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Sample records for adolescent mice effects

  1. Pre-adolescent and adolescent mice are less sensitive to the effects of acute nicotine on extinction and spontaneous recovery.

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    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Zeid, Dana; Tumolo, Jessica M; Gould, Thomas J

    2018-04-01

    Adolescence is a period of high risk for the initiation of nicotine product usage and exposure to traumatic events. In parallel, nicotine exposure has been found to age-dependently modulate acquisition of contextual fear memories; however, it is unknown if adolescent nicotine exposure alters extinction of fear related memories. Age-related differences in sensitivity to the effects of nicotine on fear extinction could increase or decrease susceptibility to anxiety disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of acute nicotine administration on extinction and spontaneous recovery of contextual fear memories in pre-adolescent (PND 23), late adolescent (PND 38), and adult (PND 53) C57B6/J mice. Mice were first trained in a background contextual fear conditioning paradigm and given an intraperitoneal injection of one of four doses of nicotine (0.045, 0.09, 0.18, or 0.36mg/kg, freebase) prior to subsequent extinction or spontaneous recovery sessions. Results indicated that all acute nicotine doses impaired extinction of contextual fear in adult mice. Late adolescent mice exhibited impaired extinction of contextual fear only following higher doses of acute nicotine, and extinction of contextual fear was unaffected by acute nicotine exposure in pre-adolescent mice. Finally, acute nicotine exposure enhanced spontaneous recovery of fear memory, but only in adult mice. Overall, our results suggest that younger mice were less sensitive to nicotine's impairing effects on extinction of contextual fear and to nicotine's enhancing effects on spontaneous recovery of contextual fear memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential effects of social isolation in adolescent and adult mice on behavior and cortical gene expression.

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    Lander, Sharon S; Linder-Shacham, Donna; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna

    2017-01-01

    Intact function of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) function relies on proper development of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations and on integral myelination processes. Social isolation (SI) affects behavior and brain circuitry in adulthood, but previous rodent studies typically induced prolonged (post-weaning) exposure and failed to directly compare between the effects of SI in adolescent and adulthood. Here, we assessed the impact of a 3-week SI period, starting in mid-adolescence (around the onset of puberty) or adulthood, on a wide range of behaviors in adult male mice. Additionally, we asked whether adolescent SI would differentially affect the expression of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal markers and myelin-related genes in mPFC. Our findings indicate that mid-adolescent or adult SI increase anxiogenic behavior and locomotor activity. However, SI in adolescence uniquely affects the response to the psychotomimetic drug amphetamine, social and novelty exploration and performance in reversal and attentional set shifting tasks. Furthermore, adolescent but not adult SI increased the expression of glutamate markers in the adult mPFC. Our results imply that adolescent social deprivation is detrimental for normal development and may be particularly relevant to the investigation of developmental psychopathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of maternal exposure to bisphenol AF on emotional behaviors in adolescent mice offspring.

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    Gong, Miao; Huai, Ziqing; Song, Han; Cui, Lingyu; Guo, Qingjun; Shao, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Shi, Haishui

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), one kind of environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs), exerted significantly detrimental effects on neuro-endocrinological system and related disorders, such as memory dysfunction and depression. Bisphenol AF (BPAF),a newly introduced chemical structurally related to BPA, is used extensively. BPAF has stronger estrogenic activities than BPA. However, the potential neurotoxicological effects of BPAF are still elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the potential effects of maternal BPAF exposure during pregnancy on emotional behaviors of adolescent mice offspring. In male adolescent offspring, maternal exposure to BPAF (0.4, 4.0 mg kg -1 , intragastrically administration) induced significant anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, assessed by open field test (OFT), novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSF), sucrose preference test (SPT), tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST). In female adolescent offspring, BPAF exposure at 0.4 mg kg -1 dose reduced the latency to feeding in the NSF test, while increased the floating time in the FST. Maternal BPAF exposure decreased the recognition index in the long term memory (LTM) test in both sexes, while only decreased the freezing time of male offspring in the contextual fear conditioning (CFC) task. These results indicate that maternal exposure to BPAF significantly affect emotion-related behaviors in adolescent mice offspring, and the male offspring with a higher probability to develop symptoms of anxiety and depression and to suffer memory impairment after maternal exposure to BPAF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cocaine enhances the conditioned rewarding effects of MDMA in adolescent mice.

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    Aguilar, M A; Roger-Sánchez, C; Rodríguez-Arias, M; Miñarro, J

    2015-04-01

    Although the consumption of cocaine is frequent in young users of MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), the influence of exposure to cocaine on the rewarding effects of MDMA in adolescents has not been studied. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the effect of co-administration of cocaine (1 and 10 mg/kg) and a sub-threshold dose of MDMA (1.25 mg/kg) on the acquisition of conditioned place preference (CPP) (experiment 1). In addition, the effect of pre-treatment with cocaine on MDMA-induced CPP was evaluated (experiment 2). Levels of monoamines in striatum, hippocampus and cortex were measured in both experiments. Our hypotheses were that cocaine co-administration or pre-treatment would increase the rewarding effects of MDMA, and that these effects would be related with changes in brain monoamine levels. Our results showed that cocaine potentiated the rewarding effects of MDMA, since a sub-threshold dose of MDMA, which did not induce CPP by itself, induced a significant CPP in adolescent mice when administered along with cocaine during conditioning (experiment 1). Moreover, pre-treatment with cocaine several days before conditioning also increased the rewarding effects of MDMA (experiment 2). No significant changes in the levels of biogenic amines, which correlated with these behavioural effects, were observed. Our results confirm the involvement of the dopaminergic system in MDMA-induced CPP in adolescent mice and suggest that combined consumption with or pre-exposure to cocaine increases the conditioned rewarding effects of MDMA, which may enhance the capacity of MDMA to induce dependence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sex differences in the effects of adolescent social deprivation on alcohol consumption in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice.

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    Moriya, Yuki; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Hall, F Scott; Sakakibara, Yasufumi; Uhl, George R; Tomita, Hiroaki; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    Evidence based on clinical and experimental animal studies indicates that adolescent social deprivation influences alcohol consumption in a sex-dependent manner, perhaps by influencing stress responses. However, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between these phenomena remain to be elucidated. Since the μ-opioid receptor (MOP) has been reported to have key roles in social stress responses as well as the reinforcing/addictive effects of ethanol, MOP is a candidate molecule that may link adolescent social deprivation and subsequent alterations in alcohol consumption. To evaluate the involvement of MOP and social isolation-induced changes in alcohol consumption, as well as the effect of sex differences on responses to social isolation, alcohol consumption was assessed using a two-bottle home-cage consumption procedure (8 % ethanol vs. water) in MOP knockout (MOP-KO) and wild type (WT) mice of both sexes exposed to adolescent social deprivation or reared socially. Isolation rearing had no effects upon alcohol consumption of WT mice, whereas it significantly altered alcohol consumption in both male and female MOP-KO mice. Interestingly, social isolation affected ethanol consumption differently in male and female mice. Ethanol consumption was increased in male MOP-KO mice, but decreased in female MOP-KO mice, by isolation rearing. These results indicate that disturbances of MOP function influence the effects of isolation rearing on ethanol consumption in a sex-dependent manner. Consequently, this suggests the possibility that genetic variation that influences MOP function may have differential roles in alcoholism in men and women, and alcoholism treatments that target MOP function may be differentially effective in males and females.

  6. Effects of Cannabinoid Exposure during Adolescence on the Conditioned Rewarding Effects of WIN 55212-2 and Cocaine in Mice: Influence of the Novelty-Seeking Trait

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    M. Rodríguez-Arias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent exposure to cannabinoids enhances the behavioural effects of cocaine, and high novelty-seeking trait predicts greater sensitivity to the conditioned place preference (CPP induced by this drug. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of novelty-seeking on the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure. Adolescent male mice were classified as high or low novelty seekers (HNS and LNS in the hole-board test. First, we evaluated the CPP induced by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 (0.05 and 0.075 mg/kg, i.p. in HNS and LNS mice. Then, HNS and LNS mice were pretreated i.p. with vehicle, WIN 55212-2 (0.1 mg/kg, or cannabinoid antagonist rimonabant (1 mg/kg and were subsequently conditioned with WIN 55212-2 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p. or cocaine (1 or 6 mg/kg, i.p.. Only HNS mice conditioned with the 0.075 mg/kg dose acquired CPP with WIN 55212-2. Adolescent exposure to this cannabinoid agonist increased the rewarding effects of 1 mg/kg of cocaine in both HNS and LNS mice, and in HNS mice it also increased the reinstating effect of a low dose of cocaine. Our results endorse a role for individual differences such as a higher propensity for sensation-seeking in the development of addiction.

  7. Effect of intermittent exposure to ethanol and MDMA during adolescence on learning and memory in adult mice

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    Vidal-Infer Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heavy binge drinking is increasingly frequent among adolescents, and consumption of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA is often combined with ethanol (EtOH. The long-lasting effects of intermittent exposure to EtOH and MDMA during adolescence on learning and memory were evaluated in adult mice using the Hebb-Williams maze. Methods Adolescent OF1 mice were exposed to EtOH (1.25 g/kg on two consecutive days at 48-h intervals over a 14-day period (from PD 29 to 42. MDMA (10 or 20 mg/kg was injected twice daily at 4-h intervals over two consecutive days, and this schedule was repeated six days later (PD 33, 34, 41 and 42, resulting in a total of eight injections. Animals were initiated in the Hebb-Williams maze on PND 64. The concentration of brain monoamines in the striatum and hippocampus was then measured. Results At the doses employed, both EtOH and MDMA, administered alone or together, impaired learning in the Hebb-Williams maze, as treated animals required more time to reach the goal than their saline-treated counterparts. The groups treated during adolescence with EtOH, alone or plus MDMA, also presented longer latency scores and needed more trials to reach the acquisition criterion score. MDMA induced a decrease in striatal DA concentration, an effect that was augmented by the co-administration of EtOH. All the treatment groups displayed an imbalance in the interaction DA/serotonin. Conclusions The present findings indicate that the developing brain is highly vulnerable to the damaging effects of EtOH and/or MDMA, since mice receiving these drugs in a binge pattern during adolescence exhibit impaired learning and memory in adulthood.

  8. Effects of 1.8 GHz Radiofrequency Fields on the Emotional Behavior and Spatial Memory of Adolescent Mice

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    Jun-Ping Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of mobile phones by teenagers has raised concern about the cognitive effects of radiofrequency (RF fields. In this study, we investigated the effects of 4-week exposure to a 1.8 GHz RF field on the emotional behavior and spatial memory of adolescent male mice. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated by open field test (OFT and elevated plus maze (EPM test, while depression-like behavior was evaluated by sucrose preference test (SPT, tail suspension test (TST and forced swim test (FST. The spatial learning and memory ability were evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM experiments. The levels of amino acid neurotransmitters were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. The histology of the brain was examined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining. It was found that the depression-like behavior, spatial memory ability and histology of the brain did not change obviously after RF exposure. However, the anxiety-like behavior increased in mice, while, the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and aspartic acid (Asp in cortex and hippocampus significantly decreased after RF exposure. These data suggested that RF exposure under these conditions do not affect the depression-like behavior, spatial memory and brain histology in adolescent male mice, but it may however increase the level of anxiety, and GABA and Asp were probably involved in this effect.

  9. Antidepressant-like drug effects in juvenile and adolescent mice in the tail suspension test: Relationship with hippocampal serotonin and norepinephrine transporter expression and function.

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    Nathan C Mitchell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major health problem for which most patients are not effectively treated. This problem is further compounded in children and adolescents where only two antidepressants [both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs] are currently approved for clinical use. Mouse models provide tools to identify mechanisms that might account for poor treatment response to antidepressants. However, there are few studies in adolescent mice and none in juvenile mice. The tail suspension test (TST is commonly used to assay for antidepressant-like effects of drugs in adult mice. Here we show that the TST can also be used to assay antidepressant-like effects of drugs in C57Bl/6 mice aged 21 (juvenile and 28 (adolescent days post-partum (P. We found that the magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the SSRI escitalopram was less in P21 mice than in P28 or adult mice. The smaller antidepressant response of juveniles was not related to either maximal binding (Bmax or affinity (Kd for [3H]citalopram binding to the serotonin transporter (SERT in hippocampus, which did not vary significantly among ages. Magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the tricyclic desipramine was similar among ages, as were Bmax and Kd values for [3H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter (NET in hippocampus. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile mice are less responsive to the antidepressant-like effects of escitalopram than adults, but that this effect is not due to delayed maturation of SERT in hippocampus. Showing that the TST is a relevant behavioral assay of antidepressant-like activity in juvenile and adolescent mice sets the stage for future studies of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response in these young populations.

  10. Effects of methamphetamine exposure on anxiety-like behavior in the open field test, corticosterone, and hippocampal tyrosine hydroxylase in adolescent and adult mice.

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    Struntz, Katelyn H; Siegel, Jessica A

    2018-08-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a psychomotor stimulant drug that can alter behavior, the stress response system, and the dopaminergic system. The effects of MA can be modulated by age, however relatively little research has examined the acute effects of MA in adolescents and how the effects compare to those found in adults. The hippocampal dopamine system is altered by MA exposure and can modulate anxiety-like behavior, but the effects of MA on the hippocampal dopamine system have not been well studied, especially in adolescent animals. In order to assess potential age differences in the effects of MA exposure, this research examined the effects of acute MA exposure on locomotor and anxiety-like behavior in the open field test, plasma corticosterone levels, and hippocampal total tyrosine hydroxylase and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase levels in adolescent and adult male C57BL/6 J mice. Tyrosine hydroxylase is the rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and was used as a marker of the hippocampal dopaminergic system. Mice were exposed to saline or 4 mg/kg MA and locomotor and anxiety-like behavior were measured in the open field test. Serum and brains were collected immediately after testing and plasma corticosterone and hippocampal total tyrosine hydroxylase and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase levels measured. MA-exposed mice showed increased locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavior in the open field test compared with saline controls, regardless of age. There was no effect of MA on plasma corticosterone levels or hippocampal total tyrosine hydroxylase or phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase levels in either adolescent or adult mice. These data suggest that acute MA exposure during adolescence and adulthood increases locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavior but does not alter plasma corticosterone levels or hippocampal total tyrosine hydroxylase or phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase levels, and that these effects are not modulated by age

  11. Effect of Perinatal Lead Exposure on the Social Behaviour of Laboratory Mice Offspring at Adolescent Age

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    AbuTaweel Qasim M; Ajarem Jamaan S

    2008-01-01

    Lead ( Pb ) was given to Swiss-Webster female mice at the concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2% ( w/v ) , containing 550 and 1100 ppm of lead respectively, in their drinking water. Treatment started from day 1 of pregnancy until day 15 postnatally . Thereafter, the dams were switched to plain tap water. After the weaning period ( 21 days ), all male offspring were isolated (one animal per cage) for 14 days, and the isolated male offspring were subjected to 'Standard Opponenttest' at the age of 36 days . the results of this test showed a significant and dose-dependent increase in the non-social behaviour , whereas such results showed a significant decline in the social behaviour including naso-genital and naso-nasal contact, number of fights, rear, wall rear and displacement activities of the Pb exposed young adult male offspring. The present perinatal Pb effects in the male offspring are possibly via in utero exposure and/or via mother's milk. (author)

  12. Unique Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects Induced by Repeated Adolescent Consumption of Caffeine-Mixed Alcohol in C57BL/6 Mice.

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    Meridith T Robins

    Full Text Available The number of highly caffeinated products has increased dramatically in the past few years. Among these products, highly caffeinated energy drinks are the most heavily advertised and purchased, which has resulted in increased incidences of co-consumption of energy drinks with alcohol. Despite the growing number of adolescents and young adults reporting caffeine-mixed alcohol use, knowledge of the potential consequences associated with co-consumption has been limited to survey-based results and in-laboratory human behavioral testing. Here, we investigate the effect of repeated adolescent (post-natal days P35-61 exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol in C57BL/6 mice on common drug-related behaviors such as locomotor sensitivity, drug reward and cross-sensitivity, and natural reward. To determine changes in neurological activity resulting from adolescent exposure, we monitored changes in expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the dopaminergic reward pathway as a sign of long-term increases in neuronal activity. Repeated adolescent exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure induced significant locomotor sensitization, desensitized cocaine conditioned place preference, decreased cocaine locomotor cross-sensitivity, and increased natural reward consumption. We also observed increased accumulation of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens following repeated adolescent caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure compared to alcohol or caffeine alone. Using our exposure model, we found that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence causes unique behavioral and neurochemical effects not observed in mice exposed to caffeine or alcohol alone. Based on similar findings for different substances of abuse, it is possible that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence could potentially alter or escalate future substance abuse as means to compensate for these behavioral and neurochemical alterations.

  13. Adolescent social defeat induced alterations in anxious behavior and cognitive flexibility in adult mice: effects of developmental stage and social condition

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    Fang Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Negative social experiences during adolescence increase the risk of psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Using resident-intruder stress, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of adolescent social defeat on emotional and cognitive symptoms associated with psychiatric disorders during adulthood and the effects of the developmental stage and social condition on this process. In experiment 1, animals were exposed to social defeat or manipulation for 10 days during early adolescence (EA, PND 28-37, late adolescence (LA, PND 38-47, and adulthood (ADULT, PND 70-79 and then singly housed until the behavioral tests. Behaviors, including social avoidance of the defeat context and cortically mediated cognitive flexibility in an attentional set-shifting task (AST, were assessed during the week following stress or after 6 weeks during adulthood. We determined that social defeat induced significant and continuous social avoidance across age groups at both time points. The mice that experienced social defeat during adulthood exhibited short-term impairments in reversal learning on the AST that dissipated after 6 weeks. In contrast, social defeat during EA but not LA induced a delayed deficit in extra-dimensional set-shifting in adulthood but not during adolescence. In experiment 2, we further examined the effects of social condition (isolation or social housing after stress on the alterations induced by social defeat during EA in adult mice. The adult mice that had experienced stress during EA exhibited social avoidance similar to the avoidance identified in experiment 1 regardless of the isolation or social housing after the stress. However, social housing after the stress ameliorated the cognitive flexibility deficits induced by early adolescent social defeat in the adult mice, and the social condition had no effect on cognitive function. These findings suggest that the effects of social defeat on emotion and cognitive function are differentially

  14. Repeated social defeat and the rewarding effects of cocaine in adult and adolescent mice: dopamine transcription factors, proBDNF signaling pathways, and the TrkB receptor in the mesolimbic system.

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    Montagud-Romero, Sandra; Nuñez, Cristina; Blanco-Gandia, M Carmen; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Aguilar, María A; Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Almela, Pilar; Milanés, Maria-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa; Miñarro, José; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta

    2017-07-01

    Repeated social defeat (RSD) increases the rewarding effects of cocaine in adolescent and adult rodents. The aim of the present study was to compare the long-term effects of RSD on the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine and levels of the transcription factors Pitx3 and Nurr1 in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the dopamine transporter (DAT), the D2 dopamine receptor (D2DR) and precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF) signaling pathways, and the tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in adult and adolescent mice. Male adolescent and young adult OF1 mice were exposed to four episodes of social defeat and were conditioned 3 weeks later with 1 mg/kg of cocaine. In a second set of mice, the expressions of the abovementioned dopaminergic and proBDNF and TrkB receptor were measured in VTA and NAc, respectively. Adolescent mice experienced social defeats less intensely than their adult counterparts and produced lower levels of corticosterone. However, both adult and adolescent defeated mice developed conditioned place preference for the compartment associated with this low dose of cocaine. Furthermore, only adolescent defeated mice displayed diminished levels of the transcription factors Pitx3 in the VTA, without changes in the expression of DAT and D2DR in the NAc. In addition, stressed adult mice showed a decreased expression of proBDNF and the TrkB receptor, while stressed adolescent mice exhibited increased expression of latter without changes in the former. Our findings suggest that dopaminergic pathways and proBDNF signaling and TrkB receptors play different roles in social defeat-stressed mice exposed to cocaine.

  15. Phenotypic effects of repeated psychosocial stress during adolescence in mice mutant for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin-1: a putative model of gene × environment interaction.

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    Desbonnet, Lieve; O'Tuathaigh, Colm; Clarke, Gerard; O'Leary, Claire; Petit, Emilie; Clarke, Niamh; Tighe, Orna; Lai, Donna; Harvey, Richard; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Waddington, John L

    2012-05-01

    There is a paucity of animal models by which the contributions of environmental and genetic factors to the pathobiology of psychosis can be investigated. This study examined the individual and combined effects of chronic social stress during adolescence and deletion of the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin-1 (NRG1) on adult mouse phenotype. Mice were exposed to repeated social defeat stress during adolescence and assessed for exploratory behaviour, working memory, sucrose preference, social behaviour and prepulse inhibition in adulthood. Thereafter, in vitro cytokine responses to mitogen stimulation and corticosterone inhibition were assayed in spleen cells, with measurement of cytokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. NRG1 mutants exhibited hyperactivity, decreased anxiety, impaired sensorimotor gating and reduced preference for social novelty. The effects of stress on exploratory/anxiety-related parameters, spatial working memory, sucrose preference and basal cytokine levels were modified by NRG1 deletion. Stress also exerted varied effect on spleen cytokine response to concanavalin A and brain cytokine and BDNF mRNA expression in NRG1 mutants. The experience of psychosocial stress during adolescence may trigger further pathobiological features that contribute to the development of schizophrenia, particularly in those with underlying NRG1 gene abnormalities. This model elaborates the importance of gene × environment interactions in the etiology of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Early Chemotherapeutic Treatment on Learning in Adolescent Mice: Implications for Cognitive Impairment and Remediation in Childhood Cancer Survivors

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    Bisen-Hersh, Emily B.; Hineline, Philip N.; Walker, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Among children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and given chemotherapy-only treatment, 40-70% of survivors experience neurocognitive impairment. The present study used a preclinical mouse model to investigate the effects of early exposure to common ALL chemotherapeutics methotrexate (MTX) and cytarabine (Ara-C) on learning and memory. Experimental Design Pre-weanling mouse pups were treated on postnatal day (PND) 14, 15, and 16 with saline, MTX, Ara-C, or a combination of MTX and Ara-C. Nineteen days following treatment (PND 35), behavioral tasks measuring different aspects of learning and memory were administered. Results Significant impairment in acquisition and retention over both short (1h) and long (24h) intervals, as measured by autoshaping and novel object recognition tasks, were found following treatment with MTX and Ara-C. Similarly, a novel conditional discrimination task revealed impairment in acquisition for chemotherapy-treated mice. No significant group differences were found following the extensive training component of this task, with impairment following the rapid training component occurring only for the highest MTX and Ara-C combination group. Conclusions Findings are consistent with clinical studies suggesting that childhood cancer survivors are slower at learning new information and primarily exhibit deficits in memory years after successful completion of chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of mild deficits on a novel conditional discrimination task suggests that chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment may be ameliorated through extensive training or practice. PMID:23596103

  17. Effects of early chemotherapeutic treatment on learning in adolescent mice: implications for cognitive impairment and remediation in childhood cancer survivors.

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    Bisen-Hersh, Emily B; Hineline, Philip N; Walker, Ellen A

    2013-06-01

    Among children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and given chemotherapy-only treatment, 40% to 70% of survivors experience neurocognitive impairment. The present study used a preclinical mouse model to investigate the effects of early exposure to common ALL chemotherapeutics methotrexate (MTX) and cytarabine (Ara-C) on learning and memory. Preweanling mouse pups were treated on postnatal day (PND) 14, 15, and 16 with saline, MTX, Ara-C, or a combination of MTX and Ara-C. Nineteen days after treatment (PND 35), behavioral tasks measuring different aspects of learning and memory were administered. Significant impairment in acquisition and retention over both short (1 hour) and long (24 hours) intervals, as measured by autoshaping and novel object recognition tasks, was found following treatment with MTX and Ara-C. Similarly, a novel conditional discrimination task revealed impairment in acquisition for chemotherapy-treated mice. No significant group differences were found following the extensive training component of this task, with impairment following the rapid training component occurring only for the highest MTX and Ara-C combination group. Findings are consistent with those from clinical studies suggesting that childhood cancer survivors are slower at learning new information and primarily exhibit deficits in memory years after successful completion of chemotherapy. The occurrence of mild deficits on a novel conditional discrimination task suggests that chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment may be ameliorated through extensive training or practice. ©2013 AACR

  18. Social crowding in the night-time reduces an anxiety-like behavior and increases social interaction in adolescent mice.

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    Ago, Yukio; Tanaka, Tatsunori; Ota, Yuki; Kitamoto, Mari; Imoto, Emina; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-08-15

    Rearing in crowded conditions is a psychosocial stressor that affects biological functions. The effects of continuous crowding for many days have been studied, but those of crowding over a limited time have not. In this study, we examined the effects of night-time or daytime crowding over 2 weeks on behavior in adolescent and adult mice. Crowding (20 mice/cage) in either the night-time or daytime did not affect locomotor activity in the open field test or cognitive function in the fear conditioning test. In contrast, night-time crowding, but not daytime crowding, had an anxiolytic effect in the elevated plus-maze test and increased social interaction in adolescent mice, but not in adult mice. The first night-time, but not daytime, crowding increased plasma corticosterone levels in adolescent mice, although night-time crowding over 2 weeks did not affect the corticosterone levels. Furthermore, no significant effects of the first crowding were observed in adult mice. In a second crowding condition (six mice/small cage), the anxiolytic-like effects of night-time crowding and the change in plasma corticosterone levels were not observed, suggesting that the density of mice is not important for the behavioral consequences of crowding. Night-time crowding did not affect neurotrophic/growth factor levels and hippocampal neurogenesis in adolescent mice. These findings suggest that night-time crowding leads to anxiolytic-like behaviors in adolescent mice, and imply that night-time crowding stress in adolescence may be beneficial to brain functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Behavioral neurotoxicity in adolescent and adult mice exposed to fenproporex during pregnancy.

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    Moreira, C Q; Faria, M J S S; Moreira, E G

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the effects of gestational exposure to fenproporex, one of the most used anorectic drugs in Brazil, on the behavior of adolescent and adult pups (30 and 60 days of age, respectively). Pregnant Swiss mice were treated daily, by gavage, with 15 mg/kg of fenproporex chloride or water during the whole gestational period. Male pups were submitted to open-field, forced swimming test, tail suspension test and fenproporex-induced stereotyped behavior. The results demonstrated that gestational exposure to fenproporex induces antidepressant-like effect and decreases fenproporex-induced stereotyped behavior in both adolescent and adult pups. Moreover, fenproporex-exposed adolescent pups tended (P= 0.06) to be more active than control pups. Our data show, for the first time, that gestational exposure to fenproporex leads to long-lasting behavioral toxicity in male mice characteristic of altered dopaminergic transmission.

  20. Adolescent C57BL/6J mice show elevated alcohol intake, but reduced taste aversion, as compared to adult mice: a potential behavioral mechanism for binge drinking.

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    Holstein, Sarah E; Spanos, Marina; Hodge, Clyde W

    2011-10-01

    Binge alcohol drinking during adolescence is a serious health problem that may increase future risk of an alcohol use disorder. Although there are several different procedures by which to preclinically model binge-like alcohol intake, limited-access procedures offer the advantage of achieving high voluntary alcohol intake and pharmacologically relevant blood alcohol concentrations (BACs). Therefore, in the current study, developmental differences in binge-like alcohol drinking using a limited-access cycling procedure were examined. In addition, as alcohol drinking has been negatively correlated with sensitivity to the aversive properties of alcohol, we examined developmental differences in sensitivity to an alcohol-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Binge-like alcohol consumption was investigated in adolescent (4 weeks) and adult (10 weeks) male C57BL/6J mice for 2 to 4 h/d for 16 days. Developmental differences in sensitivity to an alcohol-induced CTA were examined in adolescent and adult mice, with saline or alcohol (3 or 4 g/kg) repeatedly paired with the intake of a novel tastant (NaCl). Adolescent mice showed a significant increase in alcohol intake as compared to adults, with adolescents achieving higher BACs and increasing alcohol consumption over successive cycles of the binge procedure. Conversely, adolescent mice exhibited a dose-dependent reduction in sensitivity to the aversive properties of alcohol, as compared to adult mice, with adolescent mice failing to develop a CTA to 3 g/kg alcohol. Finally, extinction of an alcohol CTA was observed following conditioning with a higher dose of alcohol in adolescent, versus adult, mice. These results indicate that adolescent mice consume more alcohol, per kilogram body weight, than adults in a binge-like model of alcohol drinking and demonstrate a blunted sensitivity to the conditioned aversive effects of alcohol. Overall, this supports a behavioral framework by which heightened binge alcohol intake during

  1. Bupropion induces social anxiety in adolescent mice: Influence of housing conditions.

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    Gómez, Carmen; Redolat, Rosa; Carrasco, Carmen

    2017-08-01

    The antidepressant bupropion has received increasing attention as a pharmacological tool to treat addiction although little is known about its effects on social behaviour in adolescents. The present study aimed to evaluate if environmental housing conditions influence bupropion's actions on social behaviour of adolescent mice. Mice were either group- or individually housed for 2-weeks and then randomly divided into 2 cohorts: half of the mice remained in the initial housing condition and the other half were changed to isolated conditions for further 2-weeks. The following groups were compared: isolated/isolated (ISO/ISO), isolated/group-housed (ISO/GR), group-housed/isolated (GR/ISO), and group-housed/group-housed (GR/GR). The effects of bupropion (40, 20, 10mg/kg) or saline on social interaction were assessed for each housing condition. Social encounters were evaluated using ethological analysis. Data showed significant effects of bupropion on grooming and digging. This drug diminished time mice allocated to these behavioural categories in all housing conditions. In ISO/GR and GR/ISO conditions, bupropion increased environmental exploration (non-social exploration and exploration from a distance), reduced social investigation and increased avoidance/flee and defence/submission behaviours. An augment of avoidance/flee during social interactions was observed in bupropion-treated mice in GR/GR housing condition. These results suggest that this drug exhibits anxiogenic-like properties in social encounters between adolescent mice, especially when a transition in housing conditions has been experienced during this period. Changes in housing conditions may be a useful model for evaluating the effects of bupropion on social behaviour and the role of environmental housing conditions. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Social experiences during adolescence affect anxiety-like behavior but not aggressiveness in male mice.

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    Meyer, Neele; Jenikejew, Julia; Richter, S Helene; Kaiser, Sylvia; Sachser, Norbert

    2017-05-30

    Adolescence has lately been recognized as a key developmental phase during which an individual's behavior can be shaped. In a recent study with male mice varying in the expression of the serotonin transporter, escapable adverse social experiences during adolescence led to decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased exploratory and aggressive behavior compared to throughout beneficial experiences. Since in this study some behavioral tests took place with a delay of one week after the last social experiences have been made, it was not clear whether the observed effects really reflected the consequences of the experienced different social environments. To test this, the present study focused on the direct effects of beneficial and adverse social experiences on aggressiveness and anxiety-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice. In contrast to the previous study, behavioral testing took place immediately after the last social experiences had been made. Interestingly, whereas individuals from an escapable adverse environment showed significantly lower levels of anxiety-like and higher levels of exploratory behavior than animals from a beneficial environment, aggressive behavior was not affected. From this, we conclude that different social experiences during adolescence exert immediate effects on anxiety-like but not aggressive behavior in male mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cis-bifenthrin induces immunotoxicity in adolescent male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Gao, Xingli; He, Bingnan; Zhu, Jiawei; Lou, Huihui; Hu, Qinglian; Jin, Yuanxiang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2017-07-01

    Bifenthrin (BF) is an important synthetic pyrethroid. Previous studies have demonstrated that cis-BF exhibits toxic effects on development, the neurological, reproductive and endocrine system. In this study, we evaluated the immunotoxicity caused by cis-BF in adolescent male C57BL/6 mice. Mice were exposed orally to 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/d for 3 weeks. The results showed that body weight, spleen weight, and splenic cellularity decreased in mice exposed to 20 mg/kg/d cis-BF. Additionally, we found that the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-1, and TNF-α, in peritoneal macrophages, the spleen, and the thymus were inhibited in the cis-BF-treated groups. Moreover, MTT assays demonstrated that cis-BF inhibited splenocyte proliferation stimulated by LPS or Con A, as well as the secretion of IFN-γ on Con A stimulation. Collectively, the results of this study suggest that exposure to cis-BF has the potential to induce immunotoxicity in adolescent male C57BL/6 mice. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Neuroendocrine stress reactivity of male C57BL/6N mice following chronic oral corticosterone exposure during adulthood or adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahanoor, Ziasmin; Sultana, Razia; Baker, Madelyn R; Romeo, Russell D

    2017-12-01

    Adolescence is associated with the maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the major neuroendocrine axis mediating the hormonal stress response. Adolescence is also a period in development marked by a variety of stress-related vulnerabilities, including psychological and physiological dysfunctions. Many of these vulnerabilities are accompanied by a disrupted HPA axis. In adult mice, a model of disrupted HPA function has been developed using oral chronic corticosterone administration via the drinking water, which results in various physiological and neurobehavioral abnormalities, including changes in stress reactivity and anxiety-like behaviors. In an effort to further complement and extend this model, we tested the impact of HPA disruption in adolescent mice. We also examined whether this disruption led to different outcomes depending on whether the treatment happened during adolescence or adulthood. In the current set of experiments, we exposed adult (70days of age) or adolescent (30days of age) male C57BL/6N mice to 4 weeks of either 0 or 25μg/ml oral corticosterone via their drinking water. We measured body weight during treatment and plasma corticosterone levels and activation of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), as indexed by FOS immunohistochemistry, before and after a 30min session of restraint stress. Our data indicate that adolescent animals exposed to chronic corticosterone showed weight loss during treatment, an effect not observed in adults. Further, we found stress failed to elevate plasma corticosterone levels in treated mice, regardless of whether exposure occurred in adulthood or adolescence. Despite this reduced hormonal responsiveness, we found significant neural activation in the PVN of both adult- and adolescent-treated mice, indicating a dissociation between stress-induced peripheral and central stress responses following chronic corticosterone exposure. Moreover, stress-induced neural activation in the PVN was unaffected

  5. Chronic psychosocial stress disturbs long-bone growth in adolescent mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Foertsch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although a strong association between psychiatric and somatic disorders is generally accepted, little is known regarding the interrelationship between mental and skeletal health. Although depressive disorders have been shown to be strongly associated with osteoporosis and increased fracture risk, evidence from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD patients is less consistent. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of chronic psychosocial stress on bone using a well-established murine model for PTSD. C57BL/6N mice (7 weeks old were subjected to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC for 19 days, whereas control mice were singly housed. Anxiety-related behavior was assessed in the open-field/novel-object test, after which the mice were euthanized to assess endocrine and bone parameters. CSC mice exhibited increased anxiety-related behavior in the open-field/novel-object test, increased adrenal and decreased thymus weights, and unaffected plasma morning corticosterone. Microcomputed tomography and histomorphometrical analyses revealed significantly reduced tibia and femur lengths, increased growth-plate thickness and reduced mineral deposition at the growth plate, suggesting disturbed endochondral ossification during long-bone growth. This was associated with reduced Runx2 expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate. Trabecular thicknesses and bone mineral density were significantly increased in CSC compared to singly housed mice. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in bone marrow cells located at the growth plates of CSC mice, implying that local adrenergic signaling might be involved in the effects of CSC on the skeletal phenotype. In conclusion, chronic psychosocial stress negatively impacts endochondral ossification in the growth plate, affecting both longitudinal and appositional bone growth in adolescent mice.

  6. Social defeat stress induces a depression-like phenotype in adolescent male c57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Sergio D; Riggs, Lace M; Nieto, Steven J; Dayrit, Genesis; Zamora, Norma N; Shawhan, Kristi L; Cruz, Bryan; Warren, Brandon L

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Exposure to stress is highly correlated with the emergence of mood-related illnesses. Because major depressive disorder often emerges in adolescence, we assessed the effects of social defeat stress on responses to depressive-like behaviors in juvenile mice. To do this, postnatal day (PD) 35 male c57BL/6 mice were exposed to 10 days of social defeat stress (PD35-44), while control mice were handled daily. Twenty-four hours after the last episode of defeat (PD45), separate groups of mice were tested in the social interaction, forced swimming, sucrose preference, and elevated plus-maze behavioral assays (n = 7-12 per group). Also, we examined body weight gain across days of social defeat and levels of blood serum corticosterone 40 min after the last episode of defeat stress. Our data indicates that defeated mice exhibited a depressive-like phenotype as inferred from increased social avoidance, increased immobility in the forced swim test, and reduced sucrose preference (a measure of anhedonia), when compared to non-defeated controls. Defeated mice also displayed an anxiogenic-like phenotype when tested on the elevated plus-maze. Lastly, stressed mice displayed lower body weight gain, along with increased blood serum corticosterone levels, when compared to non-stressed controls. Overall, we show that in adolescent male c57BL/6 mice, social defeat stress induces a depression- and anxiety-like phenotype 24 h after the last episode of stress. These data suggest that the social defeat paradigm may be used to examine the etiology of stress-induced mood-related disorders during adolescence.

  7. Concentration- and age-dependent effects of chronic caffeine on contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Rachel L.; Braak, David; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic caffeine exerts negligible effects on learning and memory in normal adults, but it is unknown whether this is also true for children and adolescents. The hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, undergoes extensive structural and functional modifications during pre-adolescence and adolescence. As a result, chronic caffeine may have differential effects on hippocampus-dependent learning in pre-adolescents and adolescents compared with adults. Here, we characterized the effects of chronic caffeine and withdrawal from chronic caffeine on hippocampus-dependent (contextual) and hippocampus-independent (cued) fear conditioning in pre-adolescent, adolescent, and adult mice. The results indicate that chronic exposure to caffeine during pre-adolescence and adolescence enhances or impairs contextual conditioning depending on concentration, yet has no effect on cued conditioning. In contrast, withdrawal from chronic caffeine impairs contextual conditioning in pre-adolescent mice only. No changes in learning were seen for adult mice for either the chronic caffeine or withdrawal conditions. These findings support the hypothesis that chronic exposure to caffeine during pre-adolescence and adolescence can alter learning and memory and as changes were only seen in hippocampus-dependent learning, this suggests that the developing hippocampus may be sensitive to the effects of caffeine. PMID:25827925

  8. Concentration- and age-dependent effects of chronic caffeine on contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Rachel L; Braak, David; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Chronic caffeine exerts negligible effects on learning and memory in normal adults, but it is unknown whether this is also true for children and adolescents. The hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, undergoes extensive structural and functional modifications during pre-adolescence and adolescence. As a result, chronic caffeine may have differential effects on hippocampus-dependent learning in pre-adolescents and adolescents compared with adults. Here, we characterized the effects of chronic caffeine and withdrawal from chronic caffeine on hippocampus-dependent (contextual) and hippocampus-independent (cued) fear conditioning in pre-adolescent, adolescent, and adult mice. The results indicate that chronic exposure to caffeine during pre-adolescence and adolescence enhances or impairs contextual conditioning depending on concentration, yet has no effect on cued conditioning. In contrast, withdrawal from chronic caffeine impairs contextual conditioning in pre-adolescent mice only. No changes in learning were seen for adult mice for either the chronic caffeine or withdrawal conditions. These findings support the hypothesis that chronic exposure to caffeine during pre-adolescence and adolescence can alter learning and memory and as changes were only seen in hippocampus-dependent learning, which suggests that the developing hippocampus may be sensitive to the effects of caffeine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exogenous daytime melatonin modulates response of adolescent mice in a repeated unpredictable stress paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaolapo, Adejoke Yetunde; Adebayo, Ajibola Nurudeen; Onaolapo, Olakunle James

    2017-02-01

    The immediate and short-term behavioural and physiological implications of exposure to stressful scenarios in the adolescent period are largely unknown; however, increases in occurrence of stress-related physiological and psychological disorders during puberty highlight the need to study substances that may modulate stress reactivity during a crucial stage of maturation. Seven groups of mice (12-15 g each) were administered distilled water (DW) (non-stressed and stressed controls), sertraline (10 mg/kg), diazepam (2 mg/kg) or one of three doses of melatonin (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg). Mice were exposed to 30 min of chronic mild stress (25 min of cage shaking, cage tilting, handling and 5 min of forced swimming in tepid warm water at 25 °C, in a random order) after administration of DW or drugs, daily for 21 days. Behavioural assessments were conducted on day 1 and day 21 (after which mice were sacrificed, blood taken for estimation of corticosterone levels and brain homogenates used for estimation of antioxidant activities). Administration of melatonin resulted in an increase in horizontal locomotion and self-grooming, while rearing showed a time-dependent increase, compared to non-stress and stress controls. Working memory improved with increasing doses of melatonin (compared to controls and diazepam); in comparison to setraline however, working memory decreased. A dose-related anxiolytic effect is seen when melatonin is compared to non-stressed and stressed controls. Melatonin administration reduced the systemic/oxidant response to repeated stress. Administration of melatonin in repeatedly stressed adolescent mice was associated with improved central excitation, enhancement of working memory, anxiolysis and reduced systemic response to stress.

  10. Exposure to chronic variable social stress during adolescence alters affect-related behaviors and adrenocortical activity in adult male and female inbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Michael J; Kamens, Helen M; Cavigelli, Sonia A

    2017-09-01

    Rodent models provide valuable insight into mechanisms that underlie vulnerability to adverse effects of early-life challenges. Few studies have evaluated sex differences in anxiogenic or depressogenic effects of adolescent social stress in a rodent model. Furthermore, adolescent stress studies often use genetically heterogeneous outbred rodents which can lead to variable results. The current study evaluated the effects of adolescent social stress in male and female inbred (BALB/cJ) mice. Adolescent mice were exposed to repeat cycles of alternating social isolation and social novelty for 4 weeks. Adolescent social stress increased anxiety-related behaviors in both sexes and depression-related behavior in females. Locomotion/exploratory behavior was also decreased in both sexes by stress. Previously stressed adult mice produced less basal fecal corticosteroids than controls. Overall, the novel protocol induced sex-specific changes in anxiety- and depression-related behaviors and corticoid production in inbred mice. The chronic variable social stress protocol used here may be beneficial to systematically investigate sex-specific neurobiological mechanisms underlying adolescent stress vulnerability where genetic background can be controlled. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The effects of adolescent methamphetamine exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M Buck

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine use among adolescents is a significant social and public health concern. Despite increased awareness of methamphetamine use among younger people, relatively little research has examined the effects of adolescent methamphetamine use compared to adult use. Thus much remains to be learned about how methamphetamine alters adolescent brain function and behavior. In this article we review recent trends in adolescent methamphetamine use and data examining the effects of adolescent methamphetamine use on the dopaminergic system and behavior in humans and animal models. Future research is warranted to expand our understanding of the effects of adolescent methamphetamine exposure and how those effects differ from those seen in adults.

  12. Social defeat stress induces depression-like behavior and alters spine morphology in the hippocampus of adolescent male C57BL/6 mice

    OpenAIRE

    I?iguez, Sergio D.; Aubry, Antonio; Riggs, Lace M.; Alipio, Jason B.; Zanca, Roseanna M.; Flores-Ramirez, Francisco J.; Hernandez, Mirella A.; Nieto, Steven J.; Musheyev, David; Serrano, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Social stress, including bullying during adolescence, is a risk factor for common psychopathologies such as depression. To investigate the neural mechanisms associated with juvenile social stress-induced mood-related endophenotypes, we examined the behavioral, morphological, and biochemical effects of the social defeat stress model of depression on hippocampal dendritic spines within the CA1 stratum radiatum. Adolescent (postnatal day 35) male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to defeat episodes fo...

  13. The novelty-seeking phenotype modulates the long-lasting effects of adolescent MDMA exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Vaccaro, Sonia; Arenas, M Carmen; Aguilar, María A; Miñarro, José

    2015-03-15

    Exposure to drugs such as ethanol or cocaine during adolescence induces alterations in the central nervous system that are modulated by the novelty-seeking trait. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of this trait on the long-term effects of MDMA administration during adolescence on spontaneous behavior and conditioned rewarding effects in adulthood. Adolescent mice were classified as high or low novelty seekers (HNS or LNS) according to the hole-board test and received either MDMA (0, 10 or 20mg/kg PND 33-42) or saline. Three weeks later, having entered adulthood (PND>68), one set of mice performed the elevated plus maze and social interaction tests, while another set performed the conditioning place preference (CPP) test induced by cocaine-(1mg/kg) or MDMA-(1mg/kg). Only HNS mice treated with MDMA during adolescence acquired CPP in adulthood with a non-effective dose of cocaine or MDMA. Although it did not produce changes in motor activity, exposure to MDMA during adolescence was associated with more aggressive behaviors (threat and attack) and increased social contacts in HNS mice, while an anxiolytic effect was noted in LNS mice pre-treated with the highest dose of MDMA (20mg/kg). Administration of MDMA (10 or 20mg/kg) induced a decrease in DA levels in the striatum in LNS mice only and lower striatal serotonin levels in mice treated with the highest MDMA dose. Our findings show that adolescent MDMA exposure results in higher sensitivity to the conditioned reinforcing properties of MDMA and cocaine in adult HNS mice, which suggests that the relationship between exposure to MDMA in adolescence and a higher probability of substance is a feature of high novelty seekers only. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Differential influence of social versus isolate housing on vicarious fear learning in adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panksepp, Jules B; Lahvis, Garet P

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory rodents can adopt the pain or fear of nearby conspecifics. This phenotype conceptually lies within the domain of empathy, a bio-psycho-social process through which individuals come to share each other's emotion. Using a model of cue-conditioned fear, we show here that the expression of vicarious fear varies with respect to whether mice are raised socially or in solitude during adolescence. The impact of the adolescent housing environment was selective: (a) vicarious fear was more influenced than directly acquired fear, (b) "long-term" (24-h postconditioning) vicarious fear memories were stronger than "short-term" (15-min postconditioning) memories in socially reared mice whereas the opposite was true for isolate mice, and (c) females were more fearful than males. Housing differences during adolescence did not alter the general mobility of mice or their vocal response to receiving the unconditioned stimulus. Previous work with this mouse model underscored a genetic influence on vicarious fear learning, and the present study complements these findings by elucidating an interaction between the adolescent social environment and vicarious experience. Collectively, these findings are relevant to developing models of empathy amenable to mechanistic exploitation in the laboratory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Maternal separation induces hippocampal changes in cadherin-1 (CDH-1) mRNA and recognition memory impairment in adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azeredo, Lucas Araújo; Wearick-Silva, Luis Eduardo; Viola, Thiago Wendt; Tractenberg, Saulo Gantes; Centeno-Silva, Anderson; Orso, Rodrigo; Schröder, Nadja; Bredy, Timothy William; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2017-05-01

    In rodents, disruption of mother-infant attachment induced by maternal separation (MS) is associated with recognition memory impairment and long-term neurobiological consequences. Particularly stress-induced modifications have been associated to disruption of cadherin (CDH) adhesion function, which plays an important role in remodeling of neuronal connection and synaptic plasticity. This study investigated the sex-dependent effect of MS on recognition memory and mRNA levels of classical type I and type II CDH and the related β -catenin (β -Cat) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of late adolescent mice. We provided evidence that the BALB/c mice exposed to MS present deficit in recognition memory, especially females. Postnatal MS induced higher hippocampal CDH-2 and CDH-8 mRNA levels, as well as an upregulation of CDH-1 in the prefrontal cortex in both males and females. MS-reared female mice presented lower CDH-1 mRNA levels in the hippocampus. In addition, hippocampal CDH-1 mRNA levels were positively correlated with recognition memory performance in females. MS-reared male mice exhibited higher β -Cat mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Considering sex-specific effects on CDH mRNA levels, it has been demonstrated mRNA changes in CDH-1, β -Cat, and CDH-6 in the hippocampus, as well as CDH-1, CDH-8 and CDH-11 in the prefrontal cortex. Overall, these findings suggest a complex interplay among MS, CDH mRNA expression, and sex differences in the PFC and hippocampus of adolescent mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic Nicotine Treatment During Adolescence Attenuates the Effects of Acute Nicotine in Adult Contextual Fear Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Erica D; Gould, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent onset of nicotine abuse is correlated with worse chances at successful abstinence in adulthood. One reason for this may be due to enduring learning deficits resulting from nicotine use during adolescence. Previous work has indicated that chronic nicotine administration beginning in late adolescence (PND38) caused learning deficits in contextual fear when tested in adulthood. The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic nicotine treatment during adolescence would alter sensitivity to nicotine's cognitive enhancing properties in adulthood. C57BL/6J mice received saline or chronic nicotine (12.6mg/kg/day) during adolescence (postnatal day 38) or adulthood (postnatal day 54) for a period of 12 days. Following a 30-day protracted abstinence, mice received either an acute injection of saline or nicotine (0.045, 0.18, and 0.36mg/kg) prior to training and testing a mouse model of contextual fear. It was found that chronic nicotine administration in adult mice did not alter sensitivity to acute nicotine following a protracted abstinence. In adolescent mice, chronic nicotine administration disrupted adult learning and decreased sensitivity to acute nicotine in adulthood as only the highest dose tested (0.36mg/kg) was able to enhance contextual fear learning. These results suggest that adolescent nicotine exposure impairs learning in adulthood, which could increase the risk for continued nicotine use in adulthood by requiring administration of higher doses of nicotine to reverse learning impairments caused by adolescent nicotine exposure. Results from this study add to the growing body of literature suggesting chronic nicotine exposure during adolescence leads to impaired learning in adulthood and demonstrates that nicotine exposure during adolescence attenuates the cognitive enhancing effects of acute nicotine in adulthood, which suggests altered cholinergic function. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  17. Adolescent Mice Are Resilient to Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Anxiety and Changes in Indices of Glutamate Function within the Nucleus Accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kaziya M; Coelho, Michal A; McGregor, Hadley A; Solton, Noah R; Cohen, Matan; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    Binge-drinking is the most prevalent form of alcohol abuse and while an early life history of binge-drinking is a significant risk factor for subsequent alcoholism and co-morbid affective disorders, relatively little is known regarding the biobehavioral impact of binge-drinking during the sensitive neurodevelopmental period of adolescence. In adult mice, a month-long history of binge-drinking elicits a hyper-glutamatergic state within the nucleus accumbens (Acb), coinciding with hyper-anxiety. Herein, we employed a murine model of binge-drinking to determine whether or not: (1) withdrawal-induced changes in brain and behavior differ between adult and adolescent bingers; and (2) increased behavioral signs of negative affect and changes in Acb expression of glutamate-related proteins would be apparent in adult mice with less chronic binge-drinking experience (14 days, approximating the duration of mouse adolescence). Adult and adolescent male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a 14-day binge-drinking protocol (5, 10, 20 and 40% alcohol (v/v) for 2 h/day), while age-matched controls received water. At 24 h withdrawal, half of the animals from each group were assayed for negative affect, while tissue was sampled from the shell (AcbSh) and core (AcbC) subregions of the remaining mice for immunoblotting analyses. Adult bingers exhibited hyper-anxiety when tested for defensive marble burying. Additionally, adult bingers showed increased mGlu1, mGlu5, and GluN2b expression in the AcbSh and PKCε and CAMKII in the AcbC. Compared to adults, adolescent mice exhibited higher alcohol intake and blood alcohol concentrations (BACs); however, adolescent bingers did not show increased anxiety in the marble-burying test. Furthermore, adolescent bingers also failed to exhibit the same alcohol-induced changes in mGlu and kinase protein expression seen in the adult bingers. Irrespective of age, bingers exhibited behavioral hyperactivity in the forced swim test (FST) compared to water

  18. Adolescent mice are resilient to alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety and changes in indices of glutamate function within the nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziya M Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Binge-drinking is the most prevalent form of alcohol abuse and while an early life history of binge-drinking is a significant risk factor for subsequent alcoholism and co-morbid affective disorders, relatively little is known regarding the biobehavioral impact of binge-drinking during the sensitive neurodevelopmental period of adolescence. In adult mice, a month-long history of binge-drinking elicits a hyper-glutamatergic state within the nucleus accumbens (Acb, coinciding with hyper-anxiety. Herein, we employed a murine model of binge-drinking to determine whether or not: 1 withdrawal-induced changes in brain and behavior differ between adult and adolescent bingers and 2 increased behavioral signs of negative affect and changes in Acb expression of glutamate-related proteins would be apparent in adult mice with less chronic binge-drinking experience (14 days, approximating the duration of mouse adolescence. Adult and adolescent male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a 14-day binge-drinking protocol (5, 10, 20 and 40% alcohol (v/v for 2 h/day, while age-matched controls received water. At 24 h withdrawal, half of the animals from each group were assayed for negative affect, while tissue was sampled from the shell (AcbSh and core (AcbC subregions of the remaining mice for immunoblotting analyses. Adult bingers exhibited hyper-anxiety when tested for defensive marble burying. Additionally, adult bingers showed increased mGlu1, mGlu5, and GluN2b expression in the AcbSh and PKCε and CAMKII in the AcbC. Compared to adults, adolescent mice exhibited higher alcohol intake and blood alcohol concentrations; however, adolescent bingers did not show increased anxiety in the marble-burying test. Furthermore, adolescent bingers also failed to exhibit the same alcohol-induced changes in mGlu and kinase protein expression seen in the adult bingers. Irrespective of age, bingers exhibited behavioral hyperactivity in the forced swim test compared to water drinkers

  19. Effectiveness of BCG vaccination to aged mice

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    Ito Tsukasa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tuberculosis (TB still increases in the number of new cases, which is estimated to approach 10 million in 2010. The number of aged people has been growing all over the world. Ageing is one of risk factors in tuberculosis because of decreased immune responses in aged people. Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG is a sole vaccine currently used for TB, however, the efficacy of BCG in adults is still a matter of debate. Emerging the multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB make us to see the importance of vaccination against TB in new light. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of BCG vaccination in aged mice. Results The Th1 responses, interferon-γ production and interleukin 2, in BCG inoculated aged mice (24-month-old were comparable to those of young mice (4- to 6-week-old. The protection activity of BCG in aged mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv was also the same as young mice. Conclusion These findings suggest that vaccination in aged generation is still effective for protection against tuberculosis.

  20. Radiation effects on DNA methylation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, J.; Kurishita, A.; Miyamura, Y.; Ono, T.; Tawa, R.; Sakurai, H.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on DNA methylation in liver, brain and spleen were examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total methylated cytosine level in the genome was reduced within 8 hours after 3.8 Gy of irradiation in liver of adult mice. But no appreciable effect was observed in brain and spleen. When mice were irradiated at newborn, liver DNA revealed no change in methylated cytosine level. Even though slight effects of radiation were detected in he methylation of the c-myc and c-fos genes, they were only temporary and no long-term effects were observed. These data suggest that the effect of radiation on DNA methylation in vivo is not prevailing a DNA damage, but rather influenced much through biological parameters. (author)

  1. Adolescent intake of caffeinated energy drinks does not affect adult alcohol consumption in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Meridith T; DeFriel, Julia N; van Rijn, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    The rise in marketing and mass consumption of energy drink products by adolescents poses a largely unknown risk on adolescent development and drug reward. Yet, with increasing reports of acute health issues present in young adults who ingest large quantities of energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol, the need to elucidate these potential risks is pressing. Energy drinks contain high levels of caffeine and sucrose; therefore, exposure to energy drinks may lead to changes in drug-related behaviors since caffeine and sucrose consumption activates similar brain pathways engaged by substances of abuse. With a recent study observing that adolescent caffeine consumption increased cocaine sensitivity, we sought to investigate how prolonged energy drink exposure in adolescence alters alcohol use and preference in adulthood. To do so, we utilized three different energy drink exposure paradigms and two strains of male mice (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) to monitor the effect of caffeine exposure via energy drinks in adolescence on adult alcohol intake. These paradigms included two models of volitional consumption of energy drinks or energy drink-like substances and one model of forced consumption of sucrose solutions with different caffeine concentrations. Following adolescent exposure to these solutions, alcohol intake was monitored in a limited-access, two-bottle choice between water and increasing concentrations of alcohol during adulthood. In none of the three models or two strains of mice did we observe that adolescent 'energy drink' consumption or exposure was correlated with changes in adult alcohol intake or preference. While our current preclinical results suggest that exposure to large amounts of caffeine does not alter future alcohol intake, differences in caffeine metabolism between mice and humans need to be considered before translating these results to humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel molecular changes induced by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interaction in adolescence: a hippocampal proteomic study in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrah R Spencer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin 1 (NRG1 is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia and cannabis dependence. Mice that are hypomorphic for Nrg1 (Nrg1 HET mice display schizophrenia-relevant behavioural phenotypes and aberrant expression of serotonin and glutamate receptors. Nrg1 HET mice also display idiosyncratic responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC. To gain traction on the molecular pathways disrupted by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions we conducted a proteomic study. Adolescent wildtype (WT and Nrg1 HET mice were exposed to repeated injections of vehicle or THC and their hippocampi were submitted to 2D gel proteomics. Comparison of WT and Nrg1 HET mice identified proteins linked to molecular changes in schizophrenia that have not been previously associated with Nrg1. These proteins are involved in vesicular release of neurotransmitters such as SNARE proteins; enzymes impacting serotonergic neurotransmission, and; proteins affecting growth factor expression. Nrg1 HET mice treated with THC expressed a distinct protein expression signature compared to WT mice. Replicating prior findings, THC caused proteomic changes in WT mice suggestive of greater oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. We have previously observed that THC selectively increased hippocampal NMDA receptor binding of adolescent Nrg1 HET mice. Here we observed outcomes consistent with heightened NMDA-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission. This included differential expression of proteins involved in NMDA receptor trafficking to the synaptic membrane; lipid raft stabilization of synaptic NMDA receptors; and homeostatic responses to dampen excitotoxicity. These findings uncover for the first time novel proteins altered in response to Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions that improves our molecular understanding of Nrg1 signaling and Nrg1-mediated genetic vulnerability to the neurobehavioural effects

  3. Antidepressant effects of Mentha pulegium in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rabiei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the antidepressant effects of Mentha pulegium essential oil in BALB/c mice. Six experimental groups (7 mice each were used. Forced swim test was performed 30 min after essential oil injection. In the groups receiving M. pulegium essential oil (50, 75 and 100 mg/kg, immobility duration significantly decreased compared to the control group. M. pulegium (50 and 75 mg/kg resulted in significant decrease in nitrate/nitrite content in serum compared to the control group. M. pulegium essential oil antidepressant effect that may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress. The results showed that decrease in nitrate/nitrite content in serum and high anti-oxidant effects of M. pulegium essential oil.

  4. An ontogenic study of the behavioral effects of chronic intermittent exposure to ayahuasca in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Netto, N F; Masukawa, M Y; Nishide, F; Galfano, G S; Tamura, F; Shimizo, M K; Marcato, M P; Santos, J G; Linardi, A

    2017-06-05

    Ayahuasca is a beverage obtained from decoctions of the Banisteriopsis caapi plus Psychotria viridis. In religious contexts, ayahuasca is used by different age groups. However, little is known of the effects of ayahuasca during ontogenic development, particularly with regard to the functional characteristics of the central nervous system. Animal models are useful for studying the ontogenic effects of ayahuasca because they allow exclusion of the behavioral influence associated with the ritualistic use. We investigated the effects of exposure to ayahuasca (1.5 mL/kg, orally, twice a week) on memory and anxiety in C57BL/6 mice, with the post-natal day (PND) being used as the ontogenic criterion for classification: childhood (PND21 to PND35), adolescence (PND35 to PND63), adulthood (PND90-PND118), childhood-adolescence (PND21 to PND63), childhood-adulthood (PND21 to PND118) and adolescence-adulthood (PND35 to PND118). One day after the last ayahuasca exposure, the mice were subjected to the Morris water maze (MWM), open field and elevated plus maze tasks (EPM). Ayahuasca did not affect locomotion in the open field or open arms exploration in the EPM, but increased the risk assessment behavior in the childhood group. Ayahuasca did not cause any change in acquisition of spatial reference memory in the MWM task, but decreased the time spent on the platform quadrant during the test session in the adolescence group. These results suggest that, in mice, exposure to ayahuasca in childhood and adolescence promoted anxiety and memory impairment, respectively. However, these behavioral changes were not long-lasting since they were not observed in the childhood-adulthood and adolescence-adulthood groups.

  5. An ontogenic study of the behavioral effects of chronic intermittent exposure to ayahuasca in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Correa-Netto

    Full Text Available Ayahuasca is a beverage obtained from decoctions of the Banisteriopsis caapi plus Psychotria viridis. In religious contexts, ayahuasca is used by different age groups. However, little is known of the effects of ayahuasca during ontogenic development, particularly with regard to the functional characteristics of the central nervous system. Animal models are useful for studying the ontogenic effects of ayahuasca because they allow exclusion of the behavioral influence associated with the ritualistic use. We investigated the effects of exposure to ayahuasca (1.5 mL/kg, orally, twice a week on memory and anxiety in C57BL/6 mice, with the post-natal day (PND being used as the ontogenic criterion for classification: childhood (PND21 to PND35, adolescence (PND35 to PND63, adulthood (PND90-PND118, childhood-adolescence (PND21 to PND63, childhood-adulthood (PND21 to PND118 and adolescence-adulthood (PND35 to PND118. One day after the last ayahuasca exposure, the mice were subjected to the Morris water maze (MWM, open field and elevated plus maze tasks (EPM. Ayahuasca did not affect locomotion in the open field or open arms exploration in the EPM, but increased the risk assessment behavior in the childhood group. Ayahuasca did not cause any change in acquisition of spatial reference memory in the MWM task, but decreased the time spent on the platform quadrant during the test session in the adolescence group. These results suggest that, in mice, exposure to ayahuasca in childhood and adolescence promoted anxiety and memory impairment, respectively. However, these behavioral changes were not long-lasting since they were not observed in the childhood-adulthood and adolescence-adulthood groups.

  6. Peri-adolescent asthma symptoms cause adult anxiety-related behavior and neurobiological processes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Jasmine I; Caruso, Michael J; Michael, Kerry C; Bourne, Rebecca A; Chirichella, Nicole R; Klein, Laura C; Craig, Timothy; Bonneau, Robert H; August, Avery; Cavigelli, Sonia A

    2017-05-30

    Human and animal studies have shown that physical challenges and stressors during adolescence can have significant influences on behavioral and neurobiological development associated with internalizing disorders such as anxiety and depression. Given the prevalence of asthma during adolescence and increased rates of internalizing disorders in humans with asthma, we used a mouse model to test if and which symptoms of adolescent allergic asthma (airway inflammation or labored breathing) cause adult anxiety- and depression-related behavior and brain function. To mimic symptoms of allergic asthma in young BALB/cJ mice (postnatal days [P] 7-57; N=98), we induced lung inflammation with repeated intranasal administration of house dust mite extract (most common aeroallergen for humans) and bronchoconstriction with aerosolized methacholine (non-selective muscarinic receptor agonist). Three experimental groups, in addition to a control group, included: (1) "Airway inflammation only", allergen exposure 3 times/week, (2) "Labored breathing only", methacholine exposure once/week, and (3) "Airway inflammation+Labored breathing", allergen and methacholine exposure. Compared to controls, mice that experienced methacholine-induced labored breathing during adolescence displayed a ∼20% decrease in time on open arms of the elevated plus maze in early adulthood (P60), a ∼30% decrease in brainstem serotonin transporter (SERT) mRNA expression and a ∼50% increase in hippocampal serotonin receptor 1a (5Htr1a) and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (Crhr1) expression in adulthood (P75). This is the first evidence that experimentally-induced clinical symptoms of adolescent asthma alter adult anxiety-related behavior and brain function several weeks after completion of asthma manipulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of Parent-Adolescent Relationships and Parental Separation on Adolescent Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videon, Tami M.

    2002-01-01

    Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were used to investigate the effects of parental separation on adolescent delinquency and depression. Parent-adolescent relationship prior to marital dissolution moderated the effects of parental separation on adolescent delinquency. Opposite-sex parents had a significant influence on…

  8. The effects of pain sensitivity behaviour on Swiss White Mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the effects of Chloroquine phosphate on pain sensation in mice considering the fact that Chloroquine as s chemotherapic agent is known for its neurotoxicity effect. The mice were divided into three groups of 10 mice each. While group 1 as the control, 2 and 3 as the test groups and group 1 received ...

  9. Adolescent mice show anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior and the reduction of long-term potentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 synapses after neonatal maternal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S Y; Han, S H; Woo, R-S; Jang, S H; Min, S S

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to maternal separation (MS) during early life is an identified risk factor for emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression later in life. This study investigated the effects of neonatal MS on the behavior and long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as basic synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 and mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in adolescent mice for 19days. When mice were adolescents, we measured depression, learning, memory, anxious and aggressive behavior using the forced swimming test (FST), Y-maze, Morris water maze (MWM), elevated plus maze (EPM), three consecutive days of the open field test, the social interaction test, the tube-dominance test and the resident-intruder test. The results showed that there was no difference in FST, Y-maze, and MWM performance. However, MS mice showed more anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test and aggressive-like behavior in the tube-dominance and resident-intruder tests. In addition, the magnitude of LTP and release probability in the MF-CA3 synapses was reduced in the MS group but not in the CA3-CA1 synapse. Our results indicate that early life stress due to MS may induce anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior during adolescence, and these effects are associated with synaptic plasticity at the hippocampal MF-CA3 synapses. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adolescence and the ontogeny of the hormonal stress response in male and female rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Russell D; Patel, Ravenna; Pham, Laurie; So, Veronica M

    2016-11-01

    Adolescent development is marked by many changes in neuroendocrine function, resulting in both immediate and long-term influences on an individual's physiology and behavior. Stress-induced hormonal responses are one such change, with adolescent animals often showing different patterns of hormonal reactivity following a stressor compared with adults. This review will describe the unique ways in which adolescent animals respond to a variety of stressors and how these adolescent-related changes in hormonal responsiveness can be further modified by the sex and previous experience of the individual. Potential central and peripheral mechanisms that contribute to these developmental shifts in stress reactivity are also discussed. Finally, the short- and long-term programming effects of chronic stress exposure during adolescence on later adult hormonal responsiveness are also examined. Though far from a clear understanding of the neurobehavioral consequences of these adolescent-related shifts in stress reactivity, continued study of developmental changes in stress-induced hormonal responses may shed light on the increased vulnerability to physical and psychological dysfunctions that often accompany a stressful adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Passive adaptation to stress in adulthood after short-term social instability stress during adolescence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, A P N; Massoco, C O

    2017-05-01

    This study reports that short-term social instability stress (SIS) in adolescence increases passive-coping in adulthood in male mice. Short-term SIS decreased the latency of immobility and increased the frequency and time of immobility in tail suspension test. These findings support the hypothesis that adolescent stress can induce a passive adaptation to stress in adulthood, even if it is a short period of stress.

  12. Effect of Yikangning on immunological function in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Fangyu; Xu Xiaoyi; Shi Yulu; Sheng Xuecheng; Zhao Liyan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Yikangning oral liquid on immunological function in mice. Methods: 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to detect the lymphocyte transformation rate for Con A and LPS. Results: The drug increased the lymphocyte transformation rate in mice with lowed immunological function. Conclusion: Yikangning enhances immunological function in mice with lowered immunological function

  13. Negative Affect and Excessive Alcohol Intake Incubate during Protracted Withdrawal from Binge-Drinking in Adolescent, But Not Adult, Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaziya M. Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Binge-drinking is common in underage alcohol users, yet we know little regarding the biopsychological impact of binge-drinking during early periods of development. Prior work indicated that adolescent male C57BL6/J mice with a 2-week history of binge-drinking (PND28-41 are resilient to the anxiogenic effects of early alcohol withdrawal. Herein, we employed a comparable Drinking-in-the-Dark model to determine how a prior history of binge-drinking during adolescence (EtOHadolescents influences emotionality (assayed with the light-dark box, marble burying test, and the forced swim test and the propensity to consume alcohol in later life, compared to animals without prior drinking experience. For additional comparison, adult mice (EtOHadults with comparable drinking history (PND56-69 were subdivided into groups tested for anxiety/drinking either on PND70 (24 h withdrawal or PND98 (28 days withdrawal. Tissue from the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA was examined by immunoblotting for changes in the expression of glutamate-related proteins. EtOHadults exhibited some signs of hyperanxiety during early withdrawal (PND70, but not during protracted withdrawal (PND98. In contrast, EtOHadolescents exhibited robust signs of anxiety-l and depressive-like behaviors when tested as adults on PND70. While all alcohol-experienced animals subsequently consumed more alcohol than mice drinking for the first time, alcohol intake was greatest in EtOHadolescents. Independent of drinking age, the manifestation of withdrawal-induced hyperanxiety was accompanied by reduced Homer2b expression within the CeA and increased Group1 mGlu receptor expression within the AcbSh. The present data provide novel evidence that binge-drinking during adolescence produces a state characterized by profound negative affect and excessive alcohol consumption that incubates with the passage of time in withdrawal. These data extend our prior studies on the

  14. Radioprotective effects of dextran sulphate in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Bartonickova, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Palyga, G.F.; Zhukova, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Influence of a single i.p. injection of dextran sulphate on radiosensitivity of mice was investigated. The administration of dextran sulphate 24, 48 and 72 hours prior to irradiation increased formation of endogenous colonies of the hemopoietic tissue on the surface of the spleen. DRF calculated from an equieffective exposure for 5 colonies was 1.96 when dextran sulphate was administered 24 hours before irradiation, and 2.25 when dextran sulphate was administered 72 hours before irradiation. The radioprotective effects of dextran sulphate were manifested also in the survival of animals exposed to lethal doses of short-termed as well as long-termed gamma radiation. (orig.) [de

  15. Adolescent social isolation stress unmasks the combined effects of adolescent exercise and adult inflammation on hippocampal neurogenesis and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueston, Cara M; Cryan, John F; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2017-12-04

    Hippocampal neurogenesis and associated cognitive behaviors are regulated by a number of factors including stress, inflammation, and exercise. However, the interplay between these factors remains relatively unexplored, especially across the lifespan. In the current study, the effect of social isolation stress during the adolescent period on neurogenesis and hippocampal-dependent cognitive behaviors was examined. This period of the lifespan has been demonstrated to be an important time for hippocampal growth and plasticity, during which changes to hippocampal neurogenesis may have long lasting effects. Additionally, we aimed to determine whether a 'dual-hit' of adolescent stress and adult chronic neuroinflammation would potentiate any negative effects of either insult alone. Lastly, the potential positive effects of exercise during adolescence was examined to determine whether exercise could attenuate any negative impacts of these insults on hippocampal neurogenesis and behavior. The results from the current study demonstrate that social isolation stress during adolescence followed by intra-hippocampal exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in early adulthood produces deficits in both spontaneous alternations and novel object recognition. Exercise attenuated deficits in neurogenesis and novel object recognition in mice that had been exposed to the 'dual-hit' of stress and neuroinflammation. These findings indicate that adolescence represents a key period of the lifespan during which external factors such as stress and exercise can impact on hippocampal development, and may alter the response to challenges such as neuroinflammation in later life. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of cadmium chloride on hepatic lipid peroxidation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersen, O

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride to 8-12 weeks old CBA-mice enhanced hepatic lipid peroxidation. A positive correlation between cadmium chloride dose and level of peroxidation was observed in both male and female mice. A sex-related difference in mortality was not observed...... but at a dose of 25 mumol CdCl2/kg the level of hepatic lipid peroxidation was higher in male mice than in female mice. The hepatic lipid peroxidation was not increased above the control level in 3 weeks old mice, while 6 weeks old mice responded with increased peroxidation as did 8-12 weeks old mice....... The mortality after an acute toxic dose of cadmium chloride was the same in the three age groups. Pretreatment of mice with several low intraperitoneal doses of cadmium chloride alleviated cadmium induced mortality and lipid peroxidation. The results demonstrate both age dependency and a protective effect...

  17. Effect of framing on adolescents' decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Y C; Lin, C; Worthley, J

    1996-12-01

    92 young adolescents were tested using Tversky and Kahneman's (1981) decision problems for framing effects. A notable number of young adolescents tested were not influenced by the context of the decision problems, thus they selected the same response option for positively and negatively framed problems. Parallel information was not available in Tversky and Kahneman's study for adults because they used a between-subjects design. However, for present adolescents who selected different response options for different framing problems, the response pattern exhibited by them resembled the general pattern exhibited by the adults tested in Tversky and Kahneman's study-negative frames led them to accept risk to avoid certain loss; positive frames prevented them from risking what they were certain to gain. Boys and girls were similar in their susceptibility to framing effects as were honors students in mathematics as compared to nonhonors students. Although the positive vs negative framing only influenced some of the young adolescents tested in this study, because the influence was consistent, researchers and educators interested in adolescents' decisions involving risky choices might use framing principles to design and assess cognitive interventions for high-risk behaviors among young adolescents.

  18. Effect of Jiangzhi tablet on gastrointestinal propulsive function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangrong; Geng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jingsheng; Fan, Lili; Zhang, Zhengchen

    2018-04-01

    This paper aims to study the effect of lipid-lowering tablets on gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion in mice. Mice were randomly divided into control group, Digestant Pill group, Jiangzhi tablet group, middle dose and small dose, the mice gastric emptying phenolsulfonphthalein, gastric residual rate of phenol red indicator to evaluate the gastric emptying rate, residual rate of detection in mouse stomach; small intestine propulsion and selection of carbon ink as the experimental index. Effects were observed to promote the function of normal mice gastric emptying and intestine. The gastric emptying and small intestinal motor function of normal mice were all promoted by each administration group, and the effect was most obvious in small dose group. The effect of reducing blood lipid on gastrointestinal motility of mice ware obviously enhanced.

  19. Antinociceptive effect of novel pyrazolines in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabarelli Z.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The antinociceptive effect of six novel synthetic pyrazolines (3-ethoxymethyl-5-ethoxycarbonyl-1H-pyrazole (Pz 1 and its corresponding 1-substituted methyl (Pz 2 and phenyl (Pz 3 analogues, and 3-(1-ethoxyethyl-5-ethoxycarbonyl-1H-pyrazole (Pz 4 and its corresponding 1-substituted methyl (Pz 5 and phenyl (Pz 6 analogues was evaluated by the tail immersion test in adult male albino mice. The animals (N = 11-12 in each group received vehicle (5% Tween 80, 10 ml/kg, sc or 1.5 mmol/kg of each of the pyrazolines (Pz 1-Pz 6, sc. Fifteen, thirty and sixty minutes after drug administration, the mice were subjected to the tail immersion test. Thirty minutes after drug administration Pz 2 and Pz 3 increased tail withdrawal latency (vehicle = 3.4 ± 0.2; Pz 2 = 5.2 ± 0.4; Pz 3 = 5.9 ± 0.4 s; mean ± SEM, whereas the other pyrazolines did not present antinociceptive activity. Dose-effect curves (0.15 to 1.5 mmol/kg were constructed for the bioactive pyrazolines. Pz 2 (1.5 mmol/kg, sc impaired motor coordination in the rotarod and increased immobility in the open-field test. Pz 3 did not alter rotarod performance and spontaneous locomotion, but increased immobility in the open field at the dose of 1.5 mmol/kg. The involvement of opioid mechanisms in the pyrazoline-induced antinociception was investigated by pretreating the animals with naloxone (2.75 µmol/kg, sc. Naloxone prevented Pz 3- but not Pz 2-induced antinociception. Moreover, naloxone pretreatment did not alter Pz 3-induced immobility. We conclude that Pz 3-induced antinociception involves opioid mechanisms but this is not the case for Pz 2.

  20. Effects of Social Defeat Stress on Sleep in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Fiona; Vialou, Vincent; El Mestikawy, Salah; Fabre, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Stress plays a key role in the development of psychiatric disorders and has a negative impact on sleep integrity. In mice, chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) is an ethologically valid model of stress-related disorders but little is known about its effects on sleep regulation. Here, we investigated the immediate and long-term effects of 10 consecutive days of social defeat (SD) on vigilance states in C57Bl/6J male mice. Social behavior was assessed to identify susceptible mice, i.e., mice tha...

  1. Adolescent chronic variable social stress influences exploratory behavior and nicotine responses in male, but not female, BALB/cJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, M J; Reiss, D E; Caulfield, J I; Thomas, J L; Baker, A N; Cavigelli, S A; Kamens, H M

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety disorders and nicotine use are significant contributors to global morbidity and mortality as independent and comorbid diseases. Early-life stress, potentially via stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) dysregulation, can exacerbate both. However, little is known about the factors that predispose individuals to the development of both anxiety disorders and nicotine use. Here, we examined the relationship between anxiety-like behaviors and nicotine responses following adolescent stress. Adolescent male and female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to either chronic variable social stress (CVSS) or control conditions. CVSS consisted of repeated cycles of social isolation and social reorganization. In adulthood, anxiety-like behavior and social avoidance were measured using the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and social approach-avoidance test, respectively. Nicotine responses were assessed with acute effects on body temperature, corticosterone production, locomotor activity, and voluntary oral nicotine consumption. Adolescent stress had sex-dependent effects on nicotine responses and exploratory behavior, but did not affect anxiety-like behavior or social avoidance in males or females. Adult CVSS males exhibited less exploratory behavior, as indicated by reduced exploratory locomotion in the EPM and social approach-avoidance test, compared to controls. Adolescent stress did not affect nicotine-induced hypothermia in either sex, but CVSS males exhibited augmented nicotine-induced locomotion during late adolescence and voluntarily consumed less nicotine during adulthood. Stress effects on male nicotine-induced locomotion were associated with individual differences in exploratory locomotion in the EPM and social approach-avoidance test. Relative to controls, adult CVSS males and females also exhibited reduced corticosterone levels at baseline and adult male CVSS mice exhibited increased corticosterone levels following an acute nicotine injection. Results

  2. Alcohol Intake Increases in Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice during Intermittent Cycles of Phase-Delayed, Long-Light Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Gamsby

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents naturally go to bed and awaken late, but are forced to awaken early for school and work. This leads to “social jetlag”, a state of circadian desynchrony (CD, in which internal biological rhythms are out of sync with behavioral rhythms. CD is associated with increased alcohol intake in adults, but has been less well-studied in adolescents. The goal of this study was to model adolescent alcohol intake during similar CD conditions in male C57BL/6J mice. Free access alcohol intake, water intake and wheel-running activity were measured during a normal 12HR photoperiod or during alternating photoperiod (Experiment 1: 12 h light for 4 days followed by 18 h light for 3 days, with dark (activity onset delayed 9 h during the 18HR photoperiod; Experiment 2: 12 h light for 4 days followed by 6 h light for 3 days, with dark onset delayed 3 h during the 6HR photoperiod. In Experiment 1, CD produced a small but significant increase in the total alcohol intake per day as well as in intake in bouts, with the greatest increase over controls in the hours following the 6HR dark period. Additionally, the pattern of alcohol intake in bouts shifted to increase alcohol intake during the shorter dark period. In Experiment 2, the opposite effect occurred—the longer dark cycle led to lower alcohol drinking in the second half of the dark period. However, in Experiment 2, CD produced no significant changes in either total alcohol intake or alcohol intake in bouts. Conclusion: shifts in the light cycle that disrupt the regular pattern of day and night, and increase the length of the night phase, are sufficient to increase both drinking in bouts and restricted drinking in adolescent mice, modeling increased alcohol intake in adolescents during CD.

  3. Video Games, Adolescents, and the Displacement Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carla Christine

    2012-01-01

    The displacement effect (the idea that time spent in one activity displaces time spent in other activities) was examined within the lens of adolescents' video game use and their time spent reading, doing homework, in physically active sports and activities, in creative play, and with parents and friends. Data were drawn from the Panel Study…

  4. Longitudinal spillover effects of conflict resolution styles between adolescent-parent relationships and adolescent friendships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorn, Muriel D; Branje, Susan J T; Vandervalk, Inge E; De Goede, Irene H A; Meeus, Wim H J

    2011-02-01

    This study longitudinally investigated spillover effects of conflict resolution styles in adolescent-parent relationships and adolescent friendships. Questionnaires about conflict resolution styles with parents and best friends were completed by adolescents from two age cohorts: 559 early adolescents (mean age 13.4) and 327 middle adolescents (mean age 17.7). Path analyses on two waves, with a three-year interval, indicated that in the early-to-middle adolescent group positive problem solving and conflict engagement spilled over from adolescent-parent relationships to adolescent friendships and not from adolescent friendships to adolescent-parent relationships. In the middle-to-late adolescent group, we found bidirectional spillover effects for these two conflict resolution styles. For withdrawal, we found bidirectional spillover effects in both cohorts. This study showed that both parents and friends set the stage for exercising and learning conflict resolution styles and thereby shape adolescents' future conflict behavior. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Placental effects of lead in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M; Torregrosa, A; Mora, R; Götzens, V; Corbellla, J; Domingo, J L

    1996-01-01

    Although a number of studies in animal models have shown embryolethal and teratogenic lead effects when this element is administered by a parenteral route, the mechanism of the embryonary changes is well not established. In this study, the embryonic effects of parenteral lead exposure on day 9 of gestation were assessed in the Swiss mouse. Lead acetate trihydrate was injected intraperitoneally at 14, 28, 56 and 112 mg/kg. There was no maternal toxicity evidenced by death, reduced body weight gain or reduced food consumption. However, absolute placental weight at 112 mg/kg and relative placental weight at 14, 56 and 112 mg/kg were diminished significantly. The number of total implants, live and dead fetuses, sex ratio and fetal body weight were unaffected by lead exposure. Most sections of placenta showed vascular congestion, an increase of intracellular spaces and deposits of hyaline material of perivascular predominance. Trophoblast hyperplasia was also observed, whereas there was a reinforcement of the fibrovascular network in the labyrinth. It is concluded that the trophoblast hyperplasia observed in the placenta of pregnant mice after parenteral lead exposure at doses that are not toxic for the dam could act as a repairing mechanism of the extraembryonary tissues.

  6. Effects of cannabis on the adolescent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobus, Joanna; Tapert, Susan F

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews neuroimaging, neurocognitive, and preclinical findings on the effects of cannabis on the adolescent brain. Marijuana is the second most widely used intoxicant in adolescence, and teens who engage in heavy marijuana use often show disadvantages in neurocognitive performance, macrostructural and microstructural brain development, and alterations in brain functioning. It remains unclear whether such disadvantages reflect pre-existing differences that lead to increased substances use and further changes in brain architecture and behavioral outcomes. Future work should focus on prospective investigations to help disentangle dose-dependent effects from pre-existing effects, and to better understand the interactive relationships with other commonly abused substances (e.g., alcohol) to better understand the role of regular cannabis use on neurodevelopmental trajectories.

  7. Effects of Cannabis on the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobus, Joanna; Tapert, Susan F.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews neuroimaging, neurocognitive, and preclinical findings on the effects of cannabis on the adolescent brain. Marijuana is the second most widely used intoxicant in adolescence, and teens who engage in heavy marijuana use often show disadvantages in neurocognitive performance, macrostructural and microstructural brain development, and alterations in brain functioning. It remains unclear whether such disadvantages reflect pre-existing differences that lead to increased substances use and further changes in brain architecture and behavioral outcomes. Future work should focus on prospective investigations to help disentangle dose-dependent effects from pre-existing effects, and to better understand the interactive relationships with other commonly abused substances (e.g., alcohol) to better understand the role of regular cannabis use on neurodevelopmental trajectories. PMID:23829363

  8. Adolescent Initiation of Drug Use: Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Gale A.; Larkby, Cynthia; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Day, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the direct effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on adolescent drug use, while controlling for other predictors of adolescent use. Method: Data are from a longitudinal study of PCE in which women and their offspring were assessed throughout childhood. Adolescents were interviewed at 15 years about their age at…

  9. Effects of anti-glare particles on sedation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Hao, Shaojun; Liu, Xiaobin; Kong, Xuejun; Wang, Xidong; Li, Wenjun; Zhang, Zhengchen

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effect of anti-glare particles on sedation of mice, 60 mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, were fed by Ant-dizzy Granule Suspension, saline, Yang Xue Qing Nao Granule suspension and the same volume of saline, and administered 1 times daily, for 7 days. The mice in the wilderness box, hang - 150W light bulbs in the box above, the light recording activities within 2 minutes. The wilderness box into the box after the number of mice, mice with limbs went to the 1 squares is around 1 in the same case, mouse location and method of wilderness case; each group was placed in the turn/bar with rotating speed of 40RPM, each time 5 Parallel experiment recorded the mouse stay time on the rotating rod, if the mouse fell within 2 minutes, immediately put it on the rotating rod to continue the experiment, recorded the mouse on the rotating rod accumulated stay time. If 10 minutes did not drop, press 10 minutes; eighty mice were divided into 5 groups. The number of each rat injected subthreshold dose of pentobarbital sodium in mice. The sleep recording liquid were recorded sleep latency and sleep time. The anti-vertigo granule can obviously reduce the spontaneous activity of mice (Pparticles have good sedative effect.

  10. The effects of gliadin on urine metabolome in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Zhang, Li; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    Gliadin, a proline-rich protein of gluten, is thought to modulate the gut microbiota and affect the intestinal permeability and immune system. However, little is known about the long-term effects of gliadin on the host and microbial metabolism. To study this, we compared the urine metabolome of two...... groups of mice, which were on a high fat diet with and without gliadin, respectively, for 23 weeks. Using liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (MS) followed by multivariate analyses we were able to show a clear separation of the two groups of mice based on their urine metabolome. Discriminating...... in the gliadin mice. Also, Maillard reaction products and β-oxidized tocopherols were observed in higher levels in the urine of gliadin mice, suggesting increased oxidative stress in the gliadin mice. Indisputably, gliadin affected the urine metabolome. However, the mechanisms behind the observed metabolite...

  11. Parental monitoring protects against the effects of parent and adolescent depressed mood on adolescent drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lourah M; Becker, Sara J; Spirito, Anthony

    2017-12-01

    Parental monitoring is a well-established protective factor for adolescent drinking. This study examined whether parental monitoring protected against three common risk factors for alcohol use in a sample of high-risk adolescents: parental depressed mood, adolescent depressed mood, and parental alcohol use. Participants included 117 adolescents (mean age=15.5; 52% female) who presented to the hospital emergency department due to an alcohol-related event and their primary parent/guardian. Adolescents completed self-report measures of alcohol use frequency, depressed mood, and parental monitoring, while parents completed self-report measures of problematic alcohol use and depressed mood. Hierarchical regression confirmed that parental monitoring was associated with lower frequency of adolescent alcohol use, even after controlling for the three risk factors. Significant interactions were found between parental monitoring and both adolescent and parental depressed mood. Parental monitoring had significant protective effects against drinking frequency among adolescents with higher levels of depressed mood, but not among adolescents with lower levels of depressed mood. By contrast, parental monitoring only had protective effects among those parents with lower levels of depressed mood. Parental problematic alcohol use did not affect the relationship between parental monitoring and adolescent alcohol use. Our results suggest that adolescents with high levels of depressed mood may be more likely to benefit from parental monitoring, whereas parents with high levels of depressed mood may be less likely to monitor effectively. Interventions targeting parental monitoring in high-risk adolescents should take into account the influence of both adolescent and parental depressed mood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  13. Teratogenic effect of yogurt in mice fetus (Mus musculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Dwisari Dillasamola; Almahdy A; Amirah Desri; Skunda Diliarosta

    2018-01-01

    Yogurt is one of the dairy products made from lactic acid fermentation by using Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. A study on teratogenic effects of yogurt on the white female mice fetus (Mus musculus) has been carried out. Pregnant mice used were 20 which divided into 4 groups : the control group, D1, D2, and D3. The treatments giveThe mice were Distidelled water (control), 0.52 yogurt (D1), 1.04  yogurt (D2), and 2.08 g yogurt (D3). Data were analyzed using one-way ANO...

  14. Genetic effects of feeding irradiated wheat to mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalaxmi

    1976-01-01

    The effects of feeding irradiated wheat in mice on bone marrow and testis chromosomes, germ cell numbers and dominant lethal mutations were investigated. Feeding of freshly irradiated wheat resulted in significantly increased incidence of polyploid cells in bone marrow, aneuploid cells in testis, reduction in number of spermatogonia of types A, B and resting primary spermatocytes as well as a higher mutagenic index. Such a response was not observed when mice were fed stored irradiated wheat. Also there was no difference between the mice fed un-irradiated wheat and stored irradiated wheat. (author)

  15. Radioprotective effects of bacterial superoxide dismutase on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Tianxi

    1992-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of bacterial superoxide dismutase (b-SOD) on the mice irradiated by 8 Gy γ-ray were investigated. The results showed that when b-SOD was injected before and after irradiation, the survival fraction of mice is increased 50% and 30% respectively. The former treatment could increase the DNA synthesis of the myeloid cells and spleen's lymphocytes, decrease the LPO of tissue homogenates and the hemolysis of erythrocytes significantly. The mechanism that b-SOD can drop the radiation injury of the mice was discussed

  16. Effects of Social Defeat Stress on Sleep in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Fiona; Vialou, Vincent; El Mestikawy, Salah; Fabre, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Stress plays a key role in the development of psychiatric disorders and has a negative impact on sleep integrity. In mice, chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) is an ethologically valid model of stress-related disorders but little is known about its effects on sleep regulation. Here, we investigated the immediate and long-term effects of 10 consecutive days of social defeat (SD) on vigilance states in C57Bl/6J male mice. Social behavior was assessed to identify susceptible mice, i.e., mice that develop long-lasting social avoidance, and unsusceptible mice. Sleep-wake stages in mice of both groups were analyzed by means of polysomnographic recordings at baseline, after the first, third, and tenth stress sessions and on the 5th recovery day (R5) following the 10-day CSDS. In susceptible mice, each SD session produced biphasic changes in sleep-wake states that were preserved all along 10-day CSDS. These sessions elicited a short-term enhancement of wake time while rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep was strongly inhibited. Concomitantly, delta power was increased during non REM (NREM) sleep. During the following dark period, an increase in total sleep time, as well as wake fragmentation, were observed after each analyzed SD session. Similar changes were observed in unsusceptible mice. At R5, elevated high-frequency EEG activity, as observed in insomniacs, emerged during NREM sleep in both susceptible and unsusceptible groups suggesting that CSDS impaired sleep quality. Furthermore, susceptible but not unsusceptible mice displayed stress-anticipatory arousal during recovery, a common feature of anxiety disorders. Altogether, our findings show that CSDS has profound impacts on vigilance states and further support that sleep is tightly regulated by exposure to stressful events. They also revealed that susceptibility to chronic psychological stress is associated with heightened arousal, a physiological feature of stress vulnerability.

  17. Effects of Social Defeat Stress on Sleep in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Henderson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress plays a key role in the development of psychiatric disorders and has a negative impact on sleep integrity. In mice, chronic social defeat stress (CSDS is an ethologically valid model of stress-related disorders but little is known about its effects on sleep regulation. Here, we investigated the immediate and long-term effects of 10 consecutive days of social defeat (SD on vigilance states in C57Bl/6J male mice. Social behavior was assessed to identify susceptible mice, i.e., mice that develop long-lasting social avoidance, and unsusceptible mice. Sleep-wake stages in mice of both groups were analyzed by means of polysomnographic recordings at baseline, after the first, third, and tenth stress sessions and on the 5th recovery day (R5 following the 10-day CSDS. In susceptible mice, each SD session produced biphasic changes in sleep-wake states that were preserved all along 10-day CSDS. These sessions elicited a short-term enhancement of wake time while rapid eye-movement (REM sleep was strongly inhibited. Concomitantly, delta power was increased during non REM (NREM sleep. During the following dark period, an increase in total sleep time, as well as wake fragmentation, were observed after each analyzed SD session. Similar changes were observed in unsusceptible mice. At R5, elevated high-frequency EEG activity, as observed in insomniacs, emerged during NREM sleep in both susceptible and unsusceptible groups suggesting that CSDS impaired sleep quality. Furthermore, susceptible but not unsusceptible mice displayed stress-anticipatory arousal during recovery, a common feature of anxiety disorders. Altogether, our findings show that CSDS has profound impacts on vigilance states and further support that sleep is tightly regulated by exposure to stressful events. They also revealed that susceptibility to chronic psychological stress is associated with heightened arousal, a physiological feature of stress vulnerability.

  18. Sevoflurane Inhalation Accelerates the Long-Term Memory Consolidation via Small GTPase Overexpression in the Hippocampus of Mice in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Emi; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Feng, Guo-Gang; Hayashi, Hisaki; Satomoto, Maiko; Sato, Motohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane exposure impairs the long-term memory in neonates. Whether the exposure to animals in adolescence affects the memory, however, has been unclear. A small hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate (GTPase) rac1 plays a role in the F-actin dynamics related to the synaptic plasticity, as well as superoxide production via reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation. The current study was designed to examine whether sevoflurane exposure to mice in early adolescence modifies the long-term learning ability concomitantly with the changes in F-actin constitution as well as superoxide production in the hippocampus according to the levels of rac1 protein expression. Four-week-old mice were subjected to the evaluation of long-term learning ability for three days. On day one, each mouse was allowed to enter a dark chamber for five min to acclimatization. On day two, the procedure was repeated with the addition of an electric shock as soon as a mouse entered the dark chamber. All mice subsequently inhaled 2 L/min air with (Sevoflurane group) and without (Control group) 2.5% sevoflurane for three hours. On day three, each mouse was placed on the platform and retention time, which is the latency to enter the dark chamber, was examined. The brain removed after the behavior test, was used for analyses of immunofluorescence, Western immunoblotting and intracellular levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure significantly prolonged retention time, indicating the enhanced long-term memory. Sevoflurane inhalation augmented F-actin constitution coexisting with the rac1 protein overexpression in the hippocampus whereas it did not alter the levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure to 4-week-old mice accelerates the long-term memory concomitantly with the enhanced F-actin constitution coexisting with the small GTPase rac1 overexpression in the hippocampus. These results suggest that sevoflurane inhalation may amplify long-term memory

  19. Developmental exposure to chlorpyrifos alters reactivity to environmental and social cues in adolescent mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricceri, Laura; Markina, Nadja; Valanzano, Angela; Fortuna, Stefano; Cometa, Maria Francesca; Meneguz, Annarita; Calamandrei, Gemma

    2003-01-01

    Neonatal mice were treated daily on postnatal days (pnds) 1 through 4 or 11 through 14 with the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF), at doses (1 or 3 mg/kg) that do not evoke systemic toxicity. Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evaluated within 24 h from termination of treatments. Pups treated on pnds 1-4 underwent ultrasonic vocalization tests (pnds 5, 8, and 11) and a homing test (orientation to home nest material, pnd 10). Pups in both treatment schedules were then assessed for locomotor activity (pnd 25), novelty-seeking response (pnd 35), social interactions with an unfamiliar conspecific (pnd 45), and passive avoidance learning (pnd 60). AChE activity was reduced by 25% after CPF 1-4 but not after CPF 11-14 treatment. CPF selectively affected only the G 4 (tetramer) molecular isoform of AChE. Behavioral analysis showed that early CPF treatment failed to affect neonatal behaviors. Locomotor activity on pnd 25 was increased in 11-14 CPF-treated mice at both doses, and CPF-treated animals in both treatment schedules were more active when exposed to environmental novelty in the novelty-seeking test. All CPF-treated mice displayed more agonistic responses, and such effect was more marked in male mice exposed to the low CPF dose on pnds 11-14. Passive avoidance learning was not affected by CPF. These data indicate that developmental exposure to CPF induces long-term behavioral alterations in the mouse species and support the involvement of neural systems in addition to the cholinergic system in the delayed behavioral toxicity of CPF

  20. Role of the Dopaminergic System in the Acquisition, Expression and Reinstatement of MDMA-Induced Conditioned Place Preference in Adolescent Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Infer, Antonio; Roger-Sánchez, Concepción; Daza-Losada, Manuel; Aguilar, María A.; Miñarro, José; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Background The rewarding effects of 3,4-methylenedioxy-metamphetamine (MDMA) have been demonstrated in conditioned place preference (CPP) procedures, but the involvement of the dopaminergic system in MDMA-induced CPP and reinstatement is poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the effects of the DA D1 antagonist SCH 23390 (0.125 and 0.250 mg/kg), the DA D2 antagonist Haloperidol (0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg), the D2 antagonist Raclopride (0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg) and the dopamine release inhibitor CGS 10746B (3 and 10 mg/kg) on the acquisition, expression and reinstatement of a CPP induced by 10 mg/kg of MDMA were evaluated in adolescent mice. As expected, MDMA significantly increased the time spent in the drug-paired compartment during the post-conditioning (Post-C) test, and a priming dose of 5 mg/kg reinstated the extinguished preference. The higher doses of Haloperidol, Raclopride and CGS 10746B and both doses of SCH 23390 blocked acquisition of the MDMA-induced CPP. However, only Haloperidol blocked expression of the CPP. Reinstatement of the extinguished preference was not affected by any of the drugs studied. Analysis of brain monoamines revealed that the blockade of CPP acquisition was accompanied by an increase in DA concentration in the striatum, with a concomitant decrease in DOPAC and HVA levels. Administration of haloperidol during the Post-C test produced increases in striatal serotonin, DOPAC and HVA concentrations. In mice treated with the higher doses of haloperidol and CGS an increase in SERT concentration in the striatum was detected during acquisition of the CPP, but no changes in DAT were observed. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that, in adolescent mice, the dopaminergic system is involved in the acquisition and expression of MDMA-induced CPP, but not in its reinstatement. PMID:22916213

  1. Effect of ethanol on placenta and liver of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarachand, U.; Eapen, Jacob

    1977-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of ethanol in drinking water for 15 days induces fatty liver in non-pregnant female mice. A similar regimen fails to produce the same effect in liver and placenta of pregnant mice. In vivo incorporation of 14 C-chlorella protein hydrolysate into hepatic proteins, however, is impaired in both the pregnant and the non-pregnant mice following ethanol treatment. Placental and foetal liver protein syntheses remain unaffected by the treatment. A single intraperitoneal dose of ethanol in fed and fasted non-pregnant mice elicits a differential response with respect to incorporation of the labelled precursor. The results are discussed with reference to the apparent metabolic alterations due to pregnancy. (author)

  2. Therapeutic Effects of Bupleurum Polysaccharides in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Pan

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is related to low-grade chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Bupleurum Polysaccharides (BPs, isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. However, little is known about its therapeutic effects on diabetes. In this experiment, the effects of BPs on alleviation of diabetes and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Diabetic mice model was established via successive intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (100 mg/kg body weight for two days. Mice with blood glucose levels higher than 16.8mmol/L were selected for experiments. The diabetic mice were orally administered with BPs (30 and 60 mg/kg once a day for 35 days. BPs not only significantly decreased levels of blood glucose, but also increased those of serum insulin and liver glycogen in diabetic mice compared to model mice. Additionally, BPs adminstration improved the insulin expression and suppressed the apoptosis in pancreas of the diabetic mice. Histopathological observations further demonstrated that BPs protected the pancreas and liver from oxidative and inflammatory damages. These results suggest that BPs protect pancreatic β cells and liver hepatocytes and ameliorate diabetes, which is associated with its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties.

  3. Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Cheol; Ha, Wooram; Park, Jinhyeong; Kim, Junghoon; Jung, Yunjin; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-09-14

    To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice. The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 65.2% ± 1.8%, P Tang and 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 83.8% ± 1.9%, P Tang; GE values: 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 66.8% ± 2.1%, P Tang and 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 72.5% ± 1.7%, P Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits. These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract.

  4. [Effectiveness of institutional policies to prevent adolescent alcohol use: The view of experts and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Cristian; del Moral, Gonzalo; Musitu, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Juan Carlos; John, Bev

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain the views of a sample of adolescents and experts on adolescence, family, school, local policies and media, regarding the effectiveness of institutional policies to prevent adolescent alcohol use. Four educational centers in the province of Seville. Head office of the Alcohol and Society Foundation in Madrid. Qualitative study using the method proposed by Grounded theory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967). Data were collected from 10 discussion groups guided by semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using Atlas ti 5 software. A total of 32 national experts and 40 adolescents of both sexes aged 15 to 20 years living in the province of Seville, selected by theoretical intentional sampling. The experts believed that most of the evaluated preventive actions were effective, while adolescents disputed the preventive impact of most of them. Adolescents proposed actions focused on the reduction of supply of alcohol. Experts proposed a mixed model as the most effective strategy to prevent alcohol consumption in adolescents, combining supply and demand reduction policies, depending on specific short and long term objectives. We have obtained, not only an overview of what is working (or not) from the view of adolescents and experts, but also the key points that should be taken into account for designing effective prevention policies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Radioprotective Effects of Gallic Acid in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopakumar Gopinathan

    2013-01-01

    Radioprotecting ability of the natural polyphenol, gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA), was investigated in Swiss albino mice. Oral administration of GA (100 mg/kg body weight), one hour prior to whole body gamma radiation exposure (2–8 Gy; 6 animals/group), reduced the radiation-induced cellular DNA damage in mouse peripheral blood leukocytes, bone marrow cells, and spleenocytes as revealed by comet assay. The GA administration also prevented the radiation-induced decrease in the levels of the antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidise (GPx), and nonprotein thiol glutathione (GSH) and inhibited the peroxidation of membrane lipids in these animals. Exposure of mice to whole body gamma radiation also caused the formation of micronuclei in blood reticulocytes and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells, and the administration of GA resulted in the inhibition of micronucleus formation and chromosomal aberrations. In irradiated animals, administration of GA elicited an enhancement in the rate of DNA repair process and a significant increase in endogenous spleen colony formation. The administration of GA also prevented the radiation-induced weight loss and mortality in animals (10 animals/group) exposed to lethal dose (10 Gy) of gamma radiation. (For every experiment unirradiated animals without GA administration were taken as normal control; specific dose (Gy) irradiated animals without GA administration serve as radiation control; and unirradiated GA treated animals were taken as drug alone control). PMID:24069607

  6. Late vascular effects in irradiated mice brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Maki, Yutaka; Phillips, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    The whole brains of mice were irradiated with 250 kVp X-ray at 120 rad min -1 (1.6 mm Cu HVL, TSD 50 cm) and a histological study was done. The dose range of X-irradiation was from 1300 to 2500 rads. i.e., 1300, 1500, 1750, 2000, and 2500 rads. In the microscopic examination, the mice were killed at the regular postirradiation intervals of between 15 and 20, 31 and 40, 41 and 50, 51 and 60, 61 and 70, 71 and 80, 81 and 90, 139 and 177 weeks. A histological examination was performed by a morphometric estimation of vascular lesion in which the degree of the damage to the arterial system was scored through whole serial brain sections. Necrosis (encephalomalacia), atrophy, cell infiltration, and telangiectatic vascular change of the brain, caused as a result of the fibrinoid necrosis of the large artery were observed. Incidence of the fibrinoid necrosis increased dose dependently between 41 and 87 weeks after irradiation. Mean score of fibrinoid necrosis increased dose dependently approximately 60 weeks after irradiation. It is suggested that scores of large vessel damage do relate to dose at 41 - 87 weeks and can be used to quantify the vessel injury and a fibrinoid necrosis of the large vessels may relate to the incidence of radionecrosis. (author)

  7. Peer relations in adolescents: effects of parenting and adolescents' self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deković, M; Meeus, W

    1997-04-01

    In this study we examined the link between the parent-adolescent relationship and the adolescent's relationship with peers. The proposed model assumes that the quality of the parent-child relationship affects the adolescent's self-concept, which in turn affects the adolescent's integration into the world of peers. The sample consisted of 508 families with adolescents (12- to 18-years-old). The data were obtained at the subjects' homes, where a battery of questionnaires was administered individually to mothers, fathers and adolescents. Several constructs relating to the quality of parent-child relationship were assessed: parental acceptance, attachment, involvement, responsiveness, love withdrawal and monitoring of the child. The measures of the adolescent's self-concept included Harter's Perceived Competence Scale for Adolescents and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale. The indicators of the quality of peer relations were: degree of peer activity, having a best friend, perceived acceptance by peers and attachment to peers. Assessment of the hypothesized model showed that the adolescent's self-concept serves a mediating role in the relationship between maternal child-rearing style and involvement with peers. The mediating role of self-concept was greatest for maternal acceptance. Paternal child-rearing style, however, appeared to have an independent effect on the adolescent's involvement with peers that is not accounted for by the adolescent's self-concept. The prediction of the quality of adolescents' peer relations yielded similar results for both mothers and fathers. The results suggest that a positive self-concept and warm supportive parenting each contribute unique variance to satisfactory peer relations.

  8. Effectiveness of participatory adolescent strategic health action (PASHA for lifestyle modification among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha P Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lifestyle modification is one of the methods to promote healthy lifestyle among adolescents. In this study, the researcher planned to develop, implement and evaluate a need based Participatory Adolescent Strategic Health Action (PASHA for lifestyle modification among selected adolescents. Materials and Methods: An evaluative approach with Quasi experimental one group pretest post test design (time series was adopted. Sample constituted 103 adolescents, aged 12-17 years studying in high schools and pre university colleges of Udupi district selected based on convenient sampling. Data was gathered using reliable and valid tools. Results: The mean combined preventive health lifestyle score among all adolescents increased from 75.65-81.56. Similarly the number of adolescents with healthy lifestyle score also increased from 28.2-53.4% after practicing for 180 days. Analysis of all the components of lifestyle showed that the adolescents had adopted healthy lifestyle practices in all the components of lifestyle. The number of adolescents with combined health status score also showed an increase from 31.1-54.4% after implementing PASHA practice. Analysis of reported outcome among subjects indicated that PASHA was motivating to improve their lifestyle practices. Conclusion: PASHA was found to be effective in lifestyle modification of adolescents. It is reiterated that when lifestyle modification is to be done, a strategy to improve self directedness and self efficacy should be adopted.

  9. Prenatal effects of ancestral irradiation in inbred mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprackling, L.E.S.

    1975-01-01

    Mice from 13 inbred strains (S, Z, E, Bab, BaB, BrR, C, K, N, Q, G, CFW, CF1) received continuous cobalt 60 irradiation at low dose rates for varying numbers of consecutive generations. Some Bab and BaB mice had received continuous irradiation for from 24 to 31 generations and the other mice had up to six generations of continuous irradiation in their ancestry. At weaning, the mice were removed from the irradiation room and were mated within strains either to sibs or nonsibs. Ancestral and direct irradiation doses were calculated. The ancestral dose was the effective accumulated dose to the progeny of the mated mice. The direct dose was the amount of irradiation received by any mated female from her conception to her weaning. Each irradiated or control female was scored as fertile or sterile and in utero litter counts were made in pregnant females that were dissected past the tenth day of pregnancy; the sum of moles, dead embryos, and live embryos was the total in utero litter size. A ratio of the living embryos to the total number of embryos in utero was determined for each litter. An increase in ancestral or direct irradiation dose significantly decreased fertility in 11 of the 13 strains. The fertility curves for the pooled data were sigmoid in the area of the doses below those that caused complete sterility. Among the controls, there were significant strain differences in total litter size and in the ratio. Strain X--Y plots, with ancestral or direct doses plotted against total litter size or ratio, revealed the tendency for litter size to decrease as dose increased. The only trend shown for ratio was for the litters with ratios of 0.50 or less to appear more frequently among the irradiated mice. The few corpora lutea counts revealed nothing of significance. Generally, there was a definite trend toward fewer mice alive in utero among the irradiated mice

  10. Effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on social development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Zeeba D; Kennedy, Bruce; Katzman, Aaron; Lahvis, Garet P; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) in humans and animals has been shown to impair social development. Molecules that mediate synaptic plasticity and learning in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), specifically brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its downstream signaling molecule, early growth response protein 1 (egr1), have been shown to affect the regulation of social interactions (SI). In this study we determined the effects of PCE on SI and the corresponding ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in developing mice. Furthermore, we studied the PCE-induced changes in the constitutive expression of BDNF, egr1 and their transcriptional regulators in the mPFC as a possible molecular mechanism mediating the altered SI. In prenatal cocaine-exposed (PCOC) mice we identified increased SI and USV production at postnatal day (PD) 25, and increased SI but not USVs at PD35. By PD45 the expression of both social behaviors normalized in PCOC mice. At the molecular level, we found increased BDNF exon IV and egr1 mRNA in the mPFC of PCOC mice at PD30 that normalized by PD45. This was concurrent with increased EGR1 protein in the mPFC of PCOC mice at PD30, suggesting a role of egr1 in the enhanced SI observed in juvenile PCOC mice. Additionally, by measuring the association of acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 9 and 14 (acH3K9,14) and MeCP2 at the promoters of BDNF exons I and IV and egr1, our results provide evidence of promoter-specific alterations in the mPFC of PCOC juvenile mice, with increased association of acH3K9,14 only at the BDNF exon IV promoter. These results identify a potential PCE-induced molecular alteration as the underlying neurobiological mechanism mediating the altered social development in juvenile mice. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Hepatoprotective effect of Chenopodium murale in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saleem

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of drugs has its roots in medicinal plants that appeal researchers to identify new therapeutical entities from plants. The current study was conducted to determine its hepatoprotective activity. The results showed that aqueous methanolic extract of Chenopodium murale (200 and 500 mg/kg produced significant (p<0.001 decrease in paracetamol induced increased levels of liver enzymes (alanin transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin. These findings were further supported by histopathological investigations by microscope and detection of phytoconstituents having hepatoprotective potential e.g. qurecetin, kaempferol and gallic acid by HPLC. Conclusively aqueous methanolic extract of C. murale possess hepatoprotective activity against paracetamol induced liver damage in mice.

  12. The effect of endotoxin on preirradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlert, W.; Oehlert, M. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie); Moenig, H.; Konermann, G. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Biophysik und Strahlenbiologie)

    1992-12-01

    Adult male mice were given a whole body irradiation with non-lethal doses of 2.5 or 5 Gy. Unirradiated animals served as controls. The animals (including controls) received a single injection of endotoxin (LPS from Salmonella abortus equi) with doses of 100, 200 or 400 [mu]g one day up to one year after irradiation. Twelve, 24 or 48 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) application the animals were killed and dissected. Animals which died spontaneously were also examined. Liver, lung, kidney, small intestine, and stomach were histologically investigated. The histological findings showed, that differences exist between irradiated and unirradiated mice and that the cause of death is also different for animals dying spontaneously. The investigations have shown that after irradiation phases of different degrees of sensitivity with regard to the endotoxin response exist. This behaviour can be observed by different lethality rates or in the light of the histological results. Moreover, the histological findings have shown, that distinct regenerative changes occur first of all in the liver, in the mucosa of small intestine, and the gastric mucosa, in which the number of differntiated cells compared with the mitotic active cells is reduced. It can be ascertained, that a whole body irradiation with 2.5 to 5 Gy enhances an additional injury by endotoxin weeks to months later. Contrary to this a preirradiation a few days before endotoxin application leads to a 'protection' against the efficacy of endotoxin. These findings can be explained by modes of action described in literature, according to which endotoxins induce the formation of highly active mediators especially the tumor necrosis factor. (orig.).

  13. The effect of endotoxin on preirradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlert, W; Oehlert, M [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie; Moenig, H; Konermann, G [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Biophysik und Strahlenbiologie

    1992-12-01

    Adult male mice were given a whole body irradiation with non-lethal doses of 2.5 or 5 Gy. Unirradiated animals served as controls. The animals (including controls) received a single injection of endotoxin (LPS from Salmonella abortus equi) with doses of 100, 200 or 400 [mu]g one day up to one year after irradiation. Twelve, 24 or 48 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) application the animals were killed and dissected. Animals which died spontaneously were also examined. Liver, lung, kidney, small intestine, and stomach were histologically investigated. The histological findings showed, that differences exist between irradiated and unirradiated mice and that the cause of death is also different for animals dying spontaneously. The investigations have shown that after irradiation phases of different degrees of sensitivity with regard to the endotoxin response exist. This behaviour can be observed by different lethality rates or in the light of the histological results. Moreover, the histological findings have shown, that distinct regenerative changes occur first of all in the liver, in the mucosa of small intestine, and the gastric mucosa, in which the number of differntiated cells compared with the mitotic active cells is reduced. It can be ascertained, that a whole body irradiation with 2.5 to 5 Gy enhances an additional injury by endotoxin weeks to months later. Contrary to this a preirradiation a few days before endotoxin application leads to a 'protection' against the efficacy of endotoxin. These findings can be explained by modes of action described in literature, according to which endotoxins induce the formation of highly active mediators especially the tumor necrosis factor. (orig.).

  14. Enhanced novelty-induced corticosterone spike and upregulated serotonin 5-HT1A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors in adolescent BTBR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Georgianna G; Burke, Teresa F; Osorio, Miguel D; Smolik, Corey M; Zhang, Wynne Q; Onaivi, Emmanuel S; Gu, Ting-Ting; DeSilva, Mauris N; Hensler, Julie G

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis responses to change and social challenges during adolescence can influence mental health and behavior into adulthood. To examine how HPA tone in adolescence may contribute to psychopathology, we challenged male adolescent (5 weeks) and adult (16 weeks) BTBR T(+)tf/J (BTBR) and 129S1/SvImJ (129S) mice with novelty in sociability tests. In prior studies these strains had exaggerated or altered HPA stress responses and low sociability relative to C57BL/6J mice in adulthood. In adolescence these strains already exhibited similar or worse sociability deficits than adults or age-matched C57 mice. Yet BTBR adolescents were less hyperactive and buried fewer marbles than adults. Novelty-induced corticosterone (CORT) spikes in adolescent BTBR were double adult levels, and higher than 129S or C57 mice at either age. Due to their established role in HPA feedback, we hypothesized that hippocampal Gαi/o-coupled serotonin 5-HT1A and cannabinoid CB1 receptor function might be upregulated in BTBR mice. Adolescent BTBR mice had higher hippocampal 5-HT1A density as measured by [(3)H] 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) binding than C57 mice, and adult BTBR 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated GTPγS binding was higher than in either C57 or 129S mice in this region. Further, BTBR hippocampal CB1 density measured by [(3)H]CP55,940 binding was 15-20% higher than in C57. CP55,940-stimulated GTPγS binding in adult BTBR dentate gyrus was 30% higher then 129S (p<0.05), but was not a product of greater neuronal or cell density defined by NeuN and DAPI staining. Hence hyperactive HPA responsiveness during adolescence may underlie 5-HT1A and CB1 receptor up-regulation and behavioral phenotype of BTBR mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Morinda Morindiodes Extracts on Organs of Mice Infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Morinda Morindiodes Extracts on Organs of Mice Infected with ... The histological evaluation of the effect of Morinda(M.) morindiodes plant part(s) extracts in the treatment ... Control animals were given water for the same period of time.

  16. Project SHINE: Effects of Parent–Adolescent Communication on Sedentary Behavior in African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dawn K.; Schneider, Elizabeth M.; Alia, Kassandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined parenting variables (communication, monitoring) as moderators of a family-based intervention for reducing sedentary behavior (SB) in African American adolescents. As a secondary aim, a similar model was tested using adolescent weight status as the outcome. Methods African American adolescents (n = 73; 12.45 ± 1.45 years; 60% girls; 63% overweight/obese) and caregivers were randomized to a 6-week interactive, parent-based intervention or general health condition. Parent–adolescent communication and monitoring of health behaviors were self-reported by parents. Adolescent SB was self-reported by youth. Results There was a significant intervention by communication interaction, such that intervention families with more positive communication showed lower adolescent SB than those with less positive communication or those in the comparison condition. No effects were found for monitoring on SB or for the model with weight status as the outcome. Conclusions Parent–adolescent communication may be an effective component to integrate into health promotion programs for African American adolescents. PMID:23685450

  17. Project SHINE: effects of parent-adolescent communication on sedentary behavior in African American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St George, Sara M; Wilson, Dawn K; Schneider, Elizabeth M; Alia, Kassandra A

    2013-10-01

    This study examined parenting variables (communication, monitoring) as moderators of a family-based intervention for reducing sedentary behavior (SB) in African American adolescents. As a secondary aim, a similar model was tested using adolescent weight status as the outcome. African American adolescents (n = 73; 12.45 ± 1.45 years; 60% girls; 63% overweight/obese) and caregivers were randomized to a 6-week interactive, parent-based intervention or general health condition. Parent-adolescent communication and monitoring of health behaviors were self-reported by parents. Adolescent SB was self-reported by youth. There was a significant intervention by communication interaction, such that intervention families with more positive communication showed lower adolescent SB than those with less positive communication or those in the comparison condition. No effects were found for monitoring on SB or for the model with weight status as the outcome. Parent-adolescent communication may be an effective component to integrate into health promotion programs for African American adolescents.

  18. Protective effect of zinc against lethality of the irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, J.; Inada, T.; Machida, K.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of adding 1000 ppm Zn in the drinking water 10 days before gamma irradiation (562 - 1000 rad) of mice were studied. The mice which had received zinc had a lower mortality rate and a longer survival time compared to the controls. The LD 50 of gamma radiation was 690 rad in the control group and 770 rad in the zinc group. Zinc added to the culture medium of human melanoma cells did not shown any change in radiosensitivity; thus the radioprotective effect of zinc appears to work at the whole body level. (U.K.)

  19. Effects of Nrf2 deficiency on arsenic metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Zhu, Jiayu; Li, Lu; Li, Yongfang; Lv, Hang; Xu, Yuanyuan; Sun, Guifan; Pi, Jingbo

    2017-12-15

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a known toxicant and carcinogen. Worldwide arsenic exposure has become a threat to human health. The severity of arsenic toxicity is strongly correlated with the speed of arsenic metabolism (methylation) and clearance. Furthermore, oxidative stress is recognized as a major mechanism for arsenic-induced toxicity. Nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key regulator in cellular adaptive antioxidant response, is clearly involved in alleviation of arsenic-induced oxidative damage. Multiple studies demonstrate that Nrf2 deficiency mice are more vulnerable to arsenic-induced intoxication. However, what effect Nrf2 deficiency might have on arsenic metabolism in mice is still unknown. In the present study, we measured the key enzymes involved in arsenic metabolism in Nrf2-WT and Nrf2-KO mice. Our results showed that basal transcript levels of glutathione S-transferase omega 2 (Gsto2) were significantly higher and GST mu 1 (Gstm1) lower in Nrf2-KO mice compared to Nrf2-WT control. Arsenic speciation and methylation rate in liver and urine was then studied in mice treated with 5mg/kg sodium arsenite for 12h. Although there were some alterations in arsenic metabolism enzymes between Nrf2-WT and Nrf2-KO mice, the Nrf2 deficiency had no significant effect on arsenic methylation. These results suggest that the Nrf2-KO mice are more sensitive to arsenic than Nrf2-WT mainly because of differences in adaptive antioxidant detoxification capacity rather than arsenic methylation capacity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Effects of social isolation, re-socialization and age on cognitive and aggressive behaviors of Kunming mice and BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dong; Chen, Wei; Yu, De-Qin; Wang, Shi-Wei; Yu, Wei-Zhi; Xu, Hong; Wang, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Yi-Ping; Wu, Jun-Cheng; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Yin, Sheng-Ming

    2017-05-01

    Both Kunming (KM) mice and BALB/c mice have been widely used as rodent models to investigate stress-associated mental diseases. However, little is known about the different behaviors of KM mice and BALB/c mice after social isolation, particularly cognitive and aggressive behaviors. In this study, the behaviors of KM and BALB/c mice isolated for 2, 4 and 8 weeks and age-matched controls were evaluated using object recognition, object location and resident-intruder tests. The recovery of behavioral deficits by re-socialization was also examined for the isolated mice in adolescence. Our study showed that isolation for 2, 4 and 8 weeks led to cognitive deficits and increased aggressiveness for both KM and BALB/c mice. An important finding is that re-socialization could completely recover spatial/non-spatial cognitive deficits resulted from social isolation for both KM and BALB/c mice. In addition, age only impacted aggressiveness of KM mice. Moreover, isolation duration showed different impacts on cognitive and aggressive behaviors for both KM and BALB/c mice. Furthermore, BALB/c mice showed weak spatial/non-spatial memory and low aggressiveness when they were at the same age and isolation duration, compared to KM mice. In conclusion, KM mice and BALB/c mice behaved characteristically under physiology and isolation conditions. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Adolescent contraceptive use and its effects on fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Antonio Sánchez-Páez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescent reproductive health is part of internationally agreed development goals. Unmarried adolescents are not commonly included in global monitoring of contraceptive usedespite the more severe consequences of unintended childbearing for them. Objective: We document levels and trends of contraceptive prevalence and demand for married and sexually active unmarried adolescent women aged 15-19 in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. We estimate the effect of adolescent contraceptive use and marital status on fertility and the impact of meeting current demand. Methods: We propose a fertility model informed by the proximate determinants framework separating adolescents by marital status. Linear Mixed Model estimates are based on aggregate data from 120 DHS surveys for 34 developing countries. Results: Increasing contraceptive prevalence has already reduced adolescent fertility by 6.8Š in Latin America and 4.1Š in sub-Saharan Africa. Meeting the total demand for contraceptives of unmarried adolescents would lead to an additional decrease in fertility of 8.9Š and 17.4Š respectively. Conclusions: Contraceptive demand and prevalence are generally higher for sexually active unmarried adolescent women than for those married. Increasing prevalence has already had an impact in declining fertility, but there is a potentially larger effect if high levels of unmet need are eliminated, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Such reduction would have a significant impact on adolescent health. Contribution: We provide evidence of the importance of contraceptive use of unmarried sexually active adolescent women in explaining trends in adolescent fertility. We estimate the potential effect of meeting the contraceptive needs of married and unmarried adolescents on unintended childbearing.

  2. The effect of embryonal thymic calf extracts on neonatally thymectomized mice and on mice lethally irradiated with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplicki, J.; Blonska, B.; Stec, L.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of embryonal thymic calf extracts (ETCE) on mice thymectomized at birth was investigated. ETCE was found to induce an increase in leukopenia and decrease in the level of serum gamma globulins; it also reduced survival time in mice. The effect of ETCE on lethally irradiated mice was also examined. Only long-term administration of ETCE prior to gamma irradiation at 750 rad prolonged the survival time of mice (40% permanent survival) as compared with irradiated controls; the leukocytes from mice retained mitotic capability. Neither long-term treatment with ETCE prior to irradiation at 1000 rad, nor short-term administration prior to 750 rad affected survival time. ETCE administered after irradiation of mice with 750 rad caused a rapid decrease in blood leukocytes and a significantly lowered survival time. (Auth.)

  3. Effects of cage density on behavior in young adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lauren P; Chedester, Alan L; Cole, Marlene N

    2007-08-01

    Optimal housing conditions for mice can be achieved by minimizing environmental variables, such as those that may contribute to anxiety-like behavior. This study evaluated the effects of cage size on juvenile mice through assessment of differences in weaning weight, locomotor skills, and anxiety-like behavior. Eighteen pairs of male and pregnant female Swiss-Webster (Cr:SW) mice were housed in 3 different caging scenarios, providing 429, 505, or 729 cm2 of space. Litters were standardized to 10 pups per litter in each cage. Mice reared in each caging scenario were assessed with the open-field, light-dark exploration, and elevated plus-maze tests. No differences in weaning weight were noted. Mice reared in the 505- and 729-cm2 cages explored a significantly larger area of the open-field arena than did those in the 429-cm2 cages. Those reared in the 505-cm2 cages spent more time in the center of the open field than did those in the 729-cm2 cages, suggesting that anxiety-like behavior may be increased in the animals housed in the larger cages. This study did not establish a consistent link between decreased floor space and increased anxiety-like behavior; neither does there appear to be a consistent effect of available floor area on the development of locomotor skills on mouse pups.

  4. Effects of intra-abdominal sepsis on atherosclerosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynar, Ata Murat; Yende, Sachin; Zhu, Lin; Frederick, Daniel R; Chambers, Robin; Burton, Christine L; Carter, Melinda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Agostini, Brittani; Gregory, Alyssa D; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Shapiro, Steven D; Angus, Derek C

    2014-09-03

    Sepsis and other infections are associated with late cardiovascular events. Although persistent inflammation is implicated, a causal relationship has not been established. We tested whether sepsis causes vascular inflammation and accelerates atherosclerosis. We performed prospective, randomized animal studies at a university research laboratory involving adult male ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/-) and young C57B/L6 wild-type (WT) mice. In the primary study conducted to determine whether sepsis accelerates atherosclerosis, we fed ApoE-/- mice (N = 46) an atherogenic diet for 4 months and then performed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), followed by antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation or a sham operation. We followed mice for up to an additional 5 months and assessed atheroma in the descending aorta and root of the aorta. We also exposed 32 young WT mice to CLP or sham operation and followed them for 5 days to determine the effects of sepsis on vascular inflammation. ApoE-/- mice that underwent CLP had reduced activity during the first 14 days (38% reduction compared to sham; P < 0.001) and sustained weight loss compared to the sham-operated mice (-6% versus +9% change in weight after CLP or sham surgery to 5 months; P < 0.001). Despite their weight loss, CLP mice had increased atheroma (46% by 3 months and 41% increase in aortic surface area by 5 months; P = 0.03 and P = 0.004, respectively) with increased macrophage infiltration into atheroma as assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy (0.52 relative fluorescence units (rfu) versus 0.97 rfu; P = 0.04). At 5 months, peritoneal cultures were negative; however, CLP mice had elevated serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-10 (each at P < 0.05). WT mice that underwent CLP had increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 in the aortic lumen versus sham at 24 hours (P = 0.01) that persisted at 120 hours (P = 0.006). Inflammatory and adhesion genes (tumor necrosis factor α, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2

  5. Parent and adolescent effects of a universal group program for the parenting of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Joanna Ting Wai; Bullen, Pat; Farruggia, Susan P; Dittman, Cassandra K; Sanders, Matthew R

    2015-05-01

    There is growing support for the large-scale implementation of parenting programs for the prevention of child behavior disorders and child maltreatment in younger children. However, there is only limited evidence on the efficacy of parenting programs in modifying risk and protective factors relating to adolescent behavior problems. This study examined the efficacy of Group Teen Triple P (GTTP), an eight-session parenting program specifically designed for parents of young adolescents. Seventy-two families with adolescents aged between 12 and 15 years were randomly assigned to either GTTP (n = 35) or a care as usual (CAU) control condition (n = 37). Compared to CAU parents, parents who received GTTP reported significant improvements in parenting practices, parenting confidence, the quality of family relationships, and fewer adolescent problem behaviors at post-intervention. Several of the parent-reported effects were corroborated by reports from adolescents, including decreases in parent-adolescent conflict and increases in parental monitoring. Adolescents whose parents participated in GTTP also reported significantly fewer behavioral problems than adolescents in the CAU condition. Many of these improvements were maintained at 6-month follow-up.

  6. A Longitudinal Study on the Effects of Parental Monitoring on Adolescent Antisocial Behaviors: The Moderating Role of Adolescent Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Van der Graaff, Jolien; Moscatelli, Silvia; Keijsers, Loes; Koot, Hans M.; Rubini, Monica; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In adolescence, youth antisocial behaviors reach a peak. Parents can use different strategies, such as parental solicitation and control, to monitor their children’s activities and try to prevent or reduce their antisocial behaviors. However, it is still unclear if, and for which adolescents, these parental monitoring behaviors are effective. The aim of this study was to examine if the impact of parental solicitation and control on adolescent antisocial behaviors depends on adolescent empathy. In order to comprehensively address this aim, we tested the moderating effects of multiple dimensions (affective and cognitive) of both trait and state empathy. Participants were 379 Dutch adolescents (55.9% males) involved in a longitudinal study with their fathers and mothers. At T1 (conducted when adolescents were 17-year-old) adolescents filled self-report measures of antisocial behaviors and trait empathy during one home visit, while their state empathy was rated during a laboratory session. Furthermore, parents reported their own monitoring behaviors. At T2 (conducted 1 year later, when adolescents were 18-year-old), adolescents reported again on their antisocial behaviors. Moderation analyses indicated that both affective and cognitive state empathy moderated the effects of parental solicitation on adolescent antisocial behaviors. Results highlighted that solicitation had unfavorable effects on antisocial behaviors in adolescents with high empathy whereas the opposite effect was found for adolescents with low empathy. In contrast, neither state nor trait empathy moderated the effects of control on adolescent antisocial behaviors. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27857703

  7. Directions of Effects between Adolescent Psychopathic Traits and Parental Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihovic, Selma; Kerr, Margaret; Ozdemir, Metin; Pakalniskiene, Vilmante

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the directions of effects between adolescent psychopathic traits and parental behaviors. The data are from a community-based cohort-sequential study. Data were collected annually over 4 years. Participants were 875 adolescents, aged 13-15 at Time 1, and we analyzed their reports of negative and positive parental…

  8. Refusal Skill Ability: An Examination of Adolescent Perceptions of Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Tracy R.; Birnel, Sara; Graber, Julia A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined whether refusal assertion as defined by a proven drug prevention program was associated with adolescent perceptions of effectiveness by comparing two sets of coded responses to adolescent videotaped refusal role-plays (N = 63). The original set of codes was defined by programmatic standards of refusal assertion and the…

  9. Diverse Friendship Networks and Heterogeneous Peer Effects on Adolescent Misbehaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yilan; Fan, Linlin

    2018-01-01

    This study estimates peer effects in diverse friendship networks by friend types. Evidence from friendship networks for 57,351 U.S. high school adolescents demonstrates that adolescents are more likely to make friends with someone of the same immigrant status or ethnicity ('similar friends') than those with different backgrounds ('dissimilar…

  10. A Longitudinal Analysis of Television Advertising Effects on Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roy L.; Moschis, George P.

    A longitudinal study examined both the short term and the long term effects of television advertising on the development of adolescents' consumption-related orientations. Questionnaires were administered to 556 adolescents in a number of schools in a southern state; a second wave of questionnaires was administered to a subsample of 230 of these…

  11. Teratogenic effect of yogurt in mice fetus (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwisari Dillasamola

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Yogurt is one of the dairy products made from lactic acid fermentation by using Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. A study on teratogenic effects of yogurt on the white female mice fetus (Mus musculus has been carried out. Pregnant mice used were 20 which divided into 4 groups : the control group, D1, D2, and D3. The treatments giveThe mice were Distidelled water (control, 0.52 yogurt (D1, 1.04  yogurt (D2, and 2.08 g yogurt (D3. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Duncan multiple range test. Results showed that administration of yogurt during pregnancy could affect mother body weight of mice (P 0,05. Observations with Alizarin solution did not show skeletal defects in comparison to the control group. Observations with Bouin’s solution showed defective visceral cleft palate in fetal mice yogurt group D3. This study conclude that yogurt is safe to consume in groups D1 and D2. Yogurt has the potential to cause fetal teratogenic in group D3

  12. Anti-tumor effect of low dose radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhengping; Lu Jiaben; Zhu Bingchai

    1997-01-01

    The author reports the effects of the total body irradiation of low dose radiation (LDR) and/or the local irradiation of large dose on average tumor weights and tumor inhibitory rates in 170 mice inoculated S 180 sarcoma cell, and the influence of LDR on average longevity in 40 tumor-bearing animals. Results show (1) LDR in the range of 75∼250 mGy can inhibit tumor growth to some extent; (2) fractionated irradiation of 75 mGy and local irradiation of 10 Gy may produce a synergism in tumor growth inhibition; and (3)LDR may enhance average longevity in ascitic tumor-bearing mice

  13. Effect of ghrelin on glucose regulation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chacko, Shaji K.; Haymond, Morey W.; Sun, Yuxiang; Marini, Juan C.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Ma, Xiaojun; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    Chacko SK, Haymond MW, Sun Y, Marini JC, Sauer PJJ, Ma X, Sunehag AL. Effect of ghrelin on glucose regulation in mice. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 302: E1055-E1062, 2012. First published February 14, 2011; doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00445.2011.-Improvement of glucose metabolism after bariatric surgery

  14. Effect of Ketoprofen on Immune Cells in Mice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immune system. Ketoprofen is frequently used to treat different medical conditions. It may affect immune system at therapeutically effective doses. Therefore in ... Animals [9]. ELISPOT assay. After 7 days of treatment, mice were sacrificed and their spleens were removed. Spleen cells were separated on magnetic cell ...

  15. The Analgesic Effect of Pineapple Fruit Juice on Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainul Atiqah binti Hilmi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is a feeling stimulated by the nervous system which can be suppressed by giving an analgesic agent. Some studies revealed that pineapples have an analgesic effect. This study aim was to determine analgesic effect of pineapple on mice. Methods: In this experimental study, the effect was examined by using a writhing method on the 28 male mice. Subjects were divided into 4 groups with 7 mice each. The control group received aquades and other groups received pineapple fruit juice with 20%, 40% and 80% concentration with the dosage of 10 mL/kg/body weight. After 30 minutes, 3% acetic acid was injected intraperitoneally to induce pain. Writhing responseswere observed every 5 minutes for 30 minutes. Results: The result for mean of total writhing reaction was 2.39±0.40, 1.92±0.40, 1.50±2.13, 1.66±0.11 respectively for group 1 to 4. These data indicated a significant decrease of total writhing response in mice with 20%, 40% and 80% concentration compared to control group (p=0.023;p=0.000 and p=0.000 respectively. Most optimal concentration was40% with the protective percentage equal to 71.8%. Conclusion: Pineapple fruit juice concentrations (20%, 40%, and 80%has an analgesic effect with the most optimal concentration of 40%.

  16. Embryonic effects of radiation on ICR mice depending developmental stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yeun Hwa; Kusama, Tomoko; Kai, Michiaki [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-06-15

    The ICR pregnant mice were irradiated at 1.5Gy in every 6 hours in the period of organogenesis in order to classify the stage specificity of the embryonic effects of radiation and the stage of development differentiation of the primordium of each major organ. Intrauterine death, fetal body weight and external malformation in live fetuses were observed on day 18 of gestation. There was no statistically significant difference in the intrauterine mortality at any stage organogenesis. The fetal body weight of the mice irradiated in the intermediate stage of organogenesis showed significantly lower. There were specific highly sensitive stages in the incidences of each external malformation, that is exencephalia, open eyelid, cleft palate, anomalies of extremities and anomalies of the tail. At these stage, the primordial of the major organs are established in ICR mice.

  17. Embryonic effects of radiation on ICR mice depending developmental stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yeun Hwa; Kusama, Tomoko; Kai, Michiaki

    1995-01-01

    The ICR pregnant mice were irradiated at 1.5Gy in every 6 hours in the period of organogenesis in order to classify the stage specificity of the embryonic effects of radiation and the stage of development differentiation of the primordium of each major organ. Intrauterine death, fetal body weight and external malformation in live fetuses were observed on day 18 of gestation. There was no statistically significant difference in the intrauterine mortality at any stage organogenesis. The fetal body weight of the mice irradiated in the intermediate stage of organogenesis showed significantly lower. There were specific highly sensitive stages in the incidences of each external malformation, that is exencephalia, open eyelid, cleft palate, anomalies of extremities and anomalies of the tail. At these stage, the primordial of the major organs are established in ICR mice

  18. Effect of tocotrienol on aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, M.R.B.; Butt, S.A.; Ahmed, T.

    2015-01-01

    Effect of tocotrienol on aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic mice To study the histomorphological effect of tocotrienol on aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic mice having high fat diet. Study Design: Lab based randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National Institute of Health, Islamabad from November 2009 to June 2010. Material and Methods: Forty five female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups. The diabetic mice model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) 40 mg/kg body weight. Group A was given normal laboratory diet, group B high fat diet and group C was given tocotrienol along with high fat diet for 32 weeks. At the end of experiment the mice were sacrificed. The hearts of animals were dissected out and ascending aortae were taken out. The specimen was fixed in 10% formol calcium and processed for paraffin embedding. Five micrometer thick sections were made for haematoxylin and eosin, and Verhoeff's staining. After staining, histomorphologic changes in slides were noted. Results: In contrast to group A, atheroscelrosis developed in groups B and C. Statistically significant atherosclerotic changes were found in the aortae of diabetic mice in group B when compared to group A. On comparison of group A to C, atherosclerotic changes were statistically insignificant. However when group B was compared with group C, the aortic atherosclerotic changes decreased significantly in group C. Conclusion: In diabetics with high fat diet intake, there is an increase in development of atherosclerosis in aorta which can be reduced by tocotrienol. (author)

  19. Social defeat stress induces depression-like behavior and alters spine morphology in the hippocampus of adolescent male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Sergio D; Aubry, Antonio; Riggs, Lace M; Alipio, Jason B; Zanca, Roseanna M; Flores-Ramirez, Francisco J; Hernandez, Mirella A; Nieto, Steven J; Musheyev, David; Serrano, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    Social stress, including bullying during adolescence, is a risk factor for common psychopathologies such as depression. To investigate the neural mechanisms associated with juvenile social stress-induced mood-related endophenotypes, we examined the behavioral, morphological, and biochemical effects of the social defeat stress model of depression on hippocampal dendritic spines within the CA1 stratum radiatum. Adolescent (postnatal day 35) male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to defeat episodes for 10 consecutive days. Twenty-four h later, separate groups of mice were tested on the social interaction and tail suspension tests. Hippocampi were then dissected and Western blots were conducted to quantify protein levels for various markers important for synaptic plasticity including protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ), protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ), the dopamine-1 (D1) receptor, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the dopamine transporter (DAT). Furthermore, we examined the presence of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-receptor subunit GluA2 as well as colocalization with the post-synaptic density 95 (PSD95) protein, within different spine subtypes (filopodia, stubby, long-thin, mushroom) using an immunohistochemistry and Golgi-Cox staining technique. The results revealed that social defeat induced a depression-like behavioral profile, as inferred from decreased social interaction levels, increased immobility on the tail suspension test, and decreases in body weight. Whole hippocampal immunoblots revealed decreases in GluA2, with a concomitant increase in DAT and TH levels in the stressed group. Spine morphology analyses further showed that defeated mice displayed a significant decrease in stubby spines, and an increase in long-thin spines within the CA1 stratum radiatum. Further evaluation of GluA2/PSD95 containing-spines demonstrated a decrease of these markers within long-thin and mushroom spine types. Together, these results indicate that juvenile

  20. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    /6 mice. Furthermore, throughout the experiment, the C57bl/6 mice excreted significantly higher levels of FCM compared to the BALB/c mice. The mice were also challenged with synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and dexamethasone (DEX). The effect of the challenges could readily be detected...

  1. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  2. Effect of Different Starvation Levels on Cognitive Ability in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobing; Zhi, Guoguo; Yu, Yi; Cai, Lingyu; Li, Peng; Zhang, Danhua; Bao, Shuting; Hu, Wenlong; Shen, Haiyan; Song, Fujuan

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of different starvation levels on cognitive ability in mice. Method: Mice were randomly divided into four groups: normal group, dieting group A, dieting group B, dieting group C. The mice of normal group were given normal feeding amount, the rest of groups were given 3/4 of normal feeding amount, 2/4 of normal feeding amount and 1/4 of normal feeding amount. After feeding mice four days, the weight was observed and T-maze experiment, Morris water maze test, open field test and Serum Catalase activity were detected. Result: Compared with the normal group, the correct rate of the intervention group in the T-maze experiment was decreased and dieting group A> dieting group B> dieting group C. In the Morris water maze test, Compared with the normal group, the correct rate of the intervention group was increased. Among these three intervention groups, dieting group A had the highest correct rate and the difference of dieting group B and dieting group C were similar. In the open field test, Compared with the normal group, the exploration rate of the surrounding environment in the intervention group was increased. In the Serum Catalase test, Compared with the normal group, the activities of serum peroxidase in the intervention groups were decreased and dieting group A> dieting group B> dieting group C. Conclusion: A certain level of starvation could affect the cognitive ability of mice. In a certain range, the level of starvation is inversely proportional to cognitive ability in mice.

  3. Anxiolytic-like effect of Sonchus oleraceus L. in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Vilela, Fabiana; Soncini, Roseli; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2009-07-15

    Sonchus oleraceus L. has been used as a general tonic in Brazilian folk medicine. Nevertheless, available scientific information regarding this species is scarce; there are no reports related to its possible effect on the central nervous system. This study was conducted to establish the anxiolytic effect of extracts from the aerial parts of Sonchus oleraceus. This study evaluated the effect of hydroethanolic and dichloromethane extracts of Sonchus oleraceus in mice submitted to the elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Clonazepam was used as the standard drug. In the elevated plus-maze test, the Sonchus oleraceus extracts increased the percentage of open arm entries (PSonchus oleraceus extract exerts an anxiolytic-like effect on mice.

  4. Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on obesity in MSG mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon-Aguilar, Francisco J; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Perez-Garcia, Ma Dolores; Almanza-Perez, Julio C; Romero-Nuñez, Eunice; Campos-Sepulveda, Efrain A; Vazquez-Carrillo, Laura I; Roman-Ramos, Ruben

    2007-10-08

    The aim of the present investigation was determine whether a standardized Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces aqueous extract has an effect on body weight in an obese animal model induced by the administration of monosodium glutamate. Hibiscus sabdariffa aqueous extract, containing 33.64 mg of total anthocyanins per each 120 mg of extract, was orally administered (120 mg/kg/day) for 60 days to healthy and obese mice, and body weight gain, food and liquid intake, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), cholesterol, and triglycerides levels were measured. Hibiscus sabdariffa administration significantly reduced body weight gain in obese mice and increased liquid intake in healthy and obese mice. ALT levels were significantly increased on the 15th and 45th days in obese mice, but AST levels did not show significant changes. Mortality was not observed in the Hibiscus sabdariffa treated groups. Triglycerides and cholesterol levels showed non-significant reductions in animals treated with Hibiscus sabdariffa. Our data confirm the anti-obesity effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa reported by the Mexican population.

  5. Effects of taurine on gut microbiota and metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haining; Guo, Zhengzhao; Shen, Shengrong; Shan, Weiguang

    2016-07-01

    As being a necessary amino acid, taurine plays an important role in the regulation of neuroendocrine functions and nutrition. In this study, effects of taurine on mice gut microbes and metabolism were investigated. BALB/C mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups: The first group was administered saline (CK), the second was administered 165 mg/kg natural taurine (NE) and the third one administered 165 mg/kg synthetic taurine (CS). Gut microbiota composition in mice feces was analyzed by metagenomics technology, and the content of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in mice feces was detected by gas chromatography (GC), while the concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were detected by a LPS ELISA kit and a SOD assay kit, respectively. The results showed that the effect of taurine on gut microbiota could reduce the abundance of Proteobacteria, especially Helicobacter. Moreover, we found that the SCFA content was increased in feces of the NE group while LPS content was decreased in serum of the NE group; the SOD activity in serum and livers of the NE and CS groups were not changed significantly compare to that of the CK group. In conclusion, taurine could regulate the gut micro-ecology, which might be of benefit to health by inhibiting the growth of harmful bacteria, accelerating the production of SCFA and reducing LPS concentration.

  6. EFFECTS OF VITEX AGNUS CASTUS ON MICE FETUS DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    M. Azarnia; S. Ejtemaee-Mehr; A. Shakoor A. Ansari

    2007-01-01

    Vitex agnus castus (chasteberry) is a popular treatment for the management of female reproductive disorders including corpus luteum insufficiency, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), menopausal symptoms, and insufficient milk production. According to developing situation of complementary medicine, and frequent use of this herb, it is important to examine its effects during pregnancy. In this research we studied its effects on mice development, and we focused on macroscopic parameters, such as CRL (C...

  7. Cognitive and behavioural effects induced by social stress plus MDMA administration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pardo, M P; Roger-Sánchez, C; Rodríguez-Arias, M; Miñarro, J; Aguilar, M A

    2017-02-15

    Adverse life experiences such as social stress may make an individual more vulnerable to drug addiction and mental disorders associated with drug consumption. The present work aimed to evaluate the effects of stress induced by acute social defeat combined with the administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on depression-like behaviour, memory function and motor response to drug in late adolescent male mice. Two groups of mice were exposed to social defeat (SD) during four encounters with an aggressive co-specific, which took place on alternate days. Immediately after defeat, animals were treated with saline or MDMA 10mg/kg (SD+SAL and SD+MDMA). In control groups, mice were placed in a neutral cage without an opponent (Control+SAL, Control+MDMA). Corticosterone levels and temperature were measured on the last day of this phase. During the following days, the behaviour of the animals was evaluated in the tail suspension test (an animal model of depression), memory tasks (passive avoidance and object recognition) and, after administration of 5mg/kg of MDMA, in the open-field test. Exposure of adult mice to acute social defeat plus MDMA increased immobility in the tail suspension test (depression-like behaviour), produced cognitive impairment, and reduced the motor response to MDMA. An increase in corticosterone levels and a decrease of temperature were also observed. As hypothesised, a combination of social stress and consumption of MDMA increases the risk of developing mental and cognitive disorders. Our results support the idea that stress is a common contributing factor to the high rate of comorbidity between substance abuse and mental disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term effects of repeated social stress on the conditioned place preference induced by MDMA in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pardo, M P; Blanco-Gandía, M C; Valiente-Lluch, M; Rodríguez-Arias, M; Miñarro, J; Aguilar, M A

    2015-12-03

    Previous studies have demonstrated that social defeat stress increases the rewarding effects of psychostimulant drugs such as cocaine and amphetamine. In the present study we evaluated the long-term effects of repeated social defeat (RSD) on the rewarding effects of ±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) hydrochloride in the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Adolescent and young adult mice were exposed to four episodes of social defeat (on PND 29-40 and PND 47-56, respectively) and were conditioned three weeks later with 1.25 or 10mg/kg i.p. of MDMA (experiment 1). The long-term effects of RSD on anxiety, social behavior and cognitive processes were also evaluated in adult mice (experiment 2). RSD during adolescence enhanced vulnerability to priming-induced reinstatement in animals conditioned with 1.25mg/kg of MDMA and increased the duration of the CPP induced by the 10mg/kg of MDMA. The latter effect was also observed after RSD in young adult mice, as well as an increase in anxiety-like behavior, an alteration in social interaction (reduction in attack and increase in avoidance/flee and defensive/submissive behaviors) and an impairment of maze learning. These results support the idea that RSD stress increases the rewarding effects of MDMA and induces long-term alterations in anxiety, learning and social behavior in adult mice. Thus, exposure to stress may increase the vulnerability of individuals to developing MDMA dependence, which is a factor to be taken into account in relation to the prevention and treatment of this disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hepatoprotective effect of kaempferol against alcoholic liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Sun, Jianguo; Jiang, Zhihui; Xie, Wenyan; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    Kaempferol is a biologically active component present in various plants. The hepatoprotective effect of kaempferol in drug-induced liver injury has been proven, while its effect against alcoholic liver injury (ALI) remains unclear. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of kaempferol against ALI in mice. The experimental ALI mice model was developed and the mice were treated with different doses of kaempferol for 4 weeks. The liver functions were observed by monitoring the following parameters: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) levels in serum; histopathological studies of liver tissue; oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH); the lipid peroxidation status by malondialdehyde (MDA) and lipid accumulation by triglyceride (TG) level in serum; and the expression levels and activities of a key microsomal enzyme cytochrome 2E1 (CYP2E1), by both in vitro and in vivo methods. The ALI mice (untreated) showed clear symptoms of liver injury, such as significantly increased levels of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and excessive CYP2E1 expression and activity. The mice treated with different kaempferol dosages exhibited a significant decrease in the oxidative stress as well as lipid peroxidation, and increased anti-oxidative defense activity. The kaempferol treatment has significantly reduced the expression level and activity of hepatic CYP2E1, thus indicating that kaempferol could down regulate CYP2E1. These findings show the hepatoprotective properties of kaempferol against alcohol-induced liver injury by attenuating the activity and expression of CYP2E1 and by enhancing the protective role of anti-oxidative defense system.

  10. The combination of ethanol with mephedrone increases the signs of neurotoxicity and impairs neurogenesis and learning in adolescent CD-1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciudad-Roberts, Andrés; Duart-Castells, Leticia; Camarasa, Jorge; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    A new family of psychostimulants, under the name of cathinones, has broken into the market in the last decade. In light of the fact that around 95% of cathinone consumers have been reported to combine them with alcoholic drinks, we sought to study the consequences of the concomitant administration of ethanol on mephedrone -induced neurotoxicity. Adolescent male Swiss-CD1 mice were administered four times in one day, every 2 h, with saline, mephedrone (25 mg/kg), ethanol (2; 1.5; 1.5; 1 g/kg) and their combination at a room temperature of 26 ± 2 °C. The combination with ethanol impaired mephedrone-induced decreases in dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in the frontal cortex; and in serotonin transporter and tryptophan hydroxylase in the hippocampus by approximately 2-fold, 7 days post-treatment. Furthermore, these decreases correlated with a 2-fold increase in lipid peroxidation, measured as concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 24 h post-treatment, and were accompanied by changes in oxidative stress-related enzymes. Ethanol also notably potentiated mephedrone-induced negative effects on learning and memory, as well as hippocampal neurogenesis, measured through the Morris water maze (MWM) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine staining, respectively. These results are of special significance, since alcohol is widely co-abused with amphetamine derivatives such as mephedrone, especially during adolescence, a crucial stage in brain maturation. Given that the hippocampus is greatly involved in learning and memory processes, normal brain development in young adults could be affected with permanent behavioral consequences after this type of drug co-abuse. - Highlights: • Mice were administered a binge regimen of mephedrone plus/minus ethanol. • Ethanol exacerbated mephedrone-induced changes in 5-HT and DA function markers. • Neurochemical alterations were accompanied by an increase in oxidative stress. • Ethanol potentiated mephedrone-induced learning

  11. The combination of ethanol with mephedrone increases the signs of neurotoxicity and impairs neurogenesis and learning in adolescent CD-1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciudad-Roberts, Andrés; Duart-Castells, Leticia; Camarasa, Jorge; Pubill, David, E-mail: d.pubill@ub.edu; Escubedo, Elena

    2016-02-15

    A new family of psychostimulants, under the name of cathinones, has broken into the market in the last decade. In light of the fact that around 95% of cathinone consumers have been reported to combine them with alcoholic drinks, we sought to study the consequences of the concomitant administration of ethanol on mephedrone -induced neurotoxicity. Adolescent male Swiss-CD1 mice were administered four times in one day, every 2 h, with saline, mephedrone (25 mg/kg), ethanol (2; 1.5; 1.5; 1 g/kg) and their combination at a room temperature of 26 ± 2 °C. The combination with ethanol impaired mephedrone-induced decreases in dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in the frontal cortex; and in serotonin transporter and tryptophan hydroxylase in the hippocampus by approximately 2-fold, 7 days post-treatment. Furthermore, these decreases correlated with a 2-fold increase in lipid peroxidation, measured as concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 24 h post-treatment, and were accompanied by changes in oxidative stress-related enzymes. Ethanol also notably potentiated mephedrone-induced negative effects on learning and memory, as well as hippocampal neurogenesis, measured through the Morris water maze (MWM) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine staining, respectively. These results are of special significance, since alcohol is widely co-abused with amphetamine derivatives such as mephedrone, especially during adolescence, a crucial stage in brain maturation. Given that the hippocampus is greatly involved in learning and memory processes, normal brain development in young adults could be affected with permanent behavioral consequences after this type of drug co-abuse. - Highlights: • Mice were administered a binge regimen of mephedrone plus/minus ethanol. • Ethanol exacerbated mephedrone-induced changes in 5-HT and DA function markers. • Neurochemical alterations were accompanied by an increase in oxidative stress. • Ethanol potentiated mephedrone-induced learning

  12. The longitudinal effect of parental support during adolescence on the trajectory of sport participation from adolescence through young adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Gun Lee

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study contributed to the literature by providing important information on the longitudinal effect of parental support during adolescence on the trajectory of sport participation from adolescence through young adulthood using a nationally representative sample of participants transitioning from adolescence to young adulthood.

  13. EFFECTS OF VITEX AGNUS CASTUS ON MICE FETUS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Azarnia; S. Ejtemaee-Mehr; A. Shakoor A. Ansari

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitex agnus castus (chasteberry is a popular treatment for the management of female reproductive disorders including corpus luteum insufficiency, premenstrual syndrome (PMS, menopausal symptoms, and insufficient milk production. According to developing situation of complementary medicine, and frequent use of this herb, it is important to examine its effects during pregnancy. In this research we studied its effects on mice development, and we focused on macroscopic parameters, such as CRL (Crown-Rump length and the weight of embryos, and diameter and the weight of placenta, and microscopic parameters such as the diameters of eye and lens of embryos. We found that Vitex has special effects during different stages of mice development, for example it can improve the growth of embryos in 8th and 9th day of pregnancy (it causes significant increase in CRL and weight of embryos. Also, it may changes some microscopic parameters. These founding suggest that it should be used more cautiously during pregnancy.

  14. Effect of Family Structure on Marital Attitudes of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Assesses the effect of exposure to different family structures (single parent families, reconstituted families, intact families) on the marital socialization of 127 males and 194 female adolescents. (Author/CM)

  15. The Effects of Parental Advisory Labels on Adolescent Music Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Investigates the effect of parental advisory labels (on album covers) on the music taste and preference of adolescent students 12 to 15 years old. Finds that labeled music was liked less than unlabeled music. (SR)

  16. [Effect of dibunol liniment on posttraumatic skin regeneration in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutova, T V; Efimov, E A; Korman, D B

    1984-10-01

    The effect of dibunol liniment (5-50 mg/kg) on excised mouse skin was studied. The liniment caused complete skin regeneration with hair and gland formation in the majority of treated mice. Application of the liniment led to a considerable increase in proliferative activity of skin epithelial cells and inhibition of wound area reduction within the first day of healing as compared with controls.

  17. Preventive effects of Lentinus edodes on homocysteinemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun; Hwang, Inho; Kim, Sun; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-08-01

    Homocysteinemia is associated with cardiovascular and neuronal degenerative diseases. Deficiencies of the B vitamins lead to high homocysteine serum levels. Lentinus edodes ( L. edodes) is also known as the Shiitake mushroom and may have beneficial effects on vascular and lipid metabolic diseases, including hypertension, homocysteinemia and lipidemia. In this study, we induced a homocysteinemia-like condition in mice by the administration of a folate- and vitamin B12-deficient diet and evaluated the effect of L. edodes on the homocysteinemia-like condition. Homocysteinemia was induced by the administration of a diet deficient in folate and vitamin B12 (DFV) for 6 weeks to mice aged 4-10 weeks. The homocysteinemic mice were treated with L. edodes flour (5, 10 and 20%), eritadenine (10 mg/kg) or DFV only (negative control) for 2 weeks. The DFV induced a significant increase in serum homocysteine levels. The increased homocysteine serum levels were reduced by eritadenine and L. edodes flour (5, 10 and 20%). Hepatic levels of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SAH) were significantly higher under DFV administration and the elevated SAH levels were reduced by treatment with L. edodes in a dose-dependent manner. The mRNA expression levels of DNA methyl transferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were reduced in the DFV group, and the reduced levels of DNMT1 and DNMT3a mRNA expression were recovered in the eritadenine and L. edodes (5, 10 and 20%) groups. These results suggest that components of L. edodes , including eritadenine may have beneficial effects on hyperhomocysteinemia and its therapeutic effects may be involved in the regulation of DNA methylation-related genes in mice.

  18. Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Allicin on Hypercholesterolemic ICR Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Allicin was discussed as an active compound with regard to the beneficial effects of garlic in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the cholesterol-lowering properties of allicin. In order to examine its effects on hypercholesterolemia in male ICR mice, this compound with doses of 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg body weight was given orally daily for 12 weeks. Changes in body weight and daily food intake were measured regularly during the experimental period. Final contents of serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and hepatic cholesterol storage were determined. Following a 12-week experimental period, the body weights of allicin-fed mice were less than those of control mice on a high-cholesterol diet by 38.24±7.94% (P<0.0001 with 5 mg/kg allicin, 39.28±5.03% (P<0.0001 with 10 mg/kg allicin, and 41.18±5.00% (P<0.0001 with 20 mg/kg allicin, respectively. A decrease in daily food consumption was also noted in most of the treated animals. Meanwhile, allicin showed a favorable effect in reducing blood cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose levels and caused a significant decrease in lowering the hepatic cholesterol storage. Accordingly, both in vivo and in vitro results demonstrated a potential value of allicin as a pronounced cholesterol-lowering candidate, providing protection against the onset of atherosclerosis.

  19. Determinants of Effective Caregiver Communication After Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobart-Porter, Laura; Wade, Shari; Minich, Nori; Kirkwood, Michael; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, Hudson Gerry

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the effects of caregiver mental health and coping strategies on interactions with an injured adolescent acutely after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Multi-site, cross-sectional study. Outpatient setting of 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals and 2 tertiary general medical centers. Adolescents (N = 125) aged 12-17 years, 1-6 months after being hospitalized with complicated mild to severe TBI. Data were collected as part of a multi-site clinical trial of family problem-solving therapy after TBI. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of caregiver and environmental characteristics to the dimensions of effective communication, warmth, and negativity during caregiver-adolescent problem-solving discussions. Adolescent and caregiver interactions, as measured by the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales. Caregivers who utilized problem-focused coping strategies were rated as having higher levels of effective communication (P teen interactions. Problem-focused coping strategies are associated with higher levels of effective communication and lower levels of caregiver negativity during the initial months after adolescent TBI, suggesting that effective caregiver coping may facilitate better caregiver-adolescent interactions after TBI. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of social mobility from childhood to adolescence on BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Ana Paula; Gonçalves-Silva, Regina Maria Veras; Ferreira, Márcia Gonçalves; Sichieri, Rosely

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the contribution of childhood socio-economic position (SEP) and social mobility to weight change. The present study evaluated the effect of family SEP during the pre-school years and social mobility on BMI between birth and adolescence. Longitudinal. The SEP of each child's family was classified according to an asset-based wealth index as low, medium or high. Four different categories of childhood-adolescence SEP groups were created in order to examine social mobility: low-medium/high, medium-medium, medium-high and high-high/medium. For each of these categories, BMI was tracked from birth to adolescence. Linear mixed-effects models were used to analyse the data. Cuiabá-MT, Brazil. A population-based cohort of children born between 1994 and 1999 was assessed between 1999 and 2000, and again between 2009 and 2011. A total of 1716 adolescents were followed from childhood to adolescence (71·4 % of baseline). The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 20·4 % in childhood and 27·7 % in adolescence. A higher SEP in childhood was associated with a greater prevalence of overweight in adolescence. Expressive upward social mobility occurred, mainly in the lowest SEP group. There was a greater rate of change in BMI between birth and adolescence among children with a higher SEP in childhood and children who remained in the higher SEP from childhood to adolescence. Individuals from a higher SEP in childhood and those who remained in the higher social classes showed greater rate of change in BMI. Thus, initial SEP was the major determinant of changes in BMI.

  1. The protective effects of good parenting on adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Elise R; Ginsburg, Kenneth R

    2005-08-01

    To explore recent developments in the literature regarding parenting practices and adolescent development, with a focus on parenting style, parental monitoring, communication, and supervision. There have been significant recent advances in the study of the relationship between parenting and adolescent development. Several recent intervention studies with a parenting component demonstrated immediate and long-term protective effects on adolescent risk behavior. Parent-child connectedness and authoritative parenting style are protective for teens. Parental monitoring has a protective effect on many adolescent risk behaviors in both middle-class populations and poor urban environments and has been shown both to moderate the effect of peer influence and to persist into late adolescence. Whereas unsupervised time, exposure to sexual possibility situations, and out-of-home care increase sexual behavior, improved parent-child communication reduces sexual risk behaviors. Recent scholarship demonstrates the significant, enduring, and protective influence of positive parenting practices on adolescent development. In particular, parental monitoring, open parent-child communication, supervision, and high quality of the parent-child relationship deter involvement in high-risk behavior. Authoritative parenting generally leads to the best outcomes for teens. Clinicians should find opportunities to discuss evidence-based parenting practices with families. Future research should focus on the development and long-term evaluation of effective parenting interventions.

  2. Effect of the Parent-Adolescent Relationship on Adolescent Boys' Body Image and Subjective Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Ofra; Shenaar-Golan, Vered

    2017-07-01

    Adolescent boys must cope with physical changes that hamper their ability to form a positive body image. Sociocultural messages influence the concepts of body image, personal appearance, and weight, encouraging men to develop lean and muscular bodies. The current study examined adolescent boys' body image and its relationship to their subjective well-being (SWB) and the effect of the parent-adolescent relationship on body image and SWB. Participating in the research were 107 adolescent boys in Israel, aged 13 to 18 years. Four questionnaires were utilized: demographic, body mass index, Body Investment Scale, and Personal Well-Being Index. The findings indicate a significant, medium positive correlation between SWB and body image. After controlling for the variable of parent-adolescent relationship, the correlation weakened, indicating that the parent-adolescent relationship has no effect on adolescent boys' SWB and body image. Body image was reported to be a predictor of SWB.

  3. The impact of parent involvement in an effective adolescent risk reduction intervention on sexual risk communication and adolescent outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Stanton, Bonita; Deveaux, Lynette; Li, Xiaoming; Koci, Veronica; Lunn, Sonja

    2014-12-01

    Parent involvement in prevention efforts targeting adolescents increases the impact of such programs. However, the majority of risk-reduction intervention programs that are implemented through schools do not include parents, in part because most existing parental interventions require significant time commitment by parents. We designed a brief parent-adolescent sexual risk communication intervention to be delivered with an effective HIV prevention intervention as part of a randomized, controlled trial among 2,564 grade 10 students and their parents in the Bahamas. Mixed effects modeling analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of the brief parent-adolescent communication intervention using four waves of longitudinal data. Results indicate that a brief parent-adolescent communication intervention is effective in improving parent-adolescent communication on sex-related issues and perceived parental monitoring as well as the youth's condom use skills and self-efficacy. There is a marginal effect on consistent condom use. In addition, there is an apparent dose effect of the brief parent intervention on perceived parent-adolescent sexual risk communication and adolescent outcomes. These findings suggest that adolescent risk reduction interventions should include a brief parent-adolescent communication intervention that should be reinforced by periodic boosters in order to enhance the impact of adolescent HIV prevention programs.

  4. Anxiolytic effects of orcinol glucoside and orcinol monohydrate in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Guiyun; Li, Peng; Huang, Linyuan; Huang, Jianmei; Zhai, Haifeng

    2015-06-01

    Anxiety is a common psychological disorder, often occurring in combination with depression, but therapeutic drugs with high efficacy and safety are lacking. Orcinol glucoside (OG) was recently found to have an antidepressive action. To study the therapeutic potential of OG and orcinol monohydrate (OM) as anxiolytic agents. Anxiolytic effects in mice were measured using the elevated plus-maze, hole-board, and open-field tests. Eight groups of mice were included in each test. Thirty minutes before each test, mice in each group received one oral administration of OG (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg), OM (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg), the positive control diazepam (1 or 5 mg/kg), or control vehicle. Each mouse underwent only one test. Uptake of orcinol (5 mg/kg) in the brain was qualitatively detected using the HPLC-MS method. OG (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) and OM (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) increased the time spent in open arms and the number of entries into open arms in the elevated plus-maze test. OG (5 and 10 mg/kg) and OM (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) increased the number of head-dips in the hole-board test. At all tested doses, OG and OM did not significantly affect the locomotion of mice in the open-field test. Orcinol could be detected in the mouse brain homogenates 30 min after oral OM administration, having confirmed that OM is centrally active. The results demonstrated that OG and OM are anxiolytic agents without sedative effects, indicating their therapeutic potential for anxiety.

  5. Cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, E.J.; Jose, J.G.; Yang, V.V.; Barker, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of heavy charged particles on the crystalline lens of the eye of mice are important because this tissue has proven susceptible to other forms of high-LET radiation. This report summarizes the results currently available from a prospectively designed study to explore the LET dependence of the cataractogenic process. The present results are consistent with a high cataractogenic effect at 100 keV/μm, because plateau argon 40 ions, with an LET in this range, produce higher average cataracts scores at 9, 11 and 13 months than do carbon 12 or neon 20 ions. In the electron micrographs, significant changes were observed from the controls

  6. The study of hormesis effection on mice by Zuibyougan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takeshi; Nishina, Kazunari.

    1997-01-01

    Although various biohazards of high-dose radiation have been known, Dr. Lucky (1980) paid an attention to low-dose radiation and reported that a low-dose exposure which allows normal functioning of cellular repairing mechanism caused some favorable effects such as growth stimulation, elongation of life-span etc. And these effects were named as Hormesis effects by him. In this study, the biological effects of Zuibyougan, a ionizing radioactive rock produced from a mine were investigated on the growth and locomotor activities in TRC mice. Drinking water containing Zuibyougan in 3 different forms (chip, sand and fine powder) at a concentration of 25 g/100 ml was administered from the time of weaning and tap water was given to the control group. Their body weights were measured once a week up to 12 weeks of age. Body weight of the group administered with either type of Zuibyougan was slightly higher than that of the control. The increasing effects were most marked for the group given in powder form. However, the effects were not statistically significant. Further, the locomotive activities determined by round running method were also slightly higher in the mice administered with Zuibyougan. (M.N.)

  7. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  8. Immunoregulatory effect of evodiamine in mice of various germlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai-Yan; Song, Zhao-Yang; Deng, Lan; Zhang, Mei-Xia

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of evodiamine on the proliferation and the immune function of thymocytes and splenocyte of mice from three germlines, which were 8 weeks old masculinity BALB/c, C57BL/6 and F1 hybridization mice. Cells of thymus and spleen were harvested and prepared as unicellular suspension. Cell proliferation was detected by MTT method, while the concentration of IL-2 was detected by ELISA, mRNA levels of bcl-2 and cdk2 in cells treated with evodiamine were detected by RT-PCR, the apoptosis rate and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration were analyzed by FCM, and the protein levels of BCL-2, CDK2 and BAX were determined by fluorescence microscope. The results indicated that at 0.5, 0.75 and 1 micromol/L, evodiamine inhibited the proliferation and externalization of thymocytes and splenocytes stimulated with ConA (p rate increased at a prolong period of time. After treatment with evodiamine for 24 and 48 hours, the cells were divided into two groups, one of which was negatively stained by 2 7-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), which indicated that ROS level decreased significantly in the dying cells. It is concluded that evodiamine inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of thymocytes and splenocytes from different germline mice, and at the same time decreases secretion of IL-2 through down-regulating bcl-2 and cdk2 levels.

  9. Effects of Edaravone on Hippocampal Antioxidants in EL Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Asami; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Saito, Kenichi; Murashima, Yoshiya L; Itoh, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The role of oxidative stress in susceptibility to seizures has been the focus of several recent studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antiepileptic effects of the free radical scavenger edaravone on EL mice, a strain that is highly susceptible to convulsive seizures. EL mice were treated intraperitoneally with edaravone or saline for 1 week. The levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and 3 isozymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD) (cytoplasmic copper- and zinc-containing SOD, extracellular SOD, and mitochondrial manganese-containing SOD) were measured in the hippocampus, and electroencephalograms (EEGs) were used to evaluate seizure sensitivity. Hippocampal levels of GSSG were lower in the edaravone group than in the untreated control group, and the GSH/GSSG ratio, Cu/Zn-SOD, and EC-SOD activities were higher in the edaravone group. Edaravone shortened the duration of interictal spike discharges and clinically suppressed epileptic seizures. Edaravone increases antioxidant potency and reduces seizure susceptibility in EL mice, making it a promising novel antiepileptic agent.

  10. Effects of HIV-1 on Cognition in Humanized NSG Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Sidra Pervez

    Host species specificity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) creates a challenge to study the pathology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic agents. The closely related simian immunodeficiency virus and studies of neurocognitive impairments on transgenic animals expressing partial viral genome have significant limitations. The humanized mice model provides a small animal system in which a human immune system can be engrafted and immunopathobiology of HIV-1 infection can be studied. However, features of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) were not evaluated in this model. Open field activity test was selected to characterize behavior of original strain NOD/scid-IL-2Rgammac null (NSG) mice, effects of engraftment of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and functional human immune system (huNSG), and finally, investigate the behavior changes induced by chronic HIV-1 infection. Long-term infected HuNSG mice showed the loss of working memory and increased anxiety in the open field. Additionally, these animals were utilized for evaluation of central nervous system metabolic and structural changes. Detected behavioral abnormalities are correlated with obtained neuroimaging and histological abnormalities published.

  11. Effects of topical topiramate in wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Carlos Poblete; Bóbbo, Vanessa Cristina Dias; Carraro, Rodrigo Scarpari; de Araujo, Thiago Matos Ferreira; Lima, Maria H M; Velloso, Licio A; Araújo, Eliana P

    2018-02-23

    Recent studies have indicated that systemic topiramate can induce an improvement on the aesthetic appearance of skin scars. Here, we evaluated topical topiramate as an agent to improve wound healing in C57/BL6 mice. Mice were inflicted with a 6.0 mm punch to create two wounds in the skin of the dorsal region. Thereafter, mice were randomly assigned to either vehicle or topical topiramate (20 µl of 2% cream) once a day for 14 days, beginning on the same day as wound generation. We analyzed the wound samples over real-time PCR, Western blotting, and microscopy. There was no effect of the topiramate treatment on the time for complete reepithelization of the wound. However, on microscopic analysis, topiramate treatment resulted in increased granulation tissue, thicker epidermal repair, and improved deposition of type I collagen fibers. During wound healing, there were increased expressions of anti-inflammatory markers, such as IL-10, TGF-β1, and reduced expression of the active form of JNK. In addition, topiramate treatment increased the expression of active forms of two intermediaries in the insulin-signaling pathway, IRS-1 and Akt. Finally, at the end of the wound-healing process, topiramate treatment resulted in increased expression of SOX-2, a transcription factor that is essential to maintain cell self-renewal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. We conclude that topical topiramate can improve the overall quality of wound healing in the healthy skin of mice. This improvement is accompanied by reduced expression of markers involved in inflammation and increased expression of proteins of the insulin-signaling pathway.

  12. Effects of Nicotine Metabolites on Nicotine Withdrawal Behaviors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassan, Sagi; Bagdas, Deniz; Damaj, M Imad

    2017-06-01

    Rodent studies suggest that nicotine metabolites and minor tobacco alkaloids such as nornicotine and cotinine may promote cigarette smoking by enhancing nicotine rewarding and reinforcing effects. However, there is little information on the effects of these minor tobacco alkaloids on nicotine withdrawal. The present studies were conducted to determine whether the minor tobacco alkaloids nornicotine and cotinine exhibit nicotine-like behavioral effects in a mouse model of spontaneous nicotine withdrawal. Mice were infused with nicotine or saline for 14 days. Experiments were conducted on day 15, 18-24 hours after minipump removal. Ten minutes prior to testing, nicotine-dependent ICR male mice received an acute injection of nicotine (0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg), nornicotine (2.5 and 25 mg/kg), or cotinine (5 and 50 mg/kg) to determine effects on somatic signs, anxiety-like behaviors, and hyperalgesia spontaneous signs of withdrawal. Nicotine and the minor tobacco alkaloid nornicotine, but not cotinine, produced dose-dependent reversal of nicotine withdrawal signs in the mouse. The minor tobacco alkaloid and nicotine metabolite nornicotine at high doses have nicotinic like effects that may contribute to tobacco consumption and dependence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. [Detoxification effects of two drugs in thallium -poisoned mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; He, Yue-zhong; Zhang, Xi-gang

    2012-06-01

    To observe the thallium eliminating effect of prussian blue, pentetate zinc trisodium (Zn-DTPA), and their combined use in the treatment of acute thallium poisoning in mice. Thallium poisoned mice were reproduced by oral administration of 0.2 ml thallous nitrate (3 mg/ml). They were assigned randomly to four groups according to the random number table method, namely, model group, prussian blue group, Zn-DTPA group and the combination therapy group, with 10 mice in each group. Prussian blue was administered orally [4.52 g×kg(-1)×d(-1), total four times], and Zn-DTPA was injected intraperitoneally [500 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1), one time]4 hours after giving thallium. The dosage of both drugs in combination treatment was as the same as described above. After treatment for 5 days, all the animals were sacrificed. Brain, intestine, kidney and liver of 1 mouse from each group were collected for pathological examination to observe the necrosis. Thallium contents of blood, brain, urine and feces from the other mice were determined. Pathological examination showed that the damage to intestine, kidney and liver was less obvious in treatment group compared with those of the model group. The effect was most obvious in the combination treatment group. However, brain damage was slightly improved. Thallium content in blood (mg/ml) of prussian blue group and the combination treatment group decreased obviously compared with the model group, and the decrease was more obvious in the combination treatment group (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.18 ± 0.02). Thallium content in urine (mg/ml) and feces (mg/kg) was significantly increased after treatment, and the thallium elimination was most significant in the combined treatment group (urine: 11.34 ± 0.81 vs. 0.02 ± 0.01, feces: 13.11 ± 1.84 vs. 0.21 ± 0.07, both P Thallium content in brain was similar among all the groups. The single and combined use of prussian blue and Zn-DTPA could reduce the damage in intestine, kidney and liver. Combined use of

  14. Effect of Chronic Lead Intoxication on Risky Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mohammadyar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With industrialization of human societies, pollutants like lead have entered in the life cycle, causing harmful effects on body organs. No sufficient studies have been done on the effects of pollutants on behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of lead on some measurable behaviors of an animal model. Methods: Forty eight male adult mice were divided into 4 groups of 12 each. Lead acetate was added at concentrations of 0, 5, 50, or 500 ppm to the drinking water of the animals for 4 weeks (28 days. On day 29, animals were placed on an Elevated Plus maze (EPM for 5 min and the time in sec spent was measured on closed arms, open arms and the end 1/3rd of the open arms. Increased time on open arms, particularly the end 1/3rd was considered to reflect an enhanced risk-accepting behavior. Results: In this study, it was shown that lead exposure caused an increased number of entrance (P=0.006 and time spent (P=0.034 by mice on open arms of the EPM. There was a positive correlation between the concentration of lead acetate and those two effects. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that lead poisoning may decrease normal anxiety in mice and increase risky behavior in this species. Clinical studies on human subjects with risky behavior are strongly suggested in order to find a possible relation between chronic exposures to lead as well as plasma concentration of lead with the extent of this kind of behavior.

  15. The Effect of Parenting Styles on Adolescent Problems: A Case of Korean Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrake, Eunai Kim

    Focusing on Korean Americans, this study examined the overall pattern of adolescents' perceptions of their parents and its effects on adolescent problem behaviors. Analyses of survey data from 218 Korean American adolescents indicated that these adolescents perceived their parents as "authoritarian yet warm," and that this parenting…

  16. Effect of head-irradiation upon epidermal mitotic activity during wound healing in the adrenalectomized mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Koshi

    1977-01-01

    Epidermal mitotic activity during wound healing was estimated both in the adrenalectomized, head-irradiated mice and in the adrenalectomized, non-irradiated mice, and was compared with those obtained previously from the unoperated, head-irradiated mice. It was found that head-irradiation caused a mitotic depression to a much smaller extent in the adrenalectomized mice than it did in the unoperated mice, though adrenalectomy itself had exerted a great inhibitory effect upon the mitosis induced by an injury. Whether this abscopal effect of head-irradiation upon the mitotic activity was mediated via the adrenals, and whether in the adrenalectomized mice the head-irradiation acted to increase epidermal response to injury, making the mitotic pattern of adrenalectomized mice to come near that of control mice were discussed. (auth.)

  17. Effect of inulin supplementation in male mice fed with high fat diet on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the preventive and therapeutic effects of inulin supplementation in Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) male mice fed with high fat diet. Methods: NMRI male mice (n = 36) were divided into three groups. Control (C1), obese (O1) and experimental mice (E1) were fed during 8 weeks as follows: C1 ...

  18. Peer effects in adolescent bodyweight: evidence from rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Chung-Ping A; Li, Qiang

    2013-06-01

    Peer effect is a potential determinant of individual weight gain that has drawn considerable attention recently. The presence of peer effect implies that policies targeted at changing bodyweight can have enhanced effectiveness through a multiplier effect. This study aims to measure the peer effects on adolescent bodyweight in China. Using the small community nature of the rural sample of the wave 2000 of the China Health and Nutrition Survey, we define plausible peer groups and assess the effect of the average BMI of his/her peer group on the BMI of an adolescent. An instrumental variable (IV) approach is applied to control for potential endogeneity of the peer group's BMI. We find evidence supporting peer effect on BMI in general. The peer effect is around 0.3 with slight variation between two alternative peer definitions. Split sample analysis shows that the peer effect is significant for females (0.32-0.37), and insignificant for male adolescents. Furthermore, we find strong influence of same-gender peers (0.34-0.42) for female adolescents. Conditional quantile regressions show that the peer effect in weight gain is mainly present at or below the median in the conditional BMI distribution for girls, and at the higher end of the BMI distribution for boys. Multiple tests show strong identification, and strong instruments in our IV estimation. Placebo tests suggest that our results are reasonably robust to the correlated effect, due to unobserved community- and province-level factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of uremia on HDL composition, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild-type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Christian A; Bro, Susanne; Bartels, Emil D

    2007-01-01

    Wild-type mice normally do not develop atherosclerosis, unless fed cholic acid. Uremia is proinflammatory and increases atherosclerosis 6- to 10-fold in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. This study examined the effect of uremia on lipoproteins, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild...... in cholic acid-fed sham mice. The results suggest that moderate uremia neither induces aortic inflammation nor atherosclerosis in C57BL/6J mice despite increased LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio and altered HDL composition....

  20. Radiosensitizing effects of 9401 on mice bearing H22 hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoqiu; Wang Qin; Zhou Zewei; Han Ying; Wang Dezhi; Shen Xiu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radiosensitizing effects of 9401 on mice bearing H22 hepatoma. Methods: Mouse model bearing H22 hepatoma cells were established. Mice were randomly divided into six groups, the control group,the radiation group and four treatment groups including 9401 at high, medium and low dosages and nicotinamide combined with radiation. After irradiated, the growth of tumor was observed, the time of tumor growth was recorded, the delay time of tumor growth and enhancement factor (EF) were calculated. After 28 days, the mice were killed, the tumors were stripped and inhibition rate was calculated. Results: Groups of 9401 combined with radiation could postpone tumor growth. The difference was statistically significant between 9401 groups at high, medium dosages combined with radiation and nicotinamide combined with radiation group (t=24.7 and 7.5, both P<0.01). Compared with radiation alone group, groups of 9401 combined with radiation had significant radiosensitizing effect. The enhancement factor of 9401 combined with radiation groups at high and medium dosages were 2.13 and 1.73 respectively, they were significant higher than nicotinamide combined with radiation group (t=2.26 and 9.04, both P<0.05). The inhibition rate of 9401 groups at high, medium and low dosages combined with radiation were 64.5%, 50.9% and 42.6% respectively. The inhibition rate of nicotinamide group combined radiation was 53.2%. The inhibition rate of 9401 at high dosage combined with radiation had significant difference with nicotinamide combined radiation (t =2.8, P<0.05). Nicotinamide combined with radiation group, 9401 combined with radiation groups could significant inhibit the growth of tumors compared with radiation alone group (t=5.7, 4.0 and 2.2, all P<0.05). Conclusion: 9401 can inhibit the tumor growth and the inhibition effect increases gradually with the drug dose increasing. It also has radiosensitizing effects on mice bearing H22 hepatoma and present broadly

  1. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and vasectomy on circulating corticosterone and ACTH in BALB/c mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    compared to anaesthetised mice not treated with dexamethasone. Thus, dexamethasone effectively inhibited the corticosterone response in the anaesthetised-only mice, but not in the mice subjected to surgery. In conclusion, both isoflurane anaesthesia and vasectomy during isoflurane anaesthesia resulted...

  2. Relative Age Effects in Dutch Adolescents: Concurrent and Prospective Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertus F Jeronimus

    Full Text Available The literature on relative age position effects is rather inconsistent. In this study we examined intra-classroom age position (or relative age effects on Dutch adolescents' school progress and performance (as rated by teachers, physical development, temperamental development (fear and frustration, and depressive symptoms, all adjusted for age at the time of measurement. Data were derived from three waves of Tracking Adolescents' Individuals Lives Survey (TRAILS of 2230 Dutch adolescents (baseline mean age 11.1, SD = 0.6, 51% girls. Albeit relative age predicted school progress (grade retention ORs = 0.83 for each month, skipped grade OR = 1.47, both p<.001, our key observation is the absence of substantial developmental differences as a result of relative age position in Dutch adolescents with a normative school trajectory, in contrast to most literature. For adolescents who had repeated a grade inverse relative age effects were observed, in terms of physical development and school performance, as well as on depressive symptoms, favoring the relatively young. Cross-cultural differences in relative age effect may be partly explained by the decision threshold for grade retention.

  3. Effect of Potassium Channel Modulators on Morphine Withdrawal in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Seth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of potassium channel openers and blockers on morphine withdrawal syndrome. Mice were rendered dependent on morphine by subcutaneous injection of morphine; four hours later, withdrawal was induced by using an opioid antagonist, naloxone. Mice were observed for 30 minutes for the withdrawal signs ie, the characteristic jumping, hyperactivity, urination and diarrhea. ATP-dependent potassium (K + ATP channel modulators were injected intraperitoneally (i.p. 30 minutes before the naloxone. It was found that a K + ATP channel opener, minoxidil (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p., suppressed the morphine withdrawal significantly. On the other hand, the K + ATP channel blocker glibenclamide (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p. caused a significant facilitation of the withdrawal. Glibenclamide was also found to abolish the minoxidil's inhibitory effect on morphine withdrawal. The study concludes that K + ATP channels play an important role in the genesis of morphine withdrawal and K + ATP channel openers could be useful in the management of opioid withdrawal. As morphine opens K + ATP channels in neurons, the channel openers possibly act by mimicking the effects of morphine on neuronal K + currents.

  4. The novelty-seeking phenotype modulates the long-lasting effects of intermittent ethanol administration during adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Montagud-Romero

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate if a novelty-seeking phenotype mediates the long-lasting consequences of intermittent EtOH intoxication during adolescence. The hole board test was employed to classify adolescent mice as High- or Low-Novelty Seekers. Subsequently, animals were administered ethanol (1.25 or 2.5 g/kg on two consecutive days at 48-h intervals over a 14-day period. Anxiety levels--measured using the elevated plus maze- spontaneous motor activity and social interaction test were studied 3 weeks later. A different set of mice underwent the same procedure, but received only the 2.5 g/kg dose of ethanol. Three weeks later, in order to induce CPP, the same animals were administered 1 or 6 mg/kg of cocaine or 1 or 2.5 mg/kg MDMA. The results revealed a decrease in aggressive behaviors and an anxiolytic profile in HNS mice and longer latency to explore the novel object by LNS mice. Ethanol exposure enhanced the reinforcing effects of cocaine and MDMA in both groups when CPP was induced with a sub-threshold dose of the drugs. The extinguished cocaine-induced CPP (1 and 6 mg/kg was reinstated after a priming dose in HNS animals only. Our results confirm that intermittent EtOH administration during adolescence induces long-lasting effects that are manifested in adult life, and that there is an association between these effects and the novelty-seeking phenotype.

  5. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 μg/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 μg/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 μg/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 μg/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation

  6. Effect of Soybean on Male Reproductive Physiology in Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Modaresi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Soybean (Soja hispida Moench is a member of Fabaceae family. It is a species of legume native to East Asia. Soy contains significant amount of all the essential amino acids for humans therefore, is a good source of protein .Soy has an important role in the improvement and treatment of some cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of soybeans on reproductive system in male mice. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Isfahan Payam e Noor University in 2009. In this research, 32 male mice were randomly grouped into four experimental groups. The control group was fed with soy-free basic diet. The experimental groups 1, 2, and 3 were fed with a diet containing 20%, 30% and 50% soy diet respectively.At the end of 9 weeks of treatment, blood samples were collected and serum levels of testosterone, LH and FSH were measured. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS software using one way ANOVA with Dunnett's post test and Duncan test. Results : In the experimental group which received 20% soy diet, the level of testosterone had a meaningful decrease in comparison with the control group (P<0.05, but in the experimental group which received a 50% soy diet, the level of testosterone had a meaningful increase (P<0.05 .The LH level in 30% and 50% groups had a meaningful increase but no significant differences were observed in FSH level & weight of testicles (P<0.05.The number of sperms in all of the treatment regimes had a meaningful decrease (P0.05 Conclusion: Results of this research indicated that the 20, 30, and 50 percent soy diet had a negative effect on the male reproductive system in mice.

  7. Protective effect of melatonin on thrombocytopoiesis in irratiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aiguo; Hu Qun; Yang Mo; Li Zhiguang; Huang Weizhe; Pang Yaxuan; Li Guixia; Wu Baixiang; Huo Taihui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective effect of melatonin on thrombocytopoiesis (T) and its mechanism in total-bodily irradiated mice. Methods: Altogether 18 female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups (6 each): Group 1(normal control, N) received neither irradiation nor melatonin; Group 2 (model control, C); received total body-irradiation for 4 Gy gamma-rays and Group 3 (melatonin, M), received melatonin after irradiation at the dosage of 10 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 via i. p. injection in consecutive 21 days. In Group C normal saline instead of melatonin was administered in the same way as above. Peripheral blood platelets and white blood cells (WBC) were analyzed for the three groups on day 0, day 7, day 14, and day 21. All the mice were sacrificed to collect bone marrow cells for the assays of colony-forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK) and of colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F). The effects of melatonin of different concentrations (0-500 nmol/L) on CFU-MK formation were observed in vitro. Results: The results showed that melatonin enhanced the recovery of T. Moreover, melatonin also promoted the increase of CFU-F (28 ± 10.4 vs 14.6 ± 2.8) and CFU-MK (19.63 ± 3.28 vs 11 ± 2.24) in vivo. The amount of CFU-MK in vitro was dependent on the concentration of melatonin. Compared with the control group, the size of CFU-MK in Group M was much larger and MK cells were more mature, especially when the melatonin concentration was 200 nmol/L. Conclusion: Melatonin provides protective effect on T in irradiated mice. It enhances T in vivo and promotes the growth of bone marrow stromal cells as well as megakaryocytes in vitro. Therefore, we speculate that the T-protective activity of melatonin may be mediated via promoting growth of the progenitors of platelet, megakaryocytes, and bone marrow stromal cells. (authors)

  8. [The actor effect and the partner effect of self-esteem and mother-adolescent communication on depression in mothers and adolescents in Kirogi families according to adolescent' development stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Eun Kyung; Shin, Sung Hee

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to compare the level of depression, self-esteem and mother-adolescent (M-A) communication perceived by both mothers and adolescents between the early adolescent (E-A) group and the late adolescent (L-A) group; and to examine the actor effect and the partner effect of self-esteem and M-A communication on depression in mothers and adolescents. Participants were 107 Kirogi families who resided in the Midwest region of the U. S. Data were collected from September, 2008 to March, 2009 using the scales of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D), Self-esteem and Parent-Adolescent Communication Inventory. Mothers in E-A group reported higher scores on depression than mothers in L-A group. Adolescents in L-A group reported higher scores on depression and lower scores on self-esteem than adolescents in E-A group. In the E-A group, mothers' self-esteem had big actor effect on mothers' depression and partner effect on adolescents' depression. In the L-A group, self-esteem of mothers and adolescents had actor effect on their depression respectively without partner effect. M-A communication of mothers influences mothers' depression negatively and adolescents' depression positively. In both group, M-A communication influences their depression with mediating effect of self-esteem. To promote Kirogi families' mental health, programs for mothers and adolescents should be developed differently according to adolescents' development stage.

  9. Contextualizing Informal Labeling Effect on Adolescent Recidivism in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    Symbolic interactionism argues that the effect of informal labeling by general others, such as family and friends, on behavior depends on the social context under which labeling takes place. Despite abundant research on informal labeling, little effort has been made to contextualize its impact on adolescent reoffending. Also, compared with other theories, only a few studies have been conducted among youths in Asian population. Using three consecutive waves of self-reported survey data from a nationally representative sample of 2,406 Korean adolescents, this study examined an interactional model for the informal labeling effect. Findings suggest that informal labeling, as well as school commitment and delinquent peer association, has an independent effect on delinquency. Also supported is the symbolic interactionist hypothesis that adolescents with greater involvement in delinquent subcultures were less susceptible to informal labeling. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Exogenous progesterone exacerbates running response of adolescent female mice to repeated food restriction stress by changing α4-GABAA receptor activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wable, G S; Chen, Y-W; Rashid, S; Aoki, C

    2015-12-03

    Adolescent females are particularly vulnerable to mental illnesses with co-morbidity of anxiety, such as anorexia nervosa (AN). We used an animal model of AN, called activity-based anorexia (ABA), to investigate the neurobiological basis of vulnerability to repeated, food restriction (FR) stress-evoked anxiety. Twenty-one of 23 adolescent female mice responded to the 1st FR with increased wheel-running activity (WRA), even during the limited period of food access, thereby capturing AN's symptoms of voluntary FR and over-exercise. Baseline WRA was an excellent predictor of FR-elicited WRA (severity of ABA, SOA), with high baseline runners responding to FR with minimal SOA (i.e., negative correlation). Nine gained resistance to ABA following the 1st FR. Even though allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one, THP), the metabolite of progesterone (P4), is a well-recognized anxiolytic agent, subcutaneous P4 to these ABA-resistant animals during the 2nd FR was exacerbative, evoking greater WRA than the counterpart resistant group that received oil vehicle, only. Moreover, P4 had no WRA-reducing effect on animals that remained ABA-vulnerable. To explain the sensitizing effect of P4 upon the resistant mice, we examined the relationship between P4 treatment and levels of the α4 subunit of GABAARs at spines of pyramidal cells of the hippocampal CA1, a parameter previously shown to correlate with resistance to ABA. α4 levels at spine membrane correlated strongly and negatively with SOA during the 1st ABA (prior to P4 injection), confirming previous findings. α4 levels were greater among P4-treated animals that had gained resistance than of vehicle-treated resistant animals or of the vulnerable animals with or without P4. We propose that α4-GABAARs play a protective role by counterbalancing the ABA-induced increase in excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and although exogenous P4's metabolite, THP, enhances α4 expression, especially among those that can gain resistance

  11. A role for progesterone and α4-containing GABAA receptors of hippocampal pyramidal cells in the exacerbated running response of adolescent female mice to repeated food restriction stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wable, Gauri; Chen, Yi-Wen; Rashid, Shannon; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent females are particularly vulnerable to mental illnesses with comorbidity of anxiety, such as anorexia nervosa (AN). We used an animal model of AN, called activity-based anorexia (ABA), to investigate the neurobiological basis of vulnerability to repeated, food restriction (FR) stress-evoked anxiety. Twenty-one of 23 adolescent female mice responded to the 1st FR with increased wheel running activity (WRA), even during the limited period of food access, thereby capturing AN's symptoms of voluntary FR and over-exercise. Baseline WRA was an excellent predictor of FR-elicited WRA (severity of ABA, SOA), with high baseline-runners responding to FR with minimal SOA (i.e., negative correlation). Nine gained resistance to ABA following the 1st FR. Even though allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one, THP), the metabolite of progesterone (P4), is a well-recognized anxiolytic agent, subcutaneous P4 to these ABA-resistant animals during the 2nd FR was exacerbative, evoking greater WRA than the counterpart resistant group that received oil vehicle, only. Moreover, P4 had no WRA-reducing effect on animals that remained ABA-vulnerable. To explain the sensitizing effect of P4 upon the resistant mice, we examined the relationship between P4 treatment and levels of the α4 subunit of GABAARs at spines of pyramidal cells of the hippocampal CA1, a parameter previously shown to correlate with resistance to ABA. α4 levels at spine membrane correlated strongly and negatively with SOA during the 1st ABA (prior to P4 injection), confirming previous findings. α4 expression levels were greater among P4-treated animals that had gained resistance than of vehicle-treated resistant animals or of the vulnerable animals with or without P4. We propose that α4-GABAARs play a protective role by counterbalancing the ABA-induced increase in excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, and although exogenous P4's metabolite, THP, enhances α4 expression, especially among those that can gain

  12. Radioprotective effect of RSP-CM on mice irradiated with different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xia; Yang Rujun; Zhang Xin; Yang Yunfang; Jin Zhijun; Xiang Yingsong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radioprotective effects of cytokines on hematopoietic impairment of irradiated mice. Methods: Using RSP-CM and LP3-CM respectively originated GM-CSF and G-CSF to treat ICR mice irradiated with different doses of 60 Co γ-rays. The 30-day survival rate of mice, the mean survival days of dead mice were determined and the numbers of peripheral white blood cells and BMC of part of the mice were counted. At the same time, GM clonogenic activity of BM was assayed. Results:RSP-CM could effectively raise 30-day survival rate of mice irradiated with 7.5 Gy. However, LP3-CM had no obvious effect. Judging from the comparative survival ratio, only the RSP-CM treated group showed protective effect on the 8.0 Gy -irradiated mice. The 8.5 Gy-irradiated mice all died within 30 days, indicating that GM-CSF had weak effect on higher dose-irradiated mice. Conclusion: GM-CSF can stimulate the hematopoietic system of irradiated mice, and has dose-effect and time-effect relations. M-CSF used singly has no obvious effect

  13. Effect of aging and radiation in mice of different genotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storer, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented on the life span of nine inbred strains and five hybrid strains of mice based on 400 mice of each sex for inbred and 200 mice of each sex for hybrid. Some of these mice were exposed when 120 days old to 250 R or 450 R of x radiation delivered at a dose rate of 60 R/min. Data on strain, sample size, and mean survival times are presented in tables

  14. Concentration- and age-dependent effects of chronic caffeine on contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6J mice

    OpenAIRE

    Poole, Rachel L.; Braak, David; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic caffeine exerts negligible effects on learning and memory in normal adults, but it is unknown whether this is also true for children and adolescents. The hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, undergoes extensive structural and functional modifications during pre-adolescence and adolescence. As a result, chronic caffeine may have differential effects on hippocampus-dependent learning in pre-adolescents and adolescents compared with adults. Here, we characterize...

  15. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and nootropic effect of ondansetron in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S; Agarwal, N B; Mediratta, P K; Sharma, K K

    2012-09-01

    The role of serotonin receptors have been implicated in various types of experimentally induced seizures. Ondansetron is a highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist used as antiemetic agent for chemotherapy-, and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of ondansetron on electroshock, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and cognitive functions in mice. Ondansetron was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg (single dose) to observe its effect on the increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test and PTZ-induced seizure test. In addition, a chronic study (21 days) was also performed to assess the effects of ondansetron on electroshock-induced convulsions and cognitive functions. The effect on cognition was assessed by elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigms. Phenytoin (25 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard anticonvulsant drug and piracetam (200 mg/kg) was administered as a standard nootropic drug. The results were compared with an acute study, wherein it was found that the administration of ondansetron (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) significantly raised the seizure-threshold current as compared to control group in the ICES test. Similar results were observed after chronic administration of ondansetron. In PTZ test, ondansetron in all the three tested doses failed to show protective effect against PTZ-induced seizure test. Administration of ondansetron for 21 days significantly decreased the transfer latency (TL) and prolonged the step-down latency (SDL). The results of present study suggest the anticonvulsant and memory-enhancing effect of ondansetron in mice.

  16. Anxiolytic-like effects of ursolic acid in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, André R S; Rosa, Julia M; Cunha, Mauricio P; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-07-05

    Ursolic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that possesses several biological and neuropharmacological effects including antidepressant-like activity. Anxiety disorders represent common and disability psychiatric conditions that are often associated with depressive symptoms. This work investigated the anxiolytic-like effects of ursolic acid administration in different behavioral paradigms that evaluate anxiety in mice: open field test, elevated plus maze test, light/dark box test and marble burying test. To this end, mice were administered with ursolic acid (0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg, p.o.) or diazepam (2mg/kg, p.o.), positive control, and submitted to the behavioral tests. The results show that ursolic acid (10mg/kg) elicited an anxiolytic-like effect observed by the increased total time in the center and decreased number of rearings responses in the open field test and an increased percentage of entries and total time spent in the open arms of elevated plus maze, similarly to diazepam. No significant effects of ursolic acid were shown in the light/dark box and marble burying test. These data indicate that ursolic acid exhibits anxiolytic-like effects in the open field and elevated plus maze test, but not in the light/dark box and marble burying test, showing the relevance of testing several behavioral paradigms in the evaluation of anxiolytic-like actions. Of note, the results extend the understanding on the effects of ursolic acid in the central nervous system and suggest that it may be a novel approach for the management of anxiety-related disorders. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Pharmacological effect of aminoferrocene in mice with L1210 leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhun, V F; Mokhir, A; Daum, S; Todor, I N; Lukianova, N Yu; Shvets, Yu V; Burlaka, A P

    2015-06-01

    To study the cytostatic and some biological effects of aminoferrocene using mice with L1210 lymphoid leukemia. Experiments were performed on BDF1 male mice (DBA/2, female × C57Bl/6, male) with transplantable L1210 lymphoid leukemia. Determination of antitumor activity of Benzyl-Fc Boron (Bn), it was injected intraperitoneally 6 times daily, starting on day 2 after L1210 leukemia cell transplantation. Doses of Bn such as 26; 260 and 2600 μg/kg were used. The determination of intracellular content of cardiolipin, thiols, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and also analysis of Annexin V positivity and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (JC-1 staining) were performed with use of flow cytometry. The levels of "free iron" complexes, transferrin active forms and the rate of NO generation were measured by EPR-specroscopy. Six daily injections of Bn at a dose of 26 μg/kg resulted in an increased survival of mice with L1210 leukemia by 28% (p < 0.05). Bn led to an increase of apoptotic cells number and ROS amount in leukemia cells. Besides, Bn caused a decrease of cardiolipin and nonprotein thiol compounds content. The membrane electrochemical potential of cell mitochondria was decreased also after Bn administration. Studies using EPR-spectroscopy revealed a significant increase in a level of "free iron", content of transferrin active species and generation rate of NO by inducible NO-synthase in L1210 cells after aminoferrocene administration. Our data indicate that Benzyl-Fc Boron can be promising candidate for realizing a new strategy of anticancer therapy with the use of ROS-inducing agents.

  18. Brief Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Adolescents: An Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavonen, E Juulia; Huurre, Taina; Tilli, Maija; Kiviruusu, Olli; Partonen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among adolescents, but there are no brief interventions to treat them. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief semistructured, individually delivered sleep intervention to ameliorate adolescents' sleeping difficulties and lengthen sleep duration. All students aged 16-18 years in a high school were screened for sleeping difficulties and 36 students with the highest sleep problem scores were invited to the intervention. Postintervention improvements were observed on self-reported and actiwatch-registered sleep duration, self-reported sleep quality and sleep latency, perceived stress and anxiety (all p values sleep efficiency and sleep latency did not change (p > 0.05). A brief individual sleep intervention can be effective in lengthening sleep duration and improving subjective sleep quality and well-being among adolescents.

  19. The effects of individual housing on mice and rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Thomas Cæcius; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo; Ottesen, Jan Lund

    2006-01-01

    these animals individually without negative impact on welfare, eg by providing special housing improvements. A range of studies have shown that individual housing or isolation has effects on corticosterone, the open field behaviour, barbiturate sleeping time and the metabolism of different pharmaceuticals...... in the animals. However, this review of 37 studies in rats and 17 studies in mice showed divergence in test results difficult to explain, as many studies lacked basal information about the study, eg information on genetic strains and housing conditions, such as bedding, enrichment and cage sizes. Furthermore......, test and control groups most frequently differed in cage sizes and stocking densities, and behavioural tests differed in ways which may very well explain the differences in results. Overall, there seemed to be an effect of individual housing, although it may be small, and it seems reasonable to assume...

  20. Effect of Early-Life Fluoxetine on Anxiety-Like Behaviors in BDNF Val66Met Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincheva, Iva; Yang, Jianmin; Li, Anfei; Marinic, Tina; Freilingsdorf, Helena; Huang, Chienchun; Casey, B J; Hempstead, Barbara; Glatt, Charles E; Lee, Francis S; Bath, Kevin G; Jing, Deqiang

    2017-12-01

    Adolescence is a developmental stage in which the incidence of psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety disorders, peaks. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the main class of agents used to treat anxiety disorders. However, the impact of SSRIs on the developing brain during adolescence remains unknown. The authors assessed the impact of developmentally timed SSRI administration in a genetic mouse model displaying elevated anxiety-like behaviors. Knock-in mice containing a common human single-nucleotide polymorphism (Val66Met; rs6265) in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a growth factor implicated in the mechanism of action of SSRIs, were studied based on their established phenotype of increased anxiety-like behavior. Timed administration of fluoxetine was delivered during one of three developmental periods (postnatal days 21-42, 40-61, or 60-81), spanning the transition from childhood to adulthood. Neurochemical and anxiety-like behavioral analyses were performed. We identified a "sensitive period" during periadolescence (postnatal days 21-42) in which developmentally timed fluoxetine administration rescued anxiety-like phenotypes in BDNF Val66Met mice in adulthood. Compared with littermate controls, BDNF Met/Met mice exhibited diminished maturation of serotonergic fibers projecting particularly to the prefrontal cortex, as well as decreased expression of the serotonergic trophic factor S100B in the dorsal raphe. Interestingly, deficient serotonergic innervation, as well as S100B levels, were rescued with fluoxetine administration during periadolescence. These findings suggest that SSRI administration during a "sensitive period" during periadolescence leads to long-lasting anxiolytic effects in a genetic mouse model of elevated anxiety-like behaviors. These persistent effects highlight the role of BDNF in the maturation of the serotonin system and the capacity to enhance its development through a pharmacological intervention.

  1. Inhibitory effect of dietary capsaicin on liver fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Shanna; Stradiot, Leslie; Verhulst, Stefaan; Thoen, Lien; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2015-06-01

    Virtually all chronic liver injuries result in the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In their activated state, these cells are the main collagen-producing cells implicated in liver fibrosis. Capsaicin (CPS), the active compound of chili peppers, can modulate the activation and migration of HSCs in vitro. Here, we evaluated the potential protective and prophylactic effects of CPS related to cholestatic and hepatotoxic-induced liver fibrosis and its possible underlying mechanism of action. Male Balb/c mice received dietary CPS after 3 days of bile duct ligation (BDL) or before and during carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ) injections. Mice receiving dietary CPS after BDL had a significant improvement of liver fibrosis accompanied by a decrease in collagen deposition and downregulation of activation markers in isolated HSCs. In the CCl4 model, dietary CPS inhibited the upregulation of profibrogenic markers. However, CPS could not attenuate the CCl4 -induced fibrosis when it was already established. Furthermore, in vitro CPS treatment inhibited the autophagic process during HSC activation. Dietary CPS has potential benefits in the therapy of cholestatic liver fibrosis and in the prophylaxis of hepatotoxic-induced liver injury. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Immunomodulatory effect of diethylcarbamazine in mice infected with Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, M; Castro-Corona, M A; Segoviano-Ramírez, J C; Brattig, N W; Medina-De la Garza, C E

    2014-11-01

    We tested whether diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM), both antiparasitic drugs with reported immunomodulatory properties, were able to affect the immune system to potentiate host defense mechanisms and protect against actinomycetoma in a mouse model. Male BALB/c mice of 10-12 weeks of age were injected with either Nocardia brasiliensis or saline solution. Recorded were the effects of a treatment by DEC (6 mg/kg per os daily for one week) or IVM (200 μg/kg subcutaneously on days 1 and 3) on (i) the development of mycetoma lesion, (ii) the expression of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by phagocytes, (iii) the proliferation index of lymphocytes and (iv) antibody production of IgG and IgM. After an initial lesion in all mice, DEC inhibited a full development and progression of actinomycetoma resulting in a reduced lesion size (p brasiliensis antigens and concanavalin A in DEC-treated group was higher than in non-treated group at day 21 and 28 postinfection (p brasiliensis leading to retrogression of the mycetoma and increasing cellular immune responses. Our findings may indicate a potential use of DEC as a putative adjuvant in infectious disease or vaccination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Protective effects of fluoxetine on decompression sickness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Eric Blatteau

    Full Text Available Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS that can result in central nervous system disorders or even death. Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium and activate blood cells and inflammatory pathways, leading to a systemic pathophysiological process that promotes ischemic damage. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory properties at the systemic level, as well as in the setting of cerebral ischemia. We report a beneficial clinical effect associated with fluoxetine in experimental DCS. 91 mice were subjected to a simulated dive at 90 msw for 45 min before rapid decompression. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of fluoxetine 18 hours before hyperbaric exposure (n = 46 while controls were not treated (n = 45. Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine IL-6 detection. There were significantly fewer manifestations of DCS in the fluoxetine group than in the controls (43.5% versus 75.5%, respectively; p = 0.004. Survivors showed a better and significant neurological recovery with fluoxetine. Platelets and red cells were significantly decreased after decompression in controls but not in the treated mice. Fluoxetine reduced circulating IL-6, a relevant marker of systemic inflammation in DCS. We concluded that fluoxetine decreased the incidence of DCS and improved motor recovery, by limiting inflammation processes.

  4. Effects of genistein following fractionated lung irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Para, Andrea E.; Bezjak, Andrea; Yeung, Ivan W.T.; Van Dyk, Jake; Hill, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study investigated protection of lung injury by genistein following fractionated doses of radiation and its effect on tumor response. Material and methods: C3H/HeJ mice were irradiated (100 kVp X-rays) with 9 fractions of 3.1 Gy over 30 days (approximately equivalent to 10 Gy single dose) and were maintained on a genistein diet (∼10 mg/kg). Damage was assessed over 28 weeks in lung cells by a cytokinesis block micronucleus (MN) assay and by changes in breathing rate and histology. Tumor protection was assessed using a colony assay to determine cell survival following in situ irradiation of small lung nodules (KHT fibrosarcoma). Results: Genistein caused about a 50% reduction in the MN damage observed during the fractionated radiation treatment and this damage continued to decrease at later times to background levels by 16 weeks. In mice not receiving Genistein MN levels remained well above background out to 28 weeks after irradiation. Genistein reduced macrophage accumulation by 22% and reduced collagen deposition by 28%. There was minimal protection against increases in breathing rate or severe morbidity during pneumonitis. No tumor protection by genistein treatment was observed. Conclusions: Genistein at the dose levels used in this study partially reduced the extent of fibrosis developing in mouse lung caused by irradiation but gave minimal protection against pneumonitis. There was no evidence that genistein caused protection of small tumors growing in the lung.

  5. Biological Effects and Biodistribution of Bufotenine on Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Vigerelli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bufotenine is an alkaloid derived from serotonin, structurally similar to LSD and psilocin. This molecule is able to inhibit the rabies virus infection in in vitro and in vivo models, increasing the survival rate of infected animals. Being a very promising molecule for an incurable disease and because of the fact that there is no consensus regarding its neurological effects, this study aimed to evaluate chronic treatment of bufotenine on behavior, pathophysiology, and pharmacokinetics of mice. Animals were daily treated for 21 consecutive days with 0.63, 1.05, and 2.1 mg/animal/day bufotenine and evaluated by open field test and physiological parameters during all the experiment. After this period, organs were collected for histopathological and biodistribution analysis. Animals treated with bufotenine had mild behavioral alterations compared to the control group, being dose-response relationship. On the other hand, animals showed normal physiological functions and no histological alterations in the organs. With high doses, an inflammatory reaction was observed in the site of injection, but with no cellular damage. The alkaloid could be found in the heart and kidney with all doses and in the lungs and brain with higher doses. These results show that the effective dose, 0.63 mg/day, is safe to be administered in mice, since it did not cause significant effects on the animals’ physiology and on the CNS. Higher doses were well tolerated, causing only mild behavioral effects. Thus, bufotenine might be a drug prototype for rabies treatment, an incurable disease.

  6. [Effects of aquaporin-4 gene knockout on behavior changes and cerebral morphology during aging in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengan; Lu, Yunbi; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the effects of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) gene knockout on the behavior changes and cerebral morphology during aging in mice,and to compare that of young and aged mice between AQP4 knockout mice (AQP4(-/-)) and wild type mice (AQP4(+/+)). Fifty-eight CD-1 mice were divided into four groups: young (2-3 months old) AQP4(-/-), aged (17-19 months old) AQP4(-/-), young AQP4(+/+) and aged AQP4(+/+). The activity levels and exploring behavior of mice were tested in open field. The neurons were stained with toluidine blue and NeuN, the astrocytes and microglia were stained with GFAP and Iba-1, respectively. The morphological changes of neuron, astrocyte and microglia were then analyzed. Compared with young mice, the total walking distance in open field of aged AQP4(+/+) mice and aged AQP4(-/-) mice decreased 41.2% and 44.1%, respectively (Ptime in the central area of open field. The density of neuron in cortex of aged AQP4(+/+) mice and aged AQP4(-/-) mice decreased 19.6% and 15.8%, respectively (P<0.05), while there was no difference in the thickness of neuron cell body in hippocampus CA1 region. The density of astrocyte in hippocampus CA3 region of aged AQP4(+/+) mice and aged AQP4(-/-) mice increased 57.7% and 64.3%, respectively (P<0.001), while there was no difference in the area of astrocyte. The area of microglia in hippocampus CA3 region of aged AQP4(+/+) mice and aged AQP4(-/-) mice increased 46.9% and 52.0%, respectively (P<0.01), while there was no difference in the density of microglia. Compared with AQP4(+/+) mice, the young and aged AQP4(-/-) mice showed smaller area of astrocyte in hippocampus CA3 region, reduced 18.0% in young mice and 23.6% in aged mice. There was no difference between AQP4(+/+) mice and AQP4(-/-) mice for other observed indexes. AQP4 may be involved in change of astrocyte and astrocyte-related behaviors during aging. AQP4 gene knockout may have limited effects on the change of neuron, microglia and most neuronal behaviors in aging

  7. Adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular consequences of chronic social stress: Immediate and long-term effects of social isolation during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fábio C; Duarte, Josiane O; Leão, Rodrigo M; Hummel, Luiz F V; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that disruption of social bonds and perceived isolation (loneliness) are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Adolescence is proposed as a period of vulnerability to stress. Nevertheless, the impact of chronic social stress during this ontogenic period in cardiovascular function is poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the impact in cardiovascular function of social isolation for 3 weeks in adolescent and adult male rats. Also, the long-term effects of social isolation during adolescence were investigated longitudinally. Social isolation reduced body weight in adolescent, but not in adult animals. Disruption of social bonds during adolescence increased arterial pressure without affecting heart rate and pulse pressure (PP). Nevertheless, social isolation in adulthood reduced systolic arterial pressure and increased diastolic arterial pressure, which in turn decreased PP without affecting mean arterial pressure. Cardiovascular changes in adolescents, but not adults, were followed by facilitation of both baroreflex sensitivity and vascular reactivity to the vasodilator agent acetylcholine. Vascular responsiveness to either the vasodilator agent sodium nitroprusside or the vasoconstrictor agent phenylephrine was not affected by social isolation. Except for the changes in body weight and baroreflex sensitivity, all alterations evoked by social isolation during adolescence were reversed in adulthood after moving animals from isolated to collective housing. These findings suggest a vulnerability of adolescents to the effects of chronic social isolation in cardiovascular function. However, results indicate minimal cardiovascular consequences in adulthood of disruption of social bonds during adolescence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The social contagion effect of marijuana use among adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir M Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on adolescent substance use has consistently identified a strong relationship between adolescent behavior and the behavior of their peers. However, peer effects are difficult to estimate and causal interpretations must be undertaken with caution since individuals in most cases choose with whom to associate. In this paper we seek to empirically quantify the causal role of peer social networks in explaining marijuana usage among adolescents.Using data from a nationally representative sample of adolescents we utilize a multivariate structural model with school-level fixed effects to account for the problems of contextual effects, correlated effects and peer selections to purge the potential biases from the estimates of peer influence. Our peer group measures are drawn not only from the nomination of close friends (N = 6,377, but also from classmates (N = 19,335. Marijuana usage among the peer groups were constructed using the peers' own report of their marijuana consumption. Controlling for parent level characteristics, and other demographic parameters, we find that a 10% increase in the proportion of close friends and classmates who use marijuana increases the probability that an individual chooses to use marijuana by 5%.Our findings indicate that peer effects are important determinants of marijuana use even after controlling for potential biases We also found evidence to show that the influence of close friends and the more exogenous classmates are quite similar in magnitude under our preferred specification, supporting theory predicting the importance of peer influence. Effective policy aimed at reducing marijuana usage among adolescents would consider these significant peer effects.

  9. Socialising adolescent volunteering: how important are parents and friends? Age dependent effects of parents and friends on adolescents' volunteering behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, A.A.J.; van Hoof, A.; van Aken, M.A.G.; Orobio de Castro, B.; Raaijmakers, Q.A.W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of best friend's and parents' volunteering and civic family orientation (combined with open family communication) in adolescent volunteering, and the moderating effect of age. Results, involving 698 adolescents (M age = 15.19; SD = 1.43), revealed that

  10. Socialising adolescent volunteering : How important are parents and friends? Age dependent effects of parents and friends on adolescents' volunteering behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Anne A J; van Hoof, Anne; van Aken, Marcel A G; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Raaijmakers, Quinten A W

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of best friend's and parents' volunteering and civic family orientation (combined with open family communication) in adolescent volunteering, and the moderating effect of age. Results, involving 698 adolescents (M age. = 15.19; SD= 1.43), revealed that

  11. Effect of anti-smoking advertisements on Turkish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, E; Gokler, M E; Metintas, S; Kalyoncu, C

    2016-12-12

    The aim of the present study was to determine the perception of 10 anti-smoking advertisements in 1434 Turkish adolescents. We used the Effectiveness of the Anti-smoking Advertisements Scale, which included 6 items for each advertisement; each item was assessed on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with the impact of the advertisements. All the advertisements were more effective for adolescents who had never smoked compared to ex-smokers and current smokers. We also noted that, regardless of age, smoking status decreased the effectiveness of all the advertisements. Previous studies have shown that smokers have a negative attitude towards anti-smoking messages. In the present study, the most effective advertisements among adolescents were those with "Sponge and tar", "Smoking harms in every breath" and "Children want to grow". In conclusion, although anti-smoking campaigns are targeted towards adults, they also have a strong influence on adolescents. The main target population for advertisements should be individuals aged < 15 years who have not yet started smoking.

  12. Aggressive effects of prioritizing popularity in early adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cillessen, A.H.N.; Mayeux, L.; Ha, P.T.; Bruyn, E.H. de; LaFontana, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of prioritizing popularity on the association between early adolescents' popularity and their aggressive, leadership, and prosocial behaviors with peers. Participants were 288 14-year-olds from The Netherlands who completed a sociometric instrument and an

  13. Compensatory Effects of Sibling Support in Preadolescence and Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milevsky, Avidan; Levitt, Mary J.

    The current study is an examination of how support from siblings relates to academic competence in early adolescence, with a focus on the compensatory effects of sibling support. Participants were 694 African-American, European-American, and Hispanic-American students, ranging in age from 11 to 15. Participants were interviewed in school regarding…

  14. The antinociceptive effect of zolpidem and zopiclone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Chaim G; Chernes, Yakov; Rigai, Tova; Rice, Kenner C; Schreiber, Shaul

    2005-07-01

    Zolpidem and zopiclone are two of a newer hypno-sedative class of drugs, the "Z compounds". Their use for the treatment of short-term insomnia has been expanding constantly during the last two decades. The "Z compounds" are considered to cause less significant rebound insomnia or tolerance than the conventional hypnotic benzodiazepines. Their possible antinociceptive effect and interaction with the opioid system has not been studied yet. Our results demonstrate a significant difference between the antinociceptive properties of zopiclone and zolpidem when injected s.c. in the hotplate analgesic assay in mice. Zopiclone induced a weak, dose-dependent antinociceptive effect, antagonized only by the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine. Zolpidem induced a weak, biphasic dose-dependent antinociceptive effect, antagonized primarily by the non-selective opioid antagonist naloxone and by yohimbine. The weak antinociceptive effect of both drugs, evident only at very high doses (far beyond those used clinically to induce sleep), implies no clinical use for zopiclone or zolpidem in the management of pain. However, the possible interaction of zolpidem with the opioid system should be further investigated (in behavioral models, which do not overlap with the acute-pain antinociception model we used), both for possible side effects in special populations (i.e. elderly) and for possible drug-drug interactions, in order to minimize possible hazards and maximize clinical beneficial effects of its use for sleep.

  15. Antidepressant-Like Effect of Isorhynchophylline in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yan-Fang; Fan, Ding; Ip, Siu-Po; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2017-02-01

    Isorhynchophylline (IRN), an oxindole alkaloid, has been identified as the main active ingredient responsible for the biological activities of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq) Miq ex Havil. (Rubiaceae). Previous studies in our laboratory have revealed that IRN possesses potent neuroprotective effects in different models of Alzheimer's disease. However, the antidepressant-like effects of IRN are remained unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the antidepressant-like effects of IRN. The antidepressant-like effects of IRN was determined by using animal models of depression including forced swimming and tail suspension tests. The acting mechanism was explored by determining the effect of IRN on the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and the activities of monoamine oxidases. Intragastric administration of IRN at 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg for 7 days caused a significant reduction of immobility time in both forced swimming and tail suspension tests, while IRN did not stimulate locomotor activity in the open-field test. In addition, IRN treatment antagonized reserpine-induced ptosis and significantly enhanced the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters including norepinephrine (NE) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and the activity of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice. These results suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of IRN are mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of monoamine oxidases.

  16. Electric shocks are ineffective in treatment of lethal effects of rattlesnake envenomation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E K; Kardong, K V; Mackessy, S P

    1987-01-01

    Electrical shocks, even crudely delivered from 'stun guns' and gasoline engine spark plugs, have been reported to be effective in the treatment of snake bite. We thus applied similar electric shocks to mice artificially injected with reconstituted rattlesnake venom at various LD50 multiples. Those envenomated mice treated with electric shock survived no better than the controls. We thus found no evidence that electric shocks crudely administered had any life saving effect in mice.

  17. The Effect of Physical Attractiveness of Models on Advertising Effectiveness for Male and Female Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Ching; Chang, Chih-Hsiang

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of advertising with physically attractive models on male and female adolescents. The findings suggest that highly attractive models are less effective than those who are normally attractive. Implications of social comparison are discussed.

  18. Effect of prolonged continuous irradiation of humoral immunity of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillova, E.N.; Muksinova, K.N.; Skukovskaya, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the content and function of cell populations and subpopulations involved in the humoral response of mice to the thymus-dependent antigen were investigated. The effect was followed during a prolonged continuous exposure to 137 C gamma-emitter (total dose - 5 Gy and daily dose - 12 cGy for 22 hours) and after its termination. The data obtained give evidence for a decrease of the pool of polypotent lymphocyte precursors (CFUs), stable moderate hypoplasia of central and peripheral organs of the immune system, distinct inhibition of antibody production at the expense of reduced activity of precursors of lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes and T-helpers. In the remote post-irradiation period residual radiation damage was seen in polypotent and committed precursors of lymphocytes and T-helpers, which was responsible for the trend towards the decline of antibody production, hypoplasia in the spleen and lymph nodes being persistent

  19. Antiatherogenic effects of oleanolic acid in apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels Henrik; Hansson, Nicolaj Christopher; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia

    2011-01-01

    were investigated in vitro. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was visualized using immunoblotting. As opposed to WT and fluvastatin- and vehicle-treated mice, OA-fed ApoE(-/-) mice gained no weight during the treatment period. Plasma concentrations of total-cholesterol and triglyceride were...... in combination with OA (100 mg/kg/day), fluvastatin (5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle, with wild type (WT) mice serving as controls. After 8 weeks of treatment atherosclerotic plaque areas in the aortic arch and plasma lipid concentrations were determined. Vasoconstriction and relaxation of the proximal part of aorta...... not significantly reduced by OA- or fluvastatin treatment. Plaque area of vehicle-treated mice was 25%, but only 14% in OA- and 19% in fluvastatin-treated mice. As compared to WT, vasoconstriction to phenylephrine was attenuated in ApoE(-/-) mice. The NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) enhanced...

  20. Age-period-cohort effect of adolescent smoking in Korea: from 2006-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Kang

    2018-03-01

    Efforts to reduce tobacco-use among adolescents appears to be playing a substantial role in reducing current smoking and ever smoking prevalence. Ongoing surveillance for trends in adolescent cigarette smoking is essential to implement effective tobacco control programs.

  1. Life Stress and Adjustment: Effects of Life Events Experienced by Young Adolescents and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lawrence H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Used a longitudinal design to test the effects of life events experienced by young adolescents and their parents. Criteria were the adolescents' depression, anxiety and self-esteem. Analysis showed a significant effect for the adolescents' controllable, but not uncontrollable, negative events. (Author/RWB)

  2. Intestinal immunity in hypopituitary dwarf mice: effects of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Darcy, Justin; Cai, Chuan; Jin, Junfei; Bartke, Andrzej; Cao, Deliang

    2018-03-02

    Hypopituitary dwarf mice demonstrate advantages of longevity, but little is known of their colon development and intestinal immunity. Herein we found that Ames dwarf mice have shorter colon and colonic crypts, but larger ratio of mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) over body weight than age-matched wild type (WT) mice. In the colonic lamina propria (cLP) of juvenile Ames mice, more inflammatory neutrophils (Ā: 0.15% vs. 0.03% in WT mice) and monocytes (Ā: 7.97% vs. 5.15%) infiltrated, and antigen presenting cells CD11c+ dendritic cells (Ā: 1.39% vs. 0.87%), CD11b+ macrophages (Ā: 3.22% vs. 0.81%) and gamma delta T (γδ T) cells (Ā: 5.56% vs. 1.35%) were increased. In adult Ames dwarf mice, adaptive immune cells, such as IL-17 producing CD4+ T helper (Th17) cells (Ā: 8.3% vs. 4.7%) were augmented. In the MLNs of Ames dwarf mice, the antigen presenting and adaptive immune cells also altered when compared to WT mice, such as a decrease of T-regulatory (Treg) cells in juvenile Ames mice (Ā: 7.7% vs.10.5%), but an increase of Th17 cells (Ā: 0.627% vs.0.093%). Taken together, these data suggest that somatotropic signaling deficiency influences colon development and intestinal immunity.

  3. Neonatal immune activation during early and late postnatal brain development differently influences depression-related behaviors in adolescent and adult C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Majidi-Zolbanin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Immune challenge during early and late neonatal periods can induce robust alterations in physiological and behavioral functions, resulting in greater risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and depression, later in life. In addition, previous studies concluded that increasing age correlates with increased depression behaviors in humans and rodents. This study aimed to investigate for the first time whether immune challenge with a viral mimic, synthetic double-stranded ribonucleic acid (Poly I: C during different neonatal periods can differently affect depression-related behaviors in adolescent and adult mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with either saline or Poly I:C (1 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg on postnatal days (PND 3-5 (early neonatal phase or PND 14-16 (late neonatal phase, and then subjected to behavioral tests, including tail suspension test and forced swimming test, during adolescence (PND 35 or 40 and adulthood (PND 85 or 90. Results: The results demonstrated that early neonatal immune activation increases depression-related behaviors in both adolescent and adult mice, but late neonatal immune activation only increases depression in adult mice. In other words, these findings indicated that the nature of the offspring's neuropathology can depend on the severity of the insult, the pup's age at the time of the insult, and offspring age at the time of behavioral testing. Conclusion: These findings suggest that dose and timing of neonatal insult and offspring age may be important factors for evaluating neuropsychiatric disorders in adults who experienced early life infection.

  4. Sweetened ethanol drinking during social isolation: enhanced intake, resistance to genetic heterogeneity and the emergence of a distinctive drinking pattern in adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panksepp, J B; Rodriguez, E D; Ryabinin, A E

    2017-03-01

    With its ease of availability during adolescence, sweetened ethanol ('alcopops') is consumed within many contexts. We asked here whether genetically based differences in social motivation are associated with how the adolescent social environment impacts voluntary ethanol intake. Mice with previously described differences in sociability (BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, FVB/NJ and MSM/MsJ strains) were weaned into isolation or same-sex pairs (postnatal day, PD, 21), and then given continuous access to two fluids on PDs 34-45: one containing water and the other containing an ascending series of saccharin-sweetened ethanol (3-6-10%). Prior to the introduction of ethanol (PDs 30-33), increased water and food intake was detected in some of the isolation-reared groups, and controls indicated that isolated mice also consumed more 'saccharin-only' solution. Voluntary drinking of 'ethanol-only' was also higher in a subset of the isolated groups on PDs 46-49. However, sweetened ethanol intake was increased in all isolated strain × sex combinations irrespective of genotype. Surprisingly, blood ethanol concentration (BEC) was not different between these isolate and socially housed groups 4 h into the dark phase. Using lickometer-based measures of intake in FVB mice, we identified that a predominance of increased drinking during isolation transpired outside of the typical circadian consumption peak, occurring ≈8.5 h into the dark phase, with an associated difference in BEC. These findings collectively indicate that isolate housing leads to increased consumption of rewarding substances in adolescent mice independent of their genotype, and that for ethanol this may be because of when individuals drink during the circadian cycle. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  5. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of pirdot (saurauia vulcani korth.) leaves extract in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutahaean, Salomo; Tanjung, Masitta; Puspita Sari, Diah; Elfia Ningsih, Vevy

    2018-03-01

    Approximately eighty percent of deaths in diabetic patients result from atherosclerosis, which is related to hyperlipidemia tendencies in diabetes. In North Sumatra, the use of plant-based ingredients as diabetes therapy has long been recognized. One of the local species which traditionally used was the pirdot plant (Saurauia vulcani Korth.). In this paper, we report the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of the extract of pirdot leaves in model mice. In experiment I, twenty - five alloxan-induced diabetic mice was divided randomly into five groups of 5 mice, namely: control diabetic mice; diabetic mice + metformin; and three groups diabetic mice + pirdot leaves extract of 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg BW respectively. All the treatments were given daily for 21 days by oral gavage. In experiment II, another twenty-five mice were divided randomly into five groups of 5 mice. The treatments were as follows: a control group that did not receive any treatment; hyperlipidemic control (received quail yolk diet) for 30 days; and three groups of hyperlipidemic mice + orally treated pirdot leaves extract at a dose of 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg BW respectively. The result showed the pirdot leaves extract has the potential as antihyperglycemic. The effects obtained are equivalent to the effects of antidiabetic drug metformin. On the other hand, the antihyperlipidemic effect was not conclusive, because the extract lowered total cholesterol significantly, but no significant effect on triglyceride, marked reduced LDL, but significantly decreased the HDL level.

  6. Effects of parenting style on personal and social variables for Asian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Rebecca P

    2006-10-01

    Impact of perceived parenting style on adolescents' self-reliance, interpersonal relations, sense of inadequacy, and attitude to school, after controlling for effects of adolescents' self-esteem, was examined in a sample of 548 Asian adolescents. Fathers' perceived parenting style was significantly associated with adolescents' sense of inadequacy for the entire sample as well as for Chinese adolescents. Fathers' perceived parenting style was also significantly associated with Malay adolescents' self-reliance. Mothers' perceived parenting style was significant only for Malay adolescents' attitude to school. The meaning and consequences of parenting styles, in particular, the authoritarian parenting style, and the differential impact of paternal parenting style versus maternal parenting style on adolescent outcomes in an Asian context will be discussed. Implications for educators and mental health practitioners working with adolescents and their families will also be explored. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  7. Genetically obese (ob/ob) mice are resistant to the lethal effects of thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Young-Suk; Song, Ji-Won; Lim, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Mee-Young; Moon, Og-Sung; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Son, Hwa-Young; Kwon, Hyo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of chronic liver diseases, including viral hepatitis, alcohol-induced liver disease, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of obesity in acute hepatic failure using a murine model of thioacetamide (TA)-induced liver injury. Genetically obese ob/ob mice, together with non-obese ob/+ littermates, were subjected to a single intraperitoneal injection of TA, and examined for signs of hepatic injury. ob/ob mice showed a significantly higher survival rate, lower levels of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and less hepatic necrosis and apoptosis, compared with ob/+ mice. In addition, ob/ob mice exhibited significantly lower levels of malondialdehyde and significantly higher levels of glutathione and antioxidant enzyme activities compared with their ob/+ counterparts. Bioactivation analyses revealed reduced plasma clearance of TA and covalent binding of [ 14 C]TA to liver macromolecules in ob/ob mice. Together, these data demonstrate that genetically obese mice are resistant to TA-induced acute liver injury through diminished bioactivation of TA and antioxidant effects. - Highlights: • ob/ob mice are resistant to lethal doses of thioacetamide, compared to ob/+ mice. • ob/ob mice show reduced oxidative stress and enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity. • ob/ob mice exhibit diminished bioactivation of thioacetamide.

  8. Genetically obese (ob/ob) mice are resistant to the lethal effects of thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Young-Suk [Laboratory Animal Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ji-Won [Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jong-Hwan [Huons Research Center, Gyonggido (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mee-Young [Herbal Medicine Formulation Research Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Og-Sung; Kim, Hyoung-Chin [Laboratory Animal Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hwa-Young [Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyo-Jung, E-mail: hyojung@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Obesity increases the risk of chronic liver diseases, including viral hepatitis, alcohol-induced liver disease, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of obesity in acute hepatic failure using a murine model of thioacetamide (TA)-induced liver injury. Genetically obese ob/ob mice, together with non-obese ob/+ littermates, were subjected to a single intraperitoneal injection of TA, and examined for signs of hepatic injury. ob/ob mice showed a significantly higher survival rate, lower levels of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and less hepatic necrosis and apoptosis, compared with ob/+ mice. In addition, ob/ob mice exhibited significantly lower levels of malondialdehyde and significantly higher levels of glutathione and antioxidant enzyme activities compared with their ob/+ counterparts. Bioactivation analyses revealed reduced plasma clearance of TA and covalent binding of [{sup 14}C]TA to liver macromolecules in ob/ob mice. Together, these data demonstrate that genetically obese mice are resistant to TA-induced acute liver injury through diminished bioactivation of TA and antioxidant effects. - Highlights: • ob/ob mice are resistant to lethal doses of thioacetamide, compared to ob/+ mice. • ob/ob mice show reduced oxidative stress and enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity. • ob/ob mice exhibit diminished bioactivation of thioacetamide.

  9. [Immunosuppressant effect of cyclophosphamide activated in vitro by liver microsomes from different strains of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, L Iu; Zhirnov, G F; Mazurov, A V; Pevnitskiĭ, L A

    1981-07-01

    The paper is concerned with activation of cyclophosphamide by mouse liver microsomes in vitro. Liver microsomes from BALB/c mice metabolize cyclophosphamide more effectively as compared with those from DBA/2 mice, which manifested by a more intense output of products having alkylating or immunodepressant properties. This seems likely to be a consequence of the increased P-450 cytochrome content in liver microsomes from BALB/c mice, as well as of its structural characteristics in the mouse. The relationship between the immunodepressant effect of cyclophosphamide in vivo and in vitro in mice of varied genotypes is discussed.

  10. Effectiveness of amitriptyline for treating functional dyspepsia in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Mustawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Functional dyspepsia is common among adolescents. Pain reduces children’s quality of life, psychosocial functioning, and school attendance. Amitriptyline is assumed to be one of the alternative treatments in functional dyspepsia. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of amytriptyline as a treatment  for  functional dyspepsia in adolescents. Methods We conducted a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial from January to March 2011 in junior and senior high school students in Dobo City, Aru Island District, Maluku Province. Adolescents suffering from functional dyspepsia and who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were eligible for the study. Subjects were randomized into two groups. Each group received 10 mg (for body weight < 35 kg or 20 mg (for body weight ≥ 35 kg amitriptyline or placebo once per day for 28 days. Pain frequency was measured in terms of abdominal pain episodes per month, and duration was measured in minutes. Data were analyzed using t-test. Results Eighty-eight students participated in this study: the amitriptyline group (43 subjects and the placebo group (45 subjects. There were no statistically significant differences between the amitriptyline and placebo groups in frequency (P=0.777; 95%CI -0.846 to 1.129 or duration (P=0.728 of abdominal pain after treatment. Conclusion  Amitriptyline is not more effective than placebo for treating functional dyspepsia in adolescents.

  11. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract in alloxan-induced diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against diabetes in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Anti-diabetic effects of RHSE were evaluated in both the rat insulinoma-1 cell line (INS-1) and diabetic ICR mice induced by inraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. ...

  12. Biotherapeutic effects of probiotic bacteria on candidiasis in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R D; Pierson, C; Warner, T; Dohnalek, M; Farmer, J; Roberts, L; Hilty, M; Balish, E

    1997-10-01

    Four species of probiotic bacteria were assessed for their capacities to protect athymic bg/bg-nu/nu and euthymic bg/bg-nu/+ mice from mucosal and systemic candidiasis. Each bacterial species and Candida albicans colonized the gastrointestinal tracts of both strains of mice. The presence of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus casei GG, or Bifidobacterium animalis) in the gastrointestinal tracts prolonged the survival of adult and neonatal bg/bg-nu/nu mice compared to that of isogenic mice colonized with C. albicans alone. The incidence of systemic candidiasis in bg/bg-nu/nu mice was significantly reduced by each of the four probiotic bacterial species. The numbers of C. albicans present in the alimentary tracts of euthymic bg/bg-nu/+ mice were significantly reduced by L. casei GG and B. animalis. None of the probiotic bacteria species completely prevented mucosal candidiasis, but B. animalis reduced its incidence and severity. Probiotic bacteria also modulated antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses to C. albicans. The prolonged survival of mice, decreased severity of mucosal and systemic candidiasis, modulation of immune responses, decreased number of C. albicans in the alimentary tract, and reduced numbers of orogastric infections demonstrated not only that probiotic bacteria have biotherapeutic potential for prophylaxis against and therapy of this fungal disease but also that probiotic bacteria protect mice from candidiasis by a variety of immunologic (thymic and extrathymic) and nonimmunologic mechanisms in this model.

  13. The nuclear receptor Tlx regulates motor, cognitive and anxiety-related behaviours during adolescence and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, James D; Kozareva, Danka A; Hueston, Cara M; O'Leary, Olivia F; Cryan, John F; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear receptor Tlx is a key regulator of embryonic and adult hippocampal neurogenesis and has been genetically linked to bipolar disorder. Mice lacking Tlx (Nr2e1(-/-)) display deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and behavioural abnormalities. However, whether Tlx regulates behaviour during adolescence or in a sex-dependent manner remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the role of Tlx in a series of behavioural tasks in adolescent male and female mice with a spontaneous deletion of Tlx (Nr2e1(-/-) mice). Testing commenced at adolescence (postnatal day 28) and continued until adulthood (postnatal day 67). Adolescent male and female Nr2e1(-/-) mice were hyperactive in an open field, an effect that persisted in adulthood. Male but not female Nr2e1(-/-) mice exhibited reduced thigmotaxis during adolescence and adulthood. Impairments in rotarod motor performance developed in male and female Nr2e1(-/-) mice at the onset of adulthood. Spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze, a hippocampus-dependent task, was impaired in adolescent but not adult male and female Nr2e1(-/-) mice. Contextual fear conditioning was impaired in adolescent male Nr2e1(-/-) mice only, but both male and female adolescent Nr2e1(-/-) mice showed impaired cued fear conditioning, a hippocampal-amygdala dependent cognitive process. These deficits persisted into adulthood in males but not females. In conclusion, deletion of Tlx impairs motor, cognitive and anxiety-related behaviours during adolescence and adulthood in male and female mice with most effects occurring during adolescence rather than adulthood, independent of housing conditions. This suggests that Tlx has functions beyond regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and may be an important target in understanding neurobiological disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Reciprocal Effects between Parental Solicitation, Parental Control, Adolescent Disclosure, and Adolescent Delinquency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan J. T.; VanderValk, Inge E.; Meeus, Wim

    2010-01-01

    This two-wave multi-informant study examined the bidirectional associations of parental control and solicitation with adolescent disclosure and delinquency. Participants were 289 adolescents (150 females and 139 males, modal age 14) and both parents. Parental solicitation and control did not predict adolescent delinquency, but adolescents'…

  15. Eating disorder symptom trajectories in adolescence: effects of time, participant sex, and early adolescent depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Karina L; Crosby, Ross D; Oddy, Wendy H; Byrne, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of developmental risk for eating disorders and eating disorder symptoms. This study aimed to describe the prevalence and trajectory of five core eating disorder behaviours (binge eating, purging, fasting, following strict dietary rules, and hard exercise for weight control) and a continuous index of dietary restraint and eating, weight and shape concerns, in a cohort of male and female adolescents followed from 14 to 20 years. It also aimed to determine the effect of early adolescent depressive symptoms on the prevalence and trajectory of these different eating disorder symptoms. Participants (N = 1,383; 49% male) were drawn from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, a prospective cohort study that has followed participants from pre-birth to age 20 years. An adapted version of the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire was used to assess eating disorder symptoms at ages 14, 17 and 20 years. The Beck Depression Inventory for Youth was used to assess depressive symptoms at age 14. Longitudinal changes in the prevalence of eating disorder symptoms were tested using generalised estimating equations and linear mixed models. Symptom trajectories varied according to the eating disorder symptom studied, participant sex, and the presence of depressive symptoms in early adolescence. For males, eating disorder symptoms tended to be stable (for purging, fasting and hard exercise) or decreasing (for binge eating and global symptom scores) from 14 to 17 years, and then stable to 20 years. For females, fasting and global symptom scores increased from age 14 to peak in prevalence at age 17. Rates of binge eating in females were stable from age 14 to age 17 and increased significantly thereafter, whilst rates of purging and hard exercise increased from age 14 to age 17, and then remained elevated through to age 20. Depressive symptoms at age 14 impacted on eating disorder symptom trajectories in females, but not in males. Prevention

  16. The genotoxic effect of oxcarbazepine on mice blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Huma; Khan, Ajmal; Mohammadzai, Imdadullah; Khisroon, Muhammad; Begum, Ilham

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the amount of DNA damage caused by Oxcarbazepine (OXC) through single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) technique/comet assay. OXC derived from dibenzazepine series is an effective second generation antiepileptic drug (AED) for both children and adults. Side effects like genotoxic effects of AEDs are of prime importance resulting from toxic metabolites, free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Forty Eight adult male Bagg's albino mice (BALB/c) were randomly classified into eight groups, each comprising of six animals. Two of these groups were control and six were tested groups. Control groups were injected with 1% tween 80 while tested groups were injected with 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg-day OXC for seven days (acute therapy) and 28 days (subchronic therapy) in peritoneal cavity. Blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture and subjected to comet assay for the analysis of DNA damage. Per sample 100 cells were scored and classified according to comet tail length. The results showed that OXC in acute and long term therapies had significantly higher (p < 0.05) genotoxicity in treated groups as compared to control groups. Our study suggests that OXC may cause significant DNA damage in both acute as well as in subchronic therapies.

  17. Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tabarelli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Cremophor EL (CrEL is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. The antinociceptive effect of CrEL (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. Control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight or saline (0.9% NaCl, 10 ml/kg body weight. CrEL reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. At 10.6 g/kg, CrEL caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage in the tail immersion test. The effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. These data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in CrEL.

  18. Effects of leptin treatment and Western diet on wheel running in selectively bred high runner mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Thomas H; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2012-05-15

    The role of leptin in regulating physical activity is varied. The behavioral effects of leptin signaling depend on the type of activity and the animal's physiological state. We used mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running to further study how leptin regulates volitional exercise. Mice from four replicate high runner (HR) lines typically run ~3-fold more revolutions per day than those from four non-selected control (C) lines. HR mice have altered dopamine function and differences from C in brain regions known to be important in leptin-mediated behavior. Furthermore, male HR mice have been found to dramatically increase running when administered Western diet, an effect possibly mediated through leptin signaling. Male mice from generation 61 (representing three HR lines and one C line) were allowed wheel access at 24 days of age and given either Western diet (high in fat and with added sucrose) or standard chow. After four weeks, Western diet significantly increased circulating leptin, insulin, C-peptide, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, and inflammatory hormone resistin concentrations in HR mice (C mice not measured). Western diet increased running in HR mice, but did not significantly affect running in C mice. During the fifth week, all mice received two days of intra-peritoneal sham injections (physiological saline) followed by three days of murine recombinant leptin injections, and then another six days of sham injections. Leptin treatment significantly decreased caloric intake (adjusted for body mass) and body mass in all groups. Wheel running significantly increased with leptin injections in HR mice (fed Western or standard diet), but was unaffected in C mice. Whether Western diet and leptin treatment stimulate wheel running in HR mice through the same physiological pathways awaits future study. These results have implications for understanding the neural and endocrine systems that control locomotor activity, food consumption, and body

  19. Stimulatory effect of aminoethylisothiuronium on the immune response and interferogenesis in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleznikova, G.F.; Ogurtsov, R.P.; Stepanov, A.N. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR))

    Aminoethylisothiuronium (AET) stimulated the formation of antibodies against sheep erythrocytes, not against E. coli, in X-irradiated (4 Gy) mice. The serum containing AET-induced interferon had the same effect. AET also promoted the rejection of the allogenic skin graft in mice irradiated with the same dose. In addition, AET and cystaphos stimulated the induction of interferon by the Newcastle disease virus in mice exposed to doses of 4, 5 or 6 Gy.

  20. Social network effects in contraceptive behavior among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mir M; Amialchuk, Aliaksandr; Dwyer, Debra S

    2011-10-01

    To quantify empirically the role of peer social networks in contraceptive behavior among adolescents. Using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of adolescents, the authors use a multivariate structural model with school-level fixed effects to account for the problems of contextual effects, correlated effects, and peer selection to reduce the potential impact of biases from the estimates of peer influence. The peer group measures are drawn not only from the nominations of close friends but also from classmates. Contraception use among the peer groups was constructed using the peers' own reports of their contraceptive behavior. Controlling for parental characteristics and other demographic variables, the authors find that a 10% increase in the proportion of classmates who use contraception increases the likelihood of individual contraception use by approximately 5%. They also find evidence that the influence of close friends diminishes after accounting for unobserved environmental confounders. The findings of this study support the findings in the literature that peer effects are important determinants of contraception use even after controlling for potential biases in the data. Effective policy aimed at increasing contraception use among adolescents should consider these peer effects.

  1. Social network effects in alcohol consumption among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mir M; Dwyer, Debra S

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we seek to empirically quantify the role of peer social networks in explaining drinking behavior among adolescents. Using data from a nationally representative sample of adolescents we utilize a multivariate structural model with school-level fixed effects to account for the problems of contextual effects, correlated effects and peer selection to purge the potential biases from the estimates of peer influence. Our peer group measures are drawn not only from the nomination of close friends, but also from classmates. Drinking behavior among the peer groups was constructed using the peers' own report of their alcohol consumption. Controlling for parent level characteristics, and other demographic parameters, we find that a 10% increase in the proportion of classmates who drink will increase the likelihood of drinking participation and frequency by approximately four percentage points. We also find evidence to show that the influence of close friends, while still significant, diminishes in magnitude after accounting for unobserved environmental confounders. Our findings support the literature that peer effects are important determinants of drinking behavior even after controlling for potential biases. Effective policy aimed at reducing alcohol consumption among adolescents would consider these significant peer effects. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    This study posits a relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Impulsive Buying Tendency (IBT). A survey of 574 adolescents found that high-EI adolescents manifested less impulsive behavior than did low-EI adolescents, and high-IBT adolescents were more likely to engage in more impulsive buying behavior than were low-IBT adolescents.…

  3. Immunosuppressive and autoimmune effects of thimerosal in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havarinasab, S.; Haeggqvist, B.; Bjoern, E.; Pollard, K.M.; Hultman, P.

    2005-01-01

    The possible health effects of the organic mercury compound thimerosal (ethylmercurithiosalicylate), which is rapidly metabolized to ethylmercury (EtHg), have recently been much debated and the effect of this compound on the immune system is largely unknown. We therefore studied the effect of thimerosal by treating A.SW (H-2 s ) mice, susceptible to induction of autoimmunity by heavy metals, with 10 mg thimerosal/L drinking water (internal dose ca 590 μg Hg/kg body weight/day) for up to 30 days. The lymph node expression of IL-2 and IL-15 mRNA was increased after 2 days, and of IL-4 and IFN-γ mRNA after 6 and 14 days. During the first 14 days treatment, the number of splenocytes, including T and B cells as well as Ig-secreting cells decreased. A strong immunostimulation superseded after 30 days treatment with increase in splenic weight, number of splenocytes including T and B cells and Ig-secreting cells, and Th2- as well as Th-1-dependent serum immunoglobulins. Antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) targeting the 34-kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, and systemic immune-complex deposits developed. The H-2 s strains SJL and B10.S also responded to thimerosal treatment with ANoA. The A.TL and B10.TL strain, sharing background genes with the A.SW and B10.S strain, respectively, but with a different H-2 haplotype (t1), did not develop ANoA, linking the susceptibility to H-2. Thimerosal-treated H-2 s mice homozygous for the nu mutation (SJL-nu/nu), or lacking the T-cell co-stimulatory molecule CD28 (B10.S-CD28 -/- ), did not develop ANoA, which showed that the autoimmune response is T-cell dependent. Using H-2 s strains with targeted mutations, we found that IFN-γ and IL-6, but not IL-4, is important for induction of ANoA by thimerosal. The maximum added renal concentration of thimerosal (EtHg) and inorganic mercury occurred after 14 days treatment and was 81 μg Hg/g. EtHg made up 59% and inorganic mercury 41% of the renal mercury. In conclusion, the organic mercury

  4. Radiation effect on mortality and some body compositions in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shebaita, M.K.; Kamar, G.A.R.; Gaber, H.; Fahmy, M.O.

    1984-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the hypothesis that deposition of fat and or protein in animals body before irradiation or using radio-protector material such as soybean oil may reduce the hazard effects of radiation on life span and body compartments. Therefore,286 mice (144 males and 142 females) after chemical maturity were used in this study. The animals were divided to 4 major groups. The first group was fed on chow diet, the second group was fed on radioprotector diet (basal diet), the third group was fed on high energy diet and the forth group was fed on high protein diet for 7 weeks before the exposure to gamma rays. At the exposure day each nutritional group was divided to 3 exposure treatments (non-irradiated, 800 and 1200 rads). The previous hypothesis was studied for 42 days after irradiation. The data showed that: 1. The male and the female of the chow diet group which were exposed to 800 and 1200 rads died within the first two weeks and the mortality percent in all the nutritional groups increased with increasing the post irradiation days and with increasing the dose level. 2. Feed additives (skim milk or starch) along with soybean oil as the radioprotector prevented the injuries effect of radiation on the life span. This because at 7 weeks after irradiation, the mortality percent was 27-40% in the dietary groups and on mortality was observed in the male basal diet group (Soybean oil) which exposed to 800 rads. 3. There was a correlation between the decrease in body weight and the percent mortality, since increasing the percent weight loss was paralleled with increasing the mortality percent. 4. The reduction in body fat as percent body weight in the male and in the female mice which were exposed to 800 rads were pronounced in the chow diet group rather than in other groups. 5. The radioprotector substance (Soybean oil) reduced the effect of radiation on the fat-free body. 6. The reduction in the fat-free body was mainly due to the reduction in

  5. Metabolic effects of polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yejin; Lee, Hye-Jin; Oh, Jee-Young; Sung, Yeon-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by hyperandrogenic anovulation in women of reproductive age. We investigated the metabolic effects of lean and overweight adolescents with PCOS. Methods Anthropometric measurements and biochemical parameters were evaluated in 49 adolescents with PCOS and 40 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls. We further divided both PCOS and control groups into those having BMI within the normal range of less than 85th percentile and those being overweight and obese with a BMI greater than 85th percentile. Results Hemoglobin, gamma-glutamyl transferase (r-GT), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and 2-hour postglucose load plasma insulin levels were significantly elevated in the lean PCOS group than in the lean control group. In the overweight/obese PCOS group, hemoglobin and r-GT levels were significantly elevated than in the overweight/obese control group. In the normal weight group, none of the subjects had metabolic syndrome according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, but the incidence of metabolic syndrome in the overweight/obese PCOS group was 8.3% and that in the overweight/obese control group was 6.7%. Conclusion PCOS in adolescents causes metabolic abnormalities, underscoring the importance of early diagnosis of PCOS in oligomenorrheic adolescents. PMID:26512349

  6. Metabolic effects of polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejin Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposePolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is characterized by hyperandrogenic anovulation in women of reproductive age. We investigated the metabolic effects of lean and overweight adolescents with PCOS.MethodsAnthropometric measurements and biochemical parameters were evaluated in 49 adolescents with PCOS and 40 age- and body mass index (BMI-matched controls. We further divided both PCOS and control groups into those having BMI within the normal range of less than 85th percentile and those being overweight and obese with a BMI greater than 85th percentile.ResultsHemoglobin, gamma-glutamyl transferase (r-GT, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and 2-hour postglucose load plasma insulin levels were significantly elevated in the lean PCOS group than in the lean control group. In the overweight/obese PCOS group, hemoglobin and r-GT levels were significantly elevated than in the overweight/obese control group. In the normal weight group, none of the subjects had metabolic syndrome according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, but the incidence of metabolic syndrome in the overweight/obese PCOS group was 8.3% and that in the overweight/obese control group was 6.7%.ConclusionPCOS in adolescents causes metabolic abnormalities, underscoring the importance of early diagnosis of PCOS in oligomenorrheic adolescents.

  7. [Effect of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghui, Peng; Jing, Kang; Xiao, Deng

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to probe the psychological factors adolescent orthodontic patients, the role of body image and self-esteem in the whole process of orthodontic treatment and the impact on the efficacy and satisfaction of orthodontic. Five hundred and twenty-eight patients were selected in this study. The Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN-AC) , Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Negative Physical Self-General (NPS-G) and other body analysis scale study after orthodontic lasted 18-24 months were used to investigate the role of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment. Esthetic evaluation of patients teeth after correction had been significantly improved, patient self-evaluation difference IOTN-AC doctor evaluation, Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire-tooth confidence, aesthetic concerns, psychological impact and social function were significantly improved. The improvement of the dental aesthetics component (T2 when doctors evaluate IOTN-AC) was positively correlated with the evaluation of the efficacy, and was significantly negatively correlated with the negative emotions of patients at baseline. Negative body image-dental dissatisfied-cognitive component and the affective component, the overall negative body image and negative emotions can predict patient satisfaction with treatment efficacy. Orthodontic treatment not only improves the self-aesthetic evaluation of adolescent patients, but also has a positive effect on the mental health of adolescent patients.

  8. Dose rate effectiveness in radiation-induced teratogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Norimura, T.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of p53 gene in tissue repair of teratogenic injury, we compared incidence of radiation-induced malformations in homozygous p53(-/-) mice, heterozygous p53(+/-) mice and wild-type p53(+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy at high dose rate on 9.5 days of gestation, p53(-/-) mice showed higher incidences of anomalies and higher resistance to prenatal deaths than p53(+/+) mice. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and deaths supports the notion that embryos or fetuses have a p53-dependent 'guardian' that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. In fact, after X-irradiation, the number of apoptotic cells was greatly increased in p53(+/+) fetuses but not in p53(-/-) fetuses. The same dose of γ-ray exposure at low dose rate on 9.5-10.5 day of gestation produced significant reduction of radiation-induced malformation in p53(+/+) and p53(+/-) mice, remained teratogenic for p53(-/-) mice. These results suggest that complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires the concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and the p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair. When concerted DNA repair and apoptosis functions efficiently, there is a threshold dose-rate for radiation-induced malformations. (author)

  9. Effect of alcoholic beverages on progeny and reproduction of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Dias Figueiro

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alcohol is the most commonly consumed substance in the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of alcoholic beverages on male reproduction and possible alterations in their offspring. The mice were divided into 4 groups: beer, wine, cachaça (a type of sugarcane rum, with ethanol concentrations of 1.9 g/kg, and control group treated with PBS. The treatment period was 35 days. The animals which received cachaça, demonstrated significant weight loss in the testes and epididymis. The alcoholic beverages promoted significant testosterone level and fertilization index diminution, and morphological alterations in the spermatozoa. The beer group presented decreased implantation sites and a high frequency of dominant lethal. The number of reabsorptions in the wine group was increased. The fermented beverages presented higher potential to induce visceral malformations, while the cachaça caused fetal skeletal malformations. The cachaça treated group presented a negative impact on semen quality and fertilization potential. The treatment with different alcoholic beverages, during spermatogenesis, demonstrated contrasting degrees of induction of toxic effects, interfering in a general aspect in male reproductive performance, fetal viability during intrauterine life, and birth defects. From the data, it is possible to infer that the distillated beverage caused more harmful effects to reproduction in this study.

  10. Transplacental clastogenic and epigenetic effects of gold nanoparticles in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balansky, Roumen [National Center of Oncology, Sofia (Bulgaria); Longobardi, Mariagrazia [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta [National Center of Oncology, Sofia (Bulgaria); Nedyalkov, Nikolay; Atanasov, Petar [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Toshkova, Reneta [Institute of Experimental Morphology, Pathology and Anthropology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); De Flora, Silvio [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Izzotti, Alberto, E-mail: izzotti@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • We evaluated transplacental genotoxicity of 40 nm- and 100 nm-gold nanoparticles. • AuNP-100 nm significantly enhanced MN PCE in fetal liver and blood. • In fetal lung, out of 1281 miRNA analyzed, 28 were significantly altered in their expression. • In fetal liver, 5 miRNA were significantly altered in their expression. • Altered miRNAs are involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, transcription, stress response. - Abstract: The broad application of nanotechnology in medicine, biology, and pharmacology is leading to a dramatic increase of the risk of direct contact of nanoproducts, among which gold nanoparticles (AuNP), with the human organism. The present study aimed at evaluating in vivo the genotoxicity of AuNPs with average size of 40 nm and 100 nm. A single intraperitoneal treatment of adult male and female Swiss mice (strain H) with AuNPs, at a dose of 3.3 mg/kg body weight, had no effect on the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN PCEs) in bone marrow. Conversely, the transplacental treatment with AuNP-100 nm, but not with AuNP-40 nm, applied intraperitoneally at a dose of 3.3 mg/kg to pregnant mice on days 10, 12, 14, and 17 of gestation, resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of MN PCEs in both liver and peripheral blood of mouse fetuses. In parallel, the same treatment with AuNP-100 nm, but not with AuNP-40 nm, produced significant changes in microRNA expression. In particular, out of 1281 mouse microRNAs analyzed, 28 were dys-regulated more than two-fold and to a statistically significant extent in fetus lung, and 5 were up-regulated in fetal liver. Let-7a and miR-183 were significantly up-regulated in both organs. The data presented herein demonstrate for the first time the transplacental size-dependent clastogenic and epigenetic effects of AuNPs in mouse fetus, thus highlighting new aspects concerning the putative genotoxicity of AuNPs during a vulnerable period of life.

  11. Transplacental clastogenic and epigenetic effects of gold nanoparticles in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balansky, Roumen; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Nedyalkov, Nikolay; Atanasov, Petar; Toshkova, Reneta; De Flora, Silvio; Izzotti, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluated transplacental genotoxicity of 40 nm- and 100 nm-gold nanoparticles. • AuNP-100 nm significantly enhanced MN PCE in fetal liver and blood. • In fetal lung, out of 1281 miRNA analyzed, 28 were significantly altered in their expression. • In fetal liver, 5 miRNA were significantly altered in their expression. • Altered miRNAs are involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, transcription, stress response. - Abstract: The broad application of nanotechnology in medicine, biology, and pharmacology is leading to a dramatic increase of the risk of direct contact of nanoproducts, among which gold nanoparticles (AuNP), with the human organism. The present study aimed at evaluating in vivo the genotoxicity of AuNPs with average size of 40 nm and 100 nm. A single intraperitoneal treatment of adult male and female Swiss mice (strain H) with AuNPs, at a dose of 3.3 mg/kg body weight, had no effect on the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN PCEs) in bone marrow. Conversely, the transplacental treatment with AuNP-100 nm, but not with AuNP-40 nm, applied intraperitoneally at a dose of 3.3 mg/kg to pregnant mice on days 10, 12, 14, and 17 of gestation, resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of MN PCEs in both liver and peripheral blood of mouse fetuses. In parallel, the same treatment with AuNP-100 nm, but not with AuNP-40 nm, produced significant changes in microRNA expression. In particular, out of 1281 mouse microRNAs analyzed, 28 were dys-regulated more than two-fold and to a statistically significant extent in fetus lung, and 5 were up-regulated in fetal liver. Let-7a and miR-183 were significantly up-regulated in both organs. The data presented herein demonstrate for the first time the transplacental size-dependent clastogenic and epigenetic effects of AuNPs in mouse fetus, thus highlighting new aspects concerning the putative genotoxicity of AuNPs during a vulnerable period of life

  12. Protective effect of yeast β-glucan on immune system of mice irradiated by carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Lu Dong; Wei Wei; Jing Xigang; Wang Jufang; Li Wenjian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. To detect Yeast β-glucan's protective effect on mice's immune system after C ion beam radiation, mice were used as the test model. We observed the weight, hair color and behavior of mice everyday within a 7 d period of time after irradiation. Meanwhile, the content of white blood cell, on the 2nd and 7th day after irradiation was detected. We detected the thymus and spleen SOD, GSH-PX activity and MDA content of the mice on the 8th day. The results showed that yeast β-glucan could reduce the rapid weight loss of mice, increase white blood cell content, increase thymus and spleen SOD, GSH-PX activity, decrease MDA content of thymus and spleen. These results indicate that yeast 13-glucan can protect mice's immune system against C ion beam radiation damage. (authors)

  13. Protection effect of ginkgo albumin extract on γ-ray irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Qianchun; Duan Huike; Wang Lan; Xie Bijun; Chen Chunyan

    2005-01-01

    Water soluble ginkgo albumin extract (GAE), which was extracted for the first time from seeds of Ginkgo bilbo L in our laboratory has good antioxidant and anti-aging activity. In this paper, protective effect of GAE on γ-rays irradiated mice was studied. The results showed that the mice irradiated to 8.5 Gy were zero, whereas survival rate of the high dosage GAE group was 20 percent. Blood picture of the 8.5 Gy irradiated mice suffered damages of different degrees, while blood picture index of the GAE group decreased slower and recovered faster significantly than the irradiation control group. GAE and Vitamin C could significantly enhance serum SOD activity in serum and increase DNA content in bone marrow cells, and also promote recovery of damaged immunology function of the irradiated mice. These suggest that GAE may protect mice from the radiation damages by enhancement of antioxidant activity, hemopoiesis function and immunologic function of mice. (authors)

  14. The Effect Of Inoculation Dose Of trypanosoma Evansi On Blood Value In Animal Hosts f Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arifin, M.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to obtain the information and its relation between a number of parasites and pathogenity in mice. The pathogenity of T. evansi was depend on the exchange of blood value of infected mice. The parasites was irradiated by gamma rays 6 O C o with the dose of and 300 Gy. The dose of inoculation were 1 x 10 5 , 5 x 10 5 and 1 x 10 6 parasites per mice. The results obtained showed that a number of parasites were inoculated caused the drop of blood value of mice. The number of parasites and irradiation were also significant effect to the blood value (P<0.01)

  15. Effect of Fenbendazole on Three Behavioral Tests in Male C57BL/6N Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gadad, Bharathi S; Daher, João P L; Hutchinson, Eric K; Brayton, Cory F; Dawson, Ted M; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Watson, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Pinworms are highly contagious parasites of laboratory rodents that often are treated with fenbendazole. To our knowledge, the effect of fenbendazole at therapeutic dosages on behavioral tests in mice has not been evaluated. Here we studied 6-wk-old male C57BL/6N mice. We compared the behavior of control mice (fed regular diet) with 3 groups of mice treated with dietary fenbendazole. Treatment groups were 4 wk of fenbendazole, 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk of regular diet, and 2 wk of...

  16. Aggressive effects of prioritizing popularity in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillessen, Antonius H N; Mayeux, Lara; Ha, Thao; de Bruyn, Eddy H; LaFontana, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of prioritizing popularity on the association between early adolescents' popularity and their aggressive, leadership, and prosocial behaviors with peers. Participants were 288 14-year-olds from The Netherlands who completed a sociometric instrument and an assessment of how much they prioritized popularity over other personal goals. Results indicated that prioritizing popularity was distinct from actual popularity in the peer group. Further, prioritizing popularity moderated the association of popularity with aggressive and leadership behaviors, with adolescents who were both popular and who prioritized popularity being particularly aggressive and scoring high on leadership behaviors. This trend was especially true for boys. The same moderating effect was not found for prosocial behaviors. Motivational and social-cognitive factors in the dynamics of peer popularity are highlighted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Health effects of media on children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C; Jordan, Amy B; Donnerstein, Ed

    2010-04-01

    Youth spend an average of >7 hours/day using media, and the vast majority of them have access to a bedroom television, computer, the Internet, a video-game console, and a cell phone. In this article we review the most recent research on the effects of media on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Studies have shown that media can provide information about safe health practices and can foster social connectedness. However, recent evidence raises concerns about media's effects on aggression, sexual behavior, substance use, disordered eating, and academic difficulties. We provide recommendations for parents, practitioners, the media, and policy makers, among others, for ways to increase the benefits and reduce the harm that media can have for the developing child and for adolescents.

  18. Effect of diuron on germ cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, R C; Mehrota, N K

    1997-11-01

    Diuron in both, acute (340 and 170 mg/kg body wt) and chronic (3400 ppm) doses induced dominant lethal mutations in male Swiss albino mice. The results suggest that diuron is mutagenic in dominant lethal test system.

  19. Protective effect of alkali extract of Huangmo (AEHM) on immunological function in X-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Fei; Wu Congmei; Su Shijie; Cao Ruimin

    1996-01-01

    The male mice were given ip AEHM 5 mg/kg, wt/d before irradiation with 2.0 Gy X-rays for 3 days, and the changes of several immunological indexes were observed 24 h after X-irradiation. The results showed that AEHM significantly increased the numbers of splenocytes and thymocytes, the reaction of splenocytes to ConA and the spontaneous proliferation of thymocytes in irradiated mice, and decreased the fall of spleen and thymus. In addition, a tendency of the increases in the above indexes in the intact mice treated with AEHM was observed. Meanwhile, AEHM possessed similar radioprotective effect on immunological functions to polysaccharides of Ginseng. The results suggest that AEHM has not only a radioprotective effect on immunological functions in the irradiated mice, but also an enhancing effect on the defence functions in the intact mice. It is very hopeful that AEHM acted as immune-enhanced drug should be used in the clinic

  20. Effect of Cistanche deserticola Ma extract on memory of aged mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orobanchaceae) extract (CDME) on normal aged mice. Methods: An open-field test was used to study the effects of various doses of CDME on mouse locomotive activity. The mice were sacrificed following the locomotor test and the brain ...

  1. Effect of Egg Size on Predation by White-Footed Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. DeGraaf; T. J. Maier

    1996-01-01

    We compared predation by wild-trapped, caged white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) on eggs of Japanese Quail (Coturnix coturnix) and Zebra Finches (Poephila guttata) to test the effect of egg size. Nine male and nine female mice were weighed, acclimated to cages for 24 h, and presented with two wicker nests,...

  2. Protective effect of WR-2823 in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovicj, A.; Tanasijevicj, D.; Cvetkovicj, M.; Cjosicj, M.; Chizmicj, Z.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical compound named WR-2823 has been synthetised. The acute toxicity after IP application has been investigated and LD 50 estimated. The protective ability of the radioprotector has been investigated in mice with gamma rays of 60 Co, or at the origin of 252 Cf. High protective potency in mice, treated with lethal doses of gamma rays and neutrons have been estimated. (author) 8 refs.; 1 tab

  3. Transgenerational effects of radiation and chemicals in mice and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Taisei

    2006-01-01

    Parental exposure of mice to radiation and chemicals causes a variety of adverse effects (e.g., tumors, congenital malformations and embryonic deaths) in the progeny and the tumor-susceptibility phenotype is transmissible beyond the first post-radiation generation. The induced rates of tumors were 100-fold higher than those known for mouse specific locus mutations. There were clear strain differences in the types of naturally-occurring and induced tumors and most of the latter were malignant. Another important finding was that germ-line exposure elicited very weak tumorigenic responses, but caused persistent hypersensitivity in the offspring for the subsequent development of cancer by the postnatal environment. Activations of oncogenes, ras, mos, abl, etc. and mutations in tumor suppressor genes such as p53 were also detected in specific tumors in cancer-prone descendants. However, the majority of tumors observed in the progeny were those commonly observed in the strains that were used and oncogene activations were rarely observed in these tumors. It can be hypothesized that genetic instability modifies tumor occurrence in a transgenerational manner, but so far no links could be established between chromosomal and molecular changes and transmissible tumor risks. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that cumulative changes in many normal but cancer-related genes affecting immunological, biochemical and physiological functions may slightly elevate the incidence of tumors or fasten the tumor development. This hypothesis is supported by our GeneChip analyses which showed suppression and/or over-expression of many such genes in the offspring of mice exposed to radiation. In humans, a higher risk of leukemia and birth defects has been reported in the children of fathers who had been exposed to radionuclides in the nuclear reprocessing plants and to diagnostic radiation. These findings have not been supported in the children of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima

  4. Protective effect of corticosteroids on radiation pneumonitis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, N.J.; Narine, K.R.; Wade, R.

    1988-01-01

    We explored the protective effect of corticosteroids on the mortality of mice that received thoracic irradiation. Methylprednisolone, 100 mg/kg/week, given from 11 weeks after gamma irradiation of the thorax resulted in an increase in the LD50 (11-26 weeks) from 14.3 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SE) Gy to 17.6 +/- 0.4 Gy, P less than 0.001, a protection factor of 1.2. Withdrawal of steroids at various times during the period of radiation pneumonitis resulted in accelerated mortality in the next 2-4 weeks, so that the cumulative mortality caught up with that of control animals by 4 weeks after steroid withdrawal. However, after the end of the usual period of pneumonitis withdrawal of steroids did not result in accelerated mortality, suggesting that the time when steroids are protective corresponds to the duration of pneumonitis. A smaller dose of steroids, 25 mg/kg/week, was found to be as protective as the larger dose used in the above experiments. The possibility that corticosteroids reduce mortality, even when given many weeks after radiation, may have important practical and theoretical implications

  5. Effect of ionizing radiations on sperm of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, F.I.; Hassan, N.H.A.; Eldawt, H.A.; Roushdy, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of both gamma rays and reactor beams of mixed neutrons and gamma rays on sperms were investigated. Caudal sperms of adult male mice were examined 3 and 6 weeks post-exposure to 0.5 , 1.5, 3.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma rays and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks in animals exposed to 42.5 and 58.5 R of mixed neutrons and gamma-rays. Sperms were seriously affected due to exposure to both types of irradiation. There were dose dependent changes in the mean frequency of abnormal sperms. The peak values were at dose level of 3.0 Gy recording 26.43% and 29.82% in both groups sacrificed 3 and 6 weeks respectively compared with 1.57% for the control group. The increase in the abnormal sperms in the groups of the animals exposed to the reactor beam was always related to the time interval between treatment and observation, the longer the time the more sperms with abnormal head were encountered. 14 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Biologic effects of fenbendazole in rats and mice: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, David; Cray, Carolyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2007-11-01

    This review summarizes findings from toxicologic, carcinogenic, immunologic, and metabolic studies on fenbendazole (FBZ). Currently, FBZ is used to treat or prevent pinworm outbreaks in laboratory rodents. Because antiparasitic treatments usually are not part of experimental designs, interactions from the medication on the outcomes of ongoing experiments are a concern. At therapeutic levels, FBZ does not alter the total content of cytochromes P450 but does induce certain hepatic cytochrome P450 isoforms, namely 1A1, 1A2, and 2B1. Although expressed constitutively at low or undetectable levels, these isoforms particularly are known for bioactivating a number of procarcinogens. Lifetime studies in rats have shown that FBZ is not a carcinogen but that it may behave as a tumor promoter when given after certain initiators. Unlike in other animal species, FBZ treatment-associated myelosuppression has not been reported to occur in rodents. The few currently available immunologic studies in mice, including an autoimmune model, have not shown effects on selected immune responses. However, data from other animal species suggest that the ability of B and T lymphocytes to proliferate in the secondary immune response may be suppressed during treatment with FBZ.

  7. The Effect of Ecstasy Administration during Pregnancy on Mice Fetuses

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    Y Mostafavi Pour-Manshadi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ecstasy or 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine(MDMA is a psychotropic and addictive substance that young people tend to use it to reduce their psychological and social tensions. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of ecstasy consumption on the fetus of pregnant mice during the second and third weeks of pregnancy. Methods: 20 adult female mice were randomly selected(5 for control group and 15 for experimental group. Two intraperitoneal injections of ecstasy(5mg/Kg was used in the experimental group, on 7th and 14th days of pregnancy, while, in the control group, only distilled water was injected intraperitoneally. On 18th day of pregnancy, mice were placed in separate cages. The condition of palate, skull, external ear, eye, fingers and toes and sindactily, weight, and fertility potentials of newborn mice were studied using stereo microscope. Results: From 163 newborn mice in two groups, no abnormalities were observed in the skull and the external ear. There wasn’t any significant difference between male and female sex ratio between two groups (p=.08. Hypoplasia of the fingers was significantly different between the two groups(p<0.001. The frequency of sindactily was not significantly different between two groups(p=0. 11. Female fertility potential was significantly different between two groups(p<0.001. Conclusion: Adminstration of ecstasy during pregnancy may affect the organogenesis and fertility potential of newborn mice. Therefore, more studies are needed in this regard.

  8. Effect of repeated ultraviolet irradiation on skin of hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpermann, H.; Vogel, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of repeated UV-irradiation on mechanical and biochemical parameters was studied in skin of hairless mice. uV-A irradiation for a period of 1 h daily over 8 weeks caused only a slight increase in skin thickness and a decrease in ultimate strain. The changes induced by UV-B and C, however, were quite remarkable. Skin thickness was increased depending on the daily dose exposure time (15-90 s at an irradiation rate of 20mW/cm 2 UV-B and A and of 14mW/cm 2 UV-C) and the duration of treatment (1-6 weeks). Ultimate load, tensile strength and modulus of elasticity showed an increase following medium dosages after 1 and 2 weeks, however, a decrease after high dosages and longterm treatment. Ultimate strain was found to be the most sensitive parameter being decreased depending on exposure time and duration of treatment. Insoluble collagen and total collagen were decreased after long-term treatment thus being correlated with the mechanical parameters. The elastin content was only barely influenced and not correlated with the mechanical data, e.g. the modulus of elasticity. Thus, a favourable effect of short-treatment with low doses of UV-irradiation of mechanical parameters of skin could be demonstrated. Long-term treatment with relatively high doses of UV-B, however, resulted in unfavourable effects, whereby first ultimate strain, then ultimate load, modulus of elasticity and tensile strength were decreased. (orig.) [de

  9. The Effect of Adolescents' Internet Addiction on Smartphone Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Dijle; Bektas, Murat; Bektas, Ilknur; Akdeniz Kudubes, Asli; Selekoglu Ok, Yasemin; Sal Altan, Sema; Celik, Isa

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adolescents' Internet addiction levels on smartphone addiction. This study included 609 students from three high schools that are located in western Turkey. Numbers, percentages, and averages were used to evaluate the sociodemographic data. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk tests were used to determine whether the data had a normal distribution. The average age of the participants was 12.3 ± 0.9 years. Of them, 52.3% were male, and 42.8% were 10th graders. All participants had smartphones, and 89.4% of them connected to the Internet continuously with their smartphones. The study found that there was a statistically significant correlation between Internet addiction and smartphone addiction. It was determined that male adolescents with high levels of Internet addiction also had high smartphone addiction levels. On the other hand, sociodemographic variables had no statistically significant effect on smartphone addiction. A number of studies in the relevant literature examined the effects of Internet addiction on adolescents' smartphone addiction. However, findings of this study are unique because they are specific to the Turkish culture, and there is a limited database in Turkey regarding this issue. The researchers believe that the findings of this study will be beneficial to show the importance of the issue in the international arena and to guide further studies to prevent this addiction because there is no reliable database about smartphone addiction in Turkey.

  10. Effects of gasoline engine emissions on preexisting allergic airway responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Kimberly C; Reed, Matthew D; McDonald, Jacob D; Seilkop, Steven K; Barrett, Edward G

    2008-10-01

    Gasoline-powered vehicle emissions contribute significantly to ambient air pollution. We hypothesized that exposure to gasoline engine emissions (GEE) may exacerbate preexisting allergic airway responses. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized by injection with ovalbumin (OVA) and then received a 10-min aerosolized OVA challenge. Parallel groups were sham-sensitized with saline. Mice were exposed 6 h/day to air (control, C) or GEE containing particulate matter (PM) at low (L), medium (M), or high (H) concentrations, or to the H level with PM removed by filtration (high-filtered, HF). Immediately after GEE exposure mice received another 10-min aerosol OVA challenge (pre-OVA protocol). In a second (post-OVA) protocol, mice were similarly sensitized but only challenged to OVA before air or GEE exposure. Measurements of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood collection were performed approximately 24 h after the last exposure. In both protocols, M, H, and HF GEE exposure significantly decreased BAL neutrophils from nonsensitized mice but had no significant effect on BAL cells from OVA-sensitized mice. In the pre-OVA protocol, GEE exposure increased OVA-specific IgG(1) but had no effect on BAL interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-13, or interferon (IFN)-gamma in OVA-sensitized mice. Nonsensitized GEE-exposed mice had increased OVA-specific IgG(2a), IgE, and IL-2, but decreased total IgE. In the post-OVA protocol, GEE exposure reduced BAL IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma in nonsensitized mice but had no effect on sensitized mice. These results suggest acute exposure to the gas-vapor phase of GEE suppressed inflammatory cells and cytokines from nonsensitized mice but did not substantially exacerbate allergic responses.

  11. Differential regulation of morphine antinociceptive effects by endogenous enkephalinergic system in the forebrain of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wei-Zen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking the preproenkephalin (ppENK gene are hyperalgesic and show more anxiety and aggression than wild-type (WT mice. The marked behavioral changes in ppENK knock-out (KO mice appeared to occur in supraspinal response to painful stimuli. However the functional role of enkephalins in the supraspinal nociceptive processing and their underlying mechanism is not clear. The aim of present study was to compare supraspinal nociceptive and morphine antinociceptive responses between WT and ppENK KO mice. Results The genotypes of bred KO mice were confirmed by PCR. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive neurons were labeled in the caudate-putamen, intermediated part of lateral septum, lateral globus pallidus, intermediated part of lateral septum, hypothalamus, and amygdala of WT mice. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive neurons were not found in the same brain areas in KO mice. Tail withdrawal and von Frey test results did not differ between WT and KO mice. KO mice had shorter latency to start paw licking than WT mice in the hot plate test. The maximal percent effect of morphine treatments (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, i.p. differed between WT and KO mice in hot plate test. The current source density (CSD profiles evoked by peripheral noxious stimuli in the primary somatosenstory cortex (S1 and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC were similar in WT and KO mice. After morphine injection, the amplitude of the laser-evoked sink currents was decreased in S1 while the amplitude of electrical-evoked sink currents was increased in the ACC. These differential morphine effects in S1 and ACC were enhanced in KO mice. Facilitation of synaptic currents in the ACC is mediated by GABA inhibitory interneurons in the local circuitry. Percent increases in opioid receptor binding in S1 and ACC were 5.1% and 5.8%, respectively. Conclusion The present results indicate that the endogenous enkephalin system is not involved in acute nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord

  12. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT PHYSICAL ACTIVITY TRAINING METHODS ON OVERWEIGHT ADOLESCENTS

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    Shohreh Ghatrehsamani

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In view of the growing trend of obesity around the world, including in our country, and the effect of reduced physical activity in increasing the incidence of obesity and overweight in children and adolescents and limitations of families in providing transport for their children to attend exercise classes, as well as time limitations of students in taking part in these classes, accessing appropriate methods for presenting physical activity training seems essential.    METHODS: This non-pharmacological clinical trial was performed during six months from May to November 2007 on 105 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years with obesity, randomly assigned to 3 groups of thirty-five. Nutrition and treatment behavior were the same in all groups, but physical activity training in the first group was taking part in physical activity training classes twice a week, in the second group by providing a training CD, and in the third group via face-to-face training. Before and after the intervention, anthropometric indicators were measured and recorded.    RESULTS: Mean body mass index (BMI of participants in group attended physical activity training classes, and in the group undergone training with CD, after the interventions was significantly lower than that before the intervention.     CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrated that training using CDs can also be effective in reducing BMI in overweight and obese children and adolescents as much as face-to-face education and participation in physical training classes. Extending such interventions can be effective at the community level.      Keywords: Children, adolescents, physical activity, education, obesity, treatment.

  13. Stability in Effects of gamma-Irradiated Chinese Medicinal Prescriptions on Protection of Mice from Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jung-Ah; Kim Sung-Ho

    2000-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of irradiated medicinal plants on biological system were studied to apply the irradiation technology for hygienic purpose that is usually performed by chemical preservatives. We previously reported that the three Chinese medicinal prescriptions, Si-Wu-Tang, Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang and San-Ling-Bai-Shu-San, showed radioprotective effects in mice. In these experiments, to investigate the difference in radioprotective effects between irradiated (10 kGy) and non-irradiated medicinal plants, mice were administered with the irradiated or non-irradiated prescriptions and then the mice were exposed to gamma-rays with low and high dosage. Non-exposed mice were also prepared as a control. The effects of prescriptions on the jejunal crypt survival, endogenous spleen colony formation, and apoptosis of jejunal crypt cells in mice were investigated after exposure. All of the prescriptions showed the protective effects of the jejunal crypt (p0.05) and the adminstration of the prescriptions increased the formation of endogenous spleen colony (p0.05) and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced apoptosis (p0.05). No significant difference in effects between irradiated and non-irradiated prescreption on the parameters was found in mice administered with each prescription before exposure to gamma-rays. In non-exposed mice, there were no different findings in the parameters between irradiated and non-irradiated prescription

  14. Teratogenic effects of retinoic acid on neurulation in mice embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobakht, M; Zirak, A; Mehdizadeh, M; Tabatabaeei, P

    2006-02-21

    Retinoic acids (RA) are natural chemicals that exert a hormone-like activity and a variety of biological effects on early development of mouse. In this study, the probable teratogenic effects of RA on CNS have been investigated in pregnant mice (n = 20) divided into four groups: (1) untreated controls, (2) controls which received a single dose of DMSO, (3) a group that received 40 mg/kg, and (4) a group that received 60 mg/kg of all-trans RA in DMSO, respectively on the eighth day of gestation. Embryos whose dams had received 40 and 60 mg/kg doses of RA, showed malformations and decreased size. At 40 mg/kg dosage level, 50% of the embryos had closed neural tubes while at 60 mg/kg dosage level the neural tube failed to close. The neuroblast mantle layers were disorganized in the 40 mg/kg and even more in the 60 mg/kg exposed group compared to the controls. In mitosis, the density of chromatin was increased in the 60 mg/kg dose group. Compared to controls the 40 and 60 mg/kg dose groups of RA treated dams decreases in the luminal longitudinal and internal measures were observed. Also the thickness of ventricular, mantle and marginal layers was smaller. Wide intercellular spaces due to the degenerated cells at high doses of RA as well as an accumulation of intercellular fluid were observed. Therefore, the wedge shape of neuroepithelium was abolished, preventing the elevation of the neural wall.

  15. Effects of polysaccharides from Cordyceps sinensis mycelium on physical fatigue in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng yan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effects of polysaccharides from Cordyceps sinensis mycelium (CSP on physical fatigue in mice. The mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 16 in each group, i.e. control group, low-dose CSP treated group, intermediate-dose CSP treated group and high-dose CSP treated group. The mice in the treated groups received CSP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, ig, and the mice in the control group received drinking water ig. After 28 days, a forced swimming test was performed and some biochemical parameters related to fatigue were examined. The present data suggested that CSP could extend the exhaustive swimming time of mice, as well as increase the hepatic glycogen and muscle glycogen levels, and decrease the blood lactic acid and BUN levels. These results indicated that CSP had anti-fatigue effects.

  16. The Effect of Advertising on Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Matthew A; Fleming-Milici, Frances; Rozendaal, Esther; McAlister, Anna R; Castonguay, Jessica

    2017-11-01

    In ∼100 years, marketing to children went from a severely frowned upon practice to an integral part of growing up as companies came to realize that investing in marketing to children and adolescents provides excellent immediate and future dividends. Each year, enormous sums of money are spent to reach this valuable audience because children and adolescents spend billions on their own purchases, influence family decisions about what to buy, and promise a potential lifetime of brand loyalty. The channels to reach youth have grown, and marketers are increasingly using them, often blurring the distinction between entertainment and advertising. Because advertising to children and adolescents has become ubiquitous, researchers who study its influence raise significant concerns about the practice, especially as it relates to dietary behavior, family conflict, marketer tactics, and children's potential vulnerability as an audience. In this review by the Workgroup on Marketing and Advertising, we highlight the state of the research in this area and suggest that more research needs to be conducted on understanding the following: the effects of advertising exposure, how psychological development affects children's responses to marketing, the problems associated with advertising in newer media, and how researchers, parents, and practitioners might be able to mitigate the most deleterious advertising effects. We then present avenues of future research along with recommendations for key stakeholders. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. [The effect of sibutramine on weight loss in obese adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ruth Rocha; Cominato, Louise; Damiani, Durval

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of sibutramine on weight loss in obese adolescents. A double-blind controlled study lasting 13 months. The study included 73 obese adolescents of both sexes aged between 10 and 18 years. Laboratory tests and imaging studies were performed before, during wash-out, and at the end of 13 months. The percentage of patients who lost 10% of their initial weight in the placebo group was 46%, and in the sibutramine group was 75%. When placebo was used, average weight rose by 1.61 kg, and BMI decreased by 0.24 kg/m(2) whereas with the use of sibutramine, weight decreased by 4.47 kg, and average BMI decreased, 2.38 kg/m(2), with p Sibutramine induced significantly more weight loss in obese adolescents compared with placebo, without significant side effects. The weight loss curve was different depending on the moment sibutramine was introduced. This finding indicates that the best time to start sibutramine is when adhesion begins to fail.

  18. Antihypertensive effect of etamicastat in dopamine D2 receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando, Ines; Asico, Laureano D; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jones, John E; Serrão, Maria Paula; Cuevas, Santiago; Grandy, David K; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Jose, Pedro A

    2018-04-13

    Abnormalities of the D 2 R gene (DRD2) play a role in the pathogenesis of human essential hypertension; variants of the DRD2 have been reported to be associated with hypertension. Disruption of Drd2 (D 2 -/- ) in mice increases blood pressure. The hypertension of D 2 -/- mice has been related, in part, to increased sympathetic activity, renal oxidative stress, and renal endothelin B receptor (ETBR) expression. We tested in D 2 -/- mice the effect of etamicastat, a reversible peripheral inhibitor of dopamine-β-hydroxylase that reduces the biosynthesis of norepinephrine from dopamine and decreases sympathetic nerve activity. Blood pressure was measured in anesthetized D 2 -/- mice treated with etamicastat by gavage, (10 mg/kg), conscious D 2 -/- mice, and D 2 +/+ littermates, and mice with the D 2 R selectively silenced in the kidney, treated with etamicastat in the drinking water (10 mg/kg per day). Tissue and urinary catecholamines and renal expression of selected G protein-coupled receptors, enzymes related to the production of reactive oxygen species, and sodium transporters were also measured. Etamicastat decreased blood pressure both in anesthetized and conscious D 2 -/- mice and mice with renal-selective silencing of D 2 R to levels similar or close to those measured in D 2 +/+ littermates. Etamicastat decreased cardiac and renal norepinephrine and increased cardiac and urinary dopamine levels in D 2 -/- mice. It also normalized the increased renal protein expressions of ETBR, NADPH oxidase isoenzymes, and urinary 8-isoprostane, as well as renal NHE3 and NCC, and increased the renal expression of D 1 R but not D 5 R in D 2 -/- mice. In conclusion, etamicastat is effective in normalizing the increased blood pressure and some of the abnormal renal biochemical alterations of D 2 -/- mice.

  19. Effects of low-dose rate irradiation on two types of type II diabetes model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaji; Sakai, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated in two mouse strains - C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db mouse) and AKITA (AKITA mouse)-for type II diabetes mellitus. Both strains develop the developed type II diabetes by about 8 weeks of age due to dysfunction of the insulin/insulin receptor. The db Mouse' shows obese and exhibits hyperinsulinism, and the onset of Type II diabetes like resembles that for Westerners. On the other hand, the AKITA mouse has exhibits disordered insulin secretion, and the diabetes such as resembles that of Asians. Ten-week old female mice, in groups of 8 or 12, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low-dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The level of urine glucose was measured with test slips. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were highly elevated the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group of db mice, three mice showed decrease in glucose level compare to the level of non-irradiated diabetes mice after 35, 52 or 80 weeks of irradiation. All had maintained a normal level thereafter. No such improvement in diabetes was ever observed in the 12 mice of in the non-irradiated control group. The AKITA mice, however, did not decrease the glucose level regardless of the irradiation. Both the db mice and AKITA mice had their lives prolonged their life by the irradiation. The survival rate of db mice at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, but 50% in the non-irradiated group. The average life span was 104 weeks in the irradiated group and 87 weeks in the control group. Furthermore, a marked difference was furthermore observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; appearances were well preserved in the irradiated group. The average life span in the irradiated AKITA mice was also longer than that for the non-irradiated mice, 51 weeks and 41 weeks in the irradiated and non-irradiated group respectively. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation

  20. Prophylactic effects of sulforaphane on depression-like behavior and dendritic changes in mice after inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Chun; Yao, Wei; Dong, Chao; Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Ma, Min; Han, Mei; Wu, Jin; Ushida, Yusuke; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of depression. Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate compound derived from broccoli, is a potent activator of the NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which plays a role in inflammation. In this study, we examined whether the prevention effects of SFN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced depression-like behavior in mice. Pretreatment with SFN significantly blocked an increase in the serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level and an increase in microglial activation of brain regions after a single administration of LPS (0.5 mg/kg). Furthermore, SFN significantly potentiated increased serum levels of IL-10 after LPS administration. In the tail-suspension test and forced swimming test, SFN significantly attenuated an increase of the immobility time after LPS administration. In addition, SFN significantly recovered to control levels for LPS-induced alterations in the proteins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, postsynaptic density protein 95 and AMPA receptor 1 (GluA1) and dendritic spine density in the brain regions. Finally, dietary intake of 0.1% glucoraphanin (a glucosinolate precursor of SFN) food during the juvenile and adolescence could prevent the onset of LPS-induced depression-like behaviors and dendritic spine changes in the brain regions at adulthood. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dietary intake of SFN-rich broccoli sprout has prophylactic effects on inflammation-related depressive symptoms. Therefore, supplementation of SFN-rich broccoli sprout could be prophylactic vegetable to prevent or minimize the relapse by inflammation in the remission state of depressed patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunomodulatory effect of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on long-term heavy-load exercising mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yali; Cai, Dehua; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Xinshen

    2012-12-01

    Long-term heavy-load exercise can lead to a decrease in the organism's immune response. In this study, we used 100 Kunming (KM) mice to investigate the immune-regulatory effects of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on long-term heavy-load exercising mice. Peripheral white blood cells (WBC), the absolute value of neutrophils (NEUT), the phagocytic function of macrophages, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells (PFC) were evaluated 4 weeks after gavaging long-term heavy-load exercising mice with GLP. After exercise, the WBC count in peripheral blood, absolute neutrophil count, macrophage phagocytic index, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells were significantly reduced in the mice not fed GLP. Both medium and high doses of GLP drastically increased peripheral WBC, absolute neutrophil count, macrophage phagocytic index, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells in long-term heavy-load exercising mice. High doses of GLP increased peritoneal macrophage phagocytic rate considerably. With this study, we demonstrate that 4 weeks of heavy-load exercise can lead to exercise-induced immunosuppression in mice. A supplement of GLP fed to these mice improves both non-specific and specific immune responses among these mice. The effect for the high-dose GLP treatment is especially significant.

  2. Effects of Hot Water Extracts from Polygonum multiflorum on Ovariectomy Induced Osteopenia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ho Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum multiflorum (PM, a traditional Chinese medicine, is used to treat various diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hyperlipidemia. However, the influence of PM on osteoporosis in animals is unclear. The present study investigated the antiosteoporotic effect of PM on bone mass in ovariectomized (OVX mice and its possible mechanism of action. Twenty-five female C3H/HeN mice were divided into five groups of five mice as follows. Sham-operated control mice received daily oral gavage of an equal volume of water, and OVX mice received daily oral gavage of water or an injection of β-estradiol or PM for 6 weeks. Administration of PM significantly suppressed body weight and organs weight and increased weight and length of bone compared with the OVX group. Treatment with PM reversed osteopenia in OVX mice, thereby improving the bone morphometric parameters. Moreover, histological analysis using hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that PM inhibited OVX-induced bone loss. Serum estradiol and bone alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly decreased in the OVX group, with the levels increasing with PM treatment. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by PM in OVX mice. These results suggest that PM is effective in preventing bone loss in OVX mice.

  3. Attenuation of oxidative and nitrosative stress in cortical area associates with antidepressant-like effects of tropisetron in male mice following social isolation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Olson, Carl O; Rastegar, Mojgan; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Marzban, Hassan; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Samiei, Elika; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2016-06-01

    Tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist widely used as an antiemetic, has been reported to have positive effects on mood disorders. Adolescence is a critical period during the development of brain, where exposure to chronic stress during this time is highly associated with the development of depression. In this study, we showed that 4 weeks of juvenile social isolation stress (SIS) provoked depressive-like behaviors in male mice, which was associated with disruption of mitochondrial function and nitric oxide overproduction in the cortical areas. In this study, tropisetron (5mg/kg) reversed the negative behavioral effects of SIS in male mice. We found that the effects of tropisetron were mediated through mitigating the negative activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) on mitochondrial activity. Administration of aminoguanidine (specific iNOS inhibitor, 20mg/kg) augmented the protective effects of tropisetron (1mg/kg) on SIS. Furthermore, l-arginine (nitric oxide precursor, 100mg/kg) abolished the positive effects of tropisetron. These results have increased our knowledge on the pivotal role of mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of depression, and highlighted the role of 5-HT3 receptors in psychosocial stress response during adolescence. Finally, we observed that tropisetron alleviated the mitochondrial dysfunction through decreased nitrergic system activity in the cerebral cortex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recovery Effect and Life Prolong Effect of Long Term Low-Dose Rate Irradiation on Type II Diabetes Model Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Suzuki, I.; Sakai, K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of low-dose rate gamma-irradiation were investigated on model mice for type II diabetes mellitus, C57BL/KsJ-db/db. The mice develop the type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age due to obesity and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. Female 10-week old mice, a group of 12 mice, were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr from 137-Cs (370 GBq). The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, the decrease in the glucose level was observed in 3 mice. Such recovery from the diabetes was never observed in 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There is no systematic difference in the change of body weight, food assumption, and amount of drinking water, between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. The survival was better in the irradiated group: the surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75% in the irradiated group, while 40% in the non-irradiated. Marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin, and tail; better condition was kept in the irradiated group. In the irradiated mice mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20 ? 30 weeks compared with the non-irradiated mice. These results suggest that the low-dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, which lead not only to the recovery of the diabetes, but also to the suppression of the aging process. (Author)

  5. Effects of genetic background and environmental novelty on wheel running as a rewarding behaviour in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Leonie; van den Bos, Ruud; Stoker, Astrid K; Kas, Martien J H; Spruijt, Berry M

    2007-02-27

    Recent studies suggest running wheel activity to be naturally rewarding and reinforcing; considering the shared neuro-behavioural characteristics with drug-induced reward situations, wheel running behaviour gains interest as a tool to study mechanisms underlying reward-sensitivity. Previously, we showed that wheel running has the potential to disrupt the daily organization of home cage behaviour in female C57BL/6 [de Visser L, van den Bos R, Spruijt BM. Automated home cage observations as a tool to measure the effects of wheel running on cage floor locomotion. Behav Brain Res 2005;160:382-8]. In the present study, we investigated the effects of novelty-induced stress on wheel running and its impact on home cage behaviour in male C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice. Our aim was to determine whether wheel running may be used as a tool to study both genetic and environmentally induced differences in sensitivity to rewarding behaviour in mice. One group of male mice was placed in an automated home cage observation system for 2 weeks with a wheel integrated in the cage. A second group of mice was allowed to habituate to this cage for 1 week before a running wheel was introduced. Results showed a pronounced sensitising effect of novelty on the level of wheel running in C57Bl/6 mice but not in DBA mice. Overall levels of wheel running were higher in DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, wheel running affected circadian rhythmicity in DBA/2 mice but not in C57BL/6 mice. From these findings we tentatively suggest that wheel running behaviour could serve as a tool to study the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in sensitivity to rewarding behaviour in mice. As it is displayed spontaneously and easy to monitor, wheel running may be well suitable to be included in high-throughput phenotyping assays.

  6. Differential effects of diazepam and MPEP on habituation and neuro-behavioural processes in inbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Amber R; Pinzon, Nathaly Espitia; Boleij, Hetty; Kirchhoff, Susanne; Arndt, Saskia S; Nordquist, Rebecca E; Lindemann, Lothar; Jaeschke, Georg; Spooren, Will; Ohl, Frauke

    2012-06-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated a profound lack of habituation in 129P3 mice compared to the habituating, but initially more anxious, BALB/c mice. The present study investigated whether this non-adaptive phenotype of 129P3 mice is primarily based on anxiety-related characteristics. To test this hypothesis and extend our knowledge on the behavioural profile of 129P3 mice, the effects of the anxiolyticdiazepam (1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) and the putative anxiolytic metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5R) antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg) treatment on within-trial (intrasession) habituation, object recognition (diazepam: 1 mg/kg; MPEP 10 mg/kg) and on the central-nervous expression of the immediate early gene c-Fos (diazepam: 1 mg/kg; MPEP 10 mg/kg) were investigated. Behavioural findings validated the initially high, but habituating phenotype of BALB/c mice, while 129P3 mice were characterized by impaired intrasession habituation. Diazepam had an anxiolytic effect in BALB/c mice, while in higher doses caused behavioural inactivity in 129P3 mice. MPEP revealed almost no anxiolytic effects on behaviour in both strains, but reduced stress-induced corticosterone responses only in 129P3 mice. These results were complemented by reduced expression of c-Fos after MPEP treatment in brain areas related to emotional processes, and increased c-Fos expression in higher integrating brain areas such as the prelimbic cortex compared to vehicle-treated 129P3 mice. These results suggest that the strain differences observed in (non)adaptive anxiety behaviour are at least in part mediated by differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid- A and mGluR5 mediated transmission.

  7. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikai, K.; Danno, K.; Horio, T.; Narumiya, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of UV irradiation on the skin was investigated in (WB-W/+) X (C57BL/6J-Wv/+)F1-W/Wv mice, which are genetically deficient in tissue mast cells. Their congenic littermates (+/+) and normal albino mice (ICR or BALB/c) were used as controls. Mice were irradiated with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB and the increment of ear thickness was measured before and 6, 12, and 24 h after irradiation. Ear swelling in W/Wv mice at 12 and 24 h after irradiation was significantly smaller than that in +/+ and ICR mice. In contrast, the number of sunburn cells formed 24 h after UVB irradiation (200 or 500 mJ/cm2) was similar in W/Wv, +/+ and ICR mice. On the other hand, when mice were treated with 8-methoxy-psoralen (0.5%) plus UVA irradiation (4 J/cm2) (topical PUVA), ears of W/Wv and BALB/c mice, which were both white in color, were thickened similarly 72 h after treatment, but less swelling was observed in +/+ mice, which were black in skin color. The amount of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in ears, determined by radioimmunoassay specific for PGD2, was elevated 3-fold in +/+ and ICR mice at 3 h after irradiation with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB in comparison with basal level without irradiation. However, such elevation was not observed in W/Wv mice. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in UVB-induced inflammation, and PGs from mast cells are responsible at least in part for the development of this reaction. However, neither mast cells nor PGs contribute to the sunburn cell formation and ear swelling response by PUVA treatment

  8. The effect of ghrelin upon the early immune response in lean and obese mice during sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Siegl

    Full Text Available It is well established that obesity-related hormones can have modulatory effects associated with the immune response. Ghrelin, a hormone mainly derived from endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, regulates appetite, energy expenditure and body weight counteracting leptin, a hormone mainly derived from adipocytes. Additionally, receptors of both have been detected on immune cells and demonstrated an immune regulatory function during sepsis.In the present study, the effect of peripheral ghrelin administration on early immune response and survival was investigated with lean mice and mice with diet-induced obesity using cecal ligation and puncture to induce sepsis.In the obese group, we found that ghrelin treatment improved survival, ameliorated hypothermia, and increased hyperleptinemia as compared to the lean controls. We also observed that ghrelin treatment divergently regulated serum IL-1ß and TNF-α concentrations in both lean and obese septic mice. Ghrelin treatment initially decreased but later resulted in increased bacteriaemia in lean mice while having no impact upon obese mice. Similarly, ghrelin treatment increased early neutrophil oxidative burst while causing a decrease 48 hours after sepsis inducement.In conclusion, as the immune response to sepsis temporally changes, ghrelin treatment differentially mediates this response. Specifically, we observed that ghrelin conferred protective effects during the early phase of sepsis, but during the later phase deteriorated immune response and outcome. These adverse effects were more pronounced upon lean mice as compared to obese mice.

  9. Adolescent runners: the effect of training shoes on running kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Scott; Toby, E Bruce

    2013-06-01

    The modern running shoe typically features a large cushioned heel intended to dissipate the energy at heel strike to the knees and hips. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect that shoes have upon the running biomechanics among competitive adolescent runners. We wish to answer the question of whether running style is altered in these athletes because of footwear. Twelve competitive adolescent athletes were recruited from local track teams. Each ran on a treadmill in large heel trainers, track flats, and barefoot. Four different speeds were used to test each athlete. The biomechanics were assessed with a motion capture system. Stride length, heel height during posterior swing phase, and foot/ground contact were recorded. Shoe type markedly altered the running biomechanics. The foot/ground contact point showed differences in terms of footwear (Ptrainers, the athletes landed on their heels 69.79% of the time at all speeds (Ptrainers promote a heel strike pattern, whereas track flats and barefoot promote a forefoot or midfoot strike pattern. Training in heavily cushioned trainers by the competitive runner has not been clearly shown to be detrimental to performance, but it does change the gait pattern. It is not known whether the altered biomechanics of the heavily heeled cushioned trainer may be detrimental to the adolescent runner who is still developing a running style.

  10. Potential effects of reward and loss avoidance in overweight adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Sussanne; Peirano, Patricio; Luna, Beatriz; Lozoff, Betsy; Algarín, Cecilia

    2015-08-01

    Reward system and inhibitory control are brain functions that exert an influence on eating behavior regulation. We studied the differences in inhibitory control and sensitivity to reward and loss avoidance between overweight/obese and normal-weight adolescents. We assessed 51 overweight/obese and 52 normal-weight 15-y-old Chilean adolescents. The groups were similar regarding sex and intelligence quotient. Using Antisaccade and Incentive tasks, we evaluated inhibitory control and the effect of incentive trials (neutral, loss avoidance, and reward) on generating correct and incorrect responses (latency and error rate). Compared to normal-weight group participants, overweight/obese adolescents showed shorter latency for incorrect antisaccade responses (186.0 (95% CI: 176.8-195.2) vs. 201.3 ms (95% CI: 191.2-211.5), P reward (41.0 (95% CI: 34.5-47.5) vs. 49.8% (95% CI: 43.0-55.1), P reward and loss avoidance trials. These findings could suggest that an imbalance of inhibition and reward systems influence their eating behavior.

  11. Intergenerational Transmission of Maladaptive Parenting Strategies in Families of Adolescent Mothers: Effects from Grandmothers to Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Danielle M; Jahromi, Laudan B; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Updegraff, Kimberly A

    2016-08-01

    The current longitudinal study examined the effect of the transmission of maladaptive parenting strategies from grandmothers to adolescent mothers on children's subsequent development. Mexican-origin adolescent mothers (N = 204) participated in home interviews when the adolescent's child (89 boys, 60 girls) was 2, 3, 4, and 5 years old. Grandmothers' psychological control toward the adolescent mother was positively related to adolescents' potential for abuse 1 year later, which was subsequently positively related to adolescents' punitive discipline toward their young child. In addition, adolescent mothers' punitive discipline subsequently predicted greater externalizing problems and less committed compliance among their children. Adolescent mothers' potential for abuse and punitive discipline mediated the effects of grandmothers' psychological control on children's externalizing problems. Finally, adolescent mothers' potential for abuse mediated the effect of grandmothers' psychological control on adolescent mothers' punitive discipline. Results highlight the salience of long-term intergenerational effects of maladaptive parenting on children's behavior.

  12. Behavioral effects of chronic adolescent stress are sustained and sexually dimorphic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Chase H.; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that women are more susceptible to stress-related disorders than men. Animal studies demonstrate a similar female sensitivity to stress and have been used to examine the underlying neurobiology of sex-specific effects of stress. Although our understanding of the sex-specific effects of chronic adolescent stress has grown in recent years, few studies have reported the effects of adolescent stress on depressive-like behavior. The purpose of this study was to determine if a chronic mixed modality stressor (consisting of isolation, restraint, and social defeat) during adolescence (PND37-49) resulted in differential and sustained changes in depressive-like behavior in male and female Wistar rats. Female rats exposed to chronic adolescent stress displayed decreased sucrose consumption, hyperactivity in the elevated plus maze, decreased activity in the forced swim test, and a blunted corticosterone response to an acute forced swim stress compared to controls during both adolescence (PND48-57) and adulthood (PND96-104). Male rats exposed to chronic adolescent stress did not manifest significant behavioral changes at either the end of adolescence or in adulthood. These data support the proposition that adolescence may be a stress sensitive period for females and exposure to stress during adolescence results in behavioral effects that persist in females. Studies investigating the sex-specific effects of chronic adolescent stress may lead to a better understanding of the sexually dimorphic incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders in humans and ultimately improve prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:21466807

  13. Assessment of side effects induced by injection of different adjuvant/antigen combinations in rabbits and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, P.P.A.M.; Koedam, M.A.; Wester, P.W.; Baumans, V.; Claassen, E.; Hendriksen, C.F.M.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the side effects induced by injection of Freund's adjuvant (FA) and alternative adjuvants combined with different antigens. Rabbits and mice were injected subcutaneously, intramuscularly (rabbits) and intraperitoneally (mice) with different adjuvants (FA, Specol, RIBI, TiterMax,

  14. The effects of three types of macrophages culture supernatant on CFU-GM in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Hongxun; Fu Li; Zhao Fengchen; Han Fen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of peritional macrophyge(PM), alveolar macrophage (AM), and Kupffer cell (KC) on colony forming unite granulacyte/macrophage (CFU -GM) in irradiated mice. Methods: Using techniques of hemopoietic progenitors in vitro, the authors studied the effects of three types of macrophages culture supernatant on CFU - GM. Results: It is shown that three types of macrophages culture supernatant may stimulate proliferation and differentiation of CFU-GM in irradiated mice, and KC is the best one in comparison to others. Conclusion: three types of macrophages culture supernatant may protect CFU-GM irradiated mice with KC being the best method. (authors)

  15. Effect of local x-irradiation on mice reproduction in two successive generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'nikova, N.K.; Lisenkova, L.N.

    1978-01-01

    For an experimental assessment of the biologic effectiveness of a single exposure to local irradiation exposure in simulating the conditions of exposure in X ray studies, an experiment was carried out on white mice. Mice of two successive generations were exposed to local X irradiation in the eye region. The radiation was found to bring about changes in the reproductive function (such as sterility, reduced litter size and fertility of females); these changes being dose-dependent in a nonlinear manner. The biologic effect of irradiation was greater in the second-generation mice

  16. Some effects of irradiation of mice in utero with tritiated compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B E; Phipps, M L [Radiobiology Department, The Medical College of Bartholomew' s Hospital, London, UK

    1978-01-01

    Mice have been exposed continuously, in utero, to tritiated water (via the maternal drinking water) or to tritiated thymidine (infused continuously into the mother). In both cases the patterns of labeling and subsequent loss of tritium over an extended period have been studied. The technique of infusion in unrestrained mice and its application in the production of fully tritium-labeled offspring is described in some detail. These fully labeled mice are being used to study a number of early and late effects, in particular, gonad cell effects and carcinogenesis, following this form of internal irradiation. Some preliminary results are presented. Similar results produced by homogeneous irradiation from tritiated water are also reported.

  17. The Effect of Dietary Oil on the Growth and Intellectual Capacity of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea R. Aparato

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional values of three vegetable oils were evaluated on the basis of the growth response, the food efficiency ratio and the effect on mental activity. Avocado, sesame and coconut oil were the only sources of fat in the experimental diets fed to three groups of albino mice. Mice fed with avocado and sesame yielded higher body weight gains and food efficiency ratios than mice fed with coconut oil. This agrees with the reports made on the study of these oils by the biological assay. The values for the mental activity of mice fed with avocado and sesame diets were also higher. However, mice fed with avocado diet showed relatively higher values than those fed with sesame. It is possible that the content of essential fatty acids among others could be directly related to intellectual performance.

  18. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the pathogenesis of Candida albicans in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denkins, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation addresses questions concerning the effects of UV radiation on the pathogenesis of opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans. UV radiation decreased the survival of Candida-infected mice; however, no correlation was found between suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and the course of lethal infection. This suggested that DTH was not protective against lethal disease with this organism. UV radiation also changed the persistence of the organism in the internal organs. UV-irradiated, infected animals had increased numbers of Candida in their kidneys compared to non-irradiated mice. Sensitization prior to UV irradiation aided clearance of the organism from the kidneys of UV-irradiated mice. These data show that UV radiation suppresses cell-mediated immunity to Candida albicans in mice and increases mortality of Candida-infected mice. Moreover, the data suggest that an increase in environmental UV radiation could increase the severity of pathogenic infections

  19. Proconvulsant effects of the ketogenic diet in electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnowska, Iwona; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Wlaz, Piotr; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J; Gasior, Maciej

    2017-04-01

    Among non-pharmacological treatments, the ketogenic diet (KD) has the strongest demonstrated evidence of clinical success in drug resistant epilepsy. In an attempt to model the anticonvulsant effects of the KD pre-clinically, the present study assessed the effects of the KD against electroshock-induced convulsions in mice. After confirming that exposure to the KD for 2 weeks resulted in stable ketosis and hypoglycemia, mice were exposed to electroshocks of various intensities to establish general seizure susceptibility. When compared to mice fed the standard rodent chow diet (SRCD), we found that mice fed the KD were more sensitive to electroconvulsions as reflected by a significant decrease in seizure threshold (3.86 mA in mice on the KD vs 7.29 mA in mice on the SRCD; P < 0.05) in the maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test. To examine if this increased seizure sensitivity to electroconvulsions produced by the KD would affect anticonvulsant effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), anticonvulsant potencies of carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), phenytoin (PHT), and valproate (VPA) against maximal electroshock (MES)-induced convulsions were compared in mice fed the KD and SRCD. We found that potencies of all AEDs studied were decreased in mice fed the KD in comparison to those on the SRCD, with decreases in the anticonvulsant potencies ranging from 1.4 fold (PB) to 1.7 fold (PHT). Finally, the lack of differences in brain exposures of the AEDs studied in mice fed the KD and SRCD ruled out a pharmacokinetic nature of the observed findings. Taken together, exposure to the KD in the present study had an overall pro-convulsant effect. Since electroconvulsions require large metabolic reserves to support their rapid spread throughout the brain and consequent generalized tonic-clonic convulsions, this effect may be explained by a high energy state produced by the KD in regards to increased energy storage and utilization.

  20. Evaluation of anti-fatigue and immunomodulating effects of quercetin in strenuous exercise mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-qiang

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the anti-fatigue and immunomodulating effects of quercetin in strenuous exercise mice. Mice were given orally either corn oil or quercetin (20, 40 and 60 mg/kg body weight suspended in corn oil) by gavage once a day for 28 day. All mice were sacrificed after rotarod test and the major biochemical parameters were analyzed in serum and liver. The results indicated that quercetin possessed anti-fatigue effects by prolonging retention times, decreasing levels of blood lactate and serum urea nitrogen, and increasing levels of blood glucose, tissue glycogen and serum glucagon. Furthermore, quercetin could improve the immune function of fatigue mice by decreasing tumor necrosis factor-α levels, and elevated interleukin-10 levels. Quercetin possessed anti-fatigue effects may be related to its immunomodulating effects.

  1. Effects of exercise and enrichment on behaviour in CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujnarain, Amiirah B; Luo, Owen D; Taylor, Natalie; Lai, Jonathan K Y; Foster, Jane A

    2018-04-16

    A host of scholarly work has characterized the positive effects of exercise and environmental enrichment on behaviour and cognition in animal studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the uptake and longitudinal impact of exercise and enrichment on the behavioural phenotype of male and female CD-1 mice. CD-1 mice housed in standard (STD) or exercise and enrichment (EE) conditions post-weaning were tested in the 3-chamber sociability test, open field, and elevated plus maze and exercise activity was monitored throughout the enrichment protocol. Male and female EE mice both showed reduced anxiety and activity in the open field and elevated plus maze relative to sex-matched STD mice. EE altered social behaviours in a sex-specific fashion, with only female EE mice showing increased social preference relative to female STD mice and a preference for social novelty only present in male EE mice. This sexual dimorphism was not observed to be a product of exercise uptake, as CD-1 mice of both sexes demonstrated a consistent trend of wheel rotation frequencies. These findings suggest the importance of considering variables such as sex and strain on experimental design variables in future work on environmental enrichment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Eaf2 gene knockout on cataract induced by ultraviolet irradiation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Hua Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the effects of Eaf2 gene knockout on cataract in mice induced by ultraviolet irradiation.METHODS:Fifteen wild type mice were used as the control group, and 10 Eaf2 KO mice were used as the experimental group. The 14-week mice were taken as the research objects in the two groups. So the subgroups were: WT -nonUV, WT -UV, Eaf2 KO-nonUV and Eaf2 KO-UV, a total of 4 groups. Observe the lens of mice in vivo with slit lamp microscope, grade the lens opacity with Lens Opacities Classification System II(LOCSII. Then the mice were sacrificed by breaking the neck, the lens were removed and were observed by dark field microscopy. According to the captured images, the proportion of cataract region was analyzed using Image J software. The data of the two groups were statistically analyzed.RESULTS: The results detected by the two methods were similar. In WT-UV group and Eaf2 KO-UV group, the degree of lens opacity was significantly higher than those of WT-nonUV group and Eaf2 KO-nonUV group. The lens opacity of WT-UV group was significantly higher than that in Eaf2 KO-UV group, and the difference was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: Ultraviolet radiation can lead to the formation of cataract in mice. Eaf2 protein can promote the formation of cataract in mice caused by ultraviolet.

  3. Ultraviolet Radiation–Induced Cataract in Mice: The Effect of Age and the Potential Biochemical Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Yan, Hong; Löfgren, Stefan; Tian, Xiaoli; Lou, Marjorie F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To study the effect of age on the morphologic and biochemical alterations induced by in vivo exposure of ultraviolet radiation (UV). Methods. Young and old C57BL/6 mice were exposed to broadband UVB+UVA and euthanized after 2 days. Another batch of UV-exposed young mice was monitored for changes after 1, 2, 4, and 8 days. Age-matched nonexposed mice served as controls. Lens changes were documented in vivo by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and dark field microscopy photographs ex vivo. Lens homogenates were analyzed for glutathione (GSH) level, and the activities of thioredoxin (Trx), thioltransferase (TTase), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PD). Glutathionylated lens proteins (PSSGs) were detected by immunoblotting using GSH antibody. Western blot analysis was also done for the expression levels of TTase and Trx. Results. Both age groups developed epithelial and superficial anterior subcapsular cataract at 2 days postexposure. The lens GSH level and G3PD activity were decreased, and PSSGs were elevated in both age groups, but more prominent in the older mice. TTase and Trx activity and protein expression were elevated only in the young mice. Interestingly, lens TTase and Trx in the young mice showed a transient increase, peaking at 2 days after UV exposure and returning to baseline at day 8, corroborated by lens transparency. Conclusions. The lenses of old mice were more susceptible to UV radiation–induced cataract. The upregulated TTase and Trx likely provided oxidation damage repair in the young mice. PMID:23010639

  4. Radioprotective effect of chitosan in sub-lethally X-ray irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Ikota, Nobuo; Arima, Hiromi; Watanabe, Yoshito; Yukawa, Masae; Ozawa, Toshihiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kim, Hee-Sun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Radiation Health Research Inst.; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Young-Ho [Chonnam Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    2003-03-01

    The radioprotective effect of chitosan was studied in mice following whole-body X-ray irradiation. C3H/He mice were exposed to 7 Gy, and their survival rates were examined. The survival rates of chitosan-diet mice were about 20% higher than those of mice on a standard diet, and the rates dropped sharply to a plateau at day 10 after X-ray irradiation. The chitosan-diet mice had an increased weight ratio of spleen to body within the experimental period. The leukocyte, thrombocyte, and erythrocyte counts as well as the hematocrit and hemoglobin levels were recovered significantly and more rapidly in the chitosan-diet mice than the standard-diet mice at day 14 after irradiation. The scavenging abilities of chitosan were evaluated by the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method. These observations suggested that chitosan led to hematopoetic activation and leuko-cytogenesis in mice after sub-lethal dose irradiation, and that the biological response might be caused by radical trapping or scavenging. (author)

  5. Distinct neurobehavioural effects of cannabidiol in transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora E Long

    Full Text Available The cannabis constituent cannabidiol (CBD possesses anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties. We have previously shown that transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET mice display altered neurobehavioural responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here we investigated whether Nrg1 TM HET mice respond differently to CBD and whether CBD reverses schizophrenia-related phenotypes expressed by these mice. Adult male Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like littermates (WT received vehicle or CBD (1, 50 or 100 mg/kg i.p. for 21 days. During treatment and 48 h after withdrawal we measured behaviour, whole blood CBD concentrations and autoradiographic receptor binding. Nrg1 HET mice displayed locomotor hyperactivity, PPI deficits and reduced 5-HT(2A receptor binding density in the substantia nigra, but these phenotypes were not reversed by CBD. However, long-term CBD (50 and 100 mg/kg selectively enhanced social interaction in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Furthermore, acute CBD (100 mg/kg selectively increased PPI in Nrg1 TM HET mice, although tolerance to this effect was manifest upon repeated CBD administration. Long-term CBD (50 mg/kg also selectively increased GABA(A receptor binding in the granular retrosplenial cortex in Nrg1 TM HET mice and reduced 5-HT(2A binding in the substantia nigra in WT mice. Nrg1 appears necessary for CBD-induced anxiolysis since only WT mice developed decreased anxiety-related behaviour with repeated CBD treatment. Altered pharmacokinetics in mutant mice could not explain our findings since no genotype differences existed in CBD blood concentrations. Here we demonstrate that Nrg1 modulates acute and long-term neurobehavioural effects of CBD, which does not reverse the schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes.

  6. EFFECT OF MARINE TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine algal toxins are extremely toxic and can represent a major health problem to humans and animals. Temperature regulation is one of many processes to be affected by exposure to these toxins. Mice and rats become markedly hypothermic when subjected to acute exposure to the ma...

  7. Histomorphological effects of isoniazid induced hepatotoxicity in male albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humayun, F.; Zareen, N.

    2017-01-01

    To observe the histomorphological changes of isoniazid induced hepatotoxicity in male albino mice. Methodology: This experimental study was carried out at University of Health Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan from January to December 2013. Forty male albino mice selected by simple random technique, were divided into two groups; A-Control, and B-experimental. Group A comprised of 15, while Group B comprised 25 mice. Both the groups were kept under identical conditions and diet. However, experimental group was treated with an additional oral hepatotoxic dose of isoniazid i.e. 100mg/kg bodyweight daily for 30 days. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and livers were dissected out. Gross comparison of the organ and stained sections were histologically compared for morphological differences between the groups. Fischer Exact test was used to analyze the qualitative data and a p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Group A animals showed the normal liver architecture. Whereas, those of Group B showed deranged hepatic histomorphology. Conclusion: Hepatotoxic dose of Isoniazid caused histomorphological alterations in the liver of male albino mice. (author)

  8. Self-verification as a mediator of mothers' self-fulfilling effects on adolescents' educational attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Kyle C; Madon, Stephanie; Guyll, Max; Willard, Jennifer; Spoth, Richard

    2011-05-01

    This research examined whether self-verification acts as a general mediational process of self-fulfilling prophecies. The authors tested this hypothesis by examining whether self-verification processes mediated self-fulfilling prophecy effects within a different context and with a different belief and a different outcome than has been used in prior research. Results of longitudinal data obtained from mothers and their adolescents (N=332) indicated that mothers' beliefs about their adolescents' educational outcomes had a significant indirect effect on adolescents' academic attainment through adolescents' educational aspirations. This effect, observed over a 6-year span, provided evidence that mothers' self-fulfilling effects occurred, in part, because mothers' false beliefs influenced their adolescents' own educational aspirations, which adolescents then self-verified through their educational attainment. The theoretical and applied implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Selection and Socialization Effects in Early Adolescent Alcohol Use: A Propensity Score Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalco, Matthew D.; Trucco, Elisa M.; Coffman, Donna L.; Colder, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    The robust correlation between peer and adolescent alcohol use (AU) has been taken as evidence for both socialization and selection processes in the etiology of adolescent AU. Accumulating evidence from studies using a diverse range of methodological and statistical approaches suggests that both processes are involved. A major challenge in testing whether peer AU predicts an adolescent's drinking (socialization) or whether an adolescent's drinking predicts peer AU (selection) is the myriad of potentially confounding factors that might lead to an overestimation of socialization and selection effects. After creating AU transition groups based on peer and adolescent AU across two waves (N = 765; age = 10-15; 53% female), we test whether transitions into AU by adolescents and peers predict later peer and adolescent AU respectively, using (1) propensity score analysis to balance transition groups on 26 potential confounds, (2) a longitudinal design with three waves to establish temporal precedence, and (3) both adolescent (target) and peer self-report of peer AU to disentangle effects attributable to shared reporter bias. Both selection and socialization were supported using both peer self-report of AU and adolescent-report of peer AU. Although cross-sectional analyses suggested peer self-reported models were associated with smaller effects than perceived peer AU, longitudinal analyses suggest a similar sized effect across reporter of peer AU for both selection and socialization. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of adolescent AU are discussed. PMID:25601099

  10. Effect of individual and group housing of mice on the level of radioresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorozhkina O.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to examine the effect of individual and group housing of mice on radioresistance. Material and methods. Effects of individual and group housing of mice on immunity and blood systems were studied on ICR (CD-1 and C57BI6 male mice before and after proton irradiation. Results. Group housing of intact animals resulted in a decline in the number of nucleated cells in the femur bone marrow and thymus mass. The irradiation with proton with energy of 171 MeV at a dose of 1 Gy causes a statistically significant greater reduction of the number of nucleated cells in the femur bone marrow in group-housed mice. A trend toward greater safety of the number of leukocytes in the peripheral blood and higher proliferative activity of bone marrow cells, as well as lower level of aberrant mitoses have been noted in individually-housed mice. Reduction processes in the recovery period of radiation sickness take place at a greater rate in group-housed mice. Conclusion. Group housing of male mice causes increased sensitivity of the blood and immunity systems to the effects of radiation and at the same time accelerates processes of radiation recovery.

  11. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) Show Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Lung Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Isumi, Kyoko; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is increasingly recognized as a prevalent problem worldwide, especially in patients with a chronic lung disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a type of chronic inflammatory lung disease. Previous clinical studies have shown that COPD leads to low vitamin D levels, which further increase the severity of COPD. Vitamin D homeostasis represents one of the most important factors that potentially determine the severity of COPD. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in lung tissues are still unclear. To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of VDR, we generated transgenic mice that show lung-specific VDR overexpression under the control of the surfactant protein C promoter (TG mice). The TG mice were used to study the expression patterns of proinflammatory cytokines using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The TG mice had lower levels of T helper 1 (Th1)-related cytokines than wild-type (WT) mice did. No significant differences in the expression of Th2 cytokines were observed between TG and WT mice. This study is the first to achieve lung-specific overexpression of VDR in TG mice: an interesting animal model useful for studying the relation between airway cell inflammation and vitamin D signaling. VDR expression is an important factor that influences anti-inflammatory responses in lung tissues. Our results show the crucial role of VDR in anti-inflammatory effects in lungs; these data are potentially useful for the treatment or prevention of COPD.

  12. Long-lasting Effects of Minocycline on Behavior in Young but not Adult Fragile X Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansie, Lorraine E.; Phommahaxay, Kelly; Okusanya, Ayodeji G.; Uwadia, Jessica; Huang, Mike; Rotschafer, Sarah E.; Razak, Khaleel A.; Ethell, Douglas W.; Ethell, Iryna M.

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common single-gene inherited form of intellectual disability with behaviors characteristic of autism. People with FXS display childhood seizures, hyperactivity, anxiety, developmental delay, attention deficits, and visual-spatial memory impairment, as well as a propensity for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Several of these aberrant behaviors and FXS-associated synaptic irregularities also occur in “fragile X mental retardation gene” knock-out (Fmr1 KO) mice. We previously reported that minocycline promotes the maturation of dendritic spines - postsynaptic sites for excitatory synapses - in the developing hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice, which may underlie the beneficial effects of minocycline on anxiolytic behavior in young Fmr1 KO mice. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of minocycline treatment in young and adult Fmr1 KO mice, and determined the dependence of behavioral improvements on short-term versus long-term minocycline administration. We found that 4 and 8 week long treatments significantly reduced locomotor activity in both young and adult Fmr1 KO mice. Some behavioral improvements persisted in young mice post-treatment, but in adults the beneficial effects were lost soon after minocycline treatment was stopped. We also show, for the first time, that minocycline treatment partially attenuates the number and severity of audiogenic seizures in Fmr1 KO mice. This report provides further evidence that minocycline treatment has immediate and long-lasting benefits on FXS-associated behaviors in the Fmr1 KO mouse model. PMID:23660195

  13. Cost-effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery in Adolescents With Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Matthew J; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Nudel, Jacob D; Corey, Kathleen E; Kaplan, Lee M; Hur, Chin

    2017-02-01

    Severe obesity affects 4% to 6% of US youth and is increasing in prevalence. Bariatric surgery for the treatment of adolescents with severe obesity is becoming more common, but data on cost-effectiveness are limited. To assess the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery for adolescents with obesity using recently published results from the Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study. A state-transition model was constructed to compare 2 strategies: no surgery and bariatric surgery. In the no surgery strategy, patients remained at their initial body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) over time. In the bariatric surgery strategy, patients were subjected to risks of perioperative mortality and complications as well as initial morbidity but also experienced longer-term quality-of-life improvements associated with weight loss. Cohort demographic information-of the 228 patients included, the mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years, the mean (range) body mass index was 53 (34-88), and 171 (75.0%) were female-surgery-related outcomes, and base case time horizon (3 years) were based on data from the Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), total costs (in US dollars adjusted to 2015-year values using the Consumer Price Index), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). A willingness-to-pay threshold of $100 000 per QALY was used to assess cost-effectiveness. After 3 years, surgery led to a gain of 0.199 QALYs compared with no surgery at an incremental cost of $30 747, yielding an unfavorable ICER of $154 684 per QALY. When the clinical study results were extrapolated to 4 years, the ICER decreased to $114 078 per QALY and became cost-effective by 5 years with an ICER of $91 032 per QALY. Outcomes were robust in most 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Bariatric surgery incurs

  14. Long-term effects of adolescent obesity: time to act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Obesity in adolescence will probably have major implications not only for the affected adolescents but also for society. Those who have obesity during adolescence usually have obesity into adulthood, which causes many medical and psychological issues that can result in premature death. Furthermore, obesity in adolescents is associated with a range of social problems, including difficulties securing an apprenticeship or a job or finding a partner. Adolescents with obesity are also at increased risk of having children with obesity later in life. All these consequences lead to high costs for the health-care system. Although efficient treatment options are available that have been proven in randomized controlled trials, such as lifestyle interventions for adolescents with obesity and bariatric surgery for adolescents with severe obesity, these interventions frequently fail in clinical practice as treatment adherence is low in adolescents and most adolescents with obesity do not seek medical care. Therefore, improving treatment adherence and identifying treatment barriers are necessary.

  15. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeh, Yazan N.; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25–P30, ≥50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  16. Protective effect study of polysaccharides from tremella fuciformis on hematopoietic function in radiation-injured mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenqing; Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin; Gao Wenyuan; Shen Xiu; Wang Yueying; Liu Peixun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective effects of polysaccharides of Tremella fuciformis on hematopoietic function in radiation-injured mice. Methods; Colony-forming unit of spleen (CFU-S), number of nucleated cells in bone marrow (BMNC) and spleen index were used to investigated the effect of polysacharides from tremella fuciformis at 6 mg/kg, 12 mg/kg, 24 mg/kg on hematopoietic function of mice irradiated with 7.5 Gy 137 Cs γ-rays. Results: On the 9 the day after irradiation compared with the negative control group number of nucleated cells in bone marrow, colony-forming unit of spleen and spleen index of mice have treated with polysaccharides from Tremella fuciformis intraperitoneally for three days prior to irradiation increased markedly. Conclusion: Polysaccharides of tremella fuciformis have protective effect on hematopoietic function of radiation-injured mice. (authors)

  17. Adolescent sympathetic activity and salivary C-reactive protein: The effects of parental behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin W; Byrne, Michelle L; Simmons, Julian G; Whittle, Sarah; Schwartz, Orli S; Reynolds, Eric C; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Sheeber, Lisa; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-10-01

    This study utilized a novel multisystem approach to investigate the effect of observed parental behavior on the relationship between biological mechanisms associated with disease processes (i.e., autonomic physiology and immune response) among their adolescent children. Thirty-three adolescents (23 males), aged 11-13, and their parents participated in a laboratory session in which adolescents provided baseline measures of autonomic (sympathetic) activity, and adolescents and 1 parent participated in a laboratory based dyadic conflict resolution interaction task. This included 3 male parent/male adolescent dyads, 20 female parent/male adolescent dyads, 3 male parent/female adolescent dyads, and 7 female parent/female adolescent dyads. Approximately 3 years later, adolescents provided a salivary measure of C-Reactive Protein (sCRP) to index inflammation. Analyses revealed a positive association between sympathetic activity and sCRP, as well as a moderating role of positive parental behavior in this relationship, such that the association between sympathetic activity and sCRP was greater among adolescents whose parents displayed shorter duration of positive affect. Overall findings indicate parental behavior may influence the association between adolescent sympathetic activity and inflammatory processes. These findings have important implications for understanding the impact of psychosocial factors on biological mechanisms of disease. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Effect of BMPs on hematopoietic injury of acute radiation sickness in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Qiong; Zhang Shaozhang; Pu Qin; Zhang Fake; Hannah, X.H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) on hematopoietic acute radiation sickness in mice. BMP, rhBMP-2m and PBK/hBMP-2-NIH3T3 cells were obtained separately by chemistry, molecule biological method and genetherapy method. In this study, the effect of BMPs on hematopoiesis was detected at postirradiation: some hematological parameters, 30 days the survival ratio and formation of bone marrow CFU-GM colony. The experiments indicate that when phBMP (purified bovine bone morphogenetic protein) can increase the formation of bone narrow CFU-GM colony (p<0.05) at 10th d after irradiation. Irradiation control group's mice died in 30 days, but effect of rhBMP-2m on the survival of mice after 7.5Gy irradiation, was detected whereas there were 10%, 15% and 35% all mice of survived after injection i.p. with 0.5 mg, 1.0 mg and 2.0 mg of rhBMP-2m respectively. All hematological parameters of treated mice were significantly higher than control group (p<0.01). PBK/hBMP-2-NIH3T3 cells were established and transplanted into mice irradiated by 7.0Gy r ray by i.p., the survival ratio of treated mice higher than negative control group (p<0.01), and all hematopoietic parameters were increased statistically significant (p<0.01). These data support the our hypothesis: BMPs can treat the acute radiation sickness. The results indicate that in adult mice, BMPs can recover or treat the hematopoietic injury of acute radiation sickness in mice. (author)

  19. Effect of Chorda Tympani Nerve Transection on Salt Taste Perception in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwatari, Yutaka; Theodorides, Maria L.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of gustatory nerve transection on salt taste have been studied extensively in rats and hamsters but have not been well explored in the mouse. We examined the effects of chorda tympani (CT) nerve transection on NaCl taste preferences and thresholds in outbred CD-1 mice using a high-throughput phenotyping method developed in our laboratory. To measure taste thresholds, mice were conditioned by oral self-administration of LiCl or NaCl and then presented with NaCl concentration series in 2-bottle preference tests. LiCl-conditioned and control NaCl-exposed mice were given bilateral transections of the CT nerve (LiCl-CTX, NaCl-CTX) or were left intact as controls (LiCl-CNT, NaCl-CNT). After recovery from surgery, mice received a concentration series of NaCl (0–300 mM) in 48-h 2-bottle tests. CT transection increased NaCl taste thresholds in LiCl-conditioned mice and eliminated avoidance of concentrated NaCl in control NaCl-exposed mice. This demonstrates that in mice, the CT nerve is important for detection and recognition of NaCl taste and is necessary for the normal avoidance of high concentrations of NaCl. The results of this experiment also show that the method of high-throughput phenotyping of salt taste thresholds is suitable for detecting changes in the taste periphery in mouse genetic studies. PMID:21743094

  20. Antagonistic effects of cadmium on lead accumulation in pregnant and non-pregnant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Euan; Gancarz, Dorota; Rofe, Allan; Kempson, Ivan M.; Weber, John; Juhasz, Albert L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate the exposure of pregnant and non-pregnant mice to cadmium (Cd) on lead (Pb) contaminated soil. ► We examine the changes in lead accumulation in mice due to the presence of cadmium in soil. ► Lead accumulation is higher in pregnant compared to non-pregnant mice. ► Cadmium decreases lead accumulation in all mice irrespective of status. - Abstract: People are frequently exposed to combinations of contaminants but there is a paucity of data on the effects of mixed contaminants at low doses. This study investigated the influence of cadmium (Cd) on lead (Pb) accumulation in pregnant and non-pregnant mice following exposure to contaminated soil. Exposure to Pb from contaminated soils increased Pb accumulation in both pregnant and non-pregnant mice compared to unexposed control animals (pregnant and non-pregnant). Lead accumulation in the liver and kidneys of exposure pregnant mice (40 ± 15 mg Pb kg −1 ) was significantly higher (P −1 ). The presence of Cd in contaminated soil had a major effect on the Pb and Fe accumulation in the kidneys and liver, respectively. This study shows that Pb uptake is mediated by the presence of Cd in the co-contaminated soil and demonstrates that further research is required to investigate the influence of co-contaminants on human exposure at sub-chronic concentrations.

  1. Effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid connecting phospholipids on the lipid peroxidation of the brain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Seiichi; Ishihara, Kenji; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Wada, Shun; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-12-01

    The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) with two lipid types on lipid peroxidation of the brain was investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Each group of female Balb/c mice was fed a diet containing DHA-connecting phospholipids (DHA-PL) or DHA-connecting triacylglycerols (DHA-TG) for 5 wk. Safflower oil was fed as the control. The lipid peroxide level of the brain was significantly lower in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet when compared to those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets, while the alpha-tocopherol level was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets. The DHA level of phosphatidylethanolamine in the brain was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil diet. The dimethylacetal levels were significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil and DHA-TG diets. These results suggest that the dietary DHA-connecting phospholipids have an antioxidant activity on the brain lipids in mice, and the effect may be related to the brain plasmalogen.

  2. Relationship between the effect of dietary fat on swimming endurance and energy metabolism in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guihua; Shirai, Nobuya; Suzuki, Hiramitsu

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different dietary fats on alterations in endurance, energy metabolism, and plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and minerals in mice. Male mice (aged 58 weeks) were fed diets containing 6% safflower oil, fish oil, or lard for 12 weeks. Swimming time to exhaustion, energy metabolism, and plasma IL-6 levels were subsequently determined. Mice fed safflower oil exhibited a marked increase in swimming time compared to the baseline level. Mice fed lard exhibited a significant decrease in swimming time, while mice on a fish oil diet exhibited a small decrease in swimming time. The final swimming time of mice fed safflower oil was significantly longer than that of animals fed lard. This improvement in endurance with dietary safflower oil was accompanied by decreased accumulation of lactate and less glycogen depletion during swimming. In the safflower oil group, muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity increased significantly after swimming, while the plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentration decreased significantly. A trend to increased plasma IL-6 levels was observed in sedentary animals on a safflower oil diet compared to those on a lard diet. These results suggest that dietary safflower oil improves the swimming endurance of aged mice to a greater extent than lard, and that this effect appears to involve glycogen sparing through increased fatty acid utilization. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effect of parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) juice against cadmium neurotoxicity in albino mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maodaa, Saleh N; Allam, Ahmed A; Ajarem, Jamaan; Abdel-Maksoud, Mostafa A; Al-Basher, Gadah I; Wang, Zun Yao

    2016-02-04

    Parsley was employed as an experimental probe to prevent the behavioral, biochemical and morphological changes in the brain tissue of the albino mice following chronic cadmium (Cd) administration. Non-anesthetized adult male mice were given parsley juice (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) daily by gastric intubation at doses of 10 and 20 g/kg/day. The animals were divided into six groups: Group A, mice were exposed to saline; Groups B and C, were given low and high doses of parsley juice, respectively; Group D, mice were exposed to Cd; Groups E and F, were exposed to Cd and concomitantly given low and high doses of parsley, respectively. Cd intoxication can cause behavioral abnormalities, biochemical and histopathological disturbances in treated mice. Parsley juice has significantly improved the Cd-associated behavioral changes, reduced the elevation of lipid peroxidation and normalized the Cd effect on reduced glutathione and peroxidase activities in the brain of treated mice. Histological data have supported these foundations whereas Cd treatment has induced neuronal degeneration, chromatolysis and pyknosis in the cerebrum, cerebellum and medulla oblongata. The low dose (5 g/kg/day) of parsley exhibited beneficial effects in reducing the deleterious changes associated with Cd treatment on the behavior, neurotransmitters level, oxidative stress and brain neurons of the Cd-treated mice.

  4. Irradiation effects on the tumor and adjacent tissues of brain tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Maki, Yutaka; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi; Koike, Sachiko; Furukawa, Shigeo.

    1979-01-01

    C 3 H mice aged 56 - 70 days, weighing 27 - 37 g were used throughout this experiment. A transplantable fibrosarcoma arising spontaneously from C 3 H mice was used. For experiment, 10 4 tumor cells suspended in 0.025 ml of saline solution were injected into the cerebral hemisphere by a 26 gauge needle with a micrometer syringe under nembutal anesthesia. Whole brain irradiation was performed at 7 days after injection of the tumor cells and the radiation doses were 2,000 and 20,000 rads, respectively. The feature of x-rays were 200 kVp, 20 mA, 0.5 mm Cu + 0.5 mm Al filtration and TSD 20 cm. The dose-rate was 340 - 360 R/min. The articles of this study were as follows: a) Determination of LD 50 values for the mice, tumor-bearing in the brain or non-tumor-bearing; and b) Observation of clinical features and gross autopsy findings of the mice following irradiation. The LD 50 values for 2,000 rad irradiation in the tumor-bearing or non-tumor-bearing mice were 10.9 and 11.4 days, respectively. LD 50 values of 3.7 days and 4.3 days were the results for the tumor-bearing and non-tumor-bearing mice irradiated by 20,000 rad, respectively. On the other hand, the LD 50 value for the control group, i.e. non-irradiated mice, was 6.7 days. At postmortem examinations, gastrointestinal bleeding was observed frequently in mice bearing tumor in the brain. Whole brain irradiation is effective to prolong the life of tumor-bearing mice. However, in some instances, deaths have occurred earlier in tumor-bearing mice compared to the control group. (author)

  5. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-α, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  6. Effect of tetraethylthiuramdisulphide and diethyldithiocarbamate on nickel toxicokinetics in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalsgaard, G.; Andersen, O.

    1994-01-01

    A new experimental pharmacokinetic model using the γ-emitting isotope 57 Ni for studying nickel toxicokinetics was employed in a recent investigation in order to quantitatively study, for the first time, the effect of tetraethylthiuram disulphide (disulfiram, Antabuse, TTD) and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) on whole-body retention and organ distribution of nickel in mice. TTD or its decomposition product DDC given orally by stomach tube shortly after oral administration of a low dose of nickel chloride labelled with 57 Ni resulted in an approximately ten times higher whole-body retention of nickel compared to the retention in a control group exposed to nickel only. These chelators increased the whole-body retention of nickel also when given by intraperitoneal injection shortly after oral or intraperitoneal administration of nickel. Oral administration of a single dose of TTD or DDC rapidly after an oral dose of nickel chloride also resulted in extensive changes in the organ distribution of nickel, thus the nickel content in the brain was at least 700 times higher than in a control group given the same dose of nickel only. If DDC was given intraperitoneally after nickel given orally, the relative organ distribution of nickel to most organs was the same as if the chelator was given orally, though the contents of the liver and lungs were lower. That TTD and DDC resulted in a transport of nickel to the brain, is underlined by the fact that after 20 hr, approximately 15% and after 45-50 hr, 30% of the total body burden of Ni was found in the brain. Stating the nickel content as concentrations, we found after 19 hr to 23 hr the highest nickel concentration in the brain, kidneys, lungs and liver, in order of decreasing concentration. From 68 hr to 122 hr the order was brain, lungs, kidneys and liver. TTD and DDC are widely used clinically. These results indicate, that long-term simultaneous administration of nickel and TTD or DDC to humans should be avoided, as

  7. Protective effect of Hongxue tea mixture against radiation injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Chun; Zhang Xuehui; Wang Qi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop health food of anti-radiation among biological source in Yunnan. Methods: Screening test was done of the health food of biological source of anti-radiation injury in mice. It is indicated that Hong-Xue Tea Mixture among the biological source has the effect against radiation injury, observing experiment of dose-effect of Hong-Xue Tea Mixture was done. Micronuclei in the bone marrow polychromatophilic erythrocytes in each dose group of mice were examined, leucocytes number and 30 day survival rate of mice following whole-body 5.0 Gy γ irradiation were also determined. Results: Research showed that Hong-Xue Tea Mixture and Spirulina Platensis Mixture among the biological source have protective effect against radiation injury in mice. Observing experiment of dose-effect of Hong-Xue Tea Mixture show that low, medium and high dose of Hong-Xue Tea Mixture can significantly decrease bone marrow PECMN rate of mice, increase leucocytes number and 30 day survival rate. Conclusion: Hong-Xue Tea Mixture has potent protective effects against radiation injury in mice. (authors)

  8. Effects of daily treatment with a radioprotector WR-2721 on Ehrlich's ascites tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebuchi, Makoto; Shinohara, Shigeo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Kunio; Shima, Akihiro

    1981-01-01

    Mice were injected daily with a radioprotector WR-2721 (S-2-[3-aminopropyl-amino]ethylphosphorothioic acid) after inoculation with Ehrlich's ascites tumor cells. Increases in weight of mice, volume of ascitic fluid and number of ascitic cells per mouse were reduced by the daily administration of 5 mg/mouse of the drug, indicating a suppressive effect of WR-2721 on growth of ascitic cells. But daily treatment with 5 mg/mouse of WR-2721 caused earlier death of tumor-bearing mice. (author)

  9. Effects of sulekang capsule in enhancement of resistance to radiation and regulating immunological function in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Naikun; Zhou Ouliang; Du Weixia

    1990-01-01

    The effects of Sulekang capsule in enhancing the resistance to radiation and regulating the immunological function in mice were described. The results show that Sulekang capsule may lengthen the survival time (p 60 Co gamma rays. The experimental results of ANAE reaction show that the activety of T cells of normal or exposed mice may be enhanced by Sulekang capsule, which can control the decrease of both ANAE-positive cells and T cells in exposed mice. So it may enhance the immunological function on exposed animals

  10. Long-Term Effects of a Universal Family Intervention: Mediation Through Parent-Adolescent Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M.; Wong, J.J.; Gonzales, N.A.; Dumka, L.E.; Millsap, R.; Coxe, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This randomized trial of a family-focused preventive intervention for Mexican American middle schoolers examined internalizing, externalizing, and substance use outcomes in late adolescence, five years after completing the intervention. Parent-adolescent conflict was tested as a mediator of these effects. The role of parent and adolescent acculturation in these pathways was also examined. Method 498 7th grade adolescents and their primary female caregivers were randomized to receive either a 9-week, multi-component intervention or a brief workshop control group. Assessments were conducted at pre-test, two year follow-up (9th grade), and five year follow-up (when most participants were in the 12th grade). Results The Bridges program significantly reduced mother-adolescent conflict measured in the 9th grade, with conflict mediating program effects on internalizing and externalizing symptoms, adolescent substance use, and diagnosed internalizing disorder in late adolescence. Mother and child acculturation were both significantly predictive of late adolescence outcomes. Contrary to hypotheses, neither mother nor child acculturation emerged as a significant predictor of mother-adolescent conflict, and the interaction of mother and adolescent acculturation was similarly not related to mother-adolescent conflict. Intervention effects were largely consistent across different levels of acculturation. Conclusions These findings provide support for the efficacy of family-focused intervention during early adolescence, both in reducing mental health problems and substance use in the long term, as well as in impacting parent-adolescent conflict processes that appear to play an important role in the development of later adjustment problems. PMID:24730357

  11. Effects of feeding lactobacillus GG on lethal irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, M.Y.; Chang, T.W.; Gorbach, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Mice exposed to 1400 rads of total body irradiation experienced 80%-100% mortality in 2 wk. Bacteremia was demonstrated in all dead animals. Feeding Lactobacillus GG strain reduced Pseudomonas bacteremia and prolonged survival time in animals colonized with this organism. In animals not colonized with Pseudomonas, feeding Lactobacillus GG also produced some reduction in early deaths, and there was less Gram-negative bacteremia in these animals compared with controls

  12. Effect of malocclusion on the self-esteem of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibah, Salwa Mahmoud; Al-Hummayani, Fadia Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Esthetics plays an essential role in orthodontic treatment. The psychological effects of malocclusion are an inspiration to improve one's esthetics and seek treatment. This study aimed to assess relationships between self-esteem and malocclusion severity and type in adolescents using a self-esteem measurement scale and the index of treatment need (IOTN) and to investigate the influence of age, sex, and school type in these relationships. Adolescent students aged 12-19 years randomly selected from four private and two governmental schools were enrolled for this study. After completing the self-esteem questionnaire, participants were examined by researchers to evaluate malocclusion severity and type using the IOTN. The sample consisted of 886 participants: 558 females (62.9%) and 328 males (37.1%) with a mean age of 16 years. Chi-square analysis showed that 17.1% of males and 31% of females showed low levels of self-esteem, with a statistically significant difference ( P self-esteem ( P = 0.018) compared with single-category malocclusion. Anterior teeth spacing, crowding, and overjet malocclusion showed the highest percentages of low self-esteem. The present study supports that malocclusion has negative effects on self-esteem; multiple malocclusions with spacing, crowding, and overjet had the greatest effects.

  13. Breakfast glycaemic index and exercise: combined effects on adolescents' cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon B; Bandelow, Stephan; Nute, Maria L; Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the combined effects of breakfast glycaemic index (GI) and a mid-morning bout of exercise on adolescents' cognitive function. Participants were randomly allocated to a high or low GI breakfast group in a mixed research design, where each participant completed two experimental trials (exercise and resting). Forty-two adolescents (12.4±0.5 years old), undertook a bout of exercise (ten repeats of level one of the multi-stage fitness test; exercise trial) or continued to rest (resting trial) following consumption of either a high or low GI breakfast. A battery of cognitive function tests (visual search test, Stroop test and Sternberg paradigm) was completed 30 min before and 45 min following the exercise. Average heart rate during exercise was 170±15 beats·min(-1). On the complex level of the Stroop test, response times improved across the morning following the low GI breakfast on both the exercise and resting trials, though the improvement was greatest on the exercise trial. However, response times only improved on the resting trial following the high GI breakfast (p=0.012). On the 5 letter level of the Sternberg paradigm, response times improved across the morning following the low GI breakfast (regardless of exercise) and only on the exercise trial following the high GI breakfast (p=0.019). The findings of the present study suggest that the combined effects of breakfast GI and exercise in adolescents depend upon the component of cognitive function examined. A low GI breakfast and mid-morning bout of exercise were individually beneficial for response times on the Sternberg paradigm, whereas they conferred additional benefits for response times on the Stroop test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of acetylsalicylic acid on spermatogenesis in adult albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameer, M.K.; Tahrir, M.

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis in male albino mice. Study Design: Laboratory based randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anatomy University of Health Sciences, Lahore from Apr, 2012 to Dec, 2012. Material and Methods: Thirty nine male albino mice, 6-8 weeks old weighing 30 - 5 gm, were used; these were randomly divided into three groups having thirteen mice in each using random numbers table. Group A served as a control and was given distilled water orally via oral gavage 10 ml per kg for 30 days. Group B was given acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/kg dissolved in 10 ml distilled orally for a period of 30 days. Group C was given acetylsalicylic acid 25 mg/kg dissolved in 2.5 ml distilled orally for a period of 30 days. Animals were sacrificed 24 hours after the last dose and the testes were removed, fixed in Bouin's fixative for 48 hours. Five microns thick sections of processed tissue were stained with H and E and PAS for calculation of Johnsen score and diameter of seminiferous tubules. Serum testosterone level was measured by testosterone enzyme immunoassay test kits. Results: Microscopic examination demonstrated that ASA treatment lead to statistically significant increase in the mean Johnsen score and mean diameter of seminiferous tubules. Conclusion: It was concluded from the current study that ASA treatment enhances spermatogenesis. (author)

  15. Immunomodulatory and protective effect of probiotic Lactobacillus casei against Candida albicans infection in malnourished mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Julio; Salva, Susana; Agüero, Graciela; Alvarez, Susana

    2011-06-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 (Lc), when administered as a supplement to a repletion diet, on the resistance of malnourished mice to Candida albicans infection was studied. Weaned mice were malnourished by being given a protein-free diet (PFD) for 21 days. The malnourished mice were then fed a balanced conventional diet (BCD) for 7 days or BCD for 7 days with supplemental Lc on days 6 and 7 (BCD+Lc). Malnourished (MNC) and well-nourished (WNC) mice were used as controls. At the end of the treatments the mice were infected intraperitoneally with C. albicans. Animals that had received probiotics had improved survival and resistance against this infection compared to those in the BCD and MNC groups. The number and fungicidal activity of phagocytes, and the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ and interleukin-6 (IL-6), increased in blood and infected tissues in all experimental groups, but MNC mice showed lower concentrations than those in the WNC group. BCD and BCD+Lc mice showed higher concentrations of these variables than those in the MNC group, but only the BCD+Lc group presented values similar to the WNC mice. Malnutrition also impaired the production of IL-17 and IL-10 in response to infection. Both repletion treatments normalized IL-17 concentrations, but IL-10 in the BCD+Lc group was significantly higher than in WNC mice. The addition of L. casei to the repletion diet normalized the immune response against C. albicans, allowing efficient recruitment and activation of phagocytes, as well as effective release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, probiotic treatment induced an increase in IL-10 concentrations, which would have helped to prevent damage caused by the inflammatory response. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Effect of Diets Containing Sucrose vs. D-tagatose in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Police, S.; Harris, J; Lodder, R; Cassis, L

    2008-01-01

    Effects of functional sweeteners on the development of the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis are unknown. The objective was to compare the effect of dietary carbohydrate in the form of sucrose (SUCR) to D-tagatose (TAG; an isomer of fructose currently used as a low-calorie sweetener) on body weight, blood cholesterol concentrations, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLr-/-) mice. LDLr-/- male and female mice were fed either standard murine diet or a diet enriched with TAG or SUCR as carbohydrate sources for 16 weeks. TAG and SUCR diets contained equivalent amounts (g/kg) of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. We measured food intake, body weight, adipocyte diameter, serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations, and aortic atherosclerosis. Macrophage immunostaining and collagen content were examined in aortic root lesions. CONTROL and TAG-fed mice exhibited similar energy intake, body weights and blood glucose and insulin concentrations, but SUCR-fed mice exhibited increased energy intake and became obese and hyperglycemic. Adipocyte diameter increased in female SUCR-fed mice compared to TAG and CONTROL. Male and female SUCR-fed mice had increased serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared to TAG and CONTROL. Atherosclerosis was increased in SUCR-fed mice of both genders compared to TAG and CONTROL. Lesions from SUCR-fed mice exhibited pronounced macrophage immunostaining and reductions in collagen content compared to TAG and CONTROL mice. These results demonstrate that in comparison to sucrose, equivalent substitution of TAG as dietary carbohydrate does not result in the same extent of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis.

  17. Effects of metallothionein on zinc metabolism in lethal-milk mutant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grider, A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The lethal-milk mice (C57BL/6J-Im) exhibit various pleiotropic effects, including a congenital otolith defect, production of zinc-deficient milk, and clinical signs of a systemic Zn deficiency by one year of age. The clinical signs include alopecia, dermatitis, and skin lesions. The systemic zinc deficiency may be due to increased levels of metallothionein (MT) in the intestine and/or liver of Im mice. The untreated Im mice contain twice as much intestinal MT as do C57BL/6J-(+/sup im//+ /sup Im/) (B6) controls. This was determined by a sulfhydryl assay, by the 109 Cd-saturation/hemolysate method, and by the 65 Zn-binding assay. Various concentrations of Cd or Zn were added to the drinking water three days before assaying for MT. Compared to B6 mice, the Im mice exhibited more MT in their liver by the 65 Zn-MT binding assay (3-fold) and by the 109 Cd-saturation/hemolysate method (18-fold). The effects of the two zinc treatments did not differ significantly between Im and B6 mice. The retention and excretion of 65 Zn (administered intraperitoneally) were determined over a 14-day period, but the results did not different between the Im and B6 mice. The increased concentrations of MT within the Im mice was not significantly different for the intestine and liver. Based on these data and other studies, the Im mice may exhibit alterations in zinc homeostasis due to some deregulation of MT metabolism, including the inner ear of the fetus, the lactating mammary gland, and the intestine and liver of adults by one year of age

  18. Effect of diets containing sucrose vs. D-tagatose in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Police, Sara B; Harris, J Clay; Lodder, Robert A; Cassis, Lisa A

    2009-02-01

    Effects of functional sweeteners on the development of the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis are unknown. The objective was to compare the effect of dietary carbohydrate in the form of sucrose (SUCR) to D-tagatose (TAG; an isomer of fructose currently used as a low-calorie sweetener) on body weight, blood cholesterol concentrations, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice. LDLr(-/-) male and female mice were fed either standard murine diet or a diet enriched with TAG or SUCR as carbohydrate sources for 16 weeks. TAG and SUCR diets contained equivalent amounts (g/kg) of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. We measured food intake, body weight, adipocyte diameter, serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations, and aortic atherosclerosis. Macrophage immunostaining and collagen content were examined in aortic root lesions. CONTROL and TAG-fed mice exhibited similar energy intake, body weights and blood glucose and insulin concentrations, but SUCR-fed mice exhibited increased energy intake and became obese and hyperglycemic. Adipocyte diameter increased in female SUCR-fed mice compared to TAG and CONTROL. Male and female SUCR-fed mice had increased serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared to TAG and CONTROL. Atherosclerosis was increased in SUCR-fed mice of both genders compared to TAG and CONTROL. Lesions from SUCR-fed mice exhibited pronounced macrophage immunostaining and reductions in collagen content compared to TAG and CONTROL mice. These results demonstrate that in comparison to sucrose, equivalent substitution of TAG as dietary carbohydrate does not result in the same extent of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis.

  19. Effects of metallothionein on zinc metabolism in lethal-milk mutant mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grider, A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The lethal-milk mice (C57BL/6J-Im) exhibit various pleiotropic effects, including a congenital otolith defect, production of zinc-deficient milk, and clinical signs of a systemic Zn deficiency by one year of age. The clinical signs include alopecia, dermatitis, and skin lesions. The systemic zinc deficiency may be due to increased levels of metallothionein (MT) in the intestine and/or liver of Im mice. The untreated Im mice contain twice as much intestinal MT as do C57BL/6J-(+/sup im//+ /sup Im/) (B6) controls. This was determined by a sulfhydryl assay, by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method, and by the /sup 65/Zn-binding assay. Various concentrations of Cd or Zn were added to the drinking water three days before assaying for MT. Compared to B6 mice, the Im mice exhibited more MT in their liver by the /sup 65/Zn-MT binding assay (3-fold) and by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method (18-fold). The effects of the two zinc treatments did not differ significantly between Im and B6 mice. The retention and excretion of /sup 65/Zn (administered intraperitoneally) were determined over a 14-day period, but the results did not different between the Im and B6 mice. The increased concentrations of MT within the Im mice was not significantly different for the intestine and liver. Based on these data and other studies, the Im mice may exhibit alterations in zinc homeostasis due to some deregulation of MT metabolism, including the inner ear of the fetus, the lactating mammary gland, and the intestine and liver of adults by one year of age.

  20. The Protective Effects of Oral Low-dose Quercetin on Diabetic Nephropathy in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabele Beserra Santos Gomes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the major causes of end-stage renal disease, and the incidence of DN is increasing worldwide. Considering our previous report indicating that chronic treatment with oral low-dose quercetin (10 mg/Kg demonstrated renoprotective, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in the C57BL/6J model of diabetic nephropathy, we investigated whether this flavonoid could also have beneficial effects in concurrent DN and spontaneous atherosclerosis using the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse (apoE-/-. Methods: DN was induced by streptozotocin (100 mg/kg/day, for 3 days in adult apoE-/-mice. Six weeks later, the mice were divided into the following groups: diabetic apoE-/- mice treated with quercetin (DQ, 10 mg/kg/day, 4 weeks, diabetic ApoE-/- mice treated with vehicle (DV and non-treated non-diabetic (ND mice.Results: Quercetin treatment caused a reduction in polyuria (~30%, glycemia (~25%, abolished the hypertriglyceridemia and had significant effects on renal function, including decreased proteinuria (~15% and creatininemia (~30%, which were accompanied by beneficial effects on the renal structural changes, including normalization of the index of glomerulosclerosis and kidney weight.Conclusions: Our data revealed that quercetin treatment significantly reduced DN in hypercholesterolemic mice by inducing biochemical and morphological modifications. Thus, this translational study highlights the importance of quercetin as a potential nutraceutical for the management of DN, including in diabetes associated with dyslipidemia.

  1. Effect of hormone treatment on spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosomal breakage in normal and dwarf mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buul, P.P.W. van; Buul-Offers, S. van

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of dwarf mice with growth hormone, insulin and testosterone had no effect on the spontaneous frequencies of micronuclei (MN) in bone-marrow cells, whereas thyroxine decreased these frequencies. The induction of MN by X-rays and mitomycin C was significantly lower in dwarf mice than in normal mice. Treatment with thyroxine plus growth hormone restored normal radiosensitivity in dwarfs. (orig.)

  2. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jinxiu [Department of Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Cheng, Henry [Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Atti, Elisa [Division of Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Shih, Diana M. [Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Demer, Linda L. [Department of Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Tintut, Yin, E-mail: ytintut@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  3. Immunity to sporozoite-induced malaria infection in mice. I. The effect of immunization of T and B cell-deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.H.; Tigelaar, R.E.; Weinbaum, F.I.

    1977-01-01

    The cellular basis of immunity to sporozoites was investigated by examining the effect of immunization of T and B cell-deficient C57BL/6N x BALB/c AnN F 1 (BLCF 1 ) mice compared to immunocompetent controls. Immunization of T cell-deficient (ATX-BM-ATS) BLCF 1 mice with x-irradiated sporozoites did not result in the generation of protective immunity. The same immunization protocols protected all immunocompetent controls. In contrast, B cell-deficient (μ-suppressed) BLCF 1 mice were protected by immunization in the majority of cases. The absence of detectable serum circumsporozoite precipitins or sporozoite neutralizing activity in the μ-suppressed mice that resisted a sporozoite challenge suggests a minor role for these humoral factors in protection. These data demonstrate a preeminent role for T cells in the induction of protective immunity in BLCF 1 mice against a P. berghei sporozoite infection

  4. Negotiated media effects. Peer feedback modifies effects of media's thin-body ideal on adolescent girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Jolanda; Konijn, Elly A; Seidell, Jacob C

    The present study introduces a theoretical framework on negotiated media effects. Specifically, we argue that feedback of peers on thin-body ideal media images and individual dispositions guide effects on adolescent girls' psychosocial responses to media exposure. Therefore, we examined the

  5. Effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii on cholesterol metabolism in germ-free mice and on atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E knock-out mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portugal L.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated blood cholesterol is an important risk factor associated with atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Several studies have reported a decrease in serum cholesterol during the consumption of large doses of fermented dairy products or lactobacillus strains. The proposed mechanism for this effect is the removal or assimilation of intestinal cholesterol by the bacteria, reducing cholesterol absorption. Although this effect was demonstrated in vitro, its relevance in vivo is still controversial. Furthermore, few studies have investigated the role of lactobacilli in atherogenesis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii on cholesterol metabolism in germ-free mice and the possible hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic action of these bacteria using atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apo E knock-out (KO mice. For this purpose, Swiss/NIH germ-free mice were monoassociated with L. delbrueckii and fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for four weeks. In addition, apo E KO mice were fed a normal chow diet and treated with L. delbrueckii for 6 weeks. There was a reduction in cholesterol excretion in germ-free mice, which was not associated with changes in blood or liver cholesterol concentration. In apo E KO mice, no effect of L. delbrueckii was detected in blood, liver or fecal cholesterol. The atherosclerotic lesion in the aorta was also similar in mice receiving or not these bacteria. In conclusion, these results suggest that, although L. delbrueckii treatment was able to reduce cholesterol excretion in germ-free mice, no hypocholesterolemic or antiatherogenic effect was observed in apo E KO mice.

  6. The Influence of Discrimination on Inmigrant Adolescents' Depressive Symptoms: What Buffers its Detrimental Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cristini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the link between perceived discrimination, depressive symptoms, cultural identity and social support at school reported by immigrant adolescents. Participants were 214 mostly male, immigrant adolescents in grades 9 through 13 of high schools in two small cities in northern Italy. Results showed that discrimination has a significant detrimental effect on psychological well-being of foreign-born adolescents. Additionally, the current study outlined that the only protective factor for depressive symptoms, among the analyzed variables concerning cultural identity and school social support, was social support from teachers. None of the analyzed moderators buffered the relationship between discrimination and depressive symptoms reported by immigrant adolescents. These results have implications for preventive interventions for immigrant adolescents and suggest a protective role for teachers. Future research should detect strategies to reduce discrimination and prejudice toward immigrant adolescents and detect factors that may buffer detrimental effects of discrimination on psychological well-being.

  7. Effect of visfatin on lipid profile of obese and diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, R.; Hussain, M.M.; Aslam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of visfatin on blood lipid levels in balb/c strain of albino mice. Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: The study was carried out at the department of Physiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National Institute of Health Sciences, Islamabad from April to December 2007. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty balb/c strain albino mice were procured from NIH, Islamabad. After taking base line blood samples, mice were divided randomly into four groups. Animals in groups I and II were made obese by feeding high fat / high carbohydrate diet whereas mice in Groups III and IV were induced diabetes mellitus by injecting streptozotocin. Groups I (obese) and III (diabetic) served as controls whereas groups II (obese treated) and IV (diabetic treated) were administered visfatin injection. Terminal intracardiac blood sample was used to measure the serum lipid and visfatin levels. Results: Serum lipid levels were found increased in obese and diabetic groups as compared to healthy mice. The administration of recombinant-histidine soluble (mice) visfatin significantly (p< 0.01) decreased the serum lipid levels with concomitant increase in HDL levels (p< 0.01) in obese and diabetic groups of mice and were comparable with baseline normal values of healthy controls. Conclusion: Visfatin is a potential antilipidemic adipocytokine that probably modulates insulin sensitivity and decreases atherogenic lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL and VLDL) with concomitant increase in HDL in obesity and diabetes mellitus. (author)

  8. Effect of thumus cell injections on germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues of nude (thymusless) mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, E.B.; Caporale, L.H.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1974-01-01

    Nude mice, partially backcrossed to Balb/c or DBA/2, were injected iv with 5 x 10 7 thymus cells from the respective inbred strain. The response of these mice to immunization with Brucella abortus antigen was studied, with respect to both antibody production and the formation of germinal centers in their lymphoid tissues. The results were compared to those obtained with nude mice to which no thymus cells were given, as well as to Balb/c, DBA/2, or +/question litter mate controls. Nude mice formed less 19S as well as 7S antibody than did litter mate controls and completely lacked germinal centers in lymph nodes and gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Those nude mice which had been injected with thymus cells made a much better secondary response, both for 19S and for 7S antibody, and had active germinal centers in their lymph nodes as early as 3 wk after thymus cell injection. Intestinal lymphoid tissue in nude mice showed only slight reconstitution of germinal center activity several months after thymus cell injection and none at earlier times. Irradiated (3000 R) thymus cells appeared as effective as normal cells in facilitating germinal center appearance and 7S antibody production in the nude mice

  9. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on carbon-ion and X ray irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masayoshi; Kawata, Tetsuya; Liu, C.; Sakurai, Akiko; Ito, Hisao; Ando, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The radioprotective ability of melatonin was investigated in C3H mice irradiated to a whole-body X-ray (150 Kv, 20 mA) and carbon-ion (290 MeV/u). Mice exposed to X-ray, 13 KeV/μm and 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion dose of 7.0-7.5 Gy, 6.5-7.25 Gy and 6.0-6.5 Gy, respectively. One hour before the irradiation, mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of 0.2 ml of either solvent (soybean oil) or melatonin (250 mg/kg, uniform suspension in soybean oil). Mice were observed for mortality over a period of 30 days following irradiation. Results obtained the first year are as follows. The toxicity of melatonin (at a dose 250 mg/kg) intraperitoneal administered to mice could not be observed. A pretreatment of melatonin is effective in protecting mice from lethal damage of low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation (X-ray and 13 KeV/μm carbon-ion). In the high-LET irradiated mice with 50 KeV/μm carbon-ion, melatonin exhibited a slight increase in their survival. (author)

  10. Expression of GAT1 in male reproductive system and its effects on reproduction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, JinFu; Gui, YaPing; Yuan, Tao; Bian, CuiDong; Guo, LiHe

    2009-12-01

    The present study was carried out to identify GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transport protein I (GAT1) in male reproductive organs and to study the effect of GAT1 overexpression on the male reproductive system in GAT1 transgenic mice (TG). Expression and location of GAT1 in testes, epididymis, and sperm of wild-type (WT) mice were identified by immunohistochemistry and western-blot. Histological changes of testes, epididymis, and sperm of transgenic mice overexpressing GAT1 were detected by immunofluorenscent staining and haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. GAT1 expression was detected in the testes, epididymis, and sperm of non-transgenic mice. Vacuolization and deformity of spermatogenic cells were observed in the transgenic mice, but the epididymis was unremarkable. Immunofluorenscent staining showed that the number of diastrophic and decapitated sperm increased significantly in transgenic mice to 46.9% from 7.3% in nontransgenic mice. These results suggest that abnormal expression of GAT1 could result in spermiogenesis function injury, sperm paramorphia and dysgenesis.

  11. Effect of aging and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology on brain monoamines in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von Linstow, C. U.; Severino, Maurizio; Metaxas, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    , but these can both be age- and/or disease-related. We examined whether brain monoamine levels change as part of physiological aging and/or AD-like disease in APPSWE/PS1δE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice. The neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, brainstem and cerebellum of 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month-old B6C3 wild......-type (WT) mice and of 18-month old APP/PS1 and WT mice were analysed for 5-HT, DA and NA contents by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), along with neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 and WT mice. While, we observed no aging effect in WT mice, we detected region-specific changes in the levels...... of all monoamines in 18-month-old transgenic compared with WT mice. This included reductions in 5-HT (-30%), DA (-47%) and NA (-32%) levels in the neocortex and increases of 5-HT in the brainstem (+18%). No changes were observed in any of the monoamines in the neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 mice...

  12. Effects of EDTA-Na (Na ethylenediaminetetraacetate) upon the metabolism of radiostrontium and radioyttrium in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Wakisaka, G; Kono, T; Hiroaki, A; Yamamasu, T; Sugawa, I

    1954-01-01

    The toxicity of EDTA-Na, inert Sr (NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and Ba (NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ has been examined. Simultaneous injection of EDTA-Na showed no significant effect upon the distribution of radio-Sr in the bones of mice. The distribution of radio-Y in the bones of mice tended to decrease following the simultaneous subcutaneous injection of /sup 91/Y and EDTA-Na.

  13. Taurine effect on cytogenetic lesions in the cornea of mice exposed to 9 Gev proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsova, S.V.; Yartsev, E.I.

    1989-01-01

    Possibilities of preventive measures and treatment of cytogenetic injuries in the mice cornea, subjected to proton irradiation at 9 Gev were studied. Taurine containing solution (TCS) was used as a radiomodifying agent. It is shown that TCS application enables to decrease aberrant mitoses level in cornea epithelium cells of mice. Antiactinic effect of the above agent is determined by its considerable action on mitotic delay

  14. Radioprotective effect of dextran sulphate and aerogenic hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Bartonickova, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Konoplyanikova, O.A.; Konoplyanikov, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of dextran sulfate given 6 h before irradiation produced higher numbers of microcolonies of intestinal crypt stem cells in whole-body irradiated mice than an injection of saline in control mice. If dextran sulfate and hypoxia are combined, the radioprotective effect of hypoxia on intestinal crypt stem cells depends on the time interval between irradiation and administration of dextran sulfate. (author). 2 figs., 12 refs

  15. Effect of Tribulus terrestris on Haloperidol-induced Catalepsy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nishchal, B. S.; Rai, S.; Prabhu, M. N.; Ullal, Sheetal D.; Rajeswari, S.; Gopalakrishna, H. N.

    2014-01-01

    Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, leads to the development of a behavioural state called catalepsy, in which the animal is not able to correct an externally imposed posture. In the present study we have attempted to evaluate the anticataleptic effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in albino mice. Mice were allocated to four groups, each group containing six animals. Both, the test drug, Tribulus terrestris and the standard drug trihexyphenidyl were uniformly suspend...

  16. Protective Effect of Hericium erinaceus on Alcohol Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Lijun; Xie, Yuxi; Wu, Guikai; Cheng, Aibin; Liu, Xiaogang; Zheng, Rongjuan; Huo, Hong; Zhang, Junwei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Hericium erinaceus (HEM) on liver injury induced by acute alcohol administration in mice. Mice received ethanol (5?g/kg?BW) by gavage every 12?hrs for a total of 3 doses. HEM (200?mg/kg?BW) was gavage before ethanol administration. Subsequent serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) level, Maleic dialdehyde (MDA) level, hepatic total antioxidant status (TAOS), and activated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activat...

  17. Recovery of Normal Body Weight in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: The Nurses’ Perspective on Effective Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie van Elburg; prof Berno van Meijel; Esther Meerwijk; Laura Beukers; Joyce van Ommen; René Bakker

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about effective nursing interventions for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. The purpose of this study was to discover which aspects of nursing care are most effective, according to nurses, in recovery of normal body weight in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. METHODS: A qualitative

  18. Effects of a Guided Internet-Delivered Self-Help Intervention for Adolescents With Chronic Pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, J.S.; Remerie, S.; Westendorp, T.; Timman, R.; Busschbach, J.J.V.; Passchier, J.; de Klerk, C.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective in reducing the frequency and intensity of chronic pain in adolescents. However, CBT seems not to be considered acceptable by all adolescents. The main aim of our study was therefore to evaluate the effects of guided Internet-delivered self-help for

  19. The Effects of Assertiveness Training on Enhancing the Social Skills of Adolescents with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-il

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of assertiveness training to enhance the social/assertiveness skills of 36 adolescents with visual impairments found that parents, the students, teachers, and observers judged the adolescents' social skills differently. However, the training did have some specific effect on increasing assertiveness. (Contains references.)…

  20. Age-Sensitive Effect of Adolescent Dating Experience on Delinquency and Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryang Hui

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a developmental perspective and focuses on examining whether the impact of adolescent dating is age-sensitive. Dating at earlier ages is hypothesized to have a stronger effect on adolescent criminal behavior or substance use, but the effect would be weaker as one ages. The data obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of…

  1. Effect of milk proteins on linear growth and IGF variables in overweight adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larnkjær, Anni; Arnberg, Karina; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2014-01-01

    Milk may stimulate growth acting via insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion but the effect in adolescents is less examined. This study investigates the effect of milk proteins on linear growth, IGF-I, IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio in overweight adolescents....

  2. Sex and Sibling Structure: Interaction Effects upon the Accuracy of Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas Ewin

    1984-01-01

    Surveyed 291 mother-child and 221 father-child dyads to examine adolescent perceptions of parental educational goals. Results showed family size and student's age had no effect, but birth order and sibling sex composition interact with sex of the parent and the adolescent in effects on accuracy of perception. (JAC)

  3. Older and Newer Media: Patterns of Use and Effects on Adolescents' Health and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jane D.; Bobkowski, Piotr S.

    2011-01-01

    The past decade's research on the use and effects of older (television, music, movies, magazines) and newer media (the Internet, cell phones, social networking) on adolescents' health and well-being is reviewed. A portrait of patterns of use of the media is provided and then the predictors and effects of those patterns on adolescents' mental…

  4. Individual and shared effects of social environment and polygenic risk scores on adolescent body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Krapohl, Eva; Eley, Thalia C; Breen, Gerome

    2018-04-20

    Juvenile obesity is associated with adverse health outcomes. Understanding genetic and environmental influences on body mass index (BMI) during adolescence could inform interventions. We investigated independent and interactive effects of parenting, socioeconomic status (SES) and polygenic risk on BMI pre-adolescence, and on the rate of change in BMI across adolescence. Genome-wide genotype data, BMI and child perceptions of parental warmth and punitive discipline were available at 11 years old, and parental SES was available from birth on 3,414 unrelated participants. Linear models were used to test the effects of social environment and polygenic risk on pre-adolescent BMI. Change in BMI across adolescence was assessed in a subset (N = 1943). Sex-specific effects were assessed. Higher genetic risk was associated with increased BMI pre-adolescence and across adolescence (p parenting was not significantly associated with either phenotype, but lower SES was associated with increased BMI pre-adolescence. No interactions passed correction for multiple testing. Polygenic risk scores from adult GWAS meta-analyses are associated with BMI in juveniles, suggesting a stable genetic component. Pre-adolescent BMI was associated with social environment, but parental style has, at most, a small effect.

  5. Late effects of chronic low dose-rate γ-rays irradiation on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sasagawa, Sumiko; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation, we are conducting two experiments. Experiment 1 - Late effects of chronic low dose-rate g-rays irradiation on SPF mice, using life-span and pathological changes as parameters. Continuous irradiation with g-rays for 400 days was performed using 137 Cs γ-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8,000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until they died a natural death. As of 2002 March 31, 3,999 of the total 4,000 mice have died. Preliminary analyses of data show that 20 mGy/day suggested a shortened life span in both sexes. Partial results show that the most common lethal neoplasms in the pooled data of non-irradiated control and irradiated male mice, in order of frequency, were neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, liver, and lung. In female mice, neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, soft tissue, and endocrine system were common. Experiment 2 - Effects on the progeny of chronic low dose-rate g-ray irradiated SPF mice: pilot study, was started in 1999 and is currently in progress. (author)

  6. Protective effect of metformin on D-galactose-induced aging model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Iman; Khaluoi, Amin; Kaeidi, Ayat; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Heydari, Sara; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad Aa

    2018-01-01

    Metformin (Met), an antidiabetic biguanide, reduces hyperglycemia via improving glucose utilization and reducing the gluconeogenesis. Met has been shown to exert neuroprotective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the possible effect of Met on the D-galactose (D-gal)-induced aging in mice. Met (1 and 10 mg/kg/p.o.), was administrated daily in D-gal-received (500 mg/kg/p.o.) mice model of aging for six weeks. Anxiety-like behavior, cognitive function, and physical power were evaluated by the elevated plus-maze, novel object recognition task (NORT), and forced swimming capacity test, respectively. The brains were analyzed for the level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Met decreased the anxiety-like behavior in D-gal-treated mice. Also, Met treated mice showed significantly improved learning and memory ability in NORT compared to the D-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, Met increased the physical power as well as the activity of SOD and BDNF level in D-gal-treated mice. Our results suggest that the use of Met can be an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of D-gal-induced aging in animal models. This effect seems to be mediated by attenuation of oxidative stress and enhancement of the neurotrophic factors.

  7. [Effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Bian, Y X; Feng, T T; Zhang, J H; Yu, Y H

    2017-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn. Methods: One hundred and sixty ICR mice were divided into sham injury, hydrogen, pure burn, and burn+ hydrogen groups according to the random number table, with 40 mice in each group. Mice in pure burn group and burn+ hydrogen group were inflicted with 40% total body surface area full-thickness scald (hereafter referred to as burn) on the back, while mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group were sham injured. Mice in hydrogen group and burn+ hydrogen group inhaled 2% hydrogen for 1 h at post injury hour (PIH) 1 and 6, respectively, while mice in sham injury group and pure burn group inhaled air for 1 h. At PIH 24, lung tissue of six mice in each group was harvested, and then pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by HE staining and the lung tissue injury pathological score was calculated. Inferior vena cava blood and lung tissue of other eight mice in each group were obtained, and then content of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum and lung tissue was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum and lung tissue was detected by spectrophotometry. After arterial blood of other six mice in each group was collected for detection of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)), the wet and dry weight of lung tissue were weighted to calculate lung wet to dry weight ratio. The survival rates of the other twenty mice in each group during post injury days 7 were calculated. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, LSD test and log-rank test. Results: (1) At PIH 24, lung tissue of mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group showed no abnormality. Mice in pure burn group were with pulmonary interstitial edema, serious rupture of alveolar capillary wall, and infiltration of a large number of inflammatory cells. Mice in burn+ hydrogen group were with mild

  8. Effects of adolescent online gaming time and motives on depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Hellstr?m, Charlotta; Nilsson, Kent W; Leppert, Jerzy; ?slund, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To investigate whether adolescent online gaming time and the additive effect of gaming motives were associated with depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. The hypothesis was that adolescents who engage in online gaming with escape motives and increased online gaming time have higher probability for depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms compared to adolescents with other online gaming motives and/or less online gaming time. Method. An anonymous and volu...

  9. Binge Drinking Trajectories from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Effects of Peer Social Network

    OpenAIRE

    Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Kolaczyk, Eric; Jang, Jisun; Swenson, Theadora; Bhindarwala, Asma Moiz

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates an association between social network characteristics and binge drinking from adolescence to young adulthood, utilizing National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 7,966) and employing social network and longitudinal analysis. Lower integration and socialization with alcohol-using peers had immediate risks of binge drinking during adolescence; however, over time, the effects of socialization with alcohol-using peers had the most dramatic reduction. The most p...

  10. Social support moderates the effects of stress on sleep in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    van Schalkwijk, Frank J; Blessinga, Agaath N; Willemen, Agnes M; Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Schuengel, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Academic expectations and demands become primary sources of stress during adolescence, negatively affecting sleep. To cope with stress, adolescents may turn to social support figures. The present study tested the extent of main and moderating effects of various sources of social support on the association between stress and sleep. Adolescents (n = 202, meanage 14.6 years, standard deviation = 0.71) reported on academic stress, sleep, and support using questionnaires during a low- and high-str...

  11. Antidepressant effects of insulin in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice: Modulation of brain serotonin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2014-04-22

    Diabetes is a persistent metabolic disorder, which often leads to depression as a result of the impaired neurotransmitter function. Insulin is believed to have antidepressant effects in depression associated with diabetes; however, the mechanism underlying the postulated effect is poorly understood. In the present study, it is hypothesized that insulin mediates an antidepressant effect in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in mice through modulation of the serotonin system in the brain. Therefore, the current study investigated the antidepressant effect of insulin in STZ induced diabetes in mice and insulin mediated modulation in the brain serotonin system. In addition, the possible pathways that lead to altered serotonin levels as a result of insulin administration were examined. Experimentally, Swiss albino mice of either sex were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ. After one week, diabetic mice received a single dose of either insulin or saline or escitalopram for 14days. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the behavioral despair effects using forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), followed by biochemical estimations of serotonin concentrations and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the whole brain content. The results demonstrated that, STZ treated diabetic mice exhibited an increased duration of immobility in FST and TST as compared to non-diabetic mice, while insulin treatment significantly reversed the effect. Biochemical assays revealed that administration of insulin attenuated STZ treated diabetes induced neurochemical alterations as indicated by elevated serotonin levels and decreased MAO-A and MAO-B activities in the brain. Collectively, the data indicate that insulin exhibits antidepressant effects in depression associated with STZ induced diabetes in mice through the elevation of the brain serotonin levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Yani; Leu, David; Chui, Jennifer; Fike, John R.; Huang, Ting-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted

  13. Effects of diet quality on vulnerability to mild subchronic social defeat stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tatsuhiko; Kubota, Yoshifumi; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) mouse model is a potentially useful system for understanding stress responses to social environments. We previously developed a mouse model of subchronic and mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) that exhibits increased body weight gain and food intake following polydipsia-like features. sCSDS mice also show avoidance behavior in a social interaction test. In this study, we examined the effects of diet quality on susceptibility to sCSDS by feeding these mice semi- and non-purified diets. Male C57BL/6J (B6; n = 82) mice were exposed to sCSDS using male ICR mice. The B6 mice were divided into four test groups: semi-purified pellet diet + sCSDS, non-purified pellet diet + sCSDS, semi-purified diet + control (no sCSDS), and non-purified diet + control. Although increased body weight, and food and water intake following sCSDS exposure were consistently observed in the groups that were fed semi- and non-purified diets, social avoidance behavior was influenced by food type (i.e., sCSDS mice fed semi-purified diet showed the greatest social avoidance behavior). In addition, the rates of stress susceptibility were estimated at 73.9 and 34.8% in sCSDS mice fed semi-purified and non-purified diets, respectively (P healthy control mice fed semi-purified and non-purified diets, respectively. These results suggest that diet quality affects the vulnerability of mice to social defeat stress.

  14. Adolescent ethnic prejudice: understanding the effects of parental extrinsic versus intrinsic goal promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriez, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Based on Self-Determination Theory, the role of parental extrinsic versus intrinsic (E / I) goal promotion for adolescent ethnic prejudice and the mechanisms underlying this effect were examined in a sample of adolescents and their parents. Results indicate that paternal and maternal E / I goal promotion had a significantly positive effect on ethnic prejudice. This effect could be accounted for by differences in adolescent right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) and social dominance orientation (SDO). In addition, differences in adolescent E / I goal pursuit fully mediated the effects of parental E / I goal promotion on RWA and SDO. Finally, the effects of adolescent E / I goal pursuits on ethnic prejudice were fully mediated by RWA and SDO. Implications of these findings will be discussed.

  15. Adolescent adjustment and well-being: effects of parental divorce and distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størksen, Ingunn; Røysamb, Espen; Holmen, Turid L; Tambs, Kristian

    2006-02-01

    This study investigates the long-term effects of parental divorce on adolescent psychological adjustment and well-being, and to what extent the effects are accounted for by parental psychological distress. Data were collected among 8,984 Norwegian adolescents (13-19 years) and their parents. Outcome variables were symptoms of anxiety and depression, subjective well-being, and three areas of school problems. Parental divorce was found to be associated with both higher mean levels and larger variances in adolescent problems. Divorce and parental distress contributed independently to adolescent distress, supporting the notion of "double exposure" effects. The prevalence of adolescents with substantial distress symptoms was 14% among those with non-distressed non-divorced parents and 30% among those with divorced and distressed parents. In general effects remained when controlling for demographic factors. Long-term effects of divorce on symptoms of anxiety and depression were stronger among girls than among boys.

  16. Effect of administration of some antitumor extracts on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesalam, N.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is considered one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many researches have been studied on the discovery of natural and synthetic compounds that can be used in the prevention and/or treatment of cancer. Many chemo preventive agents have been associated with antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on cancer cells because of their high antioxidant activity. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antioxidant and antitumor effects of three natural extracts including (propolis, green tea and Chlorella vulgaris) without or with radiation exposure in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) - bearing female albino mice. The animals were randomly distributed into three major groups as follows:- Group A (control group).This group consists of 10 mice kept on normal standard rodent diet without any treatment and housed in two cages: mice of the first cage served as control for non tumor-bearing group and the second cage served as control for tumor-bearing group. Group B (Non tumor - bearing group).This group consists of 30 mice and used to study the effect of the vehicle solutions (gum acacia, DMSO), propolis, green tea, Chlorella vulgaris and gamma irradiation on normal mice. Mice of this group were equally distributed into six subgroups receiving gum acacia, DMSO, propolis, green tea and Chlorella vulgaris for two weeks and whole body gamma irradiated. Group C (Tumor- bearing group): This group consists of 160 mice randomly and equally distributed into 8 subgroups: Ehrlich ascites carcinoma(mice were inoculated with 2.5 x 10 6 intra-peretoneally(i.p), Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and 2 Gy irradiated, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and propolis treated (150 mg/kg b.w), Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, propolis treated and irradiated, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and green tea treated (150 mg/kg b.w), Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, green tea treated and irradiated, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Chlorella vulgaris treated (150 mg/kg b.w) and Ehrlich ascites

  17. The protective effects of parental monitoring and internet restriction on adolescents' risk of online harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Atika; Bleakley, Amy; Jordan, Amy B; Romer, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    With many adolescents using the internet to communicate with their peers, online harassment is on the rise among youth. The purpose of this study was to understand how parental monitoring and strategies parents use to regulate children's internet use (i.e., internet restriction) can help reduce online harassment among adolescents. Online survey data were collected from a nationally representative sample of parents and their 12-17 year old adolescents (n = 629; 49 % female). Structural equation modeling was used to test direct and indirect effects of parental monitoring and internet restriction on being a victim of online harassment. Potential mediators included adolescents' frequency of use of social networking websites, time spent on computers outside of school, and internet access in the adolescent's bedroom. Age and gender differences were also explored. Adolescents' reports of parental monitoring and efforts to regulate specific forms of internet use were associated with reduced rates of online harassment. Specifically, the effect of parental monitoring was largely direct and 26 times greater than parental internet restriction. The latter was associated with lower rates of harassment only indirectly by limiting internet access in the adolescent's bedroom. These effects operated similarly for younger and older adolescents and for males and females. Adolescents' perceptions of parental monitoring and awareness can be protective against online harassment. Specific restriction strategies such as regulating internet time and content can also help reduce the risk of online harassment.

  18. Effect of sex on ethanol consumption and conditioned taste aversion in adolescent and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm-Sapyta, Nicole L; Francis, Reynold; MacDonald, Andrea; Keistler, Colby; O'Neill, Lauren; Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2014-04-01

    Vulnerability to alcoholism is determined by many factors, including the balance of pleasurable vs. aversive alcohol-induced sensations: pleasurable sensations increase intake, while aversive sensations decrease it. Female sex and adolescent age are associated with lower sensitivity to intake-reducing effects and more rapid development of alcohol abuse. This study assessed voluntary drinking and the aversive effects of alcohol to determine whether these measures are inversely related across the sexes and development. Voluntary drinking of 20 % ethanol in an every-other-day (EOD) availability pattern and the dose-response relationship of ethanol conditioned taste aversion (CTA) were assessed in male and female adolescent and adult rats. CTA was sex specific in adult but not adolescent rats, with adult females exhibiting less aversion. Voluntary ethanol consumption varied according to age and individual differences but was not sex specific. Adolescents initially drank more than adults, exhibited greater day-to-day variation in consumption, were more susceptible to the alcohol deprivation effect, and took longer to establish individual differences in consumption patterns. These results show that the emergence of intake patterns differs between adolescents and adults. Adolescents as a group initiate drinking at high levels but decrease intake as they mature. A subset of adolescents maintained high drinking levels into adulthood. In contrast, most adults consumed at steady, low levels, but a small subset quickly established and maintained high-consumption patterns. Adolescents also showed marked deprivation-induced increases. Sex differences were not observed in EOD drinking during either adolescence or adulthood.

  19. Effect of alcoholic beverages on progeny and reproduction of mice

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiro, Fernanda Dias; Bispo, Ana Clara Cerato; Guarido, Karla Lorena; Marianno, Priscila; Costa, Gabriel de Araújo; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Salles, Maria José Sparça

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alcohol is the most commonly consumed substance in the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of alcoholic beverages on male reproduction and possible alterations in their offspring. The mice were divided into 4 groups: beer, wine, cachaça (a type of sugarcane rum), with ethanol concentrations of 1.9 g/kg, and control group treated with PBS. The treatment period was 35 days. The animals which received cachaça, demonstrated significant weight loss in the test...

  20. Effects of gamma radiation on fetal development in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahere Dehghan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many cancer patients receive radiotherapy which may lead to serious damages to the ovary storage and the matrix muscle state. Some of these patients may admit to infertility clinics for having pregnancy and on the other hand hormonal administration for superovulation induction is a routine procedure in assisted reproduction technology (ART clinics. Objective: This study aimed to investigate fertility and fetuses of hormone treated super ovulated female mice who had received whole-body gamma irradiation before mating. Materials and Methods: Female mice were randomly categorized into a control group and 3 experimental groups including: Group I (Irradiation, Group II (Superovulation, and Group III (Superovulation and Irradiation. In hormone treated groups, mice were injected with different doses of 59Tpregnant mare's serum gonadotropin59T (PMSG followed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG. Irradiation was done using a Co-60 gamma ray generator with doses of 2 and 4 Gy. Number of fetuses counted and the fetus’s weight, head circumference, birth height, the number of live healthy fetuses, the number of fetuses with detected anomalies in the body, the sum of resorption and arrested fetuses were all recorded as outcome of treatments. Results: In the group I and group II, increased radiation and hormone dose led to a decrease in the number of survived fetuses (45 in 2 Gy vs. 29 in 4 Gy for irradiated group as well as from 76 in 10 units into 48 in 15 units. In the group III, a higher dose of hormone in the presence of a 2 Gy irradiation boosted the slink rate; i.e. the number of aborted fetuses reached 21 cases while applying the dose of 15 Iu, whereas 6 cases of abortion were reported applying the hormone with a lower dose. Among different parameters studied, there was a significant difference in parameters of weight and height in the mouse fetuses (p=0.01. Conclusion: The data indicated that use of ovarian stimulating hormones in mice

  1. Dual effects of crude extracts obtained from Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae) on experimental anxiety in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blainski, Andressa; Piccolo, Vanessa K; Mello, João Carlos P; de Oliveira, Rúbia M W

    2010-03-24

    Different preparations obtained from P. alliacea have been traditionally used in South America and Brazil for many medical conditions. To investigate the effects of fresh whole plant (WP) extract, aerial part (AP) extract, and root (R) extract obtained from Petiveria alliacea using the elevated plus maze (EPM) model of anxiety in mice. Total flavonoid content present in Petiveria alliacea extracts was also determined. WP, AP, or R (300-900 mg/kg) extracts were orally administered to mice 30 min before they were subjected to the EPM and open field test. Total flavonoid content present in the extracts was determined by spectrophotometry. The WP extract (300 and 900 mg/kg) caused anxiolytic-like effects, and the AP extract (300 mg/kg) induced anxiogenic-like effects in mice subjected to the EPM. No effect on anxiety-like behavior was observed with acute administration of the R extract. The content of flavonoids present in the AP extract (1.34%) was almost threefold higher than the flavonoid content present in the WP extract (0.52%). Preparations using different fresh parts of Petiveria alliacea caused opposite effects on experimental anxiety in mice. However, predicting the extent to which flavonoid content present in Petiveria alliacea extracts differentially induces anxiolysis or anxiogenesis in mice was not possible. Further studies will be necessary to elucidate the effects of flavonoids or other substances present in Petiveria alliacea extracts on experimental anxiety. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: natural history and long term treatment effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asher Marc A

    2006-03-01

    risks of major surgery, a 6 to 29% chance of requiring re-operation, and the remote possibility of developing a pain management problem. Knowledge of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis natural history and long-term treatment effects is and will always remain somewhat incomplete. However, enough is know to provide patients and parents the information needed to make informed decisions about management options.

  3. Effects of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) on vigilance states and EEG in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Westerveld, P; Turek, FW; Koehl, M

    2004-01-01

    Study Objectives: Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is an endogenous neuromodulator that appears to have wide-ranging effects on vigilance and behavior. In the present study, we examined the effects of GHB on sleep-wake behavior and EEG in mice. In addition, we measured effects of GHB on body temperature

  4. Inhibitory effect of sequential combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy on growth of implanted tumor in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kouji

    1983-01-01

    Sequential chemotherapy using FT-207, adriamycin and mitomycin C followed by radiotherapy was attempted to achieve effective inhibition against implanted tumor in C57BL/6 black mice bearing YM-12 tumors. Sequential combined chemotherapy was more effective than single drug chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy of other drugs. Addition of radiotherapy to the sequential combined chemotherapy was successful for enhancing therapeutic effect. (author)

  5. The predictive effect of empathy and social norms on adolescents' implicit and explicit stigma responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silke, Charlotte; Swords, Lorraine; Heary, Caroline

    2017-11-01

    Research indicates that adolescents who experience mental health difficulties are frequently stigmatised by their peers. Stigmatisation is associated with a host of negative social and psychological effects, which impacts a young person's well-being. As a result, the development of effective anti-stigma strategies is considered a major research priority. However, in order to design effective stigma reduction strategies, researchers must be informed by an understanding of the factors that influence the expression of stigma. Although evidence suggests that empathy and social norms have a considerable effect on adolescents' social attitudes and behaviours, research has yet to examine whether these factors significantly influence adolescents' responses toward their peers with mental health difficulties. Thus, this study aims to examine whether empathy (cognitive and affective) and peer norms (descriptive and injunctive) influence adolescents' implicit and explicit stigmatising responses toward peers with mental health problems. A total of 570 (221 male and 348 female; 1 non-specified) adolescents, aged between 13 and 18 years (M = 15.51, SD = 1.13), participated in this research. Adolescents read vignettes describing male/female depressed and 'typically developing' peers. Adolescents answered questions assessing their stigmatising responses toward each target, as well as their empathic responding and normative perceptions. A sub-sample of participants (n=173) also completed an IAT assessing their implicit stigmatising responses. Results showed that descriptive norms exerted a substantial effect on adolescents' explicit responses. Cognitive empathy, affective empathy and injunctive norms exerted more limited effects on explicit responses. No significant effects were observed for implicit stigma. Overall, empathy was found to have limited effects on adolescents' explicit and implicit stigmatising responses, which may suggest that other contextual variables moderate the

  6. Effects of low dose radiation on antioxidant enzymes after radiotherapy of tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin; Gao Gang; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Liu Xiaoqiu; Wang Zhiquan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To search for effects of low dose radiation on the activities of antioxidant enzymes after radiotherapy of tumor-bearing mice. Methods: Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) were all determined by chemical colorimetry. Results: Low dose radiation increase the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) in serum of tumor-bearing mice more markedly than those in the unirradiated controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, GST, CAT in serum of tumor-bearing mice (d 5 , d 3 ) irradiated with 5cGy 6h before 2.0 Gy radiation are obviously higher than those of the group (c 3 , c 5 ) given with radiotherapy only. Conclusion: The increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in serum of tumor-bearing mice triggered by low dose radiation could partly contribute to the protective mechanism. (authors)

  7. Anti-ghrelin immunoglobulins modulate ghrelin stability and its orexigenic effect in obese mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kuniko; Legrand, Romain; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; François, Marie; Tennoune, Naouel; Coëffier, Moïse; Claeyssens, Sophie; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Inui, Akio; Fetissov, Sergueï O.

    2013-01-01

    Obese individuals often have increased appetite despite normal plasma levels of the main orexigenic hormone ghrelin. Here we show that ghrelin degradation in the plasma is inhibited by ghrelin-reactive IgG immunoglobulins, which display increased binding affinity to ghrelin in obese patients and mice. Co-administration of ghrelin together with IgG from obese individuals, but not with IgG from anorectic or control patients, increases food intake in rats. Similarly, chronic injections of ghrelin together with IgG from ob/ob mice increase food intake, meal frequency and total lean body mass of mice. These data reveal that in both obese humans and mice, IgG with increased affinity for ghrelin enhances ghrelin’s orexigenic effect, which may contribute to increased appetite and overeating. PMID:24158035

  8. Effect of bite-raised condition on the hippocampal cholinergic system of aged SAMP8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Tasuku; Mori, Daisuke; Miyake, Hidekazu; Fujiwara, Shuu; Ono, Yumie; Takahashi, Toru; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2012-06-27

    Occlusal disharmony induces chronic stress, which results in learning deficits in association with the morphologic changes in the hippocampus, e.g., neuronal degeneration and increased hypertrophied glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells. To investigate the mechanisms underlying impaired hippocampal function resulting from occlusal disharmony, we examined the effects of the bite-raised condition on the septohippocampal cholinergic system by assessing acetylcholine release in the hippocampus and choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the medial septal nucleus in aged SAMP8 mice that underwent the bite raising procedure. Aged bite-raised mice showed decreased acetylcholine release in the hippocampus and a reduced number of choline acetyltransferase-immunopositive neurons in the medial septal nucleus compared to age-matched control mice. These findings suggest that the bite-raised condition in aged SAMP8 mice enhances the age-related decline in the septohippocampal cholinergic system, leading to impaired learning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of sleep extension and sleep hygiene advice on sleep and depressive symptoms in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Sleep problems are common and persistent during adolescence and can have negative effects on adolescents' mood. To date, studies that investigate the effects of sleep extension on adolescents' sleep and depressive symptoms are still lacking. This study aims to investigate the effects of

  10. The effects of sleep extension and sleep hygiene advice on sleep and depressive symptoms in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J. F.; Oort, F. J.; Meijer, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep problems are common and persistent during adolescence and can have negative effects on adolescents' mood. To date, studies that investigate the effects of sleep extension on adolescents' sleep and depressive symptoms are still lacking. This study aims to investigate the effects of gradual

  11. Effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field on fetal development in ICR mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Uchida, Soshi; Norimura, Toshiyuki

    2001-01-01

    In order to determine the effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field (SMF) on fetal development in mice, we evaluated fetal teratogenesis and endochondral ossification following exposure in utero. Pregnant ICR mice were exposed to a 4.7 T SMF from day 7.5 to 9.5 of gestation in a whole-body dose, and sacrificed on day 18.5 of gestation. We examined with incidence of prenatal death, external malformations and fetal skeletal malformations. There were no significant differences observed in the incidence of prenatal death and/or malformations between SMF-exposed mice and control mice. Further, we evaluated the immunoreactivity for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is implicated in angiogenesis and osteogenesis, in the sternum of fetal mice following magnetic exposure. Our studies also indicated that on day 16.5 of gestation following SMF exposure, the immunoreactivity for VEGF was increased compared to unexposed controls. However, it was decreased in the exposed group compared to the control group on day 18.5 of gestation. DNA and proteoglycan (PG) synthesis were also measured in rabbit costal growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. No significant differences were observed in DNA synthesis between the SMF exposed chondrocytes and the control chondrocytes; however, PG synthesis in SMF exposed chondrocytes increased compared to the controls. Based on these results, we suggest that while SMF exposure promoted the endochondral ossification of chondrocytes, it did not induce any harmful effects on fetal development in ICR mice. (author)

  12. Effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field on fetal development in ICR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Uchida, Soshi; Norimura, Toshiyuki [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field (SMF) on fetal development in mice, we evaluated fetal teratogenesis and endochondral ossification following exposure in utero. Pregnant ICR mice were exposed to a 4.7 T SMF from day 7.5 to 9.5 of gestation in a whole-body dose, and sacrificed on day 18.5 of gestation. We examined with incidence of prenatal death, external malformations and fetal skeletal malformations. There were no significant differences observed in the incidence of prenatal death and/or malformations between SMF-exposed mice and control mice. Further, we evaluated the immunoreactivity for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is implicated in angiogenesis and osteogenesis, in the sternum of fetal mice following magnetic exposure. Our studies also indicated that on day 16.5 of gestation following SMF exposure, the immunoreactivity for VEGF was increased compared to unexposed controls. However, it was decreased in the exposed group compared to the control group on day 18.5 of gestation. DNA and proteoglycan (PG) synthesis were also measured in rabbit costal growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. No significant differences were observed in DNA synthesis between the SMF exposed chondrocytes and the control chondrocytes; however, PG synthesis in SMF exposed chondrocytes increased compared to the controls. Based on these results, we suggest that while SMF exposure promoted the endochondral ossification of chondrocytes, it did not induce any harmful effects on fetal development in ICR mice. (author)

  13. The Effect of Sun Radiation on the Course of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abas Azarian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sStudies have described immunomedulatory effects of sun exposure and ultraviolet radiation on infectious and neoplastic diseases. Here the effect of exposure to low potency radiation of sun on the course of leishmaniasis in mice was studied. Materials and MethodsFifteen BALB/c mice were exposed to suberythemogenic doses of sun (mean 180 mJ/cm2/day of UVB 2 months before and 4 months after Leishmania major inoculation to food pad. Control group was kept in the sun protected environment. From 2nd to 17th week after inoculation, size of the lesion was recorded in each group weekly and at last week the parasite burden in spleen was detected. Results were compared between two groups. ResultsSeven mice from case group and 9 mice from control group survived up to last week. The mean lesion size was 0.90±0.59 cm in exposed and 4.01±3.59 cm in unexposed mice (P= 0.037. Parasite burden in spleen of case and control groups were 5.5±4.61 and 106.94±279.76 respectively (P= 0.006.ConclusionChronic exposure of BALB/c mice to suberythemogenic doses of sun suppressed skin lesion and decreased the extension of L. major to spleen.

  14. Investigation of radioprotective effects of aqueous extract of sauseurea obyallata on immune system of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guoliang; Li Wenhui; Guo Na; Hou Yu; Wang Chenghong; Li Tianqian; Yu Shuhui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radioprotective effects of test compound on immune system of mice from radiation injury. Methods: Immunologic function and general state of mice were shown by swimming experiment with the weighing of spleen, thymus and computing their indexs, hemolysin mensurate experiment and PHA stimulated lymphocyte transformation experiment. All mice were irradiated with 6 Gy and received the test compound by gavage for 14 days, 7 days before irradiation and 7 days after irradiation. All the indicators were measured according to established methods. The data went through Statistical analysis by spss11.5. Results: Irradiation has obvious influence on the immune function and systemic state of mice. In swimming experiment, mice in the treatment group swim longer than the model group, but is of no significant difference. The thymus indexes are higher in treatment groups than in model group, especially the HD group, compared with model group, the differences are obvious (P<0.05). There is no obvious difference between treatment groups and model group with OD value in hemolysin mensurate experiment. Conclusions: Aqueous Extract of Sauseurea Obyallata may have radioprotective effects on immune system of mice, which deserves further exploration in the compound preparing, analysis of Chemical Compositions and the dose and mode and the treatment duration of the compound. (authors)

  15. Differentially Severe Cognitive Effects of Compromised Cerebral Blood Flow in Aged Mice: Association with Myelin Degradation and Microglia Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Wolf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS models the effects of compromised cerebral blood flow on brain structure and function in mice. We compared the effects of BCAS in aged (21 month and young adult (3 month female mice, anticipating a differentially more severe effect in the older mice. Four weeks after surgery there was a significant age by time by treatment interaction on the radial-arm water maze (RAWM; p = 0.014: on the first day of the test, latencies of old mice were longer compared to the latencies of young adult mice, independent of BCAS. However, on the second day of the test, latencies of old BCAS mice were significantly longer than old control mice (p = 0.049, while latencies of old controls were similar to those of the young adult mice, indicating more severe impairment of hippocampal dependent learning and working memory by BCAS in the older mice. Fluorescence staining of myelin basic protein (MBP showed that old age and BCAS both induced a significant decrease in fluorescence intensity. Evaluation of the number oligodendrocyte precursor cells demonstrated augmented myelin replacement in old BCAS mice (p < 0.05 compared with young adult BCAS and old control mice. While microglia morphology was assessed as normal in young adult control and young adult BCAS mice, microglia of old BCAS mice exhibited striking activation in the area of degraded myelin compared to young adult BCAS (p < 0.01 and old control mice (p < 0.05. These findings show a differentially more severe effect of cerebral hypoperfusion on cognitive function, myelin integrity and inflammatory processes in aged mice. Hypoperfusion may exacerbate degradation initiated by aging, which may induce more severe neuronal and cognitive phenotypes.

  16. Effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Akbari Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: There is concern that leached components from dental composites may cause adverse changes in the reproductive health. This study aimed to assess the effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice.Materials and Methods: In the present animal study, twenty adult Syrian male mice were divided into two groups of 10 mice each. In the test group, components which leached from samples made from Filtek Z250 resin composite into 75% ethanol were daily administered to the mice for 28 days. In the control group, the procedure was repeated in the same way as the test group but without placing composite samples in the solution. Then, the body weight, weights of paired testes, Gonado Somatic Index, sperm viability, sperm motility, epididymal sperm reserve and daily sperm production were recorded. Four male mice in each group were mated with untreated female mice for 10 days. After that, the number of pregnant females and number of infants were recorded. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, Chi-square test and t-test.Results: There was a significant reduction in the sperm viability and sperm motility of male mice in the test group compared to the control group (P=0.001. There was no any significant differences in other parameters between two groups (P>0.05.Conclusion: This study showed that the leached components from resin composites cannot cause infertility but they could potentially cause some adverse effects on the reproductive system of male mice.

  17. Antagonistic effects of cadmium on lead accumulation in pregnant and non-pregnant mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Euan, E-mail: euan.smith@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Gancarz, Dorota; Rofe, Allan [Veterinary Services Division, Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Gilles Plains, SA 5086 (Australia); Kempson, Ivan M. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, 128 Academia Road, Section 2, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Weber, John; Juhasz, Albert L. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the exposure of pregnant and non-pregnant mice to cadmium (Cd) on lead (Pb) contaminated soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the changes in lead accumulation in mice due to the presence of cadmium in soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lead accumulation is higher in pregnant compared to non-pregnant mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium decreases lead accumulation in all mice irrespective of status. - Abstract: People are frequently exposed to combinations of contaminants but there is a paucity of data on the effects of mixed contaminants at low doses. This study investigated the influence of cadmium (Cd) on lead (Pb) accumulation in pregnant and non-pregnant mice following exposure to contaminated soil. Exposure to Pb from contaminated soils increased Pb accumulation in both pregnant and non-pregnant mice compared to unexposed control animals (pregnant and non-pregnant). Lead accumulation in the liver and kidneys of exposure pregnant mice (40 {+-} 15 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than concentrations detected in control pregnant mice (<1 mg Pb kg{sup -1}). The presence of Cd in contaminated soil had a major effect on the Pb and Fe accumulation in the kidneys and liver, respectively. This study shows that Pb uptake is mediated by the presence of Cd in the co-contaminated soil and demonstrates that further research is required to investigate the influence of co-contaminants on human exposure at sub-chronic concentrations.

  18. Protective effects of caffeoylxanthiazonoside isolated from fruits of Xanthium strumarium on sepsis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Li, Tie-Hua; Wu, Ben-Quan; Liu, Hui; Shi, Yun-Feng; Feng, Ding-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The fruit of Xanthium strumarium L. (Asteraceae) has been used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. This study investigates the protective effect of caffeoylxanthiazonoside (CYXD) isolated from fruits of X. strumarium on sepsis mice in vitro and in vivo. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) operation was used to establish the sepsis mice model, and sham mice were also performed. CYXD was administered by intraperitoneal injection (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg/d), then the survival rate was measured in 96 h. Additionally, sepsis mice were induced by injection LPS (2 mg/kg); CYXD was administered by intraperitoneal injection (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg/d), then mice were sacrificed, and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were determined by ELISA assay. Furthermore, the ability of CYXD to neutralize LPS was measured by using the LAL test, and expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 were determined by using real-time fluorogenic PCR. Results indicated that CYXD significantly elevated survival rates of sepsis mice induced by CLP (p < 0.05) with survival rates of 35%, 45%, and 65%. Furthermore, the LPS level was decreased obviously by CYXD (1, 2, and 4 mg/L) (p < 0.05). Additionally, CYXD (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) can not only significantly decrease TNF-α and IL-6 levels induced by LPS in mice's serum (p < 0.05), but also inhibit mRNA expressions of TNF-α and IL-6 induced by LPS in RAW 264.7 cells at doses of 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL (p < 0.05). Our study demonstrated that CYXD has significant protective effects on sepsis mice.

  19. Tissue distribution and effects of fasting and obesity on the ghrelin axis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morash, Michael G; Gagnon, Jeffrey; Nelson, Stephanie; Anini, Younes

    2010-08-09

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide hormone derived from the 117 amino acid proghrelin, following cleavage by proprotein convertase 1 (PC1). In this study, we comprehensively assessed the tissue distribution and the effect of fasting and obesity on preproghrelin, Exon-4D, PC1 and GOAT expression and proghrelin-derived peptide (PGDP) secretion. The stomach was the major source of preproghrelin expression and PDGPs, followed by the small intestine. The remaining peripheral tissues (including the brain and pancreas) contained negligible expression levels. We detected obestatin in all stomach proghrelin cells, however, 22% of proghrelin cells in the small intestine did not express obestatin. There were strain differences in ghrelin secretion in response to fasting between CD1 and C57BL/6 mice. After a 24 hour-fast, CD1 mice had increased plasma levels of total ghrelin and obestatin with no change in preproghrelin mRNA or PGDP tissues levels. C57BL/6 mice showed a different response to a 24 hour-fast having increased proghrelin mRNA expression, stomach acylated ghrelin peptide and no change in plasma obestatin in C57BL/6 mice. In obese mice (ob/ob and diet-induced obesity (DIO)) there was a significant increase in preproghrelin mRNA levels while tissue and plasma PGDP levels were significantly reduced. Fasting did not affect PGDP in obese mice. Obese models displayed differences in GOAT expression, which was elevated in DIO mice, but reduced in ob/ob mice. We did not find co-localization of the leptin receptor in ghrelin expressing stomach cells, ruling out a direct effect of leptin on stomach ghrelin synthesis and secretion. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of infrared radiation A on photoaged hairless mice harboring eumelanin and pheomelanin in the epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Shizuka; Funasaka, Yoko; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Kawana, Seiji; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2015-04-01

    Infrared radiation A (IRA) is absorbed by melanin and generates heat. Therefore, the effect of IRA could be well analyzed using skin, which contains melanin in the epidermis. Hairless mice harboring epidermal melanocytes that produce eumelanin, pheomelanin, or non-melanin were generated by backcrossing K14-stem cell factor mice, recessive yellow mice, and then albino hairless mice. High-dose IRA was irradiated over 18 weeks after the establishment of photoaged mice by irradiation with ultraviolet B (UVB) three times a week for 14 weeks. Tumor formation was assessed every week. The formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer and apoptotic cells by the irradiation of IRA and UVB was evaluated. Repetitive irradiation of IRA did not promote tumor formation in all types of mice. Pre-irradiation of IRA to UVB, but not post-irradiation, accelerated the elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and enhanced apoptosis; these effects were most obvious in eumelanin-producing mice. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulation of FLICE (cellular caspase 8)-like inhibitory protein and B-cell lymphoma-extra large and upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein by UVB, but further enhancement of these molecules by pre-irradiation of IRA was not observed. These results indicate that IRA does not confer the promotion of UVB-induced carcinogenesis in photoaged mice harboring epidermal melanocytes and that photochemical reaction between IRA and melanin might be involved in the induction of apoptosis and the elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by UVB. The enhancement of apoptosis by pre-irradiation of IRA to UVB might be induced by mechanisms other than the modification of the mRNA expression of FLICE (cellular caspase 8)-like inhibitory protein, B-cell lymphoma-extra large, and Bcl-2-associated X. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. The Effect of Minimum Wages on Adolescent Fertility: A Nationwide Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinger, Lindsey Rose

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effect of minimum wage laws on adolescent birth rates in the United States. I used a difference-in-differences approach and vital statistics data measured quarterly at the state level from 2003 to 2014. All models included state covariates, state and quarter-year fixed effects, and state-specific quarter-year nonlinear time trends, which provided plausibly causal estimates of the effect of minimum wage on adolescent birth rates. A $1 increase in minimum wage reduces adolescent birth rates by about 2%. The effects are driven by non-Hispanic White and Hispanic adolescents. Nationwide, increasing minimum wages by $1 would likely result in roughly 5000 fewer adolescent births annually.

  2. Effects of slightly acidic electrolysed drinking water on mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshiko; Obata, Takahiro; Kawagoe, Masami; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Sato, Masayoshi; Toida, Kazumi; Kushima, Hidemi; Matsuda, Yukihisa

    2011-10-01

    Slightly acidic electrolysed (SAE) water is a sanitizer with strong bactericidal activity due to hypochlorous acid. We assessed the safety of SAE water as drinking water for mice at a 5 ppm total residual chlorine (TRC) concentration to examine the possibility of SAE water as a labour- and energy-saving alternative to sterile water. We provided SAE water or sterile water to mice for 12 weeks, during which time we recorded changes in body weight and weekly water and food intakes. At the end of the experiment, all of the subject animals were sacrificed to assess serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine levels and to examine the main organs histopathologically under a light microscope. In addition, we investigated the bacteria levels of both types of water. We found no difference in functional and morphological health condition indices between the groups. Compared with sterile water, SAE water had a relatively higher ability to suppress bacterial growth. We suggest that SAE water at 5 ppm TRC is a safe and useful alternative to sterile water for use as drinking water in laboratory animal facilities.

  3. Professionals' perceptions of the effect of pornography on Swedish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattebo, Magdalena; Larsson, Margareta; Tydén, Tanja; Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    The aims were to gain a deeper understanding of how personnel, who work with adolescents, reason about the effect of pornography and its spread in the media, and to explore how well prepared they consider themselves to be in addressing sexual health and gender equality. An inductive, exploratory, qualitative study with focus group discussions was selected. Seventeen participants with different professions were invited into five heterogeneous groups. Data were analyzed according to grounded theory. Conflicting messages about sexuality became the core category. Participants were of the opinion that pornography conveyed a contradictory message compared with national public health goals, societal laws, and regulations. They believed that young people use pornography as a source of information and stimulation. Furthermore, they thought that pornography contributed to norm-creating ideals and a demanding sexuality, thus, confirming the traditional gender order. The participants opined that a professional approach was required when addressing sexuality and gender equality issues and requested better training tools and more cultural competence. Professionals working with adolescents perceived that pornography conveys a conflicting message about sexuality. They expressed a need for adequate tools for improving education on health and sexuality, including gender equality aspects and critical media analysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anti-tumor effect of total body irradiation of low doses on WHT/Ht mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Miyako; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1987-01-01

    The effect of low dose (0.05 - 1.0 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) on non-tumor bearing and tumor bearing mice were investigated. Mice received TBI of 0.1 Gy during 6 - 12 hours before tumor cell inoculation demonstrated to need larger number of tumor cells (approximately 2.5 times) for 50 per cent tumor incidence, compared to recipient mice not to receive TBI. On the other hand, in tumor bearing mice given 0.1 Gy of TBI only tumor cell killing effect was not detected, however enhancement of tumor cell killing effect and prolonged growth delay were observed when tumor bearing mice were treated with 0.1 Gy of TBI in combined with local irradiation on tumors, especially cell killing effect was remarkable in dose range over 6 Gy of local exposure. The mechanism of the effect of 0.1 Gy TBI is considered to be host mediated reactions from the other our experimental results. (author)

  5. Enhancement of radioprotective effectiveness of adenosine monophosphate by magnesium aspartate in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Netikova, J.; Kozubik, A.; Chertkov, K.S.; Ministry of Health, Moscow

    1988-01-01

    The enhancing effect of magnesium aspartate on the radioprotective effectiveness of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) administered to whole-body gamma-irradiated mice was studied. Male (CBA x C57BL/10)F 1 hybrid mice of a mean body weight of 32 g were used. 5 mg AMP per mouse was injected i.p. 15 min before and 15 min after irradiation; magnesium aspartate (13.3 mg per mouse) was administered s.c. 35 min before irradiation. The benefical effect of the drug combination used was manifested when investigating hematological indices at the recovery phase of sublethally irradiated animals, as well as when observing the survival of lethally irradiated mice. The synergistic radioprotective effects of AMP and magnesium aspartate are explained by the stimulatory action of both these compounds on the cell adenylate cyclase system. (author)

  6. Adrenaline and serotonin therapeutic effect on the hemopoietic system of irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, I.B.; Dontsova, G.V.; Rakhmanina, O.N.; Konstantinova, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Post-irradiation effect of adrenaline and serotonin on the hemopoietic system of irradiated mice has been studied. The pharmaceuticals were injected subcutaneously 15 minutes before the X-radiation exposure at a dose of 7 Gy or immediately after it. The degree of radiation injury has been estimated from 30-day survival fraction of the animals, cell state of the bone marrow, mass of spleen, cfu quantity in the bone marrow at exo- and endocolonial growth (following implantation of bone marrow cells from mice that had been injected with these drugs to irradiated recipients). Post-irradiation effect of adrenaline turned to be weaker than that of serotonin, the latter increasing the survival rate of irradiated mice to 50%. It is stated that post-irradiation therapeutic effect of adrenaline and serotonin expressed in acceleration of the irradiated hemopoietic tissue repair can be realized under direct effect of drugs on the viable hemopoietic cells, probably, by enchancement of their proliferation

  7. Biological Effect of Ganoderma lucidum in Mice Suffering from Ehrlich Carcinoma and Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahim, Th.M.; Sherif, N.H.; Abd El-Azime, A.Sh.

    2013-01-01

    The popular edible mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been widely used for the general promotion of health and longevity in oriental countries. The present study was performed to investigate the antitumor effect of G. lucidum on Ehrlich carcinoma (EC) cells and/or gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress, kidney dysfunction and histopathological changes in the albino mouse. G. lucidum was orally administered via gavages to mice for a period of 3 weeks at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight begins on the 10th day of tumor inoculation. Animals were exposed to 4 Gy whole body γ radiation after 2 weeks of tumor inoculation. The antitumor effect of G. lucidum was evident in terms of a reduction in tumor viable cells count, inhibited both weight loss and tumor growth rate of EC-tumor bearing mice alone and in combination with gamma-radiation. Inoculation of mice with EC cells resulted in biochemical and histopathological changes leading to kidney damage. Oral administration of G. lucidum improved kidney functions through a recovery of the elevated levels of serum urea, creatinine, uric acid and increased albumin level and decreased the levels of tumor markers. Also, treatment of mice with G. lucidum induced a reduction of lipid peroxidation (MDA) level, improvement in glutathione content (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the kidney compared with those EC and /or irradiated damaged mice. On the other hand, treatment EC bearing mice with gamma radiation or G. lucidum combined showed increase in MDA level and decrease in GSH content and SOD activity, as compared to EC bearing mice. Histopathological studies showed that suffering from EC caused fatty degeneration, presence of necrosis and enlargement of kidney cells nuclei. Furthermore, an elevation of tail DNA % was recorded in the tumor tissue of mice treated with G. lucidum and/or γ radiation compared to EC control group. Treatment of EC bearing mice with G. lucidum and/or γ radiation exhibited

  8. Protective effect of intermittent fasting on the mortality of gamma-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubik, A.; Pospisil, M.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of 1 to 6 weeks' adaptation to intermittent fasting (alternating periods of 24 h fasting and subsequent 24 h feeding) on the manifestations of radioresistance of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation was studied. A favourable effect of this feeding regimen on the survival of irradiated animals was observed. The optimal redioprotective effect was achieved in mice adapted to intermittent fasting for 2 to 3 weeks and irradiated after 24 h of food intake. Furthermore, it was shown that the radioresistance of the adapted organism depends on the momentary state of food intake. After renewal of the normal ad libitum feeding the adaptively induced radioresistance decreases. (orig.) [de

  9. Protective effect of intermittent fasting on the mortality of gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubik, A.; Pospisil, M.

    1982-12-01

    The effect of 1 to 6 weeks' adaptation to intermittent fasting (alternating periods of 24 h fasting and subsequent 24 h feeding) on the manifestations of radioresistance of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation was studied. A favourable effect of this feeding regimen on the survival of irradiated animals was observed. The optimal redioprotective effect was achieved in mice adapted to intermittent fasting for 2 to 3 weeks and irradiated after 24 h of food intake. Furthermore, it was shown that the radioresistance of the adapted organism depends on the momentary state of food intake. After renewal of the normal ad libitum feeding the adaptively induced radioresistance decreases.

  10. Protective effect of intermittent fasting on the mortality of gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubik, A; Pospisil, M

    1982-12-01

    The effect of 1 to 6 weeks' adaptation to intermittent fasting (alternating periods of 24 h fasting and subsequent 24 h feeding) on the manifestations of radioresistance of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation was studied. A favourable effect of this feeding regimen on the survival of irradiated animals was observed. The optimal redioprotective effect was achieved in mice adapted to intermittent fasting for 2 to 3 weeks and irradiated after 24 h of food intake. Furthermore, it was shown that the radioresistance of the adapted organism depends on the momentary state of food intake. After renewal of the normal ad libitum feeding the adaptively induced radioresistance decreases.

  11. The Unexpected Effects of Beneficial and Adverse Social Experiences during Adolescence on Anxiety and Aggression and Their Modulation by Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Neele; Richter, S. Helene; Schreiber, Rebecca S.; Kloke, Vanessa; Kaiser, Sylvia; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Sachser, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and aggression are part of the behavioral repertoire of humans and animals. However, in their exaggerated form both can become maladaptive and result in psychiatric disorders. On the one hand, genetic predisposition has been shown to play a crucial modulatory role in anxiety and aggression. On the other hand, social experiences have been implicated in the modulation of these traits. However, so far, mainly experiences in early life phases have been considered crucial for shaping anxiety-like and aggressive behavior, while the phase of adolescence has largely been neglected. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate how levels of anxiety-like and aggressive behavior are shaped by social experiences during adolescence and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genotype. For this purpose, male mice of a 5-HTT knockout mouse model including all three genotypes (wildtype, heterozygous and homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice) were either exposed to an adverse social situation or a beneficial social environment during adolescence. This was accomplished in a custom-made cage system where mice experiencing the adverse environment were repeatedly introduced to the territory of a dominant opponent but had the possibility to escape to a refuge cage. Mice encountering beneficial social conditions had free access to a female mating partner. Afterwards, anxiety-like and aggressive behavior was assessed in a battery of tests. Surprisingly, unfavorable conditions during adolescence led to a decrease in anxiety-like behavior and an increase in exploratory locomotion. Additionally, aggressive behavior was augmented in animals that experienced social adversity. Concerning genotype, homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice were more anxious and less aggressive than heterozygous 5-HTT knockout and wildtype mice. In summary, adolescence is clearly an important phase in which anxiety-like and aggressive behavior can be shaped. Furthermore, it seems that having to cope with challenge during

  12. The unexpected effects of beneficial and adverse social experiences during adolescence on anxiety and aggression and their modulation by genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neele eMeyer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and aggression are part of the behavioral repertoire of humans and animals. However, in their exaggerated form both can become maladaptive and result in psychiatric disorders. On the one hand, genetic predisposition has been shown to play a crucial modulatory role in anxiety and aggression. On the other hand, social experiences have been implicated in the modulation of these traits. However, so far, mainly experiences in early life phases have been considered crucial for shaping anxiety-like and aggressive behavior while the phase of adolescence has mainly been neglected. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate how levels of anxiety-like and aggressive behavior are shaped by social experiences during adolescence and serotonin transporter (5-HTT genotype. For this purpose, male mice of a 5-HTT knockout mouse model including all three genotypes (wildtype, heterozygous and homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice were either exposed to an adverse social situation or a beneficial social environment during adolescence. This was accomplished in a custom-made cage system where mice experiencing the adverse environment were repeatedly introduced to the territory of a dominant opponent but had the possibility to escape to a refuge cage. Mice encountering beneficial social conditions had free access to a female mating partner. Afterwards, anxiety-like and aggressive behavior was assessed in a battery of tests. Surprisingly, unfavorable conditions during adolescence led to a decrease in anxiety-like behavior and an increase in exploratory locomotion. Additionally, aggressive behavior was augmented in animals that experienced social adversity. Concerning genotype, homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice were more anxious and less aggressive than heterozygous 5-HTT knockout and wildtype mice. In summary, adolescence is clearly an important phase in which anxiety-like and aggressive behavior can be shaped. Furthermore, it seems that having to cope with

  13. Effects of Bifidobacterium Breve Feeding Strategy and Delivery Modes on Experimental Allergic Rhinitis Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-jun Ren

    Full Text Available Different delivery modes may affect the susceptibility to allergic diseases. It is still unknown whether early intervention with probiotics would counteract this effect.The effect of different delivery modes on immune status and nasal symptoms was investigated on established allergic rhinitis (AR mouse model. In addition, the immunoregulatory effects and mechanisms of different feeding manners with Bifidobacterium breve(B. breve were examined.Live lyophilized B. breve was orally administered to BALB/c mice born via vaginal delivery(VD or cesarean delivery (CD for 8 consecutive weeks, after which they were sensitized by ovalbumin(OVA to establish experimental AR. Nasal symptoms, serum immunoglobulins, cytokines, splenic percentages of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T(Treg cells and nasal eosinophil infiltration were evaluated.Compared with VD mice, mice delivered via CD demonstrated more serious nasal symptoms, higher concentrations of OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig E, more nasal eosinophils and lower percentages of splenic CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+Treg cells after establishing experimental AR. These parameters were reversed by administering B. breves hortly after birth. However, the effect of B. breve did not differ between different delivery modes.CD aggravates the nasal symptoms of AR mice compared to VD. This is the first report that oral administration of B. breve shortly after birth can significantly alleviate the symptoms of AR mice born via both deliveries, probably via activation of the regulatory capacity of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+Treg cells.

  14. Effects of Bifidobacterium Breve Feeding Strategy and Delivery Modes on Experimental Allergic Rhinitis Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-jun; Yu, Zhao; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lv, Dan; Hung, Shi; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Ping; Liu, Shi-Xi; Zhang, Nan; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Different delivery modes may affect the susceptibility to allergic diseases. It is still unknown whether early intervention with probiotics would counteract this effect. The effect of different delivery modes on immune status and nasal symptoms was investigated on established allergic rhinitis (AR) mouse model. In addition, the immunoregulatory effects and mechanisms of different feeding manners with Bifidobacterium breve(B. breve) were examined. Live lyophilized B. breve was orally administered to BALB/c mice born via vaginal delivery(VD) or cesarean delivery (CD) for 8 consecutive weeks, after which they were sensitized by ovalbumin(OVA) to establish experimental AR. Nasal symptoms, serum immunoglobulins, cytokines, splenic percentages of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T(Treg) cells and nasal eosinophil infiltration were evaluated. Compared with VD mice, mice delivered via CD demonstrated more serious nasal symptoms, higher concentrations of OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E, more nasal eosinophils and lower percentages of splenic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg cells after establishing experimental AR. These parameters were reversed by administering B. breves hortly after birth. However, the effect of B. breve did not differ between different delivery modes. CD aggravates the nasal symptoms of AR mice compared to VD. This is the first report that oral administration of B. breve shortly after birth can significantly alleviate the symptoms of AR mice born via both deliveries, probably via activation of the regulatory capacity of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg cells.

  15. Metabolic effect of obesity on polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescents: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Feng, Qiong; Ye, Ming; He, Yaojuan; Yao, Aling; Shi, Kun

    2017-11-01

    This meta-analysis provides an updated and comprehensive estimate of the effects of obesity on metabolic disorders in adolescent polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Relevant articles consistent with the search terms published up to 31 January 2014 were retrieved from PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CENTRAL. Thirteen articles (16 independent studies) conformed to the inclusion criteria. The evaluated outcomes were the metabolic parameters of obese adolescents with PCOS (case group) relative to normal-weight adolescents with PCOS, or obese adolescents without PCOS. Compared with normal-weight adolescents with PCOS, the case group had significantly lower sex hormone-binding globulin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significantly higher triglycerides, leptin, fasting insulin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and free testosterone levels. Relative to obese adolescents without PCOS, the case group had significantly higher fasting insulin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, free testosterone levels and 2-h glucose during the oral glucose tolerance test. These results indicate that metabolic disorders in adolescent PCOS are worsened by concomitant obesity. This study highlights the importance of preventing obesity during the management of adolescent PCOS. Impact statement What is already known about this subject: Obesity and PCOS share many of the same metabolic disorders, for example, hyperandrogenism and hyperinsulinemia with subsequent insulin resistance. Knowledge regarding metabolic features in obese adolescents with PCOS is limited, and there is concern whether obesity and PCOS are related. What do the results of this study add: Relative to PCOS adolescents of normal weight, obese adolescents with PCOS (the case group) had significantly lower SHBG and HDL-C, and significantly higher triglycerides, leptin, fasting insulin, LDL-C and free testosterone levels. The results indicate that metabolic disorders in adolescent PCOS are worsened by concomitant

  16. Positive and Negative Affect and Adolescent Adjustment: Moderation Effects of Prefrontal Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieant, Alexis; Holmes, Christopher J; Maciejewski, Dominique; Lee, Jacob; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; King-Casas, Brooks; Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen

    2018-03-01

    We examined whether cognitive control moderates the effects of emotion on adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptomatology in a longitudinal study of 138 adolescents. Self-reported positive affect (PA) and negative affect and behavioral and neural indicators of cognitive control, indexed by performance and prefrontal hemodynamic response during a cognitive interference task, were collected at Time 1. Self-reported internalizing and externalizing symptomatology were collected at Time 1 and Time 2 (1 year later). Results indicated that higher PA predicted decreases in externalizing symptomatology, but only for adolescents with poor neural cognitive control. No moderation effects were found for behavioral cognitive control. Findings imply the beneficial effects of PA on the development of externalizing problems among adolescents with poor prefrontal functioning. © 2018 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  17. Effects of noise pollution stress during pregnancy on anatomical and functional brain cortex development of the offsprings of NMRI mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bijani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Effects of stress on changes in neural system activity is well defined, which might be because of the changes in brain cortex architecture. In the present study, the effects of maternal noise stress on the morphological and functional changes in brain cortex of off springs of NMRI mice were examined.Materials and Methods: Female pregnant mice divided into two groups. Control group was maintained in their home cages without any invasion but the experimental group was exposed to the noise stress (80 db for 5 min/day from day zero of pregnancy to day 14 (i.e. 15 days. After delivery, six pups from each group were killed and their brains were fixed, sectioned and stained in H&E. These sections were investigated by MOTIC software for both control and experimental groups. Other pups were nursed by their mothers until their adolescence (22 g-8 weeks old. Then they were examined for behavioral side-biased and locomotor activity tests.Results: Decrease in cortex diameter and diameter of each layer for the experimental group was observed. In addition, neuron counting in each layer indicated that the number of the neurons in the middle and outer layers of cortex for the experimental group was reduced than the control group. In contrast, the number of the neurons in the inner layer of the experimental group was increased. From the functional view, in experimental group increases in left-handness especially in female off springs were observed. Furthermore, spontaneous locomotor activity in the new environment was increased in the experimental group.Conclusion: These results indicated that neuronal immigration and network connections in the inner layer of cortex through the middle and outer layers in the experimental group were inhibited. In other word, noise stress was able to inhibit brain cortex development in next generation

  18. Effect of a Hippotherapy Intervention Program on Static Balance and Strength in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Arabatzi, Fotini; Dipla, Konstantina; Liga, Maria; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a hippotherapy program on static balance and strength in adolescents with intellectual disability (ID). Nineteen adolescents with moderate ID were assigned either an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 9). The experimental group attended a 10-week hippotherapy program. To assess…

  19. Differential effects of online insomnia treatment on executive functions in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.J.; Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.; Oort, F.J.; Bögels, S.M.; Meijer, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of online Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBTI) on adolescents' sleep and cognitive functioning. Methods: 32 adolescents (13-19 years, M = 15.9, SD = 1.6) with DSM-5 insomnia disorder, were randomly assigned to a treatment group (n = 18) or a waiting list

  20. The Effect of Recreational Activities on Self-Esteem Development of Girls in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayazit, Betül

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of recreational activities on self-esteem development of girls in adolescence. For this purpose, a total of 20 girls in adolescence period took part in the present study. Recreational activities program included bowling, patenga, orienteering, basketball, volleyball, badminton, ping-pong, dance, fun…

  1. Effects of Learning about Gender Discrimination on Adolescent Girls' Attitudes toward and Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgram, Erica S.; Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2007-01-01

    Gender discrimination has contributed to the gender imbalance in scientific fields. However, research on the effects of informing adolescent girls about gender discrimination in these fields is rare and controversial. To examine the consequences of learning about gender-based occupational discrimination, adolescent girls (n= 158, ages 11 to 14)…

  2. Engaging Adolescents in Politics: The Longitudinal Effect of Political Socialization Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintelier, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a political socialization perspective, this study examined the development of political participation during adolescence and early adulthood. We explore the effect of parents, peers, school media, and voluntary associations on political participation. Self-reported data were collected from 3,025 Belgian adolescents at three points in…

  3. The Play Factor: Effect of Social Skills Group Play Therapy on Adolescent African-American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earls, Melissa K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Social Skills Group Play Therapy on remedying the social skills deficits of adolescent African-American males. Additionally, the study investigated whether age and grade level impacted the outcome of the intervention. The participants were adolescent African-American males ages 10 to…

  4. Effects of the Spock Videogame on Improving Emotional Intelligence in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejudo, Javier; Latorre, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present research is to experimentally assess the effects of a videogame program ("Spock") for improving emotional intelligence (EI) as an ability among a sample of adolescents. Method: The sample was made up of 92 adolescents, aged 17 to 19, who were currently studying the second year of…

  5. Social support moderates the effects of stress on sleep in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schalkwijk, Frank J; Blessinga, Agaath N; Willemen, Agnes M; Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Schuengel, Carlo

    Academic expectations and demands become primary sources of stress during adolescence, negatively affecting sleep. To cope with stress, adolescents may turn to social support figures. The present study tested the extent of main and moderating effects of various sources of social support on the

  6. Effects of Positive Affect on Risk Perceptions in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Claudia M.; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Affective influences may play a key role in adolescent risk taking, but have rarely been studied. Using an audiovisual method of affect induction, two experimental studies examined the effect of positive affect on risk perceptions in adolescence and young adulthood. Outcomes were risk perceptions regarding drinking alcohol, smoking a cigarette,…

  7. Effects of Childhood Aggression on Parenting during Adolescence: The Role of Parental Psychological Need Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Amaranta D.; Soenens, Bart; Dekovic, Maja; Prinzie, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the explanatory role of satisfaction of parental psychological needs in effects of childhood aggression on various adolescent-perceived parenting behaviors in middle adolescence. Research questions were examined in a large multi-informant, prospective community study of ethnic majority Belgian families…

  8. The Initiation of Dating in Adolescence : The Effect of Parental Divorce. The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, Katya; Mills, Melinda; Veenstra, Rene

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of parental divorce on the time it took adolescents to initiate their first romantic relationships. Individual differences in temperament and pubertal development and the age of the adolescent at the time of divorce were also taken into account. Hypotheses were tested

  9. Effectiveness of a Computerised Working Memory Training in Adolescents with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Van Luit, J. E. H.; Van der Molen, M. W.; Klugkist, I.; Jongmans, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised working memory (WM) training on memory, response inhibition, fluid intelligence, scholastic abilities and the recall of stories in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities attending special education. Method: A total of 95 adolescents with…

  10. The Effect of Friendship Skills Training on Friendship Quality and Subjective Well-Being of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çekiç, Ali; Kul, Aykut; Çetin, Aysenur; Cihangiroglu, Ümmügülsüm

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effects of friendship skills training on the quality of friendship and subjective well-being of adolescents. In order to determine the experimental and control groups, the Friendship Quality Scale and the Adolescent Subjective Well-Being Scale were administered to 311 students in 9th, 10th and 11th grade classes from…

  11. Suppressor Effects in Coping Research with African American Adolescents from Low-Income Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord-Harden, Noni K.; Cunningham, Jamila A.; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Grant, Kathryn E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current study was to demonstrate the replicable nature of statistical suppressor effects in coping research through 2 examples with African American adolescents from low-income communities. Method: Participants in the 1st example included 497 African American adolescents (mean age = 12.61 years, SD = 0.99; 57% female)…

  12. Dispositional Mindfulness Moderates the Effects of Stress among Adolescents: Rumination as a Mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, Jeffrey A.; Reilly, Laura C.; Dickson, Kelsey S.; Emanuel, Amber S.; Updegraff, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that higher levels of mindfulness are associated with greater psychological and physical health. However, the majority of this research has been conducted with adults; research is only beginning to examine the effects of mindfulness among adolescents. Further, research into adolescent mindfulness has typically…

  13. The Effects of Family Structure on African American Adolescents' Marijuana Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandara, Jelani; Rogers, Sheba Y.; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between family structure and marijuana use throughout adolescence was assessed among 1,069 African Americans from the NLSY. A model was also tested suggesting that the effects of family structure on marijuana use would be mediated by poverty, neighborhood quality, and adolescents' self-control. As most prior studies have found,…

  14. The Initiation of Dating in Adolescence: The Effect of Parental Divorce. The TRAILS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Katya; Mills, Melinda; Veenstra, Rene

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of parental divorce on the time it took adolescents to initiate their first romantic relationships. Individual differences in temperament and pubertal development and the age of the adolescent at the time of divorce were also taken into account. Hypotheses were tested using event history analysis with a sample of…

  15. Direct Clinical Health Effects of the Consumption of Alcohol Mixed With Energy Drink in Dutch Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Karin; Van Hoof, Joris J.; van der Lely, Nicolaas

    2018-01-01

    The direct clinical health effects of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) consumption are largely unknown. Using data from a nationwide questionnaire, two groups were compared: adolescents who consumed an energy drink at the event (ED+) and adolescents who did not (ED–). Blood alcohol

  16. Materialistic Values among Chinese Adolescents: Effects of Parental Rejection and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinyuan; Kou, Yu; Yang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background: Materialistic values among today's adolescents have been a concern around the world, yet few studies concerning Chinese adolescents' materialistic values have been conducted. Additionally, the joint effects of parental rejection and self-esteem on materialistic values remain unclear. Objective: We examined materialistic values in a…

  17. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  18. Effect of Major Depression on the Self-Image of Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Veijo; Laukkanen, Eila; Peiponen, Sirkka; Lehtonen, Johannes; Viinamaki, Heimo

    2001-01-01

    Studied the specific impact of major depressive disorder (MDD) on the self-image of adolescent boys and girls seeking outpatient treatment. Compared 68 adolescents with MDD and 39 with no psychiatric illness. Self-image among MDD patients was in general poorer than in the comparison group. The effect of MDD was more negative for girls than boys,…

  19. School-Based Drug Prevention among At-Risk Adolescents: Effects of ALERT Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshore, Douglas; Ellickson, Phyllis L.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; St. Clair, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    In a recent randomized field trial, Ellickson et al. found the Project ALERT drug prevention curriculum curbed alcohol misuse and tobacco and marijuana use among eighth-grade adolescents. This article reports effects among ninth-grade at-risk adolescents. Comparisons between at-risk girls in ALERT Plus schools (basic curriculum extended to ninth…

  20. Alcohol use in adolescence : A longitudinal study of its effect on cognitive functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelema, Sarai

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the adolescent brain is particularly vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of alcohol because significant maturation of brain structure and corresponding cognitive control function takes place over the course of adolescence. However, research on this subject has remained

  1. The Effects of a Summary Writing Strategy on the Literacy Skills of Adolescents with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaro-Saddler, Kristie; Muir-Knox, Haley; Meredith, Holly

    2018-01-01

    Many adolescents, particularly adolescents with disabilities, have difficulty with literacy tasks such as reading and writing. Yet research has found that when students with disabilities receive appropriate instruction, they typically are able to improve their overall writing outcomes. This study explored the effectiveness of a summary writing…

  2. The effectiveness of mindfulness training on behavioral problems and attentional functioning in adolescents with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weijer-Bergsma, E.; Formsma, A.R.; de Bruin, E.I.; Bögels, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness training for adolescents aged 11-15 years with ADHD and parallel Mindful Parenting training for their parents was evaluated, using questionnaires as well as computerized attention tests. Adolescents (N = 10), their parents (N = 19) and tutors (N = 7)

  3. Effect of single and fractionated x-irradiation on maze learning ability of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Isao

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-six-day-old male ddk mice at the starting of the investigation were used as subjects through the experiment for 64 weeks. After 15 days' preliminary training, and 16 times of weekly trial training using complete maze, 15 mice received a single 224 rads of x-rays (S group), another 15 mice received two 112 rads spaced two weeks apart (F group) and another 15 mice were sham-irradiated (Control group). Then those mice were tested on the multiple T-maze with nine-choice points and change of performance was observed in terms of errorchoices by giving one test trial a week. We introduced the concept of ''confusional trials'' as an index for surmising to what extent mice failed to exhibit good maze learning habits. In the results, the F group showed significantly worse performance than the two other groups at early stages, opposite to it the S group exhibited the same, but at late stages after irradiation. The worse performance of F group should be considered to be due to the psychological after-effect to fractionated irradiation and that for S group could be assumed to be due to the acceleration of aging by the irradiation. (auth.)

  4. Increasing the effectiveness of intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice: a neurosurgical point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathon, Bertrand; Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Le Duigou, Caroline; Clemenceau, Stéphane; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral injections of tracers or viral constructs in rodents are now commonly used in the neurosciences and must be executed perfectly. The purpose of this article is to update existing protocols for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice. Our procedure for stereotaxic injections in adult mice allows the investigator to improve the effectiveness and safety, and save time. Furthermore, for the first time, we describe a two-handed procedure for intracerebral injections in neonatal mice that can be performed by a single operator in a very short time. Our technique using the stereotaxic arm allows a higher precision than freehand techniques previously described. Stereotaxic injections in adult mice can be performed in 20 min and have >90% efficacy in targeting the injection site. Injections in neonatal mice can be performed in 5 min. Efficacy depends on the difficulty of precisely localizing the injection sites, due to the small size of the animal. We describe an innovative, effortless, and reproducible surgical protocol for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice.

  5. The carcinogenic effects of fetal and postnatal radiation in female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko; Yoshizawa, Yasuo

    1982-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the carcinogenic effects of fetal and postnatal irradiation in female mice. The C57BL/6J mice were subjected to whole-body exposure to 1-Gy or 4-Gy 137 Cs γ-ray irradiation on the 15th fetal day or the 30th postnatal day. Following this, all mice were observed throughout their respective life spans under conventional rearing conditions. The tumor incidence rate, average latent period and distributions of various tumors were used as the quantitative parameters of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The following conclusions can be draw: (1) The mean life span of mice that underwent 4-Gy irradiation at the age of 30 days was shorter than that of non-irradiated control mice. (2) In control mice, the tumor incidence was 75.7%. (3) In order to estimate the mean age and tumor incidence, an adjustment for competing death is necessary. (4) The adjusted tumor incidences of thymic lymphoma and breast tumor of the irradiated groups were not different from those of control group. On the other hand, there was a significant difference between the two in the adjusted incidence of reticular tissue neoplasm. (author)

  6. The early effects in the brain after irradiation with carbon ions using mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Saori; Ohba, Yoshihito; Uzawa, Akiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Koike, Sachiko; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated both early and late effects in the brain after irradiation with carbon ions using mice. The irradiation dose was set at level known to produce vascular change followed by necrosis, which appeared the late period after irradiation with 30 Gy. The whole of brain was irradiated, excluding eyes and brain stem. The mice irradiated with single dose of 30 Gy showed deficit in short-term working memory assessed at 36 hr after irradiation, whereas mice receiving carbon irradiation showed no deficit in long-term reference memory. At 16 weeks after irradiation, the irradiated mice showed marked learning impairment compared with age-matched controls and the irradiated mice showed substantial impairment of working memory. Histopathological observation revealed no abnormal finding in the irradiated brain at 36 hr after irradiation, although irradiated mice showed marked neuronal degeneration at the hippocampus within CA1 to CA3 layers at 16 weeks after irradiation. In the irradiated group, neuronal cells in the hippocampal CA1-3 areas were reduced by 30-49%. These results suggest that although irradiation-induced hippocampal degeneration is associated with learning disability, cognitive deficits may also be detected on the early stage, not associated with hippocampal degeneration. (author)

  7. Intestinal epithelial cell surface glycosylation in mice. I. Effect of high-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R; Jaswal, V M; Meenu Mahmood, A

    1992-01-01

    The effects of variation in dietary protein content have been investigated on brush border glycosylation and enzyme activities in mice small intestine. The comparison of different parameters was made between the mice fed 30% (high protein, HP) and 18% protein (pair-fed, PF, and ad libitum-fed) for 21 days. The activities of brush border sucrase, lactase, p-nitrophenyl (PNP)-beta-D-glucosidase and PNP-beta-D-galactosidase were reduced in the HP diet-fed mice compared to PF and ad libitum-fed controls. Alkaline phosphatase and leucine amino-peptidase activities were significantly enhanced while gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was unaltered under these conditions. Total hexoses and sialic acid content in the brush borders were reduced significantly in the test group compared to the controls while hexosamine and fucose contents remained essentially similar in different groups. The results on the binding of wheat germ agglutinin and Ulex europaeus agglutininI to microvillus membranes corroborated the chemical analysis data on sialic acid and fucose contents of the membranes. Peanut agglutinin binding was enhanced in mice from the HP group. Incorporation of (14C)-mannose into membranes was significantly less in HP diet-fed mice. These results indicate that the feeding of HP diet to mice brings about marked alterations in small intestinal epithelial cell surface glycosylation and enzyme functions.

  8. Effect of ketamine on exploratory behaviour in BALB/C and C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akillioglu, Kubra; Melik, Emine Babar; Melik, Enver; Boga, Ayper

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of ketamine on exploratory locomotion behaviours in the Balb/c and C57BL/6 strains of mice, which differ in their locomotion behaviours. Intraperitoneal administration of ketamine at three different doses (1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, 0.1 ml/10 gr body weight) was performed on adult male Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice. The same volume of saline was applied to the control group. The open-field and elevated plus maze apparatus were used to evaluate exploratory locomotion. In the open-field test, Balb/c mice less spend time in the centre of the field and was decreased locomotor activity compared to C57BL/6 mice (pmice at 10 mg/kg dose caused an increase in locomotor activity and an increase in the amount of time spent in the centre in the open-field test, compared to the control group (pmice, ketamine treatment (1 and 10 mg/kg) decreased locomotor activity (pmice, the three different doses of ketamine application each caused a decrease in the frequency of centre crossing (pmice compared to C57BL/6 mice (pmice at 10 mg/kg dose caused an increase in the open-arm activity (pmice (pmice. In contrast, a subanaesthetic dose of ketamine decreased exploratory locomotion in C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, hereditary factors may play an important role in ketamine-induced responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects and mechanisms of cavidine protecting mice against LPS-induced endotoxic shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weifeng, E-mail: liwf@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Hailin; Niu, Xiaofeng, E-mail: niuxf@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yu; He, Zehong; Yao, Huan

    2016-08-15

    LPS sensitized mice are usually considered as an experimental model of endotoxin shock. The present study aims to evaluate effects of cavidine on LPS-induced endotoxin shock. Mice were intraperitoneally administrated with cavidine (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or DEX (5 mg/kg) at 1 and 12 h before injecting LPS (30 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Blood samples, liver, lung and kidney tissues were harvested after LPS injection. The study demonstrated that pretreatment with cavidine reduced the mortality of mice during 72 h after endotoxin injection. In addition, cavidine administration significantly attenuated histological pathophysiology features of LPS-induced injury in lung, liver and kidney. Furthermore, cavidine administration inhibited endotoxin-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and HMGB1. Moreover, cavidine pretreatment attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase primed by LPS. In summary, cavidine protects mice against LPS-induced endotoxic shock via inhibiting early pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, IL-6 and late-phase cytokine HMGB1, and the modulation of HMGB1 may be related with MAPK signal pathway. - Highlights: • Cavidine significantly reduced mortality in mice during 72 h after LPS injection. • Cavidine attenuated histopathological changes in lung, liver and kidney. • Cavidine decreased the level of early inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, IL-6 in LPS- stimulated mice. • Cavidine inhibited late inflammatory cytokine HMGB1 through MAPK pathway.

  10. EFFECTS OF AEROBIC TRAINING ON THE CARDIOMYOCYTES OF THE RIGHT ATRIUM OF MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Gonçalves Coutinho de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Polypeptide hormones (natriuretic peptides, NPs are secreted by the cardiac atria and play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. Objective: To evaluate the effects of aerobic training on the secretory apparatus of NPs in cardiomyocytes of the right atrium. Methods: Nine-month-old mice were divided in two groups (n=10: control group (CG and trained group (TG. The training protocol was performed on a motor treadmill for 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was measured at the beginning of the experiment (9 months of age and at moment of the sacrifice (11 months of age. Electron micrographs were used to quantify the following variables: the quantitative density and area of NP granules, the relative volumes of the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi complex and the relative volume of euchromatin in the nucleus and the number of pores per 10 µm of the nuclear membrane. The results were compared by Student's t test (p< 0.05. Results: The cardiomyocytes obtained from TG mice showed increased density and sectional area of secretory granules of NP, higher relative volume of endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and Golgi complex compared with the CG mice. Furthermore, the quantitative density of nuclear pores and the relative volume of euchromatin in the nucleus were significantly higher compared with the CG mice. Conclusion: Aerobic training caused hypertrophy of the secretory apparatus in the cardiomyocytes of right atrium, which could explain the intense synthesis of natriuretic peptides in trained mice with respect to the untrained mice.

  11. Effect of adiponectin deficiency on intestinal damage and hematopoietic responses of mice exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponemone, Venkatesh; Fayad, Raja; Gove, Melissa E.; Pini, Maria [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Fantuzzi, Giamila, E-mail: giamila@uic.edu [Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-08-07

    Adiponectin (APN) is an adipose tissue-derived cytokine that regulates insulin sensitivity and inflammation. It is also involved in modulation of cell proliferation by binding to various growth factors. Based on its known effects in modulating cell proliferation and oxidative stress, APN may potentially be involved in regulating tissue damage and repair following irradiation. Adiponectin KO mice and their WT littermates were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 3 or 6 Gy gamma radiation. Radiation-induced alterations were studied in jejunum, blood, bone marrow and thymus at days 1 and 5 post-irradiation and compared with sham-irradiated groups. In WT mice, irradiation did not significantly alter serum APN levels while inducing a significant decrease in serum leptin. Irradiation caused a significant reduction in thymocyte cellularity, with concomitant decrease in CD4{sup +}, CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell populations, with no significant differences between WT and APN KO mice. Irradiation resulted in a significantly higher increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes in the blood of APN KO compared with WT mice, whereas frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow at day 5 was significantly higher in WT compared with APN KO mice. Finally, irradiation induced similar alterations in villus height and crypt cell proliferation in the jejunum of WT and APN KO mice. Jejunum explants from sham-irradiated APN KO mice produced higher levels of IL-6 compared with tissue from WT animals, but the difference was no longer apparent following irradiation. Our data indicate that APN deficiency does not play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury in mice, while it may participate in regulation of damage to the hematopoietic system.

  12. Effect of adiponectin deficiency on intestinal damage and hematopoietic responses of mice exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponemone, Venkatesh; Fayad, Raja; Gove, Melissa E.; Pini, Maria; Fantuzzi, Giamila

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin (APN) is an adipose tissue-derived cytokine that regulates insulin sensitivity and inflammation. It is also involved in modulation of cell proliferation by binding to various growth factors. Based on its known effects in modulating cell proliferation and oxidative stress, APN may potentially be involved in regulating tissue damage and repair following irradiation. Adiponectin KO mice and their WT littermates were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 3 or 6 Gy gamma radiation. Radiation-induced alterations were studied in jejunum, blood, bone marrow and thymus at days 1 and 5 post-irradiation and compared with sham-irradiated groups. In WT mice, irradiation did not significantly alter serum APN levels while inducing a significant decrease in serum leptin. Irradiation caused a significant reduction in thymocyte cellularity, with concomitant decrease in CD4 + , CD8 + and CD4 + CD8 + T cell populations, with no significant differences between WT and APN KO mice. Irradiation resulted in a significantly higher increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes in the blood of APN KO compared with WT mice, whereas frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow at day 5 was significantly higher in WT compared with APN KO mice. Finally, irradiation induced similar alterations in villus height and crypt cell proliferation in the jejunum of WT and APN KO mice. Jejunum explants from sham-irradiated APN KO mice produced higher levels of IL-6 compared with tissue from WT animals, but the difference was no longer apparent following irradiation. Our data indicate that APN deficiency does not play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury in mice, while it may participate in regulation of damage to the hematopoietic system.

  13. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on neurogenesis and tryptophan hydroxylase expression in adolescent and adult rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Anne; Václavů, Lena; Meerhoff, Gideon F.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Lucassen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac) has been increasingly prescribed to children and adolescents with depressive disorders despite a lack of thorough understanding of its therapeutic effects in the paediatric population and of its putative neurodevelopmental effects. Within the framework of

  14. The caries-preventive effect of chlorhexidine varnish in children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    James, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose was to systematically review the literature on the effectiveness of chlorhexidine varnish for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents and to determine its effectiveness compared to fluoride varnish.

  15. Excess TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-09-01

    Hypothyroidism in the young leads to irreversible growth failure. hyt/hyt Mice have a nonfunctional TSH receptor (TSHR) and are severely hypothyroid, but growth retardation was not observed in adult mice. We found that epiphysial cartilage as well as cultured chondrocytes expressed functional TSHR at levels comparable to that seen in the thyroid, and that addition of TSH to cultured chondrocytes suppressed expression of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes such as Sox-9 and type IIa collagen. Next, we compared the long bone phenotypes of two distinct mouse models of hypothyroidism: thyroidectomized (THYx) mice and hyt/hyt mice. Although both THYx and hyt/hyt mice were severely hypothyroid and had similar serum Ca(2+) and growth hormone levels, the tibia was shorter and the proliferating and hypertrophic zones in the growth plate was significantly narrower in THYx mice than in hyt/hyt mice. Supplementation of hyt/hyt mice thyroid hormone resulted in a wider growth plate compared with that of wild-type mice. Expressions of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes Sox-9 and type IIa collagen in growth plate from THYx mice were 52 and 60% lower than those of hyt/hyt mice, respectively. High serum TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

  16. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body. gamma. irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice.

  17. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body γ irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice

  18. Therapeutic Effect of Activated Carbon-Induced Constipation Mice with Lactobacillus fermentum Suo on Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayi Suo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus fermentum Suo (LF-Suo on activated carbon-induced constipation in ICR (Institute of Cancer Research mice. ICR mice were orally administered with lactic acid bacteria for 9 days. Body weight, diet intake, drinking amount, defecation status, gastrointestinal transit and defecation time, and the serum levels of MTL (motilin, Gas (gastrin, ET (endothelin, SS (somatostatin, AChE (acetylcholinesterase, SP (substance P, VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide were used to evaluate the preventive effects of LF-Suo on constipation. Bisacodyl, a laxative drug, was used as a positive control. The normal, control, 100 mg/kg bisacodyl treatment, LB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus-, LF-Suo (L- and LF-Suo (H-treated mice showed the time to the first black stool defecation at 90, 218, 117, 180, 155 and 137 min, respectively. By the oral administration of LB-, LF-Suo (L, LF-Suo (H or bisacodyl (100 mg/kg, the gastrointestinal transit was reduced to 55.2%, 72.3%, 85.5% and 94.6%, respectively, of the transit in normal mice, respectively. In contrast to the control mice, the serum levels of MTL, Gas, ET, AChE, SP and VIP were significantly increased and the serum levels of SS were reduced in the mice treated with LF-Suo (p < 0.05. By the RT-PCR (reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays, LF-Suo increased the c-Kit, SCF (stem cell factor, GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and decreased TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, NOS (nitric oxide synthase expressions of small intestine tissue in mice. These results demonstrate that lactic acid bacteria has preventive effects on mouse constipation and LF-Suo demonstrated the best functional activity.

  19. Effects of Breeding Configuration on Maternal and Weanling Behavior in Laboratory Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Gillian C; Rasmussen, Skye; Monette, Sebastien; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2017-07-01

    Although numerous studies have evaluated the effect of housing density on the wellbeing of laboratory mice, little is known about the effect of breeding configuration on mouse behavior. The 8th edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals lists the recommended minimal floor area per animal for a female mouse and her litter as 51 in.2 We sought to determine the effects of pair, trio, and harem breeding configurations on the maternal and weanling behavior of C57BL/6J (B6) and 129S6/SvEvTac (129) mice on the basis of nest scores and performance in pup retrieval tests, open-field test (OFT), elevated plus maze, and tail suspension test; we concurrently evaluated cage microenvironment, reproductive indices, and anatomic and clinical pathology. Harem breeding configurations enhanced B6 maternal behaviors as evidenced by significantly shorter pup retrieval times. Trio- and harem-raised B6 weanlings showed increased exploratory behaviors, as evidenced by greater time spent in the center of the OFT, when compared with pair-raised B6 mice. Conversely, breeding configuration did not alter pup retrieval times for 129 mice, and on the day of weaning trio- and harem-raised 129 mice demonstrated increased anxiety-like behavior, as evidenced by greater time spent in the periphery of the OFT, when compared with pair-raised counterparts. Behavioral differences were not noted on subsequent days for either strain. Trio- and harem-raised B6 and 129 weanling mice had significantly higher weaning weights than weanlings raised in a pair breeding configuration. Trio and harem breeding in a standard 67-in.2 shoebox cage did not detrimentally affect the evaluated welfare parameters in either C57BL/6J or 129S6/SvEvTac mice.

  20. Effects of Simulated Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Functions in Senile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the effects of simulated heat waves on cardiovascular disease in senile mice was investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a TEM1880 meteorological environment simulation chamber, according to a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen senile mice were divided into control, heat wave, and heat wave BH4 groups, respectively. Mice in the heat wave and heat wave BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. The levels of ET-1, NO, HSP60, SOD, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α in each group of mice were measured after heat wave simulation. Results show that heat waves decreased SOD activity in the myocardial tissue of senile mice, increased NO, HSP60, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α levels, and slightly decreased ET-1 levels, BH4 can relieve the effects of heat waves on various biological indicators. After a comprehensive analysis of the experiments above, we draw the followings conclusions regarding the influence of heat waves on senile mice: excess HSP60 activated immune cells, and induced endothelial cells and macrophages to secrete large amounts of ICAM-1, TNF-α, and other inflammatory cytokines, it also activated the inflammation response in the body and damaged the coronary endothelial cell structure, which increased the permeability of blood vessel intima and decreased SOD activity in cardiac tissues. The oxidation of lipoproteins in the blood increased, and large amounts of cholesterol were generated. Cholesterol penetrated the intima and deposited on the blood vessel wall, forming atherosclerosis and leading to the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in senile mice. These results maybe are useful for studying the effects of heat waves on elderly humans, which we discussed in the discussion chapter.

  1. Anti-diabetic effects of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides-chromium (III) complex in type 2 diabetic mice and its sub-acute toxicity evaluation in normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Chen, Zhongqin; Pan, Yuxiang; Gao, Xudong; Chen, Haixia

    2017-10-01

    Polysaccharides are important bioactive ingredients from Inonotus obliquus. This study aimed to synthesize and characterize a novel I. obliquus polysaccharides-chromium (III) complex (UIOPC) and investigate the anti-diabetic effects in streptozotocin (STZ) induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) mice and sub-acute toxicity in normal mice. The molecular weight of UIOPC was about 11.5 × 10 4  Da with the chromium content was 13.01% and the chromium was linked with polysaccharides through coordination bond. After treatment of UIOPC for four weeks, the body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, plasma insulin levels of the diabetic mice were significantly reduced when compared with those of the diabetic mice (p < 0.05). The results on serum profiles and antioxidant enzymes activities revealed that UIOPC had a positive effect on hypoglycemic and antioxidant ability. Histopathology results showed that UIOPC could effectively alleviate the STZ-lesioned tissues in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high dose administration of UIOPC had no obviously influence on serum profiles levels and antioxidant ability of the normal mice and the organ tissues maintained organized and integrity in the sub-acute toxicity study. These results suggested that UIOPC might be a good candidate for the functional food or pharmaceuticals in the treatment of T2DM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of voluntary alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during rat adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S McMurray

    Full Text Available Alcohol use is common in adolescence, with a large portion of intake occurring during episodes of binging. This pattern of alcohol consumption coincides with a critical period for neurocognitive development and may impact decision-making and reward processing. Prior studies have demonstrated alterations in adult decision-making following adolescent usage, but it remains to be seen if these alterations exist in adolescence, or are latent until adulthood. Here, using a translational model of voluntary binge alcohol consumption in adolescents, we assess the impact of alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during adolescence. During adolescence (postnatal day 30-50, rats were given 1-hour access to either a 10% alcohol gelatin mixture (EtOH or a calorie equivalent gelatin (Control at the onset of the dark cycle. EtOH consuming rats were classified as either High or Low consumers based on intake levels. Adolescent rats underwent behavioral testing once a day, with one group performing a risk preference task, and a second group performing a reversal-learning task during the 20-day period of gelatin access. EtOH-High rats showed increases in risk preference compared to Control rats, but not EtOH-Low animals. However, adolescent rats did a poor job of matching their behavior to optimize outcomes, suggesting that adolescents may adopt a response bias. In addition, adolescent ethanol exposure did not affect the animals' ability to flexibly adapt behavior to changing reward contingencies during reversal learning. These data support the view that adolescent alcohol consumption can have short-term detrimental effects on risk-taking when examined during adolescence, which does not seem to be attributable to an inability to flexibly encode reward contingencies on behavioral responses.

  3. Memory-enhancing effect of Rhodiola rosea L extract on aged mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The memory-enhancing effects of Rhodiola rosea L. extract (RRLE) on normal aged mice were assessed. Methods: In the open-field test, the effect of RRLE (150 and 300 mg/kg) on mouse locomotive activities was evaluated by investigating the extract's influence on CAT and AchE activities in the brain tissue of ...

  4. Preventive and therapeutic effects of lithium carbonate on acute radiation injury of hemopoietic system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, X Y; Wang, Y F; Jia, T Z

    1991-01-01

    The administration of Li2CO3 to female LACA mice for three consecutive days before or after 4Gy whole body gamma-irradiation appeared to have both preventive and therapeutic effects on radiation-induced leucopenia, especially on the depression of CFU-GM. It is effective in small dosage, short course, and even when given 24 hours after irradiation.

  5. Vascular effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in dyslipidemic ApoE-/- mice and cultured endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate that pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is associated with increased risk of lung diseases, whereas the effect on the vascular system is less studied. We investigated vascular effects of 2 types of multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice,...

  6. Friendly fire: Longitudinal effects of exposure to violent video games on aggressive behavior in adolescent friendship dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, G.P.; Burk, W.J.; Stoltz, S.E.M.J.; Berg, Y.H.M. van den; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2018-01-01

    Research on gaming effects has focused on adolescence, a developmental period in which peer relationships become increasingly salient. However, the impact of peers on the effects of violent gaming on adolescents has been understudied. This study examined whether adolescents' exposure to violent

  7. Adolescent Problematic Social Networking and School Experiences: The Mediating Effects of Sleep Disruptions and Sleep Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Lynette; Barber, Bonnie L; Modecki, Kathryn L

    2015-07-01

    An important developmental task for adolescents is to become increasingly responsible for their own health behaviors. Establishing healthy sleep routines and controlling media use before bedtime are important for adequate, quality sleep so adolescents are alert during the day and perform well at school. Despite the prevalence of adolescent social media use and the large percentage of computers and cell phones in adolescents' bedrooms, no studies to date have investigated the link between problematic adolescent investment in social networking, their sleep practices, and associated experiences at school. A sample of 1,886 students in Australia aged between 12 and 18 years of age completed self-report data on problematic social networking use, sleep disturbances, sleep quality, and school satisfaction. Structural equation modeling (SEM) substantiated the serial mediation hypothesis: for adolescents, problematic social networking use significantly increased sleep disturbances, which adversely affected perceptions of sleep quality that, in turn, lowered adolescents' appraisals of their school satisfaction. This significant pattern was largely driven by the indirect effect of sleep disturbances. These findings suggest that adolescents are vulnerable to negative consequences from social networking use. Specifically, problematic social networking is associated with poor school experiences, which result from poor sleep habits. Promoting better sleep routines by minimizing sleep disturbances from social media use could improve school experiences for adolescents with enhanced emotional engagement and improved subjective well-being.

  8. The effect of driven exercise on treatment outcomes for adolescents with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles-Shields, Colleen; DclinPsy, Bryony Bamford; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of driven exercise (DE) and its role in treatment outcome for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants were 201 adolescents with an eating disorder (ED) (80 with BN and 121 with AN) presenting for outpatient treatment at two specialist clinics. All adolescents participated in one of two randomized controlled trials. Descriptive statistics were conducted to evaluate the presence and frequency of baseline DE. Exploratory hierarchical regressions were used to evaluate the effect of baseline DE on treatment outcomes. About 66.3% of adolescents with BN and 23.1% of adolescents with AN presented with baseline DE. The presence of baseline DE predicted significantly worse outcomes for adolescents with AN in terms of ED symptom severity (ps adolescents with BN (ps adolescents with BN and AN. However, DE may be related to different constructs for adolescents with AN than those with BN, suggesting differences in treatment needs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors reverse age-related increases in side effects of haloperidol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza L; Fisher, Daniel W; Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Fang, Deyu; Csernansky, John G; Dong, Hongxin

    2017-08-01

    Older patients can be especially susceptible to antipsychotic-induced side effects, and the pharmacodynamic mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. We hypothesized that age-related epigenetic alterations lead to decreased expression and functionality of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), contributing to this susceptibility. In this study, we treated young (2-3 months old) and aged (22-24 months old) C57BL/6 mice with the D2R antagonist haloperidol (HAL) once a day for 14 days to evaluate HAL-induced motor side effects. In addition, we pretreated separate groups of young and aged mice with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) or entinostat (MS-275) and then administered HAL. Our results show that the motor side effects of HAL are exaggerated in aged mice as compared to young mice and that HDAC inhibitors are able to reverse the severity of these deficits. HAL-induced motor deficits in aged mice are associated with an age- and drug-dependent decrease in striatal D2R protein levels and functionality. Further, histone acetylation was reduced while histone tri-methylation was increased at specific lysine residues of H3 and H4 within the Drd2 promoter in the striatum of aged mice. HDAC inhibitors, particularly VPA, restored striatal D2R protein levels and functionality and reversed age- and drug-related histone modifications at the Drd2 promoter. These results suggest that epigenetic changes at the striatal Drd2 promoter drive age-related increases in antipsychotic side effect susceptibility, and HDAC inhibitors may be an effective adjunct treatment strategy to reduce side effects in aged populations.

  10. Hypoglycemic effect of DL-aminocarnitine in streptozotocin diabetic mice: inhibition of gluconeogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, D.L.; Griffith, O.W.

    1986-01-01

    DL-Aminocarnitine and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine are potent, non-covalent inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl transferase. In both diabetic and non-diabetic fasted mice, DL-aminocarnitine (0.3 mmol/kg) and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine (0.1 mmol/kg) decrease the blood concentration of ketone bodies to levels observed in fed control mice. Both carnitine palmitoyltransferase inhibitors also normalize plasma glucose levels in diabetic mice. The hypoglycemic effect is maximal at 8 hours, the continues for at least 12 hours. In the present studies the authors have used [ 14 C]alanine, a pyruvate precursor, to prove the effect of aminocarnitine on gluconeogenesis. Diabetic mice given L-[U- 14 C]alanine (1 mmol/kg) by intraperitoneal injection convert 10-15% of the administered dose to [ 14 C]glucose after 10 min; less than 0.1% of the radioactivity is recovered in glycogen. If 0.3 mmol/kg aminocarnitine is given subcutaneously 1 hr prior to giving [ 14 C]analine, the radioactivity recovered in plasma glucose is reduced by approximately 40%. The authors conclude that the hypoglycemic effect of DL-aminocarnitine in diabetic mice is due, at least in part, to inhibition of gluconeogenesis. The possibility that aminocarnitine also stimulates glucose utilization in diabetic animals is not excluded

  11. Anxiolytic effect of music exposure on BDNFMet/Met transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Jing; Yu, Hui; Yang, Jian-Min; Gao, Jing; Jiang, Hong; Feng, Min; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2010-08-06

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been reported to play important roles in the modulation of anxiety, mood stabilizers, and pathophysiology of affective disorders. Recently, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the BDNF gene (Val66Met) has been found to be associated with depression and anxiety disorders. The humanized BDNF(Met/Met) knock-in transgenic mice exhibited increased anxiety-related behaviors that were unresponsive to serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine. Music is known to be able to elicit emotional changes, including anxiolytic effects. In this study, we found that music treatment could significantly decrease anxiety state in BDNF(Met/Met) mice, but not in BDNF(+/)(-), mice compared with white noise exposure in open field and elevated plus maze test. Moreover, in contrast to white noise exposure, BDNF expression levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala and hippocampus were significantly increased in music-exposed adult BDNF(Met/Met) mice. However, music treatment could not upregulate BDNF levels in the PFC, amygdala, and hippocampus in BDNF(+/)(-) mice, which suggests the essential role of BDNF in the anxiolytic effect of music. Together, our results imply that music may provide an effective therapeutic intervention for anxiety disorders in humans with this genetic BDNF(Met) variant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of three different cultivars of Lepidium meyenii (Maca on learning and depression in ovariectomized mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzales Gustavo F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lepidium meyenii Walp. (Brassicaceae, known as Maca, is a Peruvian hypocotyl growing exclusively between 4000 and 4500 m altitude in the central Peruvian Andes, particularly in Junin plateau and is used traditionally to enhance fertility. Maca is a cultivated plant and different cultivars are described according to the color of the hypocotyls. Methods The study aimed to elucidate the effect of Yellow, Red and Black Maca on cognitive function and depression in ovariectomized (OVX mice. In all experiments OVX mice were treated during 21 days and divided in four groups: control group, Yellow Maca, Red Maca and Black Maca. Latent learning was assessed using the water finding task and the antidepressant activity of the three varieties of Maca was evaluated using the forced swimming test. Animals were sacrificed at the end of each treatment and the uterus were excised and weighed. Results Black Maca was the variety that showed the best response in the water finding task, particularly in the trained mice. The three varieties were effective to reduce finding latency in non trained and trained mice (P Conclusion Black Maca appeared to have more beneficial effects on latent learning in OVX mice; meanwhile, all varieties of Maca showed antidepressant activity.

  13. Effect of aerobic exercise and fish oil supplements on plasma levels of inflammatory indexes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Hamid; Bazgir, Behzad; Daryanoosh, Farhad; Koushki, Maryam; Sobhani, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Exercise has positive and negative effects on immune system. Herein, we would like to investigate the effects of incremental aerobic training and fish oil supplementation on the plasma levels of CRP, CPK and IL-17 in trained mice. One of the major roles of immune system is to produce soluble or cellular components that provide the immunity against inflammatory agent. The purpose of this study is to investigate distinct and combine effects of incremental aerobic training and fish oil supplement on plasma levels of IL-17, CPK and CRP in trained male mice. Totally, 54 healthy male mice (2 months old, weight= 34±1 grams) were selected. At first 10 mice were killed to determine base line values, the rest of them were randomly divided into four groups, control group (C, n=11), supplement group (S, n=11), training group (T, n=11) and supplement-training group (ST, n=11).The supplement and supplement-training groups were fed with 0.2cc/day fish oil for 8 weeks. Training and supplement-training groups underwent exercise for 5 sessions per week for a period of 8 weeks on animal treadmill. SPSS 16.0 software and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis of data Exercise and fish oil supplement lead to a decrease in CRP levels and subsequently causing a reduction in plasma levels of IL-17 and CK in mice (poil can reduce regulate inflammatory response caused by incremental exercise.

  14. [Enhancing effect of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I modified liposomes on oral insulin absorption in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Ping, Qi-neng; Xu, Wen-fang

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the enhancing effect on insulin absorption through GI. tract in mice by using the Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1) modified liposomes as the carrier. UEA1 modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was prepared by conjugating method of 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), then the modified compound (PE-UEA1) was incorporated into the conventional liposomes of insulin to obtain UEA1 modified liposomes. The agglutination test was performed to examine the UEA1 biological activities after synthesis and modification. When liposomes were applied to healthy mice or diabetic mice at insulin dose of 350 u x kg(-1) orally, the hypoglycemic effect was investigated according to the blood glucose level determination. The blood glucose levels of the healthy mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (84 +/- 15)% at 4 h, (78 +/- 11)% at 8 h and (90 +/- 12)% at 12 h after oral administration. The conventional liposomes and saline showed no effect. The blood glucose levels of the diabetic mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (73 +/- 7)% at 4 h, (74 +/- 9)% at 8 h, (86 +/- 9)% at 12 h after oral administration. The UEA1 modified liposomes promote the oral absorption of insulin due to the specific-site combination on M cell membrane.

  15. Metabolic Effects of CX3CR1 Deficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

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    Rachana Shah

    Full Text Available The fractalkine (CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine system is associated with obesity-related inflammation and type 2 diabetes, but data on effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency on metabolic pathways is contradictory. We examined male C57BL/6 Cx3cr1-/- mice on chow and high-fat diet to determine the metabolic effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency. We found no difference in body weight and fat content or feeding and energy expenditure between Cx3cr1-/- and WT mice. Cx3cr1-/- mice had reduced glucose intolerance assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests at chow and high-fat fed states, though there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin values. Cx3cr1-/- mice also had improved insulin sensitivity at hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, with higher glucose infusion rate, rate of disposal, and hepatic glucose production suppression compared to WT mice. Enhanced insulin signaling in response to acute intravenous insulin injection was demonstrated in Cx3cr1-/- by increased liver protein levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK3β proteins. There were no differences in adipose tissue macrophage populations, circulating inflammatory monocytes, adipokines, lipids, or inflammatory markers. In conclusion, we demonstrate a moderate and reproducible protective effect of Cx3cr1 deficiency on glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

  16. Effects of Psychosocial Stress on Subsequent Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langgartner, Dominik; Wachter, Ulrich; Hartmann, Clair; Gröger, Michael; Vogt, Josef; Merz, Tamara; McCook, Oscar; Fink, Marina; Kress, Sandra; Georgieff, Michael; Kunze, Julia F; Radermacher, Peter L; Reber, Stefan O; Wepler, Martin

    2018-06-08

    Hypoxemia and tissue ischemia during hemorrhage as well as formation of oxygen and nitrogen radicals during resuscitation promote hyperinflammation and, consequently, trigger severe multiple-organ-failure (MOF). Individuals diagnosed with stress-related disorders or reporting a life history of psychosocial stress are characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation and a reduced glucocorticoid (GC) signaling. We hypothesized that exposure to chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood prior to hemorrhagic shock increases oxidative/nitrosative stress and therefore the risk of developing MOF in mice. To induce chronic psychosocial stress linked to mild immune activation and reduced GC signaling in male mice, the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) paradigm was employed. Single-housed (SHC) mice were used as controls. Subsequently, CSC and SHC mice were exposed to hemorrhagic shock following resuscitation to investigate the effects of prior psychosocial stress load on survival, organ function, metabolism, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and inflammatory readouts. An increased adrenal weight in CSC mice indicates that the stress paradigm reliably worked. However, no effect of prior psychosocial stress on outcome after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation could be detected. Chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood is not sufficient to promote hemodynamic complications, organ dysfunction, metabolic disturbances and did not increase the risk of MOF after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation. Intravenous norepinephrine to keep target hemodynamics might have led to a certain level of oxidative stress in both groups and, therefore, disguised potential effects of chronic psychosocial stress on organ function after hemorrhagic shock in the present murine trauma model.

  17. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

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    Yunlong Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS, then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and low density lipoprotein (LDL levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

  18. Effects of Peers and Social Environment on Adolescent Psychological Well-Being

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    Andrew J. Hussey

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We use data from Add Health to estimate models of peer effects and effects of social environment on adolescent psychological well-being. Past literature has focused mostly on the role of peers on adolescents, notably on schooling (GPA, high school graduation, etc. and risk behavioral (smoking, drinking, drug use, etc. outcomes. Our study’s core innovation lies in the conceptual testing of the hypothesis that an enlarged adolescent social environment encompasses support from peers, school, parents, and the neighborhood. In this paper, we isolate the effects of each of these groups on adolescent psychological well-being and find significant effects of support from schools and parents. However, peer effects are insignificant except for the baseline Ordinary Least Squares (OLS model. Separate models for males and females and different age groups are also estimated and similar results are found, although the effects are greatest during late adolescence. Given the likely endogeneity of peer group formation, we also use an instrumental variables (IV approach. The IV results indicate that peer effects are not statistically significant, but otherwise mimic OLS estimates, supporting the presence of a multi-faceted social network influencing adolescent health. These results, reinforced by further statistical testing, suggest that past work limiting influence on adolescent behavior or outcome to only the peers tends to be incomplete.

  19. [Effect of Huanglian Jiedu Decoction on Monocyte Development in apoE Gene Knockout Mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Kong, Ya-xian; Ll, Yu-mei; Xue, Xin; Zhang, Jian-ping; Zeng, Hui; Hu, Jing- qing; Ma, Ya-luan

    2016-01-01

    To observe monocyte (Mo) development in wild type C57BL/6 mice and apoE gene knockout (apoE(-/-)) mice, and to evaluate the immuno-regulatory effect of Huanglian Jiedu Decoction (HJD) on peripheral Mo development in apoE(-/-) mice. Four, 8, 12, and 16 weeks old female C57BL/6 mice were set up as control groups of different ages, while 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks old female apoE(-/-) mice were set up as hyperlipidemia groups of different ages. Four-week old female C57BL/6 mice were recruited as a blank group. Four-week old female apoE(-/-) mice were randomly divided into the control group, the Western medicine group, and the Chinese medicine group by paired comparison, 5 in each group. Equivalent clinical dose was administered to mice according to body weight. Mice in the Western medicine group were administered with Atrovastatin at the daily dose of 10 mg/kg by gastrogavage, while those in the Chinese medicine group were administered with HJD at the daily dose of 5 g/kg by gastrogavage. Body weight was detected each week. After 4 weeks blood lipids levels (such as TG, TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C), and the proportions of Mo and Ly6c(hi) were detected. Compared with 4-week-old homogenic mice, the proportion of Mo decreased in 16-week-old C57BL/6 mice (P < 0.05). Levels of TC and TG, and the proportion of Ly6c(hi) subtype increased, but the proportion of Mo de- creased in 8-week-old apoE(-/-) mice (P <0. 05). Levels of TC, TG, and LDL-C increased in 12-week-old apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). Levels of TC, TG, LDL-C, and HDL-C increased in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Compared with 8-week-old homogenic mice, the proportion of Mo decreased in 16-week-old C57BL/6 mice (P < 0.05); levels of TC and LDL-C increased in 12-week-old apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05); levels of TC and HDL-C increased in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Compared with C57BL/6 mice of the same age, TC and TG increased, HDL-C decreased (P < 0.01) in 4-and 8-week-old apoE(-/-) mice (P

  20. Chronic consumption of distilled sugarcane spirit induces anxiolytic-like effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Maria Clecia P; Nunes, Fabíola C; Salvadori, Mirian G S Stiebbe; Carvalho, Cleyton Charles D; Morais, Liana Clebia S L; Braga, Valdir A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is a major public health problem throughout the world. We investigated the anxiolytic-like effects and the possible ever injury induced by the chronic consumption of ethanol or sugarcane spirit in mice. Adult mice were exposed to a two-bottle free-choice paradigm for 6 weeks. The mice in Group A (n = 16) had access to sugarcane spirit + distilled water, the mice in Group B (n = 15) had access to ethanol + distilled water, and the mice in Group C (control, n = 14) had access to distilled water + distilled water. The ethanol content in the beverages offered to Groups A and B was 2% for the first week, 5% for the second week and 10% for the remaining four weeks. At the end of the experimental period, the mice were evaluated using the elevated-plus maze and the hole-board test to assess their anxiety-related behaviors. We also determined the serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels. In the elevated-plus maze, the time spent in the open arms was increased in the mice exposed to chronic ethanol (32 ± 8 vs. 7 ± 2 s, n = 9) or sugarcane spirit (36 ± 9 vs. 7 ± 2 s, n = 9) compared to the controls. In the hole-board test, the mice exposed to ethanol or sugarcane spirit displayed increases in their head-dipping frequency (16 ± 1 for the control group, 27 ± 2 for the ethanol group, and 31 ± 3 for the sugarcane-spirit group; n = 9 for each group). In addition, the mice exposed to sugarcane spirit displayed an increase in the aspartate aminotransferase / alanine aminotransferase ratio compared to the ethanol group (1.29 ± 0.17 for the control group and 2.67 ± 0.17 for the sugarcane spirit group; n = 8 for each group). The chronic consumption of sugarcane-spirit produces liver injury and anxiolytic-like effects and the possible liver injury in mice.

  1. Chronic consumption of distilled sugarcane spirit induces anxiolytic-like effects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Clecia P. Sena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic ethanol consumption is a major public health problem throughout the world. We investigated the anxiolytic-like effects and the possible ever injury induced by the chronic consumption of ethanol or sugarcane spirit in mice. METHOD: Adult mice were exposed to a two-bottle free-choice paradigm for 6 weeks. The mice in Group A (n = 16 had access to sugarcane spirit + distilled water, the mice in Group B (n = 15 had access to ethanol + distilled water, and the mice in Group C (control, n = 14 had access to distilled water + distilled water. The ethanol content in the beverages offered to Groups A and B was 2% for the first week, 5% for the second week and 10% for the remaining four weeks. At the end of the experimental period, the mice were evaluated using the elevated-plus maze and the hole-board test to assess their anxiety-related behaviors. We also determined the serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels. RESULTS: In the elevated-plus maze, the time spent in the open arms was increased in the mice exposed to chronic ethanol (32 + 8 vs. 7 + 2 s, n = 9 or sugarcane spirit (36 + 9 vs. 7 + 2 s, n = 9 compared to the controls. In the hole-board test, the mice exposed to ethanol or sugarcane spirit displayed increases in their head-dipping frequency (16 + 1 for the control group, 27 + 2 for the ethanol group, and 31 + 3 for the sugarcane-spirit group; n = 9 for each group. In addition, the mice exposed to sugarcane spirit displayed an increase in the aspartate aminotransferase / alanine aminotransferase ratio compared to the ethanol group (1.29 + 0.17 for the control group and 2.67 + 0.17 for the sugarcane spirit group; n = 8 for each group. CONCLUSION: The chronic consumption of sugarcane-spirit produces liver injury and anxiolytic-like effects and the possible liver injury in mice.

  2. ⍺4-GABAA receptors of hippocampal pyramidal neurons are associated with resilience against activity-based anorexia for adolescent female mice but not for males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Actor-Engel, Hannah; Aoki, Chiye

    2018-04-20

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is an animal model of anorexia nervosa, a mental illness with highest mortality and with onset that is most frequently during adolescence. We questioned whether vulnerability of adolescent mice to ABA differs between sexes and whether individual differences in resilience are causally linked to alpha4betadelta-GABA A R expression. C57BL6/J WT and α4-KO adolescent male and female mice underwent ABA induction by combining wheel access with food restriction. ABA vulnerability was measured as the extent of food restriction-evoked hyperactivity on a running wheel and body weight losses. alpha4betadelta-GABA A R levels at plasma membranes of pyramidal cells in dorsal hippocampus were assessed by electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Temporal patterns and extent of weight loss during ABA induction were similar between sexes. Both sexes also exhibited individual differences in ABA vulnerability. Correlation analyses revealed that, for both sexes, body weight changes precede and thus are likely to drive suppression of wheel running. However, the suppression was during the food-anticipatory hours for males, while for females, suppression was delayed by a day and during food-access hours. Correspondingly, only females adaptively increased food intake. ABA induced up-regulation of alpha4betadelta-GABA A Rs at plasma membranes of dorsal hippocampal pyramidal cells of females, and especially those females exhibiting resilience. Conversely, α4-KO females exhibited greater food restriction-evoked hyperactivity than WT females. In contrast, ABA males did not up-regulate alpha4betadelta-GABA A Rs, did not exhibit genotype differences in vulnerability, and exhibited no correlation between plasmalemmal alpha4betadelta-GABA A Rs and ABA resilience. Thus, food restriction-evoked hyperactivity is driven by anxiety but can be suppressed through upregulation of hippocampal alpha4betadelta-GABA A Rs for female but not for males. This knowledge of sex

  3. Individually tailored internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for adolescents with anxiety disorders: A pilot effectiveness study

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin Silfvernagel; Malin Gren-Landell; Marie Emanuelsson; Per Carlbring; Gerhard Andersson

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study of adolescents suffering from anxiety disorder in Sweden to receive individually tailored internet-based treatment within a child and adolescent psychiatric clinic. The primary aim of this effectiveness study was to examine the effects of tailored internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents. 11 adolescents, aged 15-19 years, were allocated to treatment after assessment. Screening consisted of online questionnaires followed by a diagnostic face-to-face...

  4. Effect of Jiangzhi tablet on serum indexes of mice with fatty liver induced by CCL4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiuli; Kong, Xuejun; Li, Chongxian; Hao, Shaojun; Wang, Hongyu; Chen, Weiliang; Zhang, Zhengchen

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effect of Jiangzhi tablet on serum indexes of mice with fatty liver induced by CCL4, 60 mice were randomly divided into blank control group, model group, positive group, high, middle and low dose group. High fat diet fed mice for 2 weeks, in second the beginning of the weekend, each group of experimental animal except the blank group in the afternoon 1:00 subcutaneous injection of 40% CCl4 of edible oil (0.05 mL/10g, 2 times / week) for modeling; at the same time, 9:00 in the morning to lipid-lowering tablets LARGEMEDTUM and small dose group (0.1125g/ml, 0.05625g/ml, 0.02815g/ml) and Gantai tablet group (0.045g/ml) mice fed with corresponding drugs, the model group received the same volume of physiological saline. At the end of the fifth week, the eyeballs were collected and the serum was separated. The levels of serum triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, serum AST, ALT and ALP were detected. Compared with the model group, Dongbao Gantai group, Jiangzhi tablets, high dose group had significantly decreased TG and LDL content in serum of mice (ptablets low dose group can significantly reduce TG and LDL content in serum (ptablet high dose group and middle dose group could significantly reduce the content of ALT, ALP, AST in serum of mice (ptablets in small dose group can significantly reduce ALP and AST content in serum (ptablets have a better intervention effect on the mice model of fatty liver induced by small dose of carbon tetrachloride.

  5. Effects of mesenchymal stem cells on thymus tissue injury induced by ionizing radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongyan; Qi Yali; Gong Shouliang; Song Xiangfu; Liu Liping; Chen Yubing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the migration,colonization and repairing effects of marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on thymus tissue injury induced by ionizing radiation in mice. Methods: MSCs of C57BL/6 mice were isolated, purified and cultivated in vitro. Their migration and colorization were observed with laser confocal microscopy 1, 5 and 10 d after DAPI labeled. MSCs were injected into the thymus tissue of mice through tail vein. The model of thymus tissue injury induced by whole-body X-irradiation was established. The mice were divided into four groups: normal, irradiation, irradiation+saline, and irradiation+MSCs groups. The apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and the repairing effect of MSCs on thymus tissue injury was observed by histological method 3 months later. Results: The occurrence of MSCs in the thymus was observed 1 d after MSCs injection, the diffusion of MSCs in the thymus appeared 5 d later, and widely dispersed 10 d later. The apoptotic rate of thymocytes in irradiation group was higher than that in normal (P<0.05) and was lower than that in MSCs group (P<0.05). The structures of cortex and medulla of thymus were clear in mice in normal group, there were a large number of lymphocytes in the cortex and small number of lymphocytes in the medulla. The structures of cortex and medulla of thymus were unclear in mice in both irradiation, irradiation and saline groups. The lymphocytes in thymus showed extensive coagulation necrosis. There were remnants or newborn lymphoid tissue in the cortex and medulla in mice in irradiation+MSCs groups. Conclusion: MSCs can be rapidly enriched in thymus tissue and promote regeneration and repair of damaged thymus. (authors)

  6. Effects of dietary fucoxanthin on cholesterol metabolism in diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice

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    Beppu Fumiaki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fucoxanthin is a xanthophyll present in brown seaweeds and has several beneficial effects, including anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. However, we and another group previously observed that fucoxanthin increases serum cholesterol levels in rodents. Cholesterol is an important component of cell membranes and biosynthesis of bile acids. Serum cholesterol levels are also closely associated with atherosclerosis. Therefore, we sought to identify the mechanism underlying the increase in serum cholesterol levels by fucoxanthin. Methods Diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice were fed a diet containing 0.2% fucoxanthin for 4 weeks. The mice were sacrificed, and total blood samples were collected for the measurement of serum total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol levels. Cholesterol content in tissues was also analyzed. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine hepatic mRNA and protein expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, respectively. Results Dietary fucoxanthin significantly increased serum HDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels, and reduced hepatic cholesterol content. In liver, the expression of SREBP1, SREBP2 and their target genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis significantly increased and tended to increase in the fucoxanthin-fed mice, respectively. In contrast, hepatic levels of LDLR and SR-B1 proteins which is important factors for LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol uptake in the liver from serum, decreased to 60% and 80% in the fucoxanthin-fed mice, respectively, compared with the control mice. Further, we found that dietary fucoxanthin significantly increased the mRNA expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, which enhances intracellular degradation of LDLR in lysosomes. Conclusions Fucoxanthin increased HDL-cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol levels in KK-Ay mice by inducing SREBP expression and reduced cholesterol uptake in the liver via

  7. Effect of rTMP-GH recombinant fusion protein on thrombocytopoiesis in irradiation injured mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yang; Wang Junping; Chen Fang; Shen Mingqiang; Chen Mo; Wang Song; Ran Xinze; Su Yongping; Kai Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vivo effects of rTMP-GH recombinant fusion protein on thrombocytopoiesis in mice with thrombopenia inflicted by irradiation. Methods: BALB/C mice weighting around 20 g were irradiated with 5 Gy of 60 Co γ-ray irradiation to generate thrombopenia. The irradiation injured mice were injected with rTMP-GH or rhGH subcutaneously at the dose of 200 (μg ·kg -1 · d -1 for 7 days. From the 6 th day, the platelets in blood samples from vena caudalis were counted routinely, and the pathological changes of bone marrow were determined by morphological observation. Results: From the 10 th day, the levels of blood platelet in rTMP-GH treated mice were much higher than those of rhGH treatment group and normal saline (NS) control group, especially at the nadir (P < 0.01). On the 22 nd day, the platelet count has recovered up to 80% of normal level in rTMP-GH treatment group, while it has just recovered up to 30% in NS control group. Morphological observation showed that there was obvious reconstruction of bone marrow in mice treated with rTMP-GH, compared with NS group.The number of megarkaryoblasts and megakaryocytes in bone marrow of rTMP-GH treated mice (3.07 ± 0.32) was much higher than those of rhGH treatment group (2.20 ± 0.22, P < 0.05) and NS control group (0.87 ± 0.19, P <0.01). Conclusions: rTMP-GH has potent effects on the recovery of blood platelet by promoting megarkaryocytopoiesis in irradiation injuried mice. (authors)

  8. Enhanced brain disposition and effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein knockout mice.

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    Adena S Spiro

    Full Text Available The ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Abcb1 and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2 regulate the CNS disposition of many drugs. The main psychoactive constituent of cannabis Δ(9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC has affinity for P-gp and Bcrp, however it is unknown whether these transporters modulate the brain accumulation of THC and its functional effects on the CNS. Here we aim to show that mice devoid of Abcb1 and Abcg2 retain higher brain THC levels and are more sensitive to cannabinoid-induced hypothermia than wild-type (WT mice. Abcb1a/b (-/-, Abcg2 (-/- and wild-type (WT mice were injected with THC before brain and blood were collected and THC concentrations determined. Another cohort of mice was examined for THC-induced hypothermia by measuring rectal body temperature. Brain THC concentrations were higher in both Abcb1a/b (-/- and Abcg2 (-/- mice than WT mice. ABC transporter knockout mice exhibited delayed elimination of THC from the brain with the effect being more prominent in Abcg2 (-/- mice. ABC transporter knockout mice were more sensitive to THC-induced hypothermia compared to WT mice. These results show P-gp and Bcrp prolong the brain disposition and hypothermic effects of THC and offer a novel mechanism for both genetic vulnerability to the psychoactive effects of cannabis and drug interactions between CNS therapies and cannabis.

  9. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in mice.

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    Adam L Hartman

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway integrates signals from different nutrient sources, including amino acids and glucose. Compounds that inhibit mTOR kinase activity such as rapamycin and everolimus can suppress seizures in some chronic animal models and in patients with tuberous sclerosis. However, it is not known whether mTOR inhibitors exert acute anticonvulsant effects in addition to their longer term antiepileptogenic effects. To gain insights into how rapamycin suppresses seizures, we investigated the anticonvulsant activity of rapamycin using acute seizure tests in mice.Following intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin, normal four-week-old male NIH Swiss mice were evaluated for susceptibility to a battery of acute seizure tests similar to those currently used to screen potential therapeutics by the US NIH Anticonvulsant Screening Program. To assess the short term effects of rapamycin, mice were seizure tested in ≤ 6 hours of a single dose of rapamycin, and for longer term effects of rapamycin, mice were tested after 3 or more daily doses of rapamycin.The only seizure test where short-term rapamycin treatment protected mice was against tonic hindlimb extension in the MES threshold test, though this protection waned with longer rapamycin treatment. Longer term rapamycin treatment protected against kainic acid-induced seizure activity, but only at late times after seizure onset. Rapamycin was not protective in the 6 Hz or PTZ seizure tests after short or longer rapamycin treatment times. In contrast to other metabolism-based therapies that protect in acute seizure tests, rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in normal mice.The efficacy of rapamycin as an acute anticonvulsant agent may be limited. Furthermore, the combined pattern of acute seizure test results places rapamycin in a third category distinct from both fasting and the ketogenic diet, and which is more similar to drugs acting on sodium channels.

  10. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-06-30

    Muscarinic M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (S D ) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those effects are not known. A better understanding of the complex cocaine/muscarinic interactions is needed to evaluate and develop potential muscarinic-based medications. Here, knockout mice lacking M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 receptors (M 1 -/- , M 2 -/- , M 4 -/- ), as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline. Muscarinic receptor antagonists with no subtype selectivity (scopolamine), or preferential affinity at the M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 subtype (telenzepine, trihexyphenidyl; methoctramine, AQ-RA 741; tropicamide) were tested alone and in combination with cocaine. In intact animals, antagonists with high affinity at M 1 /M 4 receptors partially substituted for cocaine and increased the S D effect of cocaine, while M 2 -preferring antagonists did not substitute, and reduced the S D effect of cocaine. The cocaine-like effects of scopolamine were absent in M 1 -/- mice. The cocaine S D attenuating effects of methoctramine were absent in M 2 -/- mice and almost absent in M 1 -/- mice. The findings indicate that the cocaine-like S D effects of muscarinic antagonists are primarily mediated through M 1 receptors, with a minor contribution of M 4 receptors. The data also support our previous findings that stimulation of M 1 receptors and M 4 receptors can each attenuate the S D effect of cocaine, and show that this can also be achieved by blocking M 2 autoreceptors, likely via increased acetylcholine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergistic tumorigenic effect of procarbazine and ionizing radiation in (BALB/c x DBA/2)F1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arseneau, J.C.; Fowler, E.; Bakemeier, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Female (BALB/c x DBA/2)F, (CD2F 1 ) mice were treated with procarbazine (PCB) and ionizing radiation at different times to determine whether any synergistic carcinogenic effect could be demonstrated with the combined treatment. The incidence of pulmonary adenomas in groups of mice receiving both PCB and radiation increased significantly, when compared with mice given PCB alone. The incidence of thymomas also increased significantly in groups of mice given PCB 3 days before or after radiation treatment. Two cases of adenocarcinoma apparently arising from the lacrimal gland were also observed in mice from the groups receiving the combined treatment. This tumor had not previously been associated with PCB administration in mice. The results of this experiment indicated a potentiation of the tumorigenic action of PCB by ionizing radiation in CD2F 1 mice

  12. The effect of scoliotic deformity on spine kinematics in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Galvis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS produces well characterized deformation in spinal form, the effect on spinal function, namely mobility, is not well known. Better understanding of scoliotic spinal mobility could yield better treatment targets and diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spinal mobility differences due to AIS. It was hypothesized that the AIS group would exhibit reduced mobility compared to the typical adolescent (TA group. Method