18. Stability of leisure participation from school-age to adolescence in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Schmitz, Norbert; Shevell, Michael; Lach, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    With increasing age, youth with disabilities are at risk for decreased participation in leisure activities, a key component for physical and mental health. This prospective study describes changes in leisure participation and leisure preferences from school-age to adolescence in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Participants were recruited at school-age (6-12 years) for a study on participation and reassessed for a second study on adolescents (12-19 years) if >12 years. Thirty-eight children (24 males) with CP who could actively participate in the completion of the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and the Preferences for Activities of Children (PAC) comprised the sample. Average time between assessments was 5.0 ± 1.3 years. Most children were ambulatory (32/38 Gross Motor Function Classification System I-II). In addition to the CAPE and PAC, children were evaluated using the Gross Motor Function Measure-66 and parents completed a socio-demographic questionnaire. Paired t-tests revealed a significant decline in leisure participation diversity and intensity (CAPE) for recreation (p.05). Diversity of active-physical activities increased modestly (p=.06) although intensity of participation in this activity domain decreased (p=.003). There was also a decline in enjoyment of leisure activities. Preferences for these leisure activities remained unchanged between school-age and adolescence, except for recreational activities. Gender, maternal education, family income and gross motor ability were not related to differences in CAPE/PAC scores with increasing age. Findings suggest that over time, children with CP's participation in leisure activities diminishes, which is of concern to their functioning and well-being. Parents may be more involved in early childhood in facilitating participation whereas in adolescence, youth may be faced with more environmental barriers and a greater awareness of challenges to participation. Adolescents

  19. Associations between Active Commuting to School and Health-Related Physical Fitness in Spanish School-Aged Children: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio Villa-González; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Palma Chillón

    2015-01-01

    Active commuting (walking or cycling) to school has been positively associated with improved fitness among adolescents. However, current evidence lacks information on whether this association persists in children. The aim of this study was to examine the association of active commuting to school with different fitness parameters in Spanish school-aged children. A total of 494 children (229 girls) from five primary schools in Granada and Jaén (Spain), aged between eight and 11 years, particip...

  20. Vegetarian diets in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Amit, M

    2010-01-01

    A well-balanced vegetarian diet can provide for the needs of children and adolescents. However, appropriate caloric intake should be ensured and growth monitored. Particular attention should be paid to adequate protein intake and sources of essential fatty acids, iron, zinc, calcium, and vitamins B12 and D. Supplementation may be required in cases of strict vegetarian diets with no intake of any animal products. Pregnant and nursing mothers should also be appropriately advised to ensure that ...

  1. Familial hypercholesterolaemia in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegman, Albert; Gidding, Samuel S; Watts, Gerald F;

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common genetic cause of premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Globally, one baby is born with FH every minute. If diagnosed and treated early in childhood, individuals with FH can have normal life expectancy. This consensus paper aims to improve awarenes...... management, we call for further studies in the young. Increased awareness, early identification, and optimal treatment from childhood are critical to adding decades of healthy life for children and adolescents with FH....

  2. Fasting guidelines for diabetic children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kiswhar Azad; Fauzia Mohsin; Abdul Hamid Zargar; Bedowra Zabeen; Jamal Ahmad; Syed Abbas Raza; Samin Tayyeb; Sarita Bajaj; Osama Ishtiaq; Sanjay Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan, the ninth month of Islamic lunar calendar, is obligatory for all healthy adult and adolescent Muslims from the age of 12 years. Fasting starts from early dawn (Sohur/Sehri) till sunset (Iftar). During this period one has to abstain from eating and drinking. Islam has allowed many categories of people to be exempted from fasting, for example, young children, travelers, the sick, the elderly, pregnant, and lactating women. According to expert opinion, patien...

  3. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Deborah M.; Kamphuis, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can involve any organ system with a wide range of disease manifestations, and can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. This article reviews the epidemiology, common clinical features, complications of disease, and briefly discusses the available treatment options. In addition, important medical and psychosocial issues relevant to the pediatrician caring for children and adolescents with SLE are discussed.

  4. Overweight and Obesity in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Koyuncuoğlu Güngör, Neslihan

    2014-01-01

    Obesity among children, adolescents and adults has emerged as one of the most serious public health concerns in the 21st century. The worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased remarkably over the past 3 decades. The growing prevalence of childhood obesity has also led to appearance of obesity-related comorbid disease entities at an early age. Childhood obesity can adversely affect nearly every organ system and often causes serious consequences, including hypertension, dyslipidem...

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Andıran, Nesibe; Çelik, Nurullah; AKÇA, Halise; Doğan, Güzide

    2012-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is an important health problem in both developed and developing countries. Recent reports on the extraskeletal effects of vitamin D have led to increased interest in prevalence studies on states of deficiency/insufficiency of vitamin D. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children and adolescents residing in Ankara, Turkey and to investigate the factors associated with low vitamin D status. Methods: A...

  6. [Healthcare of children and adolescents in national strategy for action for children for 2012-2017].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchma, V R

    2013-01-01

    The National Strategy defines the main directions and objectives of public policy in the interests of children and the key mechanisms for its implementation. The strategy is based on the universally recognized principles and norms of international law. Implementation of the National Strategy will be realized in the following areas: Family Child Welfare Policy, availability to quality education and training, cultural development, and information security of children, child-friendly health care, and healthy lifestyle; equal opportunities for children in need of special care of the State, the creation of protection and safeguarding the rights and interests of children and child-friendly justice, and children - members of the realization of National Strategy. School health care is intended to be actively involved in two directions: availability to quality education and training, cultural development, and information security of children, health care, child-friendly and healthy lifestyle. The main tasks in the part of hygiene and children's health are: state support for the construction of new preschool educational institutions and the development of all forms of safe preschool education, including non-state sector, providing for every upperclassman safe choice of training profile corresponding to his inclinations and life plans, as well as the functional possibilities and health state; providing quality psychological, correctional and pedagogical aid to children in educational institutions; renewal of forms and methods of control of child neglect, drug addiction, alcoholism, crime, prostitution; the development of effective mechanisms in prevention of deviant behavior in childhood; the creation and implementation of training programs for children and adolescents on rules of safety behavior in the World Wide Web, prevention of Internet addiction; the introduction of the system for monitoring of the educational environment; the creation of portals and sites accumulating

  7. Protocol for the adolescent hayfever trial: cluster randomised controlled trial of an educational intervention for healthcare professionals for the management of school-age children with hayfever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Aziz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seasonal allergic rhinitis (hayfever is common and can contribute to a considerable reduction in the quality of life of adolescents. This study aims to examine the effectiveness of standardised allergy training for healthcare professionals in improving disease-specific quality of life in adolescents with hayfever. Methods/Design Adolescents with a history of hayfever registered in general practices in Scotland and England were invited to participate in a cluster randomised controlled trial. The unit of randomisation is general practices. The educational intervention for healthcare professionals consists of a short standardised educational course, which focuses on the management of allergic rhinitis. Patients in the intervention arm of this cluster randomised controlled trial will have a clinic appointment with their healthcare professional who has attended the training course. Patients in the control arm will have a clinic appointment with their healthcare professional and will receive usual care. The primary outcome measure is the change in the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire with Standardised Activities (RQLQ(S score between baseline and six weeks post-intervention in the patient intervention and control groups. Secondary outcome measures relate to healthcare professionals' understanding and confidence in managing allergic rhinitis, changes in clinical practice, numbers of consultations for hayfever and adolescent exam performance. A minimum of 11 practices in each arm of the trial (10 patients per cluster will provide at least 80% power to demonstrate a minimal clinically important difference of 0.5 in RQLQ(S score at a significance level of 5% based on an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC of 0.02. Discussion At the time of submission, 24 general practices have been recruited (12 in each arm of the trial and the interventions have been delivered. Follow-up data collection is complete. 230 children

  8. Classroom context, school engagement, and academic achievement in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterer, Aryn M; Lowe, Katie

    2011-12-01

    Classroom context and school engagement are significant predictors of academic achievement. These factors are especially important for academically at-risk students. Grounded in an ecological systems perspective, this study examined links between classroom context, school engagement, and academic achievement among early adolescents. We took a multidimensional approach to the measurement of classroom context and school engagement, incorporating both observational and self-reported assessments of various dimensions of classroom context (instruction quality, social/emotional climate, and student-teacher relationship) and school engagement (psychological and behavioral engagement). Using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, we tested whether school engagement mediated the link between classroom context and academic achievement among 5th grade students, and whether these pathways were the same for students with previous achievement difficulties identified in 3rd grade. Participants included 1,014 children (50% female) in 5th grade (mean age = 11). The majority of the participants were white (77%) and 23% were children of color. Results indicated that psychological and behavioral engagement mediated the link between classroom context and academic achievement for students without previous achievement difficulties. However, for students with previous achievement difficulties psychological and behavioral engagement did not mediate the link between classroom context and academic achievement. These results suggest that improving classroom quality may not be sufficient to improve student engagement and achievement for students with previous achievement difficulties. Additional strategies may be needed for these students. PMID:21400208

  9. Exploring school neighborhood food environment of Norwegian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adolescent overweight and obesity rates are increasing in Norway. Adolescents spend a lot of time at school and the school neighborhood food environment could affect adolescents’ dietary behavior and development of overweight and obesity. Access to unhealthy foods at school can contribute to a high intake of unhealthy food items and beverages during the school day. The availability of food sales outlets in the school neighborhoods is one environmental determinant that may be of gr...

  10. Obesity among adolescents of affluent public schools in Meerut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Pant, Bhawna; Chopra, H; Tiwari, R

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide in all segments of the population due to increased industrialization, urbanization, mechanization, and associated changes in diet and lifestyles. Change in diet habit of consuming more high energy fast foods and shifting to sedentary lifestyle has affected our children and also increased the risk of chronic diseases among adolescents. Childhood obesity has association with increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer in later life. Therefore, its control and prevention is one of the major concerns for all developing nations. The present school-based cross-sectional study was carried out among 2785 affluent adolescents of six public schools in Meerut during the period October 2003 to March 2004. The objective is to assess the magnitude of overweight and obesity in adolescents and associated risk factors, with the help of the ELIZ health pathway based on body mass index criteria. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was found to be 19.7% and 5.3% in girls and 18.36% and 10.82% in boys. Obesity was found to be significantly associated with high intake of junk foods (P binge eating, high calorie intake (P watching (P < 0.05). PMID:21245587

  11. INTERNET USE AND ADOLESCENTS' SCHOOL EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Safont-Mottay, Claire; Mouisset-Lacan, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Confusion was brought both in the way knowledge is available and in the status of communication with others by Internet. The socialization of adolescents moves on a way of exchanges through media; short and frequent ties enabling them to establish their independence towards their family. The numerical culture fails to encounter the meaning of school facts. What are the effects of adolescents’ home Internet usage on homework ? We state the hypothesis that Internet modify the relation to knowle...

  12. [Young children, toddlers and school age children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller-Rouassant, Solange; Flores-Quijano, María Eugenia

    2016-09-01

    Cow´s milk represents a very important source of proteins of high biological value and calcium in the child´s diet. The aim of this article is to review the available evidences of its role in nutrition of young children and school age children. Its main benefits are related with effects in linear growth, bone health and oral health, as protein source in early severe malnutrition, and it does not appears to influence metabolic syndrome risk and autism. High protein content in cow´s milk and increased protein consumption by children during the complementary feeding period is associated to the risk of developing a high body mass index and obesity in school-age children; therefore, milk consumption should be mildly restricted during the second year of life and to 480-720 ml/day during the first years of life. Its relationship with some diseases has not been confirmed, and milk consumption is associated with iron deficiency. The use of low-fat cow's milk instead of regular milk in young children remains controversial and its introduction is not advised before 2 to 4 years of age. PMID:27603883

  13. Drug use among street children and adolescents: what helps?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yone Gonçalves de Moura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated to frequent and heavy drug use among street children and adolescents aged 10 to 18 years. A sample of 2,807 street children and adolescents from the 27 Brazilian state capital cities was analyzed. A World Health Organization questionnaire for non-students was adapted for use in Brazil. Data analysis was performed using logistic regression and decision tree models. Factors inversely associated with frequent and heavy drug use were: being age nine to 11 years (OR = 0.1; school attendance (OR = 0.3; daily time (one to five hours spent on the streets (OR = 0.3 and 0.4; not sleeping on the streets (OR = 0.4; being on the streets for less than one year (OR = 0.4; maintenance of some family bonds (OR = 0.5; presence on the streets of a family member (OR = 0.6; not suffering domestic violence (OR = 0.6; being female (OR = 0.8. All of these variables were significant at the p < 0.05 level. The findings suggest that being younger, having family bonds and engagement in school are important protective factors that affect drug use among this population and should be considered in the formulation of public policies.

  14. Empowering adolescents with life skills education in schoolsSchool mental health program: Does it work?

    OpenAIRE

    Srikala, Bharath; Kishore, Kumar K. V.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Mental Health Promotion among adolescents in schools using life skills education (LSE) and teachers as life skill educators is a novel idea. Implementation and impact of the NIMHANS model of life skills education program studied. Materials and Methods: The impact of the program is evaluated at the end of 1 year in 605 adolescents from two secondary schools in comparison to 423 age, sex, socioeconomic status-matched adolescents from nearby schools not in the program. Results: The adolesce...

  15. Children and adolescents presenting to chiropractors in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen-Unhammer, Anna; Wilson, Francis J H; Hestbaek, Lise

    2016-01-01

    2013 using National Health Insurance data (NHI) with regards to age, gender and primary complaints. Part two aimed to provide a more detailed description of these patients in the form of a descriptive, paper-based survey. METHODS: Part one involved Norwegian NHI data from 2013. Part two consisted of a...... year-long, paper-based survey. Chiropractors registered with the Norwegian chiropractic association (NKF) were invited to participate via email. Participating chiropractors were assigned one random month to collect data. All paediatric patients (or their parents) during that were asked to complete...... paediatric group in Norwegian chiropractic practice. Musculoskeletal problems were the most common reason for children visiting a chiropractor in all of the age categories, according to NHI data. Part two of the study found that one-third of young school children and adolescents reported pain lasting longer...

  16. What place for lisdexamfetamine in children and adolescents with ADHD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the commonest behavioural disorder in the UK, affecting 2-5% of school-aged children and young people.(1) Guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) state that medication is not indicated as first-line treatment for school-age children and young people with ADHD, but should be reserved for those with severe symptoms and impairment, or those with moderate levels of impairment who have refused non-drug interventions, or those whose symptoms have not responded sufficiently to parent-training/education programmes or group psychological treatment.(2) Current drug options include methylphenidate (first-line), atomoxetine (first- or second-line) or dexamfetamine (second- or third-line).(2) Lisdexamfetamine (Elvanse-Shire Pharmaceuticals) is a prodrug of dexamfetamine, licensed as part of a comprehensive treatment programme for ADHD in children aged 6 years and over when response to previous methylphenidate treatment is considered clinically inadequate.(3,4) Here we review the place of lisdexamfetamine in the management of ADHD in children and adolescents. PMID:24113146

  17. The effect of increased physical activity on present and future health in children and adolescents: A 3-year controlled intervention study in public schools in the municipality of Svendborg, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Eva; Franz, Claudia; Christensen, Heidi Klakk;

    2010-01-01

    increased physical activity on neck and back pain in Danish school children. •Impact of increased physical activity on sports and leisure time related injuries in Danish school children Methods: A three-year controlled intervention study (2008-11) in 10 public schools. 1520 children aged 6 to 11 were...... promotion of physical activity among children and youth. Aim: The overall aim of the study is to investigate the short and long term health effects of 4 addi¬tional lessons of physical education per week, compared to 2 lessons of physical education. The present five PhD-projects outlining the project are...... presented: •Physical activity and risk factors for lifestyle diseases in Danish school children •Bone health and physical activity in healthy Danish school children •Impact of increased amount and quality of physical education on physical performance and sports injuries in Danish school children •Impact of...

  18. Combating Weight Bias among Adolescents in School Settings: A Sport and Exercise Psychology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyairi, Maya; Reel, Justine J.

    2011-01-01

    Weightism involves stigmatization of individuals based on size, shape, or weight. Weight bias represents a form of bullying and is psychologically damaging to children and adolescents. Although weightism is reinforced by the media, family, and in schools, educators can play an important role in changing their class climate. This article described…

  19. The Relationship between School Achievement and Peer Harassment in Canadian Adolescents: The Importance of Mediating Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Tanya N.; Lupart, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between school achievement and peer harassment was examined using individual and peer characteristics as mediating factors. The sample consisted of adolescents age 12-15 years (n = 4,111) drawn from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, which is a stratified random sample of 22,831 households in Canada.…

  20. Data Collection Procedures for School-Based Surveys among Adolescents: The Youth in Europe Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusson, Jon; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Collection of valid and reliable surveillance data as a basis for school health promotion and education policy and practice for children and adolescence is of great importance. However, numerous methodological and practical problems arise in the planning and collection of such survey data that need to be resolved in order to ensure the…

  1. Overweight prevention in adolescents and children (behavioural and environmental prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas, Sabine

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: In 2006, the prevalence of overweight and adiposity among children and adolescents aged three to 17 years is 15%, 6.3% (800,000 of these are obese. Scientific background: Obese children and adolescents have an increased body fat ratio. The reasons for overweight are – among others – sociocultural factors, and a low social status as determined by income and educational level of the parents. The consequences of adiposity during childhood are a higher risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and increased mortality in adulthood. Possible approaches to primary prevention in children and adolescents are measures taken in schools and kindergarten, as well as education and involvement of parents. Furthermore, preventive measures geared towards changing environmental and living conditions are of particular importance. Research questions: What is the effectiveness and efficiency of different measures and programs (geared towards changing behaviour and environmental and living conditions for primary prevention of adiposity in children and adolescents, with particular consideration of social aspects? Methods: The systematic literature search yielded 1,649 abstracts. Following a two-part selection process with predefined criteria 31 publications were included in the assessment. Results: The majority of interventions evaluated in primary studies take place in schools. As the measures are mostly multi-disciplinary and the interventions are often not described in detail, no criteria of success for the various interventions can be extrapolated from the reviews assessed. An economic model calculation for Australia, which compares the efficiency of different interventions (although on the basis of low evidence comes to the conclusion that the intervention with the greatest impact on society is the reduction of TV-ads geared towards children for foods and drinks rich in fat and sugar. There is a significant correlation between

  2. [Violence in schools, adolescents suffering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szombat, M; François, A

    2012-01-01

    The schoolbullying is a neologism which designates " a long-term violence, physical or psychological, perpetrated by one or more attackers (bully) against a victim (bullied) in a relationship of domination "(C. Blaya). This term is primarily used to describe repeated harassment behavior in schools. This phenomenon concerns one child out of seven in schools. Difficult to detect, it can have more or less serious psychological impacts (medium or long-term effects), such as dropout or anxious school refusal, loss of self esteem, major depressive disorder, suicide, eating disorders and leakage to substance abuse or alcohol. Its therapeutic follow-up is multidisciplinary and difficult. The aim of this paper is to draw the attention of health professionals to these new phenomena of violence in order to detect them as early as possible and thus provide optimal care. PMID:22512146

  3. The definition of disabling fatigue in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thapar Anita

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disabling fatigue is the main illness related reason for prolonged absence from school. Although there are accepted criteria for diagnosing chronic fatigue in adults, it remains uncertain as to how best to define disabling fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS in children and adolescents. In this population-based study, the aim was to identify children who had experienced an episode of disabling fatigue and examine the clinical and demographic differences between those individuals who fulfilled a narrow definition of disabling fatigue and those who fulfilled broader definitions of disabling fatigue. Methods Participants (aged 8–17 years were identified from a population-based twin register. Parent report was used to identify children who had ever experienced a period of disabling fatigue. Standardised telephone interviews were then conducted with the parents of these affected children. Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, including age of onset, gender, days per week affected, hours per day spent resting, absence from school, comorbidity with depression and a global measure of impairment due to the fatigue, were examined. A narrow definition was defined as a minimum of 6 months disabling fatigue plus at least 4 associated symptoms, which is comparable to the operational criteria for CFS in adults. Broader definitions included those with at least 3 months of disabling fatigue and 4 or more of the associated symptoms and those with simply a minimum of 3 months of disabling fatigue. Groups were mutually exclusive. Results Questionnaires were returned by 1468 families (65% response rate and telephone interviews were completed on 99 of the 129 participants (77% who had experienced fatigue. There were no significant differences in demographic and clinical characteristics or levels of impairment between those who fulfilled the narrower definition and those who fulfilled the broader definitions. The only exception

  4. Adolescents and Substance Abuse: Warning Signs and School Counseling Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, LaShonda B.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a challenging time for many young persons. Navigating the academic, personal/social, and career planning challenges associated with adolescence indeed is challenging even with excellent school, family, and community support. For those adolescents struggling with substance use and abuse, these challenges become even greater. School…

  5. Evaluating Metabolic Syndrome in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D Rekliti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MS is consisted by a group of interrelated disorders increasing the risk for cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes causing diseases and deaths in modern world.Purpose of the current study is to relate the evaluation of the metabolic syndrome parameters in clinical practice.Data sources and methods: The methodology which was used in this study included Greek and international bibliography review with the help of key-words.Results: Bibliography review showed that the criteria for Metabolic Syndrome are not well-defined and vary according to age, gender and race, while new risk factors are identified every day. Unhealthy diet and lack of physical activity are the basic features of obesity in childhood and adolescence. As a result, the frequency of metabolic disorders constantly increases in overweight or obese children and adolescents and therefore it is necessary for the diagnosis of the syndrome.Conclusions: Metabolic Syndrome management should be based upon an individualized risk assessment and not upon a simple summation and effort in getting treatment separately for each metabolic disorder. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of children and adolescents with multiple risk factors will contribute substantially to prevention by adopting a healthy lifestyle and reducing future syndrome complications.

  6. Fasting guidelines for diabetic children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiswhar Azad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasting during the month of Ramadan, the ninth month of Islamic lunar calendar, is obligatory for all healthy adult and adolescent Muslims from the age of 12 years. Fasting starts from early dawn (Sohur/Sehri till sunset (Iftar. During this period one has to abstain from eating and drinking. Islam has allowed many categories of people to be exempted from fasting, for example, young children, travelers, the sick, the elderly, pregnant, and lactating women. According to expert opinion, patients with type 1 diabetes (type 1 DM who fast during Ramadan are at a very high risk to develop adverse events. However, some experienced physicians are of the opinion that fasting during Ramadan is safe for type 1 DM patients, including adolescents and older children, with good glycemic control who do regular self-monitoring and are under close professional supervision. The strategies to ensure safety of type 1 diabetic adolescents who are planning to fast include the following: Ramadan-focused medical education, pre-Ramadan medical assessment, following a healthy diet and physical activity pattern, modification in insulin regimen, and blood glucose monitoring as advised by the physician.

  7. Children and adolescents with functional somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgaard, Ditte Roth; Rask, Charlotte; Risør, Mette Bech;

    illness beliefs and poor sense of empowerment has been shown effective for FSS in adults. In comparison current knowledge about psychological treatment and the significance of illness beliefs and empowerment in children and adolescents with severe FSS is scarce. Aims: To conduct a qualitative study which......: Preliminary data from interviews conducted prior to family therapy, indicate that illness beliefs and sense of empowerment may be diverging for children and their parents, and are influenced by many factors, such as health professionals, family history, media and personal experiences. Conclusions: Increased...... by semi-structured interviews with approx. 10 children with FSS and their Parents at strategic points in treatment, followed by analysis using Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). IPA is a well-described qualitative method combining hermeneutic and phenomenological thoughts. Results...

  8. Dietary energy density as a marker of dietary quality in Swedish children and adolescents: the European Youth Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Emma; Wärnberg, Julia; Poortvliet, Eric; Kearney, John(Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, U.S.A.); Sjöström, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate if dietary energy density is associated with measures of dietary quality (food group, micronutrient and macronutrient intakes) in children and adolescents. Methods: 551 children (mean age 9.6y, 52% girls) and 569 adolescents (15.5y, 55% girls), sampled from schools in Sweden, completed a single 24-h dietary recall. Dietary energy density (kJ/g) was calculated as the energy from all food consumed divided by the weight of all food consumed. Bever...

  9. Explaining overweight and obesity in children and adolescents of Asian Indian origin: the Calcutta childhood obesity study

    OpenAIRE

    Arnab Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to find out the prevalence of overweight and obesity and its associated factors among Bengalee children and adolescents in the Kolkata, India. A total of 1061 Bengalee school children and adolescents (610 boys and 451 girls) participated and were divided into three age groups: Group I = 8-11 years; Group II = 12-15 years and Group III = 16-18 years. Overweight and obesity were defined as: Overweight (between ≥85 th and

  10. Prevalence and socioeconomic correlates of overweight and obesity among Pakistani primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Shahid Ubeera; Abdullah Hussain Muhammad; Gull Sibgha; Mushtaq Muhammad Umair; Shad Mushtaq Ahmad; Akram Javed

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Childhood obesity is becoming an equally challenging, yet under-recognized, problem in developing countries including Pakistan. Children and adolescents are worst affected with an estimated 10% of the world's school-going children being overweight and one quarter of these being obese. The study aimed to assess prevalence and socioeconomic correlates of overweight and obesity, and trend in prevalence statistics, among Pakistani primary school children. Methods A population-...

  11. Aerobic Capacity in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Olaf; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study described the aerobic capacity [VO[subscript 2peak] (ml/kg/min)] in contemporary children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) using a maximal exercise test protocol. Twenty-four children and adolescents with CP classified at Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale (GMFCS) level I or level II and 336 typically developing…

  12. Relationship between physical activity and obesity in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, S.; Teixeira-Pinto, A.; Ribeiro, J. C.;

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between physical activity (PA) and obesity in Portuguese children and adolescents.......The purpose of the present study was to analyze the relationship between physical activity (PA) and obesity in Portuguese children and adolescents....

  13. Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Referred Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele; Millepiedi, Stefania; Mucci, Maria; Poli, Paola; Bertini, Nicoletta; Milantoni, Luca

    2004-01-01

    Objective: There are insufficient data on generalized anxiety disorder in children and adolescents. Symptoms and comorbidity of generalized anxiety disorder are described as a function of age, gender, and comorbidity in a consecutive series of referred children and adolescents. Method: One hundred fifty-seven outpatients (97 males and 60 females,…

  14. Physical Aggression in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Micah O.; Kanne, Stephen M.; Wodka, Ericka L.

    2013-01-01

    Aggression is a clinically significant problem for many children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, there have been few large-scale studies addressing this issue. The current study examined the prevalence and correlates of physical aggression in a sample of 1584 children and adolescents with ASD enrolled in the Autism…

  15. ADHD in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Keen, Daphne; Hadijikoumi, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Core symptoms of ADHD are inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness, although other conditions frequently co-exist with ADHD, including developmental disorders (especially motor, language, social communication, and specific learning disabilities) and psychiatric disorders (especially oppositional defiant and conduct disorder, anxiety, and depressive disorders). Symptoms must be present for at least 6 months, are generally observed in children before the age of 7 years, and cause clinic...

  16. Enuresis in School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehbens, James A.

    1970-01-01

    Studies relating to the more popular explanations of enuresis, are discussed and research relating to each is presented. Evidence supporting, or failing to support, treatment methods is also presented. Research possibilities for the school psychologist are suggested. (Author)

  17. Prevalência de sobrepeso e obesidade em crianças e adolescentes de uma escola da rede privada de Recife Overweight and obesity prevalence in children and adolescents from a private school in Recife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geni Balaban

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: determinar a prevalência de sobrepeso e obesidade em estudantes de uma escola da rede privada de Recife, comparar as prevalências de sobrepeso e obesidade entre os sexos e entre os grupos etários (crianças e adolescentes e verificar a correlação entre Índice de Massa Corporal e espessura da prega triciptal, nessa população. MÉTODOS: realizou-se um estudo de corte transversal com 762 estudantes (332 crianças e 430 adolescentes de uma escola de classe média/alta de Recife, no ano de 1999. Sobrepeso foi definido como Índice de Massa Corporal igual ou superior ao percentil 85 para idade e sexo. Obesidade foi definida como Índice de Massa Corporal e espessura da prega triciptal iguais ou superiores ao percentil 85. RESULTADOS: as prevalências de sobrepeso e obesidade foram de 26,2% (IC95% = 23 a 29% e 8,5% (IC95% = 6,5 a 10,5%, respectivamente. O sobrepeso mostrou-se mais prevalente nas crianças (34,3% do que nos adolescentes (20,0% (p OBJECTIVES: to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in students from a private school in Recife; compare the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity in boys and girls and in different age groups (children and adolescents and verify the correlation between body mass index and triceps skinfold thickness in this population. METHODS: cross-sectional study with 762 students (332 children and 430 adolescents from a middle/upper class school in Recife, in 1999. Overweight was defined as body mass index equal or above the 85th percentile for age and gender. Obesity was defined as body mass index and triceps skinfold thickness equal or above the 85th percentile. RESULTS: the prevalence rates were 26.2% (95%CI = 23 to 29% for overweight, and 8.5% (CI95% = 6.5 to 10.5% for obesity. Overweight was more prevalent among children (34.3% than among adolescents (20.0% (P < 0.001. Obesity was more frequent among children (14.2% than among adolescents (4.2% (P < 0.001. The prevalence of

  18. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Didem Behice ÖZTOP; Emel KARAKAYA

    2013-01-01

    Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However,use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effectivemethod for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhoodand adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders ofthe children and adolescents....

  19. Psychological distress among children and adolescents. Do individual or contextual factors matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meilstrup, Charlotte; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Nielsen, Line;

    Psychological distress among children and adolescents. Do individual or contextual factors matter? Authors Meilstrup C, Ersbøll AK, Nielsen L, Due P, Holstein BE Background A large minority of children and adolescents suffer from mental distress and it is important to identify contributing factors...... and quantify explanatory factors at three levels, individuals nested in classes nested in schools. Results Large variations in psychological complaints from one school to another were found. One example is that the proportion of students with at daily experience of emotional complaints varied between...... 7% and 32% across schools. Individual level variables such as low socio-economic position and family composition explained much of the variation across schools. Still, class level variables also contributed to this variation. In classes where many students reported that the class-mates doesn´t like...

  20. Psychoactive Substance Use and School Performance among Adolescents in Public Secondary Schools in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukundo, Aloysius; Kibanja, Grace; Steffens, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Psychoactive substance use among adolescents influences behavioral and cognitive processes and is associated with adolescents' performance in school. We therefore sought to investigate association of PASU with adolescents' school performance. Methods: We employed quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. To test the…

  1. Diet and behavioral problems at school in Norwegian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Høigaard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discussion about dietary factors in relation to behavioral problems in children and adolescents has been going on for a long time. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional relation between diet and self-reported behavioral problems at school in adolescents in the southern part of Norway. Design: In total, 475 ninth- and tenth-grade students (236 boys and 239 girls out of 625 eligible students from four different secondary schools in three different communities in Vest-Agder County, Norway, participated, giving a participation rate of 77%. The students filled in a questionnaire with food frequency questions of selected healthy (e.g. fruits, vegetables, and fish and unhealthy (e.g. sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and crisps food items, questions of meal frequency, and four questions regarding behavioral problems at school. Results: Having breakfast regularly was significantly associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems (OR: 0.29 (0.15 − 0.55, p≤0.001. A high intake of unhealthy foods, such as sugar-sweetened soft drinks (OR: 2.8 (1.06 − 7.42, p=0.03 and sweets (OR: 2.63 (1.39 − 4.98, p=0.003, was significantly associated with increased odds of behavioral problems. At the same time, a high intake of fruits was associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems in Norwegian adolescents (OR: 0.30 (0.10 − 0.87, p=0.03. All ORs are adjusted for sex and BMI. Conclusions: This study shows that having an optimal diet and not skipping meals are associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems at school in Norwegian adolescents. Hence, it is important to improve the dietary intake and meal pattern of Norwegian adolescents. The cross-sectional design of this study limits any causal interpretations of the results of the study.

  2. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: integrating complementary therapy to care of children/adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Pagliari Araujo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify the knowledge of caregivers of children and adolescents about the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and their perceptions regarding changes in daily and family life, after participating in sessions of Tui Na massage. Semistructured interviews in the months from September to November 2013 were held, with nine caregivers of children and adolescents diagnosed with ADHD who participated in massage sessions. The data were subjected to content analysis with a qualitative approach. It was identified that some mothers have little knowledge about the disorder of their children. Regarding the participation of children and adolescents, it was related a positive response, an immediate valuable result, with improved communication with family, more tranquility after the massage, restful sleep, improved mood and better performance school. The caregivers of children and adolescents related that their participation in the Tui Na massage sessions was productive, with acceptance by them with positive changes in daily and family life. The study participants pointed that daily difficulties of ADHD approach them to their son, decreasing anxiety and improving the quality life for the whole family. Sharing information between health professionals and family of children and adolescents about ADHD is important to understand the pathology, as well as for monitoring and further treatment.

  3. Intake of water and beverages of children and adolescents in 13 countries

    OpenAIRE

    Guelinckx, I.; Iglesia, I.; Bottin, J. H.; P. de Miguel-Etayo; González-Gil, E. M.; Salas-Salvadó, J.; Kavouras, S. A.; Gandy, J.; Martinez, H.; Bardosono, S.; M Abdollahi; Nasseri, E.; Jarosz, A.; Ma, G.; Carmuega, E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the intake of water and all other beverages in children and adolescents in 13 countries of three continents. Methods Data of 3611 children (4–9 years) and 8109 adolescents (10–17 years) were retrieved from 13 cross-sectional surveys (47 % males). In three countries, stratified cluster sampling design was applied to randomly recruit schools classes. A quota method was applied in the other countries to randomly recruit participants. Details on the intake of all fluid types w...

  4. [Somatoform disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konichezky, Andres; Gothelf, Doron

    2011-02-01

    Somatoform disorders among children and adolescents may cause impairment in educational and social functioning and generate a great deal of psychosocial distress. The diagnosis of such disorders is complex due to the fact that they may appear as medical conditions. Hence, most of somatoform patients do not seek psychiatric assistance. The common feature of somatoform disorders as described in DSM-IV-TR is the presence of physical symptoms suggesting an underlying medical condition that is either not found or does not account for the level of functional impairment. The diagnostic criteria for the somatoform disorders were established for adults and are applied to children for lack of child-specific research base and a developmentally appropriate alternative system. The most common somatoform disorders in children and adolescents are recurrent abdominal pain and tension headache. Other disorders in the category include: somatization disorder, undifferentiated somatoform disorder, conversion disorder, hypochondriasis and body dysmorphic disorder Treatment is applied through a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. SSRI'S are effective in somatoform disorders that have co-morbidity with anxiety and depression as well as in body dysmorphic disorder and hypochondriasis. Conversion disorder is usually treated with benzodiazepines and pain disorder with light analgesics, tricyclics and tegretol. In terms of psychotherapy, treatments most effective for somatoform disorders have been found to be cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis and biofeedback. PMID:22164950

  5. School Climate and Continuity of Adolescent Personality Disorder Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Stephanie; Cohen, Patricia; Chen, Henian; Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Crawford, Thomas N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Schools are key social contexts for shaping development and behavior in youths; yet, little is known of their influence on adolescent personality disturbance. Method: A community-based sample of 592 adolescents was assessed for family and school experiences, Axis I psychiatric disorders, and Axis II personality disorder (PD) symptoms,…

  6. Risk and Urban School Transition in Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sharon; Sylva, Judith; Gresham, Frank M.; Wantz-Sutton, Jacqueline L.

    2007-01-01

    This is a comparison study of 244 early adolescents attending sixth grade at either an urban elementary school or an urban middle school. Utilizing four data collection instruments, it compares the adolescent groups' degrees of loneliness, levels of positive self-concept, academic competence, problem behaviors, and social skills. Results indicate…

  7. Turkish School Counsellors and Counselling Students' Knowledge of Adolescent Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyez, Digdem Müge; Bas, Asli Uz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the knowledge of Turkish high school counsellors and counselling students about adolescence suicide. The sample consisted of 71 school counsellors and 82 third and fourth year psychology counselling students who completed the Adolescent Suicide Behavior Questionnaire. The results showed that although…

  8. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  9. Adolescent Responsibility, Parent-Child Relations, and School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence; Elmen, Julie D.

    Examined are the relationships of student responsibility and parent-adolescent relations to the school performance of middle-school-age youth. A total of 120 families with a first-born child between 11 and 16 years of age participated in the study. Assessment of adolescent responsibility included measures of self-reliance, work orientation,…

  10. The Timing of School Transitions and Early Adolescent Problem Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Melissa A.; Powers, Christopher J.; Syvertsen, Amy K.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigates whether rural adolescents who transition to a new school in sixth grade have higher levels of risky behavior than adolescents who transition in seventh grade. Our findings indicate that later school transitions had little effect on problem behavior between sixth and ninth grades. Cross-sectional analyses found…

  11. Effectiveness of the workshop "Adolescent depression: What can schools do?"

    OpenAIRE

    Vania eMartinez; Daniel eEspinosa; Pedro eZitko; Rigoberto eMarin; Sara eSchilling; Camila eSchwerter; Graciela eRojas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adolescent depression is associated with serious consequences. School staff is in a unique position to screen and refer adolescents with depression in a timely manner, and can collaborate with healthcare teams to assist in the proper management of the disease. The objective of this paper is to describe the results of a workshop that aims to improve the knowledge of adolescent depression among school staff.Material and methods: This was a single-arm trial with a pre-post design. ...

  12. Overweight and Obesity and Associated Factors among School-Aged Adolescents in Ghana and Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Peltzer; Supa Pengpid

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess overweight and obesity and associated factors in school-going adolescents in low income African countries (Ghana, Uganda). The total sample included 5,613 school children aged 13 to 15 years from nationally representative samples from two African countries. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between dietary behavior, substance use, physical activity, psychosocial factors and overweight or obesity. The prevalence o...

  13. Reading and writing development - A longitudinal study from pre-school to adolescence: status report

    OpenAIRE

    Nauclér, Kerstin; Magnusson, Eva

    1999-01-01

    During the last two decades there has been an increasing tendency to regard reading and writing as linguistic activities. In numerous studies, pre-school children’s linguistic and metalinguistic abilities have been related to their emerging reading and writing skills during the first school years. However, the frequency of such studies tends to decrease as the children grow older, and there are very few investigations of reading and spelling skills of adolescents.

  14. [The dispanserization monitoring of children and adolescents with stomatologic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, N T; Overchenko, A B

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with actual issues of primary prevention of orthodontic complications and dental maxillary malformations in children and adolescents aged up to 10-14 years. The results of dispanserization monitoring of children and adolescents with dental maxillary malformations and stomatologic pathology are discussed. The analysis of the results of dispanserization monitoring a pregnant women is made. The assessment of the role of primary prevention of stomatologic diseases in preventing the development of dental maxillary malformations in children is proposed. The research data related to the dispanserization activities among children and adolescents in organized and non-organized communities and pregnant women is presented. PMID:20731151

  15. [Dreams in neuroses in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabel'nikova, E A; Golubev, V L

    1996-01-01

    46 children and adolescents with different forms of neuroses at the age of 10-18 years were observed. It is shown that the dreams in neurotic individuals are characterised by both cognitive and affective activation as well as by widening of the limits of time and space, by frequent incompletion and by some imperative tendencies (the "channelization" of colour perception, repeated dreams' rise). There was a dependence of dream's character upon the neurosis form. The data obtained are important for adequate diagnosis and therapy of borderline conditions. PMID:8992831

  16. School performance in cholesteatoma-operated children in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurhuus, B D; Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Pedersen, Jacob Krabbe;

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteatoma in childhood had no long-term effect on school performance for the majority who completed lower secondary school. Aim To investigate whether individuals operated on for cholesteatoma in childhood have impaired school performance in adolescence. Methods All children born in Denmark...... between 1986-1991 with cholesteatoma surgery performed before the age of 15 years were included (cholestetaoma group). A control group consisting of a 5% random sample of all children born in Denmark during the same period was used for comparison. Final marks (average, mathematics, Danish, and English......) achieved upon completion of lower secondary school (9th grade; age 15 or 16 years) were compared between groups. Results A total of 549 individuals met the inclusion criteria for the cholesteatoma group and 15 106 for the control group. High parental education and female sex were strongly associated with...

  17. Headache and muscle-skeletal pain in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Bachiocco

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Headache and muscle-skeletal pain are among the most diffuse kinds of pain in children and adolescents. To know the prevalence of these kinds of pain and the possible association with life habits in modern society, a study on 110 children attending a Tuscany secondary school has been carried out. Twenty-six students referred headache or muscle-skeletal pain and sixty-nine both of them. Headache had a higher prevalence in females (53% vs 46%, while muscle-skeletal pain was prevalent in males (54% vs 46%. Low back pain was present especially at the awakening (24% or following sitting position (11,5%, while the transport of school books was often accompanied by muscular pain (47%. Sport activity was associated to muscleskeletal pain (72%, as well as the forced and prolonged hypermotility (63%. From this study emerges that the presence of pain is particularly high in subjects in school age, and that some life habits are associated with its appearance.

  18. [The parents' experience of school refusal in adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Dewi; Harf, Aurélie; Sibeoni, Jordan; Radjack, Rahmeth; Benoit, Jean Pierre; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    While today's society places considerable importance on schooling and performances, school absenteeism is currently very high. One of the causes is anxiety-based school refusal. This phenomenon affects the adolescent but also has an impact on their family. Exploring the experience of the parents of teenagers presenting anxiety-based school refusal enables these families to be given better support. PMID:26381070

  19. Psychosocial aspects of changes during adolescence among school going adolescent Indian girls

    OpenAIRE

    Shweta Sinha; Jyoti Nath Modi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical as well as psychological changes during adolescence create a state of physiological stress that must be coped with. This study was undertaken to study the psychosocial aspects of changes associated with adolescence among school going girls. Methods: A predesigned questionnaire was administered to students of class VI to XII prior to a talk on and lsquo;Adolescent health' in two urban schools of Bhopal. The questions were directed at understanding the psychosocial as...

  20. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in Saudi children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: There is limited information on overweight and obesity in Saudi children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to establish the national prevalence of overweight and obesity in Saudi children and adolescents. METHODS: The 2005 Saudi reference data set was used to calculate the body mass index (BMI) for children aged 5 to 18 years. Using the 2007 WHO reference, the prevalence of overweight, obesity and severe obesity were defined as the proportion of childr...

  1. Clinical and Biochemical Parameters of Children and Adolescents Applying Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    O Hendy; M Abou Salem; G Abdel Rasoul; D Rohlman; A. Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Background: The primary agricultural product in Egypt is the cotton crop. Children and adolescents work seasonally in the cotton fields applying pesticides.Objectives: To examine the effect of pesticide exposure on clinical and biochemical parameters in children and adolescents applying pesticides.Methods: Male children currently applying pesticides and aged between 9 and 19 years (n = 50) were recruited for this study. They were asked to complete work, health, and exposure questionnaires; ex...

  2. Aspects of the built environment associated with obesity in children and adolescents: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Nappi Corrêa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a narrative literature review to describe the availability of food retailers (groceries and eateries and their association with obesity in schoolchildren and adolescents. METHODS: The review included studies published from 2003 to 2013 listed in three databases with data on the child's school and/or home surroundings. RESULTS: There was a higher concentration of fast foods near the schools, especially high schools, public schools, or schools located in low-income regions. Moreover, children and adolescents living in areas further from convenience stores had better diets. CONCLUSION: Acknowledging the relationship between built environment and obesity by establishing scientific evidence is necessary for developing specific strategies that help to control the spread of obesity in this age group, aiming to construct healthier spaces.

  3. An Exploratory Study of Aggression in School-Age Children: Underlying Factors and Implications for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddis, Lynn E.; Landy, Sarah; Moroney, Darren; Kane, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behaviour in school-aged children presents a significant challenge for society. If not managed, it can result in adverse academic, social, emotional, and behavioural outcomes for the child. In addition, it can create stress for families and become a significant burden for the community as these children reach adolescence and adulthood,…

  4. Unintentional Injuries and Psychosocial Correlates among in-School Adolescents in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Peltzer; Supa Pengpid

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to provide estimates of the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of unintentional injury among school-going adolescents in Malaysia. Cross-sectional data from the Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS) included 21,699 students (predominantly ≤13 to ≥17 years) that were selected by a two-stage cluster sample design to represent all secondary school students in Forms 1 to 5. The percentage of school children reporting one or more serious injuries in the past year was 34.9%, ...

  5. Governor's Schools: An Alternative for Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Daniel L.; Stephenson, Scott; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss Governor's Schools as an alternative for gifted students. When the word school is used, people typically think about traditional schooling. But Governor's Schools are different in the type of schooling provided and the type of students served--they educate predominantly gifted children, teach a wide array of…

  6. Review of antipsychotics in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanovic, Suad; Simpson, George M

    2006-10-01

    The use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents in the clinical setting is increasing. This article reviews 77 clinical trials published in the last 10 years, investigating their efficacy, effectiveness, safety and pharmacokinetic data in paediatric populations. The diagnostic categories in which the antipsychotics are commonly used (schizophrenia, pervasive developmental disorders, Tourette's disorder, mental retardation/subaverage intelligence, mood disorders and disruptive behaviour disorders) were used in order to review the evidence and effectiveness. All randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials from the past decade are also summarised. This review refers to recent relevant practice parameters, guidelines and reviews throughout the text. Consistent with previous reviews, it is concluded that the recent trend of increased use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents is not adequately supported by evidence. Specific suggestions have been provided on how to incorporate the existing evidence base into clinical decision making. The review ends with the authors' opinion on the clinical and research implications for the field and future directions. PMID:17020414

  7. Wernicke encephalopathy in children and adolescents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matt Lallas; Jay Desai

    2014-01-01

    Background: Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) defi ciency. It is generally considered to be a disease of adult alcoholics. However, it is known to occur in the pediatric population and in non-alcoholic conditions. Data sources: We searched PubMed with the key words Wernicke, thiamine, pediatric, children and adolescents and selected publications that were deemed appropriate. Results: The global prevalence rates of hunger, poverty and resultant nutrient deprivation have decreased in the 21st century. However, several scenarios which may predispose to Wernicke encephalopathy may be increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents such as malignancies, intensive care unit stays and surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity. Other predisposing conditions include magnesium defi ciency and defects in the SLC19A3 gene causing thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. The classic triad consists of encephalopathy, oculomotor dysfunction and gait ataxia but is not seen in a majority of patients. Treatment should be instituted immediately when the diagnosis is suspected clinically without waiting for laboratory confi rmation. Common magnetic resonance findings include symmetric T2 hyperintensities in dorsal medial thalamus, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal gray matter, and tectal plate. Conclusions: Wernicke encephalopathy is a medical emergency. Delay in its recognition and treatment may lead to significant morbidity, irreversible neurological damage or even death. This article aims to raise the awareness of this condition among pediatricians.

  8. Report on Childhood Obesity in China (4) Prevalence and Trends of Overweight and Obesity in Chinese Urban School-age Children and Adolescents, 1985-2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG-YE JI; WORKING GROUP ON OBESITY IN CHINA (WGOC)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the nationwide prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity, and their group variations and trends over the past 20 years in the Chinese urban population. Methods Data sets of boys and girls at the age of 7-18 years collected from the series of Chinese national surveillance on students' constitution and health (CNSSCH) between 1985 and 2000 were divided into five socioeconomic and demographic groups, while BMI classification reference proposed by Working Group on Obesity in China (WGOC) was used as screening reference to calculate the prevalence and trends of overweight/obesity in these groups. Results In 2000, the prevalence of obesity and overweight in boys aged 7-18 years was 11.3% and 6.5% in Beijing, 13.2% and 4.9% in Shanghai, 9.9% and 4.5% in coastal big cities, and 5.8% and 2.0% in coastal medium/small-sized cities, respectively, while the prevalence of of obesity and overweight in girls of the same age group was 8.2% and 3.7% in Beijing, 7.3% and 2.6% in Shanghai, 5.9% and 2.8% in coastal big cities, and 4.8% and 1.7% in coastal medium/small-sized cities, respectively. The prevalence of obesity was low in most of the inland cities at an early stage of epidemic overweight. The epidemic manifested a gradient distribution in groups, which was closely related to socioeconomic status (SES) of the study population. However, a dramatic and steady increasing trend was witnessed among all sex-age subgroups in the five urban groups, and such a trend was stronger in boys than in girls, and much stronger in children than in adolescents. Conclusion Although China is at an early stage of epidemic obesity by and large, the prevalence of obesity in her urban population, particularly in coastal big cities has reached the average level of developed countries. The increasing trend has been rapid since early 1990s, and the increments in obesity and overweight are exceptionally high. The prospect of epidemic obesity in China is in no way optimistic

  9. Stimulant Treatment of Elementary School Children: Implications for School Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlett, Ronald K.; Nelson, Patricia; Reeves, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Determines the percentage of elementary children in the United States who are currently receiving stimulant medication at school. Forty-six states and 246,707 children were represented in the survey. Approximately 3% of children were receiving stimulant medication at school with Ritalin the stimulant most widely used. Explores assessment issues…

  10. Assessment of Mental Symptoms and Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents Who Admitted to the Child-Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yöntem Fidan T.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The results of the studies investigating the positive and negative factors which affect the mental health were important for developing protective, new and effective programs in prevention from psychiatric disorders.The aim of this study is to determine the demographic features, symptom distribution of children and adolescents in this region.Methods: 632 child and adolescents who attended to Karadeniz Technical University Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic between 01 January 2003 and 30 June 2003 were included the study. The demographic features and first application symptoms were obtained by using interview forms to each child and adolescent and the relation between the demographic features and the first application symptoms were investigated.Results: Of the children and adolescents 63.1% were male and the frequency of the age between 6 and 11 was 40.3% and the frequency of the age between 0-3 years old was the lowest. Irritability, poor school performance, enuresis, encopresis, anxiety, attention deficit-hyperactivity, speech disorders were the most seen symptoms of child and adolescents. Depressive symptoms like crying, unhappiness, suicide attempt were most seen in girls and behavioral symptoms like hyperactivity were seen most in boys (p<0.05. According to age symptoms were specified.Conclusion: In this study, demographic features and symptom distribution between patients who applied to KTU Faculty of Medicine Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic and other Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinics were found similar. In divorced and problematic families, having psychiatric disease of mother-father some specific mental symptoms were found.

  11. Correlates of Self-Report of Rape Among Male School Adolescents in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A; Olagunju, Oluwayemisi E; Olajubu, Aanuoluwapo O; Faremi, Funmilola A; Oloyede, Ajoke S; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2016-02-01

    This study examined male adolescents' self-report of rape of adolescent girls and the socio-demographic variables that correlated with self-report of rape. Descriptive-correlational design was used and the study was conducted in five public senior secondary schools in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Three hundred and thirty-eight male adolescents participated in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings from the study revealed the mean age of the adolescent males to be 16 years, with the majority (73%) of them in the middle adolescent stage. Six percent of the adolescent males reported they had raped an adolescent girl in the past. Among the boys who reported rape, 55% reported they had raped their sexual partners, and 55% reported they had perpetrated gang rape. Smoking (p = .0001), alcohol consumption (p = .001), and birth order (p = .006) predicted self-report of rape. The coefficient of birth order showed that odds of self-report of rape by first-born male increases by 6 times compared with other children. Study findings also provided evidence that adolescent males are moving from lone rape to gang rape in intimate partner relationships. Male adolescents are important group to target in rape prevention programs. PMID:25381280

  12. School Victimization Among Adolescents. An Analysis from an Ecological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Belén Martínez Ferrer; David Moreno Ruiz; Amador, Luis V.; Jim Orford

    2011-01-01

    The present study has two objectives. The first is to analyze the relationships between community (integration in the community), family (perception of family climate), school (perception of school climate) and individual (social reputation and satisfaction with life) and school victimization among adolescents, from an ecological perspective. Secondly, this study aims to examine the differences in these relationships between boys and girls. The sample is composed of 1795 adolescents of both s...

  13. Differentiated thyroid carcinomas in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of differentiated thyroid carcinomas in children and adolescents revealed that the incidence was 3.05% of total number of patients with differentiated thyroid cancers in all age groups. There was a female preponderance. The incidence of papillary, follicular and papillary with follicular elements was equal. There were no papillary carcinomas observed in children younger than 10 years. The predominant mode of presentation was a solitary nodule of thyroid and some of them had associated cervical adenopathy. A considerable number presented with only cervical adenopathy. The incidence of nodal metastases was 50% at time of presentation and lung involvement was present in 15% of children at the time of diagnosis. Radioiodine treatment was given in 70% of children. Ablation was achieved in 86% of patients given two doses of radioiodine (200 millicuries). The more resistant cases were those with lung and nodal metastases. There was complete ablation in 100% with only residual thyroid tissue, 83% in those with associated nodal metastases, and 57% in those with lung involvement. Average duration of follow-up was 10.3 years (range, 2 to 19 years). Recurrence rate or relapse was observed in 8.5% and was in the regional nodes. There was no recorded mortality due to the disease

  14. Do School Feeding Programs Help Children?

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    Policymakers and development organizations have embraced school feeding programs as a way to help poor children get enough to eat while giving them an incentive to be in school. The programs are not just used in developing countries the United States began implementing school feeding programs in the 19th century and still uses them today for poor children. The popularity of these programs,...

  15. Implementing Children's Human Rights Education in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, Katherine; Howe, R. Brian; McNeil, Justin K.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of a children's rights education initiative in schools in Hampshire, England--consistent with previous research findings--demonstrate the effectiveness of a framework of rights for school policy, practice, and teaching, for promoting rights-respecting attitudes and behaviors among children, and for improving the school ethos. The value…

  16. Children and Celiac Disease: Going Back to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Children and Celiac Disease: Going Back to School Going back to school is usually full of excitement and anticipation. For ... of anxiety. Keeping children gluten-free in the school cafeteria and at school parties, classmates’ birthday parties, ...

  17. Unhealthy Behaviours of School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria LAZA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the study was to ascertain nutritional customs of pupils in grade schools.Material and Method: Anonymous questionnaires were done to a sample of 380 children, aged 10 to 14, in 20 fourth-to eight grade classes from 2 schools in Cluj-Napoca: one from down-town, the other one from a poorer neighbourhood.Results: Almost half of students revealed to have an irregular diet. In the last month, some of them did not have enough food or money to buy it (much of them come from the poorer neighbourhood. In this latest school, a triple percent of children have a vegetable diet (no meat, in fact. The obsession to lose weight and the irregular diet has conducted to lose appetite in over 30% of girls. About 60% take vitamins or nutritional supplements. Social status as well as the irregular diet is reflected in general status: over one third feel sad, alone, useless or cry without any reason. Some of the pupils which have problems with daily food supply, think the life is hard and do not worth to live it.Conclusions: There is a wide diversity in nutritional customs of children. Some of them are due to inappropriate nutritional knowledge or a wrong perception of being on fashion as well as to social status. Although the economic conditions are difficult to change, we consider that nutrition education should still be a part of health teaching.

  18. Braving difficult choices alone: children's and adolescents' medical decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Ruggeri

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: What role should minors play in making medical decisions? The authors examined children's and adolescents' desire to be involved in serious medical decisions and the emotional consequences associated with them. METHODS: Sixty-three children and 76 adolescents were presented with a cover story about a difficult medical choice. Participants were tested in one of four conditions: (1 own informed choice; (2 informed parents' choice to amputate; (3 informed parents' choice to continue a treatment; and (4 uninformed parents' choice to amputate. In a questionnaire, participants were asked about their choices, preference for autonomy, confidence, and emotional reactions when faced with a difficult hypothetical medical choice. RESULTS: Children and adolescents made different choices and participants, especially adolescents, preferred to make the difficult choice themselves, rather than having a parent make it. Children expressed fewer negative emotions than adolescents. Providing information about the alternatives did not affect participants' responses. CONCLUSIONS: Minors, especially adolescents, want to be responsible for their own medical decisions, even when the choice is a difficult one. For the adolescents, results suggest that the decision to be made, instead of the agent making the decision, is the main element influencing their emotional responses and decision confidence. For children, results suggest that they might be less able than adolescents to project how they would feel. The results, overall, draw attention to the need to further investigate how we can better involve minors in the medical decision-making process.

  19. Risk Factors for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jing; Han, Zhenhui; Li, Xueying; Ochs, Todd; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Xi; Yang, Jinyan; Liu, Ping; Xiong, Zhenyu; Gai, Yong; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    Background Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is prevalent in children and adolescents and has a great impact on health. But its risk factors have not been fully understood. This study aimed to explore possible risk factors for children and adolescents with POTS. Methods and Findings 600 children and adolescents (test group) aged 7–18 (11.9±3.0) years old, 259 males and 341 females, were recruited for identifying its risk factors. Another 197 subjects aged from 7 to 18 (11.3±2.3) years old ...

  20. Understanding bruxism in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulue, Paul; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Laluque, Jean-François; d'Incau, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Screening for the various forms of bruxism in children and adolescents requires a sound knowledge of the physiopathology of this parafunction in addition to the etiologic and associated factors and comorbidities. The international literature contains various suggestions for suitable treatment. The optimal therapeutic approach often involves multidisciplinary management of these young patients. Sleep bruxism (SB) is a common sleep disorder which can cause serious problems to the stomatognathic system such as damaged teeth, headaches, muscle pain and TMD. Dental professionals are responsible for the detection and prevention of these harmful impacts on the patient's oral health. However, SB is much more than a question of worn teeth. Patients with SB consult for other medical comorbidities such as nighttime breathing problems, insomnia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, moodiness and gastroesophogeal reflux before any course of treatment is initiated. If a comorbidity is diagnosed, the treatment approach will be aimed in the first instance at the medical disorder, while concurrently managing the repercussions of SB. On the other hand, in as far as the majority of young bruxers cease to grind their teeth before adolescence or adulthood, it is feasible to adopt wait-and-see and non-interventionist strategies for young children. However, it is preferable to have a better understanding of SB, notably on account of its potential association with psychological disorders during childhood. Daytime bruxism is characterized by teeth clenching (TC). First-line treatment involves encouraging patients to monitor their harmful parafunctional behavior and, consequently, change and cease it. This protocol is not always easy to apply, particularly in younger children. In such cases, cognitive-behavioral treatments and biofeedback techniques can also be used in daytime bruxism. PMID:26608467

  1. Psychological consequences of war-traumatized children and adolescents in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevludin Hasanović

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Research into the psychosocial consequences of war and political violence on children’s and adolescent’s developmental wellbeing has shown a steady increase over the last decades. Numerous studies, from differing cultures in different war zones around the world, have documented the effect on children of exposure to war atrocities. The war in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH 1992-1995, at the end of 20th century found the citizens of BH and the world mental health professionals and scientists unprepared to deal with the adverse consequences for the entire BH population and especially for its most vulnerable part, children and adolescents, to be able to take adequate measures of sufficient mental health care to prevent devastating consequences of severe multiple traumas. Only a few research studies were done during and after this war in BH, the United States, Sweden, Norway, the UK and Germany focusing on the relationship between war trauma, Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, suicidal thoughts, acculturation, repatriation, poverty, behavioral problems, school adjustment, relational problems of children and their mothers after deployment of war PTSD veterans and war prisoners, and treatment of psychological consequences in examined children and adolescents from BH. The major part of this paper reviewed available literature on Medline that reported national and international studies which investigated the psychological consequences of war on BH children and adolescents and several papers about children and adolescents from Srebrenica, that were not indexed on Medline, but showed very crucial results for the issue described.

  2. Parents' perception of health-related quality of life in children and adolescents with excess weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Maria Romero Nascimento

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the perception of parents or caregivers on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL of children/adolescents with overweight/obesity and possible factors associated with this perception. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 297 caregivers of children and adolescents with normal weight (n = 170 and with overweight/obesity (n = 127, from public and private schools in the study municipality. HRQOL scores obtained through the Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Form 50 (CHQ-PF50 were compared according to the nutritional status and gender of the children/adolescents. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value of studied variables for the variation in HRQOL scores. RESULTS: Parents of children/adolescents with overweight/obesity attributed lower HRQOL scores to their children in the following domains: physical functioning (p < 0.01; d = 0.49, self-esteem (p < 0.01; d = 0.38, parental impact-emotional (p < 0.05; d= 0.29, family cohesion (p < 0.05; d = 0.26, physical summary score (p < 0.05;d = 0.29, and psychosocial summary score (p < 0.05; d = 0.25. In the multiple regression models, the variables with the highest contribution to the variation in HRQOL scores were: in the physical functioning domain, parental impact-time (ß = 0.23; p < 0.05; self-esteem, nutritional status (ß = -0.18;p ≤ 0.01; emotional impact on parents, impact on parents' time (ß = 0.31; p < 0.05; and in family cohesion, global behavior (ß = 0.30;p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: A negative impact on HRQOL of children/adolescents with overweight/obesity was observed in the physical and psychosocial aspects. The nutritional status was the variable with the greatest contribution for the assessment the self-esteem of children and adolescents in this study.

  3. Perceived School and Neighborhood Safety, Neighborhood Violence and Academic Achievement in Urban School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aj, Milam; Cdm, Furr-Holden; Pj, Leaf

    2010-12-01

    Community and school violence continue to be a major public health problem, especially among urban children and adolescents. Little research has focused on the effect of school safety and neighborhood violence on academic performance. This study examines the effect of the school and neighborhood climate on academic achievement among a population of 3(rd)-5(th) grade students in an urban public school system. Community and school safety were assessed using the School Climate Survey, an annual city-wide assessment of student's perception of school and community safety. Community violence was measured using the Neighborhood Inventory for Environmental Typology, an objective observational assessment of neighborhood characteristics. Academic achievement was measured using the Maryland State Assessment (MSA), a standardized exam given to all Maryland 3(rd)-8(th) graders. School Climate Data and MSA data were aggregated by school and grade. Objective assessments of neighborhood environment and students' self-reported school and neighborhood safety were both strongly associated with academic performance. Increasing neighborhood violence was associated with statistically significant decreases from 4.2%-8.7% in math and reading achievement; increasing perceived safety was associated with significant increases in achievement from 16%-22%. These preliminary findings highlight the adverse impact of perceived safety and community violence exposure on primary school children's academic performance. PMID:21197388

  4. Divergent School Trajectories in Early Adolescence in the United States and China: An Examination of Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Pomerantz, Eva M

    2015-11-01

    There is increasing concern that American children are not achieving at their full potential. A particular point of risk is early adolescence when American children often view school as less valuable, becoming less engaged as well. Initial research in China does not find such a trend. The goal of the current research was to elucidate why the movement away from school evident in the United States does not appear to be evident in China. 4 times over the 7th and 8th grades, 825 (48 % female) American and Chinese children (mean age = 12.73 years) reported on the value they place on school and their engagement (i.e., use of self-regulated learning strategies) in school. They also reported on their sense of responsibility to parents (e.g., feelings of obligation to parents), parents' involvement in their learning, and their autonomous motivation in school. A decline in American but not Chinese children's sense of responsibility to parents accounted for divergent trajectories in the value they place on school and their engagement in school over the seventh and eighth grades. Neither parents' involvement nor children's autonomous motivation played a mediating role. The findings suggest that maintaining American children's sense of responsibility to parents during early adolescence may protect children from moving away from school. PMID:25354963

  5. Dropout of Children from schools in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Wagle, Dhirendra

    2012-01-01

    Nepal, a developing country of the south-asian region has bigger problem of children not completing the full cycle of basic education. In other words, large number of children dropout of schools, especially in the primary and secondary level of schooling. Especially, the situation is worse for those of the backward and socially disadvantaged populations and of the rural and the remote areas. Being in this frame, this study focused on the reasons of dropout of children from schools and the pos...

  6. Food insecurity, school absenteeism and educational attainment of adolescents in Jimma Zone Southwest Ethiopia: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremariam Abebe

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food insecurity not only affects physical growth and health of children but also their intellectual development, school attendance and academic performance. However, most evidences are based on studies in high income countries. Although food insecurity is common in Ethiopia, to what extent it affects school attendance and educational attainment of adolescents is not explored. We hypothesized that food insecure adolescents would be more likely to be absent from school and have lower grades attained after 1 year compared to their food secure peers. Methods We used data from 2009 adolescents in the age group of 13-17 years from two consecutive surveys of a five year longitudinal family study in Southwest Ethiopia. A stratified random sampling was used to select participants. Regression analyses were used to compare school absenteeism and the highest grade attained after 1 year of follow-up in food secure and insecure adolescents. The analysis was adjusted for demographic factors, reported illness and workload. Results Significantly more (33.0% food insecure adolescents were absent from school compared with their food secure peers (17.8%, P Conclusions Adolescent and household food insecurity are positively associated with school absenteeism and a lower educational attainment. Programs aiming to achieve universal access to primary education in food insecure environments should integrate interventions to ensure food security of adolescents.

  7. Multidetector computed tomography of jaw lesions in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Jaw lesions in paediatric and adolescent population are uncommon and can arise in odontogenic or non-odontogenic tissues. With the advent of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), algorithm for imaging jaw lesions has changed dramatically. This pictorial essay describes the imaging appearance of commonly encountered jaw lesions in children and adolescents with emphasis on MDCT findings

  8. Children's and Adolescents' Developing Perceptions of Gender Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Kristin D.; Cooper, Carey E.; Woodruff, Althea L.

    2007-01-01

    Two studies examined children's and adolescents' developing perceptions of gender inequality. The first study examined perceptions of inequality among 272 early, middle, and late adolescents, focusing on the spheres of politics, business, and the home. Results indicated an age-related increase in perceptions of male dominance. Men were seen to…

  9. The effectiveness of an intervention promoting physical activity in elemantary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Verstraete, S

    2006-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important component of a healthfully lifestyle in children and adolescents. The main purpose of this dissertation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive PA promotion intervention in elementary school children. Furthermore, the effectiveness of some of the intervention components was evaluated. Sixteen elementary schools participated in the intervention study. They were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 8) and control condition (n = 8...

  10. Self-evaluation and School Adaptation in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcet, Claude

    1998-01-01

    Investigates how adolescent's self-evaluation in junior high school (global self-esteem and self-evaluation related to school) influences the way he/she copes when experiencing a first difficulty in high school. Reveals the low predictive power of contextual self-evaluation on functional and dysfunctional factors and the importance of global…

  11. Noteworthy Books in Spanish for Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Isabel

    1998-01-01

    Lists Spanish language books for children ranging from wordless picture books to adolescent love stories and translated popular novels. This year's list includes publishers from Latin America, in particular Mexico's Fondo de Cultura Economica. (MMU)

  12. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Obesity among Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Amélie; Bucher Della Torre, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents has increased worldwide and has reached alarming proportions. Currently, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are the primary source of added sugar in the diet of children and adolescents. Contradictive findings from......-analyses by providing an up-to-date synthesis of recent evidence regarding the association between SSB consumption and weight gain, overweight, and obesity in a population of 6-month-old to 19-year-old children and adolescents. The secondary aim was to assess the quality of included reviews using the Assessment...... concluded that there was a direct association between SSBs and obesity in children and adolescents and four others did not. The quality of the included reviews was low to moderate, and the two reviews with the highest quality scores showed discrepant results. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of reviews concluded...

  13. Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Primary Hypertension ...

  14. Hiperlordose lombar em crianças e adolescentes de uma escola privada no Sul do Brasil: ocorrência e fatores associados Lumbar hyperlordosis in children and adolescents at a privative school in southern Brazil: occurrence and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Torres de Lemos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação da postura corporal durante a infância e adolescência permite a detecção de alterações em fases iniciais e a adoção de medidas preventivas. Avaliou-se a ocorrência de hiperlordose lombar e fatores associados em 467 crianças e adolescentes de 10 a 16 anos de idade de uma escola de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. A hiperlordose lombar foi definida como aumento da curvatura lombar avaliada por meio de fotografia. Verificou-se 78% de ocorrência da patologia. Os fatores positivamente associados a essa alteração postural foram sexo feminino (RP = 1,08; IC95%: 1,03; 1,13, força/resistência abdominal abaixo do percentil 20 (RP = 1,10; IC95%: 1,05; 1,15 e flexibilidade abaixo do percentil 20 (RP = 1,07; IC95%: 1,01; 1,12. A hiperlordose lombar se associou negativamente à mobilidade lombar (RP = 0,90; IC95%: 0,85; 0,96 e à estatura (RP = 0,995; IC95%: 0,99; 0,999. Estratégias efetivas que melhorem os níveis de aptidão física de escolares são necessárias, tendo em vista que baixos níveis de força e flexibilidade foram associados à hiperlordose lombar.Posture assessment during childhood and adolescence allows early detection of postural disorders and adoption of preventive measures. This study evaluated the occurrence of lumbar hyperlordosis and associated factors in 467 children and adolescents aged 10 to 16 years at a school in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Lumbar hyperlordosis was defined as increased lumbar curvature evaluated by photography. Prevalence of lumbar hyperlordosis was 78%. Factors positively associated with lumbar hyperlordosis were female gender (PR = 1.08; 95%CI: 1.03; 1.13, abdominal strength below the 20th percentile (PR = 1.10; 95%CI: 1.05; 1.15, and flexibility below the 20th percentile (PR = 1.07; 95%CI: 1.01; 1.12. Lumbar hyperlordois was negatively associated with lumbar mobility (PR = 0.90; 95%CI: 0.85; 0.96 and height (PR = 0.995; 95%CI: 0.99; 0.999. Effective

  15. [Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-de Sambricio, A; Garrido-Stratenwerth, E

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain is a common cause of lost playing time in young athletes, and spondylolysis is its most common identifiable cause. Despite technological advances in radiology, which can lead to an early diagnosis with better prognosis, progression to spondylolisthesis is sometimes asymptomatic and may not be detected until late stages. There are wide variations, suggesting lack of consensus as regards the objective of treatment, which consists of clinical, radiological, biomechanical or functional improvement. There is also a lack of agreement regarding the ideal conservative treatment, surgical indications and need of slip reduction, and most of the established recommendations are not evidence based. We present a review of literature, which summarizes the current knowledge of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in children and adolescents. PMID:25224623

  16. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: interventions for a complex costly clinical conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greydanus, Donald E; Pratt, Helen D; Sloane, Mark A; Rappley, Marsha D

    2003-10-01

    Management of a child or adolescent with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is reviewed, including psychological and pharmacologic approaches. Psychological treatment includes psychotherapy, cognitive-behavior therapy, support groups, parent training, educator/teacher training, biofeedback, meditation, and social skills training. Medications are reviewed that research has revealed can improve the core symptomatology of a child or adolescent with ADHD. These medications include stimulants, antidepressants, alpha-2 agonists, and a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Management of ADHD should include a multi-modal approach, involving appropriate educational interventions, appropriate psychological management of the patient (child or adolescent), and judicious use of medications. Parents, school officials, and clinicians must work together to help all children and adolescents with ADHD achieve their maximum potential. PMID:14558681

  17. Anthropometry and body composition of school children in Bahrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted because of the lack of a comprehensive nationwide assessment of data on the anthropometric status and related health problems in Bahraini school children aged 6 to 18 years. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on the anthropometric status of school children enrolled in the primary, intermediate and secondary government schools in all populated regions of Bahrain. The sample size included 2594 students (1326 girls and 1268 boys) representing 2.5% of the total student population. For sample selection, a multi-stage sampling design was chosen that combined multi-cluster and simple random sampling methods. Anthropometric measurements included height, weight, mid-arm circumference and skin fold thickness at two sites (triceps and subscapular). Anthropometric indices derived were body mass index (BMI) and arm muscle area. The WHO reference standards (2007) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2 data were used for comparison. Compared to WHO reference standards, the median height of Bahraini children and adolescents in the age range of 6 to 18 years was close to the 25th percentile or lower, while the median BMI during adolescent years was comparable in boys, but higher than WHO standards in girls, reaching the 75th percentile. The cutoff values of BMI for overweight/obesity status (85th and 95th percentile) were higher by 3-6 kg/m2 compared to WHO standards. While skin fold thicknesses were also higher in Bahraini adolescents compared to their American counterparts (NHANES 2), arm muscularity was substantially lower. Current study findings for BMI as well as skin fold thicknesses suggest an increased trend toward adiposity among Bahraini adolescents, especially in girls, which puts this age group at a high risk of adult obesity and its consequences. A need for urgent intervention program is emphasized. (author)

  18. DIETARY HABITS OF SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN IN TBILISI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebonia, N; Trapaidze, D; Kvanchakhadze, R; Zhizhilashvili, S; Kasradze, N

    2015-11-01

    Study Goal was to determine dietary habits in school-aged children. Sampling of children was conducted in two stages. In the first stage, five schools in Nadzaladevi district of city Tbilisi were randomly selected. On the second stage the study groups from the appropriate school-aged students (10-14 years old children) were also randomly selected. All student participants filled out standardized and adopted questionnaires suggested by the American Academy of family physicians. Data were analyzed by using EpiInfo 7th version. Statistical analyses looked at correlations between criteria of unhealthy diet (such as morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. A Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated by using CDC tool. 175 children with ages of 10-14 years (47% boys) were included and interviewed. Half of the children noted that they love or like fast food products. 10% - visits fast food places 2-3 times a week together with a family. 11% - visits fast food places 5 times a week and even more. 34% - do not start morning with breakfast; 15% - eat only twice a day; 26% - add salt to their dishes; 58% - drink non-alcoholic beverages every day or many times during a week; 24% - are overweight; 29% suffer from obesity; 25% noted that fast food places are located near schools. Very weak correlation was found between unhealthy diet (morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. According to study results, dietary habits of school-age children in Tbilisi is unhealthy; to improve nutritional habits is essential: (1) promote consumer (students, parents and teachers) awareness on a healthy diet, (2) educate children, adolescents and adults about nutrition and healthy dietary practices, (3) encourage to raise awareness about the salt consumption in recommended doses in children. PMID:26656554

  19. Natural history of sleep disordered breathing in prepubertal children transitioning to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Edward O; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Liao, Duanping; Calhoun, Susan; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol M; Gaines, Jordan; He, Fan; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2016-05-01

    Because there is a lack of agreed upon diagnostic criteria, it is critical to understand the natural history of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in children in order to establish treatment strategies based on objective data.The Penn State Child Cohort is a representative, general-population sample of 700 elementary school children at baseline, of whom 421 were reassessed 8 years later, during adolescence.The remission of childhood apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥2 events per h in adolescence was 52.9%. Using the higher threshold of AHI ≥5 events per h, remission was 100.0%, with 50.0% partially remitting to AHI 2- obesity). Moreover, consistent with recent studies in adults, this study includes the novel cross-sectional finding that visceral fat is associated with SDB as early as adolescence. PMID:26846837

  20. Bullying behaviors in children and adolescents: an ongoing story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis Kimon Tsitsika

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bullying is a universal problem which continues to be a serious threat to physical and emotional health of children and adolescents. This article highlights the prevalence, the common characteristics of bullies and victims, as well as the short- and long-term impact of bullying involvement. Key areas highlighted include the efficacy of bullying prevention programs, which can help health care providers to assess and provide interventions to children and adolescents affected by bullying.

  1. Regional variations in the growth of Saudi children and adolescents.

    OpenAIRE

    P J Foster, A S Al Herbish, M I El Mouzan, A A Al Salloum, M M Al Qureshi, A A Al Omar, T Kecojevic.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: No previous study has provided a detailed description of regional variations of growth within the various regions of Saudi Arabia. Thus, we sought to demonstrate differences in growth of children and adolescents in different regions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The 2005 Saudi reference was based on a cross-sectional representative sample of the Saudi population of healthy children and adolescents from birth to 18 years of age. Body measurements of the length, stature, wei...

  2. Stigmatization of obese children and adolescents, the importance of gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang-Péronard, J L; Heitmann, B L

    2008-01-01

    . The overweight girls were to a larger degree teased about their weight and relationally, verbally and physically bullied. In addition, they were more socially marginalized in respect to friendships and romantic relationships. Stigmatization of overweight children and adolescents indeed occurs, but is more...... prevalent in overweight girls than overweight boys. There is a need to conduct further studies that are specifically designed to evaluate gender differences in stigmatization of overweight children and adolescents, and for studies focusing on preventing this stigmatization....

  3. MR spectroscopy of liver in overweight children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Bille, Dorthe S; Thisted, Ebbe;

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to investigate T(2) relaxation values and to optimize hepatic fat quantification using proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3T in overweight and obese children and adolescents.......The objective was to investigate T(2) relaxation values and to optimize hepatic fat quantification using proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3T in overweight and obese children and adolescents....

  4. Suicide attempts among children and adolescents: partial or total injury?

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Alexandra Gomes Alves; Matilde Meire Miranda Cadete

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to verify the records on file and the number of cases of attempted suicide among children and adolescents who were attended by Emergency Care health professionals in the municipality of Matozinhos, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Documentary and descriptive research was conducted, the data for which was collected by means of an investigation of Outpatient Records from 2008 to 2010. Of the 73,000 files evaluated, those dealing with cases of attempted suicide among children and adolesce...

  5. Major Depression with ADHD: In Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Turgay, Atilla; Ansari, Rubaba

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review recent studies on comorbidity and treatment of major depression (MD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. Both ADHD and MD are commonly associated with other DSM-IV Axis I psychiatric disorders. ADHD is more commonly associated with oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents. The literature on comorbidities of MD and ADHD suggests that when these two disorders occur togethe...

  6. Impact of diet on cardiometabolic health in children and adolescents.

    OpenAIRE

    Funtikova, Anna N.; Navarro, Estanislau; Bawaked, Rowaedh Ahmed; Fit?? Colomer, Montserrat; Schr??der, H.

    2015-01-01

    The manifestation of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and particularly obesity begins in children and adolescents, with deleterious effects for cardiometabolic health at adulthood. Although the impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors has been studied extensively in adults, showing that their cardiometabolic health is strongly lifestyle-dependent, less is known about this impact in children and adolescents. In particular, little is known about the relationship...

  7. Active commuting to school in Portuguese adolescents: Using PALMS to detect trips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarro, Andreia Nogueira; Schipperijn, Jasper; Andersen, Henriette Bondo;

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The declining levels of physical activity (PA) have led to active commuting to school (ACS) being seen as a key strategy to increase PA levels in school-aged children. In Portugal, no data exists on the patterns of this behavior, an essential step for developing evidence-based and...... effective interventions. The purpose of this study is to explore the travel to school behavior using an objective methodology. Methods 155 adolescents (mean age 15.9±1.1 years) wore an accelerometer and a GPS for 7 consecutive days. Home and school addresses were geocoded to identify home-school trips. The...... web-based tool PALMS was used to combine GPS and accelerometer data, categorize Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA) and classify trip mode of home-school trips into: walking, bicycling or vehicle. Results 609 trips were identified as home-school trips. Walking was the most frequent trip mode...

  8. Preparing Inner-City Adolescents to Transition into High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sherri L.

    2007-01-01

    The study in this article investigated how academic preparation, career development skills, parental assistance, and social/environmental barriers predicted inner-city adolescents' psychological preparation to transition into high school. Results showed that academic preparation, parents' instrumental assistance, adolescents' career development…

  9. Adolescents' Experience with Workplace Aggression: School Health Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carolyn R.; Fisher, Bonnie S.; Gillespie, Gordon L.; Beery, Theresa A.; Gates, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Aggression exposure is a critical health issue facing adolescents in the United States. Exposure occurs in various settings including home, school, and the community. An emerging context for aggression exposure is in the workplace. Thirty adolescent employees age 16-18 participated in a qualitative study exploring proposed responses to future…

  10. Mental Health Stigma among Adolescents: Implications for School Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranke, Derrick; Floersch, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated adolescents with a mental health diagnosis and their experience of stigma in schools. Forty adolescents between the ages of twelve and seventeen who met DSM-IV criteria for a psychiatric illness and who were prescribed psychiatric medication were selected. The Teen Subjective Experience of Medication Interview was used to…

  11. The Relation of Parenting Style to Adolescent School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, Sanford M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Uses a reformation of Baumrind's typology of authoritarian, permissive, and authoritative parenting styles in the context of adolescent school performance. Authoritarian and permissive parenting were negatively associated with grades; authoritative parenting was positively associated with grades. (PCB)

  12. Acute patellofemoral instability in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANTINOLFI, PIERLUIGI; BARTOLI, MATTEO; PLACELLA, GIACOMO; SPEZIALI, ANDREA; PACE, VALERIO; DELCOGLIANO, MARCO; MAZZOLA, CLAUDIO

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral problems are considered to be among the most frequent causes of knee pain in children and adolescents. Correcting bone abnormalities through specific and targeted interventions is mandatory in skeletally immature patients. Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is the preferred procedure, but there are several important precautionary considerations that the surgeon must take into account. It must always be remembered that MPFL rupture is the result, not the cause, of an altered extensor mechanism; therefore, patellar stabilization with MPFL reconstruction is only the first step to be accomplished in the management of an MPFL rupture. If other anatomical alterations are encountered, alternative/additional surgical procedures should be considered. If MPFL rupture occurs without associated anatomical or functional knee alterations, an appropriate rehabilitation program after MPFL reconstruction should be sufficient to achieve a good outcome. In conclusion, an acute patellar dislocation should be managed conservatively unless there is evidence of osteochondral damage or medial retinaculum lesions. Osseous procedures are contraindicated in children, while MPFL anatomical reconstruction with “physeal sparing” is the primary surgical option. PMID:27386447

  13. Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Neslihan Koyuncuoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Obesity among children, adolescents and adults has emerged as one of the most serious public health concerns in the 21st century. The worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased remarkably over the past 3 decades. The growing prevalence of childhood obesity has also led to appearance of obesity-related comorbid disease entities at an early age. Childhood obesity can adversely affect nearly every organ system and often causes serious consequences, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, fatty liver disease and psychosocial complications. It is also a major contributor to increasing healthcare expenditures. For all these reasons, it is important to prevent childhood obesity as well as to identify overweight and obese children at an early stage so they can begin treatment and attain and maintain a healthy weight. At present, pharmacotherapy options for treatment of pediatric obesity are very limited. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive management program that emphasizes appropriate nutrition, exercise and behavioral modification is crucial. The physician's role should expand beyond the clinical setting to the community to serve as a role model and to advocate for prevention and early treatment of obesity. PMID:25241606

  14. Understanding of School Related Factors Associated with Emotional Health and Bullying Behavior among Jordanian Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Shaheen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Students emotional health and bullying behavior are receiving greater attention worldwide due to their long-term effects on students' health. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived school climate, peer support, teacher support, school pressure and emotional health and bullying among adolescent school students in Jordan.A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to recruit a sample of 1166 in-school adolescents in Amman between November 2013 and January 2014. A multi-stage cluster sampling technique was used to select respondents and Health Behavior in School Aged Children questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were analyzed using Pearson Correlation to detect relationships among study variables.Significant correlations (P value was ≤.05 were found between school climate including teacher and peer support and emotional health and bullying behavior of school students. School pressure was not correlated significantly with emotional health and bullying.Study findings emphasize the importance of school related factors in influencing students' emotional health and bullying behavior. This indicates that the issue of bullying and emotional health of students in Jordanian schools requires further attention, both for future research and preventive intervention.

  15. Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beineke, John A.

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching History to Adolescents: A Quest for Relevance" is an exploration of research, ideas, trends, and practices for educators who teach American history to adolescents from the middle grades through high school. Higher education faculty in history and professional education will also find the book germane to their work. Topics within the…

  16. Maternal Work Hours and Adolescents' School Outcomes among Low-Income Families in Four Urban Counties. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #07-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennetian, Lisa A.; Lopoo, Leonard M.; London, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    We examine how changes in maternal work hours affect adolescent children's school participation and performance outcomes using data from interviews in 1998 and 2001 with 1,700 women who in May 1995 were welfare-reliant, single mothers of adolescents living in disadvantaged neighborhoods in four urban counties. We find unfavorable effects of…

  17. Bullying and Victimization in Overweight and Obese Outpatient Children and Adolescents: An Italian Multicentric Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Bacchini

    Full Text Available Being overweight or obese is one of the most common reasons that children and adolescents are teased at school. We carried out a study in order to investigate: i the relation between weight status and school bullying and ii the relation between weight status categories and types of victimization and bullying in an outpatient sample of Italian children and adolescents with different degrees of overweight from minimal overweight up to severe obesity.Nine-hundred-forty-seven outpatient children and adolescents (age range 6.0-14.0 years were recruited in 14 hospitals distributed over the country of Italy. The participants were classified as normal-weight (N = 129, overweight (N = 126, moderately obese (N = 568, and severely obese (N = 124. The nature and extent of verbal, physical and relational bullying and victimization were assessed with an adapted version of the revised Olweus bully-victim questionnaire. Each participant was coded as bully, victim, bully-victim, or not involved.Normal-weight and overweight participants were less involved in bullying than obese participants; severely obese males were more involved in the double role of bully and victim. Severely obese children and adolescents suffered not only from verbal victimization but also from physical victimization and exclusion from group activities. Weight status categories were not directly related to bullying behaviour; however severely obese males perpetrated more bullying behaviour compared to severely obese females.Obesity and bullying among children and adolescents are of ongoing concern worldwide and may be closely related. Common strategies of intervention are needed to cope with these two social health challenges.

  18. Bullying and Victimization in Overweight and Obese Outpatient Children and Adolescents: An Italian Multicentric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrasi, Alessandra; Corciulo, Nicola; Driul, Daniela; Tanas, Rita; Fiumani, Perla Maria; Di Pietro, Elena; Pesce, Sabino; Crinò, Antonino; Maltoni, Giulio; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Sartorio, Alessandro; Deiana, Manuela; Lombardi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Objective Being overweight or obese is one of the most common reasons that children and adolescents are teased at school. We carried out a study in order to investigate: i) the relation between weight status and school bullying and ii) the relation between weight status categories and types of victimization and bullying in an outpatient sample of Italian children and adolescents with different degrees of overweight from minimal overweight up to severe obesity. Participants/Methods Nine-hundred-forty-seven outpatient children and adolescents (age range 6.0–14.0 years) were recruited in 14 hospitals distributed over the country of Italy. The participants were classified as normal-weight (N = 129), overweight (N = 126), moderately obese (N = 568), and severely obese (N = 124). The nature and extent of verbal, physical and relational bullying and victimization were assessed with an adapted version of the revised Olweus bully-victim questionnaire. Each participant was coded as bully, victim, bully-victim, or not involved. Results Normal-weight and overweight participants were less involved in bullying than obese participants; severely obese males were more involved in the double role of bully and victim. Severely obese children and adolescents suffered not only from verbal victimization but also from physical victimization and exclusion from group activities. Weight status categories were not directly related to bullying behaviour; however severely obese males perpetrated more bullying behaviour compared to severely obese females. Conclusions Obesity and bullying among children and adolescents are of ongoing concern worldwide and may be closely related. Common strategies of intervention are needed to cope with these two social health challenges. PMID:26606393

  19. Physical Activity Before School, Cognitive Performance, and Academic Achievement in Dutch Adolescents: Let them Walk or Cycle to School!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Martin; De Groot, Renate; Van Acker, Frederik; Savelberg, Hans; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, associations between objectively measured active commuting to school and cognitive performance and academic achievement in Dutch adolescents were investigated. Active commuting to school was found to be positively associated with executive functioning in adolescent girls.

  20. The quality of communication between parents and adolescent children in the case of parental cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, G.A.; Visser, A.; van der Graaf, W.T.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to investigate: (i) parent-adolescent communication in families of cancer patients; (ii) relationships between parent-adolescent communication and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in adolescent children; and (iii) associations between parents' illness characte

  1. Antidepressant Medications for Children and Adolescents: Information for Parents and Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will investigate how best to treat adolescents whose depression is resistant to the first SSRI medication they have tried. ... Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) Treatment of SSRI-resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) PubMed: Journal Articles about Children ...

  2. School maturity of pre-school age visually impaired children

    OpenAIRE

    Gudonis, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    The sample or research is 310 pre-school age visually impaired children. The average age of the surveyed is 6.3 years, the sharpness of vision is V 0.3–1. The research employed the methods for assessment of children’s maturity for school worked out by G. Gintilienė, D. Butkienė, S. Girdzijauskienė et al. (2005). During the investigation, essential problems of pre-school age visually impaired children have been estimated: a number of hyperactive children increases; also, a number of children w...

  3. Developmental dyscalculia in children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsies in a Brazilian sample

    OpenAIRE

    Ursula Thomé; Sandra Regina da Paixão Alves; Sabrina Mendonça Guerreiro; Célia Regina Carvalho Machado da Costa; Fernanda de Souza Moreira; Andrea Bandeira Lima; Maria Rita Ferreira Tavares; Heber de Souza Maia Filho

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic disorders of childhood which can threaten child development and mental health. Among cognitive disorders, dyscalculia is one of the most important. In this study, 39 children and adolescents with idiopathic epilepsy underwent clinical and neuropsychological assessment to determine the intellectual level, math skills, reading and writing performance and neuropsychological profile. It was observed that the mathematical ability was below schooling ex...

  4. Cognitive functioning and academic achievement in children and adolescents with chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Hoe Yan Greenly

    2005-01-01

    The current study examined the profiles of cognitive functioning and academic achievement in school-aged children and adolescents with chronic pain. The standardized psychoeducational testing results of 57 patients (ages 8 to 18) seen at a major pediatric pain clinic between 1998 and 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Pediatric pain patients scored higher in measures of general intelligence, verbal ability, nonverbal reasoning and processing speed than the general population. Verbal ability ...

  5. Primary hypertension and special aspects of hypertension in older children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis D; Miyashita Y

    2011-01-01

    Demetrius Ellis, Yosuke MiyashitaChildren’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, USAAbstract: The prevalence of hypertension has increased at an accelerated rate in older children and adolescents. This has raised great concern about premature development of cardiovascular disease, which has major long-term health and financial implications. While obesity and sedentary habits largely explain this phenomenon, there are other social and cultu...

  6. [Update on Current Care guidelines: ADHD (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, children and adolescents)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The updated Current Care guideline for children and adolescents with ADHD covers both diagnosis and treatment. Psychosocial support is provided when hyperactivity problems arise, even before specific diagnosis. While psychosocial interventions are effective in the treatment of ADHD, the core symptoms are best treated with medication, such as methylphenidate, dexamphetamine, lisdexamphetamine or atomoxetine. Collaboration between families, primary health care services, specialist consultation services and day-care and school professionals is essential within the chain of care. PMID:22486070

  7. Parental Psychological Abuse toward children and Mental Health Problems in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Iram Rizvi, Syeda Fariha; Najam, Najma

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Present study was conducted to explore the relationship between parental psychological abuse toward their children and mental health problems in adolescence. Method: Three hundred participants age range 13-17 years, (57% boys and 43% girls) participated in the study from both public and private high schools of Lahore. Psychological maltreatment experience scale (PMES) and Youth Self-Report(YSR) were used for assessment and diagnosis. Results: Findings revealed that psychological ab...

  8. Adolescent resilience: the potential impact of personal development in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, B

    1993-01-01

    The challenges and stresses faced by adolescents include entry into secondary school, the development of adolescent sexuality, family conflicts, parental mental illness, socio-cultural factors, substance use and abuse, work and career abuse, social and antisocial behaviour, and the carry-over of problems from childhood. The ways in which programmes through schools can address these issues, enhance resilience and promote adolescent mental health are discussed. The potential of personal development programmes could be utilized to this end, with targeted educational and group initiatives and evaluation of outcomes. PMID:8268020

  9. School Absenteeism during Menstruation among Rural Adolescent Girls in Pune

    OpenAIRE

    Suman Bodat, Mrunalini M Ghate, Jyoti R Majumdar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Menstrual related problems and inadequate school sanitation facilities have an adverse effect on adolescent girl?s academic performance and school attendance especially in rural setting. The following study was undertaken to determine school absenteeism during menstruation period. Objective: To assess the impact of menstruation on school attendance and factors affecting menstruation management. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in rural field practice area o...

  10. Health-defining technology as an interaction of adolescents, family, school and the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Schudro S.А.

    2014-01-01

    The main recommendations on health promotion and formation of healthy lifestyles, hygiene education of children and adolescents, formulated in the concept of the European Regional Bureau of World Health Organization are considersed. Low efficiency of clinical and preventive strategies in medicine, which is almost exhausted its resources requires the development of new health-preserving strategies. We have proposed health-defining technology at school, which includes an assessment of health st...

  11. [Chronic diseases in children and adolescents: a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Martha Cristina Nunes; Gomes, Romeu; Calheiros de Sá, Miriam Ribeiro

    2014-07-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze papers published between 2003 and 2011 that focus on discussions regarding chronic conditions or chronic diseases in children and adolescents. It combines a methodological review of the literature and thematic analysis of content in order to identify the elements that characterize chronic diseases in children and adolescents and the specificities generated by these chronic conditions. The review of the literature resulted in a description of the series of articles identified by year of publication, country of origin, type of study, population and the chronic condition addressed. Thematic content analysis generated two core themes: Definition of chronic disease and Ways of handling chronic disease in children and teenagers. The main conclusion reached is that the age transitions when a disease is diagnosed and treated since childhood involve transformations that include changes in health facilities, discharge processes, decision making and networking that include family, hospital, school and institutions that guarantee the child's rights. PMID:25014288

  12. Prevalence of bullying and victimization among children in early elementary school: Do family and school neighbourhood socioeconomic status matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen Pauline W; Verlinden Marina; Berkel Anke Dommisse-van; Mieloo Cathelijne; van der Ende Jan; Veenstra René; Verhulst Frank C; Jansen Wilma; Tiemeier Henning

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Bullying and victimization are widespread phenomena in childhood and can have a serious impact on well-being. Children from families with a low socioeconomic background have an increased risk of this behaviour, but it is unknown whether socioeconomic status (SES) of school neighbourhoods is also related to bullying behaviour. Furthermore, as previous bullying research mainly focused on older children and adolescents, it remains unclear to what extent bullying and victimiza...

  13. Self-reported school experience as a predictor of self-harm during adolescence: A prospective cohort study in the South West of England (ALSPAC)

    OpenAIRE

    Kidger, Judi; Heron, Jon; Leon, David A.; Tilling, Kate; Lewis, Glyn; Gunnell, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Several aspects of school life are thought to be associated with increased risk of self-harm in adolescence, but these have rarely been investigated in prospective studies. Methods Members of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort completed postal surveys of school experiences aged 14, and self-harm behaviour aged 16 (n=3939). Associations between school experiences (feeling connected to school, enjoyment of school and perception of teachers as fa...

  14. Factors associated with physical inactivity among school-going adolescents: data from the Malaysian School-Based Nutrition Survey 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharudin, Azli; Zainuddin, Ahmad Ali; Manickam, Mala A; Ambak, Rashidah; Ahmad, Mohamad Hasnan; Naidu, Balkish Mahadir; Cheong, Siew Man; Ying, Chan Ying; Saad, Hazizi Abu; Ahmad, Noor Ani

    2014-09-01

    The importance of physical activity to health is well recognized. Good health habits should begin from a young age. This article aims to explore physical activity among Malaysian school adolescents and factors associated with it. Data from the Malaysian School-Based Nutrition Survey (MSNS), comprising a nationally representative sample of school-going children aged 10 to 17 years, were used. The overall prevalence of physically inactive adolescents was 57.3%. Age in years (adjusted odds ratio = 1.2; 95% confidence interval = 1.16-1.23), gender - females (adjusted odds ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval = 2.66-3.10), afternoon school session, breakfast consumption (no breakfast and irregular breakfast), body mass index status (obese and underweight), and body weight perception (underweight perceivers) were significant factors associated with physical inactivity among Malaysian adolescents. Thus, there is evidence that programs to promote physical activity in this group should consider the combination of the aforementioned factors at the household, school, and community levels. PMID:25070696

  15. Personality Development and Problem Behavior in Russian Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodskaya, Helena R.; Akhmetova, Olga A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore child and adolescent personality in the Russian culture, addressing gender and age differences, and to examine personality and family effects on children's Internalizing and Externalizing problems. Parents of 1,640 Russian children aged 3-18 years completed the Inventory of Child Individual Differences…

  16. Psychiatric treatments for children and adolescents preferred by spanish psychiatrists

    OpenAIRE

    Josep Toro; María Mur; Tomás Cantó

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To study the prescription criteria of Spanish psychiatrists treating children and adolescents. Methods: a survey was designed to record their first choice and complementary preferences for pharmacological, psychotherapeutic and psychoeducational interventions in five disorders: autism, depression, separation anxiety, obsessive compulsive and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders. Results: One hundred and nine psychiatrists responded. No distinction was made between children an...

  17. Neuropsychological Effects of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Matthew R.; Obrzut, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can affect people of all ages but the literature is lacking on children and adolescents who experience PTSD. The consequences of this disorder extend beyond the basic symptoms by which it is defined. Neuroanatomically, the brains of children with PTSD have been found to be abnormally symmetrical in several…

  18. Smokeless tobacco consumption among school children

    OpenAIRE

    J Muttapppallymyalil; J Sreedharan; B Divakaran

    2010-01-01

    Background : More than one-third of the tobacco consumed regionally is of smokeless form. Aims : To determine the prevalence and pattern of smokeless tobacco use among school children. Settings and Design : This cross-sectional study was conducted among children in 5 randomly selected high schools in Kannur district, Kerala, India. Materials and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted among 1200 children. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Statistic...

  19. [HBSC Study as an Instrument for Health Reporting among Children and Adolescents - Potential and Limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucksch, J; Hilitzer, U; Gohres, H; Kolip, P

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and health promotion have to target children and adolescents. Health reporting significantly contributes to assess the needs in terms of intervention planning in children and adolescents and to plan interventions of the highest priority. In Germany, reporting on children and adolescent's health takes place at federal, federal state and regional levels. Health reporting is based on surveys or monitoring, official statistics or on other data provided by institutions and stakeholders in the health system. The nationally representative Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) survey under the auspices of the WHO - which has been conducted every 4 years since 1982, is a further database in Germany that is representative for the 11-15-year olds girls and boys from general educational schools. In this paper, the HBSC survey will be located within the canon of the German health reporting system. A special emphasis is to describe the potential and limitations of HBSC study for health reporting and to highlight the additional value for health reporting in Germany. PMID:25664908

  20. Primary School Children's Vision Screening Project

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Veronica; Harrington, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In the final year of the BSc in Optometry, students work with children in local schools to do vision screenings, supervised by DIT lecturers. This project enhances students’ experience of working with children, and ensures that any local children with eye problems are swiftly referred to a specialist.

  1. Fatores associados à dislipidemia em crianças e adolescentes de escolas públicas de Salvador, Bahia Factors associated with dyslipidemia in children and adolescents enrolled in public schools of Salvador, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Dário de Alcântara Neto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo aborda os fatores associados a dislipidemia em crianças e adolescentes matriculados na rede pública de ensino da cidade de Salvador, BA. MÉTODOS: Os participantes foram submetidos a avaliação antropométrica, coleta de sangue para dosagem de colesterol e triglicérides. As informações relacionadas a consumo alimentar, atividade física e condições socioeconômicas e de moradia da família foram fornecidas pelos responsáveis. Regressão logistica mutivariada foi utilizada para as avaliações de interesse. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de dislipidemia encontrada no presente estudo foi de 25,5% (IC:95% 22,7; 28,3. Observou-se associação positiva e estatiticamentre significante entre dislipidemia e excesso de peso (0R = 3,40; IC95%: 2,07-5,58, moderado e alto consumo de alimentos de risco (OR = 1,49; IC95%: 1,01-2,19, baixo e moderado consumo de alimentos protetores (OR = 1,54; IC95%: 1,05-2,26 e menor nível de escolaridade materna (OR = 1,72; IC95%: 1,05-2,26. CONCLUSÃO: O excesso de peso, consumo alimentar inadequado e baixa escolaridade materna constituem fatores associados a dislipidemia.OBJECTIVE: We assessed the factors associated with dyslipidemia in children and adolescents enrolled in the public school system of the city of Salvador, Bahia. METHODS: All participants were submitted to anthropometric evaluation and to cholesterol and triglyceride blood tests. Data related to food intake, physical activity and family socioeconomic and housing conditions were obtained from parents or guardians. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of dyslipidemia was 25.5% (IC:95% 22.7; 28.3. We observed a significant positive association between dyslipidemia and the following factors: overweight (OR = 3.40, 95% CI 2.07 to 5.58, moderate and high intake of risk food (OR = 1.49, 95%: 1.01 to 2.19, low and moderate intake of protective foods (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.26 and lower

  2. Psychiatric morbidity in school children who suffered a stampede

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet S Bhatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stampede is described as a sudden movement of a mass of people in response to a particular circumstance or stimulus. Human stampedes are quite often reported from crowded places like places of worship, sporting events, political rallies, etc. There are reports of development of posttraumatic stress disorder, depressive and anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents subsequent to both natural and man-made disasters. The present tragedy struck in a Government Secondary School in Delhi on September 9, 2009. The study describes the long-term psychiatric morbidity in children following stampede. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted by the department of psychiatry of a tertiary care hospital. A total of 38 children (all adolescent girls were registered at the casualty of the hospital and 1 absconded, 5 were brought dead. A total of 32 children were included in the study. After first assessment in the casualty, subsequent assessments at 8 weeks and 6 months were done using semi-structured performa, GHQ and Child′s reaction to traumatic event scale (CRTES-Revised. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The age-group of the children were 12-20 years(mean 14.3, all girls, studying in grades - VII to X Eight weeks follow up GHQ score was high in 27 (87%. On CRTESQ-R scale, 22 children were in high distress group (71%. Twenty-two children had symptoms of PTSD and five were in moderate distress group. Eleven children also had a comorbid diagnosis of depressive disorder, six had phobic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. There were statistically significant differences in mean GHQ scores at baseline and at 6 months follow up. There was also significant decrease in CRTESQ-R scale scores between baseline and 6 months. Conclusion: The children who were victims of stampede warrant the need for long-term intervention.

  3. Assessment of Distress Associated to Psychopathology in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Reich

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study the distress associated to psychopathology in children and adolescents. The sample included 330 children aged 8 to 17 years attending outpatient mental health services of the public network in Barcelona(Spain assessed using a structured diagnostic interview. A substantial part of children brought to treatment suffered distress associated to internalizing and externalizing psychological symptoms. Psychological distress was most frequent among girls and among adolescents, and was more frequently reported by children and adolescents than by their parents. It was also a marker of perception of need of psychological help, and it was significantly related to diagnosis, subthreshold conditions and functional impairment. Individual symptoms of depression, dysthymia, generalized anxiety disorder and oppositional defiant disorder were most associated with psychological distress. Given the potential importance of subjective distress as well as impairment for the identification and definition of psychopathology and planning of treatment, diagnostic assessment should include questions related to distress.

  4. Identification of risk factors for obesity in children and adolescents living in Tashkent city

    OpenAIRE

    Rakhimov Bakhodir

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the identification of risk factors for obesity in children and adolescents living in Tashkent city in order to form the following prophylactic measures to prevent obesity in children and adolescents at an early age.

  5. Risperidone in Children and Adolescents with Conduct Disorder: A Single-Center, Open-Label Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Kutlu, Ayşe; Çıkoğlu, Sibel; Veznedaroğlu, Baybars; Erermiş, Serpil; Varan, Azmi

    2003-01-01

    Background: Risperidone is one of the most commonly used atypical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of children and adolescents. However, the data about its use in children and adolescents with conduct disorder (CD) are limited.

  6. Measures of Muscular Strength in U.S. Children and Adolescents, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Measures of Muscular Strength in U.S. Children and Adolescents, 2012 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NCHS ... by sex and age group among children and adolescents? There were no significant differences between younger girls ...

  7. The influence of advertising on pre-school children in comparison to children in primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Sywalová, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor thesis The influence of advertising on pre-school children in comparison to children in primary school deals with characteristics of television advertising aimed at children. Targeting ads to this particular group tends to be controversial these days and there is an increasing rate of child protection under the laws of the Czech Republic. This thesis analyses the characteristics of television advertising and its impact on children. The goal is to find differences among children in ki...

  8. [Diet therapy of obesity in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol'shova, O V; Malinovs'ka, T M

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is a frequent pathology among children and adolescents. Disease incidence and prevalence increase among the Ukrainian children population from year to year. The causes leading to an excessive body mass in children are revealed in this article. Dietotherapy is principal method of obesity treatment in children and adolescents. The dietotherapy principles, indications and contraindications to different diets used for children and also their pathogenetic idea of administration are detailed in the article. Criteria of adequate prescription of low-calorie diet are explained. The examples of prescribed in podiatry fasting days with the indication of chemical content of proposed products are given in the article. Diets for children of different age depending on the degree of excessive body mass are described in the article. PMID:19663021

  9. Adolescent Health Behavior, Contentment in School, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P.; Helgason, Asgeir R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the association between health behavior indicators, school contentment, and academic achievement. Methods: Structural equation modeling with 5810 adolescents. Results: Our model explained 36% of the variance in academic achievement and 24% in school contentment. BMI and sedentary lifestyle were negatively related to school…

  10. Freedom of Speech and Adolescent Public School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Murad

    2008-01-01

    Some legal cases on the freedom of speech in adolescent public school students are discussed. It is suggested that schools, social scientists and psychologists should build a social consensus on the extent to which the freedom of speech for abusive students can be allowed so as not to affect development of other students.

  11. Cultural Considerations in the Treatment of Mental Illness among Sexually Abused Children and Adolescents: The Case of Bali, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmana, Cokorda Bagus J.; Suryani, Luh Ketut; Tiliopoulos, Niko

    2015-01-01

    Childhood and adolescence sexual abuse can have long-lasting and devastating effects on personal and interpersonal growth and development. Sexually abused children tend to exhibit higher rates of poor school performance, aggressive behavior, PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder), or depressive symptomatology, as well as social and relational…

  12. Kiddie-SADS Reveals High Rates of DSM-IV Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjevik, Elen; Eldevik, Sigmund; Fjaeran-Granum, Torill; Sponheim, Eili

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of current comorbid DSM-IV disorders was assessed in a special school population of children and adolescents with ASD (N = 71, age 6.0-17.9 years), representing all cognitive levels and main ASD subgroups. Symptoms were assessed through parent interview and association to child characteristics was explored. Seventy-two percent was…

  13. Family Advocates' Perspectives on the Early Academic Success of Children Born to Low-Income Adolescent Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Tom; Bates, Laura; Vandenbelt, Marcia; Nievar, M. Angela

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative analyses were conducted to examine family factors related to individual differences in the early school success of children born to low-income adolescent mothers from the perspective of paraprofessional family advocates. These families were participants in a 5-year family support program. Achievement test scores and teacher ratings…

  14. [Visually-impaired adolescents' interpersonal relationships at school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Camilla Pontes; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2007-09-01

    This study describes the school environment and how interpersonal relationships are conducted in view of the needs of visually handicapped adolescents. Data were collected through observations of the physical environment of two schools in Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil, with the support of a checklist, in order to analyze the existence of obstacles. Four visually handicapped adolescents from 14 to 20 years of age were interviewed. Conclusions were that the obstacles that hamper the free locomotion, communication, and physical and social interaction of the blind--or people with other eye disorders--during their activities at school are numerous. PMID:18183692

  15. International note: Are Emirati parents' attitudes toward mathematics linked to their adolescent children's attitudes toward mathematics and mathematics achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Khine, Myint Swe; Melkonian, Michael; Welch, Anita G; Al Nuaimi, Samira Ahmed; Rashad, Fatimah F

    2015-10-01

    Drawing on data from the 2012 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) and employing multilevel modeling as an analytic strategy, this study examined the relations of adolescent children's perceptions of their parents' attitudes towards mathematics to their own attitudes towards mathematics and mathematics achievement among a sample of 5116 adolescents from 384 schools in the United Arab Emirates. The results of this cross-sectional study revealed that adolescents who perceived that their parents liked mathematics and considered mathematics was important for their children not only to study but also for their career tended to report higher levels of intrinsic and instrumental motivation to learn mathematics, mathematics self-concept and self-efficacy, and mathematics work ethic. Moreover, adolescents who perceived that their parents liked mathematics and considered mathematics was important for their children's career tended to report positive intentions and behaviors toward mathematics. However, adolescents who perceived that their parents considered mathematics was important for their children's career tended to report higher levels of mathematics anxiety. Finally, adolescents who perceived that their parents considered mathematics was important for their children to study performed significantly better on the mathematics assessment than did their peers whose parents disregarded the importance of learning mathematics. PMID:26189150

  16. School-Based Prevention of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Early Adolescence: A Pilot of a Parent Intervention Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen J.; Freres, Derek R.; Lascher, Marisa; Litzinger, Samantha; Shatte, Andrew; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that school-based cognitive-behavioral interventions can reduce and prevent depressive symptoms in youth. This pilot study investigated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program, the Penn Resiliency Program for Children and Adolescents (the PRP-CA), when combined with a parent intervention…

  17. Expectations on Track? High School Tracking and Adolescent Educational Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of adaptation in expectation formation processes by analyzing how educational tracking in high schools affects adolescents' educational expectations. I argue that adolescents view track placement as a signal about their academic abilities and respond to it in terms of...... modifying their educational expectations. Applying a difference-in-differences approach to the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988, I find that being placed in an advanced or honors class in high school positively affects adolescents’ expectations, particularly if placement is consistent across...... subjects and if placement contradicts tracking experiences in middle school. My findings support the hypothesis that adolescents adapt their educational expectations to ability signals sent by schools....

  18. National trends in school victimization among Asian American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooc, North; Gee, Kevin A

    2014-08-01

    The "model minority" perception of Asian American students often ignores the academic and social challenges that many face in schools. One area that has received less attention is the school victimization experiences of Asian American adolescents. While some qualitative researchers have explored factors contributing to school victimization in recent years, missing in the literature is the scope of these incidents among Asian Americans. This paper contributes to this literature by (1) examining national trends in the victimization of Asian American adolescents in schools over the last decade and (2) investigating how victimization varies according to their gender, socioeconomic status, and achievement levels. The results show that although Asian American adolescents are consistently less likely to be bullied relative to other students, they are more likely to report experiences of racial discrimination. Victimization incidents for Asian Americans also differ by gender and academic achievement levels. PMID:25086460

  19. Effect of school-based interventions on physical activity and fitness in children and adolescents: a review of reviews and systematic update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriemler, S; Meyer, U; Martin, E;

    2011-01-01

    School-based interventions are thought to be the most universally applicable and effective way to counteract low physical activity (PA) and fitness although there is controversy about the optimal strategy to intervene.......School-based interventions are thought to be the most universally applicable and effective way to counteract low physical activity (PA) and fitness although there is controversy about the optimal strategy to intervene....

  20. Equalisation of socioeconomic differences in injury risks at school age? A study of three age cohorts of Swedish children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, K; Laflamme, L; Diderichsen, F

    2003-01-01

    Hospital Discharge and Causes of Death registers) with documented socioeconomic differences: injuries due to traffic, interpersonal violence, and self-infliction. The Relative Index of Inequality was used to measure the magnitude of relative socioeconomic differences, for each year of observation. Where...... the two older cohorts (10-14 and 15-19, in 1990). In conclusion, this study provides limited evidence of equalisation in injury risks between socioeconomic groups among Swedish adolescents. Equalisation appears to be a gender-specific phenomenon, that is, among girls, and manifests itself around the...

  1. Nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases on children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilton Marques dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a sistematiy review of the literature about the nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents.DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, with inclusion of articles in Portuguese and in English with original data, that analyzed nutritional aspects of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. The initial search used the terms "inflammatory bowel diseases" and "children" or "adolescents" and "nutritional evaluation" or "nutrition deficiency". The selection of studies was initially performed by reading the titles and abstracts. Review studies and those withouth data for pediatric patients were excluded. Subsequently, the full reading of the articles considered relevant was performed.RESULTS: 237 studies were identified, and 12 of them were selected according to the inclusion criteria. None of them was performed in South America. During the analysis of the studies, it was observed that nutritional characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be altered; the main reports were related to malnutrition, growth stunting, delayed puberty and vitamin D deficiency.CONCLUSION: There are nutritional consequences of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents, mainly growth stunting, slower pubertal development, underweight and vitamin deficiencies. Nutritional impairments were more significant in patients with Crohn's disease; overweight and obesity were more common in patients with ulcerative rectocolitis. A detailed nutritional assessment should be performed periodically in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Treating depression in children and adolescents: what options now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    There have been significant developments in the understanding of depression in children and adolescents in the past few years, including an increased recognition that significant depressive illness occurs in this patient group. Pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments are used to manage depression in children and adolescents, and there is evidence from randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of benefit for both approaches. However, not all medication trials have been positive. In addition, there have been increasing concerns about specific safety issues related to the use of medications to treat depression, with an overall finding of mood-related adverse effects, including suicide attempts, in 4% of active drug versus 2% of placebo recipients in controlled trials involving children and adolescents. This has resulted in regulatory actions in a number of countries that have ranged from the declaration of contraindication for most antidepressants (in Great Britain), to relegation of antidepressants to a second-line intervention (in New Zealand) to a Black Box warning (in the US). It can be concluded that best practice combines treatment with both medication and psychotherapy, and that important safety issues must be monitored carefully when children and adolescents are treated for depression. On balance, there appears to be evidence of the benefit for antidepressant medications in children and adolescents, which outweigh safety concerns. PMID:16396520

  3. The Relationship between Spoken Language Ability and Intelligence Test Performance of Deaf Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remine, Maria D.; Brown, P. Margaret; Care, Esther; Rickards, Field

    2007-01-01

    For several decades the intellectual abilities of deaf children and adolescents, as measured by performance IQ, have been reported as comparable with those of hearing children and adolescents. Differences have been reported, however, on measures of verbal IQ, with deaf children and adolescents typically obtaining verbal IQ scores within the low…

  4. Objectification of the school-related transport monitoring of the adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Kudláček

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School and school-related physical activity (PA are important for the total PA of children and youth. The total amount of PA is higher within school days compare to weekends. Children and youth, who use active transportation (to/from the school, confirm the higher PA per week compared to those without active transportation (using car, train, bus. There is a lack of available data in the Czech Republic about active transportation of children and adolescents. AIM: The main aim of the study is the objectification of the school-related transport monitoring of the adolescents. One of the additional outcomes is to enrich this relatively new scientific area in the Czech Republic. METHODS: There was one high school chosen for this project - Gymnázium Nový Jičín. Data were collected by using ActiGraph GT1M, pedometer YAMAX SW-700, NQLS questionnaire and internet system INDARES. RESULTS: By using the newly developer map module "tracker", within the system INDARES, we could compare the participants which active transport (AT was lower than 1000 m, with participants with the AT values higher than 1000 m. We found out significant differences between school days and weekends in the intensity of 1 to 3 MET. The statistical significance was supported by the coefficient effect size (d = 0.83. The participants recording AT values lower than 1000 m showing significantly higher level of PA in school days then during weekends (p = .003; F = 26.149; ω2 = 0.456. Similar results were found in participants recording AT values higher than 1000 m; the differences between school days and weekends are highly significant (p = .0004; F = 26.149; ω 2 = 0.456. CONCLUSIONS: We have contributed to the objectification of the school-related transport monitoring of the adolescents by the creation of the map module within the INDARES system. The usage of a triangulation approach (objective methods - subjective methods - system INDARES into the PA monitoring in

  5. Evaluation of Negative Cognitions in Children and Adolescents: Children’s Automatic Thoughts Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Atalan ERGİN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: The aim of the present study is to evaluate psychometric properties of the Children’s Automatic Thoughts Scale to children and adolescents. Method: A total of 534 children and adolescents aged 9-16 participated in the study. They attended elementary schools in Ankara. Of these participants 276 were girls and 258 were boys. The mean age of the group was 12.30 (SD=1.26.They were attending 4th to 8th grade of the elementary schools.Results: Exploratory and Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the four factor model (Schniering and Rapee 2002. The four factor model explained 50% of variance. The first factor was social threat and 31.72% of the total variance. Followed by personal failure, hostility and physical treat factors explaining 8.32%, 5.80% and 5.10 % of the total variance. Social threat was found to be explaining the higher variance in the present study while personal failure was the first factor explaining higher variance in the original study. Test-rest reliabilities with two weeks interval demonstrated that the Children’s Automatic Thoughts Scale is a reliable instrument(r=.90. Cronbach Alpha was found to be and .94. These reliability and validity analyses supported that Children’s Automatic Thoughts Scale could be used with Turkish children. Conclusion: Children’s Automatic Thoughts Scale, evaluates the presence and severity of negative cognition in children and adolescents, could be utilized in research and clinical practice. It could also be used in educational settings where the thought content of children and adolescents are important in areas such as friendship, academic success and bullying

  6. Routine Activities Preceding Adolescent Sexual Abuse of Younger Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Benoit; Felson, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Adolescent abuse of younger children has long been recognized, but empirical research on the circumstances of this phenomenon is rare. This article examines how adolescent offenders find and gain access to victims, work out time alone with them, and set up or exploit settings for sexual contact. Prior researchers learned that adult sex offenders use certain routine activities to perform these tasks. The current research inquires whether adolescent offenders are similar. We administered Kaufman's Modus Operandi Questionnaire to a sample of 116 Canadian adolescent males undergoing treatment for a sexual offense against a child. Adolescent offenders follow routines similar to adults but are better able to use games and activities as a prelude to sexual abuse. We discuss how routine legal activities set the stage for activities and should be considered when devising situational prevention strategies. PMID:25060598

  7. 儿童青少年拒绝上学原因问卷的编制及信效度检验%School refusal reason inventory for children and adolescents: development, reliability and validity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭梅; 张莹; 何强; 韩继阳; 夏静; 邵云; 王晓雪; 苏荣坤; 马颂

    2012-01-01

    目的 编制一个适合我国儿童青少年拒绝上学原因的问卷,并检验其信度和效度.方法 依据临床访谈以及查阅文献资料编制拒绝上学原因问卷初测版.在门诊进行小样本预测验,经定性分析与项目分析结果形成正式版问卷.采用整群抽样的方法,在沈阳市及其周边农村选取7所学校的在校学生完成拒绝上学原因问卷(School Refusal Reason Inventory,SRRI)、儿童焦虑性情绪障碍筛查表(SCARED)和儿童抑郁量表(CDI).间隔1个月随机选取部分学生进行重测.对所得数据进行描述性统计、探索性因子分析以检验SRRI的信度和效度.结果 项目分析显示所有题项与总分的相关系数均>0.3,且均达到显著性水平;题项的决断值(CR值)均>3.探索性因子分析得到教养方式、教师因素、同学关系、分离焦虑、学习态度和学习环境6个因子,因子负荷值为0.372~0.848.各个因子的内部一致性信度分别为0.827,0.831,0.759,0.623,0.821,0.808,重测信度为0.644(P<0.01),与SCARED的相关系数为0.273~0.434,与CDI的相关系数为0.353~0.497.结论 在我国文化背景下,本研究所编制的拒绝上学原因问卷符合心理测量学的测量指标,具有良好的信度和效度,可以用于了解儿童青少年拒绝上学的原因.%Objective To develop school refusal reason inventory (SRRI)for children and adolescents in China and assess its reliability and validity.Methods The primary SSRI was made based on clinical interviews and literatures.Pretest was carried out in a small sample from a clinic.Then the final SSRI was developed after qualitative analysis and item analysis.SRRI,the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders(SCARED) and Child Depression Inventory(CDI) were administered to school refusers from 7 schools in Shenyang.All the schools were selected from Shenyang City and its countryside by cluster sampling.Some of the students were retested after one month

  8. Short stature in children and adolescence. Causes, diagnosis and treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Hussimy Marchena Morera; Alina Ester González Hermida; Jorge Luis Irizar Hernández; Greyci Cuervo-Arango Bernia; Inés Martínez Fernández; Alberto Roteta Dorado

    2008-01-01

    Growth is a biological and dynamic process that begins with fecundation and ends at the final stage of adolescence. Its development is complex and different factors intervene in it. Short stature is the most frequent growth disorder in the daily medical practice; furthermore, it is the entity that produces concern and dissent in the patient and his/her relatives. To recognize and to treat early this growth and development altered in our children and adolescence permits us to adopt diagnosis s...

  9. Bone Mineral Status in Children and Adolescents with Klinefelter Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Stagi, Stefano; Di Tommaso, Mariarosaria; Manoni, Cristina; Scalini, Perla; Chiarelli, Francesco; Verrotti, Alberto; Lapi, Elisabetta; Giglio, Sabrina; Dosa, Laura; de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Klinefelter syndrome (KS) has long-term consequences on bone health. However, studies regarding bone status and metabolism during childhood and adolescence are very rare. Patients. This cross-sectional study involved 40 (mean age: 13.7±3.8 years) KS children and adolescents and 80 age-matched healthy subjects. For both patient and control groups, we evaluated serum levels of ionised and total calcium, phosphate, total testosterone, luteinising hormone, follicle stimulating hormone,...

  10. Depression in children and adolescents. When "moodiness" merits special attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugart, Margaret A; Lopez, Elda M

    2002-09-01

    Depression does occur in children and adolescents and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification and treatment of depression are essential. Referral to a mental health clinician, preferably a child and adolescent psychiatrist, is important for suicide evaluation, psychotherapy, and management of complicated medication treatment regimens. The SSRIs are most often used in youngsters because of their favorable side effect profiles and their efficacy as documented in some double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. PMID:12360657

  11. Oral and Hand Hygiene Behaviour and Risk Factors among In-School Adolescents in Four Southeast Asian Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Peltzer; Supa Pengpid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral and hand hygiene behaviour and risk factors among 13 to 15 year-old in-school adolescents in four Southeast Asian countries. Data were collected by self-reported questionnaire from nationally representative samples (total 13,824) of school children aged 13 to 15 years in India, Indonesia, Myanmar and Thailand. Results indicate that overall, 22.4% of school children reported sub-optimal oral hygiene (

  12. Peer Victimization and Adolescent Adjustment: Does School Belonging Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Wormington, SV; Anderson, KG; Schneider, A.; Tomlinson, KL; Brown, SA

    2014-01-01

    Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Recent research highlights the role of peer victimization in students’ adjustment across a variety of domains (e.g., academic, social), but less often identifies potential mediating variables. In the current study, we tested for direct effects from peer victimization to adolescents’ academic behavior and alcohol use, as well as indirect effects through school belonging. Adolescents from two large samples (middle school: N = 2,808; high school: N = 6,82...

  13. Study of School Environment and Prevalence of Obesity & Its Predictors among Adolescent (10-13 Years) Belonging to a Private School in an Urban Indian City

    OpenAIRE

    Mehan Meenakshi, Munshi Aparna, Surabhi Somila, Bhatt Trushna, Kantharia Neha

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent shift in lifestyle and behavioral patterns in population have caused an obesity epidemic during formative years. Present study evaluated existing health and nutrition policies in a private school in an urban Indian city and assessed prevalence of obesity in adolescent children & their association if any, with predictive behaviors of obesity. Methods: A private coeducational school located in an urban Indian city was selected and its existing health policies were eva...

  14. How children and adolescents spend time across the world: work, play, and developmental opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, R W; Verma, S

    1999-11-01

    The authors review studies on time use of children and adolescents around the world and discuss developmental implications of population differences. Industrialization and schooling are linked to dramatic declines in time spent on household and wage labor. This labor is often unchallenging, sometimes hazardous; developmental benefits often do not increase above a limited number of hours; hence, reduction in these activities opens time for activities that may be more developmentally beneficial. Adolescents in East Asian postindustrial societies spend this freed-up time in schoolwork, a use associated with lower intrinsic motivation but high achievement and economic productivity. Adolescents in North America spend more time in leisure, associated with greater self-direction but of an uncertain relation to development. Age, gender, and socioeconomic differences in activities and with whom time is spent are also considered. PMID:10589300

  15. Activity and school attendance monitoring system for adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Janani; Brown, Clark; Cheng, Chihwen; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease, the most common hemoglobin disorder, affects major organ systems with symptoms of pain, anemia and a multitude of chronic conditions. For adolescents, the disease adversely affects school attendance, academic progress and social activity. To effectively study the relationship among school attendance and other factors like demographics and academic performance, studies have relied on self-reporting and school records, all of which have some bias. In this study we design and prototype a system, called SickleSAM (Sickle cell School attendance and Activity Monitoring system), for automatically monitoring school attendance and daily activity of adolescents with sickle cell disease. SickleSAM intends to remove human bias and inaccuracies. The system uses built-in GPS to collect data which will be recorded into a cloud database using Short Messaging Service technology. SickleSAM is developed by Georgia Institute of Technology in conjunction with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA). System effectiveness is being evaluated using a trial of 10 adolescents with the disease. PMID:23366422

  16. Children's rights and school psychology: children's right to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, Gerison; Jimerson, Shane R; Shahroozi, Reza

    2014-02-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child detailed an international imperative to fulfilling, protecting, and respecting the rights of every child. In particular, the Convention set out a clear mandate for guaranteeing opportunities for children to be heard on all matters of concern to them. The attainment of these goals involves respecting and valuing children as active participants in the educational process. If fully implemented, the right of children to express views and have them taken seriously, throughout the school environment, would represent one of the most profound transformations in moving towards a culture of respect for children's rights, for their dignity and citizenship, and for their capacities to contribute significantly towards their own well-being. These values and principles are consistent with those of the school psychology profession, thus, school psychologists are encouraged to be at the Center of the process advocating and actualizing the Convention in schools throughout the world. PMID:24495491

  17. THE LIFE EVENTS OF ADOLESCENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR RURAL SCHOOL NURSES

    OpenAIRE

    Puskar, Kathryn R.; Grabiak, Beth R.; Ren, Dianxu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe life events of rural adolescents and their relationship to depression. The design was a cross sectional survey. The sample included 193 students attending three rural high schools in southwestern Pennsylvania. Measures included The Life Events Checklist and The Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale (RADS-2). Results showed that the mean number of life events was eighteen. Females reported more life events and more negative life events than males. There...

  18. The Effects of Breakfast and Breakfast Composition on Cognition in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphus, Katie; Lawton, Clare L; Champ, Claire L; Dye, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Breakfast is thought to be beneficial for cognitive and academic performance in school children. However, breakfast is the most frequently skipped meal, especially among adolescents. The aim of the current article was to systematically review the evidence from intervention studies for the effects of breakfast on cognitive performance in children and adolescents. The effects of breakfast were evaluated by cognitive domain and breakfast manipulation. A total of 45 studies reported in 43 articles were included in the review. Most studies considered the acute effect of a single breakfast (n = 34). The acute studies looked at breakfast compared with no breakfast (n = 24) and/or comparisons of breakfast type (n = 15). The effects of chronic school breakfast program interventions were evaluated in 11 studies. The findings suggest that breakfast consumption relative to fasting has a short-term (same morning) positive domain-specific effect on cognition. Tasks requiring attention, executive function, and memory were facilitated more reliably by breakfast consumption relative to fasting, with effects more apparent in undernourished children. Firm conclusions cannot be made about the acute effects of breakfast composition and the effects of chronic breakfast interventions because there are too few studies and these largely report inconsistent findings. This review also highlights methodologic limitations of the existing research. These include a lack of research on adolescents, few naturalistic breakfast manipulations or testing environments, small samples, and insensitive cognitive tests. PMID:27184287

  19. Adolescent Suicide Prevention: School Psychologists' Acceptability of School-Based Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Tanya L.; Miller, David N.; DuPaul, George J.; Riley-Tillman, T. Christopher

    2003-01-01

    From a random sample of members of the 1996-1997 membership directory of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), school psychologists' acceptability ratings of three school-based programs for the prevention of adolescent suicide were examined. A total of 211 (46.2%) respondents read a case description of a particular prevention…

  20. Implications of Out-of-School Activities for School Engagement in African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterer, Aryn M.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2007-01-01

    The connection between out-of-school activities and school engagement was examined in 140, 6th through 9th grade African American adolescents. Youth's out-of-school activities were measured with a series of 7 nightly phone calls and focused on time in structured (homework, academically-oriented, extracurricular/sports) and unstructured (watching…

  1. Association of Being Bullied in School with Suicide Ideation and Planning among Rural Middle School Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Madhav P.; Shakya, Sunita; Jefferis, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study examined the association of ever being bullied in school with suicide ideation (ever thinking about killing oneself) and ever seriously making a plan to kill oneself (suicide planning) among rural middle school adolescents. Methods: Using the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Middle School Youth Risk…

  2. Trends of attempted suicide in Albanian children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kola, Vuksan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Attempted suicides and suicides are becoming pertinent social phenomena in Albania, with increasing trend in the last years, exceeding the road traffic accident numbers. Our objective was to examine suicide attempts trends among Albanian children and adolescents. Methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of standardized suicide attempts rates in Statistic Department at University Hospital Center “Mother Theresa”; epidemiology data for the period spanning from 2006 to 2012. We analyzed the data by age, sex and by suicide attempts method over time for two age groups: 10–14 year old (children and 15–19 year old (adolescents. Results. We found an average annual increase of the suicide attempts rate for children and adolescents (p<0.001, but stratification by age and sex showed significant variation. By comparing the two age groups it came out that the suicidal phenomena is more present at adolescence age (p<0.001. According to the statistic data and by analyzing the cases on yearly bases it resulted that female gender is more attempt to commit suicide that male gender, with a significant statistical variation of (p<0.001. From the study it was noted that the suicidal attempt methods, in the most of cases, were drug overdose (97.6% and 2.4% hang themselves (suffocation or cut their vein. Conclusions. The increasing cases of suicidal tendency among children and adolescents necessitate further studies to identify the causes and risk factors, and to develop suitable preventive programs .

  3. PCBs levels and indicator congeners in children's and adolescents' hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were determined in the hair samples collected from children (4–12) and adolescents (13–18) of Changchun city, Northeastern China. The mean concentrations of total PCBs and dioxin-like PCBs (dl-PCBs) in the adolescents' hair samples were 161.0 ng g−1 and 61.7 ng g−1, which were relatively higher than 43.7 ng g−1 and 14.6 ng g−1 in the children's ones. Considering gender difference, the mean concentrations in the girls' hair samples were approximately two times higher than those in the boys' ones for most PCB congeners. The pentachlorinated biphenyl was the dominant homologue. It was found that the levels of total PCBs and dl-PCBs were highly correlated with PCB 118 level in the children's hair samples, and with PCB 114 level in the adolescents' ones. The result demonstrated that the two PCB congeners could be applied as the indicators to evaluate the concentrations of total PCBs and dl-PCBs in children's and adolescents' hair, respectively. -- Highlights: • PCBs levels for most congeners were higher in the adolescents' hair samples. • The mean PCBs were approximately 2 times higher for girls except few congeners. • Pentachlorinated biphenyl was the dominant homologue in the both hair samples. • PCB 118 and PCB 114 were the indicators for total PCBs and total dl-PCBs. -- The PCBs levels can be predicted conveniently by the congener-specific analysis

  4. Sleep and Television and Computer Habits of Swedish School-Age Children

    OpenAIRE

    Garmy, Pernilla; Nyberg, Per; Jakobsson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sleep, television and computer habits and enjoyment and feelings of tiredness in school of school-age children and adolescents in Sweden. An instrument found to be valid and reliable here was distributed to 3,011 children aged 6, 7, 10, 14, and 16 years. Those sleeping less than the median length of time reported a significantly lower degree of enjoyment of school. Short sleep was found to be associated with having a bedroom TV, spending more than 2 hr...

  5. Feasibility of Using Actigraphy and Motivational-Based Interviewing to Improve Sleep among School-Age Children and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgerodt, Mayumi A.; Kieckhefer, Gail M.; Ward, Teresa M.; Lentz, Martha J.

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate sleep occurs in 25% of our nation's children; poor sleep is associated with physical, cognitive, and social consequences. Developing good sleep hygiene in middle childhood is important, because habits typically extend to adolescence and adulthood; yet, there has been little research on sleep interventions for school-age children.…

  6. Vitamin D status among infants, children, and adolescents in southeastern China*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-li; Wang, Hui-yan; Wen, Huai-kai; Tao, Hong-qun; Zhao, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are global public health problems, which must first be identified before they can be appropriately addressed, and yet information is strikingly lacking in most parts of the Asia and Pacific region. The study aimed to document and account for the actual situation in Wenzhou on the southeastern coast of China. Subjects and methods: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels among a total of 5845 infants, preschool children, school children, and adolescents aged 1–18 years were examined between March 2014 and February 2015. Results: Their mean levels were (110.2±26.8), (77.5±25.7), (55.6±15.4), and (47.2±13.9) nmol/L, respectively. Older age groups were involved in increasing risk of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. There were significant seasonal differences in its median level and prevalence of deficiency and insufficiency among school children and adolescents, but there was no significant sex difference in mean level and prevalence in any age group. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were prevalent among infants, preschool children, school children, and adolescents in Wenzhou. A vitamin D-rich diet and outdoor activities for 1–2 h per day under the natural conditions favorable to its endogeous synthesis do not suffice. The vitamin D status in Wenzhounese infants excelling over that in the US was the result of its supplementation thanks to the Chinese Medical Association recommendations, which should be consequently extended to more age groups. Life style shaped by socio-economic environments affects vitamin D status. Knowledge on the importance of vitamin D for healthy growth should be popularized. PMID:27381731

  7. Prevalence of cigarette smoking and its predictors among school going adolescents of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgesh Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cigarettes smoking is a common mode of consuming tobacco in India. This habit usually starts in adolescence and tracks across the life course. Interventions like building decision making skills and resisting negative influences are effective in reducing the initiation and level of tobacco use. Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of adolescent current cigarette smoking behavior and to investigate the individual and social factors, which influence them both to and not to smoke. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was carried out among school going adolescents in Shimla town of North India. After obtaining their written informed consent, a questionnaire was administered. Results: The overall prevalence of current cigarette smoking was 11.8%. The binary logistic regression model revealed that parents′ and peers′ smoking behavior influence adolescent smoking behavior. Individual self-harm tendency also significantly predicted cigarette smoking behavior. Parental active participation in keeping a track of their children′s free time activities predicted to protect adolescents from taking this habit. Conclusion: Our research lends support to the need for intervention on restricting adolescents from taking up this habit and becoming another tobacco industries′ addicted customer. Parents who smoke should quit this habit, which will not only restore their own health, but also protect their children. All parents should be counseled to carefully observe their children′s free time activities.

  8. Changes in cardiorespiratory fitness among children and adolescents in Australia: 1997 and 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okely, Anthony D; Hardy, Louise L; Booth, Michael L; Dobbins, Timothy A; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth A; Yang, Baohui

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we describe changes in cardiorespiratory fitness among children and adolescents in New South Wales, Australia from 1997 to 2004. Altogether, 4363 children and adolescents were surveyed in 1997 and 3720 were surveyed in 2004. Participants were randomly selected from Grades 4 and 6 in primary school and Grades 8 and 10 in high schools. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed on both occasions using the 20-m shuttle run test. There was a very small, but statistically significant, increase in the median number of laps completed for primary (P = 0.02) and high school girls (P = 0.02) and high school boys (P = 0.01); however, the prevalence of adequate cardiorespiratory fitness did not change significantly from 1997 to 2004 for primary or high school boys or girls. Cardiorespiratory fitness was higher among the most socially advantaged boys and girls and this tertile also recorded the greatest increases in all but one group. Over the period 1997 to 2004, the prevalence of adequate cardiorespiratory fitness among students rose slightly in general. It is concerning that the gap between low and high socio-economic tertiles appears to have widened. PMID:20480429

  9. STUDY OF ANEMIA IN ADOLESCENT SCHOOL GIRLS OF BHOPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kakkar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common form of malnutrition, early intervention during adolescence (girls can prevent high morbidity and mortality of these future mothers. Objectives: To study prevalence & factors contributing to anaemia among adolescent school girls. Material and Methods: Area or region addressed – Iron deficiency anemia in adolescent girls. Present study was conducted among 317 adolescent (10-19Yrs government schoolgirls of Bhopal city from June2005-July2006. Three study groups were selected from three different girls’ school by random sampling method. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS. Result & Conclusion: Overall prevalence was 58.4% among adolescent schoolgirls. Prevalence of anemia was dependent on the knowledge about prevention of anemia, literacy level, food habits, birth order & also frequency of Iron rich source viz. green leafy vegetable & non vegetarian diet. While there was no significant relation of anemia with duration of menstrual flow but there was significant (P<0.05 difference in number of anaemic cases with age at menarche i.e. with higher age at menarche; there was more chances of anemia. Level of anemia was higher (p<0.05 in early adolescent (10 -13 Years age group (81% as compared to middle (58.3% and late adolescent (17-19 years age group girls (48.7%.

  10. Antipsychotic treatment for children and adolescents with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Tarp, Simon; Glintborg, D;

    2014-01-01

    effectiveness studies in children and adolescents are limited in number and size, and only a few meta-analyses based on conventional methodologies have been conducted. METHODS AND ANALYSES: We will conduct a network meta-analysis of all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluate antipsychotic therapies...... randomly allocate children and adolescents presenting with schizophrenia or a related non-affective psychotic condition to an intervention group or to a control group. Two reviewers will-independently and in duplicate-screen titles and abstracts, complete full text reviews to determine eligibility, and...

  11. Primary follicular lymphoma of the testis in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lones, Mark A; Raphael, Martine; McCarthy, Keith; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Terrier-Lacombe, Marie-Josee; Ramsay, Alan D; Maclennan, Ken; Cairo, Mitchell S; Gerrard, Mary; Michon, Jean; Patte, Catherine; Pinkerton, Ross; Sender, Leonard; Auperin, Anne; Sposto, Richard; Weston, Claire; Heerema, Nyla A; Sanger, Warren G; von Allmen, Daniel; Perkins, Sherrie L

    2012-01-01

    This study reports 6 cases of primary follicular lymphoma of the testis (PFLT) in children and adolescents correlated with clinical presentation, pathologic features, treatment, and outcome. All 6 patients (age, 3 to 16 y; median, 4 y) had PFLT grade 3 with disease limited to the testis, completely resected and treated with 2 courses of chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, doxorubicin). Event-free survival was 100% (follow-up: median, 73 mo; mean, 53 mo; range, 6 to 96 mo). In conclusion, clinical outcome in children and adolescents with PFLT is excellent with treatment including complete surgical resection and 2 courses of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, doxorubicin. PMID:22215099

  12. PERCEIVING THE CONTENT OF TELEVISION PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husejn Musić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous research, daily occurrences and an information perceived through the mass media indicate the complexity and topicality of problems considered in this paper, as well as the need of its' examination from several aspects, with the aim of identifying, preventing and overcoming the very frequent displays of unacceptable behavioural patterns in children and adolescents in their environment. More precisely stated, the television with its program content, information and messages, in addition to the family, educational institutions, and other factors has a large and responsible part, influencing both positively and negatively the quality of an entire educational process and development of children and adolescents.

  13. Measuring school-related subjective well-being in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rachel F; Huebner, E Scott; Wedell, Douglas H; Hills, Kimberly J

    2012-01-01

    The tripartite model of subjective well-being (SWB) incorporates 3 components: frequent positive emotions, infrequent negative emotions, and an overall positive evaluation of life circumstances (Diener, Suh, Lucas, & Smith, 1999). In light of the large amount of time that youth spend in school, this study investigated a tripartite model of school-related SWB among adolescents, based on 3 measures of SWB appropriate for adolescents. The measures included a measure of school satisfaction (SS) and measures of positive and negative emotions experienced specifically during school hours. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to analyze the factorial validity of 3- and 4-factor models of school-related SWB in a sample of 921 adolescents. Results indicated that a 4-factor model comprised of positive emotions, negative emotions, fear-related negative emotions, and SS best described the structure of school-related SWB in the current sample. Results also revealed a comparable factor structure for male and female students. The study points to the possible benefits of a contextualized approach to SWB that takes into account the specific environments in which adolescents live. PMID:22239393

  14. The Socialization of Home-Schooled Children in Rural Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Mecham, Neil A.

    2004-01-01

    Concern over the social development of children who are home schooled has caused parents and educators to question the wisdom of this practice. A review of home-schooling research has not revealed whether a difference exists between the social skills of homeschooled children and children who attend public schools. This study explored the socialization of home-schooled children by comparing Social Skills Rating System scores of home-schooled children with the scores of their mothers and a comp...

  15. Preventive dental care for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, B K

    2001-03-01

    Preventive dental care for children and adolescents requires a good understanding of the dental caries process and the particular relationships that exist throughout childhood and young adulthood. Only when these relationships are understood can they be used to diagnose dental caries risk and apply appropriate preventive therapies and restorative care that is effective. The need to diagnose risk when applying preventive care is as important for individual patients as it is for population groups. At the individual level, the aim is to aid the development of a healthy functioning dentition for life. This applies in the population group level but the cost benefits also become important in justifying the funding to carry out preventive practices. Risk can be determined by general factors including the socioeconomic status, access to optimally fluoridated drinking water and age. Specific factors include the microbiology of the dental plaque, dietary practices, oral hygiene practices, individual fluoride use and previous dental caries history. Once the risk has been diagnosed and the related factors identified, the best preventive approach can be selected. This may include oral hygiene, dietary change, fluoride recommendations, restorative care using fluoride releasing materials or antibacterial mouthwashes. The dentist may play several roles in preventive dental care. The first is as the giver of advice and care for the individual child patient; the second is as an advocate to help the child get the care by getting the consent and support of the parents; and the third may be to lobby for the appropriate funding to obtain this care in publicly funded programs. PMID:11458617

  16. School Health Screening of Indochinese Refugee Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, Sheila M.

    1981-01-01

    Indochinese children registering for the first time in American schools are appearing with multiple health problems. These frequently include lice and scabies, intestinal parasites, vision and hearing defects, and severe dental decay. (JN)

  17. How Schools Train Children for Political Impotence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozol, Jonathan

    1972-01-01

    The contrast between the real power and the experience of impotence that millions of bright, earnest school children attest to prompts one to enquire into preplanned impotence and self-defeat. (Author)

  18. Diabetes in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities: barriers to education, treatment and good metabolic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Olsen, Birthe; Ladelund, Steen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This paper reports an investigation to establish whether metabolic control is different in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities with type 1 diabetes compared with young Danish patients, and to learn about factors affecting their opportunities to achieve good metabolic control....... BACKGROUND: The prevalence of diabetes in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities in Denmark is increasing. Having a different ethnic background has frequently been described as a risk factor for poor metabolic control, but whether the risk is represented by the ethnicity and immigration itself...... the centres provided limited specialized knowledge and support. The questionnaires completed by the parents revealed limited schooling, lack of professional education and a major need for interpreters; these characteristics were especially prevalent among the mothers. CONCLUSIONS: Young patients from ethnic...

  19. Relationship between Family Characteristics and Aggressive Behaviors of Children and Adolescents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yizhen; SHI Junxia; HUANG Yan; WANG Jun

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify family factors obviously relevant to aggression, and offer a theoretical foundation for the prevention of aggression, 4010 students from primary and secondary schools in 5 different areas in Hubei province were surveyed. The Child Behavior Checklist "parents' form"(Chinese version) and the four scales of Family Environment Scale were used. A multiple logistic regression was used to identify risk factors of children's and adolescents' aggressive behavior. The results showed that maternal education, paternal occupation, family type, parental child-rearing attitude and patterns, students' interpersonal relationship were significantly associated with the children's and adolescents' aggression. The risk factors of aggression were parental child-rearing patterns, peer relationship, teacher-student relationship, and family conflicts.

  20. [Stressing events in socially vulnerable children and adolescents in Porto Alegre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Michele; Koller, Sílvia Helena; Dell'Aglio, Débora Dalbosco

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the occurrence and impact of stressing events for 297 low- income children/adolescents (both sexes; 7-16 years, M =11.22; SD = 2.13) in the city of Porto Alegre. Group 1 (G1) consisted of 142 participants (living with their families) and Group 2 (G2) of 155 institutionalized individuals. All were individually interviewed and answered the Stressing Events Inventory for Children/Adolescents. The most frequent stressing events for the sample were: follow orders given by the parents (85.2%); quarrels with friends (72.9%); death of relatives (71.8%); failure at school (69.2%); and rivalry of siblings (68%). Student's t-test revealed significant difference between groups (p 0.05). The high frequency and strong impact of stressing events reveal the situation of social and familiar vulnerability, presence of violence and lack of resources in the whole group. PMID:19197420

  1. Understanding adolescents' sleep patterns and school performance: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R; Carskadon, Mary A

    2003-12-01

    The present paper reviews and critiques studies assessing the relation between sleep patterns, sleep quality, and school performance of adolescents attending middle school, high school, and/or college. The majority of studies relied on self-report, yet the researchers approached the question with different designs and measures. Specifically, studies looked at (1) sleep/wake patterns and usual grades, (2) school start time and phase preference in relation to sleep habits and quality and academic performance, and (3) sleep patterns and classroom performance (e.g., examination grades). The findings strongly indicate that self-reported shortened total sleep time, erratic sleep/wake schedules, late bed and rise times, and poor sleep quality are negatively associated with academic performance for adolescents from middle school through the college years. Limitations of the current published studies are also discussed in detail in this review. PMID:15018092

  2. Prevalence of Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease in School Children in Malwa Region of MP

    OpenAIRE

    P Yadav, P Joshi, J Gupta, D Joseph, P Sakhi

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to affect millions of people around the world. Children and adolescents of the developing countries are especially susceptible to this disease. To asses the prevalence of Rheumatic Fever /Rheumatic heart disease in an urban area, we do survey of children aged between 5 to 16 years studying in various government schools in Indore district which were selected randomly. Out of 9879 students enrolled in the study 9526 were examined, the percent...

  3. Hypnosis for treatment of insomnia in school-age children: a retrospective chart review

    OpenAIRE

    Slothower Molly P; Anbar Ran D

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The purposes of this study are to document psychosocial stressors and medical conditions associated with development of insomnia in school-age children and to report use of hypnosis for this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed for 84 children and adolescents with insomnia, excluding those with central or obstructive sleep apnea. All patients were offered and accepted instruction in self-hypnosis for treatment of insomnia, and for other symptoms if...

  4. Overweight and obesity at school entry among migrant and German children: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeb Hajo; Will Beata; Baune Bernhard T

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Overweight and obesity have become a global epidemic and are increasing rapidly in both childhood and adolescence. Obesity is linked both to socioeconomic status and to ethnicity among adults. It is unclear whether similar associations exist in childhood. The aim of the present study was to assess differences in overweight and obesity in migrant and German children at school entry. Methods The body mass index (BMI) was calculated for 525 children attending the 2002 compuls...

  5. Traumatic Dental Injuries Among 12-15-Year-Old-School Children in Panchkula

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Amandeep; Lakhanpal, Manav; Rao, NC; Gupta, Nidhi; Vashisth, Shelja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic dental injury (TDI) in children and adolescents has become one of the most serious dental public health problems. Despite such a high prevalence of dental trauma, very less attention has been paid to TDI, its etiology, and prevention. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of anterior tooth traumatic dental injuries in 12-15-year-old school children of Panchkula district, India, and to find any correlation with the cause, gender, extent of overbite as well as over-jet, ...

  6. Prevalence of acne in primary school children and the relationship of acne with pubertal maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Hilal Kaya Erdoğan; İlknur Kıvanç Altunay; Serap Turan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: Although acne vulgaris is generally regarded as a disease of adolescence period, it can occur in infancy, early childhood and prepubertal period. Acne may emerge as the first sign of pubertal maturation. In our study, we aimed to determine the acne prevalence in primary school children, then, evaluate the pubertal signs in those children; examine the correlation of the presence and severity of acne with pubertal signs, and finally, revise the concept of prepubertal a...

  7. School bus and children's traffic safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Shu-ming; Stephen Hargarten; ZHU Shan-kuan

    2007-01-01

    There is no safer way to transport a child than a school bus. Fatal crashes involving occupants are extremely rare events in the US. In recent years, school bus transportation began to develop in China. We want to bring advanced experience on school bus safety in Western countries such as the US to developing countries.Methods: We searched the papers related to school bus safety from Medline, Chinese Scientific Journals Database and the Web of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).Results: There were only 9 papers related to school bus safety, which showed that higher levels of safety standards on school buses, school bus-related transportation and environmental laws and injury prevention were the primary reasons for the desired outcome. Few school bus is related to deaths and injuries in the developed countries.Conclusions: The developing countries should make strict environmental laws and standards on school bus safety to prevent children's injury and death.

  8. Buying behaviour of children at secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Snížková, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    The bachelor thesis deals with buying behaviour of children at secondary school. The aim is to describe their buying behaviour and find out their motivational factors to purchase factors with a focus on advertisement. In the theoretical part is specified buying behaviour and factors influencing consumer. Gen Z and Net generation, in which children at secondary school class, are characterized. It described their buying behaviour and specification that characterize this generation. A part of th...

  9. The changing seroepidemiology of enterovirus 71 infection among children and adolescents in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lyn

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has caused recurrent epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease among children in Singapore. Between August 2008 and July 2010, we conducted a survey to estimate the seroprevalence of EV71 infection among children and adolescents aged 1-17 years. We compared our EV71 seroepidemiologic findings with a previous study conducted in 1996-1997. Methods The survey involved the prospective collection of 1,200 residual sera from Singapore residents aged 1-17 years in two hospitals. Neutralizing antibodies to EV71 were detected by the microneutralization test. The geometric mean titer (GMT of EV71 antibodies and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated and compared by age groups. Statistical significance was taken as P Results The overall EV71 antibody prevalence was 26.9% (95% CI: 24.5-29.5%. It increased significantly from 14.3% in children aged 1-6 years to 27.8% in those aged 7-12 years, and reached 38.8% in adolescents aged 13-17 years. The seroconversion rate differed by about 12% between the consecutive age groups. The GMT of EV71 antibodies was higher among primary school children aged 7-12 years in our study than that among the 6-12 year age group in the 1996-1997 study. Conclusions Higher antibody titers were observed in children aged 1-6 years than those in the other two age groups, indicating that most of the infections had been acquired during early childhood. EV71 infection is common among children and adolescents in Singapore, with 39% infected by the time they are in secondary school (13-17 years of age.

  10. Clinical and Biochemical Parameters of Children and Adolescents Applying Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Hendy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary agricultural product in Egypt is the cotton crop. Children and adolescents work seasonally in the cotton fields applying pesticides.Objectives: To examine the effect of pesticide exposure on clinical and biochemical parameters in children and adolescents applying pesticides.Methods: Male children currently applying pesticides and aged between 9 and 19 years (n = 50 were recruited for this study. They were asked to complete work, health, and exposure questionnaires; examined for any medical and neurological problems with particular attention to sensory and motor functions including cranial nerves, sensory and motor system, and reflexes. From each participant, a blood sample was taken to measure acetylcholinesterase activity, and liver and kidney functions. Children who have never worked in agriculture (n = 50, matched on age, education, and socioeconomic status were also studied and served as controls.Results: More neuromuscular disorders were identified in pesticide applicators than controls. A significant lower level of acetylcholinesterase was found in the applicator group compared to the controls. There was also a significant difference in hematological, renal and hepatic indices in the exposed children compared to the control children. Working more days in the current season and also working more years as a pesticide applicator were both associated with an increase in the prevalence of neuromuscular abnormalities and significant changes in the laboratory tests.Conclusion: Children and adolescent pesticide applicators working in farms of Egypt are at risk of developing serious health problems similar to those of adults.

  11. Psychosocial aspects of changes during adolescence among school going adolescent Indian girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Sinha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical as well as psychological changes during adolescence create a state of physiological stress that must be coped with. This study was undertaken to study the psychosocial aspects of changes associated with adolescence among school going girls. Methods: A predesigned questionnaire was administered to students of class VI to XII prior to a talk on and lsquo;Adolescent health' in two urban schools of Bhopal. The questions were directed at understanding the psychosocial aspects of behavior among the girls during adolescence while they cope with changes of adolescence. Results: A total of 414 schoolgirls from classes VI-XII participated in the study. Their mean age was 14.4years [SD 2.01; Range 10-18 years]. Of them, 277 reported having attained menarche, the mean age at menarche being 12.7 years [SD 1.52]. Almost 63% of girls had knowledge about menstruation before attaining menarche. Majority of them had learned about it from their mother (41%. Nearly one third (30.6% of girls were not comfortable with the bodily changes of adolescence; 41% reported feeling anxious and 26.4% reported suffering from low self-esteem. Excessive irritability was reported by 47% of girls; undue anger by 51.4%, and 34.7% felt uncomfortable interacting with people. One third of girls had frequent arguments with parents. Almost 80% of girls found their parents supportive. Conclusions: A good proportion of adolescent girls appear to be in need for counseling and support for optimally coping with the bodily as well as psychological changes of adolescence. This preliminary study unveils the need for more widespread and regular Adolescent School health programs for increasing awareness and support services. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(2.000: 409-413

  12. Gendered Patterns in Adolescents' School Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Monica Kirkpatrick; Crosnoe, Robert; Thaden, Lyssa L.

    2006-01-01

    A substantial literature documents a gender reversal in many aspects of social psychological functioning during adolescence, in which girls fall below boys in domains in which they once enjoyed advantages. This study elaborates upon recent research from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health suggesting that this phenomenon may occur…

  13. The mental health care gap among children and adolescents: data from an epidemiological survey from four Brazilian regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane S Paula

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, a minority of disordered children/adolescents receives mental health assistance. In order to improve service access, it is important to investigate factors that influence the process leading to receiving care. Data on frequency and barriers for mental health service use (MHSU among Brazilian children/adolescents are extremely scarce and are needed to guide public policy. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency of MHSU among 6-to-16-year-old with psychiatric disorders from four Brazilian regions; and to identify structural/psychosocial/demographic barriers associated with child/adolescent MHSU. METHODS: Multicenter cross-sectional-study involving four towns from four out of five Brazilian regions. In each town, a representative sample of elementary public school students was randomly selected (sample: 1,721. Child/adolescent MHSU was defined as being seen by a psychologist/psychiatrist/neurologist in the previous 12 months. Standardized instruments measured: (1 children/adolescent characteristics [(1.1 Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS-PL-psychiatric disorders; (1.2 Ten Questions Screen-neurodevelopment problems; (1.3 two subtests of WISC-III-estimated IQ; (1.4 Academic Performance Test-school performance], (2 factors related to mothers/main caregivers (Self-Reporting Questionnaire-anxiety/depression, (3 family (Brazilian Research-Companies-Association's Questionnaire-SES. RESULTS: Only 19.8% of children/adolescents with psychiatric disorder have used mental health services in the previous 12 months. Multiple logistic regression modeling identified five factors associated with lower rates of MHSU (female gender, adequate school performance, mother/main caregiver living with a partner, lower SES, residing in deprived Brazilian regions regardless of the presence of any psychiatric disorders/neurodevelopmental problems. CONCLUSIONS: Only a small proportion of children/adolescents

  14. The Development of Attitude to School by Children Beginning School Attendance

    OpenAIRE

    KŘIŽANOVÁ, Jaroslava

    2009-01-01

    The aim of my diploma thesis is to ascertain how is developed attitude to school by children beginning school attendance. The theoretical part is devoted to pre-school children and primary school children with specialization in socialization in their family and out of it. There is also included concept of primary school. The practical part is devoted to the research of the developmet attitude to school by three children. Information was found out of that three children, their parents and teac...

  15. Food Advertising and Marketing Directed at Children and Adolescents in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Mary; French, Simone

    2004-02-10

    In recent years, the food and beverage industry in the US has viewed children and adolescents as a major market force. As a result, children and adolescents are now the target of intense and specialized food marketing and advertising efforts. Food marketers are interested in youth as consumers because of their spending power, their purchasing influence, and as future adult consumers. Multiple techniques and channels are used to reach youth, beginning when they are toddlers, to foster brand-building and influence food product purchase behavior. These food marketing channels include television advertising, in-school marketing, product placements, kids clubs, the Internet, toys and products with brand logos, and youth-targeted promotions, such as cross-selling and tie-ins. Foods marketed to children are predominantly high in sugar and fat, and as such are inconsistent with national dietary recommendations. The purpose of this article is to examine the food advertising and marketing channels used to target children and adolescents in the US, the impact of food advertising on eating behavior, and current regulation and policies. PMID:15171786

  16. Food Advertising and Marketing Directed at Children and Adolescents in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Simone

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, the food and beverage industry in the US has viewed children and adolescents as a major market force. As a result, children and adolescents are now the target of intense and specialized food marketing and advertising efforts. Food marketers are interested in youth as consumers because of their spending power, their purchasing influence, and as future adult consumers. Multiple techniques and channels are used to reach youth, beginning when they are toddlers, to foster brand-building and influence food product purchase behavior. These food marketing channels include television advertising, in-school marketing, product placements, kids clubs, the Internet, toys and products with brand logos, and youth-targeted promotions, such as cross-selling and tie-ins. Foods marketed to children are predominantly high in sugar and fat, and as such are inconsistent with national dietary recommendations. The purpose of this article is to examine the food advertising and marketing channels used to target children and adolescents in the US, the impact of food advertising on eating behavior, and current regulation and policies.

  17. School Substance Use Norms and Racial Composition Moderate Parental and Peer Influences on Adolescent Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jinni; Supple, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Parental and peer influences on adolescent substance use have been well demonstrated. However, limited research has examined how parental and peer influences vary across school contexts. This study used a multilevel approach to examine the effects of school substance use norms and school racial composition in predicting adolescent substance use (a composite measure of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use) and in moderating parental and peer influences on adolescent substance use. A total of 14,346 adolescents from 34 schools in a mid-western county completed surveys electronically at school. Analyses were conducted using hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicated that school-level disapproval against substance use and percentage of minority students at school were negatively associated with adolescent substance use. School-level disapproval moderated the association between peer substance use and adolescent substance use, with the association being stronger when school-level disapproval was lower. School racial composition moderated the influence of parental disapproval and peer substance use on adolescent substance use. Specifically, both the association between parental disapproval and adolescent substance use and the association between peer substance use and adolescent substance use were weaker for adolescents who attended schools with higher percentages of minority students. Findings highlighted the importance of considering the role of school contexts, in conjunction with parental and peer influences, in understanding adolescent substance use. PMID:27215854

  18. Prevalence of naevi in school children

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma N; Sharma R

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of naevi in general and pigmented (melanocytic) naevi in particular was studied in school children. Naevi were seen in 73.6% of the examined children, while 73.1% of them had pigmented naevi. The average number of naevi was 5.4 per child with slight male preponderance. There was complete absence of naevi over palms and soles.

  19. Health and School Performance among Danish adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus D.; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    This study examines the impact of a wide range of health measures on school performance at the end of compulsory school (9 years of school). The key questions raised are whether different health problems lowers school performance contributing to a health selection process that could lead to lower...... health and school performance....

  20. Processes Of Self-Concept Development Among Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael

    Interviews and observations from a longitudinal study (from 1998 - 2009) has been analyzed to approach a contextual understanding of children's identity and self-concept development (Spaten 2007). Bronfenbrenner assumed (2005) that scientific limitations in widespread approaches to research on...... & Van der Veer, 1988). amd dialogical, cultural self-autorship are important themes for an understanding of processes of self-concept development among Danish children and adolescents from diverse cultual backgrounds. Limitations for this research as well as further directions for new studies will be...... childrens's development may be conquered by broader perspectives in theory and, methodology. He proposed a scientific perspective as the ecology of human development and, the Person-Process-Context-Time model (ibid). Our results includes that childrens's and adolescent's active internalization (Valsiner...

  1. Food price inflation and children's schooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Grimm (Michael)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractI analyze the impact of food price inflation on parental decisions to send their children to school. Moreover, I use the fact that food crop farmers and cotton farmers were exposed differently to that shock to estimate the income elasticity of school enrolment. The results suggest that t

  2. Ritalin for School Children: The Teachers' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Stanley S.; Bosco, James J.

    Research in an urban public school system (Grand Rapids, Michigan) was conducted to determine teachers' view of Ritalin for school children. Three questions were addressed: what contact with and information about Ritalin do teachers have; what attitude do teachers express toward Ritalin; and what professional behaviors do teachers report in regard…

  3. The School Children's Development in Language Skills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史崔丽

    2009-01-01

    @@ During the school years, children's development in cognition enables them to focus their thinking on the facts and relationships less intuitively and more analytically. Growing language abilities complement these cognitive skills. As a result, older children can discuss and explain their world and themselves in ways no presehoolers can. And the ability to plan and follow through on cognitive strategies further distinguishes older children from preschoolers.

  4. Whole Grain Intakes in the Diets Of Malaysian Children and Adolescents--Findings from the MyBreakfast Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimah Ak

    Full Text Available Diets rich in whole grain are associated with several health benefits. Little is known however, about whole grain consumption patterns in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to assess whole grain intakes and dietary source in Malaysian children and adolescents.This analysis is from the MyBreakfast study, a national cross sectional study investigating eating habits among primary and secondary school children throughout Malaysia, conducted in 2013. Children (n = 5,165 and adolescents (n = 2,947 who completed two days of dietary assessment using a food record or recall respectively were included. The whole grain content of foods was estimated mainly through the use of quantitative ingredient declarations on food labels. All wholegrain foods were considered irrespective of the amount of whole grain they contained.Overall, only 25% of children and 19% of adolescents were wholegrain consumers. Mean daily intakes in the total sample were 2.3g/d (SD 5.8 g/d in children and 1.7 g/d (SD 4.7 g/d in adolescents and in the consumer's only sample, mean intakes reached 9.1g/d (SD 8.6 and 9.2g/d (SD 7.1g/d respectively. Wheat was the main grain source of whole grain while ready to eat breakfast cereals and hot cereals were the main food contributors. Less than 3% of the children and adolescents reached the US quantitative whole grain recommendation of 48 g/day.Whole grain is consumed by only a minority of Malaysian children and adolescents and even among consumers, intakes are well below recommendations. Efforts are needed to firstly understand the barriers to whole grain consumption among Malaysian children in order to design effective health promotion initiatives to promote an increase in whole grain consumption.

  5. Whole Grain Intakes in the Diets Of Malaysian Children and Adolescents – Findings from the MyBreakfast Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    AK, Norimah; Koo, H. C.; JM, Hamid Jan; MT, Mohd Nasir; Tan, S. Y.; Appukutty, Mahendran; AR, Nurliyana; Thielecke, Frank; Hopkins, Sinead; Ong, M. K.; Ning, C.; Tee, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diets rich in whole grain are associated with several health benefits. Little is known however, about whole grain consumption patterns in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to assess whole grain intakes and dietary source in Malaysian children and adolescents. Methods This analysis is from the MyBreakfast study, a national cross sectional study investigating eating habits among primary and secondary school children throughout Malaysia, conducted in 2013. Children (n = 5,165) and adolescents (n = 2,947) who completed two days of dietary assessment using a food record or recall respectively were included. The whole grain content of foods was estimated mainly through the use of quantitative ingredient declarations on food labels. All wholegrain foods were considered irrespective of the amount of whole grain they contained. Results Overall, only 25% of children and 19% of adolescents were wholegrain consumers. Mean daily intakes in the total sample were 2.3g/d (SD 5.8g/d) in children and 1.7g/d (SD 4.7g/d) in adolescents and in the consumer’s only sample, mean intakes reached 9.1g/d (SD 8.6) and 9.2g/d (SD 7.1g/d) respectively. Wheat was the main grain source of whole grain while ready to eat breakfast cereals and hot cereals were the main food contributors. Less than 3% of the children and adolescents reached the US quantitative whole grain recommendation of 48g/day. Conclusion Whole grain is consumed by only a minority of Malaysian children and adolescents and even among consumers, intakes are well below recommendations. Efforts are needed to firstly understand the barriers to whole grain consumption among Malaysian children in order to design effective health promotion initiatives to promote an increase in whole grain consumption. PMID:26473369

  6. Affective disorders in children and adolescents: The dysthymic disorder dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Fine, S.; M. Moretti; Haley, G.; Marriage, K.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the use of psychiatric ratings and self-report information in distinguishing major depression and dysthymic disorders from each other and from other disorders. 60 adolescent psychiatry patients (mean age 13.05 yrs) completed the Children's Depression Scale and a children's depression inventory, and the results were compared with those from diagnostic interviews using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) criteria. Findings suggest that diagnostic ratings...

  7. Headaches as Somatoform Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kostorz; Ilona Kopyta; Barbara Szwed-Białożyt; Ewa Widera-Emich; Beata Kazek

    2012-01-01

    Somatoform disorders are often the main cause for seeking professional advice and performing a number of specialist checks. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of somatoform disorders in the form of headaches in children and adolescents neurologically diagnosed and the risk factors thereof. Analysis of the biological and situational risk factors were established. Somatoform disorders were diagnosed in 27 out of 276 children with headaches. We concluded that in the differential...

  8. Chronic diseases in children and adolescents-some psychological characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Nada POP JORDANOVA; Fustić, Stojka; Zorčec, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of children suffer from chronic diseases, which demand careful adjustment, and the coping and active role of all involved in the treatment. Psychological problems in this population are increased by the long duration of procedures, specific diet and low physical activity. In this study various psychometric instruments are used to evaluate the psychological characteristics of children and adolescents suffering from cystic fibrosis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes m...

  9. Factors Influencing Whether Children Walk to School

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jason G.; Jerrett, Michael; McCONNELL, ROB; Berhane, Kiros; Dunton, Genevieve; Shankardass, Ketan; reynolds, Kim; Chang, Roger; Wolch, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated multiple levels of influence simultaneously on whether children walk to school. A large cohort of 4,338 subjects from ten communities was used to identify the determinants of walking through (1) a one-level logistic regression model for individual-level variables and (2) a two-level mixed regression model for individual and school-level variables. Walking rates were positively associated with home-to-school proximity, greater age, and living in neighborhoods charact...

  10. Weight status of adolescents in secondary schools in port Harcourt using Body Mass Index (BMI)

    OpenAIRE

    Adesina Adesuwa F; Peterside Oliemen; Anochie Ifeoma; Akani Nwadiuto A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Adolescent weight status is a cumulative effect of health and nutritional problems. Adolescent weight problems often go unnoticed as weight assessment is not considered a priority in adolescents. Objectives To determine the weight status of adolescents using BMI and to identify the contributing factors to adolescent weight problems. Methods In April 2010, 960 adolescents aged 10–19 years in secondary schools in Port Harcourt were selected for the study using a stratified m...

  11. Effectiveness of the workshop "Adolescent depression: What can schools do?"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania eMartinez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescent depression is associated with serious consequences. School staff is in a unique position to screen and refer adolescents with depression in a timely manner, and can collaborate with healthcare teams to assist in the proper management of the disease. The objective of this paper is to describe the results of a workshop that aims to improve the knowledge of adolescent depression among school staff.Material and methods: This was a single-arm trial with a pre-post design. Six workshops were conducted in four cities in Chile. Each workshop lasted four hours. Participatory methodology was used. A 26-item knowledge questionnaire about adolescent depression, with the alternatives I agree, I disagree, and I don’t know was administered to the participants, before and after the workshop.Results: A total of 152 people participated in the trial. Of these, 74.3% were female, and 44.7% were school psychologists, 25.0%, teachers, 17.8%, school counselors, and 5.3%, social workers. On average, there were 69.6% (SD 21.3 correct responses on the initial test, and 91.8% (SD 8.0 on the final test. All items had an increase of correct answers and a decrease of don’t know answers. There were notable increases of correct responses on statements dealing with myths: Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in adolescents must be avoided because they produce dependence (59% to 96% and Depression in adolescence is better defined as a weakness of character than as a disease (75% to 95%. School psychologists scored higher than the other participants on the questionnaire both before and after the workshop.Conclusions: The workshop: Adolescent depression: What can schools do? can improve school staff knowledge of this topic, especially aiding to dispel myths regarding the disease and its treatment. This can help bring about timely case detection and improved collaboration with health team for proper handling of adolescent depression.

  12. Problem and pro-social behavior among Nigerian children with intellectual disability: the implication for developing policy for school based mental health programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bakare Muideen O; Ubochi Vincent N; Ebigbo Peter O; Orovwigho Andrew O

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background School based mental health programs are absent in most educational institutions for intellectually disabled children and adolescents in Nigeria and co-morbid behavioral problems often complicate intellectual disability in children and adolescents receiving special education instructions. Little is known about prevalence and pattern of behavioral problems existing co-morbidly among sub-Saharan African children with intellectual disability. This study assessed the prevalence...

  13. Nocturnal enuresis among primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Mohamed Aljefri; Omer Abdullah Basurreh; Faisel Yunus; Amen Ahmed Bawazir

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and personal and family risk factors for nocturnal enuresis (NE) among primary school children in Al-Mukalla City, Yemen, we conducted a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered, three-part structured questionnaire involving 832 school children aged 6 - 15 years between 2007 and 2008. We assessed participants′ socio-demographic factors, family characteristics and factors related to the presence of NE. The mean age of the children was 11.5 (±2.7) years. The ...

  14. Meeting the needs of adolescent parents and their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent parents and their children present to health care practitioners as two paediatric patients, each with unique health care needs. Young parents and their children may be at risk for negative health outcomes, not directly as a consequence of maternal age but because of poverty and other inequities in the social determinants of health. The health needs of child and mother are best assessed using a nonjudgmental approach, appropriate screening tools and open questions that address both preventative and acute health issues. The dyad's coexisting needs may be anticipated as they relate to growth and development, infant and adolescent mental health, nutrition and food security, safety, relationships, parenting, education, sexual health and the facilitation of supports and resources. Care providers who understand adolescent development and integrate medical home elements of a patient-centred 'medical home' into their practices are ideally positioned to facilitate positive health outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:27441025

  15. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents in northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiaoli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To describe the prevalence of DSM-IV disorders and comorbidity in a large school-based sample of 6-17 year old children and adolescents in northeast China. METHODS: A two-phase cross-sectional study was conducted on 9,806 children. During the screening phase, 8848 children (90.23% and their mothers and teachers were interviewed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ. During the diagnostic phase, 1129 children with a positive SDQ and 804 randomly selected children with a negative SDQ (11%, and their mothers and teachers, were interviewed using the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of DSM-IV disorders was 9.49% (95% CI = 8.10-11.10%. Anxiety disorders were the most common (6.06%, 95% CI = 4.92-7.40, followed by depression (1.32%, 95% CI = 0.91-1.92%, oppositional defiant disorder (1.21%, 95%CI = 0.77-1.87 and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (0.84%, 95% CI = 0.52-1.36%. Of the 805 children with a psychiatric disorder, 15.2% had two or more comorbid disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately one in ten Chinese school children has psychiatric disorders involving a level of distress or social impairment likely to warrant treatment. Prevention, early identification and treatment of these disorders are urgently needed and pose a serious challenge in China.

  16. Serious Emotional Disturbance in Children and Adolescents: Multisystemic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henggeler, Scott W.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.

    Originally developed to treat antisocial behavior, multisystemic therapy (MST) has emerged as a leading evidence-based treatment for serious emotional disturbance in children and adolescents. This manual presents the MST approach to working with this challenging population. Delineated are ways to develop and implement collaborative interventions…

  17. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about functional electrical stimulation in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is defined as the electrical stimulation of muscles that have impaired motor control, in order to produce a contraction to obtain functionally useful movement. It was first proposed in…

  18. Physical fitness in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, O.W.

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a non-progressive condition; however, certain negative side effects such as a low muscle strength and cardio respiratory endurance can develop at later stages and can get progressively worse depending on the specifics of a person's condition. Children and adolescents with CP h

  19. Anorexia nervosa: an increasing problem in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Halmi, Katherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Information from eating disorder clinics across five continents suggests that anorexia nervosa is becoming an increasing problem in children and young adolescents. There is some indication that anxiety disorders in childhood may be a major risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa. Early recognition and family treatment for this disorder are essential to prevent chronic impairment.

  20. Pain-Based Behavior with Children and Adolescents in Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Many actions of troubled children and adolescents can disguise and conceal their ever-present and deep-seated psycho-emotional pain. Adults living and working with these youth may overlook this pain in a strategy of avoidance. Labelling troubling behavior as "outbursts," "explosions," or "acting out," ignores the…

  1. Harmful Effects of Media on Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Dhanasekaran, Saranya

    2012-01-01

    Children and adolescents spent a considerable portion of their time watching television, movies, playing videogames and on the internet. Media has proved to be a very useful tool in the fields of education, arts, science, sports, and culture. Over the past few decades, there has been a surge in the use of media by the younger generations and…

  2. Is obesity an emerging problem in Brazilian children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this issue of the Jornal de Pediatria, Silva et al. compared the growth patterns of Brazilian children and adolescents with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) growth charts. The Silva et al. study has significant public health implications...

  3. Brain connectivity during verbal working memory in children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. van den Bosch (Gerbrich); H.E. Marroun (Hanan); M. Schmidt (Marcus); D. Tibboel (Dick); D.S. Manoach (Dara); V.D. Calhoun (Vince); T.J.H. White (Tonya)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWorking memory (WkM) is a fundamental cognitive process that serves as a building block for higher order cognitive functions. While studies have shown that children and adolescents utilize similar brain regions during verbal WkM, there have been few studies that evaluate the developmenta

  4. Practice Parameter for Telepsychiatry with Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Parameter for the usage of telepsychiatry to provide services to children and adolescents is developed using clinical consensus and existing scientific evidence. Telepsychiatry is the result of applying telemedicine, a mode of health care delivery that uses telecommunications, to psychiatry. The parameter's use for determining best practices in…

  5. Psychiatric Diagnostic Interviews for Children and Adolescents: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angold, Adrian; Erkanli, Alaattin; Copeland, William; Goodman, Robert; Fisher, Prudence W.; Costello, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare examples of three styles of psychiatric interviews for youth: the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) ("respondent-based"), the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment (CAPA) ("interviewer-based"), and the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) ("expert judgment"). Method: Roughly equal numbers of…

  6. Association of Stress and Delinquency in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Stašević, Ina; ROPAC, DARKO; Lučev, Oskar

    2005-01-01

    The aim of investigation was to assess the impact of subjective stress exposure on delinquent behaviour in children and adolescents. The study included 174 young male delinquents, selected by the method of stratified systematic (random) sample and divided into three age groups of

  7. The Enigma of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, Gregory T.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been a proliferation in the number of children and adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Except in rare cases, the young people who receive this diagnosis do not meet the strict diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder I or II in the DSM-IV-TR. Many pediatric psychiatrists insist there are important development…

  8. Fulminant hepatic failure in children and adolescents in Northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca José Carlos F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological findings of fulminant hepatic failure were correlated to the demographic, clinical, biochemical and virological features in children and adolescents, native to the Amazonas State in Northern Brazil. 96.2% had evidence of infection by primary hepatotrophic viruses. Histological analysis revealed three distinct patterns of fulminant hepatic failure.

  9. Fulminant hepatic failure in children and adolescents in Northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, José Carlos F; Souza, Rita A B; Brasil, Leila M; Araújo, José R; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos L

    2004-01-01

    The histological findings of fulminant hepatic failure were correlated to the demographic, clinical, biochemical and virological features in children and adolescents, native to the Amazonas State in Northern Brazil. 96.2% had evidence of infection by primary hepatotrophic viruses. Histological analysis revealed three distinct patterns of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:15042190

  10. Emotional Reasoning in Acutely Traumatized Children and Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduijn, Nina J.C.; Vincken, Manon J.B.; Meesters, Cor M.G.; Engelhard, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    After a traumatic event, many children and adolescents develop post-traumatic stress disorder. Studies in adults suggest that emotional reasoning (i.e., drawing conclusions about situations on the basis of one’s emotional responses) is involved in PTSD development or maintenance. This longitudinal s

  11. Gender, Values, and Occupational Interests among Children, Adolescents, and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgram, Erica S.; Bigler, Rebecca S.; Liben, Lynn S.

    2010-01-01

    Work fulfills personal values, perhaps differently for males and females. Explored here was the role values play in shaping occupational interests. Study 1 examined children's, adolescents', and adults' (N = 313) occupational values (regarding money, power, family, altruism), occupational interests, and perceptions of values afforded by…

  12. Cognitive Profile of Children and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersdam Telléus, Gry; Jepsen, Jens Richardt; Bentz, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies of cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been conducted. The aim of this study was to examine the neurocognitive and intelligence profile of this clinical group. METHOD: The study was a matched case-control (N = 188), multi...

  13. Alternative Schooling Strategies and the Religious Lives of American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uecker, Jeremy E

    2008-12-01

    I analyze the effects of Catholic schooling, Protestant schooling, and homeschooling on adolescents' religious lives and test three mechanisms through which these schooling strategies might influence religiosity: friendship networks, network closure, and adult mentors. Data from Wave 1 of the National Survey of Youth and Religion suggest that Catholic schoolers attend religious services more frequently and value their faith more highly than public schoolers, but attend religious education classes and youth group less often. Protestant schoolers' involvement in their local congregation is similar to public schoolers', but their faith plays a more salient role in their life and they are more active in private religious activities. Homeschoolers do not differ significantly from public schoolers on any outcome considered. Moreover, friendship networks, network closure, and adult mentors play a very limited role in mediating the relationships between schooling strategies and adolescent religiosity. Interpretations of these findings are presented and discussed. PMID:21709822

  14. Sexual Maturation Pattern in Adolescent School Girls of Rural India: A Cross Sectional Study from Nagpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Charuhas V Akre

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Puberty is transformation of the child into an adult. It includes all the events of somatic and mental maturation. Secondary sex characters were also a part of this period. The objective was to assess the pattern of sexual maturation of adolescent school girls in rural India.Methods: This was a community based cross sectional study conducted among school children of Sevanand High school, Mahadula, Nagpur. 322 girls in the age group of 10-18 years were assessed for sexual maturation. The pubertal evaluation was made with reference to Tanner stages and grading was done as per Tanner’s scale. For statistical analysis, median and standard error along with 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated using Epi Info statistical package programme version 6.0 updated 2009. Statistical significance was assessed at a type I error rate of 0.05.Results: We found that pubertal changes appeared earlier in girls. The first to appear was breast development at a median age of 10.40 years. The last to appear was pubic hair development (PH5 at median age 16.87 years, the total time taken for complete sexual maturation being 6.38 years. Median age of menarche was found to be13.18 years.Conclusion: The pattern of sexual maturation in rural adolescent school children revealed that though puberty set in earlier in girls, but took longer time for complete maturation.

  15. Factors Influencing the Dysmenorrhea among Korean Adolescents in Middle School

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Ga Eul; Cha, Nam Hyun; Sok, Sohyune R.

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the factors influencing dysmenorrhea among Korean middle school adolescents. [Subjects] The subjects included 572 female students in three different middle schools located in Seoul, South Korea. [Methods] A cross-sectional design was adopted. The measurement tools used included a demographic form and revised Menstrual distress Questionnaire (MDQ). [Results] The analyses showed that the prediction model was significant. The value of the adjusted R2 was 0.2...

  16. Risk behaviors for the health of adolescents from High School

    OpenAIRE

    José Henrique Ramos; Eliane Denise da Silveira Araújo; Nelson Blankb

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the risk behaviors (smoking addiction, alcoholism, drug use and sexual risk behavior) of adolescents from High School. Methods: It was an analytical and cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 720 scholars (252 boys and 468 girls) from the age group of 16 to 17 years-old, from three public schools in Florianopolis/SC. The data was collected through two types of self administrated questionnaires; one for the parents and another one for the students, from March ...

  17. Working with Adolescents in a High School Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    While the high school setting holds the best promise of employment for the recently certified athletic trainer, most student athletic trainers do not spend time working with the secondary school athlete. The athletic trainer must be aware of the stages of adolescent psychological maturity and be sensitive to the athlete's psychological needs. It is important that the athletic trainer develops strategies for dealing with both the athlete and his/her parents.

  18. Predicting Behavior Problems and Social Competence in Children of Adolescent Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbs-Tait, Laura; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes longitudinal investigation evaluating additive model of impact of adolescent mothers' parenting practices on children. Suggests infant-mother attachment predicted behavior problems among preschool children of adolescent mothers and adolescent mothers' depression explained significant additional variance in those problems. States mothers'…

  19. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL ON THE EFFICACY OF MEDHYA RASAYANA TABLET ON ACADEMIC STRESS AND PERFORMANCE IN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Abhimanyu Kumar; Reena Kulkarni

    2013-01-01

    Background:School children and academics are not exempted from stress. In Indian context, especially for high school children, the demands to be placed high, parental pressures, the future career option and time bound targets along with inherent biological variations of adolescence create paramount stress. Such stress can be detrimental if not well managed. Despite of loss of lives consequent upon stress and poor performance, academic stress is less researched. Psychotherapy is the current go...

  20. Middle Grades' School Models and Their Impact on Early Adolescent Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Margaret Zoller; Sheehan, Heather Chase; Earley, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the world, school grade structures are most variable during the early adolescent years when students can find themselves in a variety of school models. This paper investigates the impact of two popular school models in the United States (middle school and K-8) on the self-esteem and self-concept of early adolescents. Based on mixed…

  1. Attention-deficit hyperactive disorder presenting with school truancy in an adolescent: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Noor Azimah; Wan Ismail, Wan Salwina; Tan, Chai Eng; Jaffar, Aida; Sharip, Shalisah; Omar, Khairani

    2011-12-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric illness commonly diagnosed during the early years of childhood. In many adolescents with undiagnosed ADHD, presentation may not be entirely similar to that in younger children. These adolescents pose significant challenges to parents and teachers coping with their disability. Often adolescents with behavioural problems are brought to medical attention as a last resort. This case describes an adolescent who presented to a primary care clinic with school truancy. He was initially treated for depression with oppositional defiant disorder and sibling rivalry. Only following a careful detailed history and further investigations was the diagnosis of ADHD made. He showed a positive improvement with the use of methylphenidate for his ADHD and escitalopram for his depression. The success of his management was further supported by the use of behavioural therapy and parenting interventions. There is a need to increase public awareness of ADHD, especially among parents and teachers so that early intervention can be instituted in these children. PMID:23205066

  2. Racial differences in suicidal ideation among school going adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Young adults are at increased risk for suicidal behavior and there is growing concern about racial differences in suicidal ideation, especially in the younger population. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess suicidal ideation in school going tribal and nontribal adolescents and to study its relationships with psychological well-being, depression, and anxiety. Materials and Methods: A total of 259 students of Classes X, XI, and XII of three Schools of Ranchi, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria, were screened for suicidal ideation by Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire (SIQ and psychological well-being by General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12. The level of anxiety and depression was assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS. Results: Overall 33.2% of the adolescents had suicidal ideation out of which 34.2% were tribal-students and 32.8% nontribal-students with no significant intergroup difference. Psychological discomfort (GHQ-12 Score ≥3 was noticed in 59.1% of adolescents, but no racial difference was found. However, the mean HADS depression score was significantly higher in tribal adolescents, more so in tribal boys than nontribal adolescents or boys, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation of SIQ total score in all the adolescents with GHQ-12 total score, HADS total score, HADS anxiety score, and HADS depression score. Conclusion: There were no racial differences in suicidal ideation and psychological discomfort among tribal and nontribal adolescents. Tribal adolescents, and more specifically tribal boys, had more depression than their nontribal counterparts. Suicidal ideation was positively correlated with psychological discomfort, anxiety, and depression.

  3. Mood Stabilizers in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders including autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified as to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. All these categories are grouped together in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, classification under the category of Autism Spectrum Disorders.Behavioral disorders including irritability, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, and aggression are additional symptoms found in up to 20% of children and adolescents with ASD and require careful evaluation for appropriate treatment. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is defined by impaired attention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, whereas ASD is defined by social dysfunction, communicative impairment, and restricted/repetitive behaviors. They should be distinctly evaluated in children and adolescents with ASD and intellectual disability in contrast to individuals without intellectual disability, because significant differences between these conditions exist. Mood disorders are also common in ASD and should be systematically investigated in this population of children and adolescents. Approximately 50% of children and adolescents with ASD receive medication for comorbid behavioral/ADHD and mood symptoms, mostly stimulants, antiepileptics and antipsychotics. Guidelines for the evaluation and treatment including medications for ADHD-like symptoms have recently been provided and should be carefully considered. Antiepileptic drugs are commonly used in ASDs with epilepsy, because seizures are associated with ASD in 10% to 30% of young patients, and as mood stabilizers. Lithium is another option for children and adolescents with ASD who present with symptoms of a mood disorder, such as elevated moods/euphoria, mania, and paranoia, whether accompanied or not by irritability. Experimental treatments are under

  4. Prevalence of obesity and its correlates in school going adolescents of Haldwani, Nainital, Uttarakhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Aggarwal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: With a rising trend of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs in the present world, overweight and obesity has gained importance as it is not only a disease in itself but also risk factor for majority of other NCDs. A dramatic increase in overweight and obesity among children and adolescent has raised the concern of various public health physicians especially in developing country like India. Aims & Objective: To study the prevalence of overweight and obesity & its correlates among school going adolescents of Haldwani block. Material & Methods: School based cross sectional study was done among the adolescents of 8th to 12th standard. To calculate the maximum sample size prevalence of obesity was assumed to be 50%, taking absolute error of 5%, design effect of 2 and 10% non-response rate the sample was calculated to be 880, rounded off to 900. Samples were collected from 30 clusters/schools using simple random sampling. Data was collected using a pre-designed, semi-structured and pre-tested questionnaire and analyzed by using SPSS version 22. Results: Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 13% (CI = 10.8 - 15.2%. Overweight and obesity was found to be significantly associated with urban area, private school, Socio-economic class I, non-vegetarian diet, physical inactivity and playing videogames, working on laptops and computer on univariate analysis. On applying binary logistic regression factors like private schools, socioeconomic class I, non-vegetarian diet and physical inactivity were again found to be significantly associated with overweight and obesity. Conclusion: Prevalence of obesity was found to be more in adolescents having modifiable risk factors. 

  5. [Alcohol use in young adolescents. A survey in French secondary schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, D; Rouchaud, A; Garcia, C; Roehrig, C; Ferley, J-P

    2015-05-01

    Among young adolescents, early use of alcohol has been shown to be related to later alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related problems in numerous epidemiologic studies. However, if drinking problems are now well documented in young people, few data are available on alcohol use in children and young adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes with respect to alcohol use among young adolescents entering their first year of secondary school (mean age, 11.5 years). Data were collected from the ESPACE program, a preventive program conducted in the educational district of Limoges, France. Of the 2268 respondents with complete data, 73.4% (77.1% in males vs. 69.9% in females; Pcannabis use (6.0% in regular users vs. 0.9% in occasional users and 0.2% in nonusers) were found to be significantly more frequent in regular alcohol users than in other students (Pdepressed, lacking self-assurance, dissatisfied with their physical appearance and their way of life, and they felt that they exhibited significantly more impairments in their interactions with parents, peers, and the school environment. Similarly, they were found to have significantly more frequently an inclination for risk behaviors and a significantly more positive view of drinking than other students. These results look almost like those reported in adolescents and young people, and show that the alcohol abuse pattern is drawn early in childhood. They also highlight the value of epidemiologic investigations for planning preventive interventions. PMID:25836668

  6. Homelessness, Violence Exposure, and School Participation among Urban Adolescent Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Angie C.

    2007-01-01

    Using a risk and resilience framework, this exploratory study examines the relationships between homelessness, exposure to multiple types of violence, and school participation within a survey sample of poor adolescent mothers living in an urban setting. Participants who were homeless either currently or historically were compared with participants…

  7. Body Mass Index Of Nigerian Adolescent Urban Secondary School Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyiriuka Alphonsus N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Body mass index (BMI is an inexpensive and easy-to-perform method of screening for weight status, which may have detrimental health consequences. The aim of our study was to assess the pattern of BMI among Nigerian adolescent secondary school girls and determine the prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity among them.

  8. Turn the Wheel: Integral School Counseling for Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2003-01-01

    This article formulates an overarching, inclusive model of integral counseling that enables school counselors to help male adolescents challenge the norm of conventional masculinity. The model draws from 3 areas: transpersonal counseling, holistic education, and mindful social action. The aim is to move the students' level of self-development and…

  9. The relation between breakfast skipping and school performance in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, Annemarie; Ouwehand, Carolijn; Dekker, Sanne; Lee, Nikki; De Groot, Renate; Krabbendam, Lydia; Jolles, Jelle

    2012-01-01

    Boschloo, A., Ouwehand, C., Dekker, S., Lee, N., De Groot, R., Krabbendam, L., & Jolles, J. (2012). The relation between breakfast skipping and school performance in adolescents. Mind, Brain, and Education, 6(2), 81-88. doi:10.1111/j.1751-228x.2012.01138.x

  10. School Life and Adolescents' Self-Esteem Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Maïano, Christophe; Marsh, Herbert W.; Nagengast, Benjamin; Janosz, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates heterogeneity in adolescents' trajectories of global self-esteem (GSE) and the relations between these trajectories and facets of the interpersonal, organizational, and instructional components of students' school life. Methodologically, this study illustrates the use of growth mixture analyses, and how to obtain…

  11. Unnecessary Roughness? School Sports, Peer Networks, and Male Adolescent Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreager, Derek A.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which participation in high school interscholastic sports contributes to male violence. Deriving competing hypotheses from social control, social learning, and masculinity theories, I use data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to test if (1) type of sport and (2) peer athletic…

  12. Prevalence of bullying and victimization among children in early elementary school: Do family and school neighbourhood socioeconomic status matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Pauline W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullying and victimization are widespread phenomena in childhood and can have a serious impact on well-being. Children from families with a low socioeconomic background have an increased risk of this behaviour, but it is unknown whether socioeconomic status (SES of school neighbourhoods is also related to bullying behaviour. Furthermore, as previous bullying research mainly focused on older children and adolescents, it remains unclear to what extent bullying and victimization affects the lives of younger children. The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence and socioeconomic disparities in bullying behaviour among young elementary school children. Methods The study was part of a population-based survey in the Netherlands. Teacher reports of bullying behaviour and indicators of SES of families and schools were available for 6379 children aged 5–6 years. Results One-third of the children were involved in bullying, most of them as bullies (17% or bully-victims (13%, and less as pure victims (4%. All indicators of low family SES and poor school neighbourhood SES were associated with an increased risk of being a bully or bully-victim. Parental educational level was the only indicator of SES related with victimization. The influence of school neighbourhood SES on bullying attenuated to statistical non-significance once adjusted for family SES. Conclusions Bullying and victimization are already common problems in early elementary school. Children from socioeconomically disadvantaged families, rather than children visiting schools in disadvantaged neighbourhoods, have a particularly high risk of involvement in bullying. These findings suggest the need of timely bullying preventions and interventions that should have a special focus on children of families with a low socioeconomic background. Future studies are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of such programs.

  13. Health maintenance in school-aged children: Part II. Counseling recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Locke, Amy B; Skye, Eric P

    2011-03-15

    School-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are establishing patterns of behavior that may last a lifetime; therefore, it is important to counsel these patients about healthy lifestyle practices during well-child examinations. Children and families should be advised to eat a diet high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat or nonfat dairy products, beans, fish, and lean meats, while limiting sugar, fast food, and highly processed foods. Children should engage in at least 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity, and screen time (e.g., television, computer, video games) should be limited to no more than one to two hours of quality programming daily. Most school-aged children require 11 hours of sleep per night. Decreased sleep is associated with behavioral issues, decreased concentration at school, and obesity. Children should brush their teeth twice per day with a toothpaste containing fluoride. Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death in this age group in the United States, and families should be counseled on traffic, water, sports, and firearm safety. Because high-risk behaviors may start in early adolescence, many experts recommend screening for tobacco, alcohol, and drug use beginning at 11 years of age. Sexually active adolescents should be counseled on protecting against sexually transmitted infections, and should be screened for these infections if indicated. PMID:21404979

  14. Understanding Violent Behavior in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aggressive or violent behavior Being the victim of physical abuse and/or sexual abuse Exposure to violence in ... and War: How to Talk to Children Sexual Abuse Physical Punishment Music and Music Videos Firearms and Children ...

  15. The Importance of Adult Connections in Adolescents' Sense of School Belonging: Implications for Schools and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Amy Dutton; Varjas, Kris; Roach, Andrew T.; Kuperminc, Gabriel P.; Meyers, Joel

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the significance of adult connections for adolescents' sense of school belonging and identifies areas for future research and practice by (a) exploring the influence of adult connections on adolescents' sense of school belonging; (b) reviewing the literature regarding school belonging outcomes; (c) identifying…

  16. Prolonged grief in children and adolescents: Assessment, correlates, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Spuij, M.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 6400 children and adolescents lose a parent in the Netherlands and even more children are confronted with other types of loss such as the death of a close friend or grandparent. The death of a loved one is one of the most devastating events that can occur in children’s and adolescents’ lives. There is growing recognition of a syndrome that children can develop post loss, referred to as Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD). This dissertation project had three aims: (I) to increase our ...

  17. FDG PET/CT in children and adolescents with lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluge, Regine; Kurch, Lars [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Montravers, Francoise [Hospital Tenon, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mauz-Koerholz, Christine [University Hospital Halle, Department of Paediatrics, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of FDG PET/CT applications in children and adolescents with lymphoma. Today, FDG PET is used for tailoring treatment intensity in children with Hodgkin lymphoma within the framework of international treatment optimisation protocols. In contrast, the role of this method in children with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is not well defined. This paper overviews clinical appearance and metabolic behaviour of the most frequent lymphoma subtypes in childhood. The main focus of the review is to summarise knowledge about the role of FDG PET/CT for initial staging and early response assessment. (orig.)

  18. FDG PET/CT in children and adolescents with lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of FDG PET/CT applications in children and adolescents with lymphoma. Today, FDG PET is used for tailoring treatment intensity in children with Hodgkin lymphoma within the framework of international treatment optimisation protocols. In contrast, the role of this method in children with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is not well defined. This paper overviews clinical appearance and metabolic behaviour of the most frequent lymphoma subtypes in childhood. The main focus of the review is to summarise knowledge about the role of FDG PET/CT for initial staging and early response assessment. (orig.)

  19. Sex Stereotypes and School Adolescents' Sexual Behaviour in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Bayode Isaiah

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between sex stereotypes and the sexual behaviour of Nigerian school-going adolescents. It also ascertained the effects of age and sex on adolescents' beliefs about sex stereotypes. The study sample consisted of 658 (male = 287, female = 371) adolescents from nine randomly selected secondary schools in three…

  20. The Effectiveness of a School-Based Adolescent Depression Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Karen L.; Kastelic, Elizabeth A.; Hess, Sally G.; Cox, Todd S.; Gonzales, Lizza C.; Mink, Sallie P.; DePaulo, J. Raymond, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to decrease the suicide rate in adolescents, many interventions have focused on school-based suicide prevention programs. Alternatively, depression education in schools might be effective in decreasing the morbidity, mortality, and stigma associated with adolescent depression. The Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP)…

  1. Adolescent Brain Development: Current Research and the Impact on Secondary School Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaten, Gail K.; Roaten, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Brain growth and change is a key factor in adolescent development, influencing cognitions, emotions, and behavior. As technology has improved, so has the research on the adolescent brain. School counselors working with adolescents need to be familiar with recent literature to be more effective in their work with middle and high school students.…

  2. Media influences on children and adolescents: violence and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earles, K A; Alexander, Randell; Johnson, Melba; Liverpool, Joan; McGhee, Melissa

    2002-09-01

    The portrayal of violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol in the media has been known to adversely affect the behavior of children and adolescents. There is a strong association between perceptions of media messages and observed behavior, especially with children. Lately, there has been more of a focus in the public health/medical field on media influences of youth and the role of the pediatrician and/or healthcare worker in addressing this area of growing concern. There is a need to explicitly explore the influences of media violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol on youth within the context of the Social Learning Theory. Implications of these influences are discussed, and recommendations for pediatricians and/or health care workers who interact with children and adolescents are described. Pediatricians and health care workers should incorporate media exposure probes into the developmental history of their patients and become knowledgeable about the effects of medial influences on youth. PMID:12392043

  3. Media influences on children and adolescents: violence and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earles, K. A.; Alexander, Randell; Johnson, Melba; Liverpool, Joan; McGhee, Melissa

    2002-01-01

    The portrayal of violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol in the media has been known to adversely affect the behavior of children and adolescents. There is a strong association between perceptions of media messages and observed behavior, especially with children. Lately, there has been more of a focus in the public health/medical field on media influences of youth and the role of the pediatrician and/or healthcare worker in addressing this area of growing concern. There is a need to explicitly explore the influences of media violence, sex, and drugs/alcohol on youth within the context of the Social Learning Theory. Implications of these influences are discussed, and recommendations for pediatricians and/or health care workers who interact with children and adolescents are described. Pediatricians and health care workers should incorporate media exposure probes into the developmental history of their patients and become knowledgeable about the effects of medial influences on youth. PMID:12392043

  4. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    SUZUKI, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The e...

  5. Changes in quality of life among Norwegian school children: a six-month follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson Bo; Jozefiak Thomas; Wichstrøm Lars

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A considerable gap exists in regard to longitudinal research on quality of life (QoL) in community populations of children and adolescents. Changes and stability of QoL have been poorly examined, despite the fact that children and adolescents undergo profound developmental changes. The aims of the study were to investigate short-term changes in student QoL with regard to sex and age in a school-based sample. Methods A representative Norwegian sample of 1,821 school childre...

  6. School attendance, health-risk behaviors, and self-esteem in adolescents applying for working papers.

    OpenAIRE

    Suss, A. L.; Tinkelman, B. K.; Freeman, K; Friedman, S B

    1996-01-01

    Since health-risk behaviors are often encountered in clusters among adolescents, it was hypothesized that adolescents with poor school attendance would be associated with more health-risk behaviors (e.g., substance use, violence) than those who attend school regularly. This study assessed the relationship between poor school attendance and health-risk behaviors, and described health-risk behaviors and self-esteem among adolescents seeking employment. In this cross-sectional study, school atte...

  7. An Analysis of Family-School Collaboration in Preventing Adolescent Violence in Urban Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, C. J. Gerda; Emslie, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how school staff members, learners and parents collaborate to prevent adolescent learner violence in two different urban secondary schools. The increase in acts of interpersonal learner violence has a destructive effect on the safe and positive development of young people. Empirical evidence indicates…

  8. Early Environmental Support and Elementary School Adjustment as Predictors of School Adjustment in Middle Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Elizabeth A.; Sroufe, L. Alan; Collins, W. Andres; Jimerson, Shane; Weinfield, Nancy; Henninghausen, Katherine; Egeland, Byron; Hyson, Daniel M.; Anderson, Fione; Meyer, Stephanie E.

    1999-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined socioemotional antecedents of adolescent school adjustment. Findings indicated that early and later parental problem-solving support accounted for 13 percent of variance in high school adjustment. Early and later parental problem-solving support, peer competence, externalizing behavior, and emotional…

  9. Sexual behavior among Brazilian adolescents, National Adolescent School-based Health Survey (PeNSE 2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Maryane Oliveira-Campos; Marília Lavocart Nunes; Fátima Carvalho Madeira; Maria Goreth Santos; Silvia Reise Bregmann; Deborah Carvalho Malta; Luana Giatti; Sandhi Maria Barreto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study describes the sexual behavior among students who participated in the National Adolescent School-based Health Survey (PeNSE) 2012 and investigates whether social inequalities, the use of psychoactive substances and the dissemination of information on sexual and reproductive health in school are associated with differences in behavior. METHODOLOGY: The response variable was the sexual behavior described in three categories (never had sexual intercourse, had protected ...

  10. Conceptions of Adolescence: Implications for Differences in Engagement in School Over Early Adolescence in the United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Pomerantz, Eva M; Wang, Meifang; Cheung, Cecilia; Cimpian, Andrei

    2016-07-01

    American youth are more prone to storm and stress during adolescence than are Chinese youth (e.g., American youth's engagement in school declines more). However, it is unclear why. This research examined differences in conceptions of adolescence in the United States and China. Using both open- and closed-ended measures, youth (N = 397; 50 % female; mean age = 13.19 years) reported on their views of teens. American (vs. Chinese) youth were more likely to see adolescence as a time of decreased family responsibility along with increased individuation from parents, school disengagement, and peer orientation. Conceptions of adolescence as a time of dampened family responsibility and heightened school disengagement contributed to American (vs. Chinese) youth being less engaged in school over the seventh and eighth grades. The findings suggest that culture shapes ideas about adolescence, which contribute to differences in American and Chinese youth's engagement in school over this phase. PMID:27160846

  11. Comorbid psychopathology and clinical symptomatology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, D C; Korlou, S; Sakellariou, K; Kondyli, V; Sarafidou, J; Tsakanikos, E; Giannakopoulos, G; Liakopoulou, M

    2016-01-01

    Comorbid psychopathology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been investigated in a number of studies over the last twenty years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenomenology of illness and broader psychopathology in a group of Greek children and adolescents with OCD. The investigation of parental psychopathology in children and adolescents with OCD was a secondary aim of the present study. We studied 31 children and adolescents with OCD (n=31, age range 8-15 years) and their parents (n=62, age range 43-48 years) and compared to children and adolescents with specific reading and written expression learning disorders (n=30, age range 7-16 years) and their parents (n=58, age range 40-46 years). Appropriate testing showed specific reading and learning disorders, which were of mild to moderate severity for the 85% of this latter group. The diagnosis of learning disorder of reading and written expression was made through the use of standardized reading material, appropriate for ages 10-15 years. Reading comprehension and narration were tested. The written expression (spelling, syntax, content) was examined by a written text, in which the subject developed a certain theme from the reading material. Based on their level of education and occupation, the index families were classified as high (29%), average (45%) and low (26%) socioeconomic status, whereas 6.7% of control families belonged to high, 63.3% to average, and 30% to low status. In order to investigate psychopathology, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children, Present and Life-time version was administered to children and their parents, as well as the Child Behavior Checklist 4/18 (CBCL) to both parents and adolescents (Youth Self-Report). Also the Yale- Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) was rated for both children and parents. Moreover, the children were given the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the

  12. Timed "Up & Go" test in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata D'Agostini Nicolini-Panisson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate, by a literature review, the Timed "Up & Go" (TUG test use and its main methodological aspects in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES The searches were performed in the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, SciELO and Cochrane Library, from April to July 2012. Studies published from 1990 to 2012 using the terms in Portuguese and English "Timed "Up & Go", "test", "balance", "child", and "adolescent" were selected. The results were divided into categories: general characteristics of the studies, population, test implementation METHODS, interpretation of results and associations with other measurements. DATA SYNTHESIS 27 studies were analyzed in this review and most of them used the TUG test along with other outcome measures to assess functional mobility or balance. Three studies evaluated the TUG test in significant samples of children and adolescents with typical development, and the most studied specific diagnoses were cerebral palsy and traumatic brain injury. The absence of methodological standardization was noted, but one study proposed adaptations to the pediatric population. In children and adolescents with specific clinical diagnoses, the coefficient of within-session reliability was found to be high in most studies, as well as the intra and inter-examiner reliability, which characterizes the good reproducibility of the test. CONCLUSIONS The TUG test was shown to be a good tool to assess functional mobility in the pediatric population, presenting a good reproducibility and correlation with other assessment tools.

  13. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder

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    Didem Behice ÖZTOP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However,use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effectivemethod for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhoodand adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders ofthe children and adolescents. Moreover, it was suggested that this effectiveness is permanent in some studies. Prioritygoal of CBT is to change inappropriate learning and thinking patterns in the children and adolescents. By “now and here”fashion, it is attempted to reveal the origin of current problems. During the process, the factors are considered, whichcause to maintain the symptoms. It is attempted to decrease signs caused to stress by improving coping skills duringtherapy. To this end, methods including observation, relaxation training, systematic desensitization, social skills training,cognitive restructuring and exposure therapy are applied in sessions by taking child’s problems into consideration. Scalesspecific to anxiety disorders are used in the assessment and follow-up. Age and development level of the child should beparticularly taken into account while using assessment tools and therapeutic modality.

  14. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-12-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is emerging as a new clinical problem within pediatric practice. Recent reports indicate an increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents around the world in all ethnicities, even if the prevalence of obesity is not increasing any more. The majority of young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in specific ethnic subgroups such as African-American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Clinicians should be aware of the frequent mild or asymptomatic manifestation of type 2 diabetes mellitus in childhood. Therefore, a screening seems meaningful especially in high risk groups such as children and adolescents with obesity, relatives with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and clinical features of insulin resistance (hypertension, dyslipidemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, or acanthosis nigricans). Treatment of choice is lifestyle intervention followed by pharmacological treatment (e.g., metformin). New drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors or glucagon like peptide 1 mimetics are in the pipeline for treatment of youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, recent reports indicate a high dropout of the medical care system of adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus suggesting that management of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus requires some remodeling of current healthcare practices. PMID:24379917

  15. Trends in prevalence of overweight and obesity in danish infants, children and adolescents--are we still on a plateau?

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    Camilla Schmidt Morgen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After the worldwide steep increase in child and adolescent overweight and obesity during the last decades, there is now evidence of a levelling off in the prevalence in many countries in the Western world. AIM: To examine whether there still is a plateau in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Danish children and adolescents, or whether the prevalence is decreasing or rising again. METHODS: THE TRENDS IN THE PREVALENCE RATES WERE BASED ON THREE DATA SETS PROVIDING COMPARABLE REPEATED ESTIMATES: 1 the Danish Health Visitors Child Health Database (DHVCHD with measurements on infant and childhood height and weight from 2002 to 2011 (n up to 39,984, 2 the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC with maternal reports of measured infant and childhood height and weight from 1998 to 2010 (n up to 56,826 and 3 the Danish part of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey (HBSC with self-reported information on adolescent height and weight from the years 2002 to 2010 (n = 16,557. Overweight and obesity were categorized according to WHO growth standards. Trends were assessed by repeated point estimates and linear regression analyses providing regression coefficients for changes in per cent per year with 95% confidence intervals (CI. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of overweight and obesity for infants, children and adolescents showed a mixed pattern of decline, stability and increase (ranging from -1.10 through 0.29 per cent per year with CI's from -3.10 through 2.37. Overall, there were no consistent statistically significant trends upwards or downwards, although some significant downward trends in childhood and adolescence were observed. CONCLUSION: This study, based on data from 1998 through 2011, showed that the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity among Danish infants, children and adolescents were largely still on a plateau with tendencies for a decline among children and adolescents.

  16. School counsellor's roles in minimising adolescents' attrition from schools

    OpenAIRE

    Ikechukwu, Bridget N. Q.; Aluede, Oyaziwo

    2002-01-01

    Counselling ways (rendering financial advice, providing encouragement, reassurances and support), which the school counselllors could adopt to help the school system minimize the increasing incidence of school dropout, were advanced.

  17. Blood pressure standards for Saudi children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood pressure levels may vary in children because of genetic, ethnic and socioeconomic factors. To date, there have been no large national studies in Saudi Arabia on blood pressure in children. Therefore, we sought to establish representative blood pressure reference centiles for Saudi Arabian children and adolescents. We selected a sample of children and adolescents aged from birth to 18 years by multi-stage probability sampling of the Saudi population. The selected sample represented Saudi children from the whole country. Data were collected through a house-to-house survey of all selected households in all 13 regions in the country. Data were analyzed to study the distribution pattern of systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and to develop reference values. The 90th percentile of SBP and DBP values for each age were compared with values from a Turkish and an American study. A total of 16 226 Saudi children and adolescents from birth to 18 years were studied. Blood pressure rose steadily with age in both boys and girls. The average annual increase in SBP was 1.66 mm Hg for boys and1.44 mm Hg for girls. The average annual increase in DBP was 0.83 mm Hg for boys and 0.77 mm Hg for girls. DBP rose sharply in boys at the age of 18 years. Values for the 90th percentile of both SBP and DBP varied in Saudi children from their Turkish and American counterparts for all age groups. Blood pressure values in this study differed from those from other studies in developing countries and in the United States, indicating that comparison across studies is difficult and from that every population should use their own normal standards to define measured blood pressure levels in children. (author)

  18. Understanding the school 'climate': secondary school children and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This interdisciplinary study analyzes the production, circulation and reception of messages on climate change in secondary schools in France. The objective is to understand how political and educational policy initiatives influence the ways in which schools contribute to creating youngsters' perceptions and opinions about climate change. In order to study the conditions of production and reception of information about climate change, a survey was conducted in four French secondary schools, in the 'Bas Rhin' and 'Nord' departments, and local political actors in each department were interviewed. The cross disciplinary analytical and methodological approach uses the tools of sociological inquiry, information science, and political science: questionnaires and interviews were conducted with members of the educational and governmental communities of each school and department, semiotic and discursive analyses of corpuses of documents were carried out, in order to characterize documents used by students and teachers at school or in more informal contexts; the nature and extent of the relations between the political contexts and school directives and programs were also discussed. This interdisciplinary approach, combining sociological, communicational, and political methods, was chosen in response to the hypothesis that three types of variables (social, communicational and political) contribute to the structuring and production of messages about climate change in schools. This report offers a contextualized overview of activities developed within the four secondary schools to help sensitize children to the risks associated with climate change. A study of the networks of individuals (teachers, staff, members of associations, etc.) created in and around the school environment is presented. The degree of involvement of these actors in climate change programs is analyzed, as it is related to their motives and objectives, to the school discipline taught, and to the position

  19. School Administrators' Perceptions of Factors that Influence Children's Active Travel to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Anna E.; Pluto, Delores M.; Ogoussan, Olga; Banda, Jorge A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increasing children's active travel to school may be 1 strategy for addressing the growing prevalence of obesity among school age children. Using the School Travel Survey, we examined South Carolina school district leaders' perceptions of factors that influence elementary and middle school students walking to school. Methods: Frequency…

  20. Adolescent School Experiences and Dropout, Adolescent Pregnancy, and Young Adult Deviant Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Stephanie; Cohen, Patricia; Brook, Judith S.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined predictability of inappropriate behavior in a random sample of 452 adolescents. Behaviors examined included dropping out, teen pregnancy, criminal activities and conviction, antisocial personality disorder, and alcohol abuse. Found that academic achievement and aspirations, and learning-focused school settings related to…

  1. The effects of breakfast on behavior and academic performance in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphus, Katie; Lawton, Clare L; Dye, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Breakfast consumption is associated with positive outcomes for diet quality, micronutrient intake, weight status and lifestyle factors. Breakfast has been suggested to positively affect learning in children in terms of behavior, cognitive, and school performance. However, these assertions are largely based on evidence which demonstrates acute effects of breakfast on cognitive performance. Less research which examines the effects of breakfast on the ecologically valid outcomes of academic performance or in-class behavior is available. The literature was searched for articles published between 1950-2013 indexed in Ovid MEDLINE, Pubmed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE databases, and PsychINFO. Thirty-six articles examining the effects of breakfast on in-class behavior and academic performance in children and adolescents were included. The effects of breakfast in different populations were considered, including undernourished or well-nourished children and adolescents from differing socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds. The habitual and acute effects of breakfast and the effects of school breakfast programs (SBPs) were considered. The evidence indicated a mainly positive effect of breakfast on on-task behavior in the classroom. There was suggestive evidence that habitual breakfast (frequency and quality) and SBPs have a positive effect on children's academic performance with clearest effects on mathematic and arithmetic grades in undernourished children. Increased frequency of habitual breakfast was consistently positively associated with academic performance. Some evidence suggested that quality of habitual breakfast, in terms of providing a greater variety of food groups and adequate energy, was positively related to school performance. However, these associations can be attributed, in part, to confounders such as SES and to methodological weaknesses such as the subjective nature of the observations of behavior in class. PMID:23964220

  2. Characterization of Morbidity from Interpersonal Violence in Brazilian Children and Adolescents.

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    Thaliny Batista Sarmento de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents are vulnerable to violent situations in their social, family and school environment. The aim of the study was to characterize morbidity due to violence in Brazilian children and adolescents.A cross-sectional study through the analysis of 1,356 corpus delicti medical reports and police reports of children and adolescents aged 0-19 years, victims of interpersonal violence was conducted from January 2008 to December 2011. Sociodemographic variables related to victims, offenders and aggressions were analyzed.There was a prevalence of females over males (56.9% vs. 43.1% with age between 15 and 19 years (64.7%. There was a significant association between variables age of the victim and place of occurrence, sex and type of aggression, sex and number of lesions, presence of fracture, maxillofacial injury, oral cavity lesion and physical violence; physical violence and involvement of face, neck, abdomen and back (P < 0.001. Public streets (56.4% were the main place of occurrence of events, followed by home (33.1%. Family members accounted for 26.48% of aggressions. The face was the most affected body region (43.36%, with 12.61% of records referring to oral cavity lesions.Violence was responsible for a large number of non-fatal injuries to children and adolescents, affecting mainly females aged 15 and 19 years. The occurrence of such events is more frequent on public streets and at home. Most victims had multiple injuries and the face was the most affected body region.

  3. Profile of aripiprazole in the treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents

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    Kirino E

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Kirino1–3 1Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, 3Juntendo Institute of Mental Health, Shizuoka, Japan Abstract: Bipolar disorder is a pernicious illness. Compared with the later-onset form, early onset bipolar disorder is associated with worse psychosocial outcomes, and is characterized by rapid cycling and increased risks of substance abuse and suicide attempts. Controlling mood episodes and preventing relapse in this group of pediatric patients requires careful treatment. Here, we review the effectiveness of aripiprazole for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, with discussion of this drug's unique pharmacological profile and various clinical study outcomes. Aripiprazole acts as a serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, as well as a partial agonist of the serotonin 5-HT1A and dopamine D2 receptors. It can be safely used in children and adolescents, as it is highly tolerated and shows lower rates of the side effects typically observed with other antipsychotic drugs, including sedation, weight gain, hyperprolactinemia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. The presently reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-RCTs generally reported aripiprazole to be effective and well-tolerated in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. However, due to the limited number of RCTs, the present conclusions must be evaluated cautiously. Furthermore, aripiprazole cannot yet be considered a preferred treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, as there is not yet evidence that aripiprazole shows greater efficacy compared to other second-generation antipsychotics. Additional data are needed from future head-to-head comparison studies. Keywords: child, mania, mixed state

  4. Perceived School Climate and Chinese Adolescents' Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts: The Mediating Role of Sleep Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongping; Bao, Zhenzhou; Li, Xian; Wang, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Background: School factors play important roles in adolescent suicide. However, little is known about how school climate is associated with adolescent suicide. This study examined the relationship between perceived school climate and adolescent suicidal ideation and suicide attempts, and whether these relations were explained by adolescent sleep…

  5. School mental health services: signpost for out-of-school service utilization in adolescents with mental disorders? A nationally representative United States cohort.

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    Marion Tegethoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School mental health services are important contact points for children and adolescents with mental disorders, but their ability to provide comprehensive treatment is limited. The main objective was to estimate in mentally disordered adolescents of a nationally representative United States cohort the role of school mental health services as guide to mental health care in different out-of-school service sectors. METHODS: Analyses are based on weighted data (N = 6483 from the United States National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement (participants' age: 13-18 years. Lifetime DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed using the fully structured WHO CIDI interview, complemented by parent report. Adolescents and parents provided information on mental health service use across multiple sectors, based on the Service Assessment for Children and Adolescents. RESULTS: School mental health service use predicted subsequent out-of-school service utilization for mental disorders i in the medical specialty sector, in adolescents with affective (hazard ratio (HR = 3.01, confidence interval (CI = 1.77-5.12, anxiety (HR = 3.87, CI = 1.97-7.64, behavior (HR = 2.49, CI = 1.62-3.82, substance use (HR = 4.12, CI = 1.87-9.04, and eating (HR = 10.72, CI = 2.31-49.70 disorders, and any mental disorder (HR = 2.97, CI = 1.94-4.54, and ii in other service sectors, in adolescents with anxiety (HR = 3.15, CI = 2.17-4.56, behavior (HR = 1.99, CI = 1.29-3.06, and substance use (HR = 2.48, CI = 1.57-3.94 disorders, and any mental disorder (HR = 2.33, CI = 1.54-3.53, but iii not in the mental health specialty sector. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that in the United States, school mental health services may serve as guide to out-of-school service utilization for mental disorders especially in the medical specialty sector across various mental disorders, thereby

  6. Development of adaptable and flexible treatment manuals for externalizing and internalizing disorders in children and adolescents

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    Bauermeister José J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the process used to develop treatment manuals for internalizing and externalizing disorders in children and adolescents. These manuals were developed to offer health care providers and others working in child mental health a flexible intervention that could be adapted to different countries and localities based on: 1 the amount of health care and school resources that are available; 2 the nature and severity of the types of problems children have; and 3 the preferences and cultural factors that are important within these communities. We also discuss the experiences and cultural issues faced by sites in Egypt, Lebanon, Israel, and Brazil who volunteered to implement the manualized treatment programs. The feedback received from these sites indicates that the manuals can be implemented to help children with internalizing and externalizing problems.

  7. Bullying at School Among Older Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    School bullying is often considered to be the fuel behind school violence. In a recent report by the Families and Work Institute, students reported that is was the small things, such as teasing, which often triggered serious episodes of violence. On the school campus, between 20 to 30% of the students report frequent involvement in bullying…

  8. The influence of asthma onset and severity on malocclusion prevalence in children and adolescents

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    Luiz Sekio Tanaka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The influence of asthma, its severity levels and onset time on malocclusion occurrence were investigated. METHODS: The sample was composed by 176 children/adolescents, of both genders, aged 3 to 15 years, that were divided in two groups. The asthma group (AG enrolled 88 children/adolescents that were seen at the Breathe Londrina Program. The asthma-free group (AFG enrolled 88 preschool and school children recruited in 2 public schools. Malocclusion diagnosis was made according to WHO criteria (OMS, 1999. RESULTS: A higher prevalence in malocclusions in asthmatic patients in mixed dentition was observed when compared to controls (p0.05 and permanent dentition (p>0.05. A significant association was seen between asthma onset time and marked maxillary overjet (p<0.05, and open bite (p<0.05 in the mixed dentition, being both conditions more common among those that have presented the symptoms of asthma prior to 12 months of age. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that the early manifestation of asthma at first year of life can cause dentofacial changes. Therefore, the prompt diagnostic of the illness, as well as the establishment of a proper therapy could improve the symptoms and chronic complications of asthma and also reduce its impact on craniofacial development.

  9. Explaining overweight and obesity in children and adolescents of Asian Indian origin: the Calcutta childhood obesity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to find out the prevalence of overweight and obesity and its associated factors among Bengalee children and adolescents in the Kolkata, India. A total of 1061 Bengalee school children and adolescents (610 boys and 451 girls) participated and were divided into three age groups: Group I = 8-11 years; Group II = 12-15 years and Group III = 16-18 years. Overweight and obesity were defined as: Overweight (between ≥85 th and too much junk foodstuffs, breakfast skip, extra consumption of salt, and computer hours. Sedentary lifestyles, including increasing fast food preferences may be responsible for increasing occurrence of pediatric and adolescent obesity in this population. PMID:24820988

  10. Qualitative Clinical Research with Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mary Lee; Quintana, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how qualitative research methods (QRMs) can augment the literature in child and adolescent clinical psychology by contributing to theory and hypothesis building. We discuss the utility of qualitative methods in examining the nature of clinical processes and obtaining deeper understandings about quantitative…

  11. TO ASSESS NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF ADOLESCENTS (10-12 YEARS FROM NON GOVERNMENT FUNDED SCHOOLS (PRIVATE OF AN URBAN INDIAN CITY & KAP OF PARENTS/ TEACHERS REGARDING HEALTHY DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE BEHAVIORS FOR ADOLESCENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somila Surabhi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess nutritional status of adolescents (10-12 years from non government funded schools (private of Gujarat, India. Teachers & parents of adolescent children were assessed regarding their knowledge, attitude and practices of healthy dietary & lifestyle behaviours. School canteen services were also critically evaluated. Parent’s willingness, to start a nutrition program in the school was also assessed. A cross sectional study was conducted on adolescents (10-12 years from two selected private schools. Anthropometric, biophysical and hemoglobin estimations were done on all children. Lipid and glucose profile was conducted only on over weight (including obese children. Results reveal that canteen offered unhealthy food. Teachers and parents had insufficient knowledge about healthy behaviors. Most (53.5% of the parents agreed to the changes proposed for canteen menus. About 3/4th of the subjects were malnourished (78.9%, with more (53.7% being under weight than over weight and obese (25.2%. Similarly, more than half (55.1% of the subjects were anemic. Central obesity as indicated by WHtR & WC was 21.6% and 9.0% respectively. The burden of sub optimal blood pressure was very high (26.3% among adolescents (Pre hypertension 13.7% and hypertension 12.6%. Hence, malnutrition along with anemia and high blood pressure were significant problems in private schools. Schools being the best setting to approach adolescents and parents, multi disciplinary programs should be part of school policies to prevent and manage triple burden of malnutrition and its adverse consequences among the adolescents from private schools.

  12. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsuyoshi; Suzuki; Jin; Kan; Sai; Toshiaki; Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treat-ment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the dif-ferential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often differ-ent than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms(such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and im-aging studies. Several scoring systems have been pro-posed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly dif-fer between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our under-standing of the pathology, optimal treatment, assess-ment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pan-creatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severeacute pancreatitis in children is becoming better under-stood and more controllable.

  13. Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders without Intellectual Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Strang, John F.; Kenworthy, Lauren; Daniolos, Peter; Case, Laura; Wills, Meagan C.; Martin, Alex; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that rates of depression and anxiety symptoms are elevated among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) of various ages and IQs and that depression/anxiety symptoms are associated with higher IQ and fewer ASD symptoms. In this study which examined correlates of depression and anxiety symptoms in the full school-age range of children and adolescents (age 6-18) with ASDs and IQs ≥ 70 (n=95), we also observed elevated rates of depression/anxiety symptoms, but...

  14. Sex and Age Differences in Psychiatric Disorders among Children and Adolescents: High-Risk Students Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jae Hong; Bang, Young Rong; Kim, Chul Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of the present study are to investigate the rate of the psychiatric disorders in psychiatrically high-risk children and adolescents and to examine sex and age differences in the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Methods The participants included students aged 6-16 from the 27 elementary and the 45 middle schools in Busan, Korea. We screened psychopathology using the Korean version of Child Behavior Checklist (K-CBCL) or the Youth Self Report (K-YSR). A total of 2,912 stud...

  15. Regional variations in the growth of Saudi children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No previous study has provided a detailed description of regional variations of growth within the various regions of Saudi Arabia. Thus, we sought to demonstrate differences in growth of children and adolescents in different regions. The 2005 Saudi reference was based on a cross-sectional representative sample of the Saudi population of healthy children and adolescents from birth to 18 years of age. Body measurements of the length, stature, weight, head circumference and calculation of the BMI were performed according to standard recommendations. Percentile construction and smoothing were performed using the LMS (lambda, mu and sigma) methodology, followed by transformation of all individual measurements into standard deviation scores. Factors such as weight for age, height for age, weight for height, and head circumference for children from birth to 3 years, stature for age, head circumference and body mass index for children between 2-18 years of age were assessed. Subsequently, variations in growth between the three main regions in the north, southwest, and center of Saudi Arabia were calculated, with the Bonferroni: method used to assess the significance of differences between regions. There were significant differences in growth between regions that varied according to age, gender, growth parameter and region. The highest variation was found between children and adolescents of the southwestern region and those of the other two regions The regression lines for all growth parameters in children <3 years of age were significantly different from one region to another reaching - 0.65 standard deviation scores for the southwestern regions ( P =.001). However, the difference between the northern and central regions were not significant for the head circumference and for weight for length. For older children and adolescents a significant difference was found in all parameters except between the northern and central regions in BMI in girls and head circumference in

  16. What motivates early adolescents for school? A longitudinal analysis of associations between observed teaching and motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroet, Kim; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Minnaert, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    For many early adolescent students, motivation for school declines after their transition to secondary education. Increasingly, the decisive importance of teachers in shaping early adolescents' motivation is stressed; thus far, however, both longitudinal and observational studies on this topic have

  17. How many steps/day are enough? for children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor-Locke Catrine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Worldwide, public health physical activity guidelines include special emphasis on populations of children (typically 6-11 years and adolescents (typically 12-19 years. Existing guidelines are commonly expressed in terms of frequency, time, and intensity of behaviour. However, the simple step output from both accelerometers and pedometers is gaining increased credibility in research and practice as a reasonable approximation of daily ambulatory physical activity volume. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review existing child and adolescent objectively monitored step-defined physical activity literature to provide researchers, practitioners, and lay people who use accelerometers and pedometers with evidence-based translations of these public health guidelines in terms of steps/day. In terms of normative data (i.e., expected values, the updated international literature indicates that we can expect 1 among children, boys to average 12,000 to 16,000 steps/day and girls to average 10,000 to 13,000 steps/day; and, 2 adolescents to steadily decrease steps/day until approximately 8,000-9,000 steps/day are observed in 18-year olds. Controlled studies of cadence show that continuous MVPA walking produces 3,300-3,500 steps in 30 minutes or 6,600-7,000 steps in 60 minutes in 10-15 year olds. Limited evidence suggests that a total daily physical activity volume of 10,000-14,000 steps/day is associated with 60-100 minutes of MVPA in preschool children (approximately 4-6 years of age. Across studies, 60 minutes of MVPA in primary/elementary school children appears to be achieved, on average, within a total volume of 13,000 to 15,000 steps/day in boys and 11,000 to 12,000 steps/day in girls. For adolescents (both boys and girls, 10,000 to 11,700 may be associated with 60 minutes of MVPA. Translations of time- and intensity-based guidelines may be higher than existing normative data (e.g., in adolescents and therefore will be more difficult to

  18. How many steps/day are enough? For children and adolescents

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2011-07-28

    Abstract Worldwide, public health physical activity guidelines include special emphasis on populations of children (typically 6-11 years) and adolescents (typically 12-19 years). Existing guidelines are commonly expressed in terms of frequency, time, and intensity of behaviour. However, the simple step output from both accelerometers and pedometers is gaining increased credibility in research and practice as a reasonable approximation of daily ambulatory physical activity volume. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review existing child and adolescent objectively monitored step-defined physical activity literature to provide researchers, practitioners, and lay people who use accelerometers and pedometers with evidence-based translations of these public health guidelines in terms of steps\\/day. In terms of normative data (i.e., expected values), the updated international literature indicates that we can expect 1) among children, boys to average 12,000 to 16,000 steps\\/day and girls to average 10,000 to 13,000 steps\\/day; and, 2) adolescents to steadily decrease steps\\/day until approximately 8,000-9,000 steps\\/day are observed in 18-year olds. Controlled studies of cadence show that continuous MVPA walking produces 3,300-3,500 steps in 30 minutes or 6,600-7,000 steps in 60 minutes in 10-15 year olds. Limited evidence suggests that a total daily physical activity volume of 10,000-14,000 steps\\/day is associated with 60-100 minutes of MVPA in preschool children (approximately 4-6 years of age). Across studies, 60 minutes of MVPA in primary\\/elementary school children appears to be achieved, on average, within a total volume of 13,000 to 15,000 steps\\/day in boys and 11,000 to 12,000 steps\\/day in girls. For adolescents (both boys and girls), 10,000 to 11,700 may be associated with 60 minutes of MVPA. Translations of time- and intensity-based guidelines may be higher than existing normative data (e.g., in adolescents) and therefore will be more

  19. PREVALENCE OF MYOPIA AMONG URBAN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Refractive error is the second leading cause of treatable blindness . 46 . 69% of all ocular morbidity in the country is directly attributed to refractiv e errors and myopia is the commonest type of refractive error . School age children constitute a particularly vulnerable group because uncorrected refractive errors may lead to amblyopia , subnormal binocularity or strabismus resulting in permanent visual lo ss . Studies have shown that there has been an increase in the proportion of myopia among students . In view of the importance of detecting the eye defects in school children in our region where staple food and socio - demography is different from rest of the country an effort has been made in the present study to find out the extent of problem of refractive errors particularly Myopia among school children . OBJECTIVES : To study and evaluate Myopia among School children . METHODS : A cross - sectional study on rando m control sample of school children of 7 - 15 year was carried out in the Hubli city . Visual acuity tests were done all students . Students with 6/6 ( p or less vision were subjected for slit lamp examination , retinoscopy , fundus examination , keratometry and A - scan . RESULTS : 13 . 5% of children had refractive errors . 4 . 54% had Myopia . Myopia was more common in females with a peak in 13 - 15 year group . CONCLUSION : Significant proportion of children of this area had uncorrected refractive errors . Regular screening and correction of refractive error will help to improve vision , prevent further deterioration and hence irreversible changes in the visual system .

  20. Substance use among adolescent high school students in India: A survey of knowledge, attitude, and opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechenla Tsering

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Is knowledge regarding the consequences of substance use among adolescents enough to prevent them from initiating and continuing its use, is a question that needs to be clarified further? Objective: To assess the knowledge regarding harm of use and to obtain information about attitudes among high school students. Also, to discover the opinion of substance use held by users. Materials and Methods: This was a population based cross-sectional study conducted in two high schools of West Bengal, India, among 416 students, in classes VIII, IX, and X, with no interventions. Primary outcome measurements were substance use: knowledge regarding harm, attitude, and opinion. Following this proportions and the chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Out of 416 students, 52 (12.5% used or abused any one of the substances irrespective of time and frequency in lifetime; 26 (15.1 % were among the urban students and 26 (10.7 % were among their rural counterparts. More than two-thirds (73.07% of the respondents expressed a desire to quit substance use and 57.69% had tried to stop. ′Easy availability′ and ′relief from tension′ were the most frequent reasons for continuation of substance use. Level of knowledge on harmfulness of substance use among students was very high (urban - -84.6% and rural - 61.5% and they stated media as the most frequent source of information. Users were successful in influencing their peers into taking up this habit (urban - 15.4% and rural - 26.9%. Conclusions: Inspite of being aware of the harmful effects of substance use, adolescents take up this habit. This requires comprehensive prevention and control programs in schools and the community, targeted toward adolescents and their parents and other family members. Effective measures are required to encourage shaping the attitude of school children toward self-confidence and adequacy, as also to prevent risk behavior among adolescents.